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Sample records for accelerator eta final

  1. High brightness cathode experiments on the experimental test accelerator (ETA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schlitt, L.; Proulx, G.

    1984-01-01

    The experiments performed on the ETA during the months of September through October of 1984 were intended to accomplish two objectives; to discover or develop a source capable of producing an electron beam whose brightness is substantially higher than that of previous sources, and to determine, if possible, the mechanisms which limit the source brightness so that further enhancements might be obtained. The results of the experiments met these objectives to a limited degree. A cathode material (velvet) and a diode geometry were identified which resulted in more than a factor of two improvements in brightness over that obtained with previous flashboard cathodes. Experiments were performed which have yielded information about mechanisms which may limit beam brightness, and have suggested approaches for further work to improve brightness. However, the desired brightness of 10/sup 5/ A/(cm/sup 2/-rad/sup 2/) was not achieved in these experiments. This report contains a discussion of the cathodes used, the diode geometries employed, the diagnostics, the typical characteristics of a single beam experiment, and the characteristics of the collimator used to measure the brightness. The entire ensemble of brightness data is presented and broken down into classes of experiments. In addition, the results of an EBQ calculation of one diode geometry are discussed, and differences between the results of similar experiments on ETA and ATA are noted. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  2. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  3. Search for B Meson Decays to eta' eta' K

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-05

    The authors describe searches for decays of B mesons to the charmless final states {eta}'{eta}'K. The data consist of 228 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The 90% confidence level upper limits for the branching fractions are {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{eta}'K{sup 0}) < 31 x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'{eta}'K{sup +}) < 25 x 10{sup -6}.

  4. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THE EXPANDING BLAST WAVE OF {eta} CARINA'S GREAT ERUPTION OF 1843

    SciTech Connect

    Ohm, S.; Domainko, W.; Hinton, J. A. E-mail: wilfried.domainko@mpi-hd.mpg.d

    2010-08-01

    Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV {<=} E {<=} 100 GeV) {gamma}-ray emission in the direction of {eta} Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE, and Fermi satellites. So far this emission has been interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars. However, the existence of a very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 'Great Eruption' provides an alternative particle acceleration site in this system. Here, we explore an alternate scenario and find that inverse Compton emission from electrons accelerated in the blast wave can naturally explain both the flux and spectral shape of the measured hard X-ray and HE {gamma}-ray emission. This scenario is further supported by the lack of significant variability in the INTEGRAL and Fermi measured fluxes.

  5. B-meson decays to eta' rho, eta' f0, and eta' K*

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We present measurements of B-meson decays to the final states {eta}{prime} {rho}, {eta}{prime} f{sub 0}, and {eta}{prime} K*, where K* stands for a vector, scalar, or tensor strange meson. We observe a significant signal or evidence for {eta}{prime} {rho}{sup +} and all the {eta}{prime}K* channels. We also measure, where applicable, the charge asymmetries, finding results consistent with no direct CP violation in all cases. The measurements are performed on a data sample consisting of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Our results favor the theoretical predictions from perturbative QCD and QCD Factorization and we observe an enhancement of the tensor K*{sub 2} (1430) with respect to the vector K*(892) component.

  6. Branching Fraction Limits for B0 Decays to eta' eta, eta' pi0 and eta pi0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-10

    We describe searches for decays to two-body charmless final states {eta}'{eta}, {eta}'{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}{pi}{sup 0} of B{sup 0} mesons produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 232 million produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions are, in units of 10{sup -6} (upper limits at 90% C.L.): {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{eta}) = 0.2{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7} {+-} 0.4 (< 1.7), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5} {+-} 0.1 (< 1.3), and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.8{sub -0.6}{sup +0.8} {+-} 0.1 (< 2.1). The first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic.

  7. Search for invisible decays of eta and eta' in J/psi --> phi eta and phi eta'.

    PubMed

    Ablikim, M; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Yi; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, Fang; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tan, Z Q; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, Z Y; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Yu; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Yiyun; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2006-11-17

    Using a data sample of 58 x 10(6) J/psi decays collected with the Beijing Spectrometer II detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider, searches for invisible decays of eta and eta' in J/psi to phi eta and phi eta' are performed. The phi signals, which are reconstructed in K+K- final states, are used to tag the eta and eta' decays. No signals are found for the invisible decays of either eta or eta', and upper limits at the 90% confidence level are determined to be 1.65 x 10(-3) for the ratio B(eta-->invisible)/B(eta --> gamma gamma) and 6.69 x 10(-2) for B(eta' --> invisible)/B(eta' --> gammagamma). These are the first searches for eta and eta' decays into invisible final states. PMID:17155676

  8. Advanced Accelerator Concepts Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2014-05-13

    physics motivation for our experiment, one that requires only a few dozen researchers but must effectively integrate plasma, accelerator, atomic, and fundamental physics, as well as combine numerous technologies in the control, manipulation, and measurement of neutral and non-neutral particles. The ELENA ring (to which we hope to contribute, should funding be provided) is expect, when completed, to significantly enhance the performance of antihydrogen trapping by increasing by a factor of 100 the number of antiprotons that can be successfully trapped and cooled. ELENA operation is scheduled to commence in 2017. In collaboration with LBNL scientists, we proposed a frictional cooling scheme. This is an alternative cooling method to that used by ELENA. It is less complicated, experimentally unproven, and produces a lower yield of cold antiprotons. Students and postdoctoral researchers work on the trapping, cooling, transport, and nonlinear dynamics of antiprotons bunches that are provided by the AD to ALPHA; they contribute to the operation of the experiment, to software development, and to the design and operation of experiments. Students are expected to spend at summers at CERN while taking courses; after completion of courses they typically reside at CERN for most of the half-year run. The Antiproton Decelerator [AD] at CERN, along with its experiments, is the only facility in the world where antiprotons can be trapped and cooled and combined with positrons to form cold antihydrogen, with the ultimate goal of studying CPT violation and, subsequently, gravitational interactions of antimatter. Beyond the ALPHA experiment, the group worked on beam physics problems including limits on the average current in a time-dependent period cathode and new methods to create longitudinally coherent high repetition rate soft x-ray sources and wide bandwidth mode locked x-ray lasers. We completed a detailed study of quantum mechanical effects in the transit time cooling of muons.

  9. Observation of B^+\\to\\eta\\rho^+ and Search for B^0 Decays to\\eta^\\prime\\eta, \\eta\\pi^0, \\eta^\\prime\\pi^0, and \\omega\\pi^0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, Marcella; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, Marco; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, Janice; Cahn, Robert N.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-04-22

    The authors present measurements of branching fractions for five B-meson decays to two-body charmless final states. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 459 million B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions are, in units of 10{sup -6} (upper limits at 90% C.L.): {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{rho}{sup +}) = 9.9 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.8, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{eta}) = 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 (< 1.2), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.9 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 (< 1.5), {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup 0}) = 0.9 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.1 (< 1.5), and {Beta}(B{sup 0}{sup 0} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup 0}) = {eta}{rho}{sup +} mode, they measure the charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch} (B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{rho}{sup +}) = 0.13 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.02.

  10. Modified betatron accelerator studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.P.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1984-12-01

    This final report describes work carried out on the equilibrium and stability properties of circular accelerators. A rigid-disk beam model in which the fields are treated exactly is used to study linear instabilities. This approach has uncovered an important inductive effect which at high toroidal mode numbers leads to either stability or to a hybrid instability. A corresponding effect has been found in electron-layer geometry. The new theory also shows that moving the equilibrium position toward the inner wall can stabilize low mode numbers. With the aid of IVORY code simulation results it is shown that the transverse motion of beam partilces is a key factor in determining beam stability. The upper bound on particle circulation frequency spread is shown to be a function only of the beam major and minor radii. This leads to upper bounds on stable currents in the modified betatron. Numerical results on stability in the stellatron and reversing-solenoidal-lens betatrons are presented. In addition, the sensitivity of equilibrium particle orbits in the stellatron to initial conditions is calculated.

  11. Eta Aquarids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A meteor shower that takes place in late April and May. The radiant lies in the constellation Aquarius. The Eta Aquarids occur when the Earth intersects the descending node of the meteor stream from Halley's Comet; the Orionids in October are produced by the Earth's passage through the ascending node. Because Halley's orbit is retrograde, Eta Aquarid meteoroids impact the Earth at a high relative...

  12. B meson decays to charmless meson pairs containing eta or eta'

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-12-14

    The authors present updated measurements of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}K{sup 0}, {eta}{eta}, {eta}{phi}, {eta}{omega}, {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, {eta}{prime}{eta}{prime}, {eta}{prime}, {phi}, and {eta}{prime}{omega} and branching fractions and CP-violating charge asymmetries for B{sup +} decays to {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +}, and {eta}{prime} K{sup +}. The data represent the full dataset of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Besides large signals for the four charged B decays modes and for B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, they find evidence for three B{sup 0} decays modes at greater than 3.0{sigma} significance. They find {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}) = (1.15{sub -0.38}{sup +0.43} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{omega}) = (0.94{sub -0.30}{sup +0.35} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}{omega}) = (1.01{sub -0.38}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6}, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic). For the B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +} decay mode, they measure the charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch} (B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}) = -0.36 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.03.

  13. Searches for Charmless Decays B0 --> eta omega, B0 --> eta K0, B+ --> eta rho+, and B+ --> eta' pi+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2004-08-13

    The authors report results for measurements of the decay branching fractions of B{sup 0} to the charmless final states {eta}{omega} and {eta}K{sup 0}, and of B{sup +} to {eta}{rho}{sup +} and {eta}'{pi}{sup +}. None of these decays have been observed definitively. Measurements of the related decays B{sup +} --> {eta}K{sup +}, B{sup +} --> {eta}{pi}{sup +}, and B --> {eta}'K were published recently. Charmless decays with kaons are usually expected to be dominated by b --> s loop (''penguin'') transitions, while b --> u tree transitions are typically larger for the decays with pions and {rho} mesons. However the B --> {eta}K decays are especially interesting since they are suppressed relative to the abundant B --> {eta}'K decays due to destructive interference between two penguin amplitudes. The CKM-suppressed b --> u amplitudes may interfere significantly with penguin amplitudes, possibly leading to large direct CP violation in B{sup +} --> {eta}{rho}{sup +} and B{sup +} --> {eta}'{pi}{sup +}; numerical estimates are available in a few cases. The authors search for such direct CP violation by measuring the charge asymmetry A{sub ch} {equivalent_to} ({Gamma}{sup -} - {Gamma}{sup +})/({Gamma}{sup -} + {Gamma}{sup +}) in the rates {Gamma}{sup {+-}} = {Gamma}(B{sup {+-}} --> f{sup {+-}}), for each observed charged final state f{sup {+-}}. Charmless B decays are becoming useful to test the accuracy of theoretical predictions. Phenomenological fits to the branching fractions and charge asymmetries can be used to understand the importance of tree and penguin contributions and may provide sensitivity to the CKM angle {gamma}.

  14. Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort; J. Argueta; M. Wehrey; D. Karner; L. Tyree

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

  15. Measurement of branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B+ decays to eta pi+, eta K+, eta rho+, and eta' pi+, and search for B0 decays to eta K0 and eta omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morg An, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Derrington, I M; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Mohapatra, A K; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-09-23

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for six B-meson decay modes with an eta or eta(') meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 232 x 10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) B Factory at SLAC. We measure the branching fractions (in units of 10(-6)): B(B+ -->eta pi(+))=5.1+/-0.6+/-0.3, B(B+ etaK+)=3.3+/-0.6+/-0.3, B(B0-->etaK0)=1.5+/-0.7+/-0.1 (<2.5 at 90% C.L.), B(B+-->eta rho(+))=8.4+/-1.9+/-1.1, B(B0-->eta omiga)=1.0+/-0.5+/-0.2 (<1.9 at 90% C.L.), and B(B+-->eta(')pi(+))=4.0+/-0.8+/-0.4, where the first uncertainty is statistical and second systematic. For the charged modes we also determine the charge asymmetries, all found to be compatible with zero.

  16. eta and eta' Mesons from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, N.H.; Izubuchi, T.; Dawson, C.; Jung, C.; Liu, Q.; Mawhinney, R.D.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Soni, A.; Zhou, R.

    2010-12-08

    The large mass of the ninth pseudoscalar meson, the {eta}{prime}, is believed to arise from the combined effects of the axial anomaly and the gauge field topology present in QCD. We report a realistic, 2+1-flavor, lattice QCD calculation of the {eta} and {eta}{prime} masses and mixing which confirms this picture. The physical eigenstates show small octet-singlet mixing with a mixing angle of {theta} = -14.1(2.8){sup o}. Extrapolation to the physical light quark mass gives, with statistical errors only, m{sub {eta}} = 573(6) MeV and m{sub {eta}} = 947(142) MeV, consistent with the experimental values of 548 and 958 MeV.

  17. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  18. Eta-nucleon interaction and nuclear production of eta mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Eta-nucleon interaction and eta-nucleus dynamics are discussed. The possibility of using {eta} to probe unnatural-parity nuclear states and to study spin-isospin correlations between two nucleons are demonstrated.

  19. The. eta. -baryon octet

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, S.F. )

    1992-11-01

    The recent tantalizing experimental support for an {eta}-baryon {ital J}{sup {ital P}}=1/2{sup {minus}} unmixed octet challenges conventional model wisdom. The establishment of the {Xi}(1868) member of the {eta} octet will give strong affirmation that the negative-parity baryon mass spectrum could be mixing-free.

  20. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  1. Electron acceleration by laser fields in a gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of the project is an investigation of topics related to the high-energy acceleration of electrons by means of suitably shaped laser beams in an inert gaseous medium. By slowing down the phase velocity of the fields by its index of refraction, the gas allows a cumulative interaction with the electrons resulting in net acceleration and also focusing. The objectives of the work reported here were twofold: (1) to participate as a consultant in the design and analysis of demonstration experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory by STI Optronics, a Belleview, WA company, under a separate DOE funded contract; (2) to perform further analytic and design work on the laser acceleration scheme originally proposed and explore a possible extension of the method to acceleration in vacuum using the same field configuration and analogous interaction process as with a gas. This report thus comprises an account of both activities. Section 2 is an overview of the various laser acceleration methods that have been proposed, in order to provide a framework to the work reported. Section 3 contains a list of meetings attended by the Principal Investigator to present his work and interact with research community colleagues and STI staff, and a list of publications containing work he co-authored or was acknowledged for. Section 4 summarizes the work performed by STI to which he contributed. Section 5 consists of the technical reports the Principal Investigator wrote describing his independent theoretical work elaborating and extending the scope of the original project.

  2. The final technical report of the CRADA, 'Medical Accelerator Technology'

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Rawls, J.M.

    2000-06-12

    Under this CRADA, Berkeley Lab and the industry partner, General Atomics (GA), have cooperatively developed hadron therapy technologies for commercialization. Specifically, Berkeley Lab and GA jointly developed beam transport systems to bring the extracted protons from the accelerator to the treatment rooms, rotating gantries to aim the treatment beams precisely into patients from any angle, and patient positioners to align the patient accurately relative to the treatment beams. We have also jointly developed a patient treatment delivery system that controls the radiation doses in the patient, and hardware to improve the accelerator performances, including a radio-frequency ion source and its low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system. This project facilitated the commercialization of the DOE-developed technologies in hadron therapy by the private sector in order to improve the quality of life of the nation.

  3. Single particles accelerate final stages of capillary break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Anke; Fiscina, Jorge Eduardo; Wagner, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Droplet formation of suspensions is present in many industrial and technological processes such as coating and food engineering. Whilst the finite-time singularity of the minimum neck diameter in capillary break-up of simple liquids can be described by well-known self-similarity solutions, the pinching of non-Brownian suspension depends in a complex way on the particle dynamics in the thinning thread. Here we focus on the very dilute regime where the filament contains only isolated beads to identify the physical mechanisms leading to the pronounced acceleration of the filament thinning observed. This accelerated regime is characterized by an asymmetric shape of the filament with an enhanced curvature that depends on the size and the spatial distribution of the particles within the capillary thread.

  4. Spectral methods and sum acceleration algorithms. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.

    1995-03-01

    The principle investigator pursued his investigation of numerical algorithms during the period of the grant. The attached list of publications is so lengthy that it is impossible to describe them in detail. However, the author calls attention to the four articles on sequence acceleration and fourteen more on spectral methods, which fulfill the goals of the original proposal. He also continued his research on nonlinear waves, and wrote a dozen papers on this, too.

  5. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Modine, Normand Arthur; Ganti, Anand; Pierson, Lyndon George; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2003-12-01

    In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be proposed as a result of this work.

  6. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.; /SLAC

    2007-04-30

    This chapter describes the accelerator physics aspects, the engineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to the accelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator (also called the ''electron beam delivery system'') covers the region from the exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. The considerations that led to the proposed configuration were made on the basis of a study that explored various options and performance limits. This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS [1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL [5], LBNL LUX [6], Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developed there. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had not yet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. A particularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement for high peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification for the ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness of the electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of the LCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce an electron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energy distributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducing novel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the fact that there were no readily available computational tools to carry out reliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of the information reported in this study is available in the form of scientific publications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of the reader.

  7. Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Irving

    2009-10-31

    The use of a beam of heavy ions to heat a target for the study of warm dense matter physics, high energy density physics, and ultimately to ignite an inertial fusion pellet, requires the achievement of beam intensities somewhat greater than have traditionally been obtained using conventional accelerator technology. The research program described here has substantially contributed to understanding the basic nonlinear intense-beam physics that is central to the attainment of the requisite intensities. Since it is very difficult to reverse intensity dilution, avoiding excessive dilution over the entire beam lifetime is necessary for achieving the required beam intensities on target. The central emphasis in this research has therefore been on understanding the nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for intensity dilution and which generally occur when intense space-charge-dominated beams are not in detailed equilibrium with the external forces used to confine them. This is an important area of study because such lack of detailed equilibrium can be an unavoidable consequence of the beam manipulations such as acceleration, bunching, and focusing necessary to attain sufficient intensity on target. The primary tool employed in this effort has been the use of simulation, particularly the WARP code, in concert with experiment, to identify the nonlinear dynamical characteristics that are important in practical high intensity accelerators. This research has gradually made a transition from the study of idealized systems and comparisons with theory, to study the fundamental scaling of intensity dilution in intense beams, and more recently to explicit identification of the mechanisms relevant to actual experiments. This work consists of two categories; work in direct support beam physics directly applicable to NDCX and a larger effort to further the general understanding of space-charge-dominated beam physics.

  8. Branching Fraction and P-violation Charge Asymmetry Measurements for B-meson Decays to eta K+-, eta pi+-, eta'K, eta' pi+-, omega K, and omega pi+-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-06-28

    The authors present measurements of the branching fractions for B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup 0} and {omega}K{sup 0}, and of the branching fractions and CP-violation charge asymmetries for B{sup +} meson decays to {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup +}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 383 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The measurements agree with previous results; they find no evidence for direct CP violation.

  9. Study of B Meson Decays with Excited eta and eta-prime Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-04-18

    Using 383 million B{bar B} pairs from the BABAR data sample, they report results for branching fractions of six charged B-meson decay modes, where a charged kaon recoils against a charmless resonance decaying to K{bar K}* or {eta}{pi}{pi} final states with mass in the range (1.2-1.8) GeV/c{sup 2}. They observe a significant enhancement at the low K{bar K}* invariant mass which is interpreted as B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1475)K{sup +}, find evidence for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1295)K{sup +}, and place upper limits on the decays B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1405)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1420)K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1680)K{sup +}.

  10. Advanced Klystrons for High Efficiency Accelerator Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2014-03-26

    This program explored tailoring of RF pulses used to drive accelerator cavities. Simulations indicated that properly shaping the pulse risetime to match accelerator cavity characteristics reduced reflected power and increased total efficiency. Tailoring the pulse requires a high power, gridded, klystron to shape the risetime while also controlling the beam current. The Phase I program generated a preliminary design of a gridded electron gun for a klystron producing 5-10 MW of RF power. This required design of a segmented cathode using Controlled Porosity Reservoir cathodes to limit power deposition on the grid. The program was successful in computationally designing a gun producing a high quality electron beam with grid control. Additional analysis of pulse tailoring indicated that technique would only be useful for cavity drive pulses that were less than approximately 2-3 times the risetime. Otherwise, the efficiency gained during the risetime of the pulse became insignificant when considering the efficiency over the entire pulse. Consequently, it was determined that a Phase II program would not provide sufficient return to justify the cost. Never the less, other applications for a high power gridded gun are currently being pursued. This klystron, for example, would facilitate development inverse Comptom x-ray sources by providing a high repetition rate (10 -100 kHz) RF source.

  11. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  12. [Advanced accelerator R and D program]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This proposal requests funding for a 3-year renewal of the DOE advanced accelerator R and D (AARD) program at Texas A and M University. The program to date has focused on the development of the gigatron, a compact high-efficiency microwave driver for future linear colliders. The author reports results and progress in that project, and plans to bring it to a milestone and conclusion by mid-1995. He proposes to initiate a second project, the development of a new technology for ultra-high field superconducting magnets for future hadron colliders. This project builds upon two magnet designs which he has introduced during the past year, which have the potential for a dramatic extension of the achievable field strength for both dipoles and quadrupoles.

  13. FERMI&Elettra Accelerator Technical Optimization FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Wang, D.; Warnock, R.

    2006-07-01

    This report describes the accelerator physics aspects, theengineering considerations and the choice of parameters that led to theaccelerator design of the FERMI Free-Electron-Laser. The accelerator(also called the "electron beam delivery system") covers the region fromthe exit of the injector to the entrance of the first FEL undulator. Theconsiderations that led to the proposed configuration were made on thebasis of a study that explored various options and performance limits.This work follows previous studies of x-ray FEL facilities (SLAC LCLS[1], DESY XFEL [2], PAL XFEL [3], MIT [4], BESSY FEL[5], LBNL LUX [6],Daresbury 4GLS [7]) and integrates many of the ideas that were developedthere. Several issues specific to harmonic cascade FELs, and that had notyet been comprehensively studied, were also encountered and tackled. Aparticularly difficult issue was the need to meet the requirement forhigh peak current and small slice energy spread, as the specification forthe ratio of these two parameters (that defines the peak brightness ofthe electron beam) is almost a factor of two higher than that of theLCLS's SASE FEL. Another challenging aspect was the demand to produce anelectron beam with as uniform as possible peak current and energydistributions along the bunch, a condition that was met by introducingnovel beam dynamics techniques. Part of the challenge was due to the factthat there were no readily available computational tools to carry outreliable calculations, and these had to be developed. Most of theinformation reported in this study is available in the form of scientificpublications, and is partly reproduced here for the convenience of thereader.

  14. Measurement of Branching Fractions in Radiative BDecays to eta K gamma and Search for B Decays to eta' K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors present measurements of the B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} branching fractions and upper limits for the B {yields} {eta}'K{gamma} branching fractions. For B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} they also measure the time-integrated charge asymmetry. The data sample, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represents 232 x 10{sup 6} produced B{bar B} pairs. The results for branching fractions and upper limits at 90% C.L. in units of 10{sup -6} are: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = 11.3{sub -2.6}{sup +2.8} {+-} 0.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = 10.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.5, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}{gamma}) < 6.6, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}'K{sup +}{gamma}) < 4.2. The charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} is {Alpha}{sub ch} = -0.09 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.01. The first errors are statistical and the second systematic.

  15. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  16. Search for B decays into {eta}{sup '}p, {eta}{sup '}K*, {eta}{sup '}{phi}, {eta}{sup '}{omega} and {eta}{sup '}{eta}{sup (')}

    SciTech Connect

    Schuemann, J.; Wang, C. H.; Abe, K.; Gershon, T.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Limosani, A.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.

    2007-05-01

    We report on a search for the exclusive two-body charmless hadronic B meson decays B{yields}{eta}{sup '}{rho}, B{yields}{eta}{sup '}K*, B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{sup '}{phi}, B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{sup '}{omega}, and B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{sup '}{eta}{sup (')}. The results are obtained from a data sample containing 535x10{sup 6} BB pairs that were collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We find no significant signals and report upper limits in the range (0.5-6.5)x10{sup -6} for all of the above decays.

  17. Final Report for "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulations".

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J. R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Stoltz, P. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B. T.; Bell, G.; Paul, K.; Veitzer, S.

    2013-04-19

    This final report describes the work that has been accomplished over the past 5 years under the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator and Simulations (ComPASS) at Tech-X Corporation. Tech-X had been involved in the full range of ComPASS activities with simulation of laser plasma accelerator concepts, mainly in collaboration with LOASIS program at LBNL, simulation of coherent electron cooling in collaboration with BNL, modeling of electron clouds in high intensity accelerators, in collaboration with researchers at Fermilab and accurate modeling of superconducting RF cavity in collaboration with Fermilab, JLab and Cockcroft Institute in the UK.

  18. Measurements of Branching Fraction and CP Violation inB Meson Rare Decays to Final States containing eta or eta' Mesons in the BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, Alfio

    2007-04-11

    Note that the main goal of this thesis work is the measurement of the branching fractions, charge asymmetry, and Time-Dependent CP Violation in η'K0 mode. All other measurements are reported here for completion because they are connected by similar physics arguments. They are part of the Milan analysis activity, done by undergraduate students. They should not be considered as done in this thesis work. The measurements of the two body-modes ηη, ηΦ, and η'Φare used to determine a theoretical bound based on SU(3) flavor symmetry for the difference between SM prediction and the experimental measurements of CP violation parameters in b → s loop-dominated modes. In general for this estimation we need to measure the branching fractions (or upper limits) of neutral B decays to two-body modes with η', η, Φ, ω, π0, K0, K*0 [13, 14, 15, 16]. There is an important issue related to the branching fractions of η'K (charged and neutral) modes. Since the discover of B → η'K in 1997 [17] with high branching fraction (higher than expected), it was found that the corresponding mode with η is suppressed. This fact was pointed out by Lipkin in 1991 [18]. In particular, using arguments concerning the η-η' mixing angle and the parity of K or K* we can say that η'K and vK* are enhanced, while ηK and η'K* are suppressed. This scheme is experimentally verified. The branching fraction of all these modes are already measured, but the B0 → ηK0. So it is important to measure also this mode to complete the scenario. Finally we report on the measurements of the radiative modes B → η'Kγ and of the three-body mode B → η'η'K. Both cases are good candidates to manifest effects due to NP in CP violations [19, 20]. For all measurements we use an unbinned maximum likelihood fit to extract the number of signal yields and CP parameters. To perform these fits we have developed a flexible program in C

  19. Study of B meson decays with excited eta and eta' mesons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-08-29

    Using 383 x 10(6) BBover pairs from the BABAR data sample, we report results for branching fractions of six charged B-meson decay modes, where a charged kaon recoils against a charmless resonance decaying to KKover* or etapipi final states with mass in the range (1.2-1.8) GeV/c2. We observe a significant enhancement at the low KKover* invariant mass which is interpreted as B+-->eta(1475)K+, find evidence for the decay B+-->eta(1295)K+, and place upper limits on the decays B+-->eta(1405)K+, B+-->f1(1285)K+, B+-->f1(1420)K+, and B+-->phi(1680)K+. PMID:18851601

  20. Towards the final BSA modeling for the accelerator-driven BNCT facility at INFN LNL.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, C; Esposito, J; Agosteo, S; Colautti, P; Conte, V; Moro, D; Pola, A

    2011-12-01

    Some remarkable advances have been made in the last years on the SPES-BNCT project of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) towards the development of the accelerator-driven thermal neutron beam facility at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL), aimed at the BNCT experimental treatment of extended skin melanoma. The compact neutron source will be produced via the (9)Be(p,xn) reactions using the 5 MeV, 30 mA beam driven by the RFQ accelerator, whose modules construction has been recently completed, into a thick beryllium target prototype already available. The Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) final modeling, using both neutron converter and the new, detailed, Be(p,xn) neutron yield spectra at 5 MeV energy recently measured at the CN Van de Graaff accelerator at LNL, is summarized here.

  1. {eta} and {eta}{sup '} Mesons from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, N. H.; Liu, Q.; Mawhinney, R. D.; Dawson, C.; Izubuchi, T.; Jung, C.; Soni, A.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Zhou, R.

    2010-12-10

    The large mass of the ninth pseudoscalar meson, the {eta}{sup '}, is believed to arise from the combined effects of the axial anomaly and the gauge field topology present in QCD. We report a realistic, 2+1-flavor, lattice QCD calculation of the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} masses and mixing which confirms this picture. The physical eigenstates show small octet-singlet mixing with a mixing angle of {theta}=-14.1(2.8) deg. Extrapolation to the physical light quark mass gives, with statistical errors only, m{sub {eta}}=573(6) MeV and m{sub {eta}{sup '}}=947(142) MeV, consistent with the experimental values of 548 and 958 MeV.

  2. The seismology of eta Bootes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarque, Pierre; Guenther, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    Some p-mode frequencies and other observations were used to determine the mass, the age and the helium abundance of eta Bootes. It is shown how, by direct application, the p-mode frequencies and stellar seismological tools help in constraining the physical parameters of eta Boo. The existence of mode bumping is confirmed and it is discussed how it may be used to refine the estimate of the eta Boo's age. The effect of the OPAL equation of state on the p-mode frequencies is described.

  3. Constraints on Decreases in Eta Carinae's Mass-loss from 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of Its Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star Eta-A in the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present result from large- (+/- 1545 au) and small- (+/- 155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's colliding winds for three Eta-A mass-loss rates ( (dot-M(sub Eta-A) = 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) M(solar)/ yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot-M Eta-A greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star Eta-B switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (Phi approx.= 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot-M Eta-A and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of Eta-A into the acceleration zone of Eta-B's wind, plus radiative inhibition of Eta-B's wind by Eta-A. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of Eta-A's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot-M EtaA should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot- M Eta-A was likely by a factor of approx. < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot-M Eta-A may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameter of Eta-B, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta-Car's next periastron in 2014 to further

  4. A Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Accelerator for the Final Acceleration Stage of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.S.; Aslaninejad, M.; Pasternak, J.; Witte, H.; Bliss, N. Cordwell M.; Jones, T.; Muir, A., Kelliher, D.; Machida, S.

    2011-09-04

    The International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) has recently completed its Interim Design Report (IDR), which presents our current baseline design of the neutrino factory. To increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of acceleration, the IDR design uses a linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG) for its final acceleration stage. We present the current lattice design of that FFAG, including the main ring plus its injection and extraction systems. We describe parameters for the main ring magnets, kickers, and septa, as well as the power supplies for the kickers. We present a first pass at an engineering layout for the ring and its subsystems.

