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Sample records for accelerator driven neutron

  1. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  2. Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, I. S.; Andreani, C.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C.-K.; Senesi, R.

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the neutron in 1932 neutron beams have been used in a very broad range of applications, As an aging fleet of nuclear reactor sources is retired the use of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) is becoming more prevalent. CANS are playing a significant and expanding role in research and development in science and engineering, as well as in education and training. In the realm of multidisciplinary applications, CANS offer opportunities over a wide range of technical utilization, from interrogation of civil structures to medical therapy to cultural heritage study. This paper aims to provide the first comprehensive overview of the history, current status of operation, and ongoing development of CANS worldwide. The basic physics and engineering regarding neutron production by accelerators, target-moderator systems, and beam line instrumentation are introduced, followed by an extensive discussion of various evolving applications currently exploited at CANS.

  3. Accelerator-Driven Neutron Source for Cargo Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Bleuel, D.L.; Hoff, M.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Li, D.; Ratti, A.; Staples, J.W.; Virostek, S.P.; Wells, R.P.

    2006-11-15

    Advanced neutron interrogation systems for the screening ofsea-land cargo containers for shielded special nuclear materials (SNM)require a high-yield neutron source to achieve the desired detectionprobability, false alarm rate, and throughput. An accelerator-drivenneutron source is described that produces a forward directed beam ofhigh-energy (up to 8.5 MeV) neutrons utilizing the D(d,n)3He reaction atdeuteron beam energies of up to 6 MeV. The key components of the neutronsource are a high-current RFQ accelerator and an innovative neutronproduction target. A microwave-driven deuteron source is coupled to anelectrostatic LEBT that injects a 40 mA D+-beam into a 6 MeV, 5.1meter-long, 200 MHz RFQ. The RFQ is based on an unusual beam dynamicsdesign and is capable of operating at a duty factor that produces morethan 1.2 mA timeaverage beam current. The beam is transported to a2-atmosphere deuterium gas target with a specially-designed, thinentrance window. A high-frequency dipole magnet is used to spread thebeam over the long dimension of the 4 by 35 cm target window. The sourcewill be capable of delivering a neutron flux of ~;2 x 107 n/(cm2 x s) tothe center of a sea-land cargo container and is expected t o satisfy therequirements for full testing and demonstration of advanced neutroninterrogation techniques based on stimulated SNM signatures.

  4. Beamed neutron emission driven by laser accelerated light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; McKenna, P.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Highly anisotropic, beam-like neutron emission with peak flux of the order of 109 n/sr was obtained from light nuclei reactions in a pitcher-catcher scenario, by employing MeV ions driven by a sub-petawatt laser. The spatial profile of the neutron beam, fully captured for the first time by employing a CR39 nuclear track detector, shows a FWHM divergence angle of ˜ 70^\\circ , with a peak flux nearly an order of magnitude higher than the isotropic component elsewhere. The observed beamed flux of neutrons is highly favourable for a wide range of applications, and indeed for further transport and moderation to thermal energies. A systematic study employing various combinations of pitcher-catcher materials indicates the dominant reactions being d(p, n+p)1H and d(d,n)3He. Albeit insufficient cross-section data are available for modelling, the observed anisotropy in the neutrons’ spatial and spectral profiles is most likely related to the directionality and high energy of the projectile ions.

  5. Neutron source in the MCNPX shielding calculating for electron accelerator driven facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of an experimental neutron source facility. It is an accelerator driven system (ADS) utilizing a subcritical assembly driven by electron accelerator. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as a design tool due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the facility shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. A method, based on generating and utilizing neutron source file, was proposed and tested. This method reduces significantly the required computer resources and improves the statistics of the calculated neutron dose outside the shield boundary. However the statistical errors introduced by generating the neutron source were not directly represented in the results, questioning the validity of this methodology, because an insufficiently sampled neutron source can cause error on the calculated neutron dose. This paper presents a procedure for the validation of the generated neutron source file. The impact of neutron source statistic on the neutron dose is examined by calculating the neutron dose as a function of the number of electron particles used for generating the neutron source files. When the value of the calculated neutron dose converges, it means the neutron source has scored sufficient records and statistic does not have apparent impact on the calculated neutron dose. In this way, the validity of neutron source and the shield analyses could be verified. (authors)

  6. Radiation effects in materials for accelerator-driven neutron technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C.; Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1997-03-01

    The materials exposed to the most damaging radiation environments in an SNS (spallation neutron source) are those in the path of the incident proton beam. This includes target and window materials. These materials will experience damage from the incident protons and the spallation neutrons. The major solid targets in operating SNS`s and under consideration for the 1--5 MW SNS`s are W, U, and Pb. Tungsten is the target material at LANSCE, and is the project target material for an upgraded LANSCE target that is presently being designed. It is also the projected target material for the tritium producing SNS under design at LANL. In this paper, the authors present the results of spallation radiation damage calculations (displacement and He production) for tungsten.

  7. High-energy in-beam neutron measurements of metal-based shielding for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Kokai, Z.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-based shielding plays an important role in the attenuation of harmful and unwanted radiation at an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source. At the European Spallation Source, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, metal-based materials are planned to be used extensively as neutron guide substrates in addition to other shielding structures around neutron guides. The usage of metal-based materials in the vicinity of neutron guides however requires careful consideration in order to minimize potential background effects in a neutron instrument at the facility. Therefore, we have carried out a combined study involving high-energy neutron measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of metal-based shielding, both to validate the simulation methodology and also to investigate the benefits and drawbacks of different metal-based solutions. The measurements were carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala, Sweden, using a 174.1 MeV neutron beam and various thicknesses of aluminum-, iron-, and copper-based shielding blocks. The results were compared to geant4 simulations and revealed excellent agreement. Our combined study highlights the particular situations where one type of metal-based solution may be preferred over another.

  8. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    DOE PAGES

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C. -K.; Senesi, R.

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10²more » MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.« less

  9. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C. -K.; Senesi, R.

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10² MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.

  10. Radiation effects in materials for accelerator-driven neutron technologies. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C.; Sommer, W.F.

    1997-04-01

    Accelerator-driven neutron technologies use spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) in which high-energy protons bombard a heavy-element target and spallation neutrons are produced. The materials exposed to the most damaging radiation environments in an SNS are those in the path of the incident proton beam. This includes target and window materials. These materials will experience damage from the incident protons and the spallation neutrons. In addition, some materials will be damaged by the spallation neutrons alone. The principal materials of interest for SNS`s are discussed elsewhere. The target should consist of one or more heavy elements, so as to increase the number of neutrons produced per incident proton. A liquid metal target (e.g., Pb, Bi, Pb-Bi, Pb-Mg, and Hg) has the advantage of eliminating the effects of radiation damage on the target material itself, but concerns over corrosion problems and the influence of transmutants remain. The major solid targets in operating SNS`s and under consideration for the 1-5 MW SNS`s are W, U, and Pb. Tungsten is the target material at LANSCE, and is the projected target material for an upgraded LANSCE target that is presently being designed. It is also the projected target material for the tritium producing SNS under design at LANL. In this paper, the authors present the results of spallation radiation damage calculations (displacement and He production) for tungsten.

  11. Burn-up and neutron economy of accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Yang, W.; An, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    1997-07-01

    It is desirable to have only a small reactivity change in the large burn-up of a solid fuel fast reactor, so that the number of replacements or shuffling of the fuel can be reduced, and plant factor accordingly increased. Also, this reduces the number of control rods needed for the change in burn-up reactivity. In subcritical operation, power controlled by beam power is suggested, but this practice is not as economical as the use of control rods and makes more careful operation of the accelerator is required due to changes in the wake field. In subcritical operation, even a slightly subcritical one, the safety problems associated with a hard neutron spectrum can be alleviated. Neutron leakage from a flattened core, which is needed for operation of the critical fast reactor can be lessen by using the non flat core which has good neutron economy. For generating nuclear energy, it is essential to have a high neutron economy, although breeding the fuel is not welcomed in the present political climate, as is needed for transmuting long lived fission products. In contrast to the breeder, the accelerator driven reactor can separate the energy production from fuel production and processing. Thus, it is suited for non-proliferation of nuclear material by prohibiting the processing and production of fuel in the unrestricted area so this can be only done in international controlled areas which are restricted and remote.

  12. A neutron booster for spallation sources—application to accelerator driven systems and isotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galy, J.; Magill, J.; Van Dam, H.; Valko, J.

    2002-06-01

    One can design a critical system with fissile material in the form of a thin layer on the inner surface of a cylindrical neutron moderator such as graphite or beryllium. Recently, we have investigated the properties of critical and near critical systems based on the use of thin actinide layers of uranium, plutonium and americium. The thickness of the required fissile layer depends on the type of fissile material, its concentration in the layer and on the geometrical arrangement, but is typically in the μm-mm range. The resulting total mass of fissile material can be as low as 100 g. Thin fissile layers have a variety of applications in nuclear technology—for example in the design neutron amplifiers for medical applications and "fast" islands in thermal reactors for waste incineration. In the present paper, we investigate the properties of a neutron booster unit for spallation sources and isotope production. In those applications a layer of fissile material surrounds the spallation source. Such a module could be developed for spallation targets foreseen in the MYRRHA (L. Van Den Durpel, H. Aı̈t Abderrahim, P. D'hondt, G. Minsart, J.L. Bellefontaine, S. Bodart, B. Ponsard, F. Vermeersch, W. Wacquier. A prototype accelerator driven system in Belgium: the Myrrha project, Technical Committee Meeting on Feasibility and Motivation for Hybrid concepts for Nuclear Energy generation and Transmutation, Madrid, Spain, September 17-19, 1997 [1]). or MEGAPIE (M. Salvatores, G.S. Bauer, G. Heusener. The MEGAPIE initiative: executive outline and status as per November 1999, MPO-1-GB-6/0_GB, 1999 [2]) projects. With a neutron multiplication factor of the booster unit in the range 10-20 (i.e. with a keff of 0.9-0.95), considerably less powerful accelerators would be required to obtain the desired neutron flux. Instead of the powerful accelerators with proton energies of 1 GeV and currents of 10 mA foreseen for accelerator driven systems, similar neutron fluxes can be obtained

  13. Laser-driven x-ray and neutron source development for industrial applications of plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, C. M.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Rusby, D. R.; Armstrong, C.; Alejo, A.; Wilson, L. A.; Clarke, R.; Ahmed, H.; Butler, N. M. H.; Haddock, D.; Higginson, A.; McClymont, A.; Murphy, C.; Notley, M.; Oliver, P.; Allott, R.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Kar, S.; McKenna, P.; Neely, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed beams of energetic x-rays and neutrons from intense laser interactions with solid foils are promising for applications where bright, small emission area sources, capable of multi-modal delivery are ideal. Possible end users of laser-driven multi-modal sources are those requiring advanced non-destructive inspection techniques in industry sectors of high value commerce such as aerospace, nuclear and advanced manufacturing. We report on experimental work that demonstrates multi-modal operation of high power laser-solid interactions for neutron and x-ray beam generation. Measurements and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations show that neutron yield is increased by a factor ~2 when a 1 mm copper foil is placed behind a 2 mm lithium foil, compared to using a 2 cm block of lithium only. We explore x-ray generation with a 10 picosecond drive pulse in order to tailor the spectral content for radiography with medium density alloy metals. The impact of using  >1 ps pulse duration on laser-accelerated electron beam generation and transport is discussed alongside the optimisation of subsequent bremsstrahlung emission in thin, high atomic number target foils. X-ray spectra are deconvolved from spectrometer measurements and simulation data generated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. We also demonstrate the unique capability of laser-driven x-rays in being able to deliver single pulse high spatial resolution projection imaging of thick metallic objects. Active detector radiographic imaging of industrially relevant sample objects with a 10 ps drive pulse is presented for the first time, demonstrating that features of 200 μm size are resolved when projected at high magnification.

  14. Systematic neutron guide misalignment for an accelerator-driven spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, C.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a long pulse spallation neutron source that is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. A considerable fraction of the 22 planned instruments extend as far as 75-150 m from the source. In such long beam lines, misalignment between neutron guide segments can decrease the neutron transmission significantly. In addition to a random misalignment from installation tolerances, the ground on which ESS is built can be expected to sink with time, and thus shift the neutron guide segments further away from the ideal alignment axis in a systematic way. These systematic errors are correlated to the ground structure, position of buildings and shielding installation. Since the largest deformation is expected close to the target, even short instruments might be noticeably affected. In this study, the effect of this systematic misalignment on short and long ESS beam lines is analyzed, and a possible mitigation by overillumination of subsequent guide sections investigated.

  15. Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-drivenNeutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt,B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-02-15

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable ofproducing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm2 and with atomicfraction>90 percent was designed and tested with an electrostaticlow energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source wasincorporatedinto the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source(ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQaccelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gastarget. In this design a 40 mA D+ beam is produced from a 6 mm diameteraperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into theRFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used tocreate ~; 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HVbreakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize thefield in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguideto the plasma is done by an autotuner. We observed significantimprovement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride linerinside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared withPBGUNS simulations.

  16. Conceptual design of thorium-fuelled Mitrailleuse accelerator-driven subcritical reactor using D-Be neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Y.; Kamei, T.

    2012-07-01

    A distributed accelerator is a charged-particle accelerator that uses a new acceleration method based on repeated electrostatic acceleration. This method offers outstanding benefits not possible with the conventional radio-frequency acceleration method, including: (1) high acceleration efficiency, (2) large acceleration current, and (3) lower failure rate made possible by a fully solid-state acceleration field generation circuit. A 'Mitrailleuse Accelerator' is a product we have conceived to optimize this distributed accelerator technology for use with a high-strength neutron source. We have completed the conceptual design of a Mitrailleuse Accelerator and of a thorium-fuelled subcritical reactor driven by a Mitrailleuse Accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design details and approach to implementing the subcritical reactor core. We will spend the next year or so on detailed design work, and then will start work on developing a prototype for demonstration. If there are no obstacles in setting up a development organization, we expect to finish verifying the prototype's performance by the third quarter of 2015. (authors)

  17. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  18. Union of Compact Accelerator-Driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) I & II Neutron applications laboratory for ESS-Bilbao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrón, S.; Magán, M.; Sordo, F.; Ghiglino, A.; Mart«ınez, F.; Bermejo, F. J.; Perlado, J. M.

    The ESS-Bilbao Accelerator Center site at Lejoa UPV/EHU campus will be provided with a proton accelerator up to 300-400 MeV. In the first construction phase, a beam extraction will be set at the end of the DTL, which will produce a 50 MeV proton beam with an average current of 2.25 mA and 1.5 ms pulses at a frequency of 20 Hz. These beam characteristics allow to configure a low intensity neutron source based on Be (p, n) reactions, which enables experimentation with cold neutrons similar to that of LENS. The total beam power will be 112 kW, so the configuration of the neutron production target will be based on a rotating disk of beryllium slabs facing the beam on one side and a cryogenic methane moderator on the other, with the target-moderator system surrounded by a beryllium reflector. In this paper, first estimates will be presented for thermomechanical conditions of the target cooling scheme, neutron source intensities, and cold neutron pulses.

  19. Mechanical Design and Analysis of a 200 MHz, Bolt-together RFQ forthe Accelerator Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve; Hoff, Matt; Li, Derun; Staples, John; Wells,Russell

    2007-06-20

    A high-yield neutron source to screen sea-land cargocontainers for shielded Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) has been designedat LBNL [1,2]. The Accelerator-Driven Neutron Source (ADNS) uses theD(d,n)3He reaction to create a forward directed neutron beam. Keycomponents are a high-current radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ)accelerator and a high-power target capable of producing a neutron fluxof>107 n/(cm2 cdot s) at a distance of 2.5 m. The mechanical designand analysis of the four-module, bolt-together RFQ will be presentedhere. Operating at 200 MHz, the 5.1 m long RFQ will accelerate a 40 mAdeuteron beam to 6 MeV. At a 5 percent duty factor, the time-average d+beam current on target is 1.5 mA. Each of the 1.27 m long RFQ moduleswill consist of four solid OFHC copper vanes. A specially designed 3-DO-ring will provide vacuum sealing between both the vanes and themodules. RF connections are made with canted coil spring contacts. Aseries of 60 water-cooled pi-mode rods provides quadrupole modestabilization. A set of 80 evenly spaced fixed slug tuners is used forfinal frequency adjustment and local field perturbationcorrection.

  20. Neutron cross-sections above 20 MeV for design and modeling of accelerator driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomgren, J.

    2007-02-01

    One of the outstanding new developments in the field of partitioning and transmutation (P{&}T) concerns accelerator-driven systems (ADS) which consist of a combination of a high-power, high-energy accelerator, a spallation target for neutron production and a sub-critical reactor core. The development of the commercial critical reactors of today motivated a large effort on nuclear data up to about 20 MeV, and presently several million data points can be found in various data libraries. At higher energies, data are scarce or even non-existent. With the development of nuclear techniques based on neutrons at higher energies, nowadays there is a need also for higher-energy nuclear data. To provide alternative to this lack of data, a wide program on neutron-induced data related to ADS for P{&}T is running at the 20-180 MeV neutron beam facility at `The Svedberg Laboratory' (TSL), Uppsala. The programme encompasses studies of elastic scattering, inelastic neutron production, i.e., (n, xn') reactions, light-ion production, fission and production of heavy residues. Recent results are presented and future program of development is outlined.

  1. Neutronics of accelerator-driven subcritical fission for burning transuranics in used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, A.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Baty, A.; Comeaux, J.; Gerity, J.; Kellams, J.; Mcintyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sooby, E.; Tsvetkov, P.; Rosaire, G.; Mann, T.

    2013-04-19

    We report the development of a conceptual design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). ADSMS is capable of destroying all of the transuranics at the same rate and proportion as they are produced in a conventional nuclear power plant. The ADSMS core is fueled solely by transuranics extracted from used nuclear fuel and reduces its radiotoxicity by a factor 10,000. ADSMS offers a way to close the nuclear fuel cycle so that the full energy potential in the fertile fuels uranium and thorium can be recovered.

  2. Neutronics of accelerator-driven subcritical fission for burning transuranics in used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattarov, A.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Baty, A.; Comeaux, J.; Gerity, J.; Kellams, J.; Mcintyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sooby, E.; Tsvetkov, P.; Rosaire, G.; Mann, T.

    2013-04-01

    We report the development of a conceptual design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). ADSMS is capable of destroying all of the transuranics at the same rate and proportion as they are produced in a conventional nuclear power plant. The ADSMS core is fueled solely by transuranics extracted from used nuclear fuel and reduces its radiotoxicity by a factor 10,000. ADSMS offers a way to close the nuclear fuel cycle so that the full energy potential in the fertile fuels uranium and thorium can be recovered.

  3. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation. PMID:26272165

  4. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation.

  5. Optimum design of a moderator system based on dose calculation for an accelerator driven Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, R; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2014-06-01

    An accelerator based BNCT has been desired because of its therapeutic convenience. However, optimal design of a neutron moderator system is still one of the issues. Therefore, detailed studies on materials consisting of the moderator system are necessary to obtain the optimal condition. In this study, the epithermal neutron flux and the RBE dose have been calculated as the indicators to look for optimal materials for the filter and the moderator. As a result, it was found that a combination of MgF2 moderator with Fe filter gave best performance, and the moderator system gave a dose ratio greater than 3 and an epithermal neutron flux over 1.0×10(9)cm(-2)s(-1).

  6. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco, R.; Ghiglino, A.; de Vicente, J. P.; Sordo, F.; Terrón, S.; Magán, M.; Perlado, J. M.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final keff value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle.

  7. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  8. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  9. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  10. Recent advances in laser-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to the limited number and high cost of large-scale neutron facilities, there has been a growing interest in compact accelerator-driven sources. In this context, several potential schemes of laser-driven neutron sources are being intensively studied employing laser-accelerated electron and ion beams. In addition to the potential of delivering neutron beams with high brilliance, directionality and ultra-short burst duration, a laser-driven neutron source would offer further advantages in terms of cost-effectiveness, compactness and radiation confinement by closed-coupled experiments. Some of the recent advances in this field are discussed, showing improvements in the directionality and flux of the laser-driven neutron beams.

  11. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, H.; Bompas, C. A.; del Moral, R.; Lacoste, V.; Vlachoudis, V.; Aleixandre, J.; Bueno, J.; Cerro, E.; González, O.; Tamarit, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Brozzi, D.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J. I.; Dumps, L.; Gelès, C.; Goulas, I.; Fernández, R.; Kadi, Y.; Klapisch, R.; Oropesa, J.; Placci, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J. A.; Saldaa, F.; Embid, M.; Gálvez, J.; López, C.; Pérez-Enciso, E.; Poza, M.; Sirvent, C.; Vieira, S.; Abánades, A.; Garcia, J.; Martinez-Val, J. M.; Perlado, M.; González, E.; Hussonnois, M.; Le Naour, C.; Trubert, D.; Belle, E.; Giorni, A.; Heuer, D.; Loiseaux, J. M.; Méplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Schussler, F.; Viano, J. B.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Kokkas, P.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Kitis, G.; Papadopoulos, I.; Savvidis, E.; Tzima, A.; Zioutas, K.; Diez, S.; Pérez-Navarro, A.

    1999-07-01

    Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (from 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3 x 3.3 x 3 m3 lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments 99Tc and 129I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation.

  12. An overview of accelerator-driven transmutation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heighway, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology, or ADT{sup 2}, is a collection of programs that share a common theme - they each have at their heart an intense source of neutrons generated by a high-energy proton beam striking a heavy metal target. The beam energy, typically 1000 MeV, is enough for a single proton to smash a target atom into atomic fragments. This so-called spallation process generates large numbers of neutrons (around 20 to 30 per proton) amid the atomic debris. These neutrons are of high value because they can be used to transmute neighboring atoms by neutron capture. Three distinct ADT{sup 2} program elements will be described. These are ADEP - accelerator-driven energy production, ABC - accelerator based conversion (of plutonium) and ATW - accelerator transmutation of waste.

  13. Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy: The Thorium Option

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Rajendran

    2009-03-18

    Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years. At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years. We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy. Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem. Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.

  14. Neutronics Study on Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems with Thorium-Based Fuel for Comparison Between Solid and Molten-Salt Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Kenji; Tenzou, Hideki; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2002-06-15

    Since thorium is an abundant fertile material, there is hope for the thorium-cycle fuels for an accelerator driven subcritical system (ADS). The ADS utilizes neutrons, which are generated by high-energy protons of giga-electron-volt-grade, but cross sections for the interaction of high-energy particles are not available for use in current ADS engineering design. In this paper the neutron behavior in the ADS target based on the related experimental data is clarified, and the feasibility of the ADS regarding both the molten salts (Flibe: {sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4}, chloride: NaCl-ThCl{sub 4}-{sup 233}UCl{sub 4}) and oxide ([Th, {sup 233}U]O{sub 2}) fuels is examined. The difference between the experiment and the calculated result at the ADS high-energy region is discussed. In a comparison of the fuels, the time evolution of k{sub eff} and the beam current in the burning period are calculated. The calculated results suggest that the ADS with solid fuel has better future prospects than that with molten-salt fuels. The ADS with Flibe molten-salt fuel tends to require a high beam current and consequently needs the installation of a metallic spallation target and the continuous removal for fission products and protactinium. In comparison with the Flibe fuel, the ADS with chloride fuel has a flux distribution that is similar to a solid fuel reactor.

  15. Kinetics of accelerator driven devices

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.T.; Buksa, J.; Houts, M.

    1994-09-01

    Kinetic calculations were made to show that subcritical accelerator driven devices are robust and stable. The calculations show that large changes in reactivity that would lead to an uncontrollable excursion in a reactor would lead only to a new power level in subcritical device. Calculations were also made to show the rate of power changes resulting from startup and shutdown, and that methods also exist for continuously monitoring the reactivity of a subcritical system.

  16. Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.

  17. Birth accelerations of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    We suggest that neutron stars experienced at birth three related physical changes, which may originate in magneto-rotational instabilities: (i) an increase in period from the initial value P 0 to the current value Ps , implying a change of rotational energy Δ E rot; (ii) an exponential decay of its magnetic field from the initial value B 0 to the current surface value Bs , implying a change of radiative energy Δ E rad; and (iii) an increase of space velocity from the initial value v 0 to the current value v, implying a change of kinetic energy Δ E kin. These changes are assumed to be connected by Δ E rad + Δ E kin = Δ E rot. This means that the radiation loss and increase of kinetic energy are both at the expense of a rotational energy loss. It is shown that this energy conversion occurs during times of order of 10-4 s if the neutron stars are born with magnetic fields in the range of 1015-1016 G and initial periods in range 1-20 ms. It is shown that the birth accelerations of neutron stars are of the order of 108g.

  18. Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy: The Thorium Option

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Rajendran

    2009-03-18

    Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years.   At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years.  We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy.  Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem.  Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.  

  19. Accelerator Driven Nuclear Energy: The Thorium Option

    ScienceCinema

    Raja, Rajendran

    2016-07-12

    Conventional nuclear reactors use enriched Uranium as fuel and produce nuclear waste which needs to be stored away for over 10,000 years.   At the current rate of use, existing sources of Uranium will last for 50-100 years.  We describe a solution to the problem that uses particle accelerators to produce fast neutrons that can be used to burn existing nuclear waste and produce energy.  Such systems, initially proposed by Carlo Rubbia and collaborators in the 1990's, are being seriously considered by many countries as a possible solution to the green energy problem.  Accelerator driven reactors operate in a sub-critical regime and, thus, are safer and can obtain energy from plentiful elements such as Thorium-232 and Uranium-238. What is missing is the high intensity (10MW) accelerator that produces 1 GeV protons. We will describe scenarios which if implemented will make such systems a reality.  

  20. A Sealed-Accelerator-Tube Neutron Generator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.-N.; Leung, K.N.; Lee, Y.; Verbeke, J.M.; Vurjic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-06-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator applications. By using a 2.5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source and a computer designed 100 keV accelerator column, peak extractable hydrogen current exceeding 1 A from a 3-mm-diameter aperture, together with H{sup +} yields over 94% have been achieved. These experimental findings together with recent moderator design will enable one to develop compact 14 MeV neutron generators based on the D-T fusion reaction. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without pumping. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, it is estimated that a treatment time of {approx} 45 minutes is needed for boron neutron capture therapy.

  1. A bright neutron source driven by relativistic transparency of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties and excite nuclear reactions with a large field of applications. It has been stated over the last years, that there is a growing need for intense, pulsed neutron sources, either fast or moderated neutrons for the scientific community. Accelerator based spallation sources provide unprecedented neutron fluxes, but could be complemented by novel sources with higher peak brightness that are more compact. Lasers offer the prospect of generating a very compact neutron source of high peak brightness that could be linked to other facilities more easily. We present experimental results on the first short pulse laser driven neutron source powerful enough for applications in radiography. For the first time an acceleration mechanism (BOA) based on the concept of relativistic transparency has been used to generate neutrons. This mechanism not only provides much higher particle energies, but also accelerated the entire target volume, thereby circumventing the need for complicated target treatment and no longer limited to protons as an intense ion source. As a consequence we have demonstrated a new record in laser-neutron production, not only in numbers, but also in energy and directionality based on an intense deuteron beam. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies in excess of 100 MeV and showed pronounced directionality, which makes then extremely useful for a variety of applications. The results also address a larger community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. They can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics as laser systems become more easily available to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators. We believe that this has the potential to increase the user community for neutron research largely.

  2. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  3. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-10-06

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeVm-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. As a result, these ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.

  4. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeV m−1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton accelerators with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. These ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams. PMID:26439410

  5. Terahertz-driven linear electron acceleration

    DOE PAGES

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Huang, Wenqian R.; Hong, Kyung-Han; Ravi, Koustuban; Fallahi, Arya; Moriena, Gustavo; Dwayne Miller, R. J.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2015-10-06

    The cost, size and availability of electron accelerators are dominated by the achievable accelerating gradient. Conventional high-brightness radio-frequency accelerating structures operate with 30–50 MeVm-1 gradients. Electron accelerators driven with optical or infrared sources have demonstrated accelerating gradients orders of magnitude above that achievable with conventional radio-frequency structures. However, laser-driven wakefield accelerators require intense femtosecond sources and direct laser-driven accelerators suffer from low bunch charge, sub-micron tolerances and sub-femtosecond timing requirements due to the short wavelength of operation. Here we demonstrate linear acceleration of electrons with keV energy gain using optically generated terahertz pulses. Terahertz-driven accelerating structures enable high-gradient electron/proton acceleratorsmore » with simple accelerating structures, high repetition rates and significant charge per bunch. As a result, these ultra-compact terahertz accelerators with extremely short electron bunches hold great potential to have a transformative impact for free electron lasers, linear colliders, ultrafast electron diffraction, X-ray science and medical therapy with X-rays and electron beams.« less

  6. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  7. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  8. Accelerator requirements for fast-neutron interrogation of luggage and cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1995-05-01

    Several different fast-neutron based techniques are being studied for the detection of contraband substances in luggage and cargo containers. The present work discusses the accelerator requirements for fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS), pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA), and 14-MeV neutron interrogation. These requirements are based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron or gamma detection rates. Accelerator requirements are driven by count-rate considerations, spatial resolution and acceptable uncertainties in elemental compositions. The authors have limited their analyses to luggage inspection with FNTS and to cargo inspection with PFNA or 14-MeV neutron interrogation.

  9. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  10. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-03-26

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brix, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-10-01

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  12. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  13. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  14. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Meyer, G.; Falabella, S.; Guethlein, G.; Kerr, P.; Park, H. G.; Rusnak, B.; Sampayan, S.; Schmid, G.; Spadaccini, C.; Wang, L.; Morse, J.

    2009-03-10

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of {approx}100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  15. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  16. Neutron contamination from medical electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This report addresses a problem encountered with the use of electron accelerators in radiation therapy. The potential exists for the production of neutrons, in several different ways, when equipment used to generate electrons operates at energies above 10 MeV. The sources of these neutrons and their relative contributions are described. A further section is devoted to the potential hazard from the neutrons which are produced and which represent a contribution to the total radiation dose to the patient. This contribution is not normally included in the calculation of dose delivered to the treatment volume, as performed by the therapist and the medical physicist. The question of whether or not this additional dose constitutes an unacceptable risk to the patient is discussed. The report addresses the hazard to operating personnel from neutrons produced outside the patient's treatment volume. Neutron measurement methods are also addressed. The report concludes with a survey of the published literature relevant to the subject.

  17. The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S.; Abraham, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Allen, C.; Alonso, J.; Anderson, D.; Arenius, D.; Arthur, T.; Assadi, S.; Ayers, J.; Bach, P.; Badea, V.; Battle, R.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Bergmann, B.; Bernardin, J.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Birke, T.; Bjorklund, E.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Blind, B.; Blokland, W.; Bookwalter, V.; Borovina, D.; Bowling, S.; Bradley, J.; Brantley, C.; Brennan, J.; Brodowski, J.; Brown, S.; Brown, R.; Bruce, D.; Bultman, N.; Cameron, P.; Campisi, I.; Casagrande, F.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Champion, M.; Champion, M.; Chen, Z.; Cheng, D.; Cho, Y.; Christensen, K.; Chu, C.; Cleaves, J.; Connolly, R.; Cote, T.; Cousineau, S.; Crandall, K.; Creel, J.; Crofford, M.; Cull, P.; Cutler, R.; Dabney, R.; Dalesio, L.; Daly, E.; Damm, R.; Danilov, V.; Davino, D.; Davis, K.; Dawson, C.; Day, L.; Deibele, C.; Delayen, J.; DeLong, J.; Demello, A.; DeVan, W.; Digennaro, R.; Dixon, K.; Dodson, G.; Doleans, M.; Doolittle, L.; Doss, J.; Drury, M.; Elliot, T.; Ellis, S.; Error, J.; Fazekas, J.; Fedotov, A.; Feng, P.; Fischer, J.; Fox, W.; Fuja, R.; Funk, W.; Galambos, J.; Ganni, V.; Garnett, R.; Geng, X.; Gentzlinger, R.; Giannella, M.; Gibson, P.; Gillis, R.; Gioia, J.; Gordon, J.; Gough, R.; Greer, J.; Gregory, W.; Gribble, R.; Grice, W.; Gurd, D.; Gurd, P.; Guthrie, A.; Hahn, H.; Hardek, T.; Hardekopf, R.; Harrison, J.; Hatfield, D.; He, P.; Hechler, M.; Heistermann, F.; Helus, S.; Hiatt, T.; Hicks, S.; Hill, J.; Hill, J.; Hoff, L.; Hoff, M.; Hogan, J.; Holding, M.; Holik, P.; Holmes, J.; Holtkamp, N.; Hovater, C.; Howell, M.; Hseuh, H.; Huhn, A.; Hunter, T.; Ilg, T.; Jackson, J.; Jain, A.; Jason, A.; Jeon, D.; Johnson, G.; Jones, A.; Joseph, S.; Justice, A.; Kang, Y.; Kasemir, K.; Keller, R.; Kersevan, R.; Kerstiens, D.; Kesselman, M.; Kim, S.; Kneisel, P.; Kravchuk, L.; Kuneli, T.; Kurennoy, S.; Kustom, R.; Kwon, S.; Ladd, P.; Lambiase, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Lewis, S.; Liaw, C.; Lionberger, C.; Lo, C. C.; Long, C.; Ludewig, H.; Ludvig, J.; Luft, P.; Lynch, M.; Ma, H.; MacGill, R.; Macha, K.; Madre, B.; Mahler, G.; Mahoney, K.; Maines, J.; Mammosser, J.; Mann, T.; Marneris, I.; Marroquin, P.; Martineau, R.; Matsumoto, K.; McCarthy, M.; McChesney, C.; McGahern, W.; McGehee, P.; Meng, W.; Merz, B.; Meyer, R.; Meyer, R.; Miller, B.; Mitchell, R.; Mize, J.; Monroy, M.; Munro, J.; Murdoch, G.; Musson, J.; Nath, S.; Nelson, R.; Nelson, R.; O`Hara, J.; Olsen, D.; Oren, W.; Oshatz, D.; Owens, T.; Pai, C.; Papaphilippou, I.; Patterson, N.; Patterson, J.; Pearson, C.; Pelaia, T.; Pieck, M.; Piller, C.; Plawski, T.; Plum, M.; Pogge, J.; Power, J.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Prokop, M.; Pruyn, J.; Purcell, D.; Rank, J.; Raparia, D.; Ratti, A.; Reass, W.; Reece, K.; Rees, D.; Regan, A.; Regis, M.; Reijonen, J.; Rej, D.; Richards, D.; Richied, D.; Rode, C.; Rodriguez, W.; Rodriguez, M.; Rohlev, A.; Rose, C.; Roseberry, T.; Rowton, L.; Roybal, W.; Rust, K.; Salazer, G.; Sandberg, J.; Saunders, J.; Schenkel, T.; Schneider, W.; Schrage, D.; Schubert, J.; Severino, F.; Shafer, R.; Shea, T.; Shishlo, A.; Shoaee, H.; Sibley, C.; Sims, J.; Smee, S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K.; Spitz, R.; Staples, J.; Stein, P.; Stettler, M.; Stirbet, M.; Stockli, M.; Stone, W.; Stout, D.; Stovall, J.; Strelo, W.; Strong, H.; Sundelin, R.; Syversrud, D.; Szajbler, M.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Tang, J.; Tanke, E.; Tepikian, S.; Thomae, R.; Thompson, D.; Thomson, D.; Thuot, M.; Treml, C.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tuzel, W.; Vassioutchenko, A.; Virostek, S.; Wallig, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. G.; Wangler, T.; Warren, D.; Wei, J.; Weiss, D.; Welton, R.; Weng, J.; Weng, W.-T.; Wezensky, M.; White, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, D.; Williams, E.; Wilson, K.; Wiseman, M.; Wood, R.; Wright, P.; Wu, A.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Young, K.; Young, L.; Yourd, R.; Zachoszcz, A.; Zaltsman, A.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed and constructed by a collaboration of six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories. The SNS accelerator system consists of a 1 GeV linear accelerator and an accumulator ring providing 1.4 MW of proton beam power in microsecond-long beam pulses to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. The accelerator complex consists of a front-end negative hydrogen-ion injector system, an 87 MeV drift tube linear accelerator, a 186 MeV side-coupled linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, a 248-m circumference accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines. The accelerator complex is supported by ~100 high-power RF power systems, a 2 K cryogenic plant, ~400 DC and pulsed power supply systems, ~400 beam diagnostic devices and a distributed control system handling ~100,000 I/O signals. The beam dynamics design of the SNS accelerator is presented, as is the engineering design of the major accelerator subsystems.

  18. Thermally driven neutron star glitches

    SciTech Connect

    Link, B. |; Epstein, R.I.

    1996-02-01

    We examine the thermal and dynamical response of a neutron star to a sudden perturbation of the inner crust temperature. During the star{close_quote}s evolution, starquakes and other processes may deposit {approx_gt}10{sup 42} ergs, causing significant internal heating and increased frictional coupling between the crust and the more rapidly rotating neutron superfluid the star is expected to contain. Through numerical simulation we study the propagation of the thermal wave created by the energy deposition, the induced motion of the interior superfluid, and the resulting spin evolution of the crust. We find that energy depositions of {approximately}10{sup 40} ergs produce gradual spin-ups above the timing noise level, while larger energy depositions produce sudden spin jumps resembling pulsar glitches. For a star with a temperature in the observed range of the Vela pulsar, an energy deposition of {approximately}10{sup 42} ergs produces a large spin-up taking place over minutes, similar to the Vela {open_quote}{open_quote}Christmas{close_quote}{close_quote} glitch. Comparable energy deposition in a younger and hotter {open_quote}{open_quote}Crab-like{close_quote}{close_quote} star produces a smaller spin-up taking place over {approximately}1{sup d}, similar to that seen during the partially time-resolved Crab glitch of 1989. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Astronomical Society.}

  19. Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total

  20. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa; Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Oba, Yojiro; Otake, Yoshie; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  1. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  2. PRODUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRONS USING PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester

    2009-11-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  3. Experimental verification of neutron phenomenology in lead and of transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing in accelerator driven systems. A summary of the TARC Project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abánades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C. A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J. I.; Cerro, E.; Del Moral, R.; Díez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernández, R.; Gálvez, J.; García, J.; Gelès, C.; Giorni, A.; González, E.; González, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Le Naour, C.; López, C.; Loiseaux, J. M.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Méplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pérez-Enciso, E.; Pérez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P.; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J. A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldaña, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J. B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K.

    2001-05-01

    The Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment was carried out as PS211 at the CERN PS from 1996 to 1999. Energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (produced by 2.5 and 3.57 GeV/ c CERN proton beams) slowing down in a 3.3×3.3×3 m 3 lead volume and neutron capture rates on long-lived fission fragments 99Tc and 129I demonstrate that Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) can be used to eliminate efficiently such nuclear waste and validate innovative simulation.

  4. Neutrino physics with accelerator driven subcritical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Evslin, Jarah; Zhao, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Accelerator driven system (ADS) subcritical nuclear reactors are under development around the world. They will be intense sources of free, 30-55 MeV μ + decay at rest {overline{ν}}_{μ } . These ADS reactor neutrinos can provide a robust test of the LSND anomaly and a precise measurement of the leptonic CP-violating phase δ, including sign(cos(δ)). The first phase of many ADS programs includes the construction of a low energy, high intensity proton or deuteron accelerator, which can yield competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos.

  5. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  6. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  7. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  8. Plasma driven neutron/gamma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Antolak, Arlyn

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for the generation of neutron/gamma rays is described including a chamber which defines an ion source, said apparatus including an RF antenna positioned outside of or within the chamber. Positioned within the chamber is a target material. One or more sets of confining magnets are also provided to create a cross B magnetic field directly above the target. To generate neutrons/gamma rays, the appropriate source gas is first introduced into the chamber, the RF antenna energized and a plasma formed. A series of high voltage pulses are then applied to the target. A plasma sheath, which serves as an accelerating gap, is formed upon application of the high voltage pulse to the target. Depending upon the selected combination of source gas and target material, either neutrons or gamma rays are generated, which may be used for cargo inspection, and the like.

  9. Towards the final BSA modeling for the accelerator-driven BNCT facility at INFN LNL.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, C; Esposito, J; Agosteo, S; Colautti, P; Conte, V; Moro, D; Pola, A

    2011-12-01

    Some remarkable advances have been made in the last years on the SPES-BNCT project of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) towards the development of the accelerator-driven thermal neutron beam facility at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL), aimed at the BNCT experimental treatment of extended skin melanoma. The compact neutron source will be produced via the (9)Be(p,xn) reactions using the 5 MeV, 30 mA beam driven by the RFQ accelerator, whose modules construction has been recently completed, into a thick beryllium target prototype already available. The Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) final modeling, using both neutron converter and the new, detailed, Be(p,xn) neutron yield spectra at 5 MeV energy recently measured at the CN Van de Graaff accelerator at LNL, is summarized here.

  10. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  11. Designing accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L. |; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Vujic, J.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction has been investigated as an accelerator-driven neutron source for proton energies between 2.1 and 2.6 MeV. Epithermal neutron beams shaped by three moderator materials, Al/AlF{sub 3}, {sup 7}LiF, and D{sub 2}O, have been analyzed and their usefulness for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments evaluated. Radiation transport through the moderator assembly has been simulated with the Monte Carlo {ital N}-particle code (MCNP). Fluence and dose distributions in a head phantom were calculated using BNCT treatment planning software. Depth-dose distributions and treatment times were studied as a function of proton beam energy and moderator thickness. It was found that an accelerator-based neutron source with Al/AlF{sub 3} or {sup 7}LiF as moderator material can produce depth-dose distributions superior to those calculated for a previously published neutron beam design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, achieving up to {approximately}50{percent} higher doses near the midline of the brain. For a single beam treatment, a proton beam current of 20 mA, and a {sup 7}LiF moderator, the treatment time was estimated to be about 40 min. The tumor dose deposited at a depth of 8 cm was calculated to be about 21 Gy-Eq. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  12. Proton acceleration in neutron star magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.; Katz, J. I.; Diamond, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    To explain the emission of TeV and PeV gamma rays from accreting X-ray binary sources, protons must be accelerated to several times the gamma-ray energy. It is shown here that at certain times, the plasma in the accretion column of the neutron star may form a deep enough pool that the top portion becomes unstable to convective motions in spite of the strong magnetic field. The resulting turbulence produces fluctuations in the strength of the magnetic field that travel up the accretion column, taking energy out to the region of the energetic protons. The protons resonantly absorb this energy and are accelerated to high energies. Including the synchrotron radiation losses of the protons, it is shown that they can be accelerated to energies that are high enough to explain the gamma-ray observations.

  13. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Wawrzynek, John

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  14. Cosmic ray acceleration by binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, W.

    Young binary neutron stars, the elder brothers of pulsars, are proposed as the boosters of the ionic component of cosmic rays. Their rotational energy can be converted into beams of cosmic rays if there is enough coupling between the corotating magnetosphere and the impinging plasma, in a manner similar to the sparking of a grindstone. Power-law spectra in energy are obtained from a power-law dependence of the accelerating fields. The upper cutoff energy should not greatly exceed 10 to the 20th eV. The observed ionic cosmic-ray spectrum would result from a superposition of the injection by no more than about one million young binary neutron stars.

  15. Neutron emission from fission fragments during acceleration p

    SciTech Connect

    Hinde, D.J.; Charity, R.J.; Foote, G.S.; Leigh, J.R.; Newton, J.O.; Ogaza, S.; Chatterjee, A.

    1984-03-19

    Fission-neutron angular correlations following fusion of /sup 19/F and /sup 232/Th have been measured. Conventional analysis, based on the approximation that post-fission neutrons originate only from fully accelerated fission fragments, gives unexpectedly large numbers of ''prefission'' neutrons. Comparison with the considerably less fissile system /sup 200/Pb gives the first convincing evidence that this approach is inadequate. Consideration of neutron emission from the accelerating fragments gives results consistent with expectations.

  16. Radiological Hazard of Spallation Products in Accelerator-Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Stankovskii, A.; Artisyuk, V.; Korovin, Yu.; Shmelev, A.; Titarenko, Yu.

    2002-09-15

    The central issue underlying this paper is related to elucidating the hazard of radioactive spallation products that might be an important factor affecting the design option of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). Hazard analysis based on the concept of Annual Limit on Intake identifies alpha-emitting isotopes of rare earths (REs) (dysprosium, gadolinium, and samarium) as the dominant contributors to the overall toxicity of traditional (W, Pb, Pb-Bi) targets. The matter is addressed from several points of view: code validation to simulate their yields, choice of material for the neutron producing targets, and challenging the beam type. The paper quantitatively determines the domain in which the toxicity of REs exceeds that of polonium activation products broadly discussed now in connection with advertising lead-bismuth technology for the needs of ADSs.

  17. Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venneri, Francesco

    1998-04-01

    Nuclear waste from commercial power plants contains large quantities of plutonium, other fissionable actinides, and long-lived fission products that are potential proliferation concerns and create challenges for the long-term storage. Different strategies for dealing with nuclear waste are being followed by various countries because of their geologic situations and their views on nuclear energy, reprocessing and non-proliferation. The current United States policy is to store unprocessed spent reactor fuel in a geologic repository. Other countries are opting for treatment of nuclear waste, including partial utilization of the fissile material contained in the spent fuel, prior to geologic storage. Long-term uncertainties are hampering the acceptability and eventual licensing of a geologic repository for nuclear spent fuel in the US, and driving up its cost. The greatest concerns are with the potential for radiation release and exposure from the spent fuel for tens of thousands of years and the possible diversion and use of the actinides contained in the waste for weapons construction. Taking advantage of the recent breakthroughs in accelerator technology and of the natural flexibility of subcritical systems, the Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept offers the United States and other countries the possibility to greatly reduce plutonium, higher actinides and environmentally hazardous fission products from the waste stream destined for permanent storage. ATW does not eliminate the need for, but instead enhances the viability of permanent waste repositories. Far from being limited to waste destruction, the ATW concept also brings to the table new technologies that could be relevant for next-generation power producing reactors. In the ATW concept, spent fuel would be shipped to the ATW site where the plutonium, transuranics and selected long-lived fission products would be destroyed by fission or transmutation in their first and only pass through the

  18. Investigation of Lead Target Nuclei Used on Accelerator-Driven Systems for Tritium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Aydin, A.

    2012-02-01

    High-current proton accelerators are being researched at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other laboratories for accelerator production of tritium, transmuting long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived products, converting excess plutonium, and producing energy. These technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. Through ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions, neutrons are produced and are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial fusion power plant. Rubbia succeeded in a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier. This plant is to be known the accelerator-driven system (ADS). The ADS can be used for production of neutrons in spallation neutron source and they can act as an intense neutron source in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, capable of incinerating nuclear waste and of producing energy. Thorium and Uranium are nuclear fuels and Lead, Bismuth, Tungsten are the target nuclei in these reactor systems. The spallation targets can be Pb, Bi, W, etc. isotopes and these target material can be liquid or solid. Naturally Lead includes the 204Pb (%1.42), 206Pb (%24.1), 207Pb (%22.1) and 208Pb (%52.3) isotopes. The design of ADS systems and also a fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems require the knowledge of a wide range of better data. In this study, by using Hartree-Fock method with an effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions rms nuclear charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, neutron radii and neutron skin thickness were calculated for the 204, 206, 208Pb isotopes . The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental and theoretical values of other studies.

  19. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-12-31

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.

  20. Characterisation of electron beams from laser-driven particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, E.; Manahan, G. G.; Shanks, R. P.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Anania, M. P.; Cipiccia, S.; Issac, R. C.; Vieux, G.; Welsh, G. H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-12-21

    The development, understanding and application of laser-driven particle accelerators require accurate measurements of the beam properties, in particular emittance, energy spread and bunch length. Here we report measurements and simulations showing that laser wakefield accelerators can produce beams of quality comparable to conventional linear accelerators.

  1. Accelerator-driven transmutation of spent fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Venneri, Francesco; Williamson, Mark A.; Li, Ning

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method is described for transmuting higher actinides, plutonium and selected fission products in a liquid-fuel subcritical assembly. Uranium may also be enriched, thereby providing new fuel for use in conventional nuclear power plants. An accelerator provides the additional neutrons required to perform the processes. The size of the accelerator needed to complete fuel cycle closure depends on the neutron efficiency of the supported reactors and on the neutron spectrum of the actinide transmutation apparatus. Treatment of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWRs) using uranium-based fuel will require the largest accelerator power, whereas neutron-efficient high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) or CANDU reactors will require the smallest accelerator power, especially if thorium is introduced into the newly generated fuel according to the teachings of the present invention. Fast spectrum actinide transmutation apparatus (based on liquid-metal fuel) will take full advantage of the accelerator-produced source neutrons and provide maximum utilization of the actinide-generated fission neutrons. However, near-thermal transmutation apparatus will require lower standing

  2. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Amar; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P. S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated keff of the system is ∼0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor ks and external neutron source efficiency φ∗ in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  3. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Aronson, A.

    2011-03-01

    be supplying source neutrons. The proton beam will be assumed to have an energy of 1 GeV, and the target material will be natural lead, which will also be the coolant for the reactor assembly. Three proton beam arrangements will be considered, first a single beam (the traditional arrangement) with an entry at the assembly center, two more options will consist of three and six entry locations. The reactor fuel assembly parameters will be based on those of the S-PRISM fast reactor proposed by GE, and the fuel composition and type will be based on that proposed by Aker Solutions for use in their accelerator driven thorium reactor. The following table summarizes the parameters to be used in this study. The isotopic composition of the fertile material is 100% Th-232, and the plutonium isotopic distribution corresponds to that characteristic of the discharge from a typical LWR, following five years of decay. Thus, the isotopic distribution for the plutonium is; Pu-238 2.5%, Pu-239 53.3%, Pu-240 25.1%, Pu-241 11.8%, and Pu-242 7.3%.

  4. Disposition of Nuclear Waste Using Subcritical Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doolen, G.D.; Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.A.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-06-27

    ATW destroys virtually all the plutonium and higher actinides without reprocessing the spent fuel in a way that could lead to weapons material diversion. An ATW facility consists of three major elements: (1) a high-power proton linear accelerator; (2) a pyrochemical spent fuel treatment i waste cleanup system; (3) a liquid lead-bismuth cooled burner that produces and utilizes an intense source-driven neutron flux for transmutation in a heterogeneous (solid fuel) core. The concept is the result of many years of development at LANL as well as other major international research centers. Once demonstrated and developed, ATW could be an essential part of a global non-proliferation strategy for countries that could build up large quantities of plutonium from their commercial reactor waste. ATW technology, initially proposed in the US, has received wide and rapidly increasing attention abroad, especially in Europe and the Far East with major programs now being planned, organized and tided. Substantial convergence presently exists on the technology choices among the programs, opening the possibility of a strong and effective international collaboration on the phased development of the ATW technology.

  5. Laser driven acceleration in vacuum and gases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Hafizi, B.; Hubbard, R.; Krall, J.; Ting, A.

    1997-03-01

    Several important issues pertaining to particle acceleration in vacuum and gases are discussed. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage, and electron aperture effects are presented. Limitations on the laser intensity and particle self-fields due to material breakdown are quantified. In addition, the reflection of the self-fields associated with the accelerated particles places a limit on the number of particles. Two configurations for the inverse Cherenkov accelerator (ICA) are considered, in which the electromagnetic driver is propagated in a waveguide that is (i) lined with a dielectric material or (ii) filled with a neutral gas. The acceleration gradient in the ICA is limited by tunneling and collisional ionization in the dielectric liner or gas. Ionization can lead to significant modification of the optical properties of the waveguide, altering the phase velocity and causing particle slippage, thus disrupting the acceleration process. Maximum accelerating gradients and pulse durations are presented for a 10 {mu}m and a 1 mm wavelength driver. We show that the use of an unguided Bessel (axicon) beam can enhance the energy gain compared to a higher order Gaussian beam. The enhancement factor is N{sup 1/2}, where N is the number of lobes in the Bessel beam. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. A small scale accelerator-driven subcritical assembly demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    The coupling of a neutron-producing accelerator with a sub-critical fission assembly has been proposed at Los Alamos as a method of addressing (1) the destruction of weapons-grade plutonium, (2) the reduction of nuclear waste from commercial reactors and, (3) the generation of power using the thorium/uranium cycle. A small scale experiment is described that will demonstrate many of the aspects of this accelerator-driven transmutation technology. This experiment will use the high-power proton beam from the LAMPF accelerator. Beam currents of up to 1 mA will be used to produce neutrons with a molten lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate plutonium burning, transmutation of commercial spent fuel and energy production from thorium. The experiment will be operated at power levels around 5 MWt.

  7. Operation and reactivity measurements of an accelerator driven subcritical TRIGA reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    Experiments were performed at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) in 2005 and 2006 in which a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator operating as a photoneutron source was coupled to the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General Atomics) Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) to simulate the operation and characteristics of a full-scale accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS). The experimental program provided a relatively low-cost substitute for the higher power and complexity of internationally proposed systems utilizing proton accelerators and spallation neutron sources for an advanced ADSS that may be used for the burning of high-level radioactive waste. Various instrumentation methods that permitted ADSS neutron flux monitoring in high gamma radiation fields were successfully explored and the data was used to evaluate the Stochastic Pulsed Feynman method for reactivity monitoring.

  8. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    DOE PAGES

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2015-10-09

    We describe an associated particle neutron generator that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Furthermore, negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). Finally, the neutron generator can operate in eithermore » pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to similar to 108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.« less

  9. Negative ion-driven associated particle neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K. N.; Morse, D. H.; Donovan, D. C.; Chames, J. M.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Chen, A. X.; Hausladen, P. A.; Liang, F.

    2015-10-09

    We describe an associated particle neutron generator that employs a negative ion source to produce high neutron flux from a small source size. Furthermore, negative ions produced in an rf-driven plasma source are extracted through a small aperture to form a beam which bombards a positively biased, high voltage target electrode. Electrons co-extracted with the negative ions are removed by a permanent magnet electron filter. The use of negative ions enables high neutron output (100% atomic ion beam), high quality imaging (small neutron source size), and reliable operation (no high voltage breakdowns). Finally, the neutron generator can operate in either pulsed or continuous-wave (cw) mode and has been demonstrated to produce 106 D-D n/s (equivalent to similar to 108 D-T n/s) from a 1 mm-diameter neutron source size to facilitate high fidelity associated particle imaging.

  10. Laser driven electron acceleration in vacuum, gases and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, P.; Esarey, E.; Krall, J.

    1996-04-19

    This paper discusses some of the important issues pertaining to laser acceleration in vacuum, neutral gases and plasmas. The limitations of laser vacuum acceleration as they relate to electron slippage, laser diffraction, material damage and electron aperture effects, are discussed. An inverse Cherenkov laser acceleration configuration is presented in which a laser beam is self guided in a partially ionized gas. Optical self guiding is the result of a balance between the nonlinear self focusing properties of neutral gases and the diffraction effects of ionization. The stability of self guided beams is analyzed and discussed. In addition, aspects of the laser wakefield accelerator are presented and laser driven accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  11. Neutron-driven gamma-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    A lasing cylinder emits laser radiation at a gamma-ray wavelength of 0.87 .ANG. when subjected to an intense neutron flux of about 400 eV neutrons. A 250 .ANG. thick layer of Be is provided between two layers of 100 .ANG. thick layer of .sup.57 Co and these layers are supported on a foil substrate. The coated foil is coiled to form the lasing cylinder. Under the neutron flux .sup.57 Co becomes .sup.58 Co by neutron absorption. The .sup.58 Co then decays to .sup.57 Fe by 1.6 MeV proton emission. .sup.57 Fe then transitions by mesne decay to a population inversion for lasing action at 14.4 keV. Recoil from the proton emission separates the .sup.57 Fe from the .sup.57 Co and into the Be, where Mossbauer emission occurs at a gamma-ray wavelength.

  12. Neutron dosimetry with TL albedo dosemeters at high energy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Haninger, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2007-01-01

    The GSF-Personal Monitoring Service uses the TLD albedo dosemeter as standard neutron personal dosemeter. Due to its low sensitivity for fast neutrons however, it is generally not recommended for workplaces at high-energy accelerators. Test measurements with the albedo dosemeter were performed at the accelerator laboratories of GSI in Darmstadt and DESY in Hamburg to reconsider this hypothesis. It revealed that the albedo dosemeter can also be used as personal dosemeter at these workplaces, because at all measurement locations a significant part of neutrons with lower energies could be found, which were produced by scattering at walls or the ground. PMID:17766258

  13. Leakage neutron radiation in a medical electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Lydia; Balcazar, Miguel; Genis, Roberto; Ortiz, Raúl

    2001-10-01

    A simple method was used for the calculation of neutron yield produced by main components of medical electron accelerator head, using a simplified geometric model with spherical-shell for the head shielding made of different materials. The leakage neutron radiation on the patient plane and outside the patient plane at one meter from the x-ray target for a Varian accelerator model Clinac 2100C was evaluated experimentally, using Panasonic UD-802 and UD-809 thermoluminescent dosimeters and CR-39 nuclear track dosimeters. The measured values of leakage neutron radiation were lower than the limits specified in the NCRP-102 and IEC 60601-2-1-Ed.2.0 reports.

  14. Heavy Ion Accelerator-Driven Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    The idea of using accelerators in the production of energy by inertial confinement fusion has been developed since the mid-1970s. The basic concept is to use accelerated beams of heavy ions to provide energy to implode and ignite a small fusion pellet. Accelerators have been seen as attractive for this application due to their reliability, high repetition rate, and potential efficiency. They are therefore competitive with high power lasers at least for the commercial production of electrical power. This review summarizes part of the development and scientific efforts directed toward this application, which has been realized over time to be an extremely demanding one. Here we focus primarily on the rf linac/storage ring driver system approach and summarize the specific development that culminated in the European HIDIF study of the late 1990s. We also discuss some of the relevant followup accelerator studies.

  15. Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rajeev, R.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications. PMID:25102948

  16. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  17. Directional Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, T.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Amin, M.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Andreev, A. A.

    2009-09-25

    Laser-driven ion acceleration is capable of generating ion beams of MeV energy exhibiting unique attributes such as ultralow emittance. Research is still focusing on fundamental laser-target interactions to control further beam attributes. In this Letter we present the observation of directional ion acceleration of irradiated spherical targets through proton imaging. This feature, together with an earlier observed quasimonoenergetic proton burst makes spherical targets extremely attractive candidates for high quality, high repetition rate sources of laser accelerated particles.

  18. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D. Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Leeper, R. J.

    2014-04-15

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ∼ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  19. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong, Chun

    2011-06-01

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY & CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  20. Fluence and dose measurements for an accelerator neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Byun, S. H.; McNeill, F. E.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2007-10-01

    The 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at McMaster University accelerator laboratory is extended to a neutron irradiation facility for low-dose bystander effects research. A long counter and an Anderson-Braun type neutron monitor have been used as monitors for the determination of the total fluence. Activation foils were used to determine the thermal neutron fluence rate (around 106 neutrons s-1). Meanwhile, the interactions of neutrons with the monitors have been simulated using a Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) code. Bystander effects, i.e. damage occurring in cells that were not traversed by radiation but were in the same radiation environment, have been well observed following both alpha and gamma irradiation of many cell lines. Since neutron radiation involves mixed field (including gamma and neutron radiations), we need to differentiate the doses for the bystander effects from the two radiations. A tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) filled with propane based tissue equivalent gas simulating a 2 μm diameter tissue sphere has been investigated to estimate the neutron and gamma absorbed doses. A photon dose contamination of the neutron beam is less than 3%. The axial dose distribution follows the inverse square law and lateral and vertical dose distributions are relatively uniform over the irradiation area required by the biological study.

  1. Acceleration and deceleration of neutrons: From the phase modulation of a neutron wave to a neutron turbine with refracting prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A. I.

    2013-05-15

    The possibility of the acceleration and deceleration of neutrons undergoing diffraction at a moving grating is discussed. It is shown that, in contrast to phase {pi} gratings used at the present time, which form a discrete spectrum featuring a large number of lines, a grating that has a special profile may shift, under certain conditions, the entire spectrum of diffracted neutrons. A blazing grating of this type may be used in efficiently accelerating and decelerating neutrons. As the scale of the structure becomes larger, a description based on the idea of neutron-wave refraction at its elements becomes valid, a system of moving prims forming a 'neutron turbine,' which is also able to accelerate or decelerate neutrons, being a classical limit of this enlargement.

  2. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  3. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  4. Miniature accelerator-driven gamma source concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, R. W.; Chan, K. D.; Wangler, Thomas P.,; Wood R. L.; Carlsten, B. E.; Kirbie, H. C.

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in W-band (-100 GHz) traveling wave tube technology at Los Alarnos may lead to a compact high-power W-band RE source. A conceptual design of a compact 8-MeV electron linac that codd be powered by this source is presented, including electromagnetic structure calculations, proposed rnicrojbbrication and manufacturing methods, supporting calculations to estimate accelerator performance, and gumma production rates based on preliminary target geometries and expected output beam current.

  5. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  6. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A; Massey, Thomas N; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W; Brenner, David J

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons.We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target.A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  7. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will bemore » based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.« less

  8. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  9. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A.; Massey, Thomas N.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Brenner, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10–20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components. PMID:22545061

  10. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  11. Laser-driven Acceleration in Clustered Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Wang, X.; Shim, B.; Downer, M. C.

    2009-01-22

    We propose a new approach to avoid dephasing limitation of laser wakefield acceleration by manipulating the group velocity of the driving pulse using clustered plasmas. We demonstrated the control of phase velocity in clustered plasmas by third harmonic generation and frequency domain interferometry experiments. The results agree with a numerical model. Based on this model, the group velocity of the driving pulse in clustered plasmas was calculated and the result shows the group velocity can approach the speed of light c in clustered plasmas.

  12. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  13. Shielding Assessment of the MYRRHA Accelerator-Driven System Using the MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeck, M.; Aoust, Th.; Vermeersch, F.; Abderrahim, A.

    The MYRRHA project includes the design and the development of an accelerator driven system (ADS) aimed at providing protons and neutrons for various R&D applications. With regard to the safety aspects, the assessment of the shielding and of the dose rates around the installation is an important task. In a first approach standard semi-empirical equations and attenuation factors found in the literature were applied. A more detailed determination of the neutron flux around the reactor is made here by Monte Carlo simulation with the code MCNP4B. The results of the shielding assessment give an estimate of the neutron flux at several positions around the core vessel and along the beam tube. Dose rates will be determined by applying the ICRP74 conversion factor.

  14. Particle acceleration in axisymmetric, magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    The potential drop in the polar cap region of a rotating, magnetized neutron star is found assuming that the magnetic field is dipolar, with the field aligned (or anti-aligned) with the rotation axis. The curvature of the field lines is of critical importance. Charge flow is assumed to be along magnetic field lines. The electric field has a maximum at radius 1.5 R and the magnitude and functional form of the current is determined.

  15. The sciences and applications of the Electron LINAC-driven neutron source in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, J. R.; Mayer, R. E.; Dawidowski, J.; Santisteban, J. R.; Cantargi, F.; Blostein, J. J.; Rodríguez Palomino, L. A.; Tartaglione, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Neutron Physics group at Centro Atómico Bariloche (CNEA, Argentina) has evolved for more than forty five years around a small 25MeV linear electron accelerator. It constitutes our compact accelerator-driven neutron source (CANS), which is dedicated to the use and development of neutronic methods to tackle problems of basic sciences and technological applications. Its historical first commitment has been the determination of the total cross sections of materials as a function of neutron energy by means of transmission experiments for thermal and sub-thermal neutrons. This also allowed testing theoretical models for the generation of scattering kernels and cross sections. Through the years, our interests moved from classic pulsed neutron diffraction, which included the development of high-precision methods for the determination of very low hydrogen content in metals, towards deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS), a powerful tool for the determination of atomic momentum distribution in condensed matter. More recently non-intrusive techniques aimed at the scanning of large cargo containers have started to be developed with our CANS, testing the capacity and limitations to detect special nuclear material and dangerous substances. Also, the ever-present "bremsstrahlung" radiation has been recognized and tested as a useful complement to instrumental neutron activation, as it permits to detect other nuclear species through high-energy photon activation. The facility is also used for graduate and undergraduate students' experimental work within the frame of Instituto Balseiro Physics and Nuclear Engineering courses of study, and also MSc and PhD theses work.

  16. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator timing system upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, L.J.; Shelley, F.E. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) 800 MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) operates at a maximum repetition rate of twice the AC power line frequency, i.e. 120 Hz. The start of each machine cycle occurs a fixed delay after each zero-crossing of the AC line voltage. Fluctuations in the AC line frequency and phase are therefore present on all linac timing signals. Proper beam acceleration along the linac requires that the timing signals remain well synchronized to the AC line. For neutron chopper spectrometers, e.g., PHAROS at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, accurate neutron energy selection requires that precise synchronization be maintained between the beam-on-target arrival time and the neutron chopper rotor position. This is most easily accomplished when the chopper is synchronized to a stable, fixed frequency signal. A new zero-crossing circuit which employs a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) has been developed to increase the phase and frequency stability of the linac timing signals and thereby improve neutron chopper performance while simultaneously maintaining proper linac operation. Results of timing signal data analysis and modeling and a description of the PLL circuit are presented.

  17. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    DOE PAGES

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r)more » from 0.2 Ap to 0.6 .Ap in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.« less

  19. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 1025 m-3 and 1.6 x 1028 m-3 plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers 20 % higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 Ap to 0.6 .Ap in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g. nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  20. Beam-driven acceleration in ultra-dense plasma media

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Young-Min

    2014-09-15

    Accelerating parameters of beam-driven wakefield acceleration in an extremely dense plasma column has been analyzed with the dynamic framed particle-in-cell plasma simulator, and compared with analytic calculations. In the model, a witness beam undergoes a TeV/m scale alternating potential gradient excited by a micro-bunched drive beam in a 10{sup 25 }m{sup −3} and 1.6 × 10{sup 28 }m{sup −3} plasma column. The acceleration gradient, energy gain, and transformer ratio have been extensively studied in quasi-linear, linear-, and blowout-regimes. The simulation analysis indicated that in the beam-driven acceleration system a hollow plasma channel offers ∼20% higher acceleration gradient by enlarging the channel radius (r) from 0.2 λ{sub p} to 0.6 λ{sub p} in a blowout regime. This paper suggests a feasibility of TeV/m scale acceleration with a hollow crystalline structure (e.g., nanotubes) of high electron plasma density.

  1. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  2. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  3. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  4. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  5. Nuclear data needs for accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-07-01

    The possibilities of several new technologies based on use of intense, medium-energy proton accelerators are being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The potential new areas include destruction of long-lived components of nuclear waste, plutonium burning, energy production, and production of tritium. The design, assessment, and safety analysis of potential facilities involves the understanding of complex combinations of nuclear processes, which in turn places new requirements on nuclear data that transcend the traditional needs of the fission and fusion reactor communities. In this paper an assessment of the nuclear data needs for systems currently being considered in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies program is given.

  6. A New Type of Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Driven By Magnetowaves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Chang, Feng-Yin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert J.; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2011-09-12

    We present a new concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator driven by magnetowaves (MPWA). This concept was originally proposed as a viable mechanism for the 'cosmic accelerator' that would accelerate cosmic particles to ultra-high energies in the astrophysical setting. Unlike the more familiar plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) and the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) where the drivers, the charged-particle beam and the laser, are independently existing entities, MPWA invokes the high-frequency and high-speed whistler mode as the driver, which is a medium wave that cannot exist outside of the plasma. Aside from the difference in drivers, the underlying mechanism that excites the plasma wakefield via the ponderomotive potential is common. Our computer simulations show that under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over many plasma wavelengths. We suggest that in addition to its celestial application, the MPWA concept can also be of terrestrial utility. A proof-of-principle experiment on MPWA would benefit both terrestrial and celestial accelerator concepts.

  7. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy. Annual report, [October 1990--April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  8. Ion Acceleration by Magnetic Pinch Instabilities- Powerful Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Since the 1950s pinch discharges with deuterium gas have been known to produce large neutron bursts. During these early quests for laboratory fusion it was initially believed that the heat produced in the pinch led to sufficently high temperatures that these neutrons resulted from thermonuclear (TN) burn. However, a series of careful measurements led by Stirling Colgate was carried out to show that these neutrons did not result form TN burn. Rather, they resulted from an m = 0 sausage mode instability that accelerated the ions, causing beam-target interactions. Today, this same mechanism is used in dense plasma focus machines to generate intense neutron pulses for neutron activation experiments. One such experiment, to test the citicality of aging plutonium, is currently being planned at the Nevada Test Site. Helping to characterize the neutrons from the dense palsma focus to be used in this large experiment was the last applied physics project that Stirling work on. In this talk we will summarize the physics issues involved both in the original discovery in the 1950s and in today's experiments.

  9. COMMISSIONING OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex consists of a 2.5 MeV H- front-end injector system, a 186 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator, a 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, an accumulator ring, and associated beam transport lines. The linac was commissioned in five discrete runs, starting in 2002 and completed in 2005. The accumulator ring and associated beam transport lines were commissioned in two runs from January to April 2006. With the completed commissioning of the SNS accelerator, the facility has begun initial low-power operations. In the course of beam commissioning, most beam performance parameters and beam intensity goals have been achieved at low duty factor. A number of beam dynamics measurements have been performed, including emittance evolution, transverse coupling in the ring, beam instability thresholds, and beam distributions on the target. The commissioning results, achieved beam performance and initial operating experience of the SNS will be discussed

  10. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGES

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  11. Separations technology development to support accelerator-driven transmutation concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Arthur, E.; Bowman, C.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project investigated separations technology development needed for accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) concepts, particularly those associated with plutonium disposition (accelerator-based conversion, ABC) and high-level radioactive waste transmutation (accelerator transmutation of waste, ATW). Specific focus areas included separations needed for preparation of feeds to ABC and ATW systems, for example from spent reactor fuel sources, those required within an ABC/ATW system for material recycle and recovery of key long-lived radionuclides for further transmutation, and those required for reuse and cleanup of molten fluoride salts. The project also featured beginning experimental development in areas associated with a small molten-salt test loop and exploratory centrifugal separations systems.

  12. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  13. Molten salt considerations for accelerator-driven subcritical fission to close the nuclear fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Adams, Marvin; Baty, Austin; Gerity, James; McIntyre, Peter; Melconian, Karie; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat; Tsevkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    The host salt selection, molecular modeling, physical chemistry, and processing chemistry are presented here for an accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). The core is fueled solely with the transuranics (TRU) and long-lived fission products (LFP) from used nuclear fuel. The neutronics and salt composition are optimized to destroy the transuranics by fission and the long-lived fission products by transmutation. The cores are driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. One such ADSMS system can destroy the transuranics in the used nuclear fuel produced by a 1GWe conventional reactor. It uniquely provides a method to close the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy.

  14. Molten salt considerations for accelerator-driven subcritical fission to close the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Baty, Austin; Gerity, James; McIntyre, Peter; Melconian, Karie; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Adams, Marvin; Tsevkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2013-04-19

    The host salt selection, molecular modeling, physical chemistry, and processing chemistry are presented here for an accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). The core is fueled solely with the transuranics (TRU) and long-lived fission products (LFP) from used nuclear fuel. The neutronics and salt composition are optimized to destroy the transuranics by fission and the long-lived fission products by transmutation. The cores are driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. One such ADSMS system can destroy the transuranics in the used nuclear fuel produced by a 1GWe conventional reactor. It uniquely provides a method to close the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy.

  15. Effect of Driver Impedance on Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch Neutron Yield and Beam Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, J.; Link, A.; Ellsworth, J.; Falabella, S.; Rusnak, B.; Tang, V.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2014-10-01

    We explore the effect of driver characteristics on dense plasma focus (DPF) neutron yield and beam acceleration using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ-scale DPF. Our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. Simulations are benchmarked to measurements of a table top kJ DPF experiment with neutron yield measured with He3-based detectors. Simulated neutron yield scales approximately with the fourth power of peak current, I4. We also probe the accelerating fields by measuring the acceleration of a 4 MeV deuteron beam and by measuring the DPF self-generated beam energy distribution, finding gradients higher than 50 MV/m. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (11-ERD-063) at LLNL.

  16. Generation of Radioisotopes with Accelerator Neutrons by Deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yasuki; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Saeki, Hideya; Motoishi, Shoji; Sato, Nozomi; Kawabata, Masako; Harada, Hideo; Kin, Tadahiro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Sato, Tetsuya K.; Minato, Futoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Seki, Yohji; Yokoyama, Kenji; Shiina, Takehiko; Ohta, Akio; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Kawauchi, Yukimasa; Sato, Norihito; Yamabayashi, Hisamichi; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Kikuchi, Yuji; Mitsumoto, Toshinori; Igarashi, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    A new system proposed for the generation of radioisotopes with accelerator neutrons by deuterons (GRAND) is described by mainly discussing the production of 99Mo used for nuclear medicine diagnosis. A prototype facility of this system consists of a cyclotron to produce intense accelerator neutrons from the \\text{natC(d,n) reaction with 40 MeV 2 mA deuteron beams, and a sublimation system to separate \\text{99mTc from an irradiated 100MoO3 sample. About 8.1 TBq/week of 99Mo is produced by repeating irradiation on an enriched 100Mo sample (251 g) with accelerator neutrons for two days three times. It meets about 10% of the 99Mo demand in Japan. The characteristic feature of the system lies in its capability to reliably produce a wide variety of high-quality, carrier-free, carrier-added radioisotopes with a minimum level of radioactive waste without using uranium. The system is compact in size, and easy to operate; therefore it could be used worldwide to produce radioisotopes for medical, research, and industrial applications.

  17. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  18. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  19. Comparison of Lead-Bismuth and Lead as Coolants for Accelerator Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, F.; Mattioda, F.; Meloni, P.