  5. Final Report to the Department of Energy on the 1994 International Accelerator School: Frontiers of Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, F.A.

    1998-09-17

    The international accelerator school on Frontiers of Accelerator Technology was organized jointly by the US Particle Accelerator School (Dr. Mel Month and Ms. Marilyn Paul), the CERN Accelerator School, and the KEK Accelerator School, and was hosted by the University of Hawaii. The course was held on Maui, Hawaii, November 3-9, 1994 and was made possible in part by a grant from the Department of Energy under award number DE-FG03-94ER40875, AMDT M006. The 1994 program was preceded by similar joint efforts held at Santa Margherita di Pula, Sardinia in February 1985, South Padre Island, Texas in October 1986, Anacapri, Italy in October 1988, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina in October 1990, and Benalmedena, Spain in October/November 1992. The most recent program was held in Montreux, Switzerland in May 1998. The purpose of the program is to disseminate knowledge on the latest ideas and developments in the technology of particle accelerators by bringing together known world experts and younger scientists in the field. It is intended for individuals with professional interest in accelerator physics and technology, for graduate students, for post-docs, for those interested in accelerator based sciences, and for scientific and engineering staff at industrial firms, especially those companies specializing in accelerator components.

  6. Gluon content of the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons and the {eta}{gamma} , {eta}{sup '}{gamma} electromagnetic transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Agaev, S.S.; Stefanis, N.G.

    2004-09-01

    We compute power-suppressed corrections to the {eta}{gamma} and {eta}{sup '}{gamma} transition form factors Q{sup 2}F{sub {eta}}{sub ({eta}}{sub {sup '}}{sub {gamma}}(Q{sup 2}) arising from the end point regions x{yields}0,1 by employing the infrared-renormalon approach. The contribution to the form factors from the quark and gluon content of the {eta},{eta}{sup '} mesons is taken into account using for the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing the SU{sub f}(3) singlet {eta}{sub 1} and octet {eta}{sub 8} basis. The theoretical predictions obtained this way are compared with the corresponding CLEO data and restrictions on the input parameters (Gegenbauer coefficients) B{sub 2}{sup q}({eta}{sub 1}), B{sub 2}{sup g}({eta}{sub 1}), and B{sub 2}{sup q}({eta}{sub 8}) in the distribution amplitudes for the {eta}{sub 1},{eta}{sub 8} states with one nonasymptotic term are deduced. Comparison is made with the results from QCD perturbation theory.

  7. UCLA Final Technical Report for the "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation”.

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Warren

    2015-08-14

    The UCLA Plasma Simulation Group is a major partner of the “Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation”. This is the final technical report. We include an overall summary, a list of publications, progress for the most recent year, and individual progress reports for each year. We have made tremendous progress during the three years. SciDAC funds have contributed to the development of a large number of skeleton codes that illustrate how to write PIC codes with a hierarchy of parallelism. These codes cover 2D and 3D as well as electrostatic solvers (which are used in beam dynamics codes and quasi-static codes) and electromagnetic solvers (which are used in plasma based accelerator codes). We also used these ideas to develop a GPU enabled version of OSIRIS. SciDAC funds were also contributed to the development of strategies to eliminate the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which is an issue when carrying laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) simulations in a boosted frame and when quantifying the emittance and energy spread of self-injected electron beams. This work included the development of a new code called UPIC-EMMA which is an FFT based electromagnetic PIC code and to new hybrid algorithms in OSIRIS. A new hybrid (PIC in r-z and gridless in φ) algorithm was implemented into OSIRIS. In this algorithm the fields and current are expanded into azimuthal harmonics and the complex amplitude for each harmonic is calculated separately. The contributions from each harmonic are summed and then used to push the particles. This algorithm permits modeling plasma based acceleration with some 3D effects but with the computational load of an 2D r-z PIC code. We developed a rigorously charge conserving current deposit for this algorithm. Very recently, we made progress in combining the speed up from the quasi-3D algorithm with that from the Lorentz boosted frame. SciDAC funds also contributed to the improvement and speed up of the quasi-static PIC

  8. All Pillars Point to Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Eta Carinae Starforming RegionSimulated Infrared View of Comet Tempel 1 (artist's concept)

    These false-color image taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the 'South Pillar' region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope 'busted open' this murky cloud to reveal star embryos (yellow or white) tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust (pink). Hot gases are green and foreground stars are blue. Not all of the newfound star embryos can be easily spotted.

    Though the nebula's most famous and massive star, Eta Carinae, is too bright to be observed by infrared telescopes, the downward-streaming rays hint at its presence above the picture frame. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from Eta Carinae and its siblings have shredded the cloud to pieces, leaving a mess of tendrils and pillars. This shredding process triggered the birth of the new stars uncovered by Spitzer.

    The inset visible-light picture (figure 2) of the Carina Nebula shows quite a different view. Dust pillars are fewer and appear dark because the dust is soaking up visible light. Spitzer's infrared detectors cut through this dust, allowing it to see the heat from warm, embedded star embryos, as well as deeper, more buried pillars. The visible-light picture is from the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

    Eta Carina is a behemoth of a star, with more than 100 times the mass of our Sun. It is so massive that it can barely hold itself together. Over the years, it has brightened and faded as material has shot away from its surface. Some astronomers think Eta Carinae might die in a supernova blast within our lifetime.

    Eta Carina's home, the Carina Nebula, is located in the southern portion of our Milky Way galaxy, 10,000 light-years from Earth. This colossal cloud of gas and dust

  9. Rare semileptonic B{sub s} decays to {eta} and {eta}' mesons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, K.; Khosravi, R.; Falahati, F.

    2010-12-01

    We analyze the rare semileptonic B{sub s}{yields}({eta},{eta}{sup '})l{sup +}l{sup -}, (l=e,{mu},{tau}), and B{sub s}{yields}({eta},{eta}{sup '}){nu}{nu} transitions probing the ss content of the {eta} and {eta}{sup '} mesons via three-point QCD sum rules. We calculate responsible form factors for these transitions in full theory. Using the obtained form factors, we also estimate the related branching fractions and longitudinal lepton polarization asymmetries. Our results are in a good consistency with the predictions of the other existing nonperturbative approaches.

  10. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Robert Westervelt; Dr. William Klein; Dr. Michael Kroupa; Eric Olsson; Rick Rothrock

    1999-06-28

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms.

  11. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    SciTech Connect

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  12. Recent results on eta and eta-prime photoproduction on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Ritchie

    2004-06-01

    The experimental situation on eta and eta' photoproduction on the proton is reviewed, emphasizing progress made since 2001. New preliminary results for eta' photoproduction on the proton from Jefferson Lab are presented. Experimental results are compared with several theoretical approaches, with an emphasis on consequences for understanding baryon spectroscopy.

  13. Dilution jets in accelerated cross flows. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipshitz, A.; Greber, I.

    1984-01-01

    Results of flow visualization experiments and measurements of the temperature field produced by a single jet and a row of dilution jets issued into a reverse flow combustor are presented. The flow in such combustors is typified by transverse and longitudinal acceleration during the passage through its bending section. The flow visualization experiments are designed to examine the separate effects of longitudinal and transverse acceleration on the jet trajectory and spreading rate. A model describing a dense single jet in a lighter accelerating cross flow is developed. The model is based on integral conservation equations, including the pressure terms appropriate to accelerating flows. It uses a modified entrainment correlation obtained from previous experiments of a jet in a cross stream. The flow visualization results are compared with the model calculations in terms of trajectories and spreading rates. Each experiment is typified by a set of three parameters: momentum ratio, density ratio and the densimetric Froude number.

  14. Development of a two-beam high-current ion accelerator based on Doppler effect. Final report (1994)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, B.I.; Yegorov, A.M.

    1995-03-01

    This Final Report presents the results of work accomplished in accordance with the Scope of Work to the Purchase Order No 4596310. The amount of works includes the following items: 1. Start of the manufacture of the Experimental Accelerating Stand (EAS)-the section for proton acceleration from 5 MeV to 8 MeV, in which RF fields are excited by an electron beam at the anomalous Doppler effect. 2. Theoretical investigation and computer simulation of field excitation and ion acceleration in the EAS. Under item 1, the EAS manufacturing is begun. To present time, a pedestal for the EAS and a stainless steel vacuum chamber for RF resonator are made (length of the chamber is about 180 cm, diameter is about 40 cm). Besides, parts of the EAS resonator with the acceleration structure are manufactured, and its assembly is begun. Under item 2, it is realized three works: calculation of increment and frequency shift of the EAS resonator excited by electron beam, calculation of the solenoid for creation of magnetic field with required spatial distribution, and theoretical investigation and computer simulation of ion acceleration in the EAS. 14 figs., 16 refs.

  15. Collective acceleration of electrons and ions in a high current relativistic electron beam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The original purpose of this research was an investigation into the use of slow space charge waves on weakly relativistic electron beams for ion acceleration. The work had three main objectives namely, the development of a suitable ion injector, the growth and study of the properties of slow space charge waves on an electron beam, and a combination of the two components parts into a suitable proof of principle demonstration of the wave accelerator. This work focusses on the first two of these objectives.

  16. Eta Carinae: an Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Gull, Theodore R.

    2009-05-01

    Eta Carinae provides a unique example to investigate a massive star in a late evolutionary phase and how CNO-processed material is ejected and mixed with the interstellar medium. The absorbing gas surrounding Eta Carinae (η Car) shows similar characteristics to the intervening gas in spectra of gamma ray burst progenitors. Consequently, the η Car spectrum may provide clues about the nature of other extreme objects such as hypernovae and supernova impostors. In the 1840s, η Car underwent a massive ejection, which was repeated to a lesser extent in the 1890s. Today we see the Homunculus, a bipolar expanding neutral shell, and the Little Homunculus, an interior, spectroscopically time-variable, ionized structure. The η Car system is ideal as a laboratory for absorption and emission line spectroscopy. In the line-of-sight towards η Car, multiple narrow absorption lines are observed from environments with densities around 107 cm- 3 and temperatures ranging from 60 to 7000 K. Thousands of neutral/singly ionized metal lines are identified, in addition to molecular lines in species such as H2, CH, OH and NH. The input from the laboratory spectroscopy community has furthered the analysis of η Car. Future observations of η Car in the infrared through radio wavelength region will enable new detections of atomic and molecular transitions, most notably of hydrides and nitrides. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where future work is needed.

  17. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-04-30

    Particle accelerators enable scientists to study the fundamental structure of the universe, but have become the largest and most expensive of scientific instruments. In this project, we advanced the science and technology of laser-plasma accelerators, which are thousands of times smaller and less expensive than their conventional counterparts. In a laser-plasma accelerator, a powerful laser pulse exerts light pressure on an ionized gas, or plasma, thereby driving an electron density wave, which resembles the wake behind a boat. Electrostatic fields within this plasma wake reach tens of billions of volts per meter, fields far stronger than ordinary non-plasma matter (such as the matter that a conventional accelerator is made of) can withstand. Under the right conditions, stray electrons from the surrounding plasma become trapped within these “wake-fields”, surf them, and acquire energy much faster than is possible in a conventional accelerator. Laser-plasma accelerators thus might herald a new generation of compact, low-cost accelerators for future particle physics, x-ray and medical research. In this project, we made two major advances in the science of laser-plasma accelerators. The first of these was to accelerate electrons beyond 1 gigaelectronvolt (1 GeV) for the first time. In experimental results reported in Nature Communications in 2013, about 1 billion electrons were captured from a tenuous plasma (about 1/100 of atmosphere density) and accelerated to 2 GeV within about one inch, while maintaining less than 5% energy spread, and spreading out less than ½ milliradian (i.e. ½ millimeter per meter of travel). Low energy spread and high beam collimation are important for applications of accelerators as coherent x-ray sources or particle colliders. This advance was made possible by exploiting unique properties of the Texas Petawatt Laser, a powerful laser at the University of Texas at Austin that produces pulses of 150 femtoseconds (1 femtosecond is 10

  18. Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1990--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The program consisted of the following three tasks: TASK A, ``Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,`` TASK B, ``Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,`` and TASK C, ``Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders.``

  19. Pseudoscalar glueball and {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Vento, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    We have performed a dynamical analysis of the mixing in the pseudoscalar channel with the goal of understanding the existence and behavior of the pseudoscalar glueball. Our philosophy has not been to predict precise values of the glueball mass but to exploit an adequate effective theory to the point of breaking and to analyze which kind of mechanisms restore compatibility with data. Our study has led to analytical solutions which allow a clear understanding of the phenomena. The outcome of our calculation leads to a large mass glueball M{sub {Theta}>}2000 MeV, to a large glue content of the {eta}{sup '}, and to mixing angles in agreement with previous numerical studies.

  20. Final report: Accelerated beta decay for disposal of fission fragment wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, Howard R.

    2000-03-06

    The fundamental theory of the interaction of intense, low-frequency electromagnetic fields with certain radioactive nuclei has been fully formulated. The nuclei are of the type that exists in high-level radioactive wastes that are end products of the production of energy from nuclear fission. The basic physical mechanisms that underlie the coupling of the applied field to the nucleus have been identified. Both the basic theory and numerical predictions that stem from it support the conclusion that high-level radioactive wastes can be disposed of by substantially accelerating the rate of radioactive decay. Some old experiments on the acceleration of this type of radioactivity, with results that were not understood at the time, have been re-examined. Their interpretation is now clear, and the experiments are found to be in agreement with the theory.

  1. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Alex

    2013-10-19

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, which each have unique arrival times and may have unique kinetic energies. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: that the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of \\main-pulse" beams relative to \\foot-pulse" beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying \\di erential acceleration" to individual beams or sets of beam at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams \\sooner" and others \\later," it is possible to simplify the beam line con guration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use di erential acceleration to e ect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams ( e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model con gurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.

  2. Differential acceleration in the final beam lines of a Heavy Ion Fusion driver

    DOE PAGES

    Friedman, Alex

    2013-10-19

    A long-standing challenge in the design of a Heavy Ion Fusion power plant is that the ion beams entering the target chamber, which number of order a hundred, all need to be routed from one or two multi-beam accelerators through a set of transport lines. The beams are divided into groups, which each have unique arrival times and may have unique kinetic energies. It is also necessary to arrange for each beam to enter the target chamber from a prescribed location on the periphery of that chamber. Furthermore, it has generally been assumed that additional constraints must be obeyed: thatmore » the path lengths of the beams in a group must be equal, and that any delay of \\main-pulse" beams relative to \\foot-pulse" beams must be provided by the insertion of large delay-arcs in the main beam transport lines. Here we introduce the notion of applying \\di erential acceleration" to individual beams or sets of beam at strategic stages of the transport lines. That is, by accelerating some beams \\sooner" and others \\later," it is possible to simplify the beam line con guration in a number of cases. For example, the time delay between the foot and main pulses can be generated without resorting to large arcs in the main-pulse beam lines. It is also possible to use di erential acceleration to e ect the simultaneous arrival on target of a set of beams ( e.g., for the foot-pulse) without requiring that their path lengths be precisely equal. We illustrate the technique for two model con gurations, one corresponding to a typical indirect-drive scenario requiring distinct foot and main energies, and the other to an ion-driven fast-ignition scenario wherein the foot and main beams share a common energy.« less

  3. Phenomenology of some rare and forbidden. eta. -decays

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the contribution from possible new physics to the decays {eta} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} {mu}e and {eta} {pi}{mu}e, and assess the sensitivities required for experimental studies of these decays to extend our knowledge about the new interactions. 61 refs.

  4. Eta Carinae and Its Ejecta, the Homunculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae (Eta Car), its interacting winds and historical ejecta provide an unique astrophysical laboratory that permits addressing a multitude of questions ranging from stellar evolution, colliding winds, chemical enrichment, nebular excitation to the formation of molecules and dust. Every 5.54 years, Eta Car changes from high excitation to several-months-long low excitation caused by modulation of the massive interacting winds due to a very eccentric binary orbit. The surrounding Homunculus (Figure 1) and Little Homunculus, thrown out in the 1840s Great Eruption and the 1890s Lesser Eruption, respond to the changing flux, providing clues to many physical phenomena of great interest to astrophysicists.

  5. Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy has completed the third year of its three-year funding cycle and an additional one-year, no-cost extension. The program consisted of the following three tasks: Task A -- Study of the transport and longitudinal compression of intense, high-brightness beams; Task B -- Study of high-brightness beam generation in pseudospark devices; Task C -- Study of a gyroklystron high-power microwave source for linear colliders. The research carried out for each task and progress made is reported.

  6. Final report for CAFDA project entitled, Experimental and numerical investigation of accelerated fluid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Greenough, J.A.; Jacobs, J.W.; Marcus, D.L.

    1997-03-26

    The main thrust of this collaborative effort can be summarized as an attempt to use the strengths of physical experiments and numerical simulations in understanding the dynamics of accelerated interfaces. Laboratory experiments represent the true nature of the physical processes and the simulations represent a model of these processes. We have taken the first steps toward this goal through development and calibration of new experimental techniques as well as validation and direct, systematic, and quantitative comparison with computational results. This report summarizes accomplishments made towards these goals. More detailed information is provided in reprints appended to this document.

  7. Charmonium decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect

    Pedlar, T. K.; Xavier, J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2009-06-01

    Using data acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure branching fractions for J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {psi}(3770) decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}. Defining R{sub n}{identical_to}B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}]/B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}], we obtain R{sub 1}=(21.1{+-}0.9)% and, unexpectedly, an order of magnitude smaller limit, R{sub 2}<1.8% at 90% C.L. We also use J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '} events to determine branching fractions of improved precision for the five most copious {eta}{sup '} decay modes.

  8. Final Commissioning of the Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator at IUAC, Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Tripti Sekhar; Choudhury, Anup; Chacko, Jacob; Kar, Soumen; Antony, Joby; Babu, Suresh; Kumar, Manoj; Mathuria, D. S.; Sahu, Santosh; Kanjilal, Dinakar

    The superconducting linac as a booster of the 15UD Pelletron accelerator was partly commissioned with one linac module housing eight quarter wave bulk niobium cavities along with the superbuncher and rebuncher cryomodules. Subsequently two more linac cryomodules were added to have in total 24 cavities for acceleration. In addition, a new Linde helium refrigerator of capacity 750 W @ 4.2 K was installed in parallel to the earlier CCI refrigerator. The new refrigerator was integrated with the earlier cryogenics network system through a specially designed liquid helium distribution line without any valve box. The cooling philosophy with this new system is modified to have a faster cool down rate in the critical zone (150 - 70 K) to avoid Q disease. The helium gas pressure fluctuation in the cavities is reduced significantly to have stable RF locking. The full linac is being operated and beams with higher energy are being delivered to the users. The present paper will highlight the performance of the new cryogenic system with respect to cool down rate, and helium pressure fluctuation.

  9. Final Report 200 MW L-Band Annular Beam Klystron for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Ives, Lawrence; Song, Liqun; Carlsten, Bruce; Fazio, Michael

    2009-02-11

    This program developed a 200 MW, 1.3 GHz, Annular Beam Klystron (ABK) for accelerator systems. An ABK provides lower impedance than a conventional klystron, making it possible to produce higher RF powers with lower voltages. With a higher power per unit, fewer klystrons would be required for a large accelerator. Lower voltage also simplifies and reduces the cost of the power supply system. Both features will significantly lower the cost of an RF system. This device operates at 475 kV. The klystron uses a magnetron injection gun producing 1100 A in one microsecond pulses. Power is extracted into fundamental rectangular waveguide through two output windows. The predicted gain is approximately 45 dB with estimated efficiency of 45%. The klystron was assembled, but no facility was available for testing. Consequently, no high power performance measurements are available. Because the assembled klystron is approximately 15 feet long, it was disassembled for storage. It can be reassembled should a use materialize.

  10. A 200 MHz 35 MW Multiple Beam Klystron for Accelerator Applications Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read; Patrick Ferguson; David Marsden

    2011-11-28

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) performed initial development of a compact and reliable 35 MW, multiple beam klystron (MBK) at 200 MHz with a pulse length of 0.125 ms and a 30 Hz repetition rate. The device was targeted for acceleration and ionization cooling of a muon collider, but there are several other potential applications in this frequency range. The klystron uses multiple beams propagating in individual beam tunnels to reduce space charge and allow reduction in the accelerating voltage. This allows a significant reduction in length over a single beam source. More importantly this allows more efficient and less expensive power supplies. At 200 MHz, the interaction circuit for a single beam klystron would be more than six meters long to obtain 50% efficiency and 50 dB gain. This would require a beam voltage of approximately 400 kV and current of 251 A for a microperveance of 1.0. For an eight beam MBK with the same beam perveance, a three meter long interaction circuit achieves the same power and gain. Each beam operates at 142 kV and 70A. The Phase I demonstrated that this device could be fabricated with funding available in a Phase II program and could achieve the program specifications.

  11. Study of {eta}' Decays in the VES Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaenko, V.; Gavrilov, Yu.; Gouz, Yu.; Dzheliadin, R.; Fenyuk, A.; Ivashin, A.; Kachaev, I.; Kabachenko, V.; Karyukhin, A.; Khokhlov, Yu.; Konopliannikov, A.; Konstantinov, V.; Matveev, V.; Ostankov, A.; Polyakov, B.; Ryabchikov, D.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solodkov, A. V.; Solovianov, O.; Starchenko, E.

    2005-10-26

    Measurements of Dalitz plot parameters for {eta}' {yields} {eta}{pi}+{pi}- decay are presented. The data sample of {approx}15000 events originates from charge-exchange reaction {pi}-p {yields} {eta}'N* at beam momentum of 28 GeV/c. Comparison with results from diffractive-like reaction, {pi}-A {yields} {eta}'{pi}-A* and with theoretical expectations is given. Also a limit of Br({eta}' {yields} ({pi}+{pi}-{pi}0)) is estimated.

  12. School Nurse Achievement Program II: Curriculum Adaptation for Expanded and Accelerated Dissemination. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann N.; Burgess, Heidi

    The final report of a 3-year project to improve the delivery of inservice training for school nurses through the development of computer assisted instructional programs and videotapes concerning handicapped children is presented. The School Nurse Achievement Program (SNAP) is an on-going national inservice training course. The evaluation project…

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the first volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of an introduction, summary/conclusion, site description and assessment, description of facility, and description of operation.

  14. Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers. Final Report for Phase I Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Suprotim; Raje, Sanyukta; Kumar, Satish; Sartor, Dale; Greenberg, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This report documents Phase 1 of the “Accelerating Energy Efficiency in Indian Data Centers” initiative to support the development of an energy efficiency policy framework for Indian data centers. The initiative is being led by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)-U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and under the guidance of Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). It is also part of the larger Power and Energy Efficiency Working Group of the US-India Bilateral Energy Dialogue. The initiative consists of two phases: Phase 1 (November 2014 – September 2015) and Phase 2 (October 2015 – September 2016).

  15. Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in Radiative B Decays to eta K gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2008-05-14

    The authors present measurements of the CP-violation parameters S and C for the radiative decay B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}{gamma}; for B {yields} {eta}K{gamma} they also measure the branching fractions and for B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma} the time-integrated charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub ch}. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, represent 465 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. The results are S = -0.18{sub -0.46}{sup +0.49} {+-} 0.12, C = -0.32{sub -0.39}{sup +0.40} {+-} 0.07, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}K{sup 0}{gamma}) = (7.1{sub -2.0}{sup +2.1} {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}K{sup +}{gamma}) = (7.7 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, and {Alpha}{sub ch} = (-9.0{sub -9.8}{sup +10.4} {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup -2}. The first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic.

  16. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst).

  17. Evidence for the eta(b)(1S) meson in radiative Upsilon(2S) decay.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-16

    We have performed a search for the eta_{b}(1S) meson in the radiative decay of the Upsilon(2S) resonance using a sample of 91.6x10(6) Upsilon(2S) events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe a peak in the photon energy spectrum at Egamma=609.3(-4.5)(+4.6)(stat)+/-1.9(syst) MeV, corresponding to an eta(b)(1S) mass of 9394.2(-4.9)(+4.8)(stat)+/-2.0(syst) MeV/c2. The branching fraction for the decay Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S) is determined to be [3.9+/-1.1(stat)-0.9+1.1(syst)]x10(-4). We find the ratio of branching fractions B[Upsilon(2S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]/B[Upsilon(3S)-->gamma(eta)b(1S)]=0.82+/-0.24(stat)(-0.19)(+0.20)(syst). PMID:19905689

  18. Measurement of charmless B decays to {eta}K* and {eta}{rho}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. H.; Schuemann, J.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukamoto, T.

    2007-05-01

    We report measurements of branching fractions and CP asymmetries for B{yields}{eta}K* and B{yields}{eta}{rho} decays. These results are obtained from a 414 fb{sup -1} data sample collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. We measure the following branching fractions: B(B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}K*{sup 0})=(15.2{+-}1.2{+-}1.0)x10{sup -6} and B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}K*{sup +})=(19.3{sub -1.9}{sup +2.0}{+-}1.5)x10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We also find a 2.7{sigma} excess in the B{sup +}{yields}{eta}{rho}{sup +} mode and measure B(B{sup +}{yields}{eta}{rho}{sup +})=(4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +1.4}{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6}<6.5x10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. For B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{rho}{sup 0} decays, we determine the upper limit B(B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{rho}{sup 0})<1.9x10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The partial rate asymmetries are A{sub CP}({eta}K*{sup 0})=0.17{+-}0.08{+-}0.01, A{sub CP}({eta}K*{sup +})=0.03{+-}0.10{+-}0.01, and A{sub CP}({eta}{rho}{sup +})=-0.04{sub -0.32}{sup +0.34}{+-}0.01.

  19. Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Schroeder

    2011-11-13

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II, Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling at Kitware Inc. in collaboration with Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The goal of the work was to develop collaborative visualization tools for large-scale data as illustrated in the figure below. The solutions we proposed address the typical problems faced by geographicallyand organizationally-separated research and engineering teams, who produce large data (either through simulation or experimental measurement) and wish to work together to analyze and understand their data. Because the data is large, we expect that it cannot be easily transported to each team member's work site, and that the visualization server must reside near the data. Further, we also expect that each work site has heterogeneous resources: some with large computing clients, tiled (or large) displays and high bandwidth; others sites as simple as a team member on a laptop computer. Our solution is based on the open-source, widely used ParaView large-data visualization application. We extended this tool to support multiple collaborative clients who may locally visualize data, and then periodically rejoin and synchronize with the group to discuss their findings. Options for managing session control, adding annotation, and defining the visualization pipeline, among others, were incorporated. We also developed and deployed a Web visualization framework based on ParaView that enables the Web browser to act as a participating client in a collaborative session. The ParaView Web Visualization framework leverages various Web technologies including WebGL, JavaScript, Java and Flash to enable interactive 3D visualization over the web using ParaView as the visualization server. We steered the development of this technology by teaming with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. SLAC has a computationally-intensive problem

  20. Eta Carinae: An Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.

    2008-01-01

    In the 1840s, Eta Carinae, a massive binary near the end of its hydrogen burning cycle, ejected at least ten solar masses of material rich in nitrogen at the expense of carbon and oxygen. The resultant chemistry has led to a most peculiar mix of metals, molecules and dust. We identify thousands of nebular absorption lines of ions including Fe, Ni, V, Sr, Sc and molecules including H2, CH, OH, but no CO. Today we see a wind-enshrouded massive binary in the center of an expanding neutral hourglass and skirt. A similar ionized internal structure is associated with a lesser ejection of the 1890s. Both systems respond to the 5.54-year modulation of X-ray and ultraviolet radiation as the less massive, hotter companion plunges through the extended wind of the more massive, cooler primary. Observations and models are being brought together to understand the properties of the wind-enshrouded central binary. In turn we are learning much atomic spectroscopy, what molecules form in oxygen-and carbon-deprived environments and potentially about a dust that is quite different from the interstellar dust. As the next periastron occurs in January 2009, a number of observing teams are preparing to test these models with new observations.

  1. Final Report: MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS [Grant Number DE-SC0010312

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-10-29

    Our program consisted of the two components: Strand Research and Cable Research, with a focus on Nb3Sn, Bi2212, and YBCO for accelerator magnet applications. We demonstrated a method to refine the grains in Nb3Sn by a factor of two, reaching 45 nm grain sizes, and layer Jcs of 6 kA/mm2 at 12 T. W also measured conductor magnetization for field quality. This has been done both with Nb3Sn conductor, as well as Bi:2212 strand. Work in support of quench studies of YBCO coils was also performed. Cable loss studies in Nb3Sn focused on connecting and comparing persistent magnetization and coupling magnetization for considering their relative impact on HEP machines. In the area of HTS cables, we have investigated both the quench in multistrand YBCO CORC cables, as well as the magnetization of these cables for use in high field magnets. In addition, we examined the magnetic and thermal properties of large (50 T) solenoids.

  2. Final safety analysis report for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This document is the second volume of a 3 volume safety analysis report on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The GTA program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the major element of the national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program, which is supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO). A principal goal of the national NPB program is to assess the feasibility of using hydrogen and deuterium neutral particle beams outside the Earth`s atmosphere. The main effort of the NPB program at Los Alamos concentrates on developing the GTA. The GTA is classified as a low-hazard facility, except for the cryogenic-cooling system, which is classified as a moderate-hazard facility. This volume consists of failure modes and effects analysis; accident analysis; operational safety requirements; quality assurance program; ES&H management program; environmental, safety, and health systems critical to safety; summary of waste-management program; environmental monitoring program; facility expansion, decontamination, and decommissioning; summary of emergency response plan; summary plan for employee training; summary plan for operating procedures; glossary; and appendices A and B.

  3. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Driven by a CO2 Laser (STELLA-LW) - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Wayne D

    2008-06-27

    The original goals of the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration – Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) program were to investigate two new methods for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). In pseudo-resonant LWFA (PR-LWFA), a laser pulse experiences nonlinear pulse steepening while traveling through the plasma. This steepening allows the laser pulse to generate wakefields even though the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA to occur. For the conditions of this program, PR-LWFA requires a minimum laser peak power of 3 TW and a low plasma density (10^16 cm^-3). Seeded self-modulated LWFA (seeded SM-LWFA) combines LWFA with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). An ultrashort (~100 fs) electron beam bunch acts as a seed in a plasma to form a wakefield via PWFA. This wakefield is subsequently amplified by the laser pulse through a self-modulated LWFA process. At least 1 TW laser power and, for a ~100-fs bunch, a plasma density ~10^17 cm^-3 are required. STELLA-LW was located on Beamline #1 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF TW CO2 laser served as the driving laser beam for both methods. For PR-LWFA, a single bunch was to probe the wakefield produced by the laser beam. For seeded SM-LWFA, the ATF linac would produce two bunches, where the first would be the seed and the second would be the witness. A chicane would compress the first bunch to enable it to generate wakefields via PWFA. The plasma source was a short-length, gas-filled capillary discharge with the laser beam tightly focused in the center of the capillary, i.e., no laser guiding was used, in order to obtain the needed laser intensity. During the course of the program, several major changes had to be made. First, the ATF could not complete the upgrade of the CO2 laser to the 3 TW peak power needed for the PR-LWFA experiment. Therefore, the PR-LWFA experiment had to be abandoned leaving only the seeded SM-LWFA experiment. Second, the ATF discovered that the

  4. Chiral corrections to the anomalous 2. gamma. decays of. pi. sup 0 ,. eta. and. eta. prime

    SciTech Connect

    Issler, D.

    1990-11-01

    To any order in chiral perturbation theory, the anomalous Wess-Zumino term is shown to generate only chirally invariant counterterms. Explicit examples of 0(p{sub 6}) terms generated by one-loop graphs are given, some of which are relevant to the two-photon decays of {pi}{sup o}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}.

  5. Eta Squared and Partial Eta Squared as Measures of Effect Size in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John T. E.

    2011-01-01

    Eta squared measures the proportion of the total variance in a dependent variable that is associated with the membership of different groups defined by an independent variable. Partial eta squared is a similar measure in which the effects of other independent variables and interactions are partialled out. The development of these measures is…

  6. Effect of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing on D{yields}PV decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2010-08-01

    Charmed meson decays to a light pseudoscalar (P) and light vector (V) meson are analyzed taking account of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing. A frequently-used octet-singlet mixing angle of 19.5 degree sign is compared with a value of 11.7 degree sign favored by a recent analysis of D{yields}PP decays.

  7. Design and Evaluation of a Clock Multiplexing Circuit for the SSRL Booster Accelerator Timing System - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, Million

    2015-08-21

    SPEAR3 is a 234 m circular storage ring at SLAC’s synchrotron radiation facility (SSRL) in which a 3 GeV electron beam is stored for user access. Typically the electron beam decays with a time constant of approximately 10hr due to electron lose. In order to replenish the lost electrons, a booster synchrotron is used to accelerate fresh electrons up to 3GeV for injection into SPEAR3. In order to maintain a constant electron beam current of 500mA, the injection process occurs at 5 minute intervals. At these times the booster synchrotron accelerates electrons for injection at a 10Hz rate. A 10Hz 'injection ready' clock pulse train is generated when the booster synchrotron is operating. Between injection intervals-where the booster is not running and hence the 10 Hz ‘injection ready’ signal is not present-a 10Hz clock is derived from the power line supplied by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) to keep track of the injection timing. For this project I constructed a multiplexing circuit to 'switch' between the booster synchrotron 'injection ready' clock signal and PG&E based clock signal. The circuit uses digital IC components and is capable of making glitch-free transitions between the two clocks. This report details construction of a prototype multiplexing circuit including test results and suggests improvement opportunities for the final design.

  8. Microwave and accelerator research. Final report on Grant DE-FG02-92ER40731

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, John A.

    2002-09-01

    This report summarizes the main technical objectives and accomplishments during the life of the grant, and concludes with data on publications describing the research. The main activity was the development of very high power microwave sources, initially in X-band, and recent initial work on a Ka band TWT amplifier. There was additional activity on ferroelectric emitters. Highlights include the following: (1) The development of a relatively broad band microwave source yielding approx. 75 MW power at a power efficiency of 54% and an energy conversion efficiency of 43%. (2) The development of a ferroelectric cathode electron gun which yielded a beam current of up to 350 A at 500 kV. The device was shown to operate satisfactorily at a low repetition rate, limited by the available power supplies. The final beam power obtained exceeds that achieved elsewhere by several orders of magnitude. The gun development achieved was shown to give an electron beam suitable for high power X-band microwave sources with the demonstration of a 5-MW tunable X-band TWT single-stage amplifier. (3) Work was initiated on a Ka-Band TWT amplifier. Gains of over 30 dB were achieved at peak output powers of about 4 MW. Appendices include two submitted papers: Symmetric and asymmetric mode interaction in high-power traveling wave amplifiers: experiments and theory and High power microwave generation using a ferroelectric cathode electron gun.

  9. Eta Carinae: Orientation of The Orbital Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Ivarsson, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Verner, E.; Hillier, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence continues to build that Eta Carinae is a massive binary system with a hidden hot companion in a highly elliptical orbit. We present imaging and spectroscopic evidence that provide clues to the orientation of the orbital plane. The circumstellar ejecta, known as the Homunculus and Little Homunculus, are hourglass-shaped structures, one encapsulated within the other, tilted at about 45 degrees from the sky plane. A disk region lies between the bipolar lobes. Based upon their velocities and proper motions, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, very bright emission clumps 0.1 to 0.3" Northwest from Eta Carinae, lie in the disk. UV flux from the hot companion, Eta Car B, photoexcites the Weigelt blobs. Other clumps form a complete chain around the star, but are not significantly photoexcited. The strontium filament, a 'neutral' emission structure, lies in the same general direction as the Weigelt blobs and exhibits peculiar properties indicative that much mid-UV, but no hydrogen-ionizing radiation impinges on this structure. It is shielded by singly-ionized iron. P Cygni absorptions in Fe I I lines, seen directly in line of sight from Eta Carinae, are absent in the stellar light scattered by the Weigelt blobs. Rather than a strong absorption extending to -600 km/s, a low velocity absorption feature extends from -40 to -150 km/s. No absorbing Fe II exists between Eta Carinae and Weigelt D, but the outer reaches of the wind are intercepted in line of sight from Weigelt D to the observer. This indicates that the UV radiation is constrained by the dominating wind of Eta Car A to a small cavity carved out by the weaker wind of Eta Car B. Since the high excitation nebular lines are seen in the Weigelt blobs at most phases, the cavity, and hence the major axis of the highly elliptical orbit, must lie in the general direction of the Weigelt blobs. The evidence is compelling that the orbital major axis of Eta Carinae is projected at -45 degrees position angle on the sky. Moreover

  10. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-06-25

    The $\\eta N$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $\\Delta$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $E\\sim 2.3$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. The resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $\\pi N\\to \\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $K\\Lambda$ and $K\\Sigma$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.

  11. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-06-25

    Themore » $$\\eta N$$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $$\\Delta$$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $$E\\sim 2.3$$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $$\\pi N\\to \\pi N$$, $$\\eta N$$, $$K\\Lambda$$ and $$K\\Sigma$$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.« less

  12. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rönchen, D.; Döring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-06-01

    The ηN final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited Δ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of E ˜ 2.3 GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single- and double-polarization observables. The resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions πN → πN, ηN, KΛ and KΣ. For the analysis, the so-called Jülich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. The influence of recent MAMI T and F asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.

  13. Endothelin ETA receptor antagonism in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Suzanne A; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2014-08-15

    Since the discovery of the endothelin system in 1988, it has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological phenomena. In the cardiovascular system, endothelin-1 (ET-1) acts through intracellular pathways of two endothelin receptors (ETA and ETB) located mainly on smooth muscle and endothelial cells to regulate vascular tone and provoke mitogenic and proinflammatory reactions. The endothelin ETA receptor is believed to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular disease including systemic hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), dilated cardiomyopathy, and diabetic microvascular dysfunction. Growing evidence from recent experimental and clinical studies indicates that the blockade of endothelin receptors, particularly the ETA subtype, grasps promise in the treatment of major cardiovascular pathologies. The simultaneous blockade of endothelin ETB receptors might not be advantageous, leading possibly to vasoconstriction and salt and water retentions. This review summarizes the role of ET-1 in cardiovascular modulation and the therapeutic potential of endothelin receptor antagonism.

  14. The electroproduction of etas and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    O.K. Baker

    2001-12-01

    Experimental results for the electromagnetic production of eta and K mesons are compared with QCD-inspired models. The eta mesons from the decay of S_11 resonance were used to study the momentum transfer dependence of the relevant helicity amplitude and cross section in the reaction ^1H(e,e'p)eta. The ^1H(e,e'K+)Lambda reaction was studied as a function of squared four-momentum transfer, Q^2, and of the virtual photon polarization parameter, epsilon. Both of these experiments were performed at Jefferson Lab during the early years of operation. The new precision data serve to constrain model calculations and provide new insights into the physical processes.

  15. THE LONG-LIVED DISKS IN THE {eta} CHAMAELEONTIS CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Bouwman, Jeroen; Juhasz, Attila; Henning, Thomas; Roccatagliata, Veronica; Lawson, Warrick A.; Acke, Bram; Decin, Leen; Feigelson, Eric D.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Meeus, Gwendolyn

    2009-08-20

    We present Infrared Spectrograph spectra and revised Multiband Imaging Photometer photometry for the 18 members of the {eta} Chamaeleontis cluster. Aged 8 Myr, the {eta} Cha cluster is one of the few nearby regions within the 5-10 Myr age range, during which the disk fraction decreases dramatically and giant planet formation must come to an end. For the 15 low-mass members, we measure a disk fraction {approx}50%, high for their 8 Myr age, and four of the eight disks lack near-IR excesses, consistent with the empirical definition of 'transition' disks. Most of the disks are comparable to geometrically flat disks. The comparison with regions of different ages suggests that at least some of the 'transition' disks may represent the normal type of disk around low-mass stars. Therefore, their flattened structure and inner holes may be related to other factors (initial masses of the disk and the star, environment, binarity), rather than to pure time evolution. We analyze the silicate dust in the disk atmosphere, finding moderate crystalline fractions ({approx}10%-30%) and typical grain sizes {approx}1-3 {mu}m, without any characteristic trend in the composition. These results are common to other regions of different ages, suggesting that the initial grain processing occurs very early in the disk lifetime (<1 Myr). Large grain sizes in the disk atmosphere cannot be used as a proxy for age, but are likely related to higher disk turbulence. The dust mineralogy varies between the 8-12 {mu}m and the 20-30 {mu}m features, suggesting high temperature dust processing and little radial mixing. Finally, the analysis of IR and optical data on the B9 star {eta} Cha reveals that it is probably surrounded by a young debris disk with a large inner hole, instead of being a classical Be star.

  16. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  17. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  18. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  19. 31 CFR 208.5 - Availability of the ETA SM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Availability of the ETA SM. 208.5... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.5 Availability of the ETA SM. An individual who receives a Federal benefit, wage, salary, or retirement payment shall be eligible to open an ETA SM at any Federally-insured financial institution...

  20. A SEA CHANGE IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Martin, John C.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ferland, Gary J.; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2010-07-01

    Major stellar-wind emission features in the spectrum of {eta} Car have recently decreased by factors of order 2 relative to the continuum. This is unprecedented in the modern observational record. The simplest, but unproven, explanation is a rapid decrease in the wind density.

  1. THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Christina B. Behr-Andres

    2001-10-01

    The objective of the Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As a result of contract changes approved by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) representatives to incorporate activities previously conducted under another NETL agreement, there are now an additional task and an expansion of activities within the stated scope of work of the ETA program. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement, funded by NETL (No. DE-FC26-00NT40840), consists of four tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, Technology Verification, and System Engineering. As currently conceived, ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. There are currently four technical subtasks: Long-Term Stewardship Initiative at the Mound Plant Site; Photocatalysis of Mercury-Contaminated Water; Subcritical Water Treatment of PCB and Metal-Contaminated Paint Waste; and Vegetative Covers for Low-Level Waste Repositories. This report covers activities during the second six months of the three-year ETA program.

  2. A preliminary analysis of {eta}'{yields}{eta}{pi}{pi} in chiral theories

    SciTech Connect

    Escribano, R.

    2010-08-05

    Preliminary results for the Dalitz plot distribution of {eta}'{yields}{eta}{pi}{pi} decays in the frameworks of Large-N{sub c} Chiral Perturbation Theory and Resonance Chiral Theory are given. We hope our results to be of some relevance for the present and forthcoming analysis of these decays at GAMS, CLEO, VES, KLOE-2, Crystal Ball, Crystal Barrel, WASA, and BES-III.

  3. FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-04ER41317 Advanced Computation and Chaotic Dynamics for Beams and Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R

    2014-09-08

    During the year ending in August 2013, we continued to investigate the potential of photonic crystal (PhC) materials for acceleration purposes. We worked to characterize acceleration ability of simple PhC accelerator structures, as well as to characterize PhC materials to determine whether current fabrication techniques can meet the needs of future accelerating structures. We have also continued to design and optimize PhC accelerator structures, with the ultimate goal of finding a new kind of accelerator structure that could offer significant advantages over current RF acceleration technology. This design and optimization of these requires high performance computation, and we continue to work on methods to make such computation faster and more efficient.

  4. Formation and characterization of the oxygen-rich hafnium dioxygen complexes: OHf(eta2-O2)(eta2-O3), Hf(eta2-O2)3, and Hf(eta2-O2)4.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Zhou, Mingfei

    2007-09-20

    Hafnium atom oxidation by dioxygen molecules has been investigated using matrix isolation infrared absorption spectroscopy. The ground-state hafnium atom inserts into dioxygen to form primarily the previously characterized HfO(2) molecule in solid argon. Annealing allows the dioxygen molecules to diffuse and react with HfO(2) to form OHf(eta(2)-O(2))(eta(2)-O(3)), which is characterized as a side-on bonded oxo-superoxo hafnium ozonide complex. Under visible light (532 nm) irradiation, the OHf(eta(2)-O(2))(eta(2)-O(3)) complex either photochemically rearranges to a more stable Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(3) isomer, a side-on bonded di-superoxo hafnium peroxide complex, or reacts with dioxygen to form an unprecedented homoleptic tetra-superoxo hafnium complex: Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(4). The Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(4) complex is determined to possess a D(2d) geometry with a tetrahedral arrangement of four side-on bonded O(2) ligands around the hafnium atom, which thus presents an 8-fold coordination. These oxygen-rich complexes are photoreversible; that is, formation of Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(3) and Hf(eta(2)-O(2))(4) is accompanied by demise of OHf(eta(2)-O(2))(eta(2)-O(3)) under visible (532 nm) light irradiation and vice versa with UV (266 nm) light irradiation.

  5. Some Comments on the Decays of eta (550)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Veltman, M.; Yellin, J.

    1966-07-01

    Various decay modes of the {eta}(500) are discussed. The relations, through SU{sub 3} and the Gell-Mann, Sharp, Wagner model, between the {eta}-decay modes and the modes {eta} {yields} {pi}{pi}{gamma), {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} are investigated taking into account {eta}-{eta}{sup *} mixing. The present experimental values for the neutral branching ratios plus the shape of the {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot are shown to require a 25% {vert_bar}{Delta}{rvec I}{vert_bar} = 3 contribution to the {eta} {yields} 3{pi} amplitude. The connection between a possible charge asymmetry in {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} and the branching ratio {Gamma}{sub {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}}/{Gamma}{sub {eta}}{sup all} is investigated in the framework of a model proposed earlier by several authors. It is shown that there is no conflict between the existing data and this model. The Dalitz plot distribution of {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} is discussed under various assumptions about the properties of the interaction responsible for the decay. (auth)

  6. etas_solve: A robust program to estimate the ETAS parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Y.; Kasahara, A.

    2015-12-01

    The epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model introduced by Ogata (1988) has been widely used to quantitatively describe seismicity (e.g. Ogata, 1992; Llenos et al., 2009). However, only a few programs for estimation of the ETAS parameters are publicly available, and it is difficult to automatically apply some of them to observed data due to initial value dependence (e.g. Ogata, 2006). A robust ETAS estimation program is required to meet the recent enhancement of earthquake catalogs. In this study, we developed a new program, etas_solve, that is based on Newton's method and calculates exact gradient and Hessian by using the automatic differentiation technique (Griewank, 1989). The program also supports auxiliary window in time and magnitude (Wang et al., 2010).To demonstrate robustness of the developed program, we tested the dependence of estimated parameters on the choice of initial value by running the program from 1,024 randomly chosen initial values, and then compared the results with that of SAPP (Ogata 2006). We used aftershock data of 26th July 2003 earthquake of M6.2 at the northern Miyagi japan, which is shipped with SAPP, as a testing data. We found that estimation values with etas_solve were independent of the initial value for the testing data, while that with SAPP were varied with the initial value. Although there was initial value dependence in the SAPP's results, the estimated values by SAPP with small (≤10-5) gradient coincided with the solution by etas_solve. etas_solve took longer computation time per iteration than SAPP due to the exact Hessian calculation, but total execution time was comparable to that of SAPP since less number of iterations for convergence was required. In addition, etas_solve was faster than SAPP on multicore machines (around 8-fold speed up with a 16 core machine) since etas_solve is parallelized by OpenMP.etas_solve is written in Fortran and distributed under GNU General Public License at https

  7. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B M.K.; Goetz, J; Lapik, A; Korolija, M; Prakhov, S; Starostin, A

    2011-05-18

    This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup 0}, 2{pi}{sup }0, 3{pi}{sup 0}, {eta} , {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4 . It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, G-parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta} ,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta} and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron

  8. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  9. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    DOE PAGES

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgηmore » and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.« less

  10. Eta-mesic nuclei: Past, present, future

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Q.; Liu, Lon -Chang

    2015-09-23

    Eta-mesic nucleus or the quasibound nuclear state of an eta (η) meson in a nucleus is caused by strong interaction force alone. This new type of nuclear species, which extends the landscape of nuclear physics, has been extensively studied since its prediction in 1986. We review and analyze in great detail the models of the fundamental η–nucleon interaction leading to the formation of an η–mesic nucleus, the methods used in calculating the properties of a bound η, and the approaches employed in the interpretation of the pertinent experimental data. In view of the successful observation of the η–mesic nucleus 25Mgη and other promising experimental results, future direction in searching for more η–mesic nuclei is suggested.

  11. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  12. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a

  13. GHRS Observations of LISM towards eta UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The star eta UMa (l=101(deg) , b=+65(deg) , d=31 pc) samples local interstellar matter (LISM) in a high latitude region. The Sun is ``above'' most of the mass of the Local Fluff cloud complex, yielding low total interstellar column densities towards eta UMa. Thus cloud properties can be determined with minimal confusion caused by velocity component blending in this sightline. The physical properties of the cloud surrounding the solar system become the boundary conditions of the solar system. A key property of the surrounding cloud is the proton density, since the Alfven velocity regulates the formation of a bow shock around the heliosphere, and since charge exchange between interstellar p(+) and H(deg) yields a pile-up of H(deg) at the heliopause. As a result, the interstellar electron density in the surrounding cloud is an important parameter in understanding the configuration of the outer heliosphere regions. We present GHRS Echelle A and Echelle B data on C({deg) *}, C(deg) , Mg(deg) and Mg(+) . These data allow us to compare electron densities as estimated from the ratios N(C({deg) *})/N(C(deg) ) versus N(Mg(deg) )/N(Mg(+) ) for a relatively simple sightline. These electron densities are also compared to electron densities determined from optical Ca(+) observations towards eta UMa by Frisch and Welty (in preparation).

  14. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  15. Interaction of eta mesons with nuclei.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P; Upadhyay, N J; Jain, B K

    2013-06-01

    Back in the mid-1980s, a new branch of investigation related to the interaction of eta mesons with nuclei came into existence. It started with the theoretical prediction of possible exotic states of eta mesons and nuclei bound by the strong interaction and later developed into an extensive experimental program to search for such unstable states as well as understand the underlying interaction via eta-meson producing reactions. The vast literature of experimental as well as theoretical works that studied various aspects of eta-producing reactions such as the π(+)n → ηp, pd → (3)Heη, p (6)Li → (7)Be η and γ (3)He → η X, to name a few, had but one objective in mind: to understand the eta-nucleon (ηN) and hence the η-nucleus interaction which could explain the production data and confirm the existence of some η-mesic nuclei. In spite of these efforts, there remain uncertainties in the knowledge of the ηN and hence the η-nucleus interaction. Therefore, this review is an attempt to bind together the findings in these works and draw some global and specific conclusions which can be useful for future explorations.The ηN scattering length (which represents the strength of the η-nucleon interaction) using different theoretical models and analyzing the data on η production in pion, photon and proton induced reactions was found to be spread out in a wide range, namely, 0.18 ≤ Re aηN ≤ 1.03 fm and 0.16 ≤ Rm aηN ≤ 0.49 fm. Theoretical searches of heavy η-mesic nuclei based on η-nucleus optical potentials and lighter ones based on Faddeev type few-body approaches predict the existence of several quasibound and resonant states. Although some hints of η-mesic states such as (3)(η)He and (25)(η)Mg do exist from previous experiments, the promise of clearer signals for the existence of η-mesic nuclei lies in the experiments to be performed at the J-PARC, MAMI and COSY facilities in the near future. This review is aimed at giving an overall status

  16. Measurement of the gamma gamma* --> eta and gamma gamma* --> eta' transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez et al, P.

    2011-02-07

    We study the reactions e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sup (/)} in the single-tag mode and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sup (/)} transition form factors in the momentum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  17. Charmless B{yields}K{sub h{eta}}{sup (')} decays with K{sub h}=K, K{sup *}, K{sub 0}{sup *}(1430), K{sub 2}{sup *}(1430)

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2010-08-01

    ) |f{sub {eta}}{sup 's}|>|f{sub {eta}}{sup s}| and (ii) a destructive (constructive) interference between type-I and type-II penguin diagrams for K{sub 2}{sup *{eta}} (K{sub 2}{sup *{eta}'}). However, the predicted rates of B{yields}K{sub 2}{sup *{eta}(')} in naive factorization are too small by 1 order of magnitude and this issue remains to be resolved. There are two K{sup (*){eta}(')} modes in which direct CP asymmetries have been measured with significance around 4{sigma}: A{sub CP}(K{sup -}{eta})=-0.37{+-}0.09 and A{sub CP}(K{sup *0}{eta})=0.19{+-}0.05. In QCDF, power corrections from penguin annihilation which are needed to resolve CP puzzles in K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} modes will flip A{sub CP}(K{sup -}{eta}) into a wrong sign. We show that soft corrections to the color-suppressed tree amplitude a{sub 2} in conjunction with the charm content of the {eta} will finally lead to A{sub CP}(K{sup -}{eta})=-0.15{sub -0.28}{sup +0.19}. Likewise, this power correction is needed to improve the prediction for A{sub CP}(K{sup *0{eta}}).

  18. {upsilon}(4S,5S){yields}{upsilon}(1S){eta} transitions in the rescattering model and the new BABAR measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Ce; Chao Kuangta

    2008-10-01

    The {eta} transitions of {upsilon}(4S,5S) into {upsilon}(1S,2S) are studied in the rescattering model by considering the final state interactions above the BB threshold. The width of the {eta} transition of {upsilon}(4S) into {upsilon}(1S) is found to be larger than that of the dipion transition, and the ratio of {gamma}({upsilon}(4S){yields}{upsilon}(1S){eta}) to {gamma}({upsilon}(4S){yields}{upsilon}(1S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) is predicted to be R{sub 4}=1.8-4.5, which is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than the expectation of the conventional hadronic transition theory, and is supported by the new BABAR measurement. The widths of the {eta} transitions of {upsilon}(5S) are found to be sensitive to the coupling constants g{sub {upsilon}}{sub (5S)B{sup (*)}}{sub B{sup (*)}} due to a large cancellation between contributions from the BB, B*B+c.c., and B*B* channels, and only a rough estimate {gamma}({upsilon}(5S){yields}{upsilon}(1S,2S){eta})=10-200 KeV can be given. The widths of the {eta}{sup '} transitions of {upsilon}(4S,5S) are also discussed, and they could be much smaller than that of the corresponding {eta} transitions mainly due to the tiny phase space.

  19. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

  20. Probing Temperatures in the Extreme Colliding-Wind Binary Eta Carinae using Iron-Line Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyder, Jean-Christophe; Eta Carinae Team

    2013-04-01

    Eta Carinae, one of the most peculiar objects in our Galaxy, was the second brightest object in the sky during its eruption in 1843. The large quantities of matter that were ejected at that time are now forming an extended nebula, while Eta Car is still ejecting matter through energetic stellar winds. Eta Car is a colliding-wind binary system: the dense stellar wind coming from the massive luminous blue variable primary star collides with the higher-velocity, lower-density wind from the hotter and luminous (and otherwise unseen) companion star in a highly eccentric orbit. Monitoring observations in the radio, UV, optical, and X-ray domains all indicate an orbital period of 5.5 years. X-ray observations of a colliding-wind binary system such as Eta Carinae provide numerous clues as to the shock physics and mechanisms responsible for particle acceleration and emission in the hydrodynamical shocks that form between the stellar winds. Furthermore, Eta Carinae's long period and high eccentricity provides varying physical conditions, and allow to probe a large parameter space of densities and wind speeds, especially when observing periastron passages where strong variations occur over a short timescale. In my talk, I will present a set of 24 high-resolution X-ray spectra of Eta Carinae obtained by the Chandra satellite, with a particularly detailed coverage around the X-ray minima of 2003.5 and 2009. I will mostly focus on the variations and peculiarities observed in the Fe K line region. Indeed, at energies around 7 keV, absorption becomes much less important, and the temperatures probed are much higher than what can be done using fir triplet around 1 keV. The relative intensities of the Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines provide a very useful diagnostic of the temperature in the apex of the shock, one of the best approaches to obtain observational constraints . They appear to vary along the orbital phase with a repeatable pattern, and I will suggest a likely interpretation

  1. Software Users Manual (SUM): Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    This software user manual describes the implementation and use the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool. The ETA Tool is a software program that augments the analysis and reporting capabilities of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) testability analysis software package called the Testability Engineering And Maintenance System (TEAMS) Designer. An initial diagnostic assessment is performed by the TEAMS Designer software using a qualitative, directed-graph model of the system being analyzed. The ETA Tool utilizes system design information captured within the diagnostic model and testability analysis output from the TEAMS Designer software to create a series of six reports for various system engineering needs. The ETA Tool allows the user to perform additional studies on the testability analysis results by determining the detection sensitivity to the loss of certain sensors or tests. The ETA Tool was developed to support design and development of the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. The diagnostic analysis provided by the ETA Tool was proven to be valuable system engineering output that provided consistency in the verification of system engineering requirements. This software user manual provides a description of each output report generated by the ETA Tool. The manual also describes the example diagnostic model and supporting documentation - also provided with the ETA Tool software release package - that were used to generate the reports presented in the manual

  2. A LIGHTHOUSE EFFECT IN ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Madura, Thomas I.; Groh, Jose H.

    2012-02-20

    We present a new model for the behavior of scattered time-dependent, asymmetric near-UV emission from the nearby ejecta of {eta} Car. Using a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulation of {eta} Car's binary colliding winds, we show that the 3D binary orientation derived by Madura et al. in 2012 is capable of explaining the asymmetric near-UV variability observed in the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Camera F220W images of Smith et al.. Models assuming a binary orientation with i Almost-Equal-To 130 Degree-Sign -145 Degree-Sign , {omega} Almost-Equal-To 230 Degree-Sign -315 Degree-Sign , P.A.{sub z} Almost-Equal-To 302 Degree-Sign -327 Degree-Sign are consistent with the observed F220W near-UV images. We find that the hot binary companion does not significantly contribute to the near-UV excess observed in the F220W images. Rather, we suggest that a bore-hole effect and the reduction of Fe II optical depths inside the wind-wind collision cavity carved in the extended photosphere of the primary star lead to the time-dependent directional illumination of circumbinary material as the companion moves about in its highly elliptical orbit.

  3. eta Carinae: physical information from photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Genderen, A. M.; de Groot, M.; Sterken, C.

    2001-06-01

    The very first physical information one can get from optical photometry is that eta Car is variable. Figure 1 shows the light curve from 1600 to 2000. Most reseachers agree with the main interpretations of the various features as shown by the light curve. The eruptive phases are called S Dor- (SD-) eruptions as opposed to the S Dor- (SD-) phases, which are responsible for the oscillating light variations (due to slow pulsations) with a time-scale of years (van Genderen 2001). The rising trend after 1935 is called the 'secular rise' and is mainly due to a decrease of circumstellar extinction, i.e. a decrease of self-extinction by the expanding Homunculus. A model for the trend of the decrease fits the time interval 1935-2000 satisfactorily (van Genderen et al. 1994, and see dotted curve in Figure 1 presented here). The optical (and near-IR) photometry of eta Car is hampered by the fact that only integrated photometry of the whole bipolar nebula is possible. However, we have luck: the nebula is mainly a reflection nebula. Thus, in analogy with a Chinese lantern: if the flame flickers, the integrated light flickers as well. Therefore, it is still possible to extract from the integrated photometry, important physical characteristics of the variable star, although heavily veiled by dust and gas. The effect of smearing out by reflections in the homunculus is presumably small, see discussion in van Genderen et al. (1999).

  4. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, J. J.; Westphal, James A.; Light, Robert M.; Currie, Douglas G.; Groth, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    New high spatial resolution observations of the material around Eta Carinae, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field/Planetary Camera, are presented. The star Eta Carinae is one of the most massive and luminous stars in the Galaxy, and has been episodically expelling significant quantities of gas over the last few centuries. The morphology of the bright central nebulosity (the homunculus) indicates that it is a thin shell with very well defined edges, and is clumpy on 0.2 arcsec (about 10 to the 16th cm) scales. An extension to the northeast of the star (NN/NS using Walborn's 1976 nomenclature) appears to be a stellar jet and its associated bow shock. The bow shock is notable for an intriguing series of parallel linear features across its face. The S ridge and the W arc appear to be part of a 'cap' of emission located to the SW and behind the star. Together, the NE jet and the SW cap suggest that the symmetry axis for the system runs NE-SW rather than SE-NW, as previously supposed. Overall, the data indicate that the material around the star may represent an oblate shell with polar blowouts, rather than a bipolar flow.

  5. MTX final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K.

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  6. Chiral corrections to the anomalous 2{gamma} decays of {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}

    SciTech Connect

    Issler, D.