    2002-07-01

    In the framework of the Italian research program TRASCO (TRAsmutazione SCOrie, namely transmutation of radioactive wastes) and of the European research program PDS-XADS (Preliminary Design Study on an eXperimental Accelerator Driven System) the feasibility and operability of gas or liquid metal cooled accelerator driven system prototypes are currently under investigation. Initially the attention of the thermal-hydraulics group of ENEA research centre in Bologna has been focussed toward a lead-bismuth cooled subcritical system under natural or enhanced natural circulation according to the prototype design proposed. The interest in using lead as a coolant, which is characterized by a higher melting point, is explained by the need to increase the plant efficiency for the economic competitiveness, though the higher temperatures pose some technological problems. Moreover, the amount of activation products should result significantly lower. Of course the results obtained and the experience gained analysing the dynamical behaviour of the lead-bismuth cooled system cannot be directly transferred to lead cooled systems. This paper aims at presenting a preliminary comparison of lead-bismuth and lead in a simplified liquid metal cooled subcritical system, mainly from the thermal-hydraulics and system dynamics points of view. By means of the modified RELAP5 version, the dynamical behavior of a lead-bismuth or lead cooled system, which is intended to be a quite accurate representation of the Italian accelerator driven prototype XADS, has been studied. Although a more exhaustive comparison should take into account the necessarily different structural characteristics of lead-bismuth and lead cooled systems, the neutronic feedback on reactor power and also the slightly different neutronic properties of lead-bismuth and lead, the purely thermal-hydraulic analysis presented in this paper has shown that the dynamical behaviour of the XADS does not differ noticeable when lead is used

  20. Ion acceleration near CME-driven interplanetary shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Lee, Martin

    2012-05-01

    We have surveyed properties of the magnetic field power spectral densities and energetic ions and compared them with the shock normal angles of 74 CME-driven IP shocks observed at ACE and Wind during solar cycle 23. We searched for events that exhibited clear signatures of first-order Fermi acceleration at quasi-parallel shocks and shock-drift acceleration at quasi-perpendicular shocks as predicted by the diffusive shock acceleration theory. Our results show that events with clear signatures of either shock-drift or first-order Fermi acceleration at 1 AU are rare, with 64 of the 74 IP shocks (~87%) exhibiting mixed signatures. We classify the remaining ten events as follows. (1) Four quasi-perpendicular shocks with θBn>70° exhibit no enhancements in the magnetic field power spectrum around the proton gyro-frequency and a slight hardening or no change in the ~80-300 keV/nucleon CNO spectral index across the shocks, indicating the absence of upstream wave activity and the re-acceleration of a pre-existing suprathermal seed spectrum. (2) Six quasi-parallel or oblique IP shocks with θBn<70° exhibit significant enhancements in the power spectral densities around the proton gyro-frequency and are accompanied by unfolding (softening) of the ~80-300 keV/nucleon CNO spectral index across the shocks, indicating the acceleration and efficient trapping of <300 keV/nucleon CNO ions by the Alfvén waves that were most likely excited by the accelerated protons as they streamed away from the shocks. In this paper, we present contrasting energetic particle and magnetic field observations near 2 IP shocks at 1 AU to highlight the complex signatures associated with the two distinct types of shock acceleration mechanisms.

  1. Detector positioning for the initial subcriticality level determination in accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Van Den Eynde, G.; Baeten, P.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Van Der Hagen, T. J. H. H.; Wols, F.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Thybault, H. E.

    2012-07-01

    Within the GUINEVERE project (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol, the continuous deuteron accelerator GENEPI-3C was coupled to the VENUS-F fast simulated lead-cooled reactor. Today the FREYA project (Fast Reactor Experiments for hYbrid Applications) is ongoing to study the neutronic behavior of this Accelerator Driven System (ADS) during different phases of operation. In particular the set-up of a monitoring system for the subcriticality of an ADS is envisaged to guarantee safe operation of the installation. The methodology for subcriticality monitoring in ADS takes into account the determination of the initial subcriticality level, the monitoring of reactivity variations, and interim cross-checking. At start-up, the Pulsed Neutron Source (PNS) technique is envisaged to determine the initial subcriticality level. Thanks to its reference critical state, the PNS technique can be validated on the VENUS-F core. A detector positioning methodology for the PNS technique is set up in this paper for the subcritical VENUS-F core, based on the reduction of higher harmonics in a static evaluation of the Sjoestrand area method. A first case study is provided on the VENUS-F core. This method can be generalised in order to create general rules for detector positions and types for full-scale ADS. (authors)

  2. A small scale accelerator driven subcritical assembly development and demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S. A.; Venneri, F.; Bowman, C. D.; Arthur, E. D.; Heighway, E.; Beard, C. A.; Bracht, R. R.; Buksa, J. J.; Chavez, W.; DeVolder, B. G.; Park, J. J.; Parker, R. B.; Pillai, C.; Pitcher, E.; Potter, R. C.; Reid, R. S.; Russell, G. J.; Trujillo, D. A.; Weinacht, D. J.; Wilson, W. B.

    1995-09-15

    A small scale experiment is described that will demonstrate many of the aspects of accelerator-driven transmutation technology. This experiment uses the high-power proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility accelerator and will be located in the Area-A experimental hall. Beam currents of up to 1 mA will be used to produce neutrons with a molten lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate plutonium burning or transmutation of commercial spent fuel or energy production from thorium. The experiment will be operated at power levels up to 5 MWt.

  3. A small scale accelerator driven subcritical assembly development and demonstration experiment at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.A.; Venneri, F.; Bowman, C.D.; Arthur, E.D.; Heighway, E.A.; Beard, C.A.; Bracht, R.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Chavez, W.; DeVolder, B.G.

    1994-10-01

    A small scale experiment is described that will demonstrate many of the aspects of accelerator-driven transmutation technology. This experiment uses the high-power proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility accelerator and will be located in the Area-A experimental hall. Beam currents of up to 1 mA will be used to produce neutrons with a molten lead target. The target is surrounded by a molten salt and graphite moderator blanket. Fissionable material can be added to the molten salt to demonstrate plutonium burning or transmutation of commercial spent fuel or energy production from thorium. The experiment will be operated at power levels up to 5 MW{sub t}.

  4. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  5. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  6. Compact Permanent Magnet Microwave-Driven Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Qing

    2011-06-01

    Permanent magnet microwave-driven neutron generators have been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The 2.45 GHz microwave signal is directly coupled into the plasma chamber via a microwave window. Plasma is confined in an axial magnetic field produced by the permanent magnets surrounding the plasma chamber. The source chamber is made of aluminum with a diameter of 4 cm and length of 5 cm. A stack of five alumina discs, which are 3 cm in diameter and total length of 3 cm, works as microwave window. Three permanent ring magnets are used to generate the axial magnetic field required for the microwave ion source. Both hydrogen and deuterium plasma have been successfully ignited. With 330W of microwave power, source chamber pressure of 5 mTorr, and an extraction aperture of 2 mm in diameter, the deuterium ion beam measured on the target was approximately 2.5 mA. Over 90% of the ions are atomic. With the ion source at ground potential and titanium target at -40 kV, the analysis of the activated gold foil and calibrated neutron dose monitor both indicated that roughly 10{sup 7} n/s of D-D neutrons have been produced. The D-D neutron yield can be easily scaled up to 10{sup 8} n/s when the titanium target is biased at -100 kV.

  7. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  8. SEP acceleration in CME driven shocks using a hybrid code

    SciTech Connect

    Gargaté, L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-09-01

    We perform hybrid simulations of a super-Alfvénic quasi-parallel shock, driven by a coronal mass ejection (CME), propagating in the outer coronal/solar wind at distances of between 3 to 6 solar radii. The hybrid treatment of the problem enables the study of the shock propagation on the ion timescale, preserving ion kinetics and allowing for a self-consistent treatment of the shock propagation and particle acceleration. The CME plasma drags the embedded magnetic field lines stretching from the sun, and propagates out into interplanetary space at a greater velocity than the in situ solar wind, driving the shock, and producing very energetic particles. Our results show that electromagnetic Alfvén waves are generated at the shock front. The waves propagate upstream of the shock and are produced by the counter-streaming ions of the solar wind plasma being reflected at the shock. A significant fraction of the particles are accelerated in two distinct phases: first, particles drift from the shock and are accelerated in the upstream region, and second, particles arriving at the shock get trapped and are accelerated at the shock front. A fraction of the particles diffused back to the shock, which is consistent with the Fermi acceleration mechanism.

  9. Ice-sheet acceleration driven by melt supply variability.

    PubMed

    Schoof, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Increased ice velocities in Greenland are contributing significantly to eustatic sea level rise. Faster ice flow has been associated with ice-ocean interactions in water-terminating outlet glaciers and with increased surface meltwater supply to the ice-sheet bed inland. Observed correlations between surface melt and ice acceleration have raised the possibility of a positive feedback in which surface melting and accelerated dynamic thinning reinforce one another, suggesting that overall warming could lead to accelerated mass loss. Here I show that it is not simply mean surface melt but an increase in water input variability that drives faster ice flow. Glacier sliding responds to melt indirectly through changes in basal water pressure, with observations showing that water under glaciers drains through channels at low pressure or through interconnected cavities at high pressure. Using a model that captures the dynamic switching between channel and cavity drainage modes, I show that channelization and glacier deceleration rather than acceleration occur above a critical rate of water flow. Higher rates of steady water supply can therefore suppress rather than enhance dynamic thinning, indicating that the melt/dynamic thinning feedback is not universally operational. Short-term increases in water input are, however, accommodated by the drainage system through temporary spikes in water pressure. It is these spikes that lead to ice acceleration, which is therefore driven by strong diurnal melt cycles and an increase in rain and surface lake drainage events rather than an increase in mean melt supply.

  10. Inherent Safety of Fuels for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, M.; Wallenius, J.; Jolkkonen, M.; Cahalan, J.E

    2005-09-15

    Transient safety characteristics of accelerator-driven systems using advanced minor actinide fuels have been investigated. Results for a molybdenum-based Ceramic-Metal (CerMet) fuel, a magnesia-based Ceramic-Ceramic fuel, and a zirconium-nitride-based fuel are reported. The focus is on the inherent safety aspects of core design. Accident analyses are carried out for the response to unprotected loss-of-flow and accelerator beam-overpower transients and coolant voiding scenarios. An attempt is made to establish basic design limits for the fuel and cladding. Maximum temperatures during transients are determined and compared with design limits. Reactivity effects associated with coolant void, fuel and structural expansion, and cladding relocation are investigated. Design studies encompass variations in lattice pitch and pin diameter. Critical mass studies are performed. The studies indicate favorable inherent safety features of the CerMet fuel. Major consideration is given to the potential threat of coolant voiding in accelerator-driven design proposals. Results for a transient test case study of a postulated steam generator tube rupture event leading to extensive coolant voiding are presented. The study underlines the importance of having a low coolant void reactivity value in a lead-bismuth system despite the high boiling temperature of the coolant. It was found that the power rise following a voiding transient increases dramatically near the critical state. The studies suggest that a reactivity margin of a few dollars in the voided state is sufficient to permit significant reactivity insertions.

  11. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  12. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  13. Development and analysis of a metal-fueled accelerator-driven burner

    SciTech Connect

    Lypsch, F.; Hill, R.N.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the safety characteristics of an accelerator driven metal fueled fast system to a critical core on a consistent basis to determine how these characteristics are affected solely by subcritically of the system. To accomplish this an accelerator proton beam/tungsten neutron source model is surrounded by a subcritical blanket using metallic fuel and sodium as coolant. The consequences of typical accident transients, namely unprotected transient overpower (TOP), loss of heat sink (LOHS), and loss of flow (LOP) were calculated for the hybrid system and compared to corresponding results for a metal-fueled fast reactor. Results indicate that the subcritical system exhibits superior performance for TOP (reactivity-induced) transits; however, only in the critical system are reactivity feedbacks able to cause passive shutdown in the LOHS ad LOP events. Therefore, for a full spectrum of accident initiators considered, the overall safety behavior of accelerator-driven metal-fueled systems can neither be concluded to be worse nor to be better than advanced reactor designs which rely on passive safety features.

  14. Stochastic acceleration of ions driven by Pc1 wave packets

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, G. V. Sibeck, D. G.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2015-07-15

    The stochastic motion of protons and He{sup +} ions driven by Pc1 wave packets is studied in the context of resonant particle heating. Resonant ion cyclotron heating typically occurs when wave powers exceed 10{sup −4} nT{sup 2}/Hz. Gyroresonance breaks the first adiabatic invariant and energizes keV ions. Cherenkov resonances with the electrostatic component of wave packets can also accelerate ions. The main effect of this interaction is to accelerate thermal protons to the local Alfven speed. The dependencies of observable quantities on the wave power and plasma parameters are determined, and estimates for the heating extent and rate of particle heating in these wave-particle interactions are shown to be in reasonable agreement with known empirical data.

  15. Accelerator-driven molten-salt blankets: Physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Durkee, J.W.; Perry, R.T.; Poston, D.I.

    1994-10-01

    A number of nuclear physics issues concerning the Los Alamos molten-salt accelerator-driven plutonium converter are discussed. General descriptions of several concepts using internal and external moderation are presented. Burnup and salt processing requirement calculations are presented for four concepts, indicating that both the high power density externally moderated concept and an internally moderated concept achieve total plutonium burnups approaching 90% at salt processing rates of less than 2 m{sup 3} per year. Beginning-of-life reactivity temperature coefficients and system kinetic response are also discussed. Future research should investigate the effect of changing blanket composition on operational and safety characteristics.

  16. Development of the accelerator-driven energy production concept

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Beard, C.; Bowman, C.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) offers a means of generating nuclear energy in a clean, safe way that can be attractive to the general public. However, there are issues associated with the energy story (both at the system level and technical detail) that have to be seriously addressed before the scientific community, the public, and potential industrial sponsors can be compellingly convinced of its cost/benefit.

  17. Transformer ratio saturation in a beam-driven wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J. P.; Martorelli, R.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-12-15

    We show that for beam-driven wakefield acceleration, the linearly ramped, equally spaced train of bunches typically considered to optimise the transformer ratio only works for flat-top bunches. Through theory and simulation, we explain that this behaviour is due to the unique properties of the plasma response to a flat-top density profile. Calculations of the optimal scaling for a train of Gaussian bunches show diminishing returns with increasing bunch number, tending towards saturation. For a periodic bunch train, a transformer ratio of 23 was achieved for 50 bunches, rising to 40 for a fully optimised beam.

  18. Particle Acceleration by Cme-driven Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1999-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Peak particle intensities are a strong function of CME speed, although the intensities, spectra, and angular distributions of particles escaping the shock are highly modified by scattering on Alfven waves produced by the streaming particles themselves. Element abundances vary in complex ways because ions with different values of Q/A resonate with different parts of the wave spectrum, which varies with space and time. Just recently, we have begun to model these systematic variations theoretically and to explore other consequences of proton-generated waves.

  19. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  20. Laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent nanotargets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. M.; Pomerantz, I.; Yin, L.; Wu, H. C.; Jung, D.; Albright, B. J.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Palaniyappan, S.; Shah, R.; Allinger, K.; Hörlein, R.; Schreiber, J.; Habs, D.; Blakeney, J.; Dyer, G.; Fuller, L.; Gaul, E.; Mccary, E.; Meadows, A. R.; Wang, C.; Ditmire, T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Here we present experimental results on laser-driven ion acceleration from relativistically transparent, overdense plasmas in the break-out afterburner (BOA) regime. Experiments were preformed at the Trident ultra-high contrast laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and at the Texas Petawatt laser facility, located in the University of Texas at Austin. It is shown that when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, an epoch of dramatic acceleration of ions occurs that lasts until the electron density in the expanding target reduces to the critical density in the non-relativistic limit. For given laser parameters, the optimal target thickness yielding the highest maximum ion energy is one in which this time window for ion acceleration overlaps with the intensity peak of the laser pulse. A simple analytic model of relativistically induced transparency is presented for plasma expansion at the time-evolving sound speed, from which these times may be estimated. The maximum ion energy attainable is controlled by the finite acceleration volume and time over which the BOA acts.

  1. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  2. A high power accelerator driver system for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Channell, P.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For several years, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have provided a successful driver for the nearly 100-kW Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) source. The authors have studied an upgrade to this system. The goal of this effort was to establish a credible design for the accelerator driver of a next-generation source providing 1-MW of beam power. They have explored a limited subset of the possible approaches to a driver and have considered only the low 1-MW beam power. The next-generation source must utilize the optimum technology and may require larger neutron intensities than they now envision.

  3. Development of an accelerating piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, J.; Loiseau, J.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest for a number of scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. In the implosion-driven launcher (ILD) concept, explosives are used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures than the propellant of conventional light-gas guns. The propellant of the IDL is compressed through the linear implosion of a pressurized tube. The imploding tube behaves like a piston which travels into the light gas at the explosive detonation velocity, thus forming an increasingly long column of shock-compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill designed IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This work will focus on the implementation of a novel launch cycle in which the explosively driven piston is accelerated in order to gradually increase driver gas compression, thus maintaining a relatively constant projectile driving pressure. The theoretical potential of the concept as well as the experimental development of an accelerating piston driver will be examined.

  4. Results from the TARC experiment: spallation neutron phenomenology in lead and neutron-driven nuclear transmutation by adiabatic resonance crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abánades, A.; Aleixandre, J.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Arnould, H.; Belle, E.; Bompas, C. A.; Brozzi, D.; Bueno, J.; Buono, S.; Carminati, F.; Casagrande, F.; Cennini, P.; Collar, J. I.; Cerro, E.; Del Moral, R.; Díez, S.; Dumps, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid, M.; Fernández, R.; Gálvez, J.; García, J.; Gelès, C.; Giorni, A.; González, E.; González, O.; Goulas, I.; Heuer, D.; Hussonnois, M.; Kadi, Y.; Karaiskos, P.; Kitis, G.; Klapisch, R.; Kokkas, P.; Lacoste, V.; Le Naour, C.; López, C.; Loiseaux, J. M.; Martínez-Val, J. M.; Méplan, O.; Nifenecker, H.; Oropesa, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pérez-Enciso, E.; Pérez-Navarro, A.; Perlado, M.; Placci, A.; Poza, M.; Revol, J.-P.; Rubbia, C.; Rubio, J. A.; Sakelliou, L.; Saldaña, F.; Savvidis, E.; Schussler, F.; Sirvent, C.; Tamarit, J.; Trubert, D.; Tzima, A.; Viano, J. B.; Vieira, S.; Vlachoudis, V.; Zioutas, K.

    2002-02-01

    We summarize here the results of the TARC experiment whose main purpose is to demonstrate the possibility of using Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFFs) in accelerator-driven systems and to validate a new simulation developed in the framework of the Energy Amplifier programme. An experimental set-up was installed in a CERN PS proton beam line to study how neutrons produced by spallation at relatively high energy ( E n⩾1 MeV) slow down quasi-adiabatically with almost flat isolethargic energy distribution and reach the capture resonance energy of an element to be transmuted where they will have a high probability of being captured. Precision measurements of energy and space distributions of spallation neutrons (using 2.5 and 3.5 GeV/ c protons) slowing down in a 3.3 m×3.3 m×3 m lead volume and of neutron capture rates on LLFFs 99Tc, 129I, and several other elements were performed. An appropriate formalism and appropriate computational tools necessary for the analysis and understanding of the data were developed and validated in detail. Our direct experimental observation of ARC demonstrates the possibility to destroy, in a parasitic mode, outside the Energy Amplifier core, large amounts of 99Tc or 129I at a rate exceeding the production rate, thereby making it practical to reduce correspondingly the existing stockpile of LLFFs. In addition, TARC opens up new possibilities for radioactive isotope production as an alternative to nuclear reactors, in particular for medical applications, as well as new possibilities for neutron research and industrial applications.

  5. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  6. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  7. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  8. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  9. Influence of shock waves on laser-driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, O.; Lindau, F.; Persson, A.; Wahlstroem, C.-G.; McKenna, P.; Batani, D.

    2007-08-15

    The influence of shock waves, driven by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), on laser-accelerated proton beams is investigated. A local deformation, produced by a cold shock wave launched by the ablation pressure of the ASE pedestal, can under oblique laser irradiation significantly direct the proton beam toward the laser axis. This can be understood in the frame of target normal sheath acceleration as proton emission from an area of the target where the local target normal is shifted toward the laser axis. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that there exists a window in laser and target parameter space where the target can be significantly deformed and yet facilitate efficient proton acceleration. The dependence of the magnitude of the deflection on target material, foil thickness, and ASE pedestal intensity and duration is experimentally investigated. The deflection angle is found to increase with increasing ASE intensity and duration and decrease with increasing target thickness. In a comparison between aluminum and copper target foils, aluminum is found to yield a larger proton beam deflection. An analytic model is successfully used to predict the proton emission direction.

  10. Development and construction of a neutron beam line for accelerator-based boron neutron capture synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C; Shefer, R E

    2000-01-01

    A potential application of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li nuclear reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, termed Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), is under investigation. In an arthritic joint, the synovial lining becomes inflamed and is a source of great pain and discomfort for the afflicted patient. The goal of BNCS is to ablate the synovium, thereby eliminating the symptoms of the arthritis. A BNCS treatment would consist of an intra-articular injection of boron followed by neutron irradiation of the joint. Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations have been used to develop an accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam line for BNCS treatments. The model includes a moderator/reflector assembly, neutron producing target, target cooling system, and arthritic joint phantom. Single and parallel opposed beam irradiations have been modeled for the human knee, human finger, and rabbit knee joints. Additional reflectors, placed to the side and back of the joint, have been added to the model and have been shown to improve treatment times and skin doses by about a factor of 2. Several neutron-producing charged particle reactions have been examined for BNCS, including the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies of 4 and 3.7 MeV, the 9Be(d,n) reaction at deuteron energies of 1.5 and 2.6 MeV, and the 7Li(p,n) reaction at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV. For an accelerator beam current of 1 mA and synovial boron uptake of 1000 ppm, the time to deliver a therapy dose of 10,000 RBEcGy ranges from 3 to 48 min, depending on the treated joint and the neutron producing charged particle reaction. The whole-body effective dose that a human would incur during a knee treatment has been estimated to be 3.6 rem or 0.75 rem, for 1000 ppm or 19,000 ppm synovial boron uptake, respectively, although the shielding configuration has not yet been optimized. The Monte Carlo design process culminated in the construction, installation, and testing of a dedicated BNCS beam line on the high

  11. CANCELLED Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for anAccelerator-Driven Neut ron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, J.H.; Gough, R.; Hoff, M.; Kwan, J.W.; Ludewigt,B.A.; Regis, M.J.; Wallig, J.G.; Wells, R.

    2007-02-27

    An over-dense microwave driven ion source capable of producing deuterium (or hydrogen) beams at 100-200 mA/cm{sup 2} and with atomic fraction > 90% was designed and tested with an electrostatic low energy beam transport section (LEBT). This ion source was incorporated into the design of an Accelerator Driven Neutron Source (ADNS). The other key components in the ADNS include a 6 MeV RFQ accelerator, a beam bending and scanning system, and a deuterium gas target. In this design a 40 mA D{sup +} beam is produced from a 6 mm diameter aperture using a 60 kV extraction voltage. The LEBT section consists of 5 electrodes arranged to form 2 Einzel lenses that focus the beam into the RFQ entrance. To create the ECR condition, 2 induction coils are used to create {approx} 875 Gauss on axis inside the source chamber. To prevent HV breakdown in the LEBT a magnetic field clamp is necessary to minimize the field in this region. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguide to the plasma is done by an autotuner. They observed significant improvement of the beam quality after installing a boron nitride liner inside the ion source. The measured emittance data are compared with PBGUNS simulations.

  12. Neutrino-driven winds from neutron star merger remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A.; Rosswog, S.; Cabezón, R. M.; Korobkin, O.; Käppeli, R.; Arcones, A.; Liebendörfer, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed, three-dimensional hydrodynamic study of the neutrino-driven winds emerging from the remnant of a neutron star merger. Our simulations are performed with the Newtonian, Eulerian code FISH, augmented by a detailed, spectral neutrino leakage scheme that accounts for neutrino absorption. Consistent with earlier two-dimensional studies, a strong baryonic wind is blown out along the original binary rotation axis within ≈100 ms. From this model, we compute a lower limit on the expelled mass of 3.5 × 10-3 M⊙, relevant for heavy element nucleosynthesis. Because of stronger neutrino irradiation, the polar regions show substantially larger electron fractions than those at lower latitudes. The polar ejecta produce interesting r-process contributions from A ≈ 80 to about 130, while the more neutron-rich, lower latitude parts produce elements up to the third r-process peak near A ≈ 195. We calculate the properties of electromagnetic transients powered by the radioactivity in the wind, in addition to the `macronova' transient stemming from the dynamic ejecta. The polar regions produce ultraviolet/optical transients reaching luminosities up to 1041 erg s-1, which peak around 1 d in optical and 0.3 d in bolometric luminosity. The lower latitude regions, due to their contamination with high-opacity heavy elements, produce dimmer and more red signals, peaking after ˜2 d in optical and infrared.

  13. /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method has been tested in a wide variety of experiments that have indicated the broad range of applicability of the method. The neutron multiplication factor k/sub eff/ has been satisfactorily detemined for a variety of materials including uranium metal, light water reactor fuel pins, fissile solutions, fuel plates in water, and interacting cylinders. For a uranyl nitrate solution tank which is typical of a fuel processing or reprocessing plant, the k/sub eff/ values were satisfactorily determined for values between 0.92 and 0.5 using a simple point kinetics interpretation of the experimental data. The short measurement times, in several cases as low as 1 min, have shown that the development of this method can lead to a practical subcriticality monitor for many in-plant applications. The further development of the method will require experiments oriented toward particular applications including dynamic experiments and the development of theoretical methods to predict the experimental observables.

  14. COMPOSITIONALLY DRIVEN CONVECTION IN THE OCEANS OF ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the effect of chemical separation as matter freezes at the base of the ocean of an accreting neutron star, and argue that the retention of light elements in the liquid acts as a source of buoyancy that drives a slow but continual mixing of the ocean, enriching it substantially in light elements, and leading to a relatively uniform composition with depth. We first consider the timescales associated with different processes that can redistribute elements in the ocean, including convection, sedimentation, crystallization, and diffusion. We then calculate the steady-state structure of the ocean of a neutron star for an illustrative model in which the accreted hydrogen and helium burn to produce a mixture of O and Se. Even though the H/He burning produces only 2% oxygen by mass, the steady-state ocean has an oxygen abundance more than 10 times larger, almost 40% by mass. Furthermore, we show that the convective motions transport heat inward, with a flux of {approx}0.2 MeV nucleon{sup -1} for an O-Se ocean, heating the ocean and steepening the outward temperature gradient. The enrichment of light elements and heating of the ocean due to compositionally driven convection likely have important implications for carbon ignition models of superbursts.

  15. Ion acceleration from laser-driven electrostatic shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fiuza, F.; Stockem, A.; Boella, E.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Haberberger, D.; Tochitsky, S.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2013-05-15

    Multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are used to study the generation of electrostatic shocks in plasma and the reflection of background ions to produce high-quality and high-energy ion beams. Electrostatic shocks are driven by the interaction of two plasmas with different density and/or relative drift velocity. The energy and number of ions reflected by the shock increase with increasing density ratio and relative drift velocity between the two interacting plasmas. It is shown that the interaction of intense lasers with tailored near-critical density plasmas allows for the efficient heating of the plasma electrons and steepening of the plasma profile at the critical density interface, leading to the generation of high-velocity shock structures and high-energy ion beams. Our results indicate that high-quality 200 MeV shock-accelerated ion beams required for medical applications may be obtained with current laser systems.

  16. Laser-driven ion acceleration with hollow laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brabetz, C. Kester, O.; Busold, S.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T.; Deppert, O.; Jahn, D.; Roth, M.; Schumacher, D.

    2015-01-15

    The laser-driven acceleration of protons from thin foils irradiated by hollow high-intensity laser beams in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) is reported for the first time. The use of hollow beams aims at reducing the initial emission solid angle of the TNSA source, due to a flattening of the electron sheath at the target rear side. The experiments were conducted at the PHELIX laser facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH with laser intensities in the range from 10{sup 18} W cm{sup −2} to 10{sup 20} W cm{sup −2}. We observed an average reduction of the half opening angle by (3.07±0.42)° or (13.2±2.0)% when the targets have a thickness between 12 μm and 14 μm. In addition, the highest proton energies were achieved with the hollow laser beam in comparison to the typical Gaussian focal spot.

  17. Improved Actinide Neutron Capture Cross Sections Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Collon, P.; Paul, M.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2014-09-01

    The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are developing a technique to inject solid material into the ECR with laser ablation. With laser ablation, we can better control material injection and potentially increase efficiency in the ECR, thus creating less contamination in the source and reducing cross talk. I will present work on the laser ablation system and preliminary results from our AMS measurements. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are

  18. Physics design of an accelerator for an accelerator-driven subcritical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhihui; Cheng, Peng; Geng, Huiping; Guo, Zhen; He, Yuan; Meng, Cai; Ouyang, Huafu; Pei, Shilun; Sun, Biao; Sun, Jilei; Tang, Jingyu; Yan, Fang; Yang, Yao; Zhang, Chuang; Yang, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    An accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS) program was launched in China in 2011, which aims to design and build an ADS demonstration facility with the capability of more than 1000 MW thermal power in multiple phases lasting about 20 years. The driver linac is defined to be 1.5 GeV in energy, 10 mA in current and in cw operation mode. To meet the extremely high reliability and availability, the linac is designed with much installed margin and fault tolerance, including hot-spare injectors and local compensation method for key element failures. The accelerator complex consists of two parallel 10-MeV injectors, a joint medium-energy beam transport line, a main linac, and a high-energy beam transport line. The superconducting acceleration structures are employed except for the radio frequency quadrupole accelerators (RFQs) which are at room temperature. The general design considerations and the beam dynamics design of the driver linac complex are presented here.

  19. Sensitivity Upgrades to the Idaho Accelerator Center Neutron Time of Flight Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S. J.; Kinlaw, M. T.; Harmon, J. F.; Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.

    2007-10-26

    Past experiments have shown that discrimination between between fissionable and non-fissionable materials is possible using an interrogation technique that monitors for high energy prompt fission neutrons. Several recent upgrades have been made to the neutron time of flight spectrometer at the Idaho Accelerator Center with the intent of increasing neutron detection sensitivity, allowing for system use in nonproliferation and security applications.

  20. Experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system at the Kyoto Univ. critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pyeon, C. H.; Yagi, T.; Lim, J. Y.; Misawa, T.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental study on the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system (ADS) is conducted in the Kyoto Univ. Critical Assembly (KUCA). The experiments are carried out in both the critical and subcritical states for attaining the reaction rates of the thorium capture and fission reactions. In the critical system, the thorium plate irradiation experiment is carried out for the thorium capture and fission reactions. From the results of the measurements, the thorium fission reactions are obtained apparently in the critical system, and the C/E values of reaction rates show the accuracy of relative difference of about 30%. In the ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons and 100 MeV protons, the subcritical experiments are carried out in the thorium-loaded cores to obtain the capture reaction rates through the measurements of {sup 115}In(n, {gamma}){sup 116m}In reactions. The results of the experiments reveal the difference between the reaction rate distributions for the change in not only the neutron spectrum but also the external neutron source. The comparison between the measured and calculated reaction rate distributions demonstrates a discrepancy of the accuracy of reaction rate analyses of thorium capture reactions through the thorium-loaded ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons. Hereafter, kinetic experiments are planned to be carried out to deduce the delayed neutron decay constants and subcriticality using the pulsed neutron method. (authors)

  1. A neutron track etch detector for electron linear accelerators in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, Branko; Faj, Dario; Poje, Marina; Varga, Maja; Radolic, Vanja; Miklavcic, Igor; Ivkovic, Ana; Planinic, Josip

    2010-01-01

    Background Electron linear accelerators in medical radiotherapy have replaced cobalt and caesium sources of radiation. However, medical accelerators with photon energies over 10 MeV generate undesired fast neutron contamination in a therapeutic X-ray photon beam. Photons with energies above 10 MeV can interact with the atomic nucleus of a high-Z material, of which the target and the head of an accelerator consist, and lead to the neutron ejection. Results and conclusions. Our neutron dosimeter, composed of the LR-115 track etch detector and boron foil BN-1 converter, was calibrated on thermal neutrons generated in the nuclear reactor of the Josef Stefan Institute (Slovenia), and applied to dosimetry of undesirable neutrons in photon radiotherapy by the linear accelerator 15 MV Siemens Mevatron. Having considered a high dependence of a cross-section between neutron and boron on neutron energy, and broad neutron spectrum in a photon beam, as well as outside the entrance door to maze of the Mevatron, we developed a method for determining the effective neutron detector response. A neutron dose rate in the photon beam was measured to be 1.96 Sv/h. Outside the Mevatron room the neutron dose rate was 0.62 μSv/h. PACS: 87.52. Ga; 87.53.St; 29.40.Wk. PMID:22933893

  2. How to produce a reactor neutron spectrum using a proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Wootan, David W.; Gates, Robert O.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Asner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A method for reproducing the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor using an engineered target in an accelerator proton beam is proposed. The protons interact with a target to create neutrons through various (p,n) type reactions. Spectral tailoring of the emitted neutrons can be used to modify the energy of the generated neutron spectrum to represent various reactor spectra. Through the use of moderators and reflectors, the neutron spectrum can be modified to reproduce many different spectra of interest including spectra in small thermal test reactors, large pressurized water reactors, and fast reactors. The particular application of this methodology is the design of an experimental approach for using an accelerator to measure the betas produced during fission to be used to reduce uncertainties in the interpretation of reactor antineutrino measurements. This approach involves using a proton accelerator to produce a neutron field representative of a power reactor, and using this neutron field to irradiate fission foils of the primary isotopes contributing to fission in the reactor, creating unstable, neutron rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. A major advantage of an accelerator neutron source over a neutron beam from a thermal reactor is that the fast neutrons can be slowed down or tailored to approximate various power reactor spectra. An accelerator based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra provides an advantage for control in studying how changes in the neutron spectra affect parameters such as the resulting fission product beta spectrum.

  3. Self-gravity driven instabilities at accelerated interfaces.

    PubMed

    Hueckstaedt, Robert M; Hunter, James H; Lovelace, Richard V E

    2005-06-01

    Nonlinear hydrodynamic flows are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium (ISM). Such flows play an important role in shaping atomic and molecular clouds and determining the initial conditions for star formation. One mechanism by which nonlinear flows arise is the onset and growth of interfacial instabilities. Any interface of discontinuous density is subject to a host of instabilities, including Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, and Richtmyer-Meshkov. As part of an ongoing study of structure formation in the ISM, Hunter, Whitaker, and Lovelace discovered an additional density interface instability. This instability is driven by self-gravity and termed the self-gravity interfacial instability (SGI). The SGI causes any displacement of the interface to grow on roughly a free-fall time scale, even when the perturbation wavelength is much less than the Jeans length. Numerical simulations have confirmed the expectations of linear theory, including the near scale invariance of the growth rate. Here, we build upon previous work by considering an initial condition in which the acceleration due to self-gravity is non-zero at the interface.

  4. Basis and objectives of the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation technology project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1995-09-01

    The Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) Project carries three approaches for dealing with waste from the defense and commercial nuclear energy enterprise. First, the problem of excess weapons plutonium in the U.S. and Russia originating both from stockpile reductions and from defense production site clean-up is one of significant current and long-term concern. The ADTT technology offers the possibility of almost complete destruction of this plutonium by fission. The technology might be particularly effective for destruction of the low quality plutonium from defense site clean-up since the system does not require the fabrication of the waste into fuel assemblies, does not require reprocessing and refabrication, and can tolerate a high level of impurities in the feed stream. Second, the ADTT system also can destroy the plutonium, other higher actinide, and long-lived fission product from commercial nuclear waste which now can only be dealt with by geologic storage. And finally, and probably most importantly the system can be used for the production of virtually unlimited electric power from thorium with concurrent destruction of its long-lived waste components so that geologic containment for them is not required. In addition plutonium is not a significant byproduct of the power generation so that non-proliferation concerns about nuclear power are almost completely eliminated. All of the ADTT systems operate with an accelerator supplementing the neutrons which in reactors are provided only by the fission process, and therefore the system can be designed to eliminate the possibility for a runaway chain reaction. The means for integration of the accelerator into nuclear power technology in order to make these benefits possible is described including estimates of accelerator operating parameters required for the three objectives.

  5. High-value use of weapons-plutonium by burning in molten salt accelerator-driven subcritical systems or reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.; Venneri, F.

    1993-11-01

    The application of thermal-spectrum molten-salt reactors and accelerator-driven subcritical systems to the destruction of weapons-return plutonium is considered from the perspective of deriving the maximum societal benefit. The enhancement of electric power production from burning the fertile fuel {sup 232}Th with the plutonium is evaluated. Also the enhancement of destruction of the accumulated waste from commercial nuclear reactors is considered using the neutron-rich weapons plutonium. Most cases examined include the concurrent transmutation of the long-lived actinide and fission product waste ({sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 126}Sn and {sup 79}Se).

  6. Accelerator tube construction and characterization for a tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Cartelli, D; Vento, V Thatar; Castell, W; Di Paolo, H; Kesque, J M; Bergueiro, J; Valda, A A; Erhardt, J; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    The accelerator tubes are essential components of the accelerator. Their function is to transport and accelerate a very intense proton or deuteron beam through the machine, from the ion source to the neutron production target, without significant losses. In this contribution, we discuss materials selected for the tube construction, the procedures used for their assembly and the testing performed to meet the stringent requirements to which it is subjected.

  7. Myrrha, a Multipurpose Accelerator Driven System for R&d - Present Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, P.; Aït Abderrahim, H.; Kupschus, P.; Benoit, P.; Malambu, E.; Sobolev, V.; Aoust, T.; van Tichelen, K.; Arien, B.; Vermeersch, F.; de Bruyn, D.; Maes, D.; Haeck, W.; Jongen, Y.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2004-02-01

    Since 1998, SCK•CEN in partnership with IBA s.a., is designing a multipurpose ADS for R&D applications -MYRRHA - and is conducting an associated R&D support programme. MYRRHA is an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) under development at Mol in Belgium and aiming to serve as a basis for the European experimental ADS to provide protons and neutrons for various R&D applications. It consists of a proton accelerator delivering a 350 MeV*5 mA proton beam to a liquid Pb-Bi spallation target that in turn couples to a Pb-Bi cooled, subcritical fast core. In a first stage, the project focuses mainly on demonstration of the ADS concept, safety research on sub-critical systems and nuclear waste transmutation studies. In a later stage, the device will also be dedicated to research on structural materials, nuclear fuel, liquid metal technology and associated aspects and on sub-critical reactor physics. Subsequently, it will be used for research on applications such as radioisotope production. The MYRRHA system is expected to become a major research infrastructure for the European partners involved in the P&T and ADS Demo development.

  8. Small Ground-Level Enhancement of 6 January 2014: Acceleration by CME-Driven Shock?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.; Sdobnov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    Available spectral data for solar energetic particles (SEPs) measured near the Earth's orbit (GOES-13) and on the terrestrial surface (polar neutron monitors) on 6 January 2014 are analyzed. A feature of this solar proton event (SPE) and weak ground-level enhancement (GLE) is that the source was located behind the limb. For the purpose of comparison, we also use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data on sub-relativistic electrons and GOES-13 measurements of a strong and extended proton event on 8 - 9 January 2014. It was found that the surface observations at energies {>} 433 MeV and GOES-13 data at {>} 30 - {>} 700 MeV may be satisfactorily reconciled by a power-law time-of-maximum (TOM) spectrum with a characteristic exponential tail (cutoff). Some methodological difficulties of spectrum determination are discussed. Assuming that the TOM spectrum near the Earth is a proxy of the spectrum of accelerated particles in the source, we critically consider the possibility of shock acceleration to relativistic energies in the solar corona. Finally, it is suggested to interpret the observational features of this GLE under the assumption that small GLEs may be produced by shocks driven by coronal mass ejections. However, the serious limitations of such an approach to the problem of the SCR spectrum prevent drawing firm conclusions in this controversial field.

  9. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  10. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  11. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  12. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Deppert, O.; and others

    2013-05-15

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 10{sup 9} neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  13. Laser Driven Ion accelerators - current status and perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Zepf, M.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2009-01-22

    The interaction of ultra-intense lasers with thin foil targets has recently emerged as a route to achieving extreme acceleration gradients and hence ultra-compact proton and ion accelerators. There are a number of distinct physical processes by which the protons/ions can be accelerated to energies in excess of 10 MeV. The recent development is discussed and a new mechanism--Radiation Pressure Acceleration is highlighted as a route to achieving efficient production of relativistic ions beams.

  14. Design and testing of a DC ion injector suitable for accelerator-driven transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. David; Meyer, Earl; Stevens, Ralph R.; Hansborough, Lash; Sherman, Joseph

    1995-09-01

    For a number of years, Los Alamos personnel have collaborated with a team of experimentalists at Chalk River Labs (CRL) near Deep River, Ontario, Canada who were pursuing the development of the front end of a high power cw proton accelerator. At the termination of this program last year, Los Alamos acquired this equipment. With the help of internal Laboratory funding and modest defense conversion funds, we have set up and operated the accelerator at Los Alamos. Operational equipment includes a slightly modified Chalk River Injector Test Stand (CRITS) including a 50 keV proton injector and a 1.25 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with a klystrode rf power system. Substantial upgrading and modification of the ac power system was necessary to provide the required ac voltage (2400 vac) and power (2 MVA) needed for the operation of this equipment. A companion paper describes in detail the first ion source and beam-transport measurements at Los Alamos. Many of the challenges involved in operating an rf linear accelerator to provide neutrons for an accelerator-driven reactor are encountered at the front (low energy) end of this system. The formation of the ion beam, the control of the beam parameters, and the focusing and matching of a highly space-charge-dominated beam are major problems. To address the operating problems in this critical front end, the Accelerator Operations and Technology Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed the APDF (Accelerator Prototype Demonstration Facility). The front end of this facility is a 75 keV, high-current, ion injector which has been assembled and is now being tested. This paper discusses the design modifications required in going from the 50 keV CRITS injector to the higher current, 75 keV injector. Major innovative changes were made in the design of this injector. This design eliminates all the control electronics and most of the ion source equipment at high potential. Also, a new, high-quality, ion

  15. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays.

  16. Optimizing Laser-accelerated Ion Beams for a Collimated Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Ellison and J. Fuchs

    2010-09-23

    High-flux neutrons for imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator- and reactor-based neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultraintense (>1018W/cm2) lasers to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons from a dual target configuration. In this article, the production capabilities of present and upcoming laser facilities are estimated while independently maximizing neutron yields and minimizing beam divergence. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. Tailoring of the incident distribution via laser parameters and microlens focusing modifies the emerging neutrons. Projected neutron yields and distributions are compared to conventional sources, yielding comparable on-target fluxes per discharge, shorter time resolution, larger neutron energies and greater collimation.

  17. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  18. Acceleration of neutrons in a scheme of a tautochronous mathematical pendulum (physical principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Rivlin, Lev A

    2010-12-09

    We consider the physical principles of neutron acceleration through a multiple synchronous interaction with a gradient rf magnetic field in a scheme of a tautochronous mathematical pendulum. (laser applications and other aspects of quantum electronics)

  19. Direct evidence for inelastic neutron 'acceleration' by {sup 177}Lu{sup m}

    SciTech Connect

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Rosse, B.; Belier, G.; Daugas, J.-M.; Morel, P.; Letourneau, A.; Menelle, A.

    2011-06-15

    The inelastic neutron acceleration cross section on the long-lived metastable state of {sup 177}Lu has been measured using a direct method. High-energy neutrons have been detected using a specially designed setup placed on a cold neutron beam extracted from the ORPHEE reactor in Saclay. The 146{+-}19 b inelastic neutron acceleration cross section in the ORPHEE cold neutron flux confirms the high cross section for this process on the {sup 177}Lu{sup m} isomer. The deviation from the 258{+-}58 b previously published obtained for a Maxwellian neutron flux at a 323 K temperature could be explained by the presence of a low energy resonance. Resonance parameters are deduced and discussed.

  20. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  1. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  2. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  3. NONDESTRUCTIVE IDENTIFICATION OF CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS AND EXPLOSIVES BY NEUTRON GENERATOR-DRIVEN PGNAA

    SciTech Connect

    T. R. Twomey; A. J. Caffrey; D. L. Chichester

    2007-02-01

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is now a proven method for the identification of chemical warfare agents and explosives in military projectiles and storage containers. Idaho National Laboratory is developing a next-generation PGNAA instrument based on the new Ortec Detective mechanically-cooled HPGe detector and a neutron generator. In this paper we review PGNAA analysis of suspect chemical warfare munitions, and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of replacing the californium-252 radioisotopic neutron source with a compact accelerator neutron generator.

  4. Burnup calculations for KIPT accelerator driven subcritical facility using Monte Carlo computer codes-MCB and MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Talamo, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-06-09

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility, using the KIPT electron accelerator. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron physics experiments and material structure analyses are planned using this facility. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}375 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products reduce continuously the reactivity during the operation, which reduces the neutron flux level and consequently the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, fuel assemblies should be added after long operating periods to compensate for the lost reactivity. This process requires accurate prediction of the fuel burnup, the decay behavior of the fission produces, and the introduced reactivity from adding fresh fuel assemblies. The recent developments of the Monte Carlo computer codes, the high speed capability of the computer processors, and the parallel computation techniques made it possible to perform three-dimensional detailed burnup simulations. A full detailed three-dimensional geometrical model is used for the burnup simulations with continuous energy nuclear data libraries for the transport calculations and 63-multigroup or one group cross sections libraries for the depletion calculations. Monte Carlo Computer code MCNPX and MCB are utilized for this study. MCNPX transports the

  5. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-07-20

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  6. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  7. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  8. The Need for a Neutron Source at the Rare Isotope Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E; Rusnak, B; Roberts, K E; Roeben, M D; Hausmann, M; Reifarth, R; Vieira, D

    2005-05-13

    An intense neutron source facility with radiochemical processing capability is necessary at the Rare Isotope Accelerator to fully realize its potential benefit to stockpile stewardship and astrophysics. While many of the important physics missions of RIA can be addressed with radioactive ion beams, direct neutron cross-section measurements of interest to stockpile stewardship and astrophysics cannot because one cannot make a neutron target. Thus, one must collect a sufficient amount of the appropriate short-lived isotope, quickly chemically process the material into a target, and promptly radiate the sample with an intense ''beam'' of neutrons. The unprecedented production rates expected at RIA enables many of these direct neutron cross-section measurements, but only if the proper infrastructure is in place. This document not only describes the major piece of this required infrastructure, a neutron source facility with radiochemical processing capabilities, but also the motivation for measuring such direct neutron cross-sections.

  9. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m-1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  10. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1995-06-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target to the lower energies required for BNCT. The fluoride compounds are in turn encased in an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron filter, which has a deep window in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films or sheets of discrete droplets--through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is re-accelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator--target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production--resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons--while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current. Parametric trade studies of the NIFTI and DISCOS concepts are described. These include analyses of a broad range of NIFTI designs using the Monte carlo MCNP neutronics code, as well as mechanical and thermal-hydraulic analyses of various DISCOS designs.

  11. Multipurpose applications of the accelerator-based neutron source[1pt] GENEPI2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Baylac, M.; Billebaud, A.; Boge, P.; Cabanel, T.; Labussière, E.; Méplan, O.; Rey, S.

    2016-11-01

    GENEPI2 (GEnérateur de NEutrons Pulsé Intense) is an accelerator-based neutron source operating at LPSC laboratory in Grenoble (France). The neutrons are produced at 2.5MeV or 14.2MeV trough fusion reactions. GENEPI2 specifications allow performing efficiently accelerated irradiation tests of integrated circuits. This facility can also be operated to test and calibrate different types of detectors. This paper will describe the facility and its performances. Then, measurements of the neutron production will be presented as well as different types of experiments and irradiations. Finally, we describe upgrades undertaken to increase the neutron flux and optimize the facility for multiple applications.

  12. Using a Tandem Pelletron accelerator to produce a thermal neutron beam for detector testing purposes.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Praena, J; Fernández, B; Macías, M; Bedogni, R; Terrón, J A; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Arias de Saavedra, F; Porras, I; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-01-01

    Active thermal neutron detectors are used in a wide range of measuring devices in medicine, industry and research. For many applications, the long-term stability of these devices is crucial, so that very well controlled neutron fields are needed to perform calibrations and repeatability tests. A way to achieve such reference neutron fields, relying on a 3 MV Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at the CNA (Seville, Spain), is reported here. This paper shows thermal neutron field production and reproducibility characteristics over few days.

  13. Annular beam-driven high-gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Keinigs, R.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    During the past several years there has been an increasing interest in using wakefield acceleration techniques as a means for achieving TeV energies with the next generation of linear colliders. The principal design goals for a wakefield accelerator that is to be sued in this context are high accelerating gradients and large transformer ratios. Fundamentally any slow wave structure can function as a wakefield accelerator, and several interesting concepts have been proposed. In this paper we consider for the slow wave structure a dielectrically loaded waveguide. The Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator is a very simple device. The geometry consists of a gapless cavity filled with a dielectric. The dielectric may fill all or just part of the cavity. Here we investigate driving the system with an intense annular beam, so the dielectric is separated from the wall by a vacuum region in which this beam is propagated. The primary advantage of driving with an annular beam is that larger currents can be achieved, and thus larger accelerating gradients can be generated. The drive beam is stabilized by a strong, axial magnetic field. The wall is coated with a dielectric liner to provide for better coupling. A small hole is drilled in the center of the dielectric to allow for the passage of a low current, witness beam.

  14. Neutron-proton-converter acceleration mechanism at subphotospheres of relativistic outflows.

    PubMed

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2013-09-27

    We study a type of particle acceleration that operates via neutron-proton conversion in inelastic nuclear collisions. This mechanism can be expected for relativistic shocks at subphotospheres if relativistic outflows contain neutrons. Using a test-particle approximation, we numerically calculate the energy spectrum and the efficiency of accelerated particles, and show that a good energy fraction of the nucleons can be accelerated. This mechanism may be especially relevant if the shock is radiation mediated, and it would enhance the detectability of GeV-TeV neutrinos. PMID:24116765

  15. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  16. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Vento, V Thatar; Bergueiro, J; Cartelli, D; Valda, A A; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  17. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  18. High Power Cyclotrons for Accelerator Driven System (ADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabretta, Luciano

    2012-03-01

    We present an accelerator module based on a injector cyclotron and a Superconducting Ring Cyclotron (SRC) able to accelerate H2+ molecules. H2+ molecules are extracted from the SRC stripping the binding electron by a thin carbon foil. The SRC will be able to deliver proton beam with maximum energy of 800 MeV and a maximum power of 8 MW. This module is forecasted for the DAEdALUS (Decay At rest Experiment for δcp At Laboratory for Underground Science) experiment, which is a neutrino experiment proposed by groups of MIT and Columbia University. Extensive beam dynamics studies have been carrying out in the last two years and proved the feasibility of the design. The use of H2+ molecules beam has three main advantages: 1) it reduces the space charge effects, 2) because of stripping extraction, it simplifies the extraction process w.r.t. single turn extraction and 3) we can extract more than one beam out of one SRC. A suitable upgraded version of the cyclotron module able to deliver up to 10MW beam is proposed to drive ADS. The accelerator system which is presented, consists of having three accelerators modules. Each SRC is equipped with two extraction systems delivering two beams each one with a power up to 5 MW. Each accelerator module, feeds both the two reactors at the same time. The three accelerators modules assure to maintain continuity in functioning of the two reactors. In normal operation, all the three accelerators module will deliver 6.6 MW each one, just in case one of the three accelerator module will be off, due to a fault or maintenance, the other two modules are pushed at maximum power of 10 MW. The superconducting magnetic sector of the SRC, as well as the normal conducting sector of the injector cyclotron, is calculated with the TOSCA module of OPERA3D. Here the main features of the injector cyclotron, of the SRC and the beam dynamic along the cyclotrons are presented.

  19. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future.

  20. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  1. Constant Acceleration: Experiments with a Fan-Driven Dynamics Cart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the rebuilding of a Project Physics fan cart on a PASCO dynamics cart chassis for achieving greatly reduced frictional forces. Suggests four experiments for the rebuilt cart: (1) acceleration on a level track, (2) initial negative velocity, (3) different masses and different forces, and (4) inclines. (MVL)

  2. Undulator radiation driven by laser-wakefield accelerator electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Anania, M. P.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Reboredo, D.; Manahan, G.; Grant, D. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Laser-Plasma High-Energy Accelerators towards X-rays (ALPHA-X) programme is developing laserplasma accelerators for the production of ultra-short electron bunches with subsequent generation of coherent, bright, short-wavelength radiation pulses. The new Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-based Accelerators (SCAPA) will develop a wide range of applications utilising such light sources. Electron bunches can be propagated through a magnetic undulator with the aim of generating fully coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation in the ultra-violet and Xrays spectral ranges. Demonstration experiments producing spontaneous undulator radiation have been conducted at visible and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths but it is an on-going challenge to generate and maintain electron bunches of sufficient quality in order to stimulate FEL behaviour. In the ALPHA-X beam line experiments, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system with peak power 20 TW has been used to generate electron bunches of energy 80-150 MeV in a 2 mm gas jet laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and these bunches have been transported through a 100 period planar undulator. High peak brilliance, narrow band spontaneous radiation pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet wavelength range have been generated. Analysis is provided with respect to the magnetic quadrupole beam transport system and subsequent effect on beam emittance and duration. Requirements for coherent spontaneous emission and FEL operation are presented.

  3. The ram accelerator - A chemically driven mass launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaloupis, P.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1988-01-01

    The ram accelerator, a chemically propelled mass driver, is presented as a viable new approach for directly launching acceleration-insensitive payloads into low earth orbit. The propulsion principle is similar to that of a conventional air-breathing ramjet. The cargo vehicle resembles the center-body of a ramjet and travels through a tube filled with a pre-mixed fuel and oxidizer mixture. The launch tube acts as the outer cowling of the ramjet and the combustion process travels with the vehicle. Two drive modes of the ram accelerator propulsion system are described, which when used in sequence are capable of accelerating the vehicle to as high as 10 km/sec. The requirements are examined for placing a 2000 kg vehicle into a 500 km orbit with a minimum of on-board rocket propellant for circularization maneuvers. It is shown that aerodynamic heating during atmospheric transit results in very little ablation of the nose. An indirect orbital insertion scenario is selected, utilizing a three step maneuver consisting of two burns and aerobraking. An on-board propulsion system using storable liquid propellants is chosen in order to minimize propellant mass requirements, and the use of a parking orbit below the desired final orbit is suggested as a means to increase the flexibility of the mass launch concept. A vehicle design using composite materials is proposed that will best meet the structural requirements, and a preliminary launch tube design is presented.

  4. How dogs lap: open pumping driven by acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-11-01

    Dogs drink by lapping because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck fluids into the mouth. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from a bath, which is then swallowed, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured the kinematics of lapping from nineteen dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments with an accelerating rod help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results suggest that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, and that dogs curl the tongue ventrally (backwards) and time their bite on the column to increase fluid intake per lap. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that though they both lap with the same frequency scaling with respect to body mass and have similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: a high-acceleration regime for dogs and a low-acceleration regime for cats.

  5. Numerical study of neutron beam divergence in a beam-fusion scenario employing laser driven ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; McKenna, P.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.

    2016-09-01

    The most established route to create a laser-based neutron source is by employing laser accelerated, low atomic-number ions in fusion reactions. In addition to the high reaction cross-sections at moderate energies of the projectile ions, the anisotropy in neutron emission is another important feature of beam-fusion reactions. Using a simple numerical model based on neutron generation in a pitcher-catcher scenario, anisotropy in neutron emission was studied for the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction. Simulation results are consistent with the narrow-divergence (∼ 70 ° full width at half maximum) neutron beam recently served in an experiment employing multi-MeV deuteron beams of narrow divergence (up to 30° FWHM, depending on the ion energy) accelerated by a sub-petawatt laser pulse from thin deuterated plastic foils via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism. By varying the input ion beam parameters, simulations show that a further improvement in the neutron beam directionality (i.e. reduction in the beam divergence) can be obtained by increasing the projectile ion beam temperature and cut-off energy, as expected from interactions employing higher power lasers at upcoming facilities.

  6. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C.; Marino, Stephen A.; Geard, Charles R.; Brenner, David J.; Garty, Guy

    2015-01-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  7. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  8. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields.

  9. Characterization of an accelerator neutron source based on the Be(d,n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Small accelerator neutron sources offer considerable potential for applied neutron radiography applications. Among the desirable features are relatively low costs, limited operating hazards, opportunities for tailoring primary neutron spectra, compactness and portability, and modest licensing requirements (compared to fission reactors). However, exploitation of this potential has been somewhat limited, in part, by incomplete knowledge of the primary-neutron yields and energy spectra from the favorable source reactions. This work describes an extensive experimental determination of zero-degree neutron yields and energy spectra from the {sup 9}Be(d,n) {sup 10}B source reaction, for incident deuterons of 2.6 to 7.0 MeV on a thick beryllium metal target. This information was acquired by means of time-of-flight measurements that were conducted with a calibrated uranium fission detector. Tables and plots of neutron-producing reaction data are presented. This information provides input which will be essential for applications involving the primary spectrum as well as for the design of neutron moderators and for calculation of thermal-neutron yield factors. Such analyses will be prerequisites in assessing the suitability of this source for various possible neutron radiography applications and, also, for assisting in the design of appropriate detectors to be used in neutron imaging devices.

  10. Characterization of an accelerator neutron source based on the Be(d,n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    Small accelerator neutron sources offer considerable potential for applied neutron radiography applications. Among the desirable features are relatively low costs, limited operating hazards, opportunities for tailoring primary neutron spectra, compactness and portability, and modest licensing requirements (compared to fission reactors). However, exploitation of this potential has been somewhat limited, in part, by incomplete knowledge of the primary-neutron yields and energy spectra from the favorable source reactions. This work describes an extensive experimental determination of zero-degree neutron yields and energy spectra from the {sup 9}Be(d,n) {sup 10}B source reaction, for incident deuterons of 2.6 to 7.0 MeV on a thick beryllium metal target. This information was acquired by means of time-of-flight measurements that were conducted with a calibrated uranium fission detector. Tables and plots of neutron-producing reaction data are presented. This information provides input which will be essential for applications involving the primary spectrum as well as for the design of neutron moderators and for calculation of thermal-neutron yield factors. Such analyses will be prerequisites in assessing the suitability of this source for various possible neutron radiography applications and, also, for assisting in the design of appropriate detectors to be used in neutron imaging devices.

  11. Electron acceleration driven by ultrashort and nonparaxial radially polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Vincent; April, Alexandre; Piché, Michel

    2012-07-01

    Exact closed-form solutions to Maxwell's equations are used to investigate the acceleration of electrons in vacuum driven by ultrashort and nonparaxial radially polarized laser pulses. We show that the threshold power above which significant acceleration takes place is greatly reduced by using a tighter focus. Moreover, electrons accelerated by tightly focused single-cycle laser pulses may reach around 80% of the theoretical energy gain limit, about twice the value previously reported with few-cycle paraxial pulses. Our results demonstrate that the direct acceleration of electrons in vacuum is well within reach of current laser technology.

  12. Klystron Modulator Design for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A.; Baca, David M.; Partridge, Edward R.; Rees, Daniel E.

    2012-06-22

    This paper will describe the design of the 44 modulator systems that will be installed to upgrade the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator RF system. The klystrons can operate up to 86 kV with a nominal 32 Amp beam current with a 120 Hz repetition rate and 15% duty cycle. The klystrons are a mod-anode design. The modulator is designed with analog feedback control to ensure the klystron beam current is flat-top regulated. To achieve fast switching while maintaining linear feedback control, a grid-clamp, totem-pole modulator configuration is used with an 'on' deck and an 'off' deck. The on and off deck modulators are of identical design and utilize a cascode connected planar triode, cathode driven with a high speed MOSFET. The derived feedback is connected to the planar triode grid to enable the flat-top control. Although modern design approaches suggest solid state designs may be considered, the planar triode (Eimac Y-847B) is very cost effective, is easy to integrate with the existing hardware, and provides a simplified linear feedback control mechanism. The design is very compact and fault tolerant. This paper will review the complete electrical design, operational performance, and system characterization as applied to the LANSCE installation.

  13. Target design optimization for an electron accelerator driven subcritical facility with circular and square beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, M. Y. A; Sofu, T.; Zhong, Z.; Belch, H.; Naberezhnev, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-30

    A subcritical facility driven by an electron accelerator is planned at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) in Ukraine for medical isotope production, materials research, training, and education. The conceptual design of the facility is being pursued through collaborations between ANL and KIPT. As part of the design effort, the high-fidelity analyses of various target options are performed with formulations to reflect the realistic configuration and the three dimensional geometry of each design. This report summarizes the results of target design optimization studies for electron beams with two different beam profiles. The target design optimization is performed via the sequential neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses for a comprehensive assessment of each configuration. First, a target CAD model is developed with proper emphasis on manufacturability to provide a basis for separate but consistent models for subsequent neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses. The optimizations are pursued for maximizing the neutron yield, streamlining the flow field to avoid hotspots, and minimizing the thermal stresses to increase the durability. In addition to general geometric modifications, the inlet/outlet channel configurations, target plate partitioning schemes, flow manipulations and rates, electron beam diameter/width options, and cladding material choices are included in the design optimizations. The electron beam interactions with the target assembly and the neutronic response of the subcritical facility are evaluated using the MCNPX code. the results for the electron beam energy deposition, neutron generation, and utilization in the subcritical pile are then used to characterize the axisymmetric heat generation profiles in the target assembly with explicit simulations of the beam tube, the coolant, the clad, and the target materials. Both tungsten and uranium are considered as target materials. Neutron spectra from tungsten

  14. A spherical shell target scheme for laser-driven neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    He, Min-Qing Zhang, Hua; Wu, Si-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Mo; Cai, Hong-Bo Zhou, Cang-Tao; Cao, Li-Hua; Zheng, Chun-Yang; Zhu, Shao-Ping; He, X. T.; Dong, Quan-Li; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Pei, Wen-Bing

    2015-12-15

    A scheme for neutron production is investigated in which an ultra-intense laser is irradiated into a two-layer (deuterium and aurum) spherical shell target through the cone shaped entrance hole. It is found that the energy conversion efficiency from laser to target can reach as high as 71%, and deuterium ions are heated to a maximum energy of several MeV from the inner layer surface. These ions are accelerated towards the center of the cavity and accumulated finally with a high density up to tens of critical density in several picoseconds. Two different mechanisms account for the efficient yield of the neutrons in the cavity: (1) At the early stage, the neutrons are generated by the high energy deuterium ions based on the “beam-target” approach. (2) At the later stage, the neutrons are generated by the thermonuclear fusion when the most of the deuterium ions reach equilibrium in the cavity. It is also found that a large number of deuterium ions accelerated inward can pass through the target center and the outer Au layer and finally stopped in the CD{sub 2} layer. This also causes efficient yield of neutrons inside the CD{sub 2} layer due to “beam-target” approach. A postprocessor has been designed to evaluate the neutron yield and the neutron spectrum is obtained.

  15. Fermi acceleration in the randomized driven Lorentz gas and the Fermi-Ulam model.

    PubMed

    Karlis, A K; Papachristou, P K; Diakonos, F K; Constantoudis, V; Schmelcher, P

    2007-07-01

    Fermi acceleration of an ensemble of noninteracting particles evolving in a stochastic two-moving wall variant of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM) and the phase randomized harmonically driven periodic Lorentz gas is investigated. As shown in [A. K. Karlis, P. K. Papachristou, F. K. Diakonos, V. Constantoudis, and P. Schmelcher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 194102 (2006)], the static wall approximation, which ignores scatterer displacement upon collision, leads to a substantial underestimation of the mean energy gain per collision. In this paper, we clarify the mechanism leading to the increased acceleration. Furthermore, the recently introduced hopping wall approximation is generalized for application in the randomized driven Lorentz gas. Utilizing the hopping approximation the asymptotic probability distribution function of the particle velocity is derived. Moreover, it is shown that, for harmonic driving, scatterer displacement upon collision increases the acceleration in both the driven Lorentz gas and the FUM by the same amount. On the other hand, the investigation of a randomized FUM, comprising one fixed and one moving wall driven by a sawtooth force function, reveals that the presence of a particular asymmetry of the driving function leads to an increase of acceleration that is different from that gained when symmetrical force functions are considered, for all finite number of collisions. This fact helps open up the prospect of designing accelerator devices by combining driving laws with specific symmetries to acquire a desired acceleration behavior for the ensemble of particles.

  16. Resistance-driven bunching mode of an accelerated ion pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1981-10-16

    Amplification of a longitudinal perturbation of an ion pulse in a linear induction accelerator is calculated. The simplified accelerator model consists only of an applied field (E/sub a/), distributed gap impedance per meter (R) and beam-pipe capacity per meter (C). The beam is treated as a cold, one-dimensional fluid. It is found that normal mode frequencies are nearly real, with only a very small damping rate proportional to R. This result is valid for a general current profile and is not restricted to small R. However, the mode structure exhibits spatial amplification from pulse head to tail by the factor exp(RCLv/sub o//2), where L is pulse length and v/sub 0/ is drift velocity. This factor is very large for typical HIF parameters. An initially small disturbance, when expanded in terms of the normal modes, is found to oscillate with maximum amplitude proportional to the amplification factor.

  17. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1998-08-01

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin ({approximately} 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target {approximately} 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies ({approximately} 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV.

  18. Advances in laser driven accelerator R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim

    2004-08-23

    Current activities (last few years) at different laboratories, towards the development of a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) are reviewed, followed by a more in depth discussion of results obtained at the L'OASIS laboratory of LBNL. Recent results on laser guiding of relativistically intense beams in preformed plasma channels are discussed. The observation of mono-energetic beams in the 100 MeV energy range, produced by a channel guided LWFA at LBNL, is described and compared to results obtained in the unguided case at LOA, RAL and LBNL. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator has a very beneficial impact on the electron energy distribution. Progress on laser triggered injection is reviewed. Results are presented on measurements of bunch duration and emittance of the accelerated electron beams, that indicate the possibility of generating femtosecond duration electron bunches. Future challenges and plans towards the development of a 1 GeV LWFA module are discussed.

  19. Neutron skyshine from end stations of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rai-Ko S.

    1991-12-01

    The MORSE{ }CG code from Oak Ridge National Laboratory was applied to the estimation of the neutron skyshine from three end stations of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), Newport News, VA. Calculations with other methods and an experiment had been directed at assessing the annual neutron dose equivalent at the site boundary. A comparison of results obtained with different methods is given, and the effect of different temperatures and humidities will be discussed.

  20. Neutron skyshine from end stations of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Rai-Ko S.

    1991-12-01

    The MORSE{_}CG code from Oak Ridge National Laboratory was applied to the estimation of the neutron skyshine from three end stations of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), Newport News, VA. Calculations with other methods and an experiment had been directed at assessing the annual neutron dose equivalent at the site boundary. A comparison of results obtained with different methods is given, and the effect of different temperatures and humidities will be discussed.

  1. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-11-01

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  2. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-10-12

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  3. Polymer gel dosimetry for neutron beam in the Neutron Exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sato, H.; Hamano, T.; Suda, M.; Yoshii, H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether gel dosimetry could be used to measure neutron beams. We irradiated a BANG3-type polymer gel dosimeter using neutron beams in the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. First, the polymer gels were irradiated from 0 to 7.0 Gy to investigate the dose-R2 responses. Irradiated gels were evaluated using 1.5-T magnetic resonance R2 images. Second, the polymer gels were irradiated to 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 Gy to acquire a depth-R2 response curve. The dose-R2 response curve was linear up to approximately 7 Gy, with a slope of 1.25 Gy-1·s-1. Additionally, compared with the photon- irradiated gels, the neutron-irradiated gels had lower R2 values. The acquired depth-R2 curves of the central axis from the 3.0- and 5.0-Gy neutron dose-irradiated gels exhibited an initial build-up. Although, a detailed investigation is needed, polymer gel dosimetry is effective for measuring the dose-related R2 linearity and depth-R2 relationships of neutron beams.

  4. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bergueiro, J; Igarzabal, M; Sandin, J C Suarez; Somacal, H R; Vento, V Thatar; Huck, H; Valda, A A; Repetto, M; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes.

  5. Acceleration of a slab driven by a constant pressure piston

    SciTech Connect

    Diez, J. A.; Thomas, L. P.

    1989-08-01

    The sequence of shock and rarefaction waves, which occur in a plane layer of ideal gas initially at rest when it is driven toward the vacuum by a very high constant pressure piston, is studied. In the rarefaction flow that relaxes the layer compressed by the first strong shock, a second shock is generated. The time and position of its formation are obtained by an exact analytical expression. The subsequent motion and intensity of the shock wave are approximated by the Chester--Chisnell--Whitham (CCW) method. Then, the Lagrangian distribution of entropy in the layer is analytically derived.

  6. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  7. Stability study for matching in laser driven plasma acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. R.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Belleveglia, M.; Bisesto, F. G.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Gallo, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Mostacci, A.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Serafini, L.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper [14], a scheme for inserting and extracting high brightness electron beams to/from a plasma based acceleration stage was presented and proved to be effective with an ideal bi-Gaussian beam, as could be delivered by a conventional photo-injector. In this paper, we extend that study, assessing the method stability against some jitters in the properties of the injected beam. We find that the effects of jitters in Twiss parameters are not symmetric in results; we find a promising configuration that yields better performances than the setting proposed in [14]. Moreover we show and interpret what happens when the beam charge profiles are modified.

  8. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, Gaetano; De Nicola, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed Fiore et al. [1] and Fiore and De Nicola [2] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  9. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  10. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Lin, C. J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Draeger, E.; White, C. G.; Luk, K. B.; Steiner, H.

    2015-08-17

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production.

  11. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  12. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  13. Laser-driven high-energy-density deuterium and tritium ions for neutron production in a double-cone configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Li-Xiang; Yu, Tong-Pu Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhu, Qing-Jun

    2015-12-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate laser-driven ion acceleration and compression from a thin DT foil in a double-cone configuration. By using two counterpropagating laser pulses, it is shown that a double-cone structure can effectively guide, focus, and strengthen the incident laser pulses, resulting in the enhanced acceleration and compression of D{sup +} and T{sup +}. Due to the ion Coulomb repulsion and the effective screening from the external laser electric fields, the transverse diffusion of ions is significantly suppressed. Finally, the peak energy density of the compressed ions exceeds 2.73 × 10{sup 16 }J/m{sup 3}, which is about five orders of magnitude higher than the threshold for high energy density physics, 10{sup 11 }J/m{sup 3}. Under this condition, DT fusion reactions are initiated and the neutron production rate per volume is estimated to be as high as 7.473 × 10{sup 35}/m{sup 3} s according to Monte Carlo simulations. It is much higher than that of the traditional large neutron sources, which may facilitate many potential applications.

  14. Pulsed Neutron Monitoring at High Energy Electron Accelerators with Silver Lined Proportional Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, P. M.; Ghodgaonkar, M. D.; Dhairyawan, M. P.; Haridas, P.

    2007-01-01

    To meet the challenging requirement of pulsed neutron background measurement, which is present around electron accelerators at the Indus-1 facility of the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) Indore, a silver lined proportional counter with 0.2cps/n cm-2s-1 thermal neutron sensitivity has been developed. The detector has been tested for its performance in continuous thermal neutron field at Apsara reactor and in pulsed neutron field at Indus-1 facility. The detector shows ±11% signal linearity at various reactor powers and follows the silver decay scheme during reactor scram experiment. Off-line measurements made in pulsed neutron background at the Indus-1 facility compare well with nuclear track detectors (CR-39). For monitoring on-line neutron flux, electronic gating circuit was used that can switch off the scalar counter unit during the prompt X-ray response of the detector taking trigger pulse from the accelerator and experiments showed that the neutron flux measured by the detector is in close agreement with CR-39 values.

  15. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  16. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Electron Beam Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark J.; Conde, Manoel E.

    2009-01-22

    Electron beam driven plasma accelerators have seen rapid progress over the last decade. Recent efforts have built on this success by constructing a concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator based linear collider. The needs for any future collider to deliver both energy and luminosity have substantial implications for interpreting current experiments and setting priorities for the future. This working group reviewed current experiments and ideas in the context of the demands of a future collider. The many discussions and presentations are summarized here.

  17. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  18. Laser-driven proton acceleration using a conical nanobrush target

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jinqing; Zhao Zongqing; Yan Yonghong; Zhou Weimin; Cao Leifeng; Gu Yuqiu; Jin Xiaolin; Li Bin; Wu Fengjuan

    2012-05-15

    A conical nanobrush target is proposed to improve the total proton energy-conversion efficiency in proton beam acceleration and investigated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations. Results indicate a significant enhancement of the number and energies of hot electrons through the target rear side of the conical nanobrush target. Compared with the plain target, the field increases several times. We observe enhancements of the average proton energy and total laser-proton energy conversion efficiency of 105%. This enhancement is attributed to both nanobrush and conical configurations. The proton beam is well collimated with a divergence angle less than 28{sup Degree-Sign }. The proposed target may serve as a new method for increasing laser to proton energy-conversion efficiency.

  19. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping

    PubMed Central

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog’s tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue’s interaction with the air–fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats. PMID:26668382

  20. Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping.

    PubMed

    Gart, Sean; Socha, John J; Vlachos, Pavlos P; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-12-29

    Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats.

  1. Laser plasma accelerator driven by a super-Gaussian pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostermayr, Tobias; Petrovics, Stefan; Iqbal, Khalid; Klier, Constantin; Ruhl, Hartmut; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Deng, Aihua; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shen, Baifei; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Tajima, Toshiki; Tajima

    2012-08-01

    A laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with a weak focusing force is considered to seek improved beam quality in LWFA. We employ super-Gaussian laser pulses to generate the wakefield and study the behavior of the electron beam dynamics and synchrotron radiation arising from the transverse betatron oscillations through analysis and computation. We note that the super-Gaussian wakefields radically reduce the betatron oscillations and make the electron orbits mainly ballistic over a single stage. This feature permits to obtain small emittance and thus high luminosity, while still benefitting from the low-density operation of LWFA (Nakajima et al. 2011 Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 14, 091301), such as the reduced radiation loss, less number of stages, less beam instabilities, and less required wall plug power than in higher density regimes.

  2. Particle Acceleration at Oblique CME-driven Shock Using Improved PATH Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Li, G.; Parker, L. N.; Zank, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    .Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are generally accepted to be caused by particle acceleration at coronal mass ejection(CME)-driven shocks. In this work we improved the PATH(Particle Acceleration and Transport in the Heliosphere) model by initiating a 2D CME-driven shock to investigate particle acceleration at different locations of an oblique CME-drive shock, where the shock has different obliquity angle(θBN). Thus we can study problems like whether quasi-perpendicular or quasi-parallel shock is more efficient in particle acceleration.The PATH model is based on the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The core of the model consists of a 3D Zeus module, which computes numerically the background solar wind and the CME-drive shock as inputs; and a shell module where the convection and diffusion of accelerated particles within the shock complex are followed. The 2D CME-driven shock is generated by perturbing the boundary condition of a steady background solar wind in certain patterns.

  3. Experimental results from the VENUS-F critical reference state for the GUINEVERE accelerator driven system project

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Baeten, P.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.; Ban, G.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Thyebault, H.E.; Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Mellier, F.

    2012-12-15

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutron pulses at the lead Venus Reactor) project was launched in 2006 within the framework of FP6 EUROTRANS in order to validate online reactivity monitoring and subcriticality level determination in accelerator driven systems (ADS). Therefore, the VENUS reactor at SCK.CEN in Mol, Belgium, was modified towards a fast core (VENUS-F) and coupled to the GENEPI-3C accelerator built by CNRS. The accelerator can operate in both continuous and pulsed mode. The VENUS-F core is loaded with enriched Uranium and reflected with solid lead. A well-chosen critical reference state is indispensable for the validation of the online subcriticality monitoring methodology. Moreover, a benchmarking tool is required for nuclear data research and code validation. In this paper, the design and the importance of the critical reference state for the GUINEVERE project are motivated. The results of the first experimental phase on the critical core are presented. The control rods worth is determined by the positive period method and the application of the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method allows the determination of the worth of the safety rods. The results are implemented in the VENUS-F core certificate for full exploitation of the critical core. (authors)

  4. Experimental results from the VENUS-F critical reference state for the GUINEVERE accelerator driven system project

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Baeten, P.; Ban, G.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Kochetkov, A.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Marie, N.; Mellier, F.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Thyebault, H. E.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.