    1990-11-01

    To any order in chiral perturbation theory, the anomalous Wess-Zumino term is shown to generate only chirally invariant counterterms. Explicit examples of 0(p{sub 6}) terms generated by one-loop graphs are given, some of which are relevant to the two-photon decays of {pi}{sup o}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}.

  7. Emittance growth and instability induced by space charge effect during final beam bunching in HIF accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Someya, T.; Kawata, S.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2006-06-01

    Beam dynamics and emittance growth are investigated by using particle-in-cell simulations during a final beam bunching for a driver system of inertial fusion driven by intense heavy ion beams. Space-charge-dominated beams are transported by a transverse confinement lattice with longitudinal compression, and the emittance increases along the longitudinal beam bunching. Dipole oscillations are excited due to the initial displacement of the beam center. The displacement causes the additional emittance growth during the final beam bunching.

  8. Differential cross sections for the reactions {gamma}p{yields}p{eta} and {gamma}p{yields}p{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Krahn, Z.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; McCracken, M. E.; Moriya, K.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Careccia, S. L.; Dodge, G. E.; Guler, N.; Klein, A.; Mayer, M.; Nepali, C. S.; Niroula, M. R.; Seraydaryan, H.; Tkachenko, S.

    2009-10-15

    High-statistics differential cross sections for the reactions {gamma}p{yields}p{eta} and {gamma}p{yields}p{eta}{sup '} have been measured using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass energies from near threshold up to 2.84 GeV. The {eta}{sup '} results are the most precise to date and provide the largest energy and angular coverage. The {eta} measurements extend the energy range of the world's large-angle results by approximately 300 MeV. These new data, in particular the {eta}{sup '} measurements, are likely to help constrain the analyses being performed to search for new baryon resonance states.

  9. Accelerated test methods for life prediction of hermetic motor insulation systems exposed to alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II; Ferguson, A.F.

    1995-04-19

    In 1992, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc. (ARTI) contracted Radian Corporation to ascertain whether an improved accelerated test method or procedure could be developed that would allow prediction of the life of motor insulation materials used in hermetic motors for air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment operated with alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Phase 1 of the project, Conceptual Design of an accelerated test method and apparatus, was successfully completed in June 1993. The culmination of that effort was the concept of the Simulated Stator Unit (SSU) test. The objective of the Phase 2 limited proof-of-concept demonstration was to: answer specific engineering/design questions; design and construct an analog control sequencer and supporting apparatus; and conduct limited tests to determine the viability of the SSU test concept. This report reviews the SSU test concept, and describes the results through the conclusion of the proof-of-concept prototype tests in March 1995. The technical design issues inherent in transforming any conceptual design to working equipment have been resolved, and two test systems and controllers have been constructed. Pilot tests and three prototype tests have been completed, concluding the current phase of work. One prototype unit was tested without thermal stress loads. Twice daily insulation property measurements (IPMs) on this unit demonstrated that the insulation property measurements themselves did not degrade the SSU.

  10. Detection of a Hot Binary Companion of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Massa, D.; Hillier, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1 180 Angsroms) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Observations were obtained at two epochs of the 2024-day orbit: 2003 June during ingress to the 2003.5 X-ray eclipse and 2004 April several months after egress. These data show that essentially all the far-UV flux from eta Car shortward of Lyman alpha disappeared at least two days before the start of the X-ray eclipse (2003 June 29), implying that the hot companion, eta Car By was also eclipsed by the dense wind or extended atmosphere of eta Car A. Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. N II 1084-1086 emission disappears at the same time as the far-UV continuum, indicating that this feature originates from eta Car B itself or in close proximity to it. The strong N II emission also raises the possibility that the companion star is nitrogen rich. The observed FUV flux levels and spectral features, combined with the timing of their disappearance, are consistent with eta Carinae being a massive binary system.

  11. Detection of a Hot Binary Companion of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnebom, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Massa, D. L.; Hillier, D. J.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Observations were obtained at two epochs of the 2024-day orbit: 2003 June during ingress to the 2003.5 X-ray eclipse and 2004 April several months after egress. These data show that essentially all the far-UV flux from eta Car shortward of Lyman alpha disappeared at least two days before the start of the X-ray eclipse (2003 June 29), implying that the hot companion, eta Car B, was also eclipsed by the dense wind or extended atmosphere of eta Car A. Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. N II 1084-1086 emission disappears at the same time as the far-UV continuum, indicating that this feature originates from eta Car B itself or in close proximity to it. The strong N II emission also raises the possibility that the companion star is nitrogen rich. The observed FUV flux levels and spectral features, combined with the timing of their disappearance, is consistent with eta Carinae being a massive binary system

  12. Structure and mechanism of human DNA polymerase [eta

    SciTech Connect

    Biertümpfel, Christian; Zhao, Ye; Kondo, Yuji; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Gregory, Mark; Lee, Jae Young; Masutani, Chikahide; Lehmann, Alan R.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Yang, Wei

    2010-11-03

    The variant form of the human syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) is caused by a deficiency in DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}), a DNA polymerase that enables replication through ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers. Here we report high-resolution crystal structures of human Pol{eta} at four consecutive steps during DNA synthesis through cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers. Pol{eta} acts like a 'molecular splint' to stabilize damaged DNA in a normal B-form conformation. An enlarged active site accommodates the thymine dimer with excellent stereochemistry for two-metal ion catalysis. Two residues conserved among Pol{eta} orthologues form specific hydrogen bonds with the lesion and the incoming nucleotide to assist translesion synthesis. On the basis of the structures, eight Pol{eta} missense mutations causing XPV can be rationalized as undermining the molecular splint or perturbing the active-site alignment. The structures also provide an insight into the role of Pol{eta} in replicating through D loop and DNA fragile sites.

  13. The Rapid Brightening of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John C.; Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Eta Carinae is one of the most dynamic and well-observed massive stars. Its bipolar Homunculus Nebula and other observations imply it has a strong latitude dependent stellar wind. The significant brightening of the star itself over the last two decades has been commonly explained as an evolution of the latitude structure of the wind , change in mass-loss rate, and/or clearing of circumstellar material in our direct line sight. Hubble Space Telescope images (with a much higher spatial resolution than ground-based images) document an increase in contrast between the brightness of the star and the Homunculus reflection nebula. We present measurements of the nebula's brightness, sampling the changing brightness of the star viewed from angles differing from our own direct line of sight. We also present ultraviolet photometry of the star synthesized from recent HST/STIS observations.

  14. Role of DNA polymerases eta, iota and zeta in UV resistance and UV-induced mutagenesis in a human cell line.

    PubMed

    Gueranger, Quentin; Stary, Anne; Aoufouchi, Saïd; Faili, Ahmad; Sarasin, Alain; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2008-09-01

    Genes coding for DNA polymerases eta, iota and zeta, or for both Pol eta and Pol iota have been inactivated by homologous recombination in the Burkitt's lymphoma BL2 cell line, thus providing for the first time the total suppression of these enzymes in a human context. The UV sensitivities and UV-induced mutagenesis on an irradiated shuttle vector have been analyzed for these deficient cell lines. The double Pol eta/iota deficient cell line was more UV sensitive than the Pol eta-deficient cell line and mutation hotspots specific to the Pol eta-deficient context appeared to require the presence of Pol iota, thus strengthening the view that Pol iota is involved in UV damage translesion synthesis and UV-induced mutagenesis. A role for Pol zeta in a damage repair process at late replicative stages is reported, which may explain the drastic UV-sensitivity phenotype observed when this polymerase is absent. A specific mutation pattern was observed for the UV-irradiated shuttle vector transfected in Pol zeta-deficient cell lines, which, in contrast to mutagenesis at the HPRT locus previously reported, strikingly resembled mutations observed in UV-induced skin cancers in humans. Finally, a Pol eta PIP-box mutant (without its PCNA binding domain) could completely restore the UV resistance in a Pol eta deficient cell line, in the absence of UV-induced foci, suggesting, as observed for Pol iota in a Pol eta-deficient background, that TLS may occur without the accumulation of microscopically visible repair factories.

  15. Estimation of the parameters of ETAS models by Simulated Annealing.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2015-02-12

    This paper proposes a new algorithm to estimate the maximum likelihood parameters of an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequences (ETAS) model. It is based on Simulated Annealing, a versatile method that solves problems of global optimization and ensures convergence to a global optimum. The procedure is tested on both simulated and real catalogs. The main conclusion is that the method performs poorly as the size of the catalog decreases because the effect of the correlation of the ETAS parameters is more significant. These results give new insights into the ETAS model and the efficiency of the maximum-likelihood method within this context.

  16. Estimation of the parameters of ETAS models by Simulated Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm to estimate the maximum likelihood parameters of an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequences (ETAS) model. It is based on Simulated Annealing, a versatile method that solves problems of global optimization and ensures convergence to a global optimum. The procedure is tested on both simulated and real catalogs. The main conclusion is that the method performs poorly as the size of the catalog decreases because the effect of the correlation of the ETAS parameters is more significant. These results give new insights into the ETAS model and the efficiency of the maximum-likelihood method within this context. PMID:25673036

  17. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bambade, P.; Alabau Pons, M.; Amann, J.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Apsimon, R.; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; Bai, S.; Bellomo, P.; Bett, D.; Blair, G.; Bolzon, B.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Deacon, L.; Elsen, E.; /DESY /Valencia U., IFIC /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Savoie U. /Fermilab /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyungpook Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Savoie U. /Daresbury /Tokyo U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /University Coll. London /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tohoku U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Brookhaven /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /SLAC /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Orsay /Fermilab /Tohoku U. /Manchester U. /CERN /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Hiroshima U. /KEK, Tsukuba /CERN /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /Fermilab /SLAC /Liverpool U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /CERN

    2011-11-11

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  18. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    A group of astronomers from the Aarhus University (Denmark) and the European Southern Observatory (2) have for the first time succeeded in detecting solar-type oscillations in another star. They observed the temperature of the bright northern star Eta Bootis during six nights with the 2.5-metre Nordic Optical Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos observatory on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) and were able to show that it varies periodically by a few hundredths of a degree. These changes are caused by pressure waves in the star and are directly dependent on its inner structure. A detailed analysis by the astronomers has shown that the observed effects are in good agreement with current stellar models. This is a most important, independent test of stellar theory. The Sun is an Oscillating Star About twenty years ago, it was discovered that the nearest star, our Sun, oscillates like the ringing of a bell with a period of about 5 minutes. The same phenomenon is known in the Earth, which begins to vibrate after earthquakes; in this way seismologists have been able to discern a layered structure in the Earth's interior. The recent impacts of a comet on Jupiter most likely had a similar effect on that planet. The observed solar oscillations concern the entire gaseous body of the Sun, but we can of course only observe them on its surface. It has been found that each mode moves the surface up and down by less than 25 metres; the combined motion is very complicated, because there are many different, simultaneous modes, each of which has a slightly different period. The exact values of these periods are sensitive to the speed of sound in the Sun's interior, which in turn depends on the density of the material there. Thus, by measuring the periods of solar oscillations, we may probe the internal structure of the Sun, that is otherwise inaccessible to observations. Why does the Sun oscillate and what is the cause of these oscillations ? We do not know yet, but it is

  19. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  20. Eta Meson Production in Proton-Proton and Nuclear Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Dick, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Total cross sections for eta meson production in proton - proton collisions are calculated. The eta meson is mainly produced via decay of the excited nucleon resonance at 1535 MeV. A scalar quantum field theory is used to calculate cross sections, which also include resonance decay. Comparison between theory and experiment is problematic near threshold when resonance decay is not included. When the decay is included, the comparison between theory and experiment is much better.

  1. High Transverse Momentum {eta} Meson Production in p+p,d+Au and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S. S.; Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Plasil, F; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of {eta} mesons in the range p{sub T}{approx}2-12 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity (|{eta}|<0.35) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}R{sub NN}=200 GeV. The eta mesons are reconstructed through their {eta}{yields}{gamma} {gamma} channel for the three colliding systems as well as through the {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode in p+p and d+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor in d+Au collisions, RdAu(p{sub T}){approx}1.0-1.1, suggests at most only modest pT broadening ('Cronin enhancement'). In central Au+Au reactions, the eta yields are significantly suppressed, with RAuAu(p{sub T}){approx}0.2. The ratio of {eta} to {pi}{sup 0} yields is approximately constant as a function of pT for the three colliding systems in agreement with the high-pT world average of R{sub {eta}}/{pi}{sup 0}{approx}0.5 in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions for a wide range of center-of-mass energies {radical}R{sub NN}{approx}3-1800 GeV as well as, for high scaled momentum xp, in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}R=91.2 GeV. These results are consistent with a scenario where high-pT eta production in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is largely unaffected by initial-state effects but where light-quark mesons ({pi}{sup 0},{eta}) are equally suppressed due to final-state interactions of the parent partons in the dense medium produced in Au+Au reactions.

  2. Radiative transitions to an eta/sub c/(2980) candidate state and the observation of hadronic decays of this state

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1980-06-01

    Preliminary results from the Crystal Ball and Mark II experiments at SPEAR are presented on radiative transitions from psi'(3684) and J/psi(3095) to an eta/sub c/(2980) candidate state. In addition to the inclusive photon signals reported previously by the Crystal Ball, both detectors now see exclusive hadronic final state signals at masses consistent with the states inclusively determined mass of 2981 +- 16 MeV.

  3. The coherent acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays and the galactic dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1995-05-01

    In order to accelerate cosmic rays to ultra high energy, >10{sup 18} ev, requires that the step size in energy in a diffusive process be very much larger than occurs in galactic or extra galactic hydrodynamic mechanisms where {Delta}E/F {approximately} v/c{approximately}1/300 per step. This step size requires >10{sup 5} scatterings per doubling in energy (the shock mechanism) and therefore <10{sup {minus}5} energy loss per scattering. Coherent acceleration (CA), on the other hand, is proposed in which the energy gained, {Delta}E per particle in the CA region is very much larger so that only one or several scatterings are required to reach the final energy. The power law spectrum is created by the probability of loss from the CA region where this probability is inversely proportional to the particle`s rigidity, E. Therefore the fractional loss in number per fractional gain in energy, dN/N {approximately} {minus}{Gamma} dE/E, results in a power law spectrum. CA depends upon the electric field, E = {eta}J, J, the current density, in a force free field, where magnetic helicity, J={alpha}B, arises universally in all evolving mass condensations due to twisting of magnetic flux by the large number of turns before pressure support. The acceleration process is E*v, where universe beam instabilities enhance {eta} leading to phased coherent acceleration (PCA). The result of the energy transfer from field energy to matter energy is the relaxation of the field helicity, or reconnection but with J{parallel}B rather than J{perpendicular}B.

  4. Indications for the decays D/sub s//sup +-/. -->. eta. pi. /sup +-/ and D/sub s//sup +-/. -->. eta'. pi. /sup +-/

    SciTech Connect

    Wormser, G.

    1987-11-01

    A search for D/sub s//sup +-/ decays into eta ..pi../sup +-/ and eta' ..pi../sup +-/ has been performed by the MarkII collaboration at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. Eta particles are reconstructed by their ..gamma gamma.. decay mode. The eta fragmentation has been measured and found to be in good agreement with the Lund model prediction. Eta' production has been measured for the first time in e/sup +/e/sup -/ high energy annihilation. Good indications are found for both decay modes D/sub s//sup +-/ ..-->.. eta ..pi../sup +-/ and D/sub s//sup +-/ ..-->.. eta' ..pi../sup +-/.

  5. Searching for Radial Velocity Variations in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Gull, T. R.; Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (see poster by Sonneborn et al.). Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. The N II 1084-86 emission feature indicates that the star may be nitrogen rich. The FUV continuum and the S IV 1073 P-Cygni wind line suggest that the effective temperature of eta Car B is at least 25,000 K. FUV spectra of eta Carinae were obtained with the FUSE satellite at 9 epochs between 2000 February and 2005 July. The data consists of 12 observations taken with the LWRS aperture (30x30 arcsec), three with the HIRS aperture (1.25x20 arcsec), and one MRDS aperture (4x20 arcsec). In this paper we discuss the analysis of these spectra to search for radial velocity variations associated with the 5.54-year binary orbit of Eta Car AB.

  6. Is the Ejecta of ETA Carinae Overabundant or Overexcited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore; Davidson, Kris; Johansson, Sveneric; Damineli, Augusto; Ishibashi, Kaxunori; Corcoran, Michael; Hartman, Henrick; Viera, Gladys; Nielsen, Krister

    2003-01-01

    The ejecta of Eta Carinae, revealed by HST/STIS, are in a large range of physical conditions. As Eta Carinae undergoes a 5.52 period, changes occur in nebular emission and nebular absorption. "Warm" neutral regions, partially ionized regions, and fully ionized regions undergo significant changes. Over 2000 emission lines, most of Fe-like elements, have been indentified in the Weigelt blobs B and D. Over 500 emission lines have been indentified in the Strontium Filament. An ionized Little Homunculus is nestled within the neutral-shelled Homunculus. In line of sight, over 500 nebular absorption lines have been identified with up to twenty velocity components. STIS is following changes in many nebular emission and absorption lines as Eta Carinae approaches the minimum, predicted to be in June/July 2003, during the General Assembly. Coordinated observations with HST, CHANDRA, RXTE, FUSE, UVES/VLT, Gemini and other observatories are following this minimum.

  7. Excited Ejecta in Light of Sight from Eta Car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G.; Gull, T. R.; Danks, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the NUV spectrum of Eta Car, we have resolved many narrow absorption lines of neutral and singly-ionized elements with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We report for the first time the detection of interstellar vanadium in absorption, and many highly-excited absorption lines of Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, Co, Mn, and Mg. These elements, normally tied up in dust grains in the ISM, are located within wall of the Homunculus within 20,000 A.U. of Eta Car. Stellar radiation and stellar wind are interacting with the wall. Dust is likely being modified and/or destroyed. Previous Homunculus studies have demonstrated that nitrogen is overabundant and that carbon and oxygen emission lines are weak, or non-existent. Are the large column densities of these heavy elements due to abundance effects, excitation mechanisms, or modified grains? We may gain insight as Eta Car goes through its spectroscopic minimum in the summer of 2003.

  8. 76 FR 12760 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Report ETA 902, Disaster Unemployment Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ..., Disaster Unemployment Assistance Activities (OMB Control No. 1205- 0051): Extension Without Change AGENCY... ETA 902, Disaster Unemployment Assistance Activities under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and.... Background The ETA 902 Report, Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) Activities, is a monthly...

  9. Start of Eta Car's X-ray Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Liburd, Jamar; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using quicklook data from the XRay Telescope on Swift shows that the flux on July 30, 2014 was 4.9 plus or minus 2.0×10(exp-12) ergs s(exp-1)cm(exp-2). This flux is nearly equal to the X-ray minimum flux seen by RXTE in 2009, 2003.5, and 1998, and indicates that Eta Car has reached its X-ray minimum, as expected based on the 2024-day period derived from previous 2-10 keV observations with RXTE.

  10. Observation of the radiative decay J/psi. -->. gamma. eta. pi pi

    SciTech Connect

    Newman-Holmes, C.

    1982-09-01

    The radiative decay J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. eta ..pi pi.. has been observed in data taken with the Crystal Ball detector at the SPEAR e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. In addition to the well-known eta', the eta ..pi pi.. mass spectrum shows a broad enhancement centered at approx. 1700 MeV. There is no explicit evidence for the l(1440) in the eta ..pi pi.. mass spectrum.

  11. 77 FR 48174 - Comment Request for Information Collection for the ETA 203, Characteristics of the Insured...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for the ETA 203.... Gibbons. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The ETA 203, Characteristics of the Insured Unemployed...-0009. Affected Public: State Workforce Agencies. Form(s): ETA 203. Total Annual Respondents: 53....

  12. 75 FR 3927 - Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Information Collection Request for the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report; Comment Request on... unemployment compensation programs. The data in the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report, includes... extension for the collection of the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience report. Comments are...

  13. Search for eta '(958)-nucleus Bound States by (p,d) Reaction at GSI and FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Brinkmann, K.-T.; Friedrich, S.; Geissel, H.; Gellanki, J.; Guo, C.; Gutz, E.; Haettner, E.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Higashi, Y.; Hirenzaki, S.; Hornung, C.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeno, N.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Jido, D.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurz, N.; Metag, V.; Mukha, I.; Nagae, T.; Nagahiro, H.; Nanova, M.; Nishi, T.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rappold, C.; Reiter, M. P.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Scheidenberger, C.; Simon, H.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Sun, B.; Suzuki, K.; Szarka, I.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Watanabe, Y. N.; Weick, H.; Widmann, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Xu, X.; Yamakami, H.; Zhao, J.

    The mass of the {\\eta}' meson is theoretically expected to be reduced at finite density, which indicates the existence of {\\eta}'-nucleus bound states. To investigate these states, we perform missing-mass spectroscopy for the (p, d) reaction near the {\\eta}' production threshold. The overview of the experimental situation is given and the current status is discussed.

  14. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 208 - Model Disclosure for Use After ETA SM Becomes Available

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Model Disclosure for Use After ETA SM... FEDERAL AGENCY DISBURSEMENTS Pt. 208, App. B Appendix B to Part 208—Model Disclosure for Use After ETA SM... through a basic, low-cost account called an ETA SM. If you receive a Federal benefit, wage, salary,...

  15. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  16. Eta Sigma Gamma: Preparing Leaders Today for Tomorrow's Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kelli McCormack

    2007-01-01

    There is no one definition for a leader or for leadership, but most people can identify a leader and can provide qualities of a good leader or good leadership. The founders of Eta Gamma Gamma--William Bock, Warren Schaller, and Robert Synovitz--all displayed a critical characteristic of leadership by having and acting on a vision. Leadership has…

  17. Targeting Inaccurate Atomic Data in the Eta Car Ejecta Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Kober, G. Vieira; Gull, T. R.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.

    2006-01-01

    The input from the laboratory spectroscopist community has on many occasions helped the analysis of the eta Car spectrum. Our analysis has targeted spectra where improved wavelengths and oscillator strengths are needed. We will demonstrate how experimentally derived atomic data have improved our spectral analysis, and illuminate where more work still is needed.

  18. Spectra of Eta Carina from Objective Prism Photographic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. Donald; Castelaz, M.; Barker, T.

    2008-05-01

    Brightness and spectral variations of Eta Carina occur over a 5.5 year cycle. Emission lines were observed to fade in 1948, 1962, 1981, 1987, and 1992 (Damineli 1996, ApJ, 460, L49), and 1997 (Eta Carinae at the Millennium, ASP Conf. Ser. 179, ed. J.A. Morse, R.M. Humphreys, and A. Damineli). Gaps in the observation of spectra occur in 1970 and 1975 when two other such occurrences of the 5.5 year cycle were expected. Objective prism photographic plates of Eta Carina were found in the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive located at Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute. The plates belong to the University of Michigan survey (Houk 1978, Michigan Catalogue of Two-dimensional Spectral Types for the HD Stars). One plate, IN emulsion + RG1 filter, was taken on 1968 July 4 UT. The other plate, IIaO emulsion, was taken on 1972 March 12 UT. These plates were taken between the 5.5 year cyclic events of 1970 and 1975 and therefore represent the usual emission line spectra. The spectrum of Eta Car was extracted from each of the objective prism plates and will be presented.

  19. Detection of the Compressed Primary Stellar Wind in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teodoro, Mairan Macedo; Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    A series of three HST/STIS spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from eta Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the 3D hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  20. Insights into the pi- p --> eta n reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Johan; Julia Diaz, Bruno; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Sato, Toru

    2009-01-01

    A dynamical coupled-channels formalism is used to investigate the $\\eta-$meson production mechanism on the proton induced by pions, in the total center-of-mass energy region from threshold up to 2 GeV. We show how and why studying exclusively total cross section data might turn out to be misleading in pinning down the reaction mechanism.

  1. EMISSIONS PROCESSING FOR THE ETA/ CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA and EPA have created an Air Quality Forecast (AQF) system. This AQF system links an adaptation of the EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality Model with the 12 kilometer ETA model running operationally at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Predication (NCEP). One of the...

  2. The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonetti, J. H.; Ellingson, S. W.; Patterson, C. D.; Taylor, W.; Venugopal, V.; Cutchin, S.; Boor, Z.

    2005-12-01

    The Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) is a radio telescope utilizing a low-cost backend, which implements flexible, reconfigurable computing techniques. It is designed to continuously monitor nearly the entire northern sky at 29-47MHz in a search for low-frequency radio transients (short pulses) from high-energy astrophysical phenomena. This antenna array, which is currently under construction, is located in a relatively radio-quiet area in the Blue Ridge Mountains southwest of Asheville, NC, at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). The array consists of 12 dual-polarization dipole antennas. The core of the array is 10 antenna stations arranged in a 16-m diameter circle with one antenna station at the center. In addition, one antenna station is situated about 50m to the north of the core and another is about 50m to the east of the core. A 26-m dish on the PARI site (about 1km from the ETA core) will be used for follow-up, added aperture, longer baselines, and additional radio frequency interference (RFI) mitigation. Preliminary observations with one test antenna station have detected the expected Galactic emission in this frequency range; ETA will be Galactic-noise limited. The ETA backend will utilize off-the-shelf components and a cluster of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for detecting pulses of various lengths, dispersion measures, and directions (synthesized delay beams), while incorporating various RFI countermeasures. Potential sources of radio transients that might be observed by ETA include gamma-ray bursts (prompt emission), supernovae (prompt emission), coalescing compact-object binaries (e.g., neutron star -- neutron star, neutron star -- black hole), and exploding primordial black holes. This array should detect giant pulses from the Crab Pulsar, and possibly other pulsars. ETA is a collaboration of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Physics Department at Virginia Tech, and PARI. ETA work at Virginia

  3. Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-rule violation and B{yields}{eta}{sup (')}K branching ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.-F.; Charng, Y.-Y.; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2008-07-01

    We show that the few-percent Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-rule violating effects in the quark-flavor basis for the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing can enhance the chiral scale associated with the {eta}{sub q} meson a few times. This enhancement is sufficient for accommodating the dramatically different data of the B{yields}{eta}{sup '}K and B{yields}{eta}K branching ratios. We comment on other proposals for resolving this problem, including flavor-singlet contributions, axial U(1) anomaly, and nonperturbative charming penguins. Discrimination of the above proposals by means of the B{yields}{eta}{sup (')}l{nu} and B{sub s}{yields}{eta}{sup (')}ll data is suggested.

  4. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. Does dinitrogen hydrogenation follow different mechanisms for [(eta5-C5Me4H)2Zr]2(mu2,eta2,eta2-N2) and {[PhP(CH2SiMe2NSiMe2CH2)PPh]Zr}2(mu2,eta2,eta2-N2) complexes? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Bobadova-Parvanova, Petia; Wang, Qingfang; Quinonero-Santiago, David; Morokuma, Keiji; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2006-09-01

    The mechanisms of dinitrogen hydrogenation by two different complexes--[(eta(5)-C(5)Me(4)H)(2)Zr](2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)), synthesized by Chirik and co-workers [Nature 2004, 427, 527], and {[P(2)N(2)]Zr}(2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)), where P(2)N(2) = PhP(CH(2)SiMe(2)NSiMe(2)CH(2))(2)PPh, synthesized by Fryzuk and co-workers [Science 1997, 275, 1445]--are compared with density functional theory calculations. The former complex is experimentally known to be capable of adding more than one H(2) molecule to the side-on coordinated N(2) molecule, while the latter does not add more than one H(2). We have shown that the observed difference in the reactivity of these dizirconium complexes is caused by the fact that the former ligand environment is more rigid than the latter. As a result, the addition of the first H(2) molecule leads to two different products: a non-H-bridged intermediate for the Chirik-type complex and a H-bridged intermediate for the Fryzuk-type complex. The non-H-bridged intermediate requires a smaller energy barrier for the second H(2) addition than the H-bridged intermediate. We have also examined the effect of different numbers of methyl substituents in [(eta(5)-C(5)Me(n)H(5)(-)(n))(2)Zr](2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)) for n = 0, 4, and 5 (n = 5 is hypothetical) and [(eta(5)-C(5)H(2)-1,2,4-Me(3))(eta(5)-C(5)Me(5))(2)Zr](2)(mu(2),eta(2),eta(2)-N(2)) and have shown that all complexes of this type would follow a similar H(2) addition mechanism. We have also performed an extensive analysis on the factors (side-on coordination of N(2) to two Zr centers, availability of the frontier orbitals with appropriate symmetry, and inflexibility of the catalyst ligand environment) that are required for successful hydrogenation of the coordinated dinitrogen.

  7. Revisit the radiative decays of J/{psi} and {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}({gamma}{eta}{sub c}{sup '})

    SciTech Connect

    Li Gang; Zhao Qiang

    2011-10-01

    With the new measurements of J/{psi} and {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}({gamma}{eta}{sub c}{sup '}) from the CLEO and BES-III collaboration, we reinvestigate the intermediate meson loop (IML) contributions to these radiative decays in association with the quark model M1 transitions in an effective Lagrangian approach. It shows that the ''unquenched'' effects due to the intermediate hadron loops can be better quantified by the new data for J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}. Although the IML contributions are relatively small in J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}, they play a crucial role in {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}({gamma}{eta}{sub c}{sup '}). A prediction for the IML contributions to {psi}(3770){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}({gamma}{eta}{sub c}{sup '}) is made. Such unquenched effects allow us to reach a coherent description of those three radiative transitions, and gain some insights into the underlying dynamics.

  8. Isolation of Omnipotent Suppressors in an [Eta(+)] Yeast Strain

    PubMed Central

    All-Robyn, J. A.; Kelley-Geraghty, D.; Griffin, E.; Brown, N.; Liebman, S. W.

    1990-01-01

    Omnipotent suppressors decrease translational fidelity and cause misreading of nonsense codons. In the presence of the non-Mendelian factor [eta(+)], some alleles of previously isolated omnipotent suppressors are lethal. Thus the current search was conducted in an [eta(+)] strain in an effort to identify new suppressor loci. A new omnipotent suppressor, SUP39, and alleles of sup35, sup45, SUP44 and SUP46 were identified. Efficiencies of the dominant suppressors were dramatically reduced in strains that were cured of non-Mendelian factors by growth on guanidine hydrochloride. Wild-type alleles of SUP44 and SUP46 were cloned and these clones were used to facilitate the genetic analyses. SUP44 was shown to be on chromosome VII linked to cyh2, and SUP46 was clearly identified as distinct from the linked sup45. PMID:2311916

  9. Turbidity of a binary fluid mixture: Determining eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A ground based (1-g) experiment is in progress that will measure the turbidity of a density-matched, binary fluid mixture extremely close to the critical point. By covering the range of reduced temperatures t is equivalent to (T-T(sub c))/T(sub c) from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -2), the turbidity measurements will allow the critical exponent eta to be determined. No experiment has determined a value of the critical exponent eta, yet its value is significant to theorists in critical phenomena. Interpreting the turbidity correctly is important if future NASA flight experiments use turbidity as an indirect measurement of relative temperature in shuttle experiments on critical phenomena in fluids.