    2011-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutron pulses at the lead Venus Reactor) project was launched in 2006 within the framework of FP6 EUROTRANS in order to validate on-line reactivity monitoring and subcriticality level determination in Accelerator Driven Systems. Therefore the VENUS reactor at SCK.CEN in Mol (Belgium) was modified towards a fast core (VENUS-F) and coupled to the GENEPI-3C accelerator built by CNRS The accelerator can operate in both continuous and pulsed mode. The VENUS-F core is loaded with enriched Uranium and reflected with solid lead. A well-chosen critical reference state is indispensable for the validation of the on-line subcriticality monitoring methodology. Moreover a benchmarking tool is required for nuclear data research and code validation. In this paper the design and the importance of the critical reference state for the GUINEVERE project are motivated. The results of the first experimental phase on the critical core are presented. The control rods worth is determined by the rod drop technique and the application of the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method allows the determination of the worth of the safety rods. The results are implemented in the VENUS-F core certificate for full exploitation of the critical core. (authors)

  5. A Novel Neutron Imaging Calibration System Using a Neutron Generating Accelerator Tube

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Z., Davis, B., Tinsley, J. R., Miller, E. K.

    2009-09-04

    Neutron Imaging is a key diagnostic for use in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and has been fielded on experiments at Omega and Z. It will also be a key diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and eventually at the Laser Megajoule in France. Most systems are based on a neutron pinhole array placed at the target chamber while it is imaged by a scintillating fiber block. The light output of this scintillator is coupled via a reducer to a fiber bundle which transports the image to a CCD camera. Alternatively some systems use optical lens assemblies to focus the light onto a camera.For ICF applications the neutron imaging systems will primarily look at 14.2 MeV neutrons. However, 2.2 MeV and 20+ MeV neutrons will also be present and will potentially provide key information.

  6. CMFD acceleration of spatial domain-decomposed neutron transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, B. W.; Larsen, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    A significant limitation to parallelizing the solution of neutron transport problems is the need for sweeps across the entirety of the problem domain. Angular domain decomposition is common practice, as the equations for each direction are independent aside from their shared scattering/fission source. Accordingly, spatial domain decomposition does not naturally arise in the transport equations and is therefore less frequent in practice. In this paper, we show that a neutron transport domain can be straightforwardly divided into independent, parallelizable sweep regions, globally linked with the standard CMFD method, with an additional update equation. We verify, theoretically (via Fourier analysis) and computationally, that the convergence properties of this method are stable and nominally as rapid as standard CMFD. (authors)

  7. Nuclear modeling for applications in medical radiation therapy and accelerator-driven technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1995-06-01

    An understanding of the interactions of neutrons and protons below a few hundred MeV with nuclei is important for a number of applications. In this paper, two new applications are discussed: radiation transport calculations of energy deposition in fast neutron and proton cancer radiotherapy to optimize the dose given to a tumor; and intermediate-energy proton accelerators which are currently being designed for a range of applications including the destruction of long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. We describe nuclear theory calculations of direct, preequilibrium, and compound nucleus reaction mechanisms important for the modeling of these systems.

  8. Particle acceleration on a chip: A laser-driven micro-accelerator for research and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.

    2013-03-01

    Particle accelerators are conventionally built from radio-frequency metal cavities, but this technology limits the maximum energy available and prevents miniaturization. In the past decade, laser-powered acceleration has been intensively studied as an alternative technology promising much higher accelerating fields in a smaller footprint and taking advantage of recent advances in photonics. Among the more promising approaches are those based on dielectric field-shaping structures. These ``dielectric laser accelerators'' (DLAs) scale with the laser wavelength employed and can be many orders of magnitude smaller than conventional accelerators; DLAs may enable the production of high-intensity, ultra-short relativistic electron bunches in a chip-scale device. When combined with a high- Z target or an optical-period undulator, these systems could produce high-brilliance x-rays from a breadbox-sized device having multiple applications in imaging, medicine, and homeland security. In our research program we have developed one such DLA, the Micro-Accelerator Platform (MAP). We describe the fundamental physics, our fabrication and testing program, and experimental results to date, along with future prospects for MAP-based light-sources and some remaining challenges. Supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and National Nuclear Security Administration.

  9. Nonlinear Acceleration Methods for Even-Parity Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Martin; C. R. E. De Oliveira; H. Park

    2010-05-01

    Convergence acceleration methods for even-parity transport were developed that have the potential to speed up transport calculations and provide a natural avenue for an implicitly coupled multiphysics code. An investigation was performed into the acceleration properties of the introduction of a nonlinear quasi-diffusion-like tensor in linear and nonlinear solution schemes. Using the tensor reduced matrix as a preconditioner for the conjugate gradients method proves highly efficient and effective. The results for the linear and nonlinear case serve as the basis for further research into the application in a full three-dimensional spherical-harmonics even-parity transport code. Once moved into the nonlinear solution scheme, the implicit coupling of the convergence accelerated transport method into codes for other physics can be done seamlessly, providing an efficient, fully implicitly coupled multiphysics code with high order transport.

  10. Cross section for inelastic neutron ''acceleration'' by {sup 178}Hf{sup m2}

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.

    2011-02-15

    The scattering of thermal neutrons from isomeric nuclei may include events in which the outgoing neutrons have increased kinetic energy. This process has been called inelastic neutron acceleration, or INNA, and occurs when the final nucleus, after emission of the neutron, is left in a state with lower energy than that of the isomer. The result, therefore, is an induced depletion of the isomer to the ground state. A cascade of several {gamma}'s must accompany the neutron emission to release the high angular momentum of the initial isomeric state. INNA was previously observed in a few cases, and the measured cross sections were only in modest agreement with theoretical estimates. The most recent measurement of an INNA cross section was {sigma}{sub INNA}=258{+-}58 b for neutron scattering by {sup 177}Lu{sup m}. In the present work, an INNA cross section of {sigma}{sub INNA}=168 {+-} 33 b was deduced from measurements of the total burnup of the high-spin, four-quasiparticle isomer {sup 178}Hf{sup m2} during irradiation by thermal neutrons. Statistical estimates for the probability of different reaction channels past neutron absorption were used in the analysis, and the deduced {sigma}{sub INNA} was compared to the theoretically predicted cross section.

  11. Electron heating in radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration with a circularly polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradkar, B. S.; Krishnagopal, S.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamics of electron heating in the radiation-pressure-driven acceleration through self-induced transparency (SIT) is investigated with the help of particle-in-cell simulations. The SIT is achieved through laser filamentation which is seeded by the transverse density modulations due to the Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability. We observe stronger SIT induced electron heating for the longer duration laser pulses leading to deterioration of accelerated ion beam quality (mainly energy spread). Such heating can be controlled to obtain a quasimonoenergetic beam by cascaded foils targets where a second foil behind the main accelerating foil acts as a laser reflector to suppress the SIT.

  12. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Bigelow, Alan W.; Akselrod, Mark S.; Sykora, Jeff G.; Brenner, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam is to use the proton beam with a micrometre-sized diameter impinging on a very thin lithium fluoride target system. From the kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction near the threshold of 1.881 MeV, the neutron beam is confined within a narrow, forward solid angle. Calculations show that the neutron spot using a target with a 17-µm thick gold backing foil will be <20 µm in diameter for cells attached to a 3.8-µm thick propylene-bottomed cell dish in contact with the target backing. The neutron flux will roughly be 2000 per second based on the current beam setup at the RARAF singleton accelerator. The dose rate will be about 200 mGy min−1. The principle of this neutron microbeam system has been preliminarily tested at the RARAF using a collimated proton beam. The imaging of the neutron beam was performed using novel fluorescent nuclear track detector technology based on Mg-doped luminescent aluminum oxide single crystals and confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy. PMID:21131327

  13. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  14. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks.

  15. MYRRHA: A multipurpose accelerator driven system for research & development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahim, H. Aı̈t; Kupschus, P.; Malambu, E.; Benoit, Ph; Van Tichelen, K.; Arien, B.; Vermeersch, F.; D'hondt, P.; Jongen, Y.; Ternier, S.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2001-05-01

    SCK·CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, in partnership with IBA s.a., Ion Beam Applications, is designing an ADS prototype, MYRRHA, and is conducting an associated R&D programme. The project focuses primarily on research on structural materials, nuclear fuel, liquid metals and associated aspects, on subcritical reactor physics and subsequently on applications such as nuclear waste transmutation, radioisotope production and safety research on sub-critical systems. The MYRRHA system is intended to be a multipurpose R&D facility and is expected to become a new major research infrastructure for the European partners presently involved in the ADS Demo development. Ion Beam Applications is performing the accelerator development. Currently the preliminary conceptual design of the MYRRHA system is under way and an intensive R&D programme is assessing the points of greatest risk in the present design. This work will define the final choice of characteristics of the facility. In this paper, we will report on the status of the pre-design study as of June 2000 as well as on the methods and results of the R&D programme.

  16. Important requirements for RF generators for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-09-01

    All Accelerator-Driven Transmutation applications require very large amounts of RF Power. For example, one version of a Plutonium burning system requires an 800-MeV, 80-mA, proton accelerator running at 100% duty factor. This accelerator requires approximately 110-MW of continuous RF power if one assumes only 10% reserve power for control of the accelerator fields. In fact, to minimize beam spill, the RF controls may need as much as 15 to 20% of reserve power. In addition, unlike an electron accelerator in which the beam is relativistic, a failed RF station can disturb the synchronism of the beam, possibly shutting down the entire accelerator. These issues and more lead to a set of requirements for the RF generators which are stringent, and in some cases, conflicting. In this paper, we will describe the issues and requirements, and outline a plan for RF generator development to meet the needs of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies. The key issues which will be discussed include: operating efficiency, operating linearity, effect on the input power grid, bandwidth, gain, reliability, operating voltage, and operating current.

  17. New estimation method of neutron skyshine for a high-energy particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Joo-Hee; Jung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ko, Seung-Kook

    2016-09-01

    A skyshine is the dominant component of the prompt radiation at off-site. Several experimental studies have been done to estimate the neutron skyshine at a few accelerator facilities. In this work, the neutron transports from a source place to off-site location were simulated using the Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA and PHITS. The transport paths were classified as skyshine, direct (transport), groundshine and multiple-shine to understand the contribution of each path and to develop a general evaluation method. The effect of each path was estimated in the view of the dose at far locations. The neutron dose was calculated using the neutron energy spectra obtained from each detector placed up to a maximum of 1 km from the accelerator. The highest altitude of the sky region in this simulation was set as 2 km from the floor of the accelerator facility. The initial model of this study was the 10 GeV electron accelerator, PAL-XFEL. Different compositions and densities of air, soil and ordinary concrete were applied in this calculation, and their dependences were reviewed. The estimation method used in this study was compared with the well-known methods suggested by Rindi, Stevenson and Stepleton, and also with the simple code, SHINE3. The results obtained using this method agreed well with those using Rindi's formula.

  18. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  19. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  20. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W.-M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J.; Ayyub, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈0.25 μm) layer of 25–30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2×1018  W/cm2. However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  1. Preferential enhancement of laser-driven carbon ion acceleration from optimized nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Malay; Wang, W-M; Trivikram, T Madhu; Sarkar, Subhrangsu; Sarkar, Subhrangshu; Tata, Sheroy; Jha, J; Ayyub, P; Sheng, Z M; Krishnamurthy, M

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity ultrashort laser pulses focused on metal targets readily generate hot dense plasmas which accelerate ions efficiently and can pave way to compact table-top accelerators. Laser-driven ion acceleration studies predominantly focus on protons, which experience the maximum acceleration owing to their highest charge-to-mass ratio. The possibility of tailoring such schemes for the preferential acceleration of a particular ion species is very much desired but has hardly been explored. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of how the nanostructuring of a copper target can be optimized for enhanced carbon ion acceleration over protons or Cu-ions. Specifically, a thin (≈ 0.25 μm) layer of 25-30 nm diameter Cu nanoparticles, sputter-deposited on a polished Cu-substrate, enhances the carbon ion energy by about 10-fold at a laser intensity of 1.2 × 10(18)  W/cm(2). However, particles smaller than 20 nm have an adverse effect on the ion acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations provide definite pointers regarding the size of nanoparticles necessary for maximizing the ion acceleration. The inherent contrast of the laser pulse is found to play an important role in the species selective ion acceleration. PMID:26153048

  2. New concepts for compact accelerator/target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-12-31

    Two new target concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, that enable a large reduction in the proton beam current needed to produce epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) are described. In the NIFTI concept, high energy neutrons produced by (p, n) reactions of 2.5 MeV protons on Li are down scattered to treatment energies ({approximately} 20 keV) by relatively thin layers of PbF{sub 2} and iron. In the DISCOS concept, treatment energy neutrons are produced directly in a succession of thin ({approximately} 1 micron) liquid Li films on rotating Be foils. These foils interact with a proton beam that operates just above threshold for the (p, n) reaction, with an applied DC field to re-accelerate the proton beam between the target foils.

  3. An intercomparison of neutron measurments for a 25 MV x-ray radiotherapy accelerator.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Price, K W; Holeman, G R

    1980-01-01

    High-energy x-ray radiotherapy machines produce neutrons by photonuclear reactions which present a potential radiation hazard to the personnel and patient. A series of measurements of the neutron flux from a 25 MV x-ray linear accelerator, inside and outside the treatment room, have been performed using a multisphere spectrometer, Nemo dosimeter, and activation detectors. These results are compared with other mixed photon-neutron field measurements for the same machine performed using an argon/propane ionization chamber, silicon diode, track-etching detectors, and Monte Carlo calculations. It is found that these measurements agree with each other within a factor of two except for silicon diode measurements in the photon beam. Measured neutron spectra at various locations in the treatment room are also compared with the results of Monte Carlo transport calculations.

  4. Investigation of laser ion acceleration inside irradiated solid targets by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Origins and acceleration directions of accelerated ions inside solid LiF, CH-LiF, and LiF-CH targets irradiated by a 450 fs, 20 J, 1053 nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been investigated by neutron spectroscopy. The irradiated targets generate neutrons through the reaction {sup 7}Li (p,n){sup 7}Be between accelerated protons and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. The produced neutron spectra observed from two different observation angles 20 deg. and 120 deg. to the target rear-side normal. From the measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, the total number, and the slope temperature of the accelerated ions are investigated. The results indicate that ions are not only accelerated from the front surface toward the rear surface, but also from the rear surface toward the front surface with comparable maximum energy and higher number.

  5. Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-11-04

    In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS

  6. High-intensity cyclotrons for radioisotope production and accelerator driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Y.; Vandeplassche, D.; Kleeven, W.; Beeckman, W.; Zaremba, S.; Lannoye, G.; Stichelbaut, F.

    2002-04-01

    IBA recently proposed a new method to extract high-intensity positive ion beams from a cyclotron based on the concept of auto-extraction. We review the design of a 14 MeV, multi-milliampere cyclotron using this new technology. IBA is also involved in the design of the accelerator system foreseen to drive the MYRRHA facility, a multipurpose neutron source developed jointly by SCK-CEN and IBA.

  7. Hardware accelerated high performance neutron transport computation based on AGENT methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shanjie

    The spatial heterogeneity of the next generation Gen-IV nuclear reactor core designs brings challenges to the neutron transport analysis. The Arbitrary Geometry Neutron Transport (AGENT) AGENT code is a three-dimensional neutron transport analysis code being developed at the Laboratory for Neutronics and Geometry Computation (NEGE) at Purdue University. It can accurately describe the spatial heterogeneity in a hierarchical structure through the R-function solid modeler. The previous version of AGENT coupled the 2D transport MOC solver and the 1D diffusion NEM solver to solve the three dimensional Boltzmann transport equation. In this research, the 2D/1D coupling methodology was expanded to couple two transport solvers, the radial 2D MOC solver and the axial 1D MOC solver, for better accuracy. The expansion was benchmarked with the widely applied C5G7 benchmark models and two fast breeder reactor models, and showed good agreement with the reference Monte Carlo results. In practice, the accurate neutron transport analysis for a full reactor core is still time-consuming and thus limits its application. Therefore, another content of my research is focused on designing a specific hardware based on the reconfigurable computing technique in order to accelerate AGENT computations. It is the first time that the application of this type is used to the reactor physics and neutron transport for reactor design. The most time consuming part of the AGENT algorithm was identified. Moreover, the architecture of the AGENT acceleration system was designed based on the analysis. Through the parallel computation on the specially designed, highly efficient architecture, the acceleration design on FPGA acquires high performance at the much lower working frequency than CPUs. The whole design simulations show that the acceleration design would be able to speedup large scale AGENT computations about 20 times. The high performance AGENT acceleration system will drastically shortening the

  8. Universality of the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    AlGendy, Mohammad; Morsink, Sharon M.

    2014-08-20

    On the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star, the effective centrifugal force decreases the effective acceleration due to gravity (as measured in the rotating frame) at the equator while increasing the acceleration at the poles due to the centrifugal flattening of the star into an oblate spheroid. We compute the effective gravitational acceleration for relativistic rapidly rotating neutron stars and show that for a star with mass M, equatorial radius R{sub e} , and angular velocity Ω, the deviations of the effective acceleration due to gravity from the nonrotating case take on a universal form that depends only on the compactness ratio M/R{sub e} , the dimensionless square of the angular velocity Ω{sup 2}R{sub e}{sup 3}/GM, and the latitude on the star's surface. This dependence is universal, in that it has very little dependence on the neutron star's equation of state. The effective gravity is expanded in the slow-rotation limit to show the dependence on the effective centrifugal force, oblate shape of the star, and the quadrupole moment of the gravitational field. In addition, an empirical fit and simple formula for the effective gravity is found. We find that the increase in the acceleration due to gravity at the poles is of the same order of magnitude as the decrease in the effective acceleration due to gravity at the equator for all realistic value of mass, radius, and spin. For neutron stars that spin with frequencies near 600 Hz, the difference between the effective gravity at the poles and the equator is about 20%.

  9. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m−1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  10. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  11. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure.

    PubMed

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L S; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P L; Schroer, Anna M; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m(-1), already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  12. Neutron production using a pyroelectric driven target coupled with a gated field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Tang, V.; Falabella, S.; Naranjo, B.; Putterman, S.

    2013-04-19

    A palm sized, portable neutron source would be useful for widespread implementation of detection systems for shielded, special nuclear material. We present progress towards the development of the components for an ultracompact neutron generator using a pulsed, meso-scale field ionization source, a deuterated (or tritiated) titanium target driven by a negative high voltage lithium tantalate crystal. Neutron production from integrated tests using an ion source with a single, biased tungsten tip and a 3 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm, vacuum insulated crystal with a plastic deuterated target are presented. Component testing of the ion source with a single tip produces up to 3 nA of current. Dielectric insulation of the lithium tantalate crystals appears to reduce flashover, which should improve the robustness. The field emission losses from a 3 cm diameter crystal with a plastic target and 6 cm diameter crystal with a metal target are compared.

  13. Industrial applications of laser neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, S.; Mima, K.; Kato, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Azechi, H.; Miyanaga, K.; Nakai, M.; Perlado, M.; Gonzalez Arrabal, R.

    2010-08-01

    The industrial applications of the intense neutron source have been widely explored because of the unique features of the neutron-matter interaction. Usually, intense neutron sources are assembled with fission reactors or high energy ion accelerators. The big size and high cost of these systems are the bottle neck to promote the industrial applications of intense neutrons. In this paper, we propose the compact laser driven neutron source for the industrial application. As the first step of our project for the versatile applications of laser driven neutron source, Li-neutron and/or Li-proton interactions have been investigated for the application to the development of Li battery.

  14. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  15. An accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam design for BNCT and dosimetric evaluation using a voxel head phantom.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deok-jae; Han, Chi Young; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    The beam shaping assembly design has been investigated in order to improve the epithermal neutron beam for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy in intensity and quality, and dosimetric evaluation for the beams has been performed using both mathematical and voxel head phantoms with MCNP runs. The neutron source was assumed to be produced from a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a thick (7)Li target. The results indicate that it is possible to enhance epithermal neutron flux remarkably as well as to embody a good spectrum shaping to epithermal neutrons only with the proper combination of moderator and reflector. It is also found that a larger number of thermal neutrons can reach deeply into the brain and, therefore, can reduce considerably the treatment time for brain tumours. Consequently, the epithermal neutron beams designed in this study can treat more effectively deep-seated brain tumours.

  16. Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

    1999-09-20

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  17. Deuteron Acceleration and Fusion Neutron Production in Z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Ananeev, S. S.; Bakshaev, Yu. L.; Blinov, P. I.; Chernenko, A. S.; Kazakov, E. D.; Korolev, V. D.; Ustroev, G. I.

    2009-01-21

    Fusion neutron measurements were carried out on the S-300 generator (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow). We tried deuterated fibers, various types of wire arrays imploding onto a deuterated fiber, and deuterium gas puffs as Z-pinch loads. On the current level of 2 MA, the peak neutron yield of 10{sup 10} was achieved with a deuterium gas-puff. The neutron and deuteron energy spectra were quite similar in various types of Z-pinch configurations. The broad width of radial neutron spectra implied a high radial component of deuteron velocity. On the basis of neutron measurements, we concluded that neutron production mechanism is connected with the study of plasma voltage. It means that the acceleration of fast deuterons is not a secondary process but it reflects the global dynamics of Z-pinch plasmas. For this reason it is useful to add deuterium as a 'tracer' in Z-pinch loads more often. For instance, it seems attractive to prepare wire-arrays from deuterated metal wires such as Pd.

  18. Three-dimensional Dielectric Photonic Crystal Structures for Laser-driven Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-12-14

    We present the design and simulation of a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide for linear laser-driven acceleration in vacuum. The structure confines a synchronous speed-of-light accelerating mode in both transverse dimensions. We report the properties of this mode, including sustainable gradient and optical-to-beam efficiency. We present a novel method for confining a particle beam using optical fields as focusing elements. This technique, combined with careful structure design, is shown to have a large dynamic aperture and minimal emittance growth, even over millions of optical wavelengths.

  19. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemery, F.; Piot, P.

    2015-08-01

    Collinear high-gradient O (GV /m ) beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios >2 , a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting "drive" bunch to an accelerated "witness" bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative continuously differentiable (smooth) current profiles which support enhanced transformer ratios. We especially demonstrate that one of the devised shapes can be implemented in a photo-emission electron source by properly shaping the photocathode-laser pulse. We finally discuss a possible superconducting linear-accelerator concept that could produce shaped drive bunches at high-repetition rates to drive a dielectric-wakefield accelerator with accelerating fields on the order of ˜60 MV /m and a transformer ratio ˜5 consistent with a recently proposed multiuser free-electron laser facility.

  20. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  1. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Castell, W; Di Paolo, H; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J; Burlon, A A; Cartelli, D; Vento, V Thatar; Kesque, J M; Erhardt, J; Ilardo, J C; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Sandin, J C Suarez; Igarzabal, M; Huck, H; Estrada, L; Repetto, M; Obligado, M; Padulo, J; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M; Gonzalez, S J; Capoulat, M E

    2011-12-01

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas.

  2. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-10-19

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner.

  3. [Leakage radiations in a medical electron accelerator facility--calculation of neutron doses in the facility].

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, K; Morikawa, K

    1990-02-01

    Neutron doses often come dominant in mazes of electron accelerator facilities in which X-rays of energies more than 10 MV are produced. A simple analytical method to calculate neutron doses in such a facility is developed. In the calculation procedure, it is assumed that the irradiation room is spherical in shape and the maze is cylindrical. Multiple reflection of neutrons is also considered using the albedo concept in the calculation. The procedure allows to exist a hanging wall over the entrance of the irradiation room and also multiple legs in the maze. All the parameters used in the calculation are given definitely in the procedure, and any experiment is unnecessary to determine value of the parameters. Comparison of the calculated results with experimental ones will be described in the following report. PMID:2326507

  4. ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

    2000-11-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

  5. Neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres for area monitoring in particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    Selecting the instruments to determine the operational quantities in the neutron fields produced by particle accelerators involves a combination of aspects, which is peculiar to these environments: the energy distribution of the neutron field, the continuous or pulsed time structure of the beam, the presence of other radiations to which the neutron instruments could have significant response and the large variability in the dose rate, which can be observed when moving from areas near the beam line to free-access areas. The use of spectrometric techniques in support of traditional instruments is highly recommended to improve the accuracy of dosimetric evaluations. The multi-sphere or Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is certainly the most used device, due to characteristics such as the wide energy range, large variety of active and passive detectors suited for different workplaces, good photon discrimination and the simple signal management. Disadvantages are the poor energy resolution, weight and need to sequentially irradiate the spheres, leading to usually long measurement sessions. Moreover, complex unfolding analyses are needed to obtain the neutron spectra. This work is an overview of the BSS for area monitoring in particle accelerators.

  6. An epithermal neutron source for BNCT based on an ESQ-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Kwan, J.; Phillips, T.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Wells, R.P.

    1997-07-01

    An accelerator-based BNCT facility is under development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Neutrons will be produced via the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction at proton energies of about 2.5 MeV with subsequent moderation and filtering for shaping epithermal neutron beams for BNCT. Moderator, filter, and shielding assemblies have been modeled using MCNP. Head-phantom dose distributions have been calculated using the treatment planning software BNCT{_}RTPE. The simulation studies have shown that a proton beam current of {approximately} 20 mA is required to deliver high quality brain treatments in about 40 minutes. The results also indicate that significantly higher doses can be delivered to deep-seated tumors in comparison to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor beam. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is ideally suited to provide the high beam currents desired. A novel power supply utilizing the air-coupled transformer concept is under development. It will enable the ESQ-accelerator to deliver proton beam currents exceeding 50 mA. A lithium target has been designed which consists of a thin layer of lithium on an aluminum backing. Closely spaced, narrow coolant passages cut into the aluminum allow the removal of a 50kW heat-load by convective water cooling. The system under development is suitable for hospital installation and has the potential for providing neutron beams superior to reactor sources.

  7. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  8. Optimization of Drive-Bunch Current Profile for Enhanced Transformer Ratio in Beam-Driven Acceleration Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C.R.; Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2012-07-08

    In recent years, wakefield acceleration has gained attention due to its high acceleration gradients and cost effectiveness. In beam-driven wakefield acceleration, a critical parameter to optimize is the transformer ratio. It has been shown that current shaping of electron beams allows for enhanced (> 2) transformer ratios. In this paper we present the optimization of the pulse shape of the drive bunch for dielectric-wakefield acceleration.

  9. LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION DRIVEN BY ATF CO2 LASER (STELLA-LW).

    SciTech Connect

    KIMURA,W.D.; ANDREEV,N.E.; BABZIEN,M.; BEN-ZVI,I.; ET AL.

    2004-09-25

    A new experiment has begun that builds upon the successful Staged Electron Laser Acceleration (STELLA) experiment, which demonstrated high-trapping efficiency and narrow energy spread in a staged laser-driven accelerator. STELLA was based upon inverse free electron lasers (IFEL); the new experiment, called STELLA-LW, is based upon laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The first phase of STELLA-LW will be to demonstrate LWFA in a capillary discharge driven by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) terawatt CO{sub 2} laser beam. This will be the first time LWFA is conducted at 10.6-{micro}m laser wavelength. It will also be operating in an interesting pseudo-resonant regime where the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA, but too short for self-modulated LWFA. Analysis has shown that in pseudo-resonant LWFA, pulse-steepening effects occur on the laser pulse that permits generation of strong wakefields. Various approaches are being explored for the capillary discharge including polypropylene and hydrogen-filled capillaries. Planned diagnostics for the experiment include coherent Thomson scattering (CTS) to detect the wakefield generation. This will be one of the first times CTS is used on a capillary discharge.

  10. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  11. Coulomb-driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser-plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Braenzel, J; Andreev, A A; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2015-03-27

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8×10^{19}  W/  cm^{2}. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200  MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration.

  12. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Gruener, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by a high-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source ({approx}10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (> or approx.10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10{sup 13} photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  13. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNLlaser-plasma-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-09-10

    We discuss the design and current status of a compactfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUVpulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existingLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator,whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposedultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to thedrive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science withpulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current (&10 kA) ofthe laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes arepotentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASEand high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length andfluctuations, are considered.

  14. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Fawley, W. M.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K. E.; Toth, Cs.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-04

    A design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, XUV pulses is presented. The FEL is driven by ahigh-current, 0.5 GeV electron beam from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose active acceleration length is only a few centimeters. The proposed ultra-fast source (~;;10 fs) would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science. Owing to the high current (>10 kA) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially greater than 10^13 photons/pulse. Devices based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission and high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length and fluctuations, are considered.

  15. Coulomb-driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser-plasma acceleration.

    PubMed

    Braenzel, J; Andreev, A A; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2015-03-27

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8×10^{19}  W/  cm^{2}. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200  MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration. PMID:25860747

  16. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  17. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  18. 9 GeV energy gain in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litos, M.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Schmeltz, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-03-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV m-1at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  19. 9 GeV energy gain in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Litos, M.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; et al

    2016-02-15

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV m-1 at the spectral peak. Moreover, the mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. Our results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gainmore » results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.« less

  20. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.; Reusch, M. F.

    1995-09-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.

  1. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.; Reusch, M. F.

    1995-09-15

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of incompressible acceleration-driven variable-density turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Ilana; Matheou, Georgios; Chung, Daniel; Dimotakis, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Fully developed turbulence in variable-density flow driven by an externally imposed acceleration field, e.g., gravity, is fundamental in many applications, such as inertial confinement fusion, geophysics, and astrophysics. Aspects of this turbulence regime are poorly understood and are of interest to fluid modeling. We investigate incompressible acceleration-driven variable-density turbulence by a series of direct numerical simulations of high-density fluid in-between slabs of low-density fluid, in a triply-periodic domain. A pseudo-spectral numerical method with a Helmholtz-Hodge decomposition of the pressure field, which ensures mass conservation, is employed, as documented in Chung & Pullin (2010). A uniform dynamic viscosity and local Schmidt number of unity are assumed. This configuration encapsulates a combination of flow phenomena in a temporally evolving variable-density shear flow. Density ratios up to 10 and Reynolds numbers in the fully developed turbulent regime are investigated. The temporal evolution of the vertical velocity difference across the shear layer, shear-layer growth, mean density, and Reynolds number are discussed. Statistics of Lagrangian accelerations of fluid elements and of vorticity as a function of the density ratio are also presented. This material is based upon work supported by the AFOSR, the DOE, the NSF GRFP, and Caltech.

  3. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  4. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J; Powell, Haydn; Maclellan, David A; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M H; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S; Murphy, Chris D; Stockhausen, Luca C; Carroll, David C; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources. PMID:27624920

  5. Towards optical polarization control of laser-driven proton acceleration in foils undergoing relativistic transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; King, Martin; Gray, Ross J.; Wilson, Robbie; Dance, Rachel J.; Powell, Haydn; MacLellan, David A.; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Murphy, Chris D.; Stockhausen, Luca C.; Carroll, David C.; Booth, Nicola; Scott, Graeme G.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Control of the collective response of plasma particles to intense laser light is intrinsic to relativistic optics, the development of compact laser-driven particle and radiation sources, as well as investigations of some laboratory astrophysics phenomena. We recently demonstrated that a relativistic plasma aperture produced in an ultra-thin foil at the focus of intense laser radiation can induce diffraction, enabling polarization-based control of the collective motion of plasma electrons. Here we show that under these conditions the electron dynamics are mapped into the beam of protons accelerated via strong charge-separation-induced electrostatic fields. It is demonstrated experimentally and numerically via 3D particle-in-cell simulations that the degree of ellipticity of the laser polarization strongly influences the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of multi-MeV protons. The influence on both sheath-accelerated and radiation pressure-accelerated protons is investigated. This approach opens up a potential new route to control laser-driven ion sources.

  6. Measurement and calculation of neutron leakage from a medical electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uwamino, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Hara, A.

    1986-05-01

    The leakage neutron spectra and dose equivalent were systematically measured in the irradiation field, treatment room, maze, and outside the shielding door at the microtron medical electron accelerator facility of the National Cancer Center, Tokyo. For these measurements, we used two types of multimoderator neutron spectrometers (Bonner spheres containing indium activation detectors and /sup 3/He detector), an aluminum activation detector, and a commercially available neutron rem counter. The measured results were compared with the combined calculation of the one-dimensional ANISN and two-dimensional DOT3.5 discrete ordinates transport codes. The calculation was performed by using a measured source spectrum in the irradiation field and by computer modeling of the maze entrance. The calculation indicated good agreement in spectral shape and agreement with experiment within a factor of 2 in absolute dose-equivalent values. This transport calculation was systematically repeated for different geometrical and material parameters, and simple analytical formulas and their parameters applicable for shielding design of a medical electron accelerator facility were obtained in general form.

  7. Laser ion acceleration and neutron source in short-pulse solid- nanoparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, K.; Watari, T.; Matsukado, K.; Sekine, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takagi, M.; Satoh, N.; Kawashima, T.; Kan, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose both an efficient neutron source and an extremely high energy proton source using solid CD and CH nano-particles, respectively, irradiated by an intense laser light. With a use of 3-d PIC simulations, we obtain an optimum CD radius for a neutron source, 250 nm and required laser field of a=eE/mωc ≈ 2, which results in D-D reaction rate of <σv> = 2x10-16 cm3/s, corresponding to an effective deuteron temperature of 500 keV to 1MeV. Reduction of neutron yield by pre-expansion is discussed. In a range of a ≈100, laser radiation pressure surrounding the particles accelerates electrons in the forward direction. Protons following the electrons become directional high energy, for example, proton energy of 450 MeV is obtained within 130 fs in CH particle interaction with 700 nm in radius. More than 10% of total protons in CH-particles are accelerated forward. Proton energy continuously increases with time and with the increase of particle size and the direction is also collimated with time.

  8. Neutron production from a mobile linear accelerator operating in electron mode for intraoperative radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, G.; Dominietto, M.; Cannillo, B.; Ciocca, M.; Krengli, M.; Mones, E.; Negri, E.; Brambilla, M.

    2006-02-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy is increasingly performed using mobile linac delivering therapeutic radiation doses in unshielded operating rooms. While no special neutron-shielding problem should arise for operation at 10 MeV or less, it is not clear whether this holds true for operation at higher energies. This paper reports the measured neutron production from a Mobetron mobile electron linac, operated at 12 MeV, and compares the results with those from a conventional linac, also operated at 12 MeV in electron mode. Neutron leakage measurements were performed by means of passive bubble detectors in the scattering foil, patient and floor planes. Neutron dose equivalent rates per unit of electron dose delivered by the Mobetron at its normal treatment distance (50 cm SSD) were 0.33 µSv Gy-1 at the accelerator head, 0.18 µSv Gy-1 in the patient plane at 15 cm from the beam axis and 0.31 µSv Gy-1 at the floor plane, on the beam axis and under the beam stopper. For a weekly workload of 250 Gy, the weekly neutron dose equivalents at 12 MeV for the Mobetron at a distance of 300 cm from the scattering foil were 14.3 and 1.7 µSv/week for floor below and adjoining areas on the same floor, respectively. Neutron dose equivalent rates generated from Mobetron are at least one order of magnitude lower than ones produced by a conventional linac operated at the same energy in electron mode. Mobetron can be used at 12 MeV in an unshielded operating room for a weekly workload of up to 250 Gy if the bremsstrahlung x-rays are shielded to negligible levels.

  9. Intense combined source of neutrons and photons for interrogation based on compact deuteron RF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Garnett, R. W.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2015-06-18

    Interrogation of special nuclear materials can benefit from mobile sources providing significant fluxes of neutrons (108/s at 2.5 MeV, 1010/s at 14.1 MeV) and of photons (>1012/s at 1-3 MeV). We propose a source that satisfies these requirements simultaneously plus also provides, via the reaction 11B(d,n)12C(γ15.1), a significant flux of 15-MeV photons, which are highly penetrating and optimal for inducing photo-fission in actinides. The source is based on a compact (< 5 m) deuteron RF accelerator that delivers an average current of a few mA of deuterons at 3-4 MeV to a boron target. The accelerator consists of a short RFQ followed by efficient inter-digital H-mode structures with permanent-magnet-quadrupole beam focusing [Kurennoy et al. (2012)], which suit perfectly for deuteron acceleration at low energies. Our estimates, based on recent measurements, indicate that the required fluxes of both neutrons and photons can be achieved at ~1 mA of 4-MeV deuterons. The goal of the proposed study is to confirm feasibility of the approach and develop requirements for future full system implementation.

  10. Intense combined source of neutrons and photons for interrogation based on compact deuteron RF accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Garnett, R. W.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2015-06-18

    Interrogation of special nuclear materials can benefit from mobile sources providing significant fluxes of neutrons (108/s at 2.5 MeV, 1010/s at 14.1 MeV) and of photons (>1012/s at 1-3 MeV). We propose a source that satisfies these requirements simultaneously plus also provides, via the reaction 11B(d,n)12C(γ15.1), a significant flux of 15-MeV photons, which are highly penetrating and optimal for inducing photo-fission in actinides. The source is based on a compact (< 5 m) deuteron RF accelerator that delivers an average current of a few mA of deuterons at 3-4 MeV to a boron target. The accelerator consists of a shortmore » RFQ followed by efficient inter-digital H-mode structures with permanent-magnet-quadrupole beam focusing [Kurennoy et al. (2012)], which suit perfectly for deuteron acceleration at low energies. Our estimates, based on recent measurements, indicate that the required fluxes of both neutrons and photons can be achieved at ~1 mA of 4-MeV deuterons. The goal of the proposed study is to confirm feasibility of the approach and develop requirements for future full system implementation.« less

  11. Converged accelerated finite difference scheme for the multigroup neutron diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Terranova, N.; Mostacci, D.; Ganapol, B. D.

    2013-07-01

    Computer codes involving neutron transport theory for nuclear engineering applications always require verification to assess improvement. Generally, analytical and semi-analytical benchmarks are desirable, since they are capable of high precision solutions to provide accurate standards of comparison. However, these benchmarks often involve relatively simple problems, usually assuming a certain degree of abstract modeling. In the present work, we show how semi-analytical equivalent benchmarks can be numerically generated using convergence acceleration. Specifically, we investigate the error behavior of a 1D spatial finite difference scheme for the multigroup (MG) steady-state neutron diffusion equation in plane geometry. Since solutions depending on subsequent discretization can be envisioned as terms of an infinite sequence converging to the true solution, extrapolation methods can accelerate an iterative process to obtain the limit before numerical instability sets in. The obtained results have been compared to the analytical solution to the 1D multigroup diffusion equation when available, using FORTRAN as the computational language. Finally, a slowing down problem has been solved using a cascading source update, showing how a finite difference scheme performs for ultra-fine groups (104 groups) in a reasonable computational time using convergence acceleration. (authors)

  12. Intense Combined Source of Neutrons and Photons for Interrogation Based on Compact Deuteron RF Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Garnett, R. W.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    Interrogation of special nuclear materials can benefit from mobile sources providing significant fluxes of neutrons (108/s at 2.5 MeV, 1010/s at 14.1 MeV) and of photons (>1012/s at 1-3 MeV). We propose a source that satisfies these requirements simultaneously plus also provides, via the reaction 11B(d,n)12C(γ15.1), a significant flux of 15-MeV photons, which are highly penetrating and optimal for inducing photo-fission in actinides. The source is based on a compact (< 5 m) deuteron RF accelerator that delivers an average current of a few mA of deuterons at 3-4 MeV to a boron target. The accelerator consists of a short RFQ followed by efficient inter-digital H-mode structures with permanent-magnet-quadrupole beam focusing [Kurennoy et al. (2012)], which suit perfectly for deuteron acceleration at low energies. Our estimates, based on recent measurements [Taddeucci et al. (2007)], indicate that the required fluxes of both neutrons and photons can be achieved at ∼1 mA of 4-MeV deuterons. The goal of the proposed study is to confirm feasibility of the approach and develop requirements for future full- system implementation.

  13. Invited Review Article: "Hands-on" laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, J; Bolton, P R; Parodi, K

    2016-07-01

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications. PMID:27475539

  14. Invited Review Article: "Hands-on" laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, J.; Bolton, P. R.; Parodi, K.

    2016-07-01

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications.

  15. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray acceleration in engine-driven relativistic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, S; Ray, A; Soderberg, A M; Loeb, A; Chandra, P

    2011-01-01

    The origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remains an enigma. They offer a window to new physics, including tests of physical laws at energies unattainable by terrestrial accelerators. They must be accelerated locally, otherwise, background radiations would severely suppress the flux of protons and nuclei, at energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit. Nearby, gamma ray bursts (GRBs), hypernovae, active galactic nuclei and their flares have all been suggested and debated as possible sources. A local sub-population of type Ibc supernovae (SNe) with mildly relativistic outflows have been detected as sub-energetic GRBs, X-ray flashes and recently as radio afterglows without detected GRB counterparts. Here, we measure the size-magnetic field evolution, baryon loading and energetics, using the observed radio spectra of SN 2009bb. We place such engine-driven SNe above the Hillas line and establish that they can readily explain the post-GZK UHECRs. PMID:21285953

  16. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B.; Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F.; Picciotto, A.; Serra, E.; Giuffrida, L.; Mangione, A.; Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; and others

    2012-02-15

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  17. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray acceleration in engine-driven relativistic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, S; Ray, A; Soderberg, A M; Loeb, A; Chandra, P

    2011-02-01

    The origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remains an enigma. They offer a window to new physics, including tests of physical laws at energies unattainable by terrestrial accelerators. They must be accelerated locally, otherwise, background radiations would severely suppress the flux of protons and nuclei, at energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit. Nearby, gamma ray bursts (GRBs), hypernovae, active galactic nuclei and their flares have all been suggested and debated as possible sources. A local sub-population of type Ibc supernovae (SNe) with mildly relativistic outflows have been detected as sub-energetic GRBs, X-ray flashes and recently as radio afterglows without detected GRB counterparts. Here, we measure the size-magnetic field evolution, baryon loading and energetics, using the observed radio spectra of SN 2009bb. We place such engine-driven SNe above the Hillas line and establish that they can readily explain the post-GZK UHECRs.

  18. Feasibility of an XUV FEL Oscillator Driven by a SCRF Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Freund, H. P.; Reinsch, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility is currently under construction at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Using a1-ms-long macropulse composed of up to 3000 micropulses, and with beam energies projected from 45 to 800 MeV, the possibility for an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free-electron laser oscillator (FELO) with the higher energy is evaluated. We have used both GINGER with an oscillator module and the MEDUSA/OPC code to assess FELO saturation prospects at 120 nm, 40 nm, and 13.4 nm. The results support saturation at all of these wavelengths which are also shorter than the demonstrated shortest wavelength record of 176 nm from a storage-ring-based FELO. This indicates linac-driven FELOs can be extended into this XUV wavelength regime previously only reached with single-pass FEL configurations.

  19. Electron self-injection in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2013-12-15

    The self-injection process of plasma electrons in the proton-driven-plasma-wakefield acceleration scheme is investigated using a two-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell method. Plasma electrons are self-injected into the back of the first acceleration bucket during the initial bubble formation period, where the wake phase velocity is low enough to trap sufficient electrons. Most of the self-injected electrons are initially located within a distance of the skin depth c/ω{sub pe} to the beam axis. A decrease (or increase) in the beam radius (or length) leads to a significant reduction in the total charges of self-injected electron bunch. Compared to the uniform plasma, the energy spread, emittance and total charges of the self-injected bunch are reduced in the plasma channel case, due to a reduced injection of plasma electrons that initially located further away from the beam axis.

  20. Chemistry technology base and fuel cycle of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the Los Alamos accelerator-driven transmutation system, a description of the pyrochemistry technology base and the fuel cycle for the system. The pyrochemistry technology base consists of four processes: direct oxide reduction, reductive extraction, electrorefining, and electrowinning. Each process and its utility is described. The fuel cycle is described for a liquid metal-based system with the focus being the conversion of commercial spent nuclear fuel to fuel for the transmutation system. Fission product separation and actinide recycle processes are also described.

  1. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Maynard, G.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  2. Freezing, accelerating, and slowing directed currents in real time with superimposed driven lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aritra K.; Liebchen, Benno; Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We provide a generic scheme offering real-time control of directed particle transport using superimposed driven lattices. This scheme allows one to accelerate, slow, and freeze the transport on demand by switching one of the lattices subsequently on and off. The underlying physical mechanism hinges on a systematic opening and closing of channels between transporting and nontransporting phase space structures upon switching and exploits cantori structures which generate memory effects in the population of these structures. Our results should allow for real-time control of cold thermal atomic ensembles in optical lattices but might also be useful as a design principle for targeted delivery of molecules or colloids in optical devices.

  3. Neutron source, linear-accelerator fuel enricher and regenerator and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, Meyer; Powell, James R.; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Grand, Pierre; Kouts, Herbert

    1982-01-01

    A device for producing fissile material inside of fabricated nuclear elements so that they can be used to produce power in nuclear power reactors. Fuel elements, for example, of a LWR are placed in pressure tubes in a vessel surrounding a liquid lead-bismuth flowing columnar target. A linear-accelerator proton beam enters the side of the vessel and impinges on the dispersed liquid lead-bismuth columns and produces neutrons which radiate through the surrounding pressure tube assembly or blanket containing the nuclear fuel elements. These neutrons are absorbed by the natural fertile uranium-238 elements and are transformed to fissile plutonium-239. The fertile fuel is thus enriched in fissile material to a concentration whereby they can be used in power reactors. After use in the power reactors, dispensed depleted fuel elements can be reinserted into the pressure tubes surrounding the target and the nuclear fuel regenerated for further burning in the power reactor.

  4. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D.A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  5. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  6. A Fast, Electromagnetically Driven Supersonic Gas Jet Target For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Wright, Jason; Ma, Timothy

    2009-01-22

    Laser-Wakefield acceleration (LWFA) promises electron accelerators with unprecedented electric field gradients. Gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for LWFA. Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4x10{sup 19} /cm{sup 3}, sufficient for self-trapping and acceleration to energies up to {approx}150 MeV. While 3 cm capillary structures have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV, gas jets require a well-collimated beam that is {>=}10 mm in length and <500 {mu}m in width, with a tunable gas density profile to optimize the LWFA process. This paper describes the design of an electromagnetically driven, fast supersonic gas valve that opens in <100 {mu}s, closes in <500 {mu}s and can operate at pressures beyond 1000 psia. The motion of the valve seat (flyer plate) is measured using a laser probe and compared with predictions of a model. The valve design is based on an optimization of many parameters: flyer plate mass and durability, driver bank speed and stored energy for high rep-rate (>10 Hz) operation, return spring non-linearity and materials selection for various components. Optimization of the valve dynamics and preliminary designs of the supersonic flow patterns are described.

  7. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN WINDS IN THE AFTERMATH OF A NEUTRON STAR MERGER: NUCLEOSYNTHESIS AND ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.; Perego, A.; Arcones, A.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Korobkin, O.; Rosswog, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a comprehensive nucleosynthesis study of the neutrino-driven wind in the aftermath of a binary neutron star merger. Our focus is the initial remnant phase when a massive central neutron star is present. Using tracers from a recent hydrodynamical simulation, we determine total masses and integrated abundances to characterize the composition of unbound matter. We find that the nucleosynthetic yields depend sensitively on both the life time of the massive neutron star and the polar angle. Matter in excess of up to 9 × 10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙} becomes unbound until ∼200 ms. Due to electron fractions of Y{sub e} ≈ 0.2–0.4, mainly nuclei with mass numbers A < 130 are synthesized, complementing the yields from the earlier dynamic ejecta. Mixing scenarios with these two types of ejecta can explain the abundance pattern in r-process enriched metal-poor stars. Additionally, we calculate heating rates for the decay of the freshly produced radioactive isotopes. The resulting light curve peaks in the blue band after about 4 hr. Furthermore, high opacities due to heavy r-process nuclei in the dynamic ejecta lead to a second peak in the infrared after 3–4 days.

  8. GPU-accelerated 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2012-07-01

    Finite difference method, as a traditional numerical solution to neutron diffusion equation, although considered simpler and more precise than the coarse mesh nodal methods, has a bottle neck to be widely applied caused by the huge memory and unendurable computation time it requires. In recent years, the concept of General-Purpose computation on GPUs has provided us with a powerful computational engine for scientific research. In this study, a GPU-Accelerated multi-group 3D neutron diffusion code based on finite difference method was developed. First, a clean-sheet neutron diffusion code (3DFD-CPU) was written in C++ on the CPU architecture, and later ported to GPUs under NVIDIA's CUDA platform (3DFD-GPU). The IAEA 3D PWR benchmark problem was calculated in the numerical test, where three different codes, including the original CPU-based sequential code, the HYPRE (High Performance Pre-conditioners)-based diffusion code and CITATION, were used as counterpoints to test the efficiency and accuracy of the GPU-based program. The results demonstrate both high efficiency and adequate accuracy of the GPU implementation for neutron diffusion equation. A speedup factor of about 46 times was obtained, using NVIDIA's Geforce GTX470 GPU card against a 2.50 GHz Intel Quad Q9300 CPU processor. Compared with the HYPRE-based code performing in parallel on an 8-core tower server, the speedup of about 2 still could be observed. More encouragingly, without any mathematical acceleration technology, the GPU implementation ran about 5 times faster than CITATION which was speeded up by using the SOR method and Chebyshev extrapolation technique. (authors)

  9. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  10. Test simulation of neutron damage to electronic components using accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. B.; Fleming, R. M.; Bielejec, E. S.; McDonald, J. K.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate equivalent bipolar transistor damage response to neutrons and silicon ions. We report on irradiation tests performed at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor, the SNL SPHINX accelerator, and the SNL Ion Beam Laboratory using commercial silicon npn bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and III-V Npn heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Late time and early time gain metrics as well as defect spectra measurements are reported.

  11. Accelerated dynamics of blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, N.; Kuranz, C.; Drake, R. P.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2014-10-01

    We report the systematic analysis of experimental data describing the late time evolution of the high Mach number and high Reynolds number Rayleigh-Taylor instability which is driven by a blast wave. The parameter regime is relevant to high energy density plasmas and astrophysics. The experiments have been conducted at the Omega laser facility. By processing the experimental x-ray images, we quantified the delicate features of RT dynamics, including the measurements of the curvature of the transmitted shock and the interface envelopes, the positions of RT bubbles and spikes, and the quantification of statistics of RT mixing. The measurements were performed at four time steps and for three different initial perturbations of the target (single mode and two two-mode). We found that within the noise level the curvatures of the shock and interface envelope evolve steadily and are an imprint of laser imperfections. At late times, the bubble merge does not occur, and the flow keeps significant degree of order. Yet, the blast-wave-driven RT spikes do accelerate with the power-law exponent smaller than that in case of sustained acceleration. We compared the experimental results with the momentum model of RT mixing and stochastic model achieving good agreement. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  12. Nonlinear development of strong current-driven instabilities and selective acceleration of ^3He ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Mieko; Okumura, Hayato

    2003-10-01

    In some solar flares, the abundance of high-energy ^3He ions is extremely increased. As a mechanism for these ^3He rich events, current-driven instabilities are believed to be important. Nonlinear development of the strong current-driven instabilities and associated energy transfer to ^3He ions are studied theoretically and numerically [1]. First, by means of a two-dimensional, electrostatic, particle simulation code, it is demonstrated that ^3He ions are selectively accelerated by fundamental H cyclotron waves with frequencies ω ≃ 2Ω_3He (Ω_3He is the cyclotron frequency of ^3He). Then, from the analysis of the dispersion relation of these waves, it is found that the ω ≃ 2 Ω_ 3He waves have the greatest growth rate, if Te > 10 T_H. Energies of the ^3He ions are also discussed. Theoretical expression for the maximum ^3He energy is presented, which is in good agreement with the simulation results. Based on this theory, it is shown that when the initial electron drift energy is of the order of 10 keV, many ^3He ions can be accelerated to energies of the order of MeV/n. [1] M. Toida and H. Okumura, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72,1098 (2003)

  13. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  14. A Data-Driven Analytical Model for Proton Acceleration at Remotely Observed Low Coronal Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarev, Kamen; Schwadron, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    We have recently studied the development of a large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) low in the solar corona (Kozarev et al., 2015), by using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes, combined with several data-driven models. Similar to previous studies (Kozarev et al., 2011; Downs et al., 2012), we determined that the observed feature is a driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave, which steepens into a shock within the AIA field of view (FOV). In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of parameters of the OCBF, which regulate the efficiency of acceleration of charged particles within the theoretical framework of Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent shock radius Rsh, speed V sh and strength r, as well as the upstream (in the shock frame) potential coronal magnetic field orientations with respect of the shock surface normal, θBN. Because of the very high cadence of the AIA telescope, we were able to obtain estimates of these quantities for every 12 seconds of the approximately 8 minutes, which the OCBF spent in the AIA field of view. Here we present a simple analytical model for the particle acceleration from low in the corona, which has been developed to incorporate the remotely observed OCBF properties described above. We showcase the model by applying it to the event studied in Kozarev et al. (2015), and show that it can produce significant increase in the particle energies during the short passage of the OCBF in the AIA field of view.

  15. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  16. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  17. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  18. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  19. Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Stuart I; Kohl, James Arthur; Granroth, Garrett E; Miller, Ross G; Doucet, Mathieu; Stansberry, Dale V; Proffen, Thomas E; Taylor, Russell J; Dillow, David

    2014-01-01

    ORNL operates the world's brightest neutron source, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Funded by the US DOE Office of Basic Energy Science, this national user facility hosts hundreds of scientists from around the world, providing a platform to enable break-through research in materials science, sustainable energy, and basic science. While the SNS provides scientists with advanced experimental instruments, the deluge of data generated from these instruments represents both a big data challenge and a big data opportunity. For example, instruments at the SNS can now generate multiple millions of neutron events per second providing unprecedented experiment fidelity but leaving the user with a dataset that cannot be processed and analyzed in a timely fashion using legacy techniques. To address this big data challenge, ORNL has developed a near real-time streaming data reduction and analysis infrastructure. The Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis (ADARA) system provides a live streaming data infrastructure based on a high-performance publish subscribe system, in situ data reduction, visualization, and analysis tools, and integration with a high-performance computing and data storage infrastructure. ADARA allows users of the SNS instruments to analyze their experiment as it is run and make changes to the experiment in real-time and visualize the results of these changes. In this paper we describe ADARA, provide a high-level architectural overview of the system, and present a set of use-cases and real-world demonstrations of the technology.

  20. (International Panel on 14 MeV Intense Neutron Source Based on Accelerators for Fusion Materials Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Thoms, K.R.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1991-02-14

    Both travelers were members of a nine-person US delegation that participated in an international workshop on accelerator-based 14 MeV neutron sources for fusion materials research hosted by the University of Tokyo. Presentations made at the workshop reviewed the technology developed by the FMIT Project, advances in accelerator technology, and proposed concepts for neutron sources. One traveler then participated in the initial meeting of the IEA Working Group on High Energy, High Flux Neutron Sources in which efforts were begun to evaluate and compare proposed neutron sources; the Fourth FFTF/MOTA Experimenters' Workshop which covered planning and coordination of the US-Japan collaboration using the FFTF reactor to irradiate fusion reactor materials; and held discussions with several JAERI personnel on the US-Japan collaboration on fusion reactor materials.

  1. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  2. TIME-DEPENDENT, COMPOSITIONALLY DRIVEN CONVECTION IN THE OCEANS OF ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2015-03-20

    We discuss the effect of convection driven by chemical separation at the ocean-crust boundary of accreting neutron stars. We extend the steady-state results of Medin and Cumming to transient accretors, by considering the time-dependent cases of heating during accretion outbursts and cooling during quiescence. During accretion outbursts, inward heat transport has only a small effect on the temperature profile in the outer layers until the ocean is strongly enriched in light elements, a process that takes hundreds of years to complete. During quiescence, however, inward heat transport rapidly cools the outer layers of the ocean while keeping the inner layers hot. We find that this leads to a sharp drop in surface emission at around a week followed by a gradual recovery as cooling becomes dominated by the crust. Such a dip should be observable in the light curves of these neutron star transients, if enough data is taken at a few days to a month after the end of accretion. If such a dip is definitively observed, it will provide strong constraints on the chemical composition of the ocean and outer crust.

  3. Neutron spectra around a tandem linear accelerator in the generation of (18)F with a bonner sphere spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lagares, J I; Araque, J E Guerrero; Méndez-Villafañe, R; Arce, P; Sansaloni, F; Vela, O; Díaz, C; Campo, Xandra; Pérez, J M

    2016-08-01

    A Bonner sphere spectrometer was used to measure the neutron spectra produced at the collision of protons with an H2(18)O target at different angles. A unique H2(18)O target to produce (18)F was designed and placed in a Tandem linear particle accelerator which produces 8.5MeV protons. The neutron count rates measured with the Bonner spheres were unfolded with the MAXED code. With the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code the neutron spectrum induced in the (p, n) reaction was estimated, this spectrum was used as initial guess during unfolding. Although the cross section of the reaction (18)O(p,n)(18)F is well known, the neutron energy spectra is not correctly defined and it is necessary to verify the simulation with measurements. For this reason, the sensitivity of the unfolding method to the initial spectrum was analyzed applying small variation to the fast neutron peak. PMID:27235889

  4. Neutron spectra around a tandem linear accelerator in the generation of (18)F with a bonner sphere spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lagares, J I; Araque, J E Guerrero; Méndez-Villafañe, R; Arce, P; Sansaloni, F; Vela, O; Díaz, C; Campo, Xandra; Pérez, J M

    2016-08-01

    A Bonner sphere spectrometer was used to measure the neutron spectra produced at the collision of protons with an H2(18)O target at different angles. A unique H2(18)O target to produce (18)F was designed and placed in a Tandem linear particle accelerator which produces 8.5MeV protons. The neutron count rates measured with the Bonner spheres were unfolded with the MAXED code. With the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code the neutron spectrum induced in the (p, n) reaction was estimated, this spectrum was used as initial guess during unfolding. Although the cross section of the reaction (18)O(p,n)(18)F is well known, the neutron energy spectra is not correctly defined and it is necessary to verify the simulation with measurements. For this reason, the sensitivity of the unfolding method to the initial spectrum was analyzed applying small variation to the fast neutron peak.

  5. Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Drive Systems: Feasibility Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Riendeau, C.D.; Moses, D.L.; Olson, A.P.

    1998-11-01

    Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium.

  6. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup −15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1μm) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  7. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  8. Free-electron laser multiplex driven by a superconducting linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Plath, Tim; Amstutz, Philipp; Bödewadt, Jörn; Brenner, Günter; Ekanayake, Nagitha; Faatz, Bart; Hacker, Kirsten; Honkavaara, Katja; Lazzarino, Leslie Lamberto; Lechner, Christoph; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Scholz, Matthias; Schreiber, Siegfried; Vogt, Mathias; Zemella, Johann; Laarmann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate femtosecond XUV and X-ray pulses at peak powers in the gigawatt range. The FEL user facility FLASH at DESY (Hamburg, Germany) is driven by a superconducting linear accelerator with up to 8000 pulses per second. Since 2014, two parallel undulator beamlines, FLASH1 and FLASH2, have been in operation. In addition to the main undulator, the FLASH1 beamline is equipped with an undulator section, sFLASH, dedicated to research and development of fully coherent extreme ultraviolet photon pulses using external seed lasers. In this contribution, the first simultaneous lasing of the three FELs at 13.4 nm, 20 nm and 38.8 nm is presented.

  9. Observation of gigawatt-class THz pulses from a compact laser-driven particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gopal, A; Herzer, S; Schmidt, A; Singh, P; Reinhard, A; Ziegler, W; Brömmel, D; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P; Dillner, U; May, T; Meyer, H-G; Paulus, G G

    2013-08-16

    We report the observation of subpicosecond terahertz (T-ray) pulses with energies ≥460 μJ from a laser-driven ion accelerator, thus rendering the peak power of the source higher even than that of state-of-the-art synchrotrons. Experiments were performed with intense laser pulses (up to 5×10(19) W/cm(2)) to irradiate thin metal foil targets. Ion spectra measured simultaneously showed a square law dependence of the T-ray yield on particle number. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show the presence of transient currents at the target rear surface which could be responsible for the strong T-ray emission.

  10. Free-electron laser multiplex driven by a superconducting linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Plath, Tim; Amstutz, Philipp; Bödewadt, Jörn; Brenner, Günter; Ekanayake, Nagitha; Faatz, Bart; Hacker, Kirsten; Honkavaara, Katja; Lazzarino, Leslie Lamberto; Lechner, Christoph; Maltezopoulos, Theophilos; Scholz, Matthias; Schreiber, Siegfried; Vogt, Mathias; Zemella, Johann; Laarmann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate femtosecond XUV and X-ray pulses at peak powers in the gigawatt range. The FEL user facility FLASH at DESY (Hamburg, Germany) is driven by a superconducting linear accelerator with up to 8000 pulses per second. Since 2014, two parallel undulator beamlines, FLASH1 and FLASH2, have been in operation. In addition to the main undulator, the FLASH1 beamline is equipped with an undulator section, sFLASH, dedicated to research and development of fully coherent extreme ultraviolet photon pulses using external seed lasers. In this contribution, the first simultaneous lasing of the three FELs at 13.4 nm, 20 nm and 38.8 nm is presented. PMID:27577757

  11. A compact post-acceleration beam chopper for a 4.5 MV Dynamitron pulsed neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Fujisawa, M.; Baba, M.; Iwasaki, T.; Iwasaki, S.; Sakamoto, R.; Hirakawa, N.; Sugiyama, K.

    1994-08-01

    A post-acceleration beam chopper (PACS) has been installed for a 4.5 MV Dynamitron accelerator to improve the energy resolution of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) experiments by shortening the duration of the ion beam pulses. The PACS sweeps the accelerated ion pulses across a chopping slit and eliminates the tails of the beam pulses. It operates sinusoidally at a frequency of 8 MHz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV peak to peak in synchronization with the accelerated ion pulses. The high voltage generator of the PACS was constructed of commercially available amplifiers and components, which realized easy maintenance and low cost. The PACS proved to be very effective to improve the pulse shape and has been applied for double-differential neutron emission cross section measurements.

  12. Study of proton acceleration at the target front surface in laser-solid interactions by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Proton acceleration inside solid LiF and CH-LiF targets irradiated by a 450-fs, 20-J, 1053-nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} has been studied via neutron spectroscopy. Neutron spectra produced through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction that occurs between accelerated protons, at the front surface, and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. From measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, total number, and slope temperature of the accelerated protons are investigated. The study indicates that protons originate at the front surface and are accelerated to a maximum energy that is reasonably consistent with the calculated one due to the ponderomotive force.

  13. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction-acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2016-04-01

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction-acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  14. Performance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, A.; Makela, M.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Boissevain, J.; Bowles, T. J.; Currie, S. A.; Hill, R. E.; Hogan, G.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R. N.; Ramsey, J.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sondheim, W. E.; Teasdale, W.; Wang, Z.; Back, H. O.; Broussard, L. J.; Hoagland, J.; Holley, A. T.; Pattie, R. W. Jr.; and others

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, we describe the performance of the Los Alamos spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source. Measurements of the cold neutron flux, the very low energy neutron production rate, and the UCN rates and density at the exit from the biological shield are presented and compared to Monte Carlo predictions. The cold neutron rates compare well with predictions from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the UCN rates agree with our custom UCN Monte Carlo code. The source is shown to perform as modeled. The maximum delivered UCN density at the exit from the biological shield is 52(9) UCN/cc with a solid deuterium volume of {approx}1500 cm{sup 3}.

  15. Quasi-monoenergetic ion beam acceleration by laser-driven shock and solitary waves in near-critical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Huang, T. W.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-07-01

    Ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas driven by intense laser pulses is investigated theoretically and numerically. A theoretical model has been given for clarification of the ion acceleration dynamics in relation to different laser and target parameters. Two distinct regimes have been identified, where ions are accelerated by, respectively, the laser-induced shock wave in the weakly driven regime (comparatively low laser intensity) and the nonlinear solitary wave in the strongly driven regime (comparatively high laser intensity). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 94.6 MeV and an energy spread 15.8% are obtained by intense laser pulses at intensity I0 = 3 × 1020 W/cm2 and pulse duration τ = 0.5 ps in the strongly driven regime, which is more advantageous than that got in the weakly driven regime. In addition, 233 MeV proton beams with narrow spread can be produced by extending τ to 1.0 ps in the strongly driven regime.

  16. Relativistic klystron driven compact high gradient accelerator as an injector to an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact high gradient accelerator driven by a relativistic klystron is utilized to inject high energy electrons into an X-ray synchrotron radiation ring. The high gradients provided by the relativistic klystron enables accelerator structure to be much shorter (typically 3 meters) than conventional injectors. This in turn enables manufacturers which utilize high energy, high intensity X-rays to produce various devices, such as computer chips, to do so on a cost effective basis.

  17. Analytic approach to nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities driven by time-dependent accelerations

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-09-28

    We extend our earlier model for Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities to the more general class of hydrodynamic instabilities driven by a time-dependent acceleration g(t) . Explicit analytic solutions for linear as well as nonlinear amplitudes are obtained for several g(t)'s by solving a Schroedinger-like equation d{sup 2}{eta}/dt{sup 2} - g(t)kA{eta} = 0 where A is the Atwood number and k is the wavenumber of the perturbation amplitude {eta}(t). In our model a simple transformation k {yields} k{sub L} and A {yields} A{sub L} connects the linear to the nonlinear amplitudes: {eta}{sup nonlinear} (k,A) {approx} (1/k{sub L})ln{eta}{sup linear} (k{sub L}, A{sub L}). The model is found to be in very good agreement with direct numerical simulations. Bubble amplitudes for a variety of accelerations are seen to scale with s defined by s = {integral} {radical}g(t)dt, while spike amplitudes prefer scaling with displacement {Delta}x = {integral}[{integral}g(t)dt]dt.

  18. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  19. Ion acceleration at CME-driven shocks near the Earth and the Sun

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Ebert, Robert; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Li, G.

    2012-11-20

    We compare the behavior of heavy ion spectra during an Energetic Storm Particle (ESP) event that exhibited clear evidence of wave excitation with that observed during an intense, large gradual Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event in which the associated <0.2 MeV/nucleon ions are delayed >12 hr. We interpret that the ESP event is an example of the first-order Fermi acceleration process where enhancements in the magnetic field power spectral densities around local ion cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub pc} indicate the presence of Alfven waves excited by accelerated protons streaming away from the in-situ interplanetary shock. The softening or unfolding of the CNO energy spectrum below {approx}200 keV/nucleon and the systematic organization of the Fe and O spectral roll-overs with the E/q ratio during the ESP event are likely due to M/Q-dependent trapping and scattering of the heavy ions by the proton-excited waves. Based on striking similarities in the spectral behavior observed upstream of both, the ESP and the SEP event, we suggest that coupling between proton-generated Alfven waves and energetic ions is also operating at the distant CME shock during the large, gradual SEP event, thereby providing us with a new, powerful tool to remotely probe the roles of shock geometries and wave-particle interactions at near-Sun CME-driven shocks.

  20. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ˜1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  1. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A. M. Li, Song; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Jie; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-15

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes.

  2. Enhanced electron yield from laser-driven wakefield acceleration in high-Z gas jets.

    PubMed

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Hafz, Nasr A M; Li, Song; Liu, Feng; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of the electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, and neon gas jet plasmas in a typical laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment is carried out. The charge measurement is made by imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a charge coupled device which was cross-calibrated with an integrated current transformer. The dependence of electron beam charge on the laser and plasma conditions for the aforementioned gases are studied. We found that laser-driven wakefield acceleration in low Z-gas jet targets usually generates high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with modest yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which are observed from high-Z gases at higher densities reached much higher yields. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in the nitrogen gas jet target, where we received the highest electron beam charge of ∼1.7 nC. Those intense electron beams will be beneficial for the applications on the generation of bright X-rays, gamma rays radiations, and energetic positrons via the bremsstrahlung or inverse-scattering processes. PMID:26520950

  3. Ion Beam Driven Shock Device Using Accelerated High Density Plasmoid by Phased Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko; Aizawa, Tatsuhiko; Tsuchida, Minoru

    1997-07-01

    Different from three methods to generate high shock pressure by acceleration of high density plasma or particles (intense ion beams, plasma gun and rail gun) having their intrinsic deficiencies, new frontier is proposed to propel the shock physics and chemistry by using the high density plasma. In the present paper, new scheduled Z-pinch method is developed as a new device to generate high shock pressure. In the present method, plasma density can be compressed to the order of 10^18 to 10^19 cm-3, and high density plasma can be accelerated by zippering together with axial shock pressure, resulting in high-velocity launching of flyer. In the present paper, systematic experimental works are performed to demonstrate that high energy plasma flow can be electro-magnetically driven by the scheduled capillary Z-pinch, and to characterize the ion velocity and its current density. The estimated value of ion speed from the plasma-measurement reaches to 7 x 10^7 cm/s corresponding to 70 to 100 KeV for Ar. Copper flyer can be shot with the velocity range from 1km/s to 3km/s in the standard condition.

  4. Mechanosensitive liposomes as artificial chaperones for shear-driven acceleration of enzyme-catalyzed reaction.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Tomotaka; Yoshimoto, Makoto

    2014-03-12

    Mechanosensitive liposomes were prepared and applied to continuously accelerate the glucose oxidase (GO) reaction in shear flow. The liposome membrane was composed of a ternary lipid mixture containing 20 mol % negatively charged lipid and 30 mol % cholesterol. The liposomes encapsulating GO and catalase were passed through microtubes with inner diameter of 190 or 380 μm at 25 °C to induce the catalytic oxidation of 10 mM glucose with simultaneous decomposition of H2O2 produced. The liposomal GO showed significantly low reactivity in the static liquid system because of the permeation resistance of lipid membranes to glucose. On the other hand, the enzyme activity of liposomal GO observed at the average shear rate of 7.8 × 10(3) s(-1) was significantly larger than its intrinsic activity free of mass transfer effect in the static liquid system. The structure of liposomes was highly shear-sensitive as elucidated on the basis of shear rate-dependent physical stability of liposomes and membrane permeability to 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein as well as to GO. Thus, the above shear-driven acceleration of GO reaction was indicated to be caused by the free GO molecules released from the structurally altered liposomes at high shear rates. Moreover, the shear-induced denaturation of free GO was completely depressed by the interaction with the sheared liposomes with the chaperone-like function. The shear-sensitive liposomal GO system can be a unique catalyst that continuously accelerates and also decelerates the oxidation reaction depending on the applied shear rate.

  5. Wakefield-induced ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T. J.; Schaper, L.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Osterhoff, J.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches [Martinez de la Ossa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 245003 (2013)]. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ( Ib 0 ≳ 8.5 kA ) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ( k p σ z ˜ k p ɛ n ˜ 0.1 ). In addition, we show that the amount of injected charge can be adjusted by tuning the concentration of the dopant gas species, which allows for controlled beam loading and leads to a reduction of the total energy spread of the witness beams. Electron bunches, produced in this way, fulfil the requirements to drive blowout regime plasma wakes at a higher density and to trigger WII injection in a second stage. This suggests a promising new concept of self-similar staging of WII injection in steps with increasing plasma density, giving rise to the potential of producing electron beams with unprecedented energy and brilliance from plasma-wakefield accelerators.

  6. ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS MODIFICATIONS FOR A SECOND TARGET STATION AT THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Plum, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets added to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.

  7. Accelerated carbonation of cement pastes in situ monitored by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, M. Andrade, C.; Turrillas, X.; Campo, J.; Cuello, G.J.

    2008-12-15

    In-situ monitoring of the changes that take place in the phase composition of cement pastes during accelerated carbonation (100% CO{sub 2}) for different binders, has been carried out, by taking Neutron Diffraction patterns in parallel with the carbonation experiments. The variation of the intensity of chosen reflections for each phase along the experiment has been used to monitor concentration changes and has supplied data, in real time, for fractional conversion of different phases (Portlandite, Ettringite and CSH gel) of the hydrated cement pastes. Fitting of these results has allowed to make a qualitative approach to the kinetics of the carbonation of the different phases and extracting conclusions on the microstructural changes that takes place during the carbonation of cement pastes.

  8. Neutron yield and induced radioactivity: a study of 235-MeV proton and 3-GeV electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Cheng; Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude of potential neutron yield and induced radioactivity of two new accelerators in Taiwan: a 235-MeV proton cyclotron for radiation therapy and a 3-GeV electron synchrotron serving as the injector for the Taiwan Photon Source. From a nuclear interaction point of view, neutron production from targets bombarded with high-energy particles is intrinsically related to the resulting target activation. Two multi-particle interaction and transport codes, FLUKA and MCNPX, were used in this study. To ensure prediction quality, much effort was devoted to the associated benchmark calculations. Comparisons of the accelerators' results for three target materials (copper, stainless steel and tissue) are presented. Although the proton-induced neutron yields were higher than those induced by electrons, the maximal neutron production rates of both accelerators were comparable according to their respective beam outputs during typical operation. Activation products in the targets of the two accelerators were unexpectedly similar because the primary reaction channels for proton- and electron-induced activation are (p,pn) and (γ,n), respectively. The resulting residual activities and remnant dose rates as a function of time were examined and discussed.

  9. Nuclear reactions with 14 MeV neutrons and bremsstrahlungs in giant dipole resonance (GDR) region using small accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiep, Tran Duc; Van Do, Nguyen; An, Truong Thi; Son, Nguyen Ngoc

    2003-07-01

    In 1974 an accelerator of deterium, namely neutron generator NA-3-C was put into operation and in 1982 another accelerator of electron Microtron MT-17 started its work in the Institute of Physics. Though very modest these accelerators are useful for developing countries as Vietnam in both Nuclear Physics Research and Training. In this report we present some results obtained in studies on Nuclear Data, Nuclear Reactions as well as nuclear activation analysis methods. We also would like to discuss about the possibilities of collaboration in the future.

  10. Analysis of Anderson Acceleration on a Simplified Neutronics/Thermal Hydraulics System

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Alex; Kelley, C. T.; Slattery, Stuart R; Hamilton, Steven P; Clarno, Kevin T; Pawlowski, R. P. P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A standard method for solving coupled multiphysics problems in light water reactors is Picard iteration, which sequentially alternates between solving single physics applications. This solution approach is appealing due to simplicity of implementation and the ability to leverage existing software packages to accurately solve single physics applications. However, there are several drawbacks in the convergence behavior of this method; namely slow convergence and the necessity of heuristically chosen damping factors to achieve convergence in many cases. Anderson acceleration is a method that has been seen to be more robust and fast converging than Picard iteration for many problems, without significantly higher cost per iteration or complexity of implementation, though its effectiveness in the context of multiphysics coupling is not well explored. In this work, we develop a one-dimensional model simulating the coupling between the neutron distribution and fuel and coolant properties in a single fuel pin. We show that this model generally captures the convergence issues noted in Picard iterations which couple high-fidelity physics codes. We then use this model to gauge potential improvements with regard to rate of convergence and robustness from utilizing Anderson acceleration as an alternative to Picard iteration.

  11. Use of a small accelerator as a source of 14-MeV neutrons for shielding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.T.; Morgan, G.L.; McConnell, J.W.