  10. Turbidity of a Binary Fluid Mixture: Determining Eta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Donald T.

    1996-01-01

    A ground based (1-g) experiment is in progress that will measure the turbidity of a density-matched, binary fluid mixture extremely close to its liquid-liquid critical point. By covering the range of reduced temperatures t equivalent to (T-T(sub c)) / T(sub c) from 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -2), the turbidity measurements will allow the critical exponent eta to be determined. No experiment has precisely determined a value of the critical exponent eta, yet its value is significant to theorists in critical phenomena. Relatively simple critical phenomena, as in the liquid-liquid system studied here, serve as model systems for more complex systems near a critical point.

  11. Mapping the interacting winds of Eta Carinae: Changes Across the Apastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, T.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the May 2009 servicing mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope, we have systematically mapped the central 1-2" region of Eta Carinae with the 0.1"-wide, long slit of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Six mappings of selected forbidden emission lines began in the late recovery after the 2009.1 periastron event and now extend to phase 0.85 of Eta Carina's 5.54 year period. In addition to the recovery of the high state as depicted by [Fe III] (IP=16.6 eV) strictures and the stabilization of [Fe II] (IP=7.8 eV) features, we see components of at least three wind-blown shells that expand outward at 400 to 500 km/s. Virtually all forbidden emission originates from primary wind structures. The [Fe II] shells, moving at 470 km/s, are primary wind (420 km/s) structures slightly accelerated by the fast secondary wind (Teodoro et al, 2013 ApJ 773, L16T). The [Fe III] arcs, directly photo-ionized by the secondary star, also shift outward with time. Structures in both emissions shift in a general clockwork direction consistent with the derived orbital motion by Gull et al (2009 MNRAS 396, 1308) and revised by Madura et al (2012 MNRAS 420, 2064). With the continued development of the 3D hydrodynamic models we are able to compare the changing structures and determine limits to changes in the mass loss rate over this period of time. Additional mappings, to be obtained by seven additional HST visits, are scheduled at selected orbital phases to follow major changes in ionization structue due to the drop of high ionization to low ionization across the 2014.5 periastron passage. This work is funded by NASA grants to support HST research.

  12. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refreigerant-lubricant mixtures. Part II: Experimental comparison and verification of methods. Final report, volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.

    1995-09-01

    The research reported herein was performed to develop an accelerated screening method for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The developed screening method was designed to be safe and to produce accelerated stability rankings that are in agreement with the rankings determined by the current test, Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems, ANSI/ASHRAE Method 97-1989. The accelerated screening test developed was designed to be independent of refrigerant and lubricant compositions and to be used with a wide variety of construction materials. The studied refrigerants included CFC-11, CFC-12, HCFC-22, HFC-134a, and HFC-32/HFC-134a (zeotrope 30:70 by weight). The studied lubricants were selected from the chemical classes of mineral oil, alkylbenzene oil, polyglycols, and polyolesters. The work reported herein was performed in three phases. In the first phase, previously identified thermal analytical techniques were evaluated for development into an accelerated screening method for refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The identified thermal analytical techniques used in situ measurements of color, temperature, or conductivity to monitor the degradation of the heated refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The identified thermal analytical techniques also used catalysts such as ferric fluoride to accelerate the degradation of the heated refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The thermal analytical technique employing in situ conductivity measurements was determined to be the most suitable for development into an accelerated screening method.

  13. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  14. The {eta}{sub 6} at LEP and TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K.; Knowles, I.G.; White, A.R.

    1993-01-20

    The {eta}{sub 6} is a {open_quotes}heavy axion{close_quotes} remnant of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by a color sextet quark condensate. Electroweak scale color instanton interactions allow it to be both very massive and yet be responsible for Strong CP conservation in the color triplet quark sector. It may have been seen at LEP via its two-photon decay mode and at TRISTAN via its hadronic decay modes.

  15. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Chandra X-Ray Observatory image of the mysterious superstar Eta Carinae reveals a surprising hot irner core, creating more questions than answers for astronomers. The image shows three distinct structures: An outer, horseshoe shaped ring about 2 light-years in diameter, a hot inner core about 3 light-months in diameter, and a hot central source less than a light-month in diameter which may contain the superstar. In 1 month, light travels a distance of approximately 489 billion miles (about 788 billion kilometers). All three structures are thought to represent shock waves produced by matter rushing away from the superstar at supersonic speeds. The temperature of the shock-heated gas ranges from 60 million degrees Kelvin in the central regions to 7 million degrees Kelvin on the outer structure. Eta Carinae is one of the most enigmatic and intriguing objects in our galaxy. Between 1837 and 1856, it increased dramatically in brightness to become the most prominent star in the sky except for Sirius, even through it is 7,500 light-years away, more than 80 times the distance to Sirius. This 'Great Eruption,' as it is called, had an energy comparable to a supernova, yet did not destroy the star, which faded to become a dim star, invisible to the naked eye. Since 1940, Eta Carinae has begun to brighten again, becoming visible to the naked eye. Photo credit: NASA/CXC/SAO

  16. High Velocity Absorption during Eta Car B's Periastron Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Krister E.; Groh, J. H.; Hillier, J.; Gull, Theodore R.; Owocki, S. P.; Okazaki, A. T.; Damineli, A.; Teodoro, M.; Weigelt, G.; Hartman, H.

    2010-01-01

    Eta Car is one of the most luminous massive stars in the Galaxy, with repeated eruptions with a 5.5 year periodicity. These events are caused by the periastron passage of a massive companion in an eccentric orbit. We report the VLT/CRIRES detection of a strong high-velocity, (<1900 km/s) , broad absorption wing in He I at 10833 A during the 2009.0 periastron passage. Previous observations during the 2003.5 event have shown evidence of such high-velocity absorption in the He I 10833 transition, allowing us to conclude that the high-velocity gas is crossing the line-of-sight toward Eta Car over a time period of approximately 2 months. Our analysis of HST/STlS archival data with observations of high velocity absorption in the ultraviolet Si IV and C IV resonance lines, confirm the presence of a high-velocity material during the spectroscopic low state. The observations provide direct detection of high-velocity material flowing from the wind-wind collision zone around the binary system, and we discuss the implications of the presence of high-velocity gas in Eta Car during periastron

  17. 2{eta} or not 2{eta}? Insights into the Cu CVD process using a Cu(I) precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Maverick, A.W.; Fronczek, F.R.; Kim, A.J.; Butler, L.G.

    1993-12-31

    One of the first successful Cu(I) CVD precursors is (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD), and this species continues to served as a model system. In the CVD process, a significant step is dissociation of the COD ligand. The energetics of this process have been estimated previously. However, it now appears that, in the solid state, (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD) undergoes an exchange process that allows additional insight into the potential energy surface governing the Cu-COD interaction. The solid-state structure of (hfac)Cu{sup I}(COD) has been difficult to establish, but a combination of variable temperature X-ray and solid-state {sup 13}C NMR studies leads to the following picture. Cu{sup I} is three-coordinate, bound to the hfac ligand and bound preferentially to one olefin of the COD ligand. There is a small energy barrier associated with motion of the Cu into position for {eta}{sup 2}-binding to the other olefin; the COD and hfac ligands remain approximately stationary. Thus, there are two sites for Cu, now labeled {eta}{sup 2} and {eta}{sup 2}. This new interpretation of the solid-state structure differs from that of our 300 K data set and a previous report. In addition, the exchange process is intimately connected with the Cu-COD dissociation step in the CVD process.

  18. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR DE-FG02-05ER64097 Systems and Methods for Injecting Helium Beams into a Synchrotron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, David A

    2008-09-30

    A research grant was approved to fund development of requirements and concepts for extracting a helium-ion beam at the LLUMC proton accelerator facility, thus enabling the facility to better simulate the deep space environment via beams sufficient to study biological effects of accelerated helium ions in living tissues. A biologically meaningful helium-ion beam will be accomplished by implementing enhancements to increase the accelerator's maximum proton beam energy output from 250MeV to 300MeV. Additional benefits anticipated from the increased energy include the capability to compare possible benefits from helium-beam radiation treatment with proton-beam treatment, and to provide a platform for developing a future proton computed tomography imaging system.

  19. Rare decay {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{pi}{gamma}{gamma} in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Knoechlein, G.; Scherer, S.; Drechsel, D.

    1996-04-01

    We investigate the rare radiative {eta} decay modes {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} within the framework of chiral perturbation theory at {ital O}({ital p}{sup 4}). We present photon spectra and partial decay rates for both processes as well as a Dalitz contour plot for the charged decay. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. The adaptive CCCG({eta}) method for efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F.F.; Birkett, N.R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Controlled Cholesky factorisation has been shown to be a robust preconditioner for the Conjugate Gradient method. In this scheme the amount of fill-in is defined in terms of a parameter {eta}, the number of extra elements allowed per column. It is demonstrated how an optimum value of {eta} can be automatically determined when solving time dependent p.d.e.`s using an implicit time step method. A comparison between CCCG({eta}) and the standard ICCG solving parabolic problems on general grids shows CCCG({eta}) to be an efficient general purpose solver.

  1. 77 FR 70833 - Comment Request for Information Collection on the ETA 9048, Worker Profiling and Reemployment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. III. Current Actions Type of... Outcomes, Extension Without Revisions AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration (ETA), Labor....

  2. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-14

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  3. Measurements of the mass and width of the eta(c) meson and of an eta(c)(2S) candidate.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-04-01

    The mass m(eta(c)) and total width Gamma(eta(c))(tot) of the eta(c) meson have been measured in two-photon interactions at the SLAC e(+)e(-) asymmetric B Factory with the BABAR detector. With a sample of approximately 2500 reconstructed eta(c)-->K(0)(S)K+/-pi(-/+) decays in 88 fb(-1) of data, the results are m(eta(c))=2982.5+/-1.1(stat)+/-0.9(syst) MeV/c(2) and Gamma(eta(c))(tot)=34.3+/-2.3(stat)+/-0.9(syst) MeV/c(2). Using the same decay mode, a second resonance with 112+/-24 events is observed with a mass of 3630.8+/-3.4(stat)+/-1.0(syst) MeV/c(2) and width of 17.0+/-8.3(stat)+/-2.5(syst) MeV/c(2). This observation is consistent with expectations for the eta(c)(2S) state.

  4. Reactions and moderators for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron capture therapy source for cancer treatment. Final report, October 1900--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, J.F.; Brugger, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been considered for nearly 30 years, and been practiced in Japan since the late 1970`s. Early experiments in the USA were generally nonpromising. However, new boron-containing ligand compounds were developed, which would seek out brain tumors. Concentration levels of the order of 30 micrograms of boron per gram of tissue become possible, and interest in the BNCT technique was revived in the USA beginning about 1985, with research reactors as the obvious source of the neutrons for the treatment. However, the limited number of research reactors in the USA (and the world) would mean that this treatment modality would be quite limited. The goals of this work was: (1) Examine as many as possible reactions of charged particles on various targets of an accelerator, and determine those that would give high neutron yields of a convenient energy. (2) Determine, through calculations (using Monte Carlo stochastic computer codes), the best design for a moderator/reflector assembly which would give high thermal flux at a nominal 5 cm depth in the head of a patient, with minimal radiation dose from gamma rays and fast neutrons. (3) Perform a benchmark experiment using a positive ion accelerator. The Li-7(p,n) reaction was chosen for the benchmark, since it was readily available for most accelerators, and was one of the two highest yielding reactions from Task No. 1. Since the University of Missouri has no accelerator, possible accelerators at other universities were investigated, as to availability and cost. A unit having capability in the 2.5 MeV range was desired.

  5. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  6. Search for {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) via fully reconstructed {eta}{sub c}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2010-03-01

    We report a search for the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub c}(2S) in a sample of 25.9x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the CLEO-c detector. No signals are observed in any of the 11 exclusive {eta}{sub c}(2S) decay modes studied, or in their sum. Product branching fraction upper limits are determined as a function of {Gamma}[{eta}{sub c}(2S)] for the 11 individual modes.

  7. Eta Carinae, the Integral Nebula and the Homunculus Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2000-07-01

    In the past two years, observations of Eta Carina have revealed much new and very exciting information. Augusto Damineli noted a 5.5 year period in the visible and near infrared spectroscopy. Michael Corcoran and Bish Ishibashi noticed modulation of the x-ray fluxes with various periodicities around 90 days before and after the xray and radio minimum in December 1997. Observations, done in March 1998 under proposal 7302 {Davidson et al} from 1640A to 10400A using STIS in GXXXM mode and the 50x0.1 arcsecond slit, revealed much new information in the immediate regions of Eta Carina. The slit orientation was slightly off the major axis of the Homunculus, but passed through Weigelt components B and D. Bish Ishibashi and Ted Gull have reduced the data and provided it to various team members. Torgil Zethson has identified well over 90 percent of the emission lines in the March 1998 spectrum and finds most to be FeII emission lines. Based upon the past ground-based history of Eta Carina, we expected that FeIII and other high ionization states would return within the year. STIS GTO observations {Ted Gull, PI program 8036} characterized a bright internal emission nebula by turning the slit 90 degrees for visit 1 and studying the changes in spectrum as the FeIII lines appear by using visit 2 with the identical slit orientation from March 19, 1998. Data from the four visits of STIS to Eta Carinae between December 1997 and February 1999 demonstrate that the star has brightened by a factor of two during that interval and that the immediate nebulosity has tripled in surface brightness. Moreover a small circular nebular shell, seen in multiple [Fe II] lines has disappeared and the opacity in the 2000 to 3000A region obscuring the star has lifted considerable as the Fe II is converting to Fe III. Given the strong changes in the spectrum, we have chosen to use the six orbits in two visits. Visit 1 will be a precise repeat of the March 1998 and February 1999 observations, adjusted

  8. Crucial role of anions on the deprotonation of the cationic dihydrogen complex trans-[FeH(eta2-H2)(dppe)2]+.

    PubMed

    Basallote, Manuel G; Besora, Maria; Castillo, C Esther; Fernandez-Trujillo, María J; Lledós, Agustí; Maseras, Feliu; Mañez, M Angeles

    2007-05-23

    The kinetics of reaction of the dihydrogen complex trans-[FeH(eta2-H2)(dppe)2]+ with an excess of NEt3 to form cis-[FeH2(dppe)2] shows a first-order dependence with respect to both the metal complex and the base. The corresponding second-order rate constant only shows minor changes when the solvent is changed from THF to acetone. However, the presence of salts containing the BF4-, PF6-, and BPh4- anions causes larger kinetic changes, the reaction being accelerated by BF4- and PF6- and decelerated in the presence of BPh4-. These results can be interpreted considering that the ion pairs formed by the complex and the anion provide a reaction pathway more efficient than that going through the unpaired metal complex. From the kinetic results in acetone solution, the stability of the ion pairs and the rate constant for their conversion to the reaction products have been derived. Theoretical calculations provide additional information about the reaction mechanism both in the absence and in the presence of anions. In all cases, the reaction occurs with proton transfer from the trans-dihydride to the base through intermediate structures showing Fe-H2...N and Fe-H...H...N dihydrogen bonds, isomerization to the cis product occurring once the proton transfer step has been completed. Optimized geometries for the ion pairs show that the anions are placed close to the H2 ligand. In the case of BPh4-, the bulky phenyls hinder the approach of the base and make the ion pairs unproductive for proton transfer. However, ion pairs with BF4- and PF6- can interact with the base and evolve to the final products, the anion accompanying the proton through the whole proton transfer process, which occurs with an activation barrier lower than for the unpaired metal complex.

  9. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  10. UV nebular absorption in Eta Car and Weigelt D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. E.; Vieira, G. L.; Gull, T. R.; Lindler, D. J.; Eta Car HST Treasury Team

    2003-12-01

    The high angular and high spectral resolution of the HST/STIS MAMA echelle mode, provide an unique means to distinguish the physical structures surrounding Eta Car. Observations are parts of the HST treasury program (K. Davidson P.I.) for monitoring variations over Eta Car's spectroscopic minimum. Nebular emission is present above and below the stellar spectrum which is about 0.03'' wide. We have extracted the nebular part of the central source spectrum and compared it with the spectrum of Weigelt D, located approximately 0.2'' Northwest of the central source. The spectra show significant similarities and our conclusions are two-fold. First, the radiation from the Wiegelt blobs give an unwanted contribution to the spectrum of the central source, which emphasizes the importance of using an extracted spectrum in a spectral analysis. Second, the Weigelt blobs have so far been assumed to produce a pure emission line spectrum. However, this comparison shows the presence of similar absorption structures previously observed in the spectrum of the central star (Gull et al., 2003, submitted ApJL). Two velocity structures at approximately -50 and -500 km/s, respectively, have been observed in the Weigelt D spectrum. We present identifications of the absorption structures to supplement the emission line work performed by T. Zethson (2000, PhD Thesis) and provide additional information regarding the geometry of the inner parts of the Eta Car nebula. The -50 km/s velocity component is similar to the absorption structure at -146 km/s observed in the spectrum of the central object. If these velocity systems are related, this implies that the absorption component is located close to the central parts of the nebular system.

  11. Implementation of an Eta Belt Domain on Parallel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouatchou, Jules; Rancic, Miodrag; Norris, Peter; Geiger, Jim

    2001-01-01

    We extend the Eta weather model from a regional domain into a belt domain that does not require meridional boundary conditions. We describe how the extension is achieved and the parallel implementation of the code on the Cray T3E and the SGI Origin 2000. We validate the forecast results on the two platforms and examine how the removal of the meridional boundary conditions affects these forecasts. In addition, using several domains of different sizes and resolutions, we present the scaling performance of the code on both systems.

  12. Eta Carinae in the Context of the Most Massive Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Damineli, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Eta Car, with its historical outbursts, visible ejecta and massive, variable winds, continues to challenge both observers and modelers. In just the past five years over 100 papers have been published on this fascinating object. We now know it to be a massive binary system with a 5.54-year period. In January 2009, Car underwent one of its periodic low-states, associated with periastron passage of the two massive stars. This event was monitored by an intensive multi-wavelength campaign ranging from -rays to radio. A large amount of data was collected to test a number of evolving models including 3-D models of the massive interacting winds. August 2009 was an excellent time for observers and theorists to come together and review the accumulated studies, as have occurred in four meetings since 1998 devoted to Eta Car. Indeed, Car behaved both predictably and unpredictably during this most recent periastron, spurring timely discussions. Coincidently, WR140 also passed through periastron in early 2009. It, too, is a intensively studied massive interacting binary. Comparison of its properties, as well as the properties of other massive stars, with those of Eta Car is very instructive. These well-known examples of evolved massive binary systems provide many clues as to the fate of the most massive stars. What are the effects of the interacting winds, of individual stellar rotation, and of the circumstellar material on what we see as hypernovae/supernovae? We hope to learn. Topics discussed in this 1.5 day Joint Discussion were: Car: the 2009.0 event: Monitoring campaigns in X-rays, optical, radio, interferometry WR140 and HD5980: similarities and differences to Car LBVs and Eta Carinae: What is the relationship? Massive binary systems, wind interactions and 3-D modeling Shapes of the Homunculus & Little Homunculus: what do we learn about mass ejection? Massive stars: the connection to supernovae, hypernovae and gamma ray bursters Where do we go from here? (future

  13. Eta Carinae and the Homunculus: A Physics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Luminous Blue Variable, Eta Carinae, and its ejecta, thrown out since the 1840s, are proving to be a very challenging system to explain. The > 100 solar mass central source (which is likely a binary system) is very complex with P-Cygni lines throughout the spectrum. Superimposed upon the stellar spectrum are many thousands of narrow absorption lines. Indeed we have found twenty different velocities between -140km/s and -580km/s with many lower levels well elevated above the ground states of numerous ions.

  14. Constraints on decreases in Eta Carinae's mass loss from 3D SPH simulations of its binary colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the LBV primary star in the massive, highly eccentric ( 0.9) colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present results from large- (±1545 au) and small- (±155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car’s colliding winds for three primary mass-loss rates (2.4, 4.8, and 8.5 × 10^-4 Msun/yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling, and radiative forces. We find that the primary' mass-loss rate greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage. This switchover is caused by the encroachment of the wind of the primary into the acceleration zone of the companion's wind, plus radiative inhibition of the companion’s wind by the super-luminous primary. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of the stellar spectra reveal that a factor of two or more drop in primary mass-loss rate should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in mass-loss rate was likely by a factor < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line-of-sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in primary mass-loss rate may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameters of the companion cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta Car’s next periastron in 2014 to further test for decreases in mass

  15. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  16. Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54888, "Simulation of Beam-Electron Cloud Interactions in Circular Accelerators Using Plasma Models"

    SciTech Connect

    Decyk, Viktor K

    2012-11-27

    The primary goal of this collaborative proposal was to modify the code QuickPIC and apply it to study the long-time stability of beam propagation in low density electron clouds present in circular accelerators. The UCLA contribution to this collaborative proposal was in supporting the development of the pipelining scheme for the QuickPIC code, which extended the parallel scaling of this code by two orders of magnitude.

  17. Accelerated test methods for life prediction of hermetic motor insulation systems exposed to alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Phase 3: Reproducibility and discrimination testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II; Ferguson, A.F.; Fuentes, K.T.

    1996-05-06

    In 1992, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc. (ARTI) contracted Radian Corporation to ascertain whether an improved accelerated test method or procedure could be developed that would allow prediction of the life of motor insulation materials used in hermetic motors for air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment operated with alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. This report presents the results of phase three concerning the reproducibility and discrimination testing.

  18. Acceleration of polarized protons in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1980-09-12

    The theory of depolarization in circular accelerators is presented. The spin equation is first expressed in terms of the particle orbit and then converted to the equivalent spinor equation. The spinor equation is then solved for three different situations: (1) a beam on a flat top near a resonance, (2) uniform acceleration through an isolated resonance, and (3) a model of a fast resonance jump. Finally, the depolarization coefficient, epsilon, is calculated in terms of properties of the particle orbit and the results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS.

  19. Scalar-meson nonet dominance predictions for eta' decays and the quark content of the 0/sup + +/ states

    SciTech Connect

    Intemann, G.W.; Greenhut, G.K.

    1980-10-01

    Assuming that the amplitude for eta'..-->..eta..pi pi.. is dominated by scalar resonances and that the 0/sup + +/ nonet is composed of conventional p-wave qq-bar states with singlet-octet mixing, we obtain predictions for the decay width and Dalitz slope parameter for the decays eta'..-->..eta..pi pi.. and eta'..--> pi pi pi.. which are in excellent agreement with the latest experimental data. The ..pi pi.. and eta..pi.. mass spectra for eta'..-->..eta..pi pi.. are also determined and fit the experimental data quite well. Similar calculations for these decays using a qq-barqq-bar description of the 0/sup + +/ mesons yield results which disagree with experiment.

  20. Scalar mesons in the decays {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-}

    SciTech Connect

    Likhoded, A. K. Luchinsky, A. V. Samoylenko, V. D.

    2010-10-15

    The decays {eta} {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} are considered within the isobar model. It is shown that, in order to explain the branching ratio and the shape of the Dalitz plot for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields}}3{pi}{sup 0}, it is sufficient to take into account the contributions of the {sigma} and a{sub 0} mesons. The inclusion of the {sigma} meson is necessary for reproducing the shape of the distribution over the Dalitz plot. The branching ratio for the decay {eta}' {sup {yields} {pi}0{pi}+{pi}-} is obtained. The predictions for the distributions over the Dalitz plot for this decay are presented. These predictions depend strongly on model parameters.

  1. Analytic approach to nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities driven by time-dependent accelerations

    SciTech Connect

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-09-28

    We extend our earlier model for Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities to the more general class of hydrodynamic instabilities driven by a time-dependent acceleration g(t) . Explicit analytic solutions for linear as well as nonlinear amplitudes are obtained for several g(t)'s by solving a Schroedinger-like equation d{sup 2}{eta}/dt{sup 2} - g(t)kA{eta} = 0 where A is the Atwood number and k is the wavenumber of the perturbation amplitude {eta}(t). In our model a simple transformation k {yields} k{sub L} and A {yields} A{sub L} connects the linear to the nonlinear amplitudes: {eta}{sup nonlinear} (k,A) {approx} (1/k{sub L})ln{eta}{sup linear} (k{sub L}, A{sub L}). The model is found to be in very good agreement with direct numerical simulations. Bubble amplitudes for a variety of accelerations are seen to scale with s defined by s = {integral} {radical}g(t)dt, while spike amplitudes prefer scaling with displacement {Delta}x = {integral}[{integral}g(t)dt]dt.

  2. 76 FR 58540 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 581, Contribution Operations Report; Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Information Collection Request of the ETA 581, Contribution Operations Report; Extension Without Change AGENCY... the impact of collection requirements on respondents can be properly assessed. A copy of the proposed... Contribution Operations report (Form ETA 581) is a comprehensive report of each state's UI tax operations...

  3. USING MM5V3 WITH ETA ANALYSES FOR AIR-QUALITY MODELING AT THE EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts have been underway since MM5v3 was released in July 1999 to set up air-quality simulations using Eta analyses as background fields. Our previous simulations used a one-way quadruple-nested set of domains with horizontal grid spacing of 108, 36, 12 and 4 km. With Eta a...

  4. 78 FR 30336 - Comment Request for Information Collection: ETA-5130 Benefit Appeals Report; Extension Without...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection: ETA-5130 Benefit Appeals... INFORMATION: I. Background The ETA-5130, Benefit Appeals Report, contains information on the number of unemployment insurance appeals and the resultant decisions classified by program, appeals level, cases...

  5. Observation of eta'c production in gammagamma fusion at CLEO.

    PubMed

    Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Haynes, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, Kevin; Mahmood, A H; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Weinstein, A J; Mahapatra, R; Nelson, H N; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Pedlar, T K; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Sun, W M; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Arms, K; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Severini, H; Skubic, P

    2004-04-01

    We report on the observation of the eta(')(c)(2(1)S0), the radial excitation of the eta(c)(1(1)S0) ground state of charmonium, in the two-photon fusion reaction gammagamma-->eta(')(c)-->K(0)(S)K+/-pi(-/+) in 13.6 fb(-1) of CLEO II/II.V data and 13.1 fb(-1) of CLEO III data. We obtain M(eta(')(c))=3642.9+/-3.1(stat)+/-1.5(syst) MeV and M(eta(c))=2981.8+/-1.3(stat)+/-1.5(syst) MeV. The corresponding values of hyperfine splittings between 1S0 and 3S1 states are DeltaM(hf)(1S)=115.1+/-2.0 MeV and DeltaM(hf)(2S)=43.1+/-3.4 MeV. Assuming that the eta(c) and eta(')(c) have equal branching fractions to K(S)Kpi, we obtain Gamma(gammagamma)(eta(')(c))=1.3+/-0.6 keV. PMID:15089529

  6. 77 FR 2089 - Proposed Information Collection Request of the ETA 204, Experience Rating Report; Comment Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... Information Collection Request of the ETA 204, Experience Rating Report; Comment Request on Extension Without... different experience rating systems. Used in conjunction with other data, the ETA-204 assists in determining... employment, etc.) on the unemployment experience of various groups of employers. The data also provide...

  7. Cautionary Note on Reporting Eta-Squared Values from Multifactor ANOVA Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Charles A.; Block, Richard A.; Aguinis, Herman

    2004-01-01

    The authors provide a cautionary note on reporting accurate eta-squared values from multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs. They reinforce the distinction between classical and partial eta-squared as measures of strength of association. They provide examples from articles published in premier psychology journals in which the authors…

  8. 76 FR 27090 - Comment Request for Extension of Information Collection (Without Revisions): Form ETA 9033-A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Revisions): Form ETA 9033-A, Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers for Longshore Activities in... collection by Form ETA 9033-A, OMB Control Number 1205-0352, Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers.... The INA generally prohibits the performance of longshore work by alien crewmembers, however the...

  9. 77 FR 35060 - Employment and Training Administration; Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 538...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... addresses section below on or before August 13, 2012. ADDRESSES: Submit written comments to Scott Gibbons... toll-free Federal Information Relay Service at 1-877-889-5627 (TTY/TDD). Email: gibbons.scott@dol.gov.... Gibbons. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The ETA 538 and ETA 539 reports are weekly reports...

  10. On Decays of B Mesons to a Strange Meson and an Eta or Eta' Meson at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschauer, James Francis

    2009-01-01

    We describe studies of the decays of B mesons to final states ηK*(892), ηK*0(S-wave), ηK*2(1430), and η'K based on data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collier at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We measure branching fractions and charge asymmetries for the decays B → ηK*, where K* indicates a spin 0, 1, or 2 Kπ system, making first observations of decays to final states ηK0*0(S-wave), ηK+*0 (S-wave), and ηK0*2(1430). We measure the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C for the decays B0 → η'K0, observing CP violation in a charmless B decay with 5σ significance considering both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  11. The Ejecta of Eta Carinae: Just what is the Mass?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.

    2006-08-01

    Estimates of the Homunculus and the Little Homunculus suggest that at least 12 solar masses were ejected in the two events of the 1840s and the 1890s (Smith et al 2003 AJ 125, 1458). We have begun a systematic analysis of the metal lines seen in the warm Homunculus and hot Little Homunculus in an attempt to characterize the properties of the gas. Analysis of these structures and the Strontium Filament suggest that Ti/Ni (and likewise Ti/Fe) is overabundant. Likely this is due to oxygen and carbon underabundances which prevent metal oxides forming. As a result, much Ti, V, Sr, Sc, Ni and Fe is left in gaseous phase. The dust associated with Eta Carinae is known to have peculiar properties. Given that many metals normally depleted in the ISM are overabundant in the ejecta of Eta Carinae, we are led to suspect that the gas/dust ratio is underestimated. Observational examples of these hundreds of lines will be shown along with model estimates of temperature, density and abundances.

  12. SECULAR CHANGES IN ETA CARINAE'S WIND 1998-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Martin, John C.; Ruiz, Maria Teresa; Walter, Frederick M.