    1980-11-01

    It is important in calculating complex shields such as those proposed for the fusion reactors to ascertain that the neutron cross-section data sets used in the calculations are as accurate as possible and that the calculational methods used to transport the neutrons are as reliable as practical. To assure that both these criteria are met, a project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being conducted in which a small accelerator is used to provide 14-MeV neutrons via the T(d,n)/sup 4/He reaction and an NE-213 detector is used to measure the neutron and gamma-ray pulse-height spectra of the radiations transported through and/or created in very thick laminated shields of stainless steel (type 304) and borated polyethylene.

  12. First Observations of Laser-Driven Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in a Semi-Infinite Vacuum Space

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Smith, T.I.; Colby, E.; Cowan, B.; Sears, C.M.S.; Spencer, J.E.; Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2006-02-17

    We have observed acceleration of relativistic electrons in vacuum driven by a linearly polarized visible laser beam incident on a thin gold-coated reflective boundary. The observed energy modulation effect follows all the characteristics expected for linear acceleration caused by a longitudinal electric field. As predicted by the Lawson-Woodward theorem the laser driven modulation only appears in the presence of the boundary. It shows a linear dependence with the strength of the electric field of the laser beam and also it is critically dependent on the laser polarization. Finally, it appears to follow the expected angular dependence of the inverse transition radiation process. experiment as the Laser Electron Accelerator Project (LEAP).

  13. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  14. On Poynting-flux-driven bubbles and shocks around merging neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-05-01

    Merging binaries of compact relativistic objects (neutron stars and black holes) are thought to be progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts and sources of gravitational waves, hence their study is of great importance for astrophysics. Because of the strong magnetic field of one or both binary members and high orbital frequencies, these binaries are strong sources of energy in the form of Poynting flux (e.g. magnetic-field-dominated outflows, relativistic leptonic winds, electromagnetic and plasma waves). The steady injection of energy by the binary forms a bubble (or a cavity) filled with matter with the relativistic equation of state, which pushes on the surrounding plasma and can drive a shock wave in it. Unlike the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor blast wave solution for a point-like explosion, the shock wave here is continuously driven by the ever-increasing pressure inside the bubble. We calculate from the first principles the dynamics and evolution of the bubble and the shock surrounding it and predict that such systems can be observed as radio sources a few hours before and after the merger. At much later times, the shock is expected to settle on to the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor solution, thus resembling an explosion.

  15. Be aware of neutrons outside short mazes from 10-MV linear accelerators X-rays in radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Brockstedt, S; Holstein, H; Jakobsson, L; Tomaszewicz, A; Knöös, T

    2015-07-01

    During the radiation survey of a reinstalled 10-MV linear accelerator in an old radiation treatment facility, high dose rates of neutrons were observed. The area outside the maze entrance is used as a waiting room where patients, their relatives and staff other than those involved in the actual treatment can freely pass. High fluence rates of neutrons would cause an unnecessary high effective dose to the staff working in the vicinity of such a system, and it can be several orders higher than the doses received due to X-rays at the same location. However, the common knowledge appears to have been that the effect of neutrons at 10-MV X-ray linear accelerator facilities is negligible and shielding calculations models seldom mention neutrons for this operating energy level. Although data are scarce, reports regarding this phenomenon are now emerging. For the future, it is advocated that contributions from neutrons are considered already during the planning stage of new or modified facilities aimed for 10 MV and that estimated dose levels are verified.

  16. Optimisation of composite metallic fuel for minor actinide transmutation in an accelerator-driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyttenhove, W.; Sobolev, V.; Maschek, W.

    2011-09-01

    A potential option for neutralization of minor actinides (MA) accumulated in spent nuclear fuel of light water reactors (LWRs) is their transmutation in dedicated accelerator-driven systems (ADS). A promising fuel candidate dedicated to MA transmutation is a CERMET composite with Mo metal matrix and (Pu, Np, Am, Cm)O 2-x fuel particles. Results of optimisation studies of the CERMET fuel targeting to increasing the MA transmutation efficiency of the EFIT (European Facility for Industrial Transmutation) core are presented. In the adopted strategy of MA burning the plutonium (Pu) balance of the core is minimized, allowing a reduction in the reactivity swing and the peak power form-factor deviation and an extension of the cycle duration. The MA/Pu ratio is used as a variable for the fuel optimisation studies. The efficiency of MA transmutation is close to the foreseen theoretical value of 42 kg TW -1 h -1 when level of Pu in the actinide mixture is about 40 wt.%. The obtained results are compared with the reference case of the EFIT core loaded with the composite CERCER fuel, where fuel particles are incorporated in a ceramic magnesia matrix. The results of this study offer additional information for the EFIT fuel selection.

  17. Pre-design of MYRRHA, A Multipurpose Accelerator Driven System for Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    D'hondt, P.; Abderrahim, H. Aiet; Kupschus, P.; Malambu, E.; Aoust, Th.; Benoit, Ph.; Sobolev, V.; Tichelen, K. van; Arien, B.; Vermeersch, F.; Jongen, Y.; Ternier, S.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2003-08-26

    One of the main SCKCEN research facility, namely BR2, is nowadays arriving at an age of 40 years just like the major materials testing reactors (MTR) in the world and in Europe (i.e. BR2 (B-Mol), HFR (EU-Petten), OSIRIS (F-Saclay), R2 (S-Studsvik)). The MYRRHA facility in planning has been conceived as potentially replacing BR2 and to be a fast spectrum facility complementary to the thermal spectrum RJH (Reacteur Jules Horowitz) facility, in planning in France. This situation would give Europe a full research capability in terms of nuclear R and D. Furthermore, the disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from industrial nuclear energy production has still to find a fully satisfactory solution, especially in terms of environmental and social acceptability. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce (by a factor of 100 or more) the radio-toxicity of the High Level Waste (HLW) to be stored in a deep geological repository. This can be achieved via burning of minor actinides (MA) and to a less extent of long-lived fission products (LLFP) in Accelerator Driven Systems. The MYRRHA project contribution will be in helping to demonstrate the ADS concept at reasonable power level and the demonstration of the technological feasibility of MA and LLFP transmutation under real conditions.

  18. Pre-design of MYRRHA, A Multipurpose Accelerator Driven System for Research and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hondt, P.; Abderrahim, H. Aït; Kupschus, P.; Malambu, E.; Aoust, Th.; Benoit, Ph.; Sobolev, V.; Van Tichelen, K.; Arien, B.; Vermeersch, F.; Jongen, Y.; Ternier, S.; Vandeplassche, D.

    2003-08-01

    One of the main SCK•CEN research facility, namely BR2, is nowadays arriving at an age of 40 years just like the major materials testing reactors (MTR) in the world and in Europe (i.e. BR2 (B-Mol), HFR (EU-Petten), OSIRIS (F-Saclay), R2 (S-Studsvik)). The MYRRHA facility in planning has been conceived as potentially replacing BR2 and to be a fast spectrum facility complementary to the thermal spectrum RJH (Réacteur Jules Horowitz) facility, in planning in France. This situation would give Europe a full research capability in terms of nuclear R&D. Furthermore, the disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from industrial nuclear energy production has still to find a fully satisfactory solution, especially in terms of environmental and social acceptability. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce (by a factor of 100 or more) the radio-toxicity of the High Level Waste (HLW) to be stored in a deep geological repository. This can be achieved via burning of minor actinides (MA) and to a less extent of long-lived fission products (LLFP) in Accelerator Driven Systems. The MYRRHA project contribution will be in helping to demonstrate the ADS concept at reasonable power level and the demonstration of the technological feasibility of MA and LLFP transmutation under real conditions.

  19. Behaviour of materials for accelerator driven systems in stagnant molten lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamati, Gianluca; Buttol, Patrizia; Imbeni, Valentina; Martini, Carla; Palombarini, Giuseppe

    2000-06-01

    The behaviour of a modified F82H martensitic steel (both uncoated and aluminised) and tungsten was evaluated by immersion tests in stagnant, oxygen-saturated liquid lead at 793 K under an argon atmosphere, for exposure times up to 3700 h. The F82H steel is a candidate structural material for Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), while tungsten is potentially suitable for a beam window working immersed in liquid lead. Layers of Me 3O 4 consisting of an inner sublayer with Me=Fe and Cr and an outer chromium-free sublayer of Fe 3O 4, formed on the surface of the uncoated steel while the aluminised steel showed no significant alteration. On tungsten, a compact and adherent layer of WO 3 formed and reacted with liquid lead leading to the formation of friable Pb-W-O ternary compounds. A two-step mechanism is proposed for interactions of metals and alloys exposed to oxygen-saturated molten lead: the first step is the solid phase oxidation of the base metal; the second is the interaction between liquid lead and the oxide layer formed on the metal surface.

  20. From laser particle acceleration to the synthesis of extremely neutron rich isotopes via the novel fission-fusion mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Thirolf, P. G.

    2015-02-24

    High-power, short pulse lasers have emerged in the last decade as attractive tools for accelerating charged particles (electrons, ions) to high energies over mm-scale acceleration lengths, thus promising to rival conventional acceleration techniques in the years ahead. In the first part of the article, the principles of laser-plasma interaction as well as the techniques and the current status of the acceleration of electron and ion beams will be briefly introduced. In particular with the upcoming next generation of multi-PW class laser systems, such as the one under construction for the ELI-Nuclear Physics project in Bucharest (ELI-NP), very efficient acceleration mechanisms for brilliant ion beams like radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) come into reach. Here, ultra-dense ion beams reaching solid-state density can be accelerated from thin target foils, exceeding the density of conventionally accelerated ion beams by about 14 orders of magnitude. This unique property of laser-accelerated ion beams can be exploited to explore the scenario of a new reaction mechanism called ‘fission-fusion’, which will be introduced in the second part of the article. Accelerating fissile species (e.g. {sup 232}Th) towards a second layer of the same material will lead to fission both of the beam-like and target-like particles. Due to the close to solid-state density of the accelerated ion bunches, fusion may occur between neutron-rich (light) fission products. This may open an access path towards extremely neutron-rich nuclides in the vicinity of the N=126 waiting point of the astrophysical r process. ‘Waiting points’ at closed nucleon shells play a crucial role in controlling the reaction rates. However, since most of the pathway of heavy-element formation via the rapid-neutron capture process (r-process) runs in ‘terra incognita’ of the nuclear landscape, in particular the waiting point at N=126 is yet unexplored and will remain largely inaccessible to conventional

  1. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  2. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  3. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Simpson, Michael

    2013-04-19

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  4. A piezo-driven micro-inclination stage for calibration of a micro-acceleration transducer: structure and control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shubao; Song, Siyang; Xu, Minglong; Xie, Shilin; Li, Liang

    2016-02-01

    In some space applications, such as space navigation and vibration control of the large space structures, micro-acceleration transducers are required and have to be calibrated accurately. Unfortunately, providing extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) for the calibration of the micro-acceleration transducer has been a challenging task. This paper proposes a novel piezo-driven micro-inclination stage (PMIS) that can produce both discrete and continuous tumbles in a gravity field so that extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) can be obtained from a tiny component of the gravity constant. The proposed PMIS, which is driven by the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stack, employs a rhombic mechanism to provide the PZT stack with a proper preload for the purpose of outputting a bidirectional force. To produce accurate static and quasi-static stimuli, the hysteresis non-linearity inherent in PZT stack is compensated by employing the strain feedback based adaptive control where the hysteresis property is identified online using the controlled auto-regressive moving average model. Furthermore, to improve the resolution of strain feedback, the strain sensitivity is maximized through structure optimization of the rhombic mechanism. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed PMIS can produce minimal micro-inclination of {{0.1}\\prime \\prime} (corresponding to the induced micro-acceleration of 0.5μ g ) with the frequency ranging from 0 (DC) to 2 Hz.

  5. [Relative biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions and fast neutrons estimated from frequency of aberration mytoses in the retinal epithelium].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Shafirkin, A V; Fedorenko, B S

    2006-01-01

    Analyzed was the literature and authors' experimental data concerning lesion and recovery of epithelium cells of mice retina immediately and long after irradiation at different sources including single and partly fractionated irradiation by gamma- and X-rays, accelerated protons, helium, carbon and boron ions, and fast neutrons of the reactor range in a large spectrum of doses and LET. Reviewed are some new techniques of determining the RBE coefficient for these types of radiation; large values of the RBE coefficients for accelerated ions and neutrons (5-10 times higher than RBE coefficients calculated for the next day following irradiation) are a result of integration into calculation of the available data about the delayed disorders in retinal epithelium cell regeneration. PMID:17193969

  6. A study of neutron radiation quality with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter for a low-energy accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Waker, A J

    2011-02-01

    The accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility at McMaster University has been used successfully for the measurement of several minor and trace elements in human hand bones due to their importance to health. Most of these in vivo measurements have been conducted at a proton beam energy (E(p)) of 2.00 MeV to optimise the activation of the selected element of interest with an effective dose of the same order as that received in chest X rays. However, measurement of other elements at the same facility requires beam energies other than 2.00 MeV. The range of energy of neutrons produced at these proton beam energies comes under the region where tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are known to experience difficulty in assessing the quality factor and dose equivalent. In this study, the response of TEPCs was investigated to determine the quality factor of neutron fields generated via the (7)Li(p, n)(7)Be reaction as a function of E(p) in the range 1.884-2.56 MeV at the position of hand irradiation in the facility. An interesting trend has been observed in the quality factor based on ICRP 60, Q(ICRP60), such that the maximum value was observed at E(p)=1.884 MeV (E(n)=33±16 keV) and then continued to decline with increasing E(p) until achieving a minimum value at E(p)=2.0 MeV despite a continuous increase in the mean neutron energy with E(p). This observation is contrary to what has been observed with direct fast neutrons where the quality factor was found to increase continuously with an increase in E(p) (i.e. increasing E(n)). The series of measurements conducted with thermal and fast neutron fields demonstrate that the (14)N(n, p)(14)C produced 580 keV protons in the detector play an important role in the response of the counter under 2.0 MeV proton energy (E(n) ≤ 250 keV). In contrast to the lower response of TEPCs to low-energy neutrons, the quality factor is overestimated in the range 1-2 depending on beam energy <2.0 MeV. This study provides

  7. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  8. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso≳1052 erg ), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  9. Neutron-star–black-hole binaries produced by binary-driven hypernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-12-04

    Here, binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso ≳1052 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed “ultrastripped” binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compactmore » binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.« less

  10. Neutron-star–black-hole binaries produced by binary-driven hypernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-12-04

    Here, binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso ≳1052 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed “ultrastripped” binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  11. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs. PMID:26684106

  12. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  13. Beam dynamics study of a 30 MeV electron linear accelerator to drive a neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep; Yang, Haeryong; Kang, Heung-Sik

    2014-02-14

    An experimental neutron facility based on 32 MeV/18.47 kW electron linac has been studied by means of PARMELA simulation code. Beam dynamics study for a traveling wave constant gradient electron accelerator is carried out to reach the preferential operation parameters (E = 30 MeV, P = 18 kW, dE/E < 12.47% for 99% particles). The whole linac comprises mainly E-gun, pre-buncher, buncher, and 2 accelerating columns. A disk-loaded, on-axis-coupled, 2π/3-mode type accelerating rf cavity is considered for this linac. After numerous optimizations of linac parameters, 32 MeV beam energy is obtained at the end of the linac. As high electron energy is required to produce acceptable neutron flux. The final neutron flux is estimated to be 5 × 10{sup 11} n/cm{sup 2}/s/mA. Future development will be the real design of a 30 MeV electron linac based on S band traveling wave.

  14. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases. PMID:27455499

  15. The design of an intense accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam prototype for BNCT using near-threshold reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles L.

    Near-threshold boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) uses proton energies only tens of rev above the (pan) reaction threshold in lithium in order to reduce the moderation requirements of the neutron source. The goals of this research were to prove the feasibility of this near-threshold concept for BNCT applications, using both calculation and experiment, and design a compact neutron source prototype from these results. This required a multidisciplinary development of methods for calculation of neutron yields, head phantom dosimetry, and accelerator target heat removal. First, a method was developed to accurately calculate thick target neutron yields for both near-threshold and higher energy proton beams, in lithium metal as well as lithium compounds. After these yields were experimentally verified, they were used as neutron sources for Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of neutron and photon transport in head phantoms. The theoretical and experimental determination of heat removal from a target backing with multiple fins, as well as numerical calculations of heat deposition profiles based on proton energy loss in target and backing materials, demonstrated that lithium integrity can be maintained for proton beam currents up to 2.5 mA. The final design uses a proton beam energy of 1.95 MeV and has a centerline epithermal neutron flux of 2.2 × 108 n/cm2- sec/mA, an advantage depth of 5.7 cm, an advantage ratio of 4.3, and an advantage depth dose rate of 6.7 RBE- cGy/min/mA, corresponding to an irradiation time of 38 minutes with a 5 mA beam. Moderator, reflector, and shielding weigh substantially less than other accelerator BNCT designs based on higher proton energies, e.g. 2.5 MeV. The near-threshold concept is useful as a portable neutron source for hospital settings, with applications ranging from glioblastomas to melanomas and synovectomy. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  16. Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fission in a Molten Salt Core: Green Nuclear Power for the New Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Scientists at Texas A&M University, Brookhaven National Lab, and Idaho National Lab are developing a design for accelerator-drive subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). Three high-power proton beams are delivered to spallation targets in a molten salt core, where they provide ˜3% of the fast neutrons required to sustain 600 MW of fission. The proton beams are produced by a flux-coupled stack of superconducting strong-focusing cyclotrons. The fuel consists of a eutectic of sodium chloride with either spent nuclear fuel from a conventional U power reactor (ADSMS-U) or thorium (ADSMS-Th). The subcritical core cannot go critical under any failure mode. The core cannot melt down even if all power is suddenly lost to the facility for a prolonged period. The ultra-fast neutronics of the core makes it possible to operate in an isobreeding mode, in which neutron capture breeds the fertile nuclide into a fissile nuclide at the same rate that fission burns the fissile nuclide, and consumes 90% of the fertile inventory instead of the 5% consumed in the original use in a conventional power plant. The ultra-fast neutronics produces a very low equilibrium inventory of the long-lived minor actinides, ˜10^4 less than what is produced in conventional power plants. ADSMS offers a method to safely produce the energy needs for all mankind for the next 3000 years.

  17. Laser-driven acceleration of subrelativistic electrons near a nanostructured dielectric grating: From acceleration via higher spatial harmonics to necessary elements of a dielectric accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeur, Josh; Kozak, Martin; Schönenberger, Norbert; Li, Ang; Tafel, Alexander; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The experimental setup that allows for the observation of energy gain of electrons interacting with Dielectric Laser Accelerators (DLAs) is reviewed. Moreover, recent results, including acceleration due to electron interaction with third, fourth and fifth spatial harmonics of a nanostructured grating are discussed and an extended outlook is given.

  18. Properties of the Feynman-alpha method applied to accelerator-driven subcritical systems.

    PubMed

    Taczanowski, S; Domanska, G; Kopec, M; Janczyszyn, J

    2005-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the Feynman-method with a simple code simulating the multiplication chain, confined to pertinent time-dependent phenomena has been done. The significance of its key parameters (detector efficiency and dead time, k-source and spallation neutrons multiplicities, required number of fissions etc.) has been discussed. It has been demonstrated that this method can be insensitive to properties of the zones surrounding the core, whereas is strongly affected by the detector dead time. In turn, the influence of harmonics in the neutron field and of the dispersion of spallation neutrons has proven much less pronounced.

  19. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, Francois; Mihalcea, Daniel; Piot, Philippe; Zhu, Jun

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  20. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Rezac, K.; Sila, O.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Velyhan, A.

    2015-09-01

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 108 at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 1016 W/cm2. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the 2H(d,n)3He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 109 with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 108 n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 1014 deuterons in the 0.5-2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 109 at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 106 n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  1. The effect of a paraffin screen on the neutron dose at the maze door of a 15 MV linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Krmar, M.; Kuzmanović, A.; Nikolić, D.; Kuzmanović, Z.; Ganezer, K.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a paraffin screen located at various positions in the maze on the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door.Methods: The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze door of a room containing a 15 MV linear accelerator for x-ray therapy. Measurements were performed for several positions of the paraffin screen covering only 27.5% of the cross-sectional area of the maze. The neutron dose equivalent was also measured at all screen positions. Two simple models of the neutron source were considered in which the first assumed that the source was the cross-sectional area at the inner entrance of the maze, radiating neutrons in an isotropic manner. In the second model the reduction in the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door due to the paraffin screen was considered to be a function of the mean values of the neutron fluence and energy at the screen.Results: The results of this study indicate that the equivalent dose at the maze door was reduced by a factor of 3 through the use of a paraffin screen that was placed inside the maze. It was also determined that the contributions to the dosage from areas that were not covered by the paraffin screen as viewed from the dosimeter, were 2.5 times higher than the contributions from the covered areas. This study also concluded that the contributions of the maze walls, ceiling, and floor to the total neutron dose equivalent were an order of magnitude lower than those from the surface at the far end of the maze.Conclusions: This study demonstrated that a paraffin screen could be used to reduce the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door by a factor of 3. This paper also found that the reduction of the neutron dose equivalent was a linear function of the area covered by the maze screen and that the decrease in the dose at the maze door could be modeled as an exponential function of the product φ·E at the screen.

  2. Laser-driven γ-ray, positron, and neutron source from ultra-intense laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Hayakawa, Takehito

    2015-08-15

    In ultra-intense laser-matter interactions, γ-rays are effectively generated via the radiation reaction effect. Since a significant fraction of the laser energy is converted into γ-rays, understanding of the energy transport inside of the target is important. We have developed a Particle-in-Cell code which includes generation of the γ-rays, their energy transport, and photo-nuclear reactions. Using the code, we have investigated the characteristics of the quantum beams generated by the transport of the laser-driven γ-rays. It is shown that collimated, mono-energetic positron beams with hundreds of MeV are generated by using thick targets. Neutron beams are also effectively generated by using beryllium targets via photo-nuclear reactions. These lead to the proposal of quantum beam sources of γ-rays, positrons, and neutrons with distinctive characters, which are selectively generated by choosing target conditions.

  3. JCANS network of compact neutron facilities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2016-05-01

    Compact neutron sources are used to promote neutron science as they can be used for studies relevant to the own interests of a researcher, and they are most suitable for educational purposes, trial use by beginners, test experiments, and challenging measurements. This type of activities supports researches at a large facility. Japan collaboration of accelerator-driven neutron sources (JCANS), which is a network of accelerator-driven neutron sources, is organized to activate a nation-wide network of individual research activities on neutron sources and practical neutron beam technologies for application in science and industry. This network promotes a collaborative work to construct neutron sources and use them in science and industry fields.

  4. X-band dielectric loaded RF driven accelerator structures: Theoretical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng

    An important area of application of high-power radio frequency (RF) and microwave sources is particle acceleration. A major challenge for the current worldwide research and development effort in linear accelerator is the search for a compact and affordable very-high-energy accelerator technology for the next generation supercolliders. It has been recognized for sometime that dielectric loaded accelerator structures are attractive candidates for the next generation very-high-energy linear accelerators, because they possess several distinct advantages over conventional metallic iris- loaded accelerator structures. However, some fundamental issues, such as RF breakdown in the dielectric, Joule heating, and vacuum properties of dielectric materials, are still the subjects of intense investigation, requiring the validation by experiments conducted at high power levels. An X-band traveling-wave accelerator based on dielectric-lined waveguide has been designed and constructed. Numerical calculation, bench measurements, and 3-D electromagnetic field simulation of this dielectric loaded accelerator are presented. One critical technical problem in constructing such dielectric loaded accelerator is efficient coupling of RF power into the dielectric-lined circular waveguide. A coupling scheme has been arrived at by empirical methods. Field distribution in this coupling configuration has been studied by numerical simulation. In the conventional iris-loaded accelerator structures, the peak surface electric field E s is in general found to be at least a factor of 2 higher than the axial acceleration field Ea. Because the peak surface electric field causes electric breakdown of the structure, it represents a direct limitation on the maximum acceleration gradient that can be obtained. A novel hybrid dielectric-iris-loaded periodic accelerator structure is proposed to utilize the advantages of both dielectric-lined waveguides and conventional iris-loaded structures. Numerical

  5. Laser Acceleration of Quasi-Monoenergetic Protons via Radiation Pressure Driven Thin Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuan S.; Shao Xi; Liu, T. C.; Dudnikova, Galina; Sagdeev, Roald Z.; Eliasson, Bengt

    2011-01-04

    We present a theoretical and simulation study of laser acceleration of quasi-monoenergetic protons in a thin foil irradiated by high intensity laser light. The underlying physics of radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is discussed, including the importance of optimal thickness and circularly polarized light for efficient acceleration of ions to quasi-monoenergetic beams. Preliminary two-dimensional simulation studies show that certain parameter regimes allow for stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and possibility of acceleration of monoenergetic ions to an excess of 200 MeV, making them suitable for important applications such as medical cancer therapy and fast ignition.

  6. Design and test of a superconducting magnet in a linear accelerator for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanling; Xu, Fengyu; Wang, Ting; Yang, Xiangchen; Chen, Anbin; Wei, Xiaotao; Gao, Yao; Hou, Zhenhua; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Haoshu

    2014-11-01

    A batch superconducting solenoid magnet for the ADS proton linear accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested in a vertical dewar in Sept. 2013. A total of ten superconducting magnets will be installed into two separate cryomodules. Each cryomodule contains six superconducting spoke RF cavities for beam acceleration and five solenoid magnets for beam focusing. The multifunction superconducting magnet contains a solenoid for beam focusing and two correctors for orbit correction. The design current for the solenoid magnet is 182 A. A quench performance test shows that the operating current of the solenoid magnet can reach above 300 A after natural quenching on three occasions during current ramping (260 A, 268 A, 308 A). The integrated field strength and leakage field at the nearby superconducting spoke cavities all meet the design requirements. The vertical test checked the reliability of the test dewar and the quench detection system. This paper presents the physical and mechanical design of the batch magnets, the quench detection technique, field measurements, and a discussion of the residual field resulting from persistent current effects.

  7. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  8. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  9. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  10. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mirfayzi, S R; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Krygier, A G; Green, A; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Freeman, R R; Fuchs, J; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Morrison, J T; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2015-07-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil. PMID:26233373

  11. Angular distribution of neutrons from deuterated cluster explosions driven by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Buersgens, F; Madison, K W; Symes, D R; Hartke, R; Osterhoff, J; Grigsby, W; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2006-07-01

    We have studied experimentally the angular distributions of fusion neutrons from plasmas of multi-keV ion temperature, created by 40 fs, multi-TW laser pulses in dense plumes of D2 and CD4 clusters. A slight anisotropy in the neutron emission is observed. We attribute this anisotropy to the fact that the differential cross section for DD fusion is anisotropic even at low collision energies, and this, coupled with the geometry of the gas jet target, leads to beam-target neutrons that are slightly directed. The qualitative features of this anisotropy are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Angular distribution of neutrons from deuterated cluster explosions driven by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buersgens, F.; Madison, K. W.; Symes, D. R.; Hartke, R.; Osterhoff, J.; Grigsby, W.; Dyer, G.; Ditmire, T.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied experimentally the angular distributions of fusion neutrons from plasmas of multi-keV ion temperature, created by 40fs , multi-TW laser pulses in dense plumes of D2 and CD4 clusters. A slight anisotropy in the neutron emission is observed. We attribute this anisotropy to the fact that the differential cross section for DD fusion is anisotropic even at low collision energies, and this, coupled with the geometry of the gas jet target, leads to beam-target neutrons that are slightly directed. The qualitative features of this anisotropy are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Free electron lasers driven by linear induction accelerators: High power radiation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orzechowski, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    The technology of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and linear induction accelerators (LIAs) is addressed by outlining the following topics: fundamentals of FELs; basic concepts of linear induction accelerators; the Electron Laser Facility (a microwave FEL); PALADIN (an infrared FEL); magnetic switching; IMP; and future directions (relativistic klystrons). This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  14. Two-stage acceleration of interstellar ions driven by high-energy lepton plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, YunQian; Sheng, ZhengMing; Lu, QuanMing; Li, YuTong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of the interaction of a high-energy lepton plasma flow with background electron-proton plasma and focus on the acceleration processes of the protons. It is found that the acceleration follows a two-stage process. In the first stage, protons are significantly accelerated transversely (perpendicular to the lepton flow) by the turbulent magnetic field "islands" generated via the strong Weibel-type instabilities. The accelerated protons shows a perfect inverse-power energy spectrum. As the interaction continues, a shockwave structure forms and the protons in front of the shockwave are reflected at twice of the shock speed, resulting in a quasi-monoenergetic peak located near 200 MeV under the simulation parameters. The presented scenario of ion acceleration may be relevant to cosmic-ray generation in some astrophysical environments.

  15. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-01

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  16. Stable long range proton acceleration driven by intense laser pulse with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Zhu, Z.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Huang, S.; Zhang, F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2014-06-15

    Proton acceleration is investigated by 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in an interaction of an ultra intense laser with a near-critical-density plasma. It was found that multi acceleration mechanisms contribute together to a 1.67 GeV collimated proton beam generation. The W-BOA (breakout afterburner based on electrons accelerated by a wakefield) acceleration mechanism plays an important role for the proton energy enhancement in the area far from the target. The stable and continuous acceleration maintains for a long distance and period at least several pico-seconds. Furthermore, the energy scalings are also discussed about the target density and the laser intensity.

  17. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; et al

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. In this study, we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel ismore » created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.« less

  18. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m−1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:27250570

  19. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  20. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  1. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:27250570

  2. Transient Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of the Windowless Target System for the Lead Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Accelerator Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Fosco; Ferri, Roberta; Moreau, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    The target system, whose function is to supply an external neutron source to the ADS sub-critical core to sustain the neutron chain reaction, is the most critical part of an ADS being subject to severe thermo-mechanical loading and material damage due to accelerator protons and fission neutrons. A windowless option was chosen as reference configuration for the target system of the LBE-cooled ADS within the European PDS-XADS project in order to reduce the material damage and to increase its life. This document deals with the thermo-hydraulic results of the calculations performed with STAR-CD and RELAP5 codes for studying the behaviour of the windowless target system during off-normal operating conditions. It also reports a description of modifications properly implemented in the codes needed for this analysis. The windowless target system shows a satisfactory thermo-hydraulic behaviour for the analysed accidents, except for the loss of both pumps without proton beam shut-off and the beam trips lasting more than one second. (authors)

  3. The relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Watterson, J. I. W.

    1999-06-10

    Fast neutron radiography as a method for non destructive testing is a fast growing field of research. At the Schonland Research Center for Nuclear Sciences we have been engaged in the formulation of a model for the physics of image formation in fast neutron radiography (FNR). This involves examining all the various factors that affect image formation in FNR by experimental and Monte Carlo methods. One of the major problems in the development of a model for fast neutron radiography is the determination of the factors that affect image contrast and resolution. Monte Carlo methods offer an ideal tool for the determination of the origin of many of these factors. In previous work the focus of these methods has been the determination of the scattered neutron field in both a scintillator and a fast neutron radiography facility. As an extension of this work MCNP has been used to evaluate the role neutron scattering in a specimen plays in image detectability. Image processing of fast neutron radiographs is a necessary method of enhancing the detectability of features in an image. MCNP has been used to determine the part it can play in indirectly improving image resolution and aiding in image processing. The role noise plays in fast neutron radiography and its impact on image reconstruction has been evaluated. All these factors aid in the development of a model describing the relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability.

  4. Effect of polarization and focusing on laser pulse driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman

    2014-04-15

    The effect of laser polarization and focusing is theoretically studied on the final energy gain of a particle in the Auto-resonant acceleration scheme using a finite duration laser pulse with Gaussian shaped temporal envelope. The exact expressions for dynamical variables viz. position, momentum, and energy are obtained by analytically solving the relativistic equation of motion describing particle dynamics in the combined field of an elliptically polarized finite duration pulse and homogeneous static axial magnetic field. From the solutions, it is shown that for a given set of laser parameters viz. intensity and pulse length along with static magnetic field, the energy gain by a positively charged particle is maximum for a right circularly polarized laser pulse. Further, a new scheme is proposed for particle acceleration by subjecting it to the combined field of a focused finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field. In this scheme, the particle is initially accelerated by the focused laser field, which drives the non-resonant particle to second stage of acceleration by cyclotron Auto-resonance. The new scheme is found to be efficient over two individual schemes, i.e., auto-resonant acceleration and direct acceleration by focused laser field, as significant particle acceleration can be achieved at one order lesser values of static axial magnetic field and laser intensity.

  5. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Harjo, Stefanus; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Umeno, Takahiro; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki

    2013-06-01

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  6. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka; Harjo, Stefanus; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Umeno, Takahiro

    2013-06-15

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  7. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Cikhardt, J.; Rezac, K.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Sila, O.

    2015-09-15

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 8 }n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 10{sup 14} deuterons in the 0.5–2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 10{sup 9} at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 10{sup 6 }n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  8. Vacuum laser-driven acceleration by two slits-truncated Bessel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Imasaki, K.

    2005-08-29

    An approach of vacuum acceleration by two laser Bessel beams is presented in this letter. With elaborate arrangement, the two Bessel beams are truncated by a set of special annular slits to form consecutive acceleration field in the electron traveling direction. Therefore, the electron of a certain initial energy can be accelerated in the whole interaction region without experiencing deceleration even though the phase-slippage occurs. Furthermore, the Bessel beam can provide a rather long distance for the effective interaction between the electron and the laser field due to its 'diffraction-free' property, resulting in improvement of the energy exchange.

  9. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  10. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  11. Reduction of the Radiotoxicity of Spent Nuclear Fuel Using a Two-Tiered System Comprising Light Water Reactors and Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    H.R. Trellue

    2003-06-01

    Two main issues regarding the disposal of spent nuclear fuel from nuclear reactors in the United States in the geological repository Yucca Mountain are: (1) Yucca Mountain is not designed to hold the amount of fuel that has been and is proposed to be generated in the next few decades, and (2) the radiotoxicity (i.e., biological hazard) of the waste (particularly the actinides) does not decrease below that of natural uranium ore for hundreds of thousands of years. One solution to these problems may be to use transmutation to convert the nuclides in spent nuclear fuel to ones with shorter half-lives. Both reactor and accelerator-based systems have been examined in the past for transmutation; there are advantages and disadvantages associated with each. By using existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to burn a majority of the plutonium in spent nuclear fuel and Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADSs) to transmute the remainder of the actinides, the benefits of each type of system can be realized. The transmutation process then becomes more efficient and less expensive. This research searched for the best combination of LWRs with multiple recycling of plutonium and ADSs to transmute spent nuclear fuel from past and projected nuclear activities (assuming little growth of nuclear energy). The neutronic design of each system is examined in detail although thermal hydraulic performance would have to be considered before a final system is designed. The results are obtained using the Monte Carlo burnup code Monteburns, which has been successfully benchmarked for MOX fuel irradiation and compared to other codes for ADS calculations. The best combination of systems found in this research includes 41 LWRs burning mixed oxide fuel with two recycles of plutonium ({approx}40 years operation each) and 53 ADSs to transmute the remainder of the actinides from spent nuclear fuel over the course of 60 years of operation.

  12. Front-end and back-end electrochemistry of molten salt in accelerator-driven transmutation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, M.A.; Venneri, F.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this work is to develop preparation and clean-up processes for the fuel and carrier salt in the Los Alamos Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology molten salt nuclear system. The front-end or fuel preparation process focuses on the removal of fission products, uranium, and zirconium from spent nuclear fuel by utilizing electrochemical methods (i.e., electrowinning). The same method provides the separation of the so-called noble metal fission products at the back-end of the fuel cycle. Both implementations would have important diversion safeguards. The proposed separation processes and a thermodynamic analysis of the electrochemical separation method are presented.

  13. SU-E-T-495: Neutron Induced Electronics Failure Rate Analysis for a Single Room Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, N; DeWees, T; Klein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the failure rate as a function of neutron dose of the range modulator's servo motor controller system (SMCS) while shielded with Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and unshielded in a single room proton accelerator. Methods: Two experimental setups were constructed using two servo motor controllers and two motors. Each SMCS was then placed 30 cm from the end of the plugged proton accelerator applicator. The motor was then turned on and observed from outside of the vault while being irradiated to known neutron doses determined from bubble detector measurements. Anytime the motor deviated from the programmed motion a failure was recorded along with the delivered dose. The experiment was repeated using 9 cm of BPE shielding surrounding the SMCS. Results: Ten SMCS failures were recorded in each experiment. The dose per monitor unit for the unshielded SMCS was 0.0211 mSv/MU and 0.0144 mSv/MU for the shielded SMCS. The mean dose to produce a failure for the unshielded SMCS was 63.5 ± 58.3 mSv versus 17.0 ±12.2 mSv for the shielded. The mean number of MUs between failures were 2297 ± 1891 MU for the unshielded SMCS and 2122 ± 1523 MU for the shielded. A Wilcoxon Signed Ranked test showed the dose between failures were significantly different (P value = 0.044) while the number of MUs between failures were not (P value = 1.000). Statistical analysis determined a SMCS neutron dose of 5.3 mSv produces a 5% chance of failure. Depending on the workload and location of the SMCS, this failure rate could impede clinical workflow. Conclusion: BPE shielding was shown to not reduce the average failure of the SMCS and relocation of the system outside of the accelerator vault was required to lower the failure rate enough to avoid impeding clinical work flow.

  14. Accelerated ions from pulsed-power-driven fast plasma flow in perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezaki, Taichi; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2016-06-01

    To understand the interaction between fast plasma flow and perpendicular magnetic field, we have investigated the behavior of a one-dimensional fast plasma flow in a perpendicular magnetic field by a laboratory-scale experiment using a pulsed-power discharge. The velocity of the plasma flow generated by a tapered cone plasma focus device is about 30 km/s, and the magnetic Reynolds number is estimated to be 8.8. After flow through the perpendicular magnetic field, the accelerated ions are measured by an ion collector. To clarify the behavior of the accelerated ions and the electromagnetic fields, numerical simulations based on an electromagnetic hybrid particle-in-cell method have been carried out. The results show that the behavior of the accelerated ions corresponds qualitatively to the experimental results. Faster ions in the plasma flow are accelerated by the induced electromagnetic fields modulated with the plasma flow.

  15. Demonstration of electron acceleration in a laser-driven dielectric microstructure.

    PubMed

    Peralta, E A; Soong, K; England, R J; Colby, E R; Wu, Z; Montazeri, B; McGuinness, C; McNeur, J; Leedle, K J; Walz, D; Sozer, E B; Cowan, B; Schwartz, B; Travish, G; Byer, R L

    2013-11-01

    The enormous size and cost of current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency technology has spawned great interest in the development of new acceleration concepts that are more compact and economical. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) are an attractive approach, because such dielectric microstructures can support accelerating fields one to two orders of magnitude higher than can radio-frequency cavity-based accelerators. DLAs use commercial lasers as a power source, which are smaller and less expensive than the radio-frequency klystrons that power today's accelerators. In addition, DLAs are fabricated via low-cost, lithographic techniques that can be used for mass production. However, despite several DLA structures having been proposed recently, no successful demonstration of acceleration in these structures has so far been shown. Here we report high-gradient (beyond 250 MeV m(-1)) acceleration of electrons in a DLA. Relativistic (60-MeV) electrons are energy-modulated over 563 ± 104 optical periods of a fused silica grating structure, powered by a 800-nm-wavelength mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The observed results are in agreement with analytical models and electrodynamic simulations. By comparison, conventional modern linear accelerators operate at gradients of 10-30 MeV m(-1), and the first linear radio-frequency cavity accelerator was ten radio-frequency periods (one metre) long with a gradient of approximately 1.6 MeV m(-1) (ref. 5). Our results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems. This would enable compact table-top accelerators on the MeV-GeV (10(6)-10(9) eV) scale for security scanners and medical therapy, university-scale X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (10(12)

  16. Demonstration of electron acceleration in a laser-driven dielectric microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; Wu, Z.; Montazeri, B.; McGuinness, C.; McNeur, J.; Leedle, K. J.; Walz, D.; Sozer, E. B.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B.; Travish, G.; Byer, R. L.

    2013-11-01

    The enormous size and cost of current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency technology has spawned great interest in the development of new acceleration concepts that are more compact and economical. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) are an attractive approach, because such dielectric microstructures can support accelerating fields one to two orders of magnitude higher than can radio-frequency cavity-based accelerators. DLAs use commercial lasers as a power source, which are smaller and less expensive than the radio-frequency klystrons that power today's accelerators. In addition, DLAs are fabricated via low-cost, lithographic techniques that can be used for mass production. However, despite several DLA structures having been proposed recently, no successful demonstration of acceleration in these structures has so far been shown. Here we report high-gradient (beyond 250MeVm-1) acceleration of electrons in a DLA. Relativistic (60-MeV) electrons are energy-modulated over 563+/-104 optical periods of a fused silica grating structure, powered by a 800-nm-wavelength mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The observed results are in agreement with analytical models and electrodynamic simulations. By comparison, conventional modern linear accelerators operate at gradients of 10-30MeVm-1, and the first linear radio-frequency cavity accelerator was ten radio-frequency periods (one metre) long with a gradient of approximately 1.6MeVm-1 (ref. 5). Our results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems. This would enable compact table-top accelerators on the MeV-GeV (106-109eV) scale for security scanners and medical therapy, university-scale X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (1012eV) scale.

  17. Generation of the magnetic helicity in a neutron star driven by the electroweak electron-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B. E-mail: semikoz@yandex.ru

    2015-05-01

    We study the instability of magnetic fields in a neutron star core driven by the parity violating part of the electron-nucleon interaction in the Standard Model. Assuming a seed field of the order 10{sup 12} G, that is a common value for pulsars, one obtains its amplification due to such a novel mechanism by about five orders of magnitude, up to 10{sup 17} G, at time scales ∼ (10{sup 3}–10{sup 5}) yr. This effect is suggested to be a possible explanation of the origin of the strongest magnetic fields observed in magnetars. The growth of a seed magnetic field energy density is stipulated by the corresponding growth of the magnetic helicity density due to the presence of the anomalous electric current in the Maxwell equation. Such an anomaly is the sum of the two competitive effects: (i) the chiral magnetic effect driven by the difference of chemical potentials for the right and left handed massless electrons and (ii) constant chiral electroweak electron-nucleon interaction term, which has the polarization origin and depends on the constant neutron density in a neutron star core. The remarkable issue for the decisive role of the magnetic helicity evolution in the suggested mechanism is the arbitrariness of an initial magnetic helicity including the case of non-helical fields from the beginning. The tendency of the magnetic helicity density to the maximal helicity case at large evolution times provides the growth of a seed magnetic field to the strongest magnetic fields in astrophysics.

  18. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskij, K. I.; Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Shatokhin, V. L.; Isaev, A. A.; Martynenko, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10-3-10-1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed.

  19. Absolute calibration of neutron detectors on the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, R. M.; Clary, R.; Korepanov, S.; Jauregui, F.; Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Valentine, T.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-11-01

    In the C-2U fusion energy experiment, high power neutral beam injection creates a large fast ion population that sustains a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The diagnosis of the fast ion pressure in these high-performance plasmas is therefore critical, and the measurement of the flux of neutrons from the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction is well suited to the task. Here we describe the absolute, in situ calibration of scintillation neutron detectors via two independent methods: firing deuterium beams into a high density gas target and calibration with a 2 × 107 n/s AmBe source. The practical issues of each method are discussed and the resulting calibration factors are shown to be in good agreement. Finally, the calibration factor is applied to C-2U experimental data where the measured neutron rate is found to exceed the classical expectation.

  20. The Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in the Two-Zone Subcritical System Driven by High- Intensity Neutron Generator - 12098

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V.O.; Gulik, V.I.; Pavlovych, V.M.

    2012-07-01

    The main problems of transmutation of high-level radioactive waste (minor actinides and long-lived fission products) are considered in our work. The range of radioactive waste of nuclear power is analyzed. The conditions under which the transmutation of radioactive waste will be most effective are analyzed too. The modeling results of a transmutation of the main radioactive isotopes are presented and discussed. The transmutation of minor actinides and long-lived fission products are modeled in our work (minor actinides - Np-237, Am-241, Am-242, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245; long-lived fission products - I-129, Tc-99). The two-zone subcritical system is calculated with help of different neutron-physical codes (MCNP, Scale, Montebarn, Origen). The ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library used in above calculations. Thus, radioactive wastes can be divided into two main groups that need to be transmuted. The minor actinides form the first group and the long-lived fission products form the second one. For the purpose of effective transmutation these isotopes must be extracted from the spent nuclear fuel with the help of either PUREX technology or pyrometallurgical technology. The two-zone reactor system with fast and thermal regions is more effective for nuclear waste transmutation than the one-zone reactor. Modeling results show that nearly all radioactive wastes can be transmuted in the two-zone subcritical system driven by a high-intensity neutron generator with the external neutron source strength of 1.10{sup 13} n/sec. Obviously, transmutation rate will increase with a rise of the external neutron source strength. From the results above we can also see that the initial loading of radioactive isotopes into the reactor system should exceed by mass those isotopes that are finally produced. (authors)

  1. ACCELERATORS: Emittance coupling driven by space charge in the CSNS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue-Jun; Fu, Shi-Nian; Peng, Jun

    2009-09-01

    In the conventional design of RF linacs, the bunched beams are not in thermal equilibrium. The space charge forces couple the particle motions between the transverse and the longitudinal directions. Furthermore it will cause the equipartitioning process which leads to emittance growth and halo formation. In the design of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac, three cases are investigated using the Hofmann stability charts. In this paper, we present the equipartitioning beam study of the CSNS Alvarez DTL linac.

  2. Heavy ion acceleration driven by the Interaction between ultraintense Laser pulse and sub-micron foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jinqing; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; High Energy Density Group Team

    2015-11-01

    For ion acceleration at the intensity exceeding 1021W/cm2, Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) could offer advantages over Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) and Break-Out Afterburner (BOA). In this ultra-relativistic regime, target electrons become highly relativistic and the results are sensitive to many parameters. Especially for heavy ions acceleration, the understanding of the most important parameter effects is limited due to the lack of experiments and modeling. To further understand the key parameters and determine the most suitable regimes for efficient acceleration of heavy ions, we have carried out two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations with the epoch code. In the simulations, effects of preplasma and optimal targets thicknesses for different laser pulse have been studied in detail. Based on the understanding of ion RPA, we propose some new target parameters to achieve higher ion energy. This work was performed with the support of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant FA9550-14-1-0282.

  3. Observation of wakefields in a beam-driven photonic band gap accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; Gao, F.; Antipov, S.; Xu, P.; Zheng, S.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Gai, W.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs LLC; Tsinghua Univ.

    2009-12-01

    Wakefield excitation has been experimentally studied in a three-cell X-band standing wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure. Major monopole (TM{sub 01}- and TM{sub 02}-like) and dipole (TM{sub 11}- and TM{sub 12}-like) modes were identified and characterized by precisely controlling the position of beam injection. The quality factor Q of the dipole modes was measured to be {approx}10 times smaller than that of the accelerating mode. A charge sweep, up to 80 nC, has been performed, equivalent to {approx} 30 MV/m accelerating field on axis. A variable delay low charge witness bunch following a high charge drive bunch was used to calibrate the gradient in the PBG structure by measuring its maximum energy gain and loss. Experimental results agree well with numerical simulations.

  4. Neutronics for critical fission reactors and subcritical fission in hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2012-06-01

    The requirements of future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will focus on safety, sustainability and radioactive waste minimization. Critical fast neutron reactors and sub-critical, external source driven systems (accelerator driven and fusion-fission hybrids) have a potential role to meet these requirements in view of their physics characteristics. This paper provides a short introduction to these features.

  5. Neutronics for critical fission reactors and subcritical fission in hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2012-06-19

    The requirements of future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will focus on safety, sustainability and radioactive waste minimization. Critical fast neutron reactors and sub-critical, external source driven systems (accelerator driven and fusion-fission hybrids) have a potential role to meet these requirements in view of their physics characteristics. This paper provides a short introduction to these features.

  6. Reduction of angular divergence of laser-driven ion beams during their acceleration and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakova, M.; Pšikal, Jan; Margarone, Daniele; Maggiore, Mario; Korn, G.

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma physics is a field of big interest because of its implications in basic science, fast ignition, medicine (i.e. hadrontherapy), astrophysics, material science, particle acceleration etc. 100-MeV class protons accelerated from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin target have been demonstrated. With continuing development of laser technology, greater and greater energies are expected, therefore projects focusing on various applications are being formed, e.g. ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration). One of the main characteristic and crucial disadvantage of ion beams accelerated by ultra-short intense laser pulses is their large divergence, not suitable for the most of applications. In this paper two ways how to decrease beam divergence are proposed. Firstly, impact of different design of targets on beam divergence is studied by using 2D Particlein-cell simulations (PIC). Namely, various types of targets include at foils, curved foil and foils with diverse microstructures. Obtained results show that well-designed microstructures, i.e. a hole in the center of the target, can produce proton beam with the lowest divergence. Moreover, the particle beam accelerated from a curved foil has lower divergence compared to the beam from a flat foil. Secondly, another proposed method for the divergence reduction is using of a magnetic solenoid. The trajectories of the laser accelerated particles passing through the solenoid are modeled in a simple Matlab program. Results from PIC simulations are used as input in the program. The divergence is controlled by optimizing the magnetic field inside the solenoid and installing an aperture in front of the device.

  7. Compton Scattering X-Ray Sources Driven by Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Gibson, D J; Brown, W J; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K T; Pukhov, A

    2005-10-19

    Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10{sup 22} s{sup -1} are predicted, with a peak brightness > 10{sup 20} photons/(mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x s x 0.1% bandwidth).

  8. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams Driven by Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Henig, A.; Hoerlein, R.; Kiefer, D.; Jung, D.; Habs, D.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Schreiber, J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Yan, X. Q.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Tajima, T.

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C{sup 6+} ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.

  9. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  10. Neutron Energy and Time-of-flight Spectra Behind the Lateral Shield of a High Energy Electron Accelerator Beam Dump, Part II: Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, Stefan

    2002-09-19

    Energy spectra of high-energy neutrons and neutron time-of-flight spectra were calculated for the setup of experiment T-454 performed with a NE213 liquid scintillator at the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The neutrons were created by the interaction a 28.7 GeV electron beam in the aluminum beam dump of the FFTB which is housed inside a thick steel and concrete shielding. In order to determine the attenuation length of high-energy neutrons additional concrete shielding of various thicknesses was placed outside the existing shielding. The calculations were performed using the FLUKA interaction and transport code. The energy and time-of-flight were recorded for the location of the detector allowing a detailed comparison with the experimental data. A generally good description of the data is achieved adding confidence to the use of FLUKA for the design of shielding for high-energy electron accelerators.

  11. Calculation of Neutron Time-of-Flight and Energy Spectra Behind Thick Shielding of an Electron Accelerator and Comparison to Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, S.

    2002-05-01

    Energy spectra of high-energy neutrons and neutron time-of-flight spectra were calculated for the setup of experiment T-454 performed with a NE213 liquid scintillator at the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The neutrons were created by the interaction a 28.7 GeV electron beam in the aluminum beam dump of the FFTB which is housed inside a thick steel and concrete shielding. In order to determine the attenuation length of high-energy neutrons additional concrete shielding of various thicknesses was placed outside the existing shielding. The calculations were performed using the FLUKA interaction and transport code. The energy and time-of-flight were recorded for the location of the detector allowing a detailed comparison with the experimental data. A generally good description of the data is achieved adding confidence to the use of FLUKA for the design of shielding for high-energy electron accelerators.

  12. Calculation of Neutron Time-of-Flight and Energy Spectra Behind Thick Shielding of an Electron Accelerator and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, Stefan

    2002-05-06

    Energy spectra of high-energy neutrons and neutron time-of-flight spectra were calculated for the setup of experiment T-454 performed with a NE213 liquid scintillator at the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The neutrons were created by the interaction a 28.7 GeV electron beam in the aluminum beam dump of the FFTB which is housed inside a thick steel and concrete shielding. In order to determine the attenuation length of high-energy neutrons additional concrete shielding of various thicknesses was placed outside the existing shielding. The calculations were performed using the FLUKA interaction and transport code. The energy and time-of-flight were recorded for the location of the detector allowing a detailed comparison with the experimental data. A generally good description of the data is achieved adding confidence to the use of FLUKA for the design of shielding for high-energy electron accelerators.

  13. High-quality electron beams from beam-driven plasma accelerators by wakefield-induced ionization injection.

    PubMed

    Martinez de la Ossa, A; Grebenyuk, J; Mehrling, T; Schaper, L; Osterhoff, J

    2013-12-13

    We propose a new and simple strategy for controlled ionization-induced trapping of electrons in a beam-driven plasma accelerator. The presented method directly exploits electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and capture them into a well-defined volume of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to high-quality witness bunches. This injection principle is explained by example of three-dimensional particle-in-cell calculations using the code OSIRIS. In these simulations a high-current-density electron-beam driver excites plasma waves in the blowout regime inside a fully ionized hydrogen plasma of density 5×10(17)cm-3. Within an embedded 100  μm long plasma column contaminated with neutral helium gas, the wakefields trigger ionization, trapping of a defined fraction of the released electrons, and subsequent acceleration. The hereby generated electron beam features a 1.5 kA peak current, 1.5  μm transverse normalized emittance, an uncorrelated energy spread of 0.3% on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch length.

  14. Dominant deuteron acceleration with a high-intensity laser for isotope production and neutron generation

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimchuk, A.; Raymond, A.; Yu, F.; Dollar, F.; Willingale, L.; Zulick, C.; Krushelnick, K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.

    2013-05-13

    Experiments on the interaction of an ultra-short pulse laser with heavy-water, ice-covered copper targets, at an intensity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, were performed demonstrating the generation of a 'pure' deuteron beam with a divergence of 20 Degree-Sign , maximum energy of 8 MeV, and a total of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} deuterons with energy above 1 MeV-equivalent to a conversion efficiency of 1.5%{+-} 0.2%. Subsequent experiments on irradiation of a {sup 10}B sample with deuterons and neutron generation from d-d reactions in a pitcher-catcher geometry, resulted in the production of {approx}10{sup 6} atoms of the positron emitter {sup 11}C and a neutron flux of (4{+-}1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} neutrons/sterad, respectively.

  15. Accelerating the development of transparent graphene electrodes through basic science driven chemical functionalization.

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Calvin; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Ohta, Taisuke; Brumbach, Michael T.; Wheeler, David Roger; Veneman, Alexander; Gearba, I. Raluca; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-09-01

    Chemical functionalization is required to adapt graphenes properties to many applications. However, most covalent functionalization schemes are spontaneous or defect driven and are not suitable for applications requiring directed assembly of molecules on graphene substrates. In this work, we demonstrated electrochemically driven covalent bonding of phenyl iodoniums onto epitaxial graphene. The amount of chemisorption was demonstrated by varying the duration of the electrochemical driving potential. Chemical, electronic, and defect states of phenyl-modified graphene were studied by photoemission spectroscopy, spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. Covalent attachment rehybridized some of the delocalized graphene sp2 orbitals to localized sp3 states. Control over the relative spontaneity (reaction rate) of covalent graphene functionalization is an important first step to the practical realization of directed molecular assembly on graphene. More than 10 publications, conference presentations, and program highlights were produced (some invited), and follow-on funding was obtained to continue this work.

  16. Accelerator measurement of the energy spectra of neutrons emitted in the interaction of 3-GeV protons with several elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalesnik, W. J.; Devlin, T. J.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The application of time of flight techniques for determining the shapes of the energy spectra of neutrons between 20 and 400 MeV is discussed. The neutrons are emitted at 20, 34, and 90 degrees in the bombardment of targets by 3 GeV protons. The targets used are carbon, aluminum, cobalt, and platinum with cylindrical cross section. Targets being bombarded are located in the internal circulating beam of a particle accelerator.

  17. Matching sub-fs electron bunches for laser-driven plasma acceleration at SINBAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Assmann, R. W.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B.

    2016-09-01

    We present theoretical and numerical studies of matching sub-femtosecond space-charge-dominated electron bunch into the Laser-plasma Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA) foreseen at the SINBAD facility. The longitudinal space-charge (SC) effect induced growths of the energy spread and longitudinal phase-space chirp are major issues in the matching section, which will result in bunch elongation, emittance growth and spot size dilution. In addition, the transverse SC effect would lead to a mismatch of the beam optics if it were not compensated for. Start-to-end simulations and preliminary optimizations were carried out in order to understand the achievable beam parameters at the entrance of the plasma accelerator.

  18. Accelerator driven system based on plutonium subcritical reactor and 660 MeV phasotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Chultem, D.; Dudarev, S. Yu.; Furman, V. I.; Gudowski, W.; Janczyszyn, J.; Maltsev, A. A.; Onischenko, L. M.; Pogodajev, G. N.; Polanski, A.; Popov, Yu. P.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.; Taczanowski, S.

    1999-11-01

    The proposal presents a PLUTONIUM BASED ENERGY AMPLIFIER TESTING CONCEPT which employs a plutonium subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator, operating in the the JINR (Dubna, Russia). To make the present conceptual design of the Plutonium Energy Amplifier we have chosen a nominal unit capacity of 20 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff between 0.94 and 0.95 and the energetic gain about 20.

  19. Compact Torus Accelerator Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Power Plant HYLIFE-CT

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B G; Moir, R W; Tabak, M; Bieri, R L; Hammer, J H; Hartman, C W; Hoffman, M A; Leber, R L; Petzoldt, R W; Tobin, M T

    2005-03-30

    A Compact Torus Accelerator (CTA) is used to accelerate a Compact Torus (CT) to 35 MJ kinetic energy which is focused to a 20 mm diameter where its kinetic energy is converted to a shaped x-ray pulse of 30 MJ. The capsule yield with a prescribed radiation profile is calculated to be (gain 60 times 30 MJ) 1.8 GJ. Schemes for achieving this profile are described. The CT is accelerated in a length of 30 m within an annulus of 150 mm ID and 300 mm OD where the maximum magnetic field is 28 T. A 2.5 m conical taper reduces the mean diameter of the CT from 225 mm to 20 mm. The conical section is made out of solid Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}. The target with its frozen conical guide section is accurately placed at the end of the accelerator about once per second. The reactor called HYLIFE uses liquid jets to attenuate blast effects including shrapnel from the shattered conical guide section and radiation so that the vessel is expected to last 30 years. The calculated cost of electricity is estimated (in constant 1988 dollars) to be about 4.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h compared to the future cost of nuclear and coal of 4.3 to 5.8 cents/kW {center_dot} h. The CT driver contributes 17% to the cost of electricity. Present CT's make 2 x 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}; the goal of experiments in progress is 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2} with further modifications to allow 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}, whereas the reactor requires 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} in a shaped pulse.

  20. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  1. Using MMS measurements to validate models of reconnection-driven magnetotail reconfiguration and particle acceleration during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    New data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission confirms and greatly extends the view that substorms are a configurational instability driven by magnetic reconnection. We have studied in detail a powerful storm period in June 2015 which shows that substorm events seen sequentially by the four MMS spacecraft subsequently feed the powerful enhancement of the radiation belts observed by the Van Allen Probes mission. Several sequences of significant southward IMF along with a period of high (VSW≥500 km/s) solar wind speed occurred following a strong interplanetary shock wave impact on the magnetosphere. We see that substorms provide a "seed" population, while high-speed solar wind drives the acceleration to relativistic energies in this two-step geomagnetic activity scenario. Thus, MMS data help validate models that invoke reconnection as a fundamental driver of magnetospheric particle acceleration. The data for several separate events on 22 June 2015 show that the magnetosphere progresses through a specific, well-observed sequence of energy-loading and stress-developing states until the entire system suddenly reconfigures. Energetic electron fluxes measured by the several MMS spacecraft reveal the clear temporal occurrence characteristics and the obvious relationships to concurrently measured solar wind drivers. This shows that enhancements in substorms are a key first step in the acceleration of radiation belt electrons to high energies as observed subsequently by the Van Allen Probes instrumentation. Thus, this high-resolution observational evidence along with the accompanying modeling has demonstrated that magnetospheric substorms are an important acceleration component within the coupled near-Earth system.

  2. MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN WINDS FROM DIFFERENTIALLY ROTATING NEUTRON STARS AND X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2014-04-10

    Besides being among the most promising sources of gravitational waves, merging neutron star binaries also represent a leading scenario to explain the phenomenology of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Recent observations have revealed a large subclass of SGRBs with roughly constant luminosity in their X-ray afterglows, lasting 10-10{sup 4} s. These features are generally taken as evidence of a long-lived central engine powered by the magnetic spin-down of a uniformly rotating, magnetized object. We propose a different scenario in which the central engine powering the X-ray emission is a differentially rotating hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) that launches a quasi-isotropic and baryon-loaded wind driven by the magnetic field, which is built-up through differential rotation. Our model is supported by long-term, three-dimensional, general-relativistic, and ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations, showing that this isotropic emission is a very robust feature. For a given HMNS, the presence of a collimated component depends sensitively on the initial magnetic field geometry, while the stationary electromagnetic luminosity depends only on the magnetic energy initially stored in the system. We show that our model is compatible with the observed timescales and luminosities and express the latter in terms of a simple scaling relation.

  3. Accelerating a Mechanically Driven anti-Woodward-Hoffmann Ring Opening with a Polymer Lever Arm Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junpeng; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B; Niu, Zhenbin; Rheingold, Arnold L; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical forces have previously been used to drive reactions along pathways that violate the orbital symmetry effects captured in the Woodward-Hoffmann rules. Here, we show that a polymer "lever arm effect" can provide a mechanical advantage in accelerating the symmetry forbidden disrotatory ring opening of benzocyclobutene (BCB). Addition of an α-E-alkene to the BCB mechanophore drops the force required to induce reactions on the ∼0.1 s time scale of single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments from 1370 to 920 pN.

  4. On the analysis of inhomogeneous magnetic field spectrometer for laser-driven ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Senje, L.; McCormack, O.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.; Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Letzring, S.; Gautier, D. C.; Fernandez, J. C.; Toncian, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2015-03-15

    We present a detailed study of the use of a non-parallel, inhomogeneous magnetic field spectrometer for the investigation of laser-accelerated ion beams. Employing a wedged yoke design, we demonstrate the feasibility of an in-situ self-calibration technique of the non-uniform magnetic field and show that high-precision measurements of ion energies are possible in a wide-angle configuration. We also discuss the implications of a stacked detector system for unambiguous identification of different ion species present in the ion beam and explore the feasibility of detection of high energy particles beyond 100 MeV/amu in radiation harsh environments.

  5. Enhanced electron injection in laser-driven bubble acceleration by ultra-intense laser irradiating foil-gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo; Ma, Yan-Yun; Xu, Han; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Chen, Min; Yu, Tong-Pu; Zou, De-Bin; Liu, Jian-Xun; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Gan, Long-Fei; Tian, Li-Chao; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Kawata, S.

    2015-08-01

    A scheme for enhancing the electron injection charge in a laser-driven bubble acceleration is proposed. In this scheme, a thin foil target is placed in front of a gas target. Upon interaction with an ultra-intense laser pulse, the foil emits electrons with large longitudinal momenta, allowing them to be trapped into the transmitted shaped laser-excited bubble in the gaseous plasma target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to demonstrate this scheme, and an electron beam with a total electron number of 4.21 × 10 8 μ m - 1 can be produced, which is twice the number of electrons produced without the foil. Such scheme may be widely used for applications that require high electron yields such as positron and gamma ray generation from relativistic electron beams interacting with solid targets.

  6. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  7. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H Y; He, Y; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  8. New Production Routes for Medical Isotopes 64Cu and 67Cu Using Accelerator Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kin, Tadahiro; Nagai, Yasuki; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Minato, Futoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Segawa, Mariko; Harada, Hideo; Konno, Chikara; Ochiai, Kentaro; Takakura, Kosuke

    2013-03-01

    We have measured the activation cross sections producing 64Cu and 67Cu, promising medical radioisotopes for molecular imaging and radioimmunotherapy, by bombarding a natural zinc sample with 14 MeV neutrons. We estimated the production yields of 64Cu and 67Cu by fast neutrons from \\text{natC(d,n) with 40 MeV 5 mA deuterons. We used the present result together with the evaluated cross section of Zn isotopes. The calculated 64Cu yield is 1.8 TBq (175 g 64Zn) for 12 h of irradiation; the yields of 67Cu by 67Zn(n,p)67Cu and 68Zn(n,x)67Cu were 249 GBq (184 g 67Zn) and 287 GBq (186 g 68Zn) at the end of 2 days of irradiation, respectively. From the results, we proposed a new route to produce 67Cu with very little radionuclide impurity via the 68Zn(n,x)67Cu reaction, and showed the 64Zn(n,p)64Cu reaction to be a promising route to produce 64Cu. Both 67Cu and 64Cu are noted to be produced using fast neutrons.

  9. Operational aspects of an externally driven neutron multiplier assembly concept using a Z-pinch 14-MeV Neutron Source (ZEDNA).

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Lewis; Heames, Terence John; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma

    2007-09-01

    This report documents the key safety and operational aspects of a Z-pinch Externally Driven Nuclear Assembly (ZEDNA) reactor concept which is envisioned to be built and operated at the Z-machine facility in Technical Area IV. Operating parameters and reactor neutronic conditions are established that would meet the design requirements of the system. Accident and off-normal conditions are analyzed using a point-kinetics, one-dimensional thermo-mechanical code developed specifically for ZEDNA applications. Downwind dose calculations are presented to determine the potential dose to the collocated worker and public in the event of a hypothetical catastrophic accident. Current and magnetic impulse modeling and the debris shield design are examined for the interface between the Z machine and the ZEDNA. This work was performed as part of the Advanced Fusion Grand Challenge Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. The conclusion of this work is that the ZEDNA concept is feasible and could be operated at the Z-machine facility without undue risk to collocated workers and the public.

  10. A neutron-star-driven X-ray flash associated with supernova SN 2006aj.

    PubMed

    Mazzali, Paolo A; Deng, Jinsong; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Sauer, Daniel N; Pian, Elena; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2006-08-31

    Supernovae connected with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are hyper-energetic explosions resulting from the collapse of very massive stars ( approximately 40 M\\circ, where M\\circ is the mass of the Sun) stripped of their outer hydrogen and helium envelopes. A very massive progenitor, collapsing to a black hole, was thought to be a requirement for the launch of a GRB. Here we report the results of modelling the spectra and light curve of SN 2006aj (ref. 9), which demonstrate that the supernova had a much smaller explosion energy and ejected much less mass than the other GRB-supernovae, suggesting that it was produced by a star whose initial mass was only approximately 20 M\\circ. A star of this mass is expected to form a neutron star rather than a black hole when its core collapses. The smaller explosion energy of SN 2006aj is matched by the weakness and softness of GRB 060218 (an X-ray flash), and the weakness of the radio flux of the supernova. Our results indicate that the supernova-GRB connection extends to a much broader range of stellar masses than previously thought, possibly involving different physical mechanisms: a 'collapsar' (ref. 8) for the more massive stars collapsing to a black hole, and magnetic activity of the nascent neutron star for the less massive stars.

  11. Prognostics of Power Mosfets Under Thermal Stress Accelerated Aging Using Data-Driven and Model-Based Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose; Saxena, Abhinav; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai F.

    2011-01-01

    An approach for predicting remaining useful life of power MOSFETs (metal oxide field effect transistor) devices has been developed. Power MOSFETs are semiconductor switching devices that are instrumental in electronics equipment such as those used in operation and control of modern aircraft and spacecraft. The MOSFETs examined here were aged under thermal overstress in a controlled experiment and continuous performance degradation data were collected from the accelerated aging experiment. Dieattach degradation was determined to be the primary failure mode. The collected run-to-failure data were analyzed and it was revealed that ON-state resistance increased as die-attach degraded under high thermal stresses. Results from finite element simulation analysis support the observations from the experimental data. Data-driven and model based prognostics algorithms were investigated where ON-state resistance was used as the primary precursor of failure feature. A Gaussian process regression algorithm was explored as an example for a data-driven technique and an extended Kalman filter and a particle filter were used as examples for model-based techniques. Both methods were able to provide valid results. Prognostic performance metrics were employed to evaluate and compare the algorithms.

  12. Accelerating the Customer-Driven Microgrid Through Real-Time Digital Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    I. Leonard; T. Baldwin; M. Sloderbeck

    2009-07-01

    Comprehensive design and testing of realistic customer-driven microgrids requires a high performance simulation platform capable of incorporating power system and control models with external hardware systems. Traditional non real-time simulation is unable to fully capture the level of detail necessary to expose real-world implementation issues. With a real-time digital simulator as its foundation, a high-fidelity simulation environment that includes a robust electrical power system model, advanced control architecture, and a highly adaptable communication network is introduced. Hardware-in-the-loop implementation approaches for the hardware-based control and communication systems are included. An overview of the existing power system model and its suitability for investigation of autonomous island formation within the microgrid is additionally presented. Further test plans are also documented.

  13. Magnetic field amplification in nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration including resonant and non-resonant cosmic-ray driven instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, Andrei M.; Osipov, Sergei M.; Ellison, Donald C.; Vladimirov, Andrey E. E-mail: osm2004@mail.ru E-mail: avenovo@gmail.com

    2014-07-10

    We present a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of efficient diffusive shock acceleration where the magnetic turbulence responsible for particle diffusion is calculated self-consistently from the resonant cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instability, together with non-resonant short- and long-wavelength CR-current-driven instabilities. We include the backpressure from CRs interacting with the strongly amplified magnetic turbulence which decelerates and heats the super-Alfvénic flow in the extended shock precursor. Uniquely, in our plane-parallel, steady-state, multi-scale model, the full range of particles, from thermal (∼eV) injected at the viscous subshock to the escape of the highest energy CRs (∼PeV) from the shock precursor, are calculated consistently with the shock structure, precursor heating, magnetic field amplification, and scattering center drift relative to the background plasma. In addition, we show how the cascade of turbulence to shorter wavelengths influences the total shock compression, the downstream proton temperature, the magnetic fluctuation spectra, and accelerated particle spectra. A parameter survey is included where we vary shock parameters, the mode of magnetic turbulence generation, and turbulence cascading. From our survey results, we obtain scaling relations for the maximum particle momentum and amplified magnetic field as functions of shock speed, ambient density, and shock size.

  14. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; English, G.; Firestone, R.; Giquel, F.; King, M.; Leung, K-N.; Sun, M.

    2003-12-31

    A wide variety of applications ranging from medical (BNCT, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) and basic science (neutron imaging, material studies) to homeland security (explosive detection and nuclear material non-proliferation) are in need of compact, high flux neutron generators. The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing various neutron generators for these applications. These neutron generators employed either the D-D or the D-T fusion reaction for the neutron production. The deuterium or deuterium-tritium gas mixture is ionized in an RF-driven plasma source. The ions are then accelerated to {approx}100 keV energy using high current, high voltage DC-power supply to a target where the 2.45 MeV (for D-D reaction) or 14 MeV (for the D-T reaction) neutrons are generated. The development of two different types of neutron tubes are being discussed in this presentation, namely compact, pulsed operation neutron generators and cw, high yield neutron generators. These generators are currently operating at D-D neutron yields of 108 n/s and 109 n/s respectively. A facility, incorporating the larger neutron generator, has been constructed for Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) measurements.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet diagnostics of preformed plasma in laser-driven proton acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ragozin, Eugene N.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Yogo, Akifumi; Ma Jinglong; Ogura, Koichi; Orimo, Satoshi; Sagisaka, Akito; Mori, Michiaki; Li, Zhong; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Daido, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-15

    Proton acceleration experiments involving a 5 {mu}m thick Ti foil target irradiation are carried out with the femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser JLITE-X. The plasma emission at 13.5 nm is recorded employing concave multilayer mirrors, which image the front- and rear-side plasmas onto the sensitive surfaces of a fast x-ray photodiode and a backside-illuminated charge coupled device. Online time-of-flight fast-particle measurements are performed simultaneously with the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) measurements. A strong correlation is observed between the energetic proton signal and the spatiotemporal behavior of the XUV plasma emission. In particular, the longer duration of the prepulse-produced XUV plasma emission indicates a lowering of the maximum proton energy. This allows using the XUV emission for the diagnostics of the high-intensity laser-solid-target interaction.

  16. The slingshot effect: A possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato; Angelis, Umberto de

    2014-11-15

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of the propagations of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation (“slingshot effect”). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or laser-wake-field ones.

  17. Electron yield enhancement in a laser wakefield accelerator driven by asymmetric laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Catravas, P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Trines, R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; van Tilborg, J.; Faure, J.

    2002-08-01

    The effect of asymmetric laser pulses on electron yield from a laser wakefield accelerator has been experimentally studied using > 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} plasmas and a 10 TW, > 45 fs, Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser. Laser pulse shape was controlled through non-linear chirp with a grating pair compressor. Pulses (76 fs FWHM) with a steep rise and positive chirp were found to significantly enhance the electron yield compared to pulses with a gentle rise and negative chirp. Theory and simulation show that fast rising pulses can generate larger amplitude wakes that seed the growth of the self-modulation instability and that frequency chirp is of minimal importance for the experimental parameters.

  18. What will it take for laser driven proton accelerators to be applied to tumor therapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Ute; Alonso, Jose

    2007-09-01

    After many years on the periphery of cancer therapy, the successes of proton and ion beams in tumor therapy are gradually receiving a higher degree of recognition. The considerable construction and acquisition costs are usually invoked to explain the slow market penetration of this favorable treatment modality. Recently, high-intensity lasers have been suggested as a potential, cost-saving alternative to cyclotrons or synchrotrons for oncology. This article will detail the technical requirements necessary for successful implementation of ion beam therapy (IBT)—the general term for proton and heavier-ion therapy. It will summarize the current state of laser acceleration of protons and will outline the very substantial developments still necessary for this technology to be successfully applied to IBT.

  19. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L.; Velyhan, A.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Vassura, L.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  20. Acceleration{endash}deceleration process of thin foils confined in water and submitted to laser driven shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Romain, J.P.; Auroux, E.

    1997-08-01

    An experimental, numerical, and analytical study of the acceleration and deceleration process of thin metallic foils immersed in water and submitted to laser driven shocks is presented. Aluminum and copper foils of 20 to 120 {mu}m thickness, confined on both sides by water, have been irradiated at 1.06 {mu}m wavelength by laser pulses of {approximately}20ns duration, {approximately}17J energy, and {approximately}4GW/cm{sup 2} incident intensity. Time resolved velocity measurements have been made, using an electromagnetic velocity gauge. The recorded velocity profiles reveal an acceleration{endash}deceleration process, with a peak velocity up to 650 m/s. Predicted profiles from numerical simulations reproduce all experimental features, such as wave reverberations, rate of increase and decrease of velocity, peak velocity, effects of nature, and thickness of the foils. A shock pressure of about 2.5 GPa is inferred from the velocity measurements. Experimental points on the evolution of plasma pressure are derived from the measurements of peak velocities. An analytical description of the acceleration{endash}deceleration process, involving multiple shock and release waves reflecting on both sides of the foils, is presented. The space{endash}time diagrams of waves propagation and the successive pressure{endash}particle velocity states are determined, from which theoretical velocity profiles are constructed. All characteristics of experimental records and numerical simulations are well reproduced. The role of foil nature and thickness, in relation with the shock impedance of the materials, appears explicitly. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}