    2012-05-20

    Stellar wind-emission features in the spectrum of eta Carinae have decreased by factors of 1.5-3 relative to the continuum within the last 10 years. We investigate a large data set from several instruments (STIS, GMOS, UVES) obtained between 1998 and 2011 and analyze the progression of spectral changes in direct view of the star, in the reflected polar-on spectra at FOS4, and at the Weigelt knots. We find that the spectral changes occurred gradually on a timescale of about 10 years and that they are dependent on the viewing angle. The line strengths declined most in our direct view of the star. About a decade ago, broad stellar wind-emission features were much stronger in our line-of-sight view of the star than at FOS4. After the 2009 event, the wind-emission line strengths are now very similar at both locations. High-excitation He I and N II absorption lines in direct view of the star strengthened gradually. The terminal velocity of Balmer P Cyg absorption lines now appears to be less latitude dependent, and the absorption strength may have weakened at FOS4. Latitude-dependent alterations in the mass-loss rate and the ionization structure of eta Carinae's wind are likely explanations for the observed spectral changes.

  13. Recurrent X-ray Emission Variations of Eta Carinae and the Binary Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Corcoran, M. F.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Drake, S. A.; Damineki, A.; White, S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that, the super-massive star eta Carinae may have a massive stellar companion (Damineli, Conti, and Lopes 1997), although the dense ejecta surrounding the star make this claim hard to test using conventional methods. Settling this question is critical for determining the current evolutionary state and future evolution of the star. We address this problem by an unconventional method: If eta Carinae is a binary, X-ray emission should be produced in shock waves generated by wind-wind collisions in the region between eta Carinae and its companion. Detailed X-ray monitoring of eta Carinae for more that) 2 years shows that the observed emission generally resembles colliding-wind X-ray emission, but with some significant discrepancies. Furthermore, periodic X-ray "flaring" may provide an additional clue to determine the presence of a companion star and for atmospheric pulsation in eta Carinae.

  14. Evidence for {psi}' Decays into {gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {gamma}{eta}

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y.

    2010-12-31

    The decays {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta} and {gamma}{eta}{sup '} are studied using data collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The processes {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta} are observed for the first time with signal significances of 4.6{sigma} and 4.3{sigma}, respectively. The branching fractions are determined to be B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0})=(1.58{+-}0.40{+-}0.13)x10{sup -6}, B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta})=(1.38{+-}0.48{+-}0.09)x10{sup -6}, and B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})=(126{+-}3{+-}8)x10{sup -6}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones systematic.

  15. Intramolecular coupling of eta/sup 2/-iminoacyl groups at group 4 metal centers: a kinetic study of the carbon-carbon double-bond-forming reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, L.D.; McMullen, A.K.; Rothwell, I.P.

    1988-03-02

    The series of bis(eta/sup 2/-iminoacyl) compounds of general formula M(OAr)/sub 2/(eta/sup 2/-R'NCR)/sub 2/ (M = Ti, Zr, Hf; OAr = 2,6-diisopropyl- and 2,6-di-tert-butylphenoxide; R = CH/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/Ph; R' = various substituted phenyls) undergo intramolecular coupling on thermolysis to produce the corresponding enediamide derivatives M(OAr)/sub 2/(R'NC(R) = C(R)NR'). A kinetic study of the reaction in hydrocarbon solvents has shown it to be first order. The reaction is metal dependent with the rate decreasing in the order Ti > Zr > Hf. The rate of the reaction is also dependent on the steric and electronic nature of the nitrogen substituent (R'). The use of the bulky aryl group 2,6-dimethylphenyl retards the reaction, while the use of various 3- and 4-substituted phenyls (3-F, 3-OMe, 4-OMe, 4-Cl, 4-NMe/sub 2/) shows the reaction to be accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents. A sigma plot based on kinetic data obtained at 67/sup 0/C and 77/sup 0/C yielded rho values of 0.83 (R = 0.97) and 0.84 (R = 0.95), respectively. Both the steric and electronic dependence of the reactivity on the nitrogen substituents is discussed mechanistically and used to rationalize the much more facile intramolecular coupling observed for the related eta/sup 2/-acyl (eta/sup 2/-OCR) functionalities.

  16. Investigation of near-threshold eta-meson production in the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields} {eta}n

    SciTech Connect

    Bayadilov, D. E.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Gridnev, A. B.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinskiy, D. V.; Radkov, A. K.; Sumachev, V. V.; Filimonov, E. A.; Shvedchikov, A. V.

    2012-08-15

    Differential and total cross sections for eta-meson production in the reaction {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {eta}n were measured within the experimental program eta-meson physics implemented in the pion channel of the synchrocyclotron of the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI, Gatchina). These measurements were performed at incident-pion momenta (700, 710, 720, and 730 MeV/c) in the vicinity of the threshold for the process under study by using the neutral-meson spectrometer designed and created at the Meson Physics Laboratory of PNPI. It is shown that, in the immediate vicinity of the threshold (685 MeV/c), the process of eta-meson production proceeds predominantly via S{sub 11}(1535)-resonance formation followed by the decay S{sub 11}(1535) {yields} {eta}n (the respective branching fraction is Br Almost-Equal-To 60%), but that, as the momentum of incident pions increases, the role of the D wave becomes ever more important. A detailed analysis of this effect indicates that it is due to the increasing contribution of the D{sub 13}(1520) resonance. Although the branching fraction of the decay of this resonance through the {eta}n channel is assumed to be very small (BR Almost-Equal-To 0.24%), the effect is enhanced owing to the interference between the D wave and the dominant resonance S{sub 11}(1535).

  17. Accelerated life test of the USDOE OC-OTEC experimental system refurbished with magnetic bearings for the 3rd stage vacuum compressor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, L.A.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the accelerated life test (time-to-failure) performed, at the request of DOE, to evaluate the viability of the magnetic bearing system installed in the stage 3 vacuum pump. To this effect the plant was successfully operated for over 500 hours during the period September-November 1996. The first part of this report discusses system performance by deriving subsystem and system performance parameters from a typical record. This is followed by the discussion of the life tests. The instrumentation used to estimate the performance parameters given here is depicted. The third stage pump was operated for 535 hours without incident. It is concluded that magnetic bearings are the preferable choice for the OC-OTEC centrifugal vacuum pumps.

  18. Construction of. gamma pi. /sup 0/ spectrometer and photon tagging facility at Bates Linear Accelerator. Final report, July 31, 1979-July 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, E.C.

    1981-08-01

    The funds provided under Contract No. DE-AC02-79ER10486 were totally expended for hardware and supplies required by two related devices at the Bates Linear Accelerator. These were a photon tagging facility and a ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer in Beam Line C of the new South Experimental Hall. Construction was begun in November of 1979 and both systems became fully operational in the summer of 1981. Preliminary data was taken in 1980 with a prototype ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer will be carried out in the fall of 1981 and spring of 1982. The photon tagging system has been used successfully to calibrate the ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer for the BU - MIT collaboration and to test a lead glass detector system for Brandeis University.

  19. A Measurement of the B ---> Eta/C K Branching Fraction Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Frank; /Manchester U.

    2006-04-26

    The branching fraction is measured for the decay channels B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{sub c}K{sup +} where {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}, using the BABAR detector. The {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decay channels are used, including non-resonant decays and possibly those through intermediate resonances.

  20. Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

  1. Space time ETAS models and an improved extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Yosihiko; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2006-02-01

    For sensitive detection of anomalous seismicity such as quiescence and activation in a given region, we need a suitable statistical reference model that represents a normal seismic activity in the region. The regional occurrence rate of the earthquakes is modeled as a function of previous activity, the specific form of which is based on empirical laws in time and space such as the modified Omori formula and the Utsu-Seki scaling law of aftershock area against magnitude, respectively. This manuscript summarizes the development of the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model and proposes an extended version of the best fitted space-time model that was suggested in Ogata [Ogata, Y., 1998. Space-time point-process models for earthquake occurrences, Ann. Inst. Statist. Math., 50: 379-402.]. This model indicates significantly better fit to seismicity in various regions in and around Japan.

  2. Model Error Estimation for the CPTEC Eta Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; daSilva, Arlindo

    1999-01-01

    Statistical data assimilation systems require the specification of forecast and observation error statistics. Forecast error is due to model imperfections and differences between the initial condition and the actual state of the atmosphere. Practical four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) methods try to fit the forecast state to the observations and assume that the model error is negligible. Here with a number of simplifying assumption, a framework is developed for isolating the model error given the forecast error at two lead-times. Two definitions are proposed for the Talagrand ratio tau, the fraction of the forecast error due to model error rather than initial condition error. Data from the CPTEC Eta Model running operationally over South America are used to calculate forecast error statistics and lower bounds for tau.

  3. UNEXPECTED IONIZATION STRUCTURE IN ETA CARINAE'S ''WEIGELT KNOTS''

    SciTech Connect

    Remmen, Grant N.; Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea

    2013-08-10

    The Weigelt knots, dense slow-moving ejecta near {eta} Carinae, are mysterious in structure as well as in origin. Using spatially dithered spectrograms obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), we have partially resolved the ionization zones of one knot. Contrary to simple models, higher ionization levels occur on the outer side, i.e., farther from the star. They cannot represent a bow shock, and no satisfying explanation is yet available-though we sketch one qualitative possibility. STIS spectrograms provide far more reliable spatial measurements of the Weigelt knots than HST images do, and this technique can also be applied to the knots' proper motion problem. Our spatial measurement accuracy is about 10 mas, corresponding to a projected linear scale of the order of 30 AU, which is appreciably smaller than the size of each Weigelt knot.

  4. The -145 km/S Absorption System of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G.; Gull, T. R.; Danks, A.; Johansson, S.

    2002-01-01

    With the STIS E230H mode (R-118,000) , we have identified about twenty absorption components in line of sight from Eta Carinae. Two components, one at -513 km/s and another at -145 W s , are quite different in character from the others, mostly at intermediate velocities. The -145 km/s component is significantly wider in fwhm, is seen in many more species, and the lower level can be above 20,000/cm, well above the 2000/cm noted in the -513 km/s component. In the spectral region from 2400 to 3160A, approximately 500 absorption lines have been identified. In this poster, we will present line identifications and atomic parameters of the measured lines, hopefully providing insight as to what levels are being excited and by what processes.

  5. The -145 km/s Absorption System of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G.; Gull, Theodore R.; Danks, A.; Johansson, S.

    2002-01-01

    With the STIS E230H mode (R approx. 118,000), we have identified about twenty absorption components in line of sight from Eta Carinae. Two components, one at -513 km/s and another at -145 km/s, are quite different in character from the others, mostly at intermediate velocities. The -145 km/s component is significantly wider in fwhm, is seen in many more species, and the lower level can be above 20,000/cm, well above the 2000/cm noted in the -513 km/s component. In the spectral region from 2400 to 3160A, approximately 500 absorption lines have been identified. In this poster, we will present line identifications and atomic parameters of the measured lines, hopefully providing insight as to what levels are being excited and by what processes. Observations were accomplished through STScI under proposal 9242. Funding is through the STIS GTO resources.

  6. Recovery from a Giant Eruption: The Case of Eta Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea; Martin, John C.; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Giant eruptions or SN Impostors are far more mysterious than "real" supernovae, because they are scarcer and because they have received far less theoretical effort. One rather special problem is the disequilibrium state of the post-eruption object. It may be partially observable by watching the star's gradual recovery; which, in principle, may offer clues to the basic instability mechanisms. So far, the only example that can be observed well enough is eta Carinae. This object's history offers tantalizing clues and counter-clues. For instance: (1) Before 2000, the recovery timescale seemed to be of order 150 years; but (2) around 2000, many attributes began to change much more rapidly; and (3) the 150-year recovery process has been punctuated by about three abrupt changes of state. This strange combination of facts has received almost no theoretical attention.

  7. Understanding the X-ray Flaring from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    We quantify the rapid variations in X-ray brightness ("flares") from the extremely massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae seen during the past three orbital cycles by RXTE. The observed flares tend to be shorter in duration and more frequent as periastron is approached, although the largest ones tend to be roughly constant in strength at all phases. Plausible scenarios include (1) the largest of multi-scale stochastic wind clumps from the LBV component entering and compressing the hard X-ray emitting wind-wind collision (WWC) zone, (2) large-scale corotating interacting regions in the LBV wind sweeping across the WWC zone, or (3) instabilities intrinsic to the WWC zone. The first one appears to be most consistent with the observations, requiring homologously expanding clumps as they propagate outward in the LBV wind and a turbulence-like powerlaw distribution of clumps, decreasing in number towards larger sizes, as seen in Wolf-Rayet winds.

  8. Little Homunculus with in the Homunculus of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, Kazunori; Gull, Theodore R.; Davidson, Kris; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The famous HST/WFPC2 images of Eta Carinae provide a two-dimensional projection of the bipolar nebula that is really a three-dimensional structure. Much is hidden in subtle, projected details that a velocity-tuned instrument can pull apart. We have used the HST/STIS with a 52" x 0.1" aperture and with about 5000 spectral resolving power to examine the kinetic information contained within emission/absorption features. By velocity tuning, we can translate this information into spatial structures. The spectroscopic datasets have been transformed to a set of images, spaced at half instrumental line width steps, 15 - 20 km/s , and with a spatial resolution of 0.1 x 0.1 arcsec near Balmer beta and 0.25 x 0.1 arcsec near Balmer alpha. We examined these narrow-band images and individual spectra to characterize the nature of an internal nebula (formerly known as the Integral nebula). The shape of this nebulosity is an bipolar nebula, deeply embedded within the Homunculus, the well-known bipolar nebula surrounding Eta Carinae. The internal nebula is shaped nearly identically to the Homunculus. It is best described as a "little Homunculus within the Homunculus". Indeed, it is reminiscent of the Russian dolls, known as Matryoshka dolls, that successively nest within each larger doll. For that reason, we call this internal nebula the Matryoshka nebula. This was performed as one of the STIS GTO key projects and was funded by the HST project. Observations were done through the STScI.

  9. The Time Evolution of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, T. I.; Grobe, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    We report new HST/STIS observations that map the high-ionization forbidden line emission in the inner arc second of Eta Car, the first that fully image the extended wind-wind interaction region of the massive colliding wind binary. These observations were obtained after the 2009.0 periastron at orbital phases 0.084, 0.163, and 0.323 of the 5.54-year spectroscopic cycle. We analyze the variations in brightness and morphology of the emission, and find that blue-shifted emission (-400 to -200 km/s is symmetric and elongated along the northeast-southwest axis, while the red-shifted emission (+ 100 to +200 km/s) is asymmetric and extends to the north-northwest. Comparison to synthetic images generated from a 3-D dynamical model strengthens the 3-D orbital orientation found by Madura et al. (2011), with an inclination i = 138 deg, argument of periapsis w = 270 deg, and an orbital axis that is aligned at the same P A on the sky as the symmetry axis of the Homunculus, 312 deg. We discuss the potential that these and future mappings have for constraining the stellar parameters of the companion star and the long-term variability of the system. Plain-Language Abstract: With HST, we resolved the interacting winds of the binary, Eta Carinae. With a 3-D model, we find the binary orbit axis is aligned to the Homunculus axis. This suggests a connection between the binary and Homunculus ejection mechanism.

  10. Experimental test accelerator: description and results of initial experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.; Birx, D.; Briggs, R.

    1980-06-02

    The ETA is a high current (10,000 Amp) linear induction accelerator that produces short (30 ns) pulses of electrons at 5 MeV twice per second or in bursts of 5 pulses separated by as little as one millisecond. At this time the machine has operated at 65% of its design current and 90% of the design voltage. This report contains a description of the accelerator and its diagnostics; the results of the initial year of operation; a comparison of design codes with experiments on beam transport; and a discussion of some of the special problems and their status.

  11. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program TPP Final Report - A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. PV Industry Growth, GE Global Research

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Tolliver; Danielle Merfeld; Charles Korman; James Rand; Tom McNulty; Neil Johnson; Dennis Coyle

    2009-07-31

    General Electric’s (GE) DOE Solar Energy Technologies TPP program encompassesd development in critical areas of the photovoltaic value chain that affected the LCOE for systems in the U.S. This was a complete view across the value chain, from materials to rooftops, to identify opportunities for cost reductions in order to realize the Department of Energy’s cost targets for 2010 and 2015. GE identified a number of strategic partners with proven leadership in their respective technology areas to accelerate along the path to commercialization. GE targeted both residential and commercial rooftop scale systems. To achieve these goals, General Electric and its partners investigated three photovoltaic pathways that included bifacial high-efficiency silicon cells and modules, low-cost multicrystalline silicon cells and modules and flexible thin film modules. In addition to these technologies, the balance of system for residential and commercial installations were also investigated. Innovative system installation strategies were pursed as an additional avenue for cost reduction.

  12. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  13. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  14. Locating and Measuring the High Mass Ejecta from the Unstable Massive Star System eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The luminous, massive binary system eta Carinae is both one of the nearest and most unstable objects in a class of evolved massive stars, near the end of its lifetime before expected destruction in a supernova. It experienced a major outburst in 1843, producing the well-known Homunculus nebula, containing some 15 to 40 Msun in warm (~170 K) and cool (90-110 K) dust and associated gas, according to mid-infrared ISO spectroscopy. The location of this material is very uncertain, due to large apertures of the spectroscopic observations, and lack of direct imaging beyond 25 microns. We propose to use the FORCAST imager with long wavelength filters to better locate and estimate the mass in thermal components of this material that may be resolved, constraining it to the interior regions or bipolar lobes of the Homunculus nebula, or in outer ejecta that would support the hypothesis of a major event prior to the 1843 eruption. This is crucial to understanding the mass-loss history of this object on the edge of a final supernova explosion, and provide constraints on the distribution and extinction properties of the dust in 3D hydrodynamical + radiative transfer numerical modeling of the Homunculus nebula.

  15. Bipolar outflows from the most luminous evolved stars, especially the unique case of eta CAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, K.

    1996-05-01

    If recent experience is a valid guide, very massive evolved stars typically show outward signs of axial (non-spherical) symmetry; some cases are dramatic. Large-scale bipolar structure has lately been identified around most well-studied Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), while their country cousins the B[e] stars (not the same as Be stars) have long been thought to have equatorial disks. Radiation pressure makes these stars fundamentally different from ordinary massive stars, helping in more than one way to encourage axial and equatorial structures. Two general questions have thus arisen: (1) Is bipolar structure practically universal among very massive evolved stars? (2) Does the crucial LBV instability occur in an essentially equatorial or axial way, to the extent that spherical theories are misleading? The special case of eta Carinae provides insights largely because its structure is so obvious and well-defined. Its polar lobes are dramatic enough by themselves, but the large-scale equatorial debris are even more wonderfully suggestive. HST spectroscopy and imaging are giving information about the equatorial structure over a wide range of size scales. Additional questions particularly inspired by eta Car are (3) How seriously are mass-loss estimates modified by this type of structure? The latitudinal distribution of ejected mass is not yet known, but it is clear that any analysis of the spectrum assuming spherical symmetry would be invalid, for this or any star with similar structure. (4) Did this prominent equatorial structure result from a much smaller wind-compressed disk, or is it the result of preferentially equatorial ejection in the LBV eruption? (5) How can we tell the difference between the effects of stellar rotation and of a close companion, for such a luminous star? (Radiation pressure prevents mass exchange in a very massive close binary, so the two cases look almost alike.) Finally, we must eventually compare the axially symmetric structures of hot

  16. ETA receptor blockade potentiates the bronchoconstrictor response to ET-1 in the guinea pig airway.

    PubMed

    Polakowski, J S; Opgenorth, T J; Pollock, D M

    1996-08-01

    The effect of ETA receptor blockade on the bronchopulmonary response to endothelin-1 was determined in the airway of the anesthetized, spontaneously breathing guinea pig. Endothelin-1 administered as an aerosol increased lung resistance and decreased dynamic lung compliance. Delivery of the ETA receptor antagonist, FR139317, 5 min prior to giving endothelin-1 greatly potentiated these changes. A lower dose of endothelin-1 that had no effect on resistance or compliance produced large and significant changes when pretreated with FR139317. In contrast, aerosolized FR139317 had no effect on the bronchopulmonary response to intravenously administered endothelin-1. These data suggest a non-contractile function of ETA receptors accessible from the airways that serve to buffer the constrictor effects of non-ETA receptors.

  17. A PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE ETA- CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM FOR THE SUMMER OF 2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster presents an evaluation of the Eta-CMAQ Air Quality Forecast System's experimental domain using O3 observations obtained from EPA's AIRNOW program and a suite of statistical metrics examining both discrete and categorical forecasts.

  18. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  19. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  20. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  1. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex

    2011-10-01

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  2. Mixture of a seismicity model based on the rate-and-state friction and ETAS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, T.

    2015-12-01

    Currently the ETAS model [Ogata, 1988, JASA] is considered to be a standard model of seismicity. However, because the ETAS model is a purely statistical one, the physics-based seismicity model derived from the rate-and-state friction (hereafter referred to as Dieterich model) [Dieterich, 1994, JGR] is frequently examined. However, the original version of the Dieterich model has several problems in the application to real earthquake sequences and therefore modifications have been conducted in previous studies. Iwata [2015, Pageoph] is one of such studies and shows that the Dieterich model is significantly improved as a result of the inclusion of the effect of secondary aftershocks (i.e., aftershocks caused by previous aftershocks). However, still the performance of the ETAS model is superior to that of the improved Dieterich model. For further improvement, the mixture of the Dieterich and ETAS models is examined in this study. To achieve the mixture, the seismicity rate is represented as a sum of the ETAS and Dieterich models of which weights are given as k and 1-k, respectively. This mixture model is applied to the aftershock sequences of the 1995 Kobe and 2004 Mid-Niigata sequences which have been analyzed in Iwata [2015]. Additionally, the sequence of the Matsushiro earthquake swarm in central Japan 1965-1970 is also analyzed. The value of k and parameters of the ETAS and Dieterich models are estimated by means of the maximum likelihood method, and the model performances are assessed on the basis of AIC. For the two aftershock sequences, the AIC values of the ETAS model are around 3-9 smaller (i.e., better) than those of the mixture model. On the contrary, for the Matsushiro swarm, the AIC value of the mixture model is 5.8 smaller than that of the ETAS model, indicating that the mixture of the two models results in significant improvement of the seismicity model.

  3. PKC{eta} is a negative regulator of AKT inhibiting the IGF-I induced proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Shahaf, Galit; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Koifman, Gabriela; Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Frost, Sigal A.; Livneh, Etta

    2012-04-15

    The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, including breast cancer, and its activation appears to be critical for tumor maintenance. Some malignant cells are dependent on activated AKT for their survival; tumors exhibiting elevated AKT activity show sensitivity to its inhibition, providing an Achilles heel for their treatment. Here we show that the PKC{eta} isoform is a negative regulator of the AKT signaling pathway. The IGF-I induced phosphorylation on Ser473 of AKT was inhibited by the PKC{eta}-induced expression in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells. This was further confirmed in shRNA PKC{eta}-knocked-down MCF-7 cells, demonstrating elevated phosphorylation on AKT Ser473. While PKC{eta} exhibited negative regulation on AKT phosphorylation it did not alter the IGF-I induced ERK phosphorylation. However, it enhanced ERK phosphorylation when stimulated by PDGF. Moreover, its effects on IGF-I/AKT and PDGF/ERK pathways were in correlation with cell proliferation. We further show that both PKC{eta} and IGF-I confer protection against UV-induced apoptosis and cell death having additive effects. Although the protective effect of IGF-I involved activation of AKT, it was not affected by PKC{eta} expression, suggesting that PKC{eta} acts through a different route to increase cell survival. Hence, our studies show that PKC{eta} provides negative control on AKT pathway leading to reduced cell proliferation, and further suggest that its presence/absence in breast cancer cells will affect cell death, which could be of therapeutic value.

  4. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  5. Eta Carinae and the Homunculus: an Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Hartman, H.; Bautista, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    Today Eta Carinae, from the 1840s Great Eruption, is surrounded by a 20", neutral, dusty bipolar shell with intervening skirt, containing 12-40 solar masses of N-rich, C- and O-poor ejecta. The ionized Little Homunculus, ejected in the 1890s, expands within. At the core are a massive extended interacting wind structure and the bright Weigelt blobs, that change between a low-ionization (<7.8 eV) to a high-ionization state (>40 eV) driven by the 5.5-year massive binary. Thousands of narrow emission and absorption lines originate from a variety of regions: 1) the Weigelt blobs and the extended wind structures; 2) the Strontium Filament, a unique photoioionized metal nebula dominated by TiII, VII, SrII, ScII, CaII, MnII, CrII and FeI, but no HI; 3) the ionized Little Homunculus; and 4) the Homunculus seen in nearly a thousand atomic absorption lines in high and low states, but a thousand H2 absorptions only seen in the high state. Ionized iron-peak elements co-exist with CH, OH, NH and H2. This system is an excellent laboratory for the study of many iron-peak species from neutral to doubly-ionized states. The variations of incident radiation allow us to study atomic processes and derive atomic data not available from terrestrial laboratories, making Eta Carinae an astrophysical laboratory in its true sense. Moreover, the Homunculus, as inventoried by Herschel spectral scans, is dominated by N-bearing molecules. While C and O are depleted nearly 100-fold, due to CNO-nuclear reactions coupled with high conduction in the massive stellar cores, dust and molecules have still formed. How? Is the Homunculus dust metallic in character? Silicates and alumina? Could the formed dust also contribute to the C,O-depletions? Through multiple studies we are gaining clues on the robustness of molecular and dust formations.

  6. Development of a partnership with government and industry to accelerate the commercialization of hydrogen. Final report, November 1, 1996--October 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The National Hydrogen Association (NHA) was born out of a Hydrogen Workshop, November 16 and 17, 1988, held at the Electric Power Research Institute in Palo Alto, California. The following mission statement was adopted and remains the statement of the organization: to foster the development of hydrogen technologies and their utilization in industrial and commercial applications and to promote the transition role of hydrogen in the energy field. This final technical report provides a summary of the activities performed by the NHA. Activities are broken down by task area, and include the following: Information exchange within the NHA; Information exchange within the hydrogen industry; Information exchange with other critical industries and the public; Annual US hydrogen meeting; Codes and standards which includes establishing industry consensus on safety issues; Industry perspective and needs; and Administrative. Appendices to this report include the following: Role of the NHA in strategic planning for the hydrogen economy--An international initiative; Hydrogen safety report; and Implementation plan workshop II, whose purpose was to seek commercialization scenarios and strategies to introduce hydrogen in near-term transportation and power markets.

  7. Development of a partnership with government and industry to accelerate the commercialization of hydrogen. Final report, 9/30/1995--10/31/1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This Final Technical Report provides a summary of the activities performed by the NHA in accordance with the Cooperative Agreement. Activities are broken down by task area, and include the following: (1) Information exchange within the NHA, which includes the two NHA newsletters, the NHA Advocate, and the H{sub 2} Digest, as well as directory information. (2) Information exchange within the hydrogen industry, which includes conferences and meeting attendance, presentations of papers, and HTAP activities. (3) Information exchange with other critical industries and the public, which includes press conferences, and public awareness activities. (4) Annual US hydrogen meeting, NHA`s signature event. The 7th Annual US Hydrogen Meeting was held April 2--4, 1996 in Alexandria, Virginia in conjunction with the US DOE`s Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel Meeting and the SAE`s Fuel Cell TOPTEC. (5) Industry perspective and needs, which covers activities related to the Hydrogen Industrialization Plan. (6) Codes and standards, which includes workshop and workgroup activities, as well as other safety-related activities. The objective of the codes and standards activities is to establish expert working groups to develop industry consensus on safety issues, and develop compatible standards and formats, and product certification protocols.

  8. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  9. New ruthenium carboxylate complexes having a 1-5-. eta. sup 5 -cyclooctadienyl ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Osakada, Kohtaro; Grohmann, A.; Yamamoto, Akio )

    1990-07-01

    Reaction of 3-butenoic acid with Ru(cod)(cot) (cod) = 1-2-{eta}{sup 2}:5-6-{eta}{sup 2}-cyclooctadiene; cot = 1-6-{eta}{sup 6}-cyclooctatriene in the presence of PMe{sub 3} gives a new ruthenium(II) complex formulated as Ru(1-5-{eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 8}H{sub 11}){eta}{sup 1}(O),{eta}{sup 2}(C,C{prime}-OCOCH{sub 2}CH{double bond}CH{sub 2})(PMe{sub 3}) (1). X-ray crystallography revealed its structure as having a piano-stool coordination around the ruthenium center. Crystals of 1 are tetragonal, space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with a = 12.559 (3) {angstrom}, c = 20.455 (4) {angstrom}, and Z = 8. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) NMR spectra of 1 agree well for the structure with the allyl entity of the carboxylate {pi}-bonded through the C{double bond}C double bond to ruthenium.

  10. Pol eta is required for DNA replication during nucleotide deprivation by hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    de Feraudy, S; Limoli, C L; Giedzinski, E; Karentz, D; Marti, T M; Feeney, L; Cleaver, J E

    2007-08-23

    Hydroxyurea reduces DNA replication by nucleotide deprivation, whereas UV damage generates DNA photoproducts that directly block replication fork progression. We show that the low fidelity class Y polymerase Pol eta is recruited to proliferating cell nuclear antigen at replication forks both by hydroxyurea and UV light. Under nucleotide deprivation, Pol eta allows cells to accumulate at the G1/S boundary by facilitating slow S-phase progression and promotes apoptosis. Normal cells consequently enter apoptosis at a faster rate than Pol eta-deficient cells. Coincident with hydroxyurea-induced S-phase delay, Pol eta-deficient cells undergo more replication fork breakage and accumulate more foci of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex and phosphorylated histone H2AX. We conclude that under conditions of nucleotide deprivation, Pol eta is required for S-phase progression but is proapoptotic. However, as Pol eta is reported to require higher nucleotide concentrations than class B replicative polymerases, its recruitment by hydroxyurea requires it to function under suboptimal conditions. Our results suggest that hydroxyurea-induced apoptosis occurs at the G1/S boundary and that initiation of the S-phase requires greater nucleotide concentrations than does S-phase progression. PMID:17369853

  11. Structural basis for the suppression of skin cancers by DNA polymerase [eta

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Timothy D.; Johnson, Robert E.; Jain, Rinku; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2010-09-13

    DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}) is unique among eukaryotic polymerases in its proficient ability for error-free replication through ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and inactivation of Pol{eta} (also known as POLH) in humans causes the variant form of xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV). We present the crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol{eta} (also known as RAD30) in ternary complex with a cis-syn thymine-thymine (T-T) dimer and with undamaged DNA. The structures reveal that the ability of Pol{eta} to replicate efficiently through the ultraviolet-induced lesion derives from a simple and yet elegant mechanism, wherein the two Ts of the T-T dimer are accommodated in an active site cleft that is much more open than in other polymerases. We also show by structural, biochemical and genetic analysis that the two Ts are maintained in a stable configuration in the active site via interactions with Gln55, Arg73 and Met74. Together, these features define the basis for Pol{eta}'s action on ultraviolet-damaged DNA that is crucial in suppressing the mutagenic and carcinogenic consequences of sun exposure, thereby reducing the incidence of skin cancers in humans.

  12. Measurement of the gamma gamma* to eta_c transition form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-04-28

    The authors study the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} {eta}{sub c}, {eta}{sub c} {yields} K{sub S}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and obtain {eta}{sub c} mass and width values 2982.2 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 1.6 MeV/c{sup 2} and 31.7 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.8 MeV, respectively. They find {Lambda}({eta}{sub c} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}){Beta}({eta}{sub c} {yields} K{bar K}{pi}) = 0.374 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.031 keV, and measure the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {eta}{sub c} transition form factor in the momentum transfer range from 2 to 50 GeV{sup 2}. The analysis is based on 469 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  13. Galactic transients with AGILE: the case of Eta Carinae and Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Sabina; Tavani, M.; Caraveo, P.; Barbiellini, G.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Argan, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Chen, A. W.; D'Ammando, F.; de Paris, G.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Ferrari, A.; Fiorini, M.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Giusti, M.; Labanti, C.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Morelli, E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Pucella, G.; Prest, M.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Rubini, A.; Scalise, E.; Soffitta, P.; Striani, E.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Zambra, A.; Zanello, D.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Vittorini, V.; Santolamazza, P.; Giommi, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Salotti, L.

    During its first 2.5 years of operation, the gamma-ray AGILE satellite accumulated an extensive dataset for the Galactic plane and carried out a specific search for emission from binary systems. Powerful colliding winds or relativistic jets in these systems can cause strong shocks in which both electrons and protons can be efficiently accelerated producing non-thermal emission. We developed specific tools of analysis for the search of transient gamma-ray sources in the data and several candidates were detected. Their variability and possible association were studied. In this talk we will mainly focus on the results of extensive observations of the Carina Re-gion and the Cygnus Region during the time period 2007 July -mid 2010. Both regions are extremely complex, hosting massive star formation, giant molecular clouds, HII regions and massive star star clusters. We present a detailed analysis of the gamma-ray data for the regions. In particular, we detect a gamma ray source (1AGL J1043-5931) consistent with the position of the colliding wind binary system Eta Carinae, and report a remarkable 2-days gamma-ray flaring episode from this source, providing the long sought first detection above 100 MeV of a colliding wind binary. Several steady and transient sources have been detected by AGILE in the Cygnus Region. Here we present the results of an extensive search for transient gamma-ray emission from the black hole binary system Cygnus X-1, during the period 2007 July -2009 October. We report an episode of significant transient gamma-ray emission detected on 2009, October 16 in a position compatible with Cygnus X-1.

  14. Accelerator simulation of astrophysical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Phenomena that involve accelerated ions in stellar processes that can be simulated with laboratory accelerators are described. Stellar evolutionary phases, such as the CNO cycle, have been partially explored with accelerators, up to the consumption of He by alpha particle radiative capture reactions. Further experimentation is indicated on reactions featuring N-13(p,gamma)O-14, O-15(alpha, gamma)Ne-19, and O-14(alpha,p)F-17. Accelerated beams interacting with thin foils produce reaction products that permit a determination of possible elemental abundances in stellar objects. Additionally, isotopic ratios observed in chondrites can be duplicated with accelerator beam interactions and thus constraints can be set on the conditions producing the meteorites. Data from isotopic fractionation from sputtering, i.e., blasting surface atoms from a material using a low energy ion beam, leads to possible models for processes occurring in supernova explosions. Finally, molecules can be synthesized with accelerators and compared with spectroscopic observations of stellar winds.

  15. Characterization of thymus-derived lymphocytes expressing Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta- eta antigen receptor isoforms: analysis by gene transfection

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the function of the CD3 eta subunit of the T cell receptor (TCR), we have used cDNAs encoding CD3 zeta, CD3 eta, or both to reconstitute a variant of a cytochrome c-specific, I-Ek-restricted murine T cell hybridoma, termed MA5.8, which lacks CD3 zeta and CD3 eta proteins. We provide direct evidence that assembly and surface expression of TCRs can be mediated by either of these subunits separately or together. However, the level of TCR expression on zeta transfectants is up to one order of magnitude greater than that on eta transfectants, implying that CD3 eta is weakly associated with the pentameric Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon complex and/or inefficient at salvaging the incomplete TCR from lysosomal degradation. As a component of the TCR, the CD3 eta subunit preferentially forms a heterodimer with CD3 zeta, but is also able to form a CD3 eta-eta homodimer. Crosslinking of Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta- zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta, or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta-eta TCR isotypes with anti-CD3 epsilon monoclonal antibody or a cytochrome c peptide epitope on I-Ek antigen-presenting cells mediates signal transduction resulting in reversible cell-cycle arrest of transfected clones. Given the potential for diversity of signals generated by these functional TCR isotypes and the expression of the CD3 eta gene product in the thymus, CD3 eta is likely to play a role in selection and/or activation of thymocytes during development. PMID:2145389

  16. The Three-dimensional Structure of the Eta Carinae Homunculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, W.; Teodoro, M.; Madura, T.I.; Groh, J.H.; Gull, T.R.; Mehner, A.; Corcoran, M.F.; Damineli, A.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate, using the modeling code SHAPE, the three-dimensional structure of the bipolar Homunculus nebula surrounding Eta Carinae as mapped by new ESO VLT/X-Shooter observations of the H2 (lambda) = 2.12125 micrometers emission line. Our results reveal for the first time important deviations from the axisymmetric bipolar morphology: 1) circumpolar trenches in each lobe positioned point-symmetrically from the center and 2) offplanar protrusions in the equatorial region from each lobe at longitudinal (approximately 55 degrees) and latitudinal (10 degrees to 20 degrees) distances from the projected apastron direction of the binary orbit. The angular distance between the protrusions (approximately 110 degrees) is similar to the angular extent of each polar trench (approximately 130 degrees) and nearly equal to the opening angle of the wind-wind collision cavity (approximately 110 degrees). As in previous studies, we confirm a hole near the centre of each polar lobe and no detectable near-IR H2 emission from the thin optical skirt seen prominently in visible imagery. We conclude that the interaction between the outflows and/or radiation from the central binary stars and their orientation in space has had, and possibly still has, a strong influence on the Homunculus. This implies that prevailing theoretical models of the Homunculus are incomplete as most assume a single star origin that produces an axisymmetric nebula.We discuss how the newly found features might be related to the Homunculus ejection, the central binary and the interacting stellar winds.

  17. Eta Carinae: At the Crossroads of becoming a Supernova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1840's, when Eta Carinae's visual magnitude rivaled Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, astronomers have wondered what major event took place. Today with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, with CHANDRA X-ray spectroscopy and the Very Large Telescope spectrographs and interferometers, we have learned that over 12 solar masses of material was ejected at 500 to 700 km/s into interstellar space. This ejecta is quite different from the normal interstellar medium. It is rich in nitrogen, poor in oxygen and carbon. The dust properties are quite peculiar and many metals such as vanadium, strontium, cadmium are seen in both absorption against the central source, plus a number of molecules. The chemical and dust formation is likely dominated by nitrogen as we see H_2, CH, CH+, OH, NH, HCl and NH-3, but no CO. Other metals and molecules are being searched out in the FUSE, HST/STIS, VLT/UVES and VLT/CRIRES spectra. I will describe what we know about the massive binary stellar system, how it changes every 5.54 year in UV and X-ray output and how the massive ejecta responds in this astrophysical laboratory.

  18. CRITICAL DIFFERENCES AND CLUES IN ETA CAR'S 2009 EVENT ,

    SciTech Connect

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Martin, John C.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ferland, Gary J.

    2011-10-20

    We monitored Eta Carinae with the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and Gemini GMOS throughout the 2009 spectroscopic event, which was expected to differ from its predecessor in 2003. Here we report major observed differences between events and their implications. Some of these results were quite unexpected. (1) The UV brightness minimum was much deeper in 2009. This suggests that physical conditions in the early stages of an event depend on different parameters than the 'normal' inter-event wind. Extra mass ejection from the primary star is one possible cause. (2) The expected He II {lambda}4687 brightness maximum was followed several weeks later by another. We explain why this fact and the timing of the {lambda}4687 maxima strongly support a 'shock breakup' hypothesis for X-ray and {lambda}4687 behavior as proposed 5-10 years ago. (3) We observed a polar view of the star via light reflected by dust in the Homunculus nebula. Surprisingly, at that location, the variations of emission-line brightness and Doppler velocities closely resembled a direct view of the star, which should not have been true for any phenomena related to the orbit. This result casts very serious doubt on all the proposed velocity interpretations that depend on the secondary star's orbital motion. (4) Latitude-dependent variations of H I, He I, and Fe II features reveal aspects of wind behavior during the event. In addition, we discuss implications of the observations for several crucial unsolved problems.

  19. The -145 km/s Absorption System of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, G. L.; Gull, T. R.; Danks, A. C.; Johansson, S.

    2002-12-01

    With the STIS E230H mode (R 118,000), we have identified about twenty absorption components in line of sight from Eta Carinae. Two components, one at -513 km/s and another at -145 km/s, are quite different in character from the others, mostly at intermediate velocities (See adjacent posters by T. Gull and A. Danks). The -145 km/s component is significantly wider in fwhm, is seen in many more species, and the lower level can be above 20,000 cm-1, well above the 2000 cm-1 noted in the -513 km/s component. In the spectral region from 2400 to 3160A, approximately 500 absorption lines have been identified. In this poster, we will present line identifications and atomic parameters of the measured lines, hopefully providing insight as to what levels are being excited and by what processes. Observations were accomplished through STScI under proposal 9242 (Danks, P.I.). Funding is through the STIS GTO resources.

  20. Retrospective forecast of ETAS model with daily parameters estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Giuseppe; Murru, Maura; Console, Rodolfo; Marzocchi, Warner; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2016-04-01

    We present a retrospective ETAS (Epidemic Type of Aftershock Sequence) model based on the daily updating of free parameters during the background, the learning and the test phase of a seismic sequence. The idea was born after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The CSEP (Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability) Center in Japan provided an appropriate testing benchmark for the five 1-day submitted models. Of all the models, only one was able to successfully predict the number of events that really happened. This result was verified using both the real time and the revised catalogs. The main cause of the failure was in the underestimation of the forecasted events, due to model parameters maintained fixed during the test. Moreover, the absence in the learning catalog of an event similar to the magnitude of the mainshock (M9.0), which drastically changed the seismicity in the area, made the learning parameters not suitable to describe the real seismicity. As an example of this methodological development we show the evolution of the model parameters during the last two strong seismic sequences in Italy: the 2009 L'Aquila and the 2012 Reggio Emilia episodes. The achievement of the model with daily updated parameters is compared with that of same model where the parameters remain fixed during the test time.

  1. The Persistent Eruption of UGC 2773-OT: finally, a decade-long extragalactic Eta Carinae analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Graham, Melissa L.; Milne, Peter

    2016-02-01

    While supernova (SN) impostors resemble the Great Eruption of η Carinae in the sense that their spectra show narrow H lines and they have typical peak absolute magnitudes of -13 to -14 mag, most extragalactic events observed so far are quite different from η Car in duration. Their bright phases typically last for ˜100 d or less, rather than persisting for several years. The transient object UGC 2773-OT (discovered in 2009) had a similar peak absolute magnitude to other SN impostors, but with a gradual 5-yr pre-discovery rise. In the ˜6 yr since discovery, it has faded very slowly (0.26 mag yr-1). Overall, we suggest that its decade-long eruption is so far the best-known analogue of η Car's 19th century eruption. We discuss extensive spectroscopy of the ongoing eruption. The spectra show interesting changes in velocity and line shape that we discuss in detail, including an asymmetric Hα emission line that we show is consistent with the ejection of a bipolar nebula that could be very much like the Homunculus of η Car. Moreover, changes in the line width, line profile, blue excess emission resembling that of Type IIn SNe, and the intensity of Hα suggest the presence of strong circumstellar interaction in the eruption at late times. This supports the hypothesis that the extended plateau of η Car's eruption may have been powered by shock interaction as well. One interesting difference compared to η Car, however, is that UGC 2773-OT so far does not exhibit the repeated brief spikes in luminosity that have been associated with binary periastron events.

  2. Gas phase fragmentation of eta2 coordinated aldehydes in [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]-: aldehyde structure dictates the nature of the products.

    PubMed

    Waters, Tom; Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2009-09-28

    The gas phase fragmentation reactions of eta2 coordinated aldehydes in [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]-, which have previously been shown to play a role in the catalytic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, were examined using a combination of isotope labelling experiments and collision induced dissociation in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The experimental data were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The types of fragmentation reactions observed depend on the nature of the R group. When R = H, the dominant fragmentation channel involves formation of [VO2H2]-via loss of CO. Minor losses of H2 and CH2O are also observed. When R = Me, loss of H2 is observed to give rise to an ion at m/z 125 corresponding to the formula [V, O3, C2, H2]-. DFT calculations on the [VO2(eta2-OCHR)]- and their CID reaction products have identified minimum energy structures for all reactants and products involved. DFT calculations also provided insights into key intermediates on the potential energy surface associated with these fragmentation reactions, including: [(H2)VO2(CO)]- in the case of R = H; and [HVO2(eta1-OCHCH2)]- in the case of R = Me. The results presented provide insights into potential side reactions occurring during catalysis of alcohols over vanadium oxides, for instance, the over-oxidation of methanol to carbon monoxide. PMID:19727457

  3. Distinct ETA Receptor Binding Mode of Macitentan As Determined by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H.; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ETA receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ETA receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ETA receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ETA receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ETA receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ETA receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that – in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan - macitentan-ETA receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable antagonism. PMID

  4. Effect of Enzyme-Treated Asparagus Extract (ETAS) on Psychological Stress in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Jun; Nakahigashi, Jun; Sato, Atsuya; Waki, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Shogo; Uebaba, Kazuo; Hisajima, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Enzyme-Treated Asparagus Extract (ETAS) on improving stress response. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial was undertaken in healthy volunteers. ETAS (150 mg/d) or a placebo was consumed for 28 d, with a washout period. Psychological parameters were examined using a self-report scale questionnaire and psychological stress was applied using the Uchida-Kraepelin (U-K) test. During the stress load, autonomic nervous function was analyzed. After the stress load, a profile of mood states (POMS) psychological rating was performed, and serum cortisol, plasma catecholamine, salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), and salivary cortisol were analyzed. ETAS intake improved the self-reported rating for the items "Feel tired," "Hard to get up," and "Feel heavy" in the psychological questionnaire; ameliorated the self-reported rating for the items "Depression-Dejection" and "Fatigue" in the POMS questionnaire; and increased salivary sIgA levels after the U-K test. In contrast, serum and salivary cortisol levels, and plasma catecholamine did not change. During the U-K test, ETAS significantly upregulated the sympathetic nerve activity. Furthermore, ETAS intake significantly increased the number of answers and the number of correct answers in the U-K test, suggesting that it might improve office work performance with swiftness and accuracy under stressful conditions. In conclusion, ETAS supplementation reduced feelings of dysphoria and fatigue, ameliorated quality of sleep, and enhanced stress-load performance as well as promoted stress response by increasing salivary sIgA levels. These data suggest ETAS intake may exert beneficial effects, resulting from well-controlled stress management, in healthy individuals. PMID:27465727

  5. Estimating Spatially Variable Parameters of the Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan, Shyam; Ouillon, Guy; Sornette, Didier; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The ETAS model is widely employed to model the spatio-temporal distribution of earthquakes, generally using spatially invariant parameters, which is most likely a gross simplification considering the extremely heterogeneous structure of the Earth's crust. We propose an efficient method for the estimation of spatially varying parameters, using an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and spatial Voronoi tessellations. We assume that each Voronoi cell is characterized by a set of eight constant ETAS parameters. For a given number of randomly distributed cells, Vi=1 to N, we jointly invert the ETAS parameters within each cell using an EM algorithm. This process is progressively repeated several times for a given N (which controls the complexity), which is itself increased incrementally. We use the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) to rank all the inverted models given their likelihood and complexity and select the top 1% models to compute the average model at any location. Using a synthetic catalog, we also check that the proposed method correctly inverts the known parameters. We apply the proposed method to earthquakes (M>=3) included in the ANSS catalog that occurred within the time period 1981-2016 in the spatial polygon defined by RELM/CSEP around California. The results indicate significant spatial variation of the ETAS parameters. Using these spatially variable estimates of ETAS parameters, we are better equipped to answer some important questions: (1) What is the seismic hazard (both long- and short-term) in a given region? (2) What kind of earthquakes dominate triggering? (3) are there regions where earthquakes are most likely preceded by foreshocks? Last but not the least, a possible correlation of the spatially varying ETAS parameters with spatially variable geophysical properties can lead to an improved understanding of the physics of earthquake triggering beside providing physical meaning to the parameters of the purely statistical ETAS model.

  6. Latitude-Dependent Effects in the Stellar Wind of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nathan; Davidson, Kris; Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Hillier, D. John

    2002-01-01

    The Homunculus reflection nebula around eta Carinae provides the rare opportunity to observe the spectrum of a star from more than one direction. In the case of eta Car, the nebula's geometry is known well enough to infer how wind profiles vary with latitude. We present STIS spectra of several positions in the Homunculus, showing directly that eta Car has an aspherical and axisymmetric stellar wind. P Cygni absorption in Balmer lines depends on latitude, with relatively high velocities and strong absorption near the polar axis. Stronger absorption at high latitudes is surprising, and it suggests higher mass flux toward the poles, perhaps resulting from equatorial gravity darkening on a rotating star. Reflected profiles of He I lines are more puzzling, and offer clues to eta Car's wind geometry and ionization structure. During eta Car's high-excitation state in March 2000, the wind had a fast, dense polar wind, with higher ionization at low latitudes. Older STIS data obtained since 1998 reveal that this global stellar-wind geometry changes during eta Car's 5.5 year cycle, and may suggest that this star s spectroscopic events are shell ejections. Whether or not a companion star triggers these outbursts remains ambiguous. The most dramatic changes in the wind occur at low latitudes, while the dense polar wind remains relatively undisturbed during an event. The apparent stability of the polar wind also supports the inferred bipolar geometry. The wind geometry and its variability have critical implications for understanding the 5.5 year cycle and long-term variability, but do not provide a clear alternative to the binary hypothesis for generating eta Car s X-rays.

  7. Gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson and instantons

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.V. |; Zhitnitsky, A.R. |

    1998-02-01

    Motivated by recent CLEO measurements of the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay, we evaluate the gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson using the interacting instanton liquid model of the QCD vacuum. Our main result is {l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 3}f{sup abc}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {nu}{alpha}}{sup b}G{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup c}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}={minus}(2.3{endash}3.3) GeV{sup 2}{times}{l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 2}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}. It is very large due to the strong field of small-size instantons. We show that it provides quantitative explanations of the CLEO data on the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay rate (as well as the inclusive process B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}+X), via a virtual Cabibbo-unsuppressed decay into a {bar c}c pair which then becomes {eta}{sup {prime}}. If so, a significant charm component may be present in other hadrons also: We briefly discuss the contribution of the charmed quark to the {ital polarized} deep-inelastic scattering on a proton. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Protein kinase C{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Protein kinase C-eta (PKC{eta}) is an upstream regulator of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway. {yields} PKC{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. {yields} PKC{eta} regulates NF-{kappa}B by activating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and inducing I{kappa}B degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-{kappa}B in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-{kappa}B regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKC{eta}) regulates NF-{kappa}B upstream signaling by activating the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and the degradation of I{kappa}B. Furthermore, PKC{eta} enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-{kappa}B under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKC{eta} confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKC{eta} is involved in NF-{kappa}B signaling leading to drug resistance.

  9. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  10. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  11. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  12. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  13. The Strontium Filament within the Homunculus of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Hartman, H.; Zethson, T.; Johansson, S.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a series of HST/STIS observations of Eta Carinae and associated ejecta, we noticed a peculiar emission filament located a few arcseconds north of the central source. While bright in nebular standards, it is submerged in a sea of scattered starlight until moderately high dispersion, long-slit spectroscopy with the STIS (R- 8000) brings the emission lines out. The initial spectrum, centered on 6768A with the STIS G750M grating, led to identification of twenty lines from singly-Ionized species including [Sr II], [Fe II], [Ti II], [Ni II], [Mn II], and [Co II] (Zethson, etal., 2001, AJ 122,322). No Balmer emission is detected from this filament and the Fe II 2507,9 lines, known to be pumped by Lyman alpha radiation in other regions near the central source, are not detected. Followup observations have led to detection of hundreds more emission lines from iron group elements in neutral and singly-ionized states. Thus far all are excited by less than 10 eV. This peculiar nebular emission is thought to be due to very intense stellar radiation, stripped of uv flux shortward of Lyman alpha, bathing a neutral structure. We are systematically identifying the many lines (over 90% identified) and measuring line intensities that will then be modeled to determine excitation mechanisms, temperature and density. Two [Sr II] and two Sr II lines have now been measured. Bautista, etal. (in preparation) have modeled the strontium flux ratios and find that large radiation fluxes and/or high strontium abundances may account for the detected emission. These observations were supported by STIS GTO funding and GO funding through the STScI

  14. Eta Carinae and the Homunculus: An Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.

    2006-01-01

    High spatial resolution spectroscopy with HST/STIS between 1998.0 and 2004.2 has provided much exciting information about the central binary system and the physics of its N-rich, C,O-poor ejecta. Stellar He I profiles, noticeably blue-shifted relative to P Cygni H and Fe II line profiles, originate from the ionized wind region between two massive companions. Changes in profiles of He I singlet and triplet lines provide clues to the excitation mechanisms involved as the hot, UV companion moves in its highly eccentric orbit. For 90% of the 5.54-year period, the spectra of nearby Weigelt blobs and the Little Homunculus include highly excited emission lines of Ar, Ne, and Fe. During the few month-long spectroscopic minimum, these systems are deprived of Lyman continuum. Recombination, plus cooling, occurs. In the skirt region between the bipolar Homunculus, a neutral emission region, devoid of hydrogen emission, glows in Ti II, Fe I, Sr II, Sc II, etc. We find the ejecta to have Ti/Ni abundances nearly 100 times solar, not due to nuclear processing, but due to lack of oxygen. Many metals normally tied up in interstellar dust remain in gaseous phase. Much information is being obtained on the physical processes in these warm N-rich gases, whose excitation varies with time in a predictable pattern. Indeed recent GRB high dispersion spectra include signatures of circumGRB warm gases. This indicates that the early, primordial massive stars have warm massive ejecta reminiscent to that around Eta Carinae.

  15. Critical Differences and Clues in Eta Car's 2009 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, Andrea; Davidson, Kris; Martin, John C.; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ferland, Gary J.

    2011-10-01

    We monitored Eta Carinae with the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and Gemini GMOS throughout the 2009 spectroscopic event, which was expected to differ from its predecessor in 2003. Here we report major observed differences between events and their implications. Some of these results were quite unexpected. (1) The UV brightness minimum was much deeper in 2009. This suggests that physical conditions in the early stages of an event depend on different parameters than the "normal" inter-event wind. Extra mass ejection from the primary star is one possible cause. (2) The expected He II λ4687 brightness maximum was followed several weeks later by another. We explain why this fact and the timing of the λ4687 maxima strongly support a "shock breakup" hypothesis for X-ray and λ4687 behavior as proposed 5-10 years ago. (3) We observed a polar view of the star via light reflected by dust in the Homunculus nebula. Surprisingly, at that location, the variations of emission-line brightness and Doppler velocities closely resembled a direct view of the star, which should not have been true for any phenomena related to the orbit. This result casts very serious doubt on all the proposed velocity interpretations that depend on the secondary star's orbital motion. (4) Latitude-dependent variations of H I, He I, and Fe II features reveal aspects of wind behavior during the event. In addition, we discuss implications of the observations for several crucial unsolved problems. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  16. An Improved Statistical Solution for Global Seismicity by the HIST-ETAS Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, A.; Ogata, Y.; Katsura, K.

    2010-12-01

    For long-term global seismic model fitting, recent work by Chu et al. (2010) applied the spatial-temporal ETAS model (Ogata 1998) and analyzed global data partitioned into tectonic zones based on geophysical characteristics (Bird 2003), and it has shown tremendous improvements of model fitting compared with one overall global model. While the ordinary ETAS model assumes constant parameter values across the complete region analyzed, the hierarchical space-time ETAS model (HIST-ETAS, Ogata 2004) is a newly introduced approach by proposing regional distinctions of the parameters for more accurate seismic prediction. As the HIST-ETAS model has been fit to regional data of Japan (Ogata 2010), our work applies the model to describe global seismicity. Employing the Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) as an assessment method, we compare the MLE results with zone divisions considered to results obtained by an overall global model. Location dependent parameters of the model and Gutenberg-Richter b-values are optimized, and seismological interpretations are discussed.

  17. Endothelin ETA receptor antagonist reverses naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal in mice.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Shaifali; Pais, Gwendolyn; Tapia, Melissa; Gulati, Anil

    2015-11-01

    Long-term use of opioids for pain management results in rapid development of tolerance and dependence leading to severe withdrawal symptoms. We have previously demonstrated that endothelin-A (ETA) receptor antagonists potentiate opioid analgesia and eliminate analgesic tolerance. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of central ET mechanisms in opioid withdrawal. The effect of intracerebroventricular administration of ETA receptor antagonist BQ123 on morphine and oxycodone withdrawal was determined in male Swiss Webster mice. Opioid tolerance was induced and withdrawal was precipitated by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Expression of ETA and ETB receptors, nerve growth factor (NGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor was determined in the brain using Western blotting. BQ123 pretreatment reversed hypothermia and weight loss during withdrawal. BQ123 also reduced wet shakes, rearing behavior, and jumping behavior. No changes in expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, ETA receptors, and ETB receptors were observed during withdrawal. NGF expression was unaffected in morphine withdrawal but significantly decreased during oxycodone withdrawal. A decrease in NGF expression in oxycodone- but not in morphine-treated mice could be due to mechanistic differences in oxycodone and morphine. It is concluded that ETA receptor antagonists attenuate opioid-induced withdrawal symptoms.

  18. The DARHT Scattering Wire Spectrometer: Operation and Checkout on ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T J

    2005-03-09

    The DARHT Scattering wire energy spectrometer has been realized and checked out on ETA II. The ETA II beam energy is generally around 5.3 MeV. This value varies from pulse-to-pulse by around 0.5% and from month-to-month by as much as 6%. The energy acceptance of the spectrometer is {+-} 5% and the time response is less than 10 ns. The instrument was calibrated to enable absolute measurements of the ETA II beam energy accurate to {+-}3%. The beam energy in MeV is related to the bending magnetic field B{sub kG} according to E{sub MeV} = 0.511[{radical}(1+347.2B{sub kG}{sup 2}) -1]. The major difficulty encountered was in the development of detectors for the scattered electrons passing through the instrument. Fortunately one detector was fabricated that worked satisfactorily which enabled us to complete the tests on ETA II. The ETA II experiments and initial FXR experiments suggest that spurious X-ray signals will not prove troublesome. No results are yet available in the x-ray environment of DARHT.

  19. Effects of endothelin ETA receptor antagonism on granulocyte and lymphocyte accumulation in LPS-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, André L F; Rae, Giles A; Henriques, Maria das Graças M O

    2004-07-01

    Endothelin peptides play active roles in different aspects of inflammation. This study investigates the contribution of endogenous endothelins to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pulmonary inflammation by assessing the influence of ET(A) receptor antagonism on leukocyte accumulation, granulocyte adhesion molecule expression, and chemokine/cytokine modulation. Local pretreatment with BQ-123 or A-127722 (150 pmol), two selective and chemically unrelated endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonists, inhibits neutrophil and eosinophil accumulation in LPS-induced pleurisy at 24 h but not neutrophil migration at 4 h. The effect of endothelin antagonism on neutrophil accumulation at 24 h was concomitant with inhibition of eosinophil and CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte influx. It is surprising that the ET(A) receptor blockade did not inhibit the accumulation of gammadelta T lymphocytes, cells that are important for granulocyte recruitment in this model. Blockade of ET(A) receptors did not influence the expression of adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD49d) on granulocytes but abrogated the increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha levels 4 h after LPS stimulation and also markedly inhibited increases in levels of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1 but not eotaxin/chemokine ligand 11. Thus, acting via ET(A) receptors, endogenous endothelins play an important role in early cytokine/chemokine production and on granulocyte and lymphocyte mobilization in LPS-induced pleurisy.

  20. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  1. Eta Car: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Nebular and Stellar Confusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.R.; Sonneborn, G.; Jensen, A.G.; Nielsen, K.E.; Vieira Kover, G.; Hillier, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Observations in the far-UV provide a unique opportunity to investigate the very massive star Eta Car and its hot binary companion, Eta Car B. Eta Car was observed with FUSE over a large portion of the 5.54 year spectroscopic period before and after the 2003.5 minimum. The observed spectrum is defined by strong stellar wind signatures, primarily from Eta Car A, complicated by the strong absorptions of the ejecta surrounding Eta Car plus interstellar absorption. The Homunculus and Little Homunculus are massive bipolar ejecta historically associable with LBV outbursts in the 1840s and the 1890s and are linked to absorptions at -513 and -146 km/s, respectively. The FUSE spectra are confused by the extended nebulosity and thermal drifting of the FUSE co-pointed instruments. Interpretation is further complicated by two B-stars sufficiently close to h Car to be included most of the time in the large FUSE aperture. Followup observations partially succeeded in obtaining spectra of at least one of these B-stars through the smaller apertures, allowing potential separation of the B-star contributions and h Car. A complete analysis of all available spectra is currently underway. Our ultimate goals are to directly detect the hot secondary star if possible with FUSE and to identify the absorption contributions to the overall spectrum especially of the stellar members and the massive ejecta.

  2. Evidence for B{yields}K{eta}'{gamma} decays at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Wedd, R.; Barberio, E.; Limosani, A.; Sevior, M. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Urquijo, P.; Adachi, I.; Dalseno, J.; Itoh, R.; Katayama, N.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schuemann, J.; Sumisawa, K.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Uno, S.

    2010-06-01

    We present the results of a search for the radiative decay B{yields}K{eta}{sup '{gamma}} and find evidence for B{sup +{yields}}K{sup +{eta}'{gamma}} decays at the 3.3 standard deviation level with a partial branching fraction of (3.6{+-}1.2{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6}, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. This measurement is restricted to the region of combined K{eta}{sup '} invariant mass less than 3.4 GeV/c{sup 2}. A 90% confidence level upper limit of 6.4x10{sup -6} is obtained for the partial branching fraction of the decay B{sup 0{yields}}K{sup 0{eta}'{gamma}} in the same K{eta}{sup '} invariant mass region. These results are obtained from a 605 fb{sup -1} data sample containing 657x10{sup 6}BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  3. Study of {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -{eta}p} and {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -{eta}{eta}}p at {radical}(s) = 18.9 GeV with the COMPASS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Uman, I.; Schlueter, T.

    2010-08-05

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN studies diffractively produced states in the light quark sector with unprecedented statistics. The observation of f{sub 0}(1500)/f{sub 2}'(1525) decaying to {eta}{eta} in 2008 data with incoming negative pion beam at 190 GeV/c poses the question whether it is produced centrally or formed by the decay of a heavier diffractively produced {pi}{sub 1}(1800)/{pi}{sub 2}(1880). To decide, a dedicated amplitude analysis which includes different production mechanisms is formulated and compared with one which was used to fit centrally produced resonances including f{sub 0}(1500) by the WA102 experiment. Unbinned mass-dependent log-likelihood fitting methods may serve to solve the ambiguities which are present in binned, mass-independent partial wave analyses.

  4. The ISAC post-accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Marchetto, M.

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration chain of the ISAC facility boosts the energy of both radioactive and stable light and heavy ions for beam delivery to both a medium energy area in ISAC-I and a high energy area in ISAC-II. The post-accelerator comprises a 35.4 MHz RFQ to accelerate beams of A/q ≤ 30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 106.1 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of A/q ≤ 6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. A 40 MV superconducting linac further accelerates beam from 1.5 MeV/u to energies above the Coulomb barrier. All linacs operate cw to preserve beam intensity.

  5. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  6. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  7. Study of {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system produced on the VES setup

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabchikov, D.; Bugg, D

    1998-05-29

    The results of the Partial Wave Analysis of the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n are presented. The low-t sample is dominated by states, having OPE quantum numbers: 1{sup --},3{sup --},...,2{sup ++},4{sup ++},... . The most intensive wave is J{sup PC}=1{sup --}{rho}(770){eta}. The waves 3{sup --}{rho}(770){eta} and a{sub 2}(1320){pi} show the decay of {rho}{sub 3}(1690) meson, accompanied by further higher-mass resonances. The AX, f{sub 2}(1565), is observed decaying to [a{sub 2}(1320){pi}]{sub L=1}. In high-t sample the peak near 1.28 GeV consists of J{sup PC}=1{sup ++} and 0{sup -+} waves, while the peak near 1.40 GeV is completely 0{sup -+}.

  8. Enzyme-treated Asparagus officinalis extract shows neuroprotective effects and attenuates cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takuya; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Arai, Takashi; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Kizaki, Takako; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Akagawa, Kimio; Ishida, Hitoshi; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Increases in the number of patients with dementia involving Alzheimer's disease (AD) are seen as a grave public health problem. In neurodegenerative disorders involving AD, biological stresses, such as oxidative and inflammatory stress, induce neural cell damage. Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a popular vegetable, and an extract prepared from this reportedly possesses various beneficial biological activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) on neuronal cells and early cognitive impairment of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. The expression of mRNAs for factors that exert cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic functions, such as heat-shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1, was upregulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells by treatment with ETAS. Moreover, when release of lactate dehydrogenase from damaged NG108-15 cells was increased for cells cultured in medium containing either the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside or the hypoxia mimic reagent cobalt chloride, ETAS significantly attenuated this cell damage. Also, when contextual fear memory, which is considered to be a hippocampus-dependent memory, was significantly impaired in SAMP8 mice, ETAS attenuated the cognitive impairment. These results suggest that ETAS produces cytoprotective effects in neuronal cells and attenuates the effects on the cognitive impairment of SAMP8 mice.

  9. Enzyme-treated Asparagus officinalis extract shows neuroprotective effects and attenuates cognitive impairment in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takuya; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Arai, Takashi; Ogasawara, Junetsu; Kizaki, Takako; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Akagawa, Kimio; Ishida, Hitoshi; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Increases in the number of patients with dementia involving Alzheimer's disease (AD) are seen as a grave public health problem. In neurodegenerative disorders involving AD, biological stresses, such as oxidative and inflammatory stress, induce neural cell damage. Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a popular vegetable, and an extract prepared from this reportedly possesses various beneficial biological activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) on neuronal cells and early cognitive impairment of senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. The expression of mRNAs for factors that exert cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic functions, such as heat-shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1, was upregulated in NG108-15 neuronal cells by treatment with ETAS. Moreover, when release of lactate dehydrogenase from damaged NG108-15 cells was increased for cells cultured in medium containing either the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside or the hypoxia mimic reagent cobalt chloride, ETAS significantly attenuated this cell damage. Also, when contextual fear memory, which is considered to be a hippocampus-dependent memory, was significantly impaired in SAMP8 mice, ETAS attenuated the cognitive impairment. These results suggest that ETAS produces cytoprotective effects in neuronal cells and attenuates the effects on the cognitive impairment of SAMP8 mice. PMID:24660475

  10. Characterization of three non-peptide endothelin receptor ligands using human cloned ETA and ETB receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, K. W.; Alldus, C.; Christodoulou, C.; Clark, K. L.; Dykes, C. W.; Sumner, M. J.; Wallace, D. M.; White, D. G.; Watts, I. S.

    1994-01-01

    1. A number of putative endothelin (ET) receptor ligands were synthesized with a view to assessing their relative affinity for human recombinant ET receptors. 2. Human (h) and endothelin ETA and ETB receptor open reading frames were cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction into the mammalian expression vector pcDNA1 and stable cell lines were created by transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells. 3. Scatchard analyses of saturation isotherms for the specific binding of [125I]-endothelin-1 ([125I]-ET-1) to membranes, prepared from Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with hETA or hETB receptors, yielded values for equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 20.5 +/- 1.8 pM and 25.5 +/- 5.5 pM, respectively. Hill coefficients did not differ significantly from unity, suggesting binding to homogeneous, non-interacting receptor populations. 4. Pharmacological characterization of the transfected hETA and hETB receptors was undertaken by measuring the relative abilities of ETA and ETB receptor-selective peptide ligands to inhibit binding of [125I]ET-1. For interaction with hETA receptors, the relative order of potency was ET-1 > ET-3 = FR139317 = BQ123 >[Ala1,3,11,15]-ET-1 = sarafotoxin S6c (S6c). In contrast, the relative order of potency, at hETB receptors, was ET-1 = ET-3 = [Ala1,3,11,15]-ET-1 = S6c >> FR139317 = BQ123. 5. The novel non-peptide ligands, Ro 46-2005, SB 209670 and BMS 182874, were found to inhibit [125I]-ET-1 binding to human recombinant ETA and ETB receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952888

  11. Distinct ETA receptor binding mode of macitentan as determined by site directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Bur, Daniel; Bolli, Martin H; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The competitive endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) bosentan and ambrisentan, which have long been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, are characterized by very short (1 min) occupancy half-lives at the ET(A) receptor. The novel ERA macitentan, displays a 20-fold increased receptor occupancy half-life, causing insurmountable antagonism of ET-1-induced signaling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We show here that the slow ET(A) receptor dissociation rate of macitentan was shared with a set of structural analogs, whereas compounds structurally related to bosentan displayed fast dissociation kinetics. NMR analysis showed that macitentan adopts a compact structure in aqueous solution and molecular modeling suggests that this conformation tightly fits into a well-defined ET(A) receptor binding pocket. In contrast the structurally different and negatively charged bosentan-type molecules only partially filled this pocket and expanded into an extended endothelin binding site. To further investigate these different ET(A) receptor-antagonist interaction modes, we performed functional studies using ET(A) receptor variants harboring amino acid point mutations in the presumed ERA interaction site. Three ET(A) receptor residues significantly and differentially affected ERA activity: Mutation R326Q did not affect the antagonist activity of macitentan, however the potencies of bosentan and ambrisentan were significantly reduced; mutation L322A rendered macitentan less potent, whereas bosentan and ambrisentan were unaffected; mutation I355A significantly reduced bosentan potency, but not ambrisentan and macitentan potencies. This suggests that--in contrast to bosentan and ambrisentan--macitentan-ET(A) receptor binding is not dependent on strong charge-charge interactions, but depends predominantly on hydrophobic interactions. This different binding mode could be the reason for macitentan's sustained target occupancy and insurmountable

  12. NUV Spectroscopic Studies of Eta Car's Weigelt D across the 2003.5 Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K. E.; Gull, T. R.; Hillier, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    HST/STIS high dispersion, high spatial resolution spectra in the near UV (2424-2705A) were recorded of Weigelt D, located 0.25" from Eta Carinae, before, during and after the star's 2003.5 minimum. Most nebular emission, including Lyman-alpha pumped Fe II and [Fe III] lines show phase dependent variations with disappearance at the minimum and reappearance a few months later. Circumstellar absorptions increase at minimum, especially in the Fe II resonance lines originating not only from ground levels but also meta stable levels well above the ground levels. These ionization/excitation effects can be explained by a sudden change in UV flux reaching the blobs, likely due to a line-of-sight obscuration of the hotter companion star, Eta Car B, recently discovered by Iping et al. (poster, this meeting). The scattered starlight seen towards Weigelt D display noticeable different line profiles than the direct starlight from Eta Carinae. P-Cygni absorption profiles in Fe II stellar lines observed directly towards Eta Carinae, show terminal velocities up to -550 km/s. However, scattered starlight of Weigelt D display significant lower velocities ranging from -40 to -150 km/s.We interpret this result to be indicative that no absorbing Fe II wind structure exists between the Central source and Weigelt D. The lower velocity absorption appears to be connected to the outer Fe II wind structure of Eta Car A extending beyond Weigelt D intersecting the observer's line of sight. This result is consistent with the highly extended wind of Eta Car A.

  13. Molecules and Dust in the Humunculus: Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the 18401s, Eta Carinae ejected massive amounts of nitrogen-rich, carbon- and oxygen-poor material which we see as the hourglass-shaped Homunculus. With the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, we detected multiple shells in line of sight, the most massive and intriguing being at -513 km/s. Numerous lines of Fe I, Fe II, Ni II, Cr II, Sc II, Sr II, Ti II, V II, etc are identified as well as nearly a thousand H2 lines. The metals have energy level populations consistent with 760K and excited by photons < 8.5eV. We have now identified CH, CH+, OH, and NH at the same velocity, but at 60K, suggesting stratification in the outer ejecta. Analysis of the interior, photoionized emission hourglass structure, known as the Little Homunculus, indicates He, N overabundances and C, 0 underabundances (approximately 1/80 solar). A skirt of neutral and partially ionized gas lies between the lobes of the hourglasses. A portion is seen as the Strontium Filament, a metal- ionized, neutral hydrogen structure. Relative abundances of TiNi are 1/80 solar, CrNi are 1/20 solar. This complex of ejecta appears to have been ejected by a massive star(s) at the end of the hydrogen-burning phase when convection led to overproduction of nitrogen at the expense of carbon and oxygen. Given the underabundances of carbon and oxygen, the chemistry of this system is quite different to the normal ISM, leading to a nitrogen- dominated chemistry. What little C and 0 that is formed is immediately taken up by SiO and Al0 molecules leading to a very different gas/dust ratio than the normal ISM. Dust in this ejecta is abundance, but known to be very grey in character. Observations with HST/STIS and VLT/UVES will be presented along with simple physical models and CLOUD modeling. Insight by the participants will be solicited.

  14. Enantiocontrolled synthesis of highly functionalized tropanes via [5 + 2] cycloaddition to eta(3)-pyridinylmolybdenum pi-complexes.

    PubMed

    Malinakova, H C; Liebeskind, L S

    2000-11-30

    [reaction: see text] A chiral, nonracemic eta(3)-pyridinyl scaffold participates in [5 + 2] cycloaddition with electron-deficient alkenes, an allene, and an alkyne to give eta(3)-allylmolybdenum bicyclic adducts. The adducts can be demetalated, providing a convergent route to highly functionalized tropanes. High enantiocontrol can be achieved throughout the cycloaddition and demetalation sequence.

  15. New [Mo(eta3-allyl)(CO)2L3]+ complexes with monodentate or tridentate nitrogen-donor ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Julio; Morales, Dolores; Nieto, Sonia; Riera, Lucía; Riera, Víctor; Miguel, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Cationic complexes [Mo(eta(3)-allyl)(CO)2L3]+ (L3 = either nitrogen-donor tridentate ligand or three monodentate ligands) were prepared in high yield and under mild conditions using as precursors either the triflato complex [Mo(eta(3)-allyl)(OTf)(CO)2(NCMe)2] or the combination of the chloro complex [Mo(eta(3)-allyl)Cl(CO)2(NCMe)2] and the salt NaBAr'(4)(Ar'= 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl). The tridentate ligands employed were 2,2':6',2'-terpyridine (terpy) and cis,cis-1,3,5-cyclohexanetriamine (CHTA), whereas the monodentate ligands imidazole (im) and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (dmpz) were chosen. In order to stabilize the labile intermediates, an excess of acetonitrile was used in most of the syntheses. However, the pyrazole complex was prepared through a nitrile-free route to avoid reactions at the coordinated nitrile. The solid state structures of [Mo(eta(3)-methallyl)(CO)2(terpy)]OTf (2), [Mo(eta(3)-methallyl)(CO)2(CHTA)]BAr'4 (3), [Mo(eta(3)-methallyl)(CO)2(NCMe)3]BAr'4 (4), [Mo(eta(3)-allyl)(CO)2(im)3]OTf (5) and [Mo(eta(3)-allyl)(CO)2(dmpz)3]BAr'4 (6) were determined by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction. PMID:15726140

  16. Mapping and Modeling the Extended Winds of the Massive Interacting Binary, Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Ted

    2010-01-01

    The combination HST/STIS high spatial and moderate spectral resolutions have revealed the massive interacting wind structure of Eta Carinae by forbidden lines of singly and doubly ionized elements. Throughout the 5.54-year period, lines of Fe++, Ne++, Ar++, S++ and N+ reveal the interacting wind structures, near critical electron densities of 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 7)cu cm, photoionized by the hot secondary, Eta Car B, Lines of Fe+ and Ni+ trace the denser (>10(exp 7)cu cm. less-ionized (< 8 eV) primary wind of Eta Car A as it wraps around the interacting binary stars. For 5 years of the 5.54 year period, the FUV radiation from Eta Car B escapes the orbital region, ionizing the boundaries of the expanding wind structures. But for three to six months, Eta Car B plunges into the primary wind approaching to within 1 to 2 AU, leading to cutoff of FUV and X-ray fluxes. The interacting wind structure, resolved out to 0.8", drops io ionization and then rebuilds as Eta Car B emerges from the primary wind envelope. Solid Particle Hydrodynamical(SPH) models have been developed extending out to 2000 AU and adapted to include FUV radiation effects of the winds. In turn, synthetic spectroimages of selected forbidden lines have been constructed and compared to the spectroimages recorded by the HST/STIS throughout 1998.0 to 2004.3, extending across the 1998 and 2003.5 minima. By this method, we show that the orbital axis of the binary system must bc within 15 degrees of the Homunculus axis of symmetry and that periastron occurs with Eta Car B passing on the far side of Eta Car B. This result ties the current binary orbit with the bipolar ejection with intervening skirt and leads to implications that the binary system influenced the mass ejection of the l840s and the lesser ejection of the 1890s.

  17. Search for bound states of the eta-meson in light nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrien, R. E.; Bart, S.; Pile, P.; Sutter, R.; Tsoupas, N.; Funsten, H. O.; Finn, J. M.; Lyndon, C.; Punjabi, V.; Perdrisat, C. F.

    1988-01-01

    A search for nuclear-bound states of the eta meson was carried out. Targets of lithium, carbon, oxygen, and aluminum were placed in a pion(+) beam at 800 MeV/c. A predicted eta bound state in O-15* (E sub x approx. = 540 MeV) with a width of approx. 9 MeV was not observed. A bound state of a size 1/3 of the predicted cross section would have been seen in this experiment at a confidence level of 3sigma (P is greater than 0.9987).

  18. Preliminary results for the helicity asymmetry E for eta photoproduction on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    B. T. Morrison, M. Dugger, B. G. Ritchie, CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    Polarization observables are an important tool for clarifying the nucleon resonance spectrum. No previous measurements for double polarization asymmetries have been published for eta photoproduction. Double polarization measurements have been made at Jefferson Lab using a polarized photon beam and protons in a polarized frozen spin target (FROST). Data were taken during the first running period of FROST using the CLAS detector with photon energies from 0.33 to 2.35 GeV. Preliminary results for the E polarization observable for eta meson photoproduction from the proton at threshold and above, along with comparisons to several theoretical predictions are presented.

  19. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  20. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  1. Measurement of the B -> Omega l Nu and B -> Eta l Nu Branching Fractions Using Neutrino Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, Vincent; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-09-09

    The authors present a study of the charmless semileptonic B-meson decays B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}. The analysis is based on 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The {omega} mesons are reconstructed in the channel {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and the {eta} mesons in the channels {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.16{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.31 {+-} 0.06{sub stat} {+-} 0.08{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}.

  2. Measurements of B to {pi, eta, eta'} l nu Branching Fractions andDetermination of |Vub| with Semileptonically Tagged B Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Frascati /Frascati /Rome U. /Frascati /Frascati /Rome U. /Frascati /Frascati /Rome U. /Frascati /Frascati /Rome U. /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-06-02

    The authors report measurements of branching fractions for the decays B {yields} P{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where P are the pseudoscalar charmless mesons {pi}{sup -}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{prime}, based on 348 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector, using B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons found in the recoil of a second B meson decaying as B {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}. Assuming isospin symmetry, they combine pionic branching fractions to obtain {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {ell}{sup +} {nu}{sub {ell}}) = (1.54 {+-} 0.17{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.09{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}; they find 3.2{sigma} evidence of the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} and measure its branching fraction to be (0.64 {+-} 0.20{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.3{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}, and determine {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) < 0.47 x 10{sup -4} to 90% confidence level. Using partial branching fractions for the pionic decays in ranges of the momentum transfer and a recent form factor calculation, they obtain the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub ub}| = (4.0 {+-} 0.5{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.2{sub (syst){sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}(theory)}) x 10{sup -3}.

  3. PERFORMANCE AND DIAGNOSTIC EVALUATION OF OZONE PREDICTIONS BY THE ETA-COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM DURING THE 2002 NEW ENGLAND AIR QUALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A real-time air quality forecasting system (Eta-CMAQ model suite) has been developed by linking the NCEP Eta model to the U.S. EPA CMAQ model. This work presents results from the application of the Eta-CMAQ modeling system for forecasting O3 over the northeastern U.S d...

  4. Branching ratios and CP asymmetries of B{yields}K{eta}{sup (')} decays in the perturbative QCD approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Zhenjun; Zhang Zhiqing; Liu Xin; Guo Libo

    2008-12-01

    We calculate the branching ratios and CP-violating asymmetries of the four B{yields}K{eta}{sup (')} decays in the perturbative QCD (pQCD) factorization approach. Besides the full leading-order contributions, the partial next-to-leading-order (NLO) contributions from the QCD vertex corrections, the quark-loops, and the chromomagnetic penguins are also taken into account. The NLO pQCD predictions for the CP-averaged branching ratios are Br(B{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{eta}){approx_equal}3.2x10{sup -6}, Br(B{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sup {+-}}{eta}{sup '}){approx_equal}51.0x10{sup -6}, Br(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}{eta}){approx_equal}2.1x10{sup -6}, and Br(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx_equal}50.3x10{sup -6}. The NLO contributions can provide a 70% enhancement to the LO Br(B{yields}K{eta}{sup '}), but a 30% reduction to the LO Br(B{yields}K{eta}), which play the key role in understanding the observed pattern of branching ratios. The NLO pQCD predictions for the CP-violating asymmetries, such as A{sub CP}{sup dir}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx}2.3% and A{sub CP}{sup mix}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '}){approx}63%, agree very well with currently available data. This means that the deviation {delta}S=A{sub CP}{sup mix}(K{sub S}{sup 0}{eta}{sup '})-sin2{beta} in pQCD approach is also very small.

  5. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: The SimpleX Radiative Transfer Algorithm Applied to 3D SPH Simulations of Eta Car's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-04-01

    At the heart of the spectacular bipolar Homunculus nebula lies an extremely luminous (5*10^6 L_sun) colliding wind binary with a highly eccentric (e ~ 0.9), 5.54-year orbit and a total mass ~ 110 M_sun. Our closest (D ~ 2.3 kpc) and best example of a pre-hypernova environment, Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions, stellar wind-wind collisions, and massive star evolution. In order to improve our knowledge of the system, we need to generate synthetic observations and compare them with the already available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer post-processing of 3D SPH hydrodynamical simulations of the interacting winds of Eta Carinae. We use SimpleX algorithm to obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, this results in ionization maps of both species that constrain the regions where these lines can form. These results will allow us to put constraints on the number of ionizing photons coming from the companion. This construction of synthetic observations allows us to obtain insight into the highly complex 3D flows in Eta, from the shape of the ionized volume and its resulting optical/spectral appearance.

  6. Measurements of B --> {pi,eta,eta;{'}}lnu_{l} branching fractions and determination of |V_{ub}| with semileptonically tagged B mesons.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-08-22

    We report measurements of branching fractions for the decays B-->Plnu_{l}, where P are the pseudoscalar charmless mesons pi;{-}, pi;{0}, eta and eta;{'}, based on 348 fb;{-1} of data collected with the BABAR detector, using B0 and B+ mesons found in the recoil of a second B meson decaying as B-->D;{(*)}lnu_{l}. Assuming isospin symmetry, we combine pionic branching fractions to obtain B(B;{0}-->pi;{-}l;{+}nu_{l})=(1.54+/-0.17_{(stat)}+/-0.09_{(syst)})x10;{-4}; we find 3.2sigma evidence of the decay B;{+}-->etal;{+}nu_{l} and measure its branching fraction to be (0.64+/-0.20_{(stat)}+/-0.03_{(syst)})x10;{-4}, and determine B(B;{+}-->eta;{'}l;{+}nu_{l})<0.47x10;{-4} to 90% confidence level. Using partial branching fractions for the pionic decays in ranges of the momentum transfer and a variety of form factor calculation, we obtain values of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V_{ub}| in ranging from 3.6x10;{-3} to 4.1x10;{-3}. PMID:18764602

  7. Synthesis of hydride and alkyl compounds containing the Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-allyl) fragment. Crystal structures of Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 8]H[sub 13])Br[sub 2] and [Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Me(H[sub 2]O)][BF[sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mui, H.D.; Brumaghim, J.L.; Gross, C.L.; Girolami, G.S. . School of Chemical Sciences)

    1999-08-16

    Treatment of Cp*[sub 2]Os[sub 2]Br[sub 4] with 3-bromo-2-methylpropene or 1,3-cyclooctadiene affords the 2-methylpropenyl and cyclooctenyl products Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Br[sub 2] and Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 8]H[sub 13])Br[sub 2], respectively. The monoalkyl complexes Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])MeBr and Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])(CH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3])-Br can be generated by treating Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Br[sub 2] with MgMe[sub 2] or LiCH[sub 2]SiMe[sub 3]. The dimethyl complex Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Me[sub 2] can be synthesized from Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Br[sub 2] by addition of methyllithium. In contrast, addition of ethyllithium to Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Br[sub 2] yields the ethylene complex Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])([eta][sup 2]-C[sub 2]H[sub 4]) and a small amount of Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])H[sub 2]. The latter dihydride can be synthesized in better yield by treating Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Br[sub 2] with LiAlH[sub 4]. When the dimethyl complex Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Me[sub 2] is protonated with HBF[sub 4] in the presence of H[sub 2]O the aqua complex [Cp*Os([eta][sup 3]-C[sub 4]H[sub 7])Me(H[sub 2]O)][BF[sub 4

  8. Synthesis of hydride and alkyl compounds containing the Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-allyl) fragment. Crystal structures of Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 8}H{sub 13})Br{sub 2} and [Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Me(H{sub 2}O)][BF{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Mui, H.D.; Brumaghim, J.L.; Gross, C.L.; Girolami, G.S.

    1999-08-16

    Treatment of Cp*{sub 2}Os{sub 2}Br{sub 4} with 3-bromo-2-methylpropene or 1,3-cyclooctadiene affords the 2-methylpropenyl and cyclooctenyl products Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Br{sub 2} and Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 8}H{sub 13})Br{sub 2}, respectively. The monoalkyl complexes Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})MeBr and Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})(CH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3})-Br can be generated by treating Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Br{sub 2} with MgMe{sub 2} or LiCH{sub 2}SiMe{sub 3}. The dimethyl complex Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Me{sub 2} can be synthesized from Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Br{sub 2} by addition of methyllithium. In contrast, addition of ethyllithium to Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Br{sub 2} yields the ethylene complex Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and a small amount of Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})H{sub 2}. The latter dihydride can be synthesized in better yield by treating Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Br{sub 2} with LiAlH{sub 4}. When the dimethyl complex Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Me{sub 2} is protonated with HBF{sub 4} in the presence of H{sub 2}O the aqua complex [Cp*Os({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 4}H{sub 7})Me(H{sub 2}O)][BF{sub 4}] is formed.

  9. Vector performance analysis of three supercomputers - Cray-2, Cray Y-MP, and ETA10-Q

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatoohi, Rod A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of experiments to study the single-processor performance of three supercomputers: Cray-2, Cray Y-MP, and ETA10-Q. The main object of this study is to determine the impact of certain architectural features on the performance of modern supercomputers. Features such as clock period, memory links, memory organization, multiple functional units, and chaining are considered. A simple performance model is used to examine the impact of these features on the performance of a set of basic operations. The results of implementing this set on these machines for three vector lengths and three memory strides are presented and compared. For unit stride operations, the Cray Y-MP outperformed the Cray-2 by as much as three times and the ETA10-Q by as much as four times for these operations. Moreover, unlike the Cray-2 and ETA10-Q, even-numbered strides do not cause a major performance degradation on the Cray Y-MP. Two numerical algorithms are also used for comparison. For three problem sizes of both algorithms, the Cray Y-MP outperformed the Cray-2 by 43 percent to 68 percent and the ETA10-Q by four to eight times.

  10. The X-ray Lightcurve of Eta Carinae, 1996-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Liburd, Jamar; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Pollock, A.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2015-01-01

    Eta Carinae is the nearest example of a supermassive, superluminous, unstable star. Mass loss from the system is important in shaping its circumstellar medium and in determining the ultimate fate of the star. Eta Car loses mass via a dense, slow stellar wind and possesses one of the largest mass loss rates known. It is prone to episodes of extreme mass ejection via eruptions from some as-yet unspecified cause; the best examples of this are the large-scale eruptions which occurred in the mid-19th century, and then again about 50 years later. Eta Car is a colliding wind binary in which strong variations in X-ray emission and in other wavebands are driven by the violent collision of the wind of Eta Car and the fast, less dense wind of an otherwise hidden companion star. X-ray variations are the simplest diagnostic we have to study the wind-wind collision and allow us to measure the state of the stellar mass loss from both stars. We present the X-ray lightcurve over the last 20 years from monitoring observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and the X-ray Telescope on the Swift satellite, and compare and contrast the behavior of the X-ray emission from the system over that timespan, including surprising variations during the 2014 X-ray minimum.

  11. THE EMISSION PROCESSING SYSTEM FOR THE ETA/CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA and EPA have created an Air Quality Forecast (AQF) system. This AQF system links an adaptation of the EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality Model with the 12 kilometer ETA model running operationally at NOAA's National Center for Environmental Predication (NCEP). One of th...

  12. Eta(') mass and chiral symmetry breaking at large N(c) and N(f).

    PubMed

    Girlanda, L; Stern, J; Talavera, P

    2001-06-25

    We propose a method for implementing the large- N(c), large-N(f) limit of QCD at the effective Lagrangian level. Depending on the value of the ratio N(f)/N(c), different patterns of chiral symmetry breaking can arise, leading in particular to different behaviors of the eta(') mass in the combined large-N limit. PMID:11415379

  13. 76 FR 386 - Proposed Information Collection Request for the ETA 586, Interstate Arrangement for Combining...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Information Collection Request for the ETA 586, Interstate Arrangement for Combining Employment and Wages... requested data can be provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is... comments concerning the proposed extension of the report for the Interstate Arrangement for...

  14. Evaluation of the 29-km Eta Model for Weather Support to the United States Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manobianco, John; Nutter, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) conducted a year-long evaluation of NCEP's 29-km mesoscale Eta (meso-eta) weather prediction model in order to identify added value to forecast operations in support of the United States space program. The evaluation was stratified over warm and cool seasons and considered both objective and subjective verification methodologies. Objective verification results generally indicate that meso-eta model point forecasts at selected stations exhibit minimal error growth in terms of RMS errors and are reasonably unbiased. Conversely, results from the subjective verification demonstrate that model forecasts of developing weather events such as thunderstorms, sea breezes, and cold fronts, are not always as accurate as implied by the seasonal error statistics. Sea-breeze case studies reveal that the model generates a dynamically-consistent thermally direct circulation over the Florida peninsula, although at a larger scale than observed. Thunderstorm verification reveals that the meso-eta model is capable of predicting areas of organized convection, particularly during the late afternoon hours but is not capable of forecasting individual thunderstorms. Verification of cold fronts during the cool season reveals that the model is capable of forecasting a majority of cold frontal passages through east central Florida to within +1-h of observed frontal passage.

  15. Eta(') mass and chiral symmetry breaking at large N(c) and N(f).

    PubMed

    Girlanda, L; Stern, J; Talavera, P

    2001-06-25

    We propose a method for implementing the large- N(c), large-N(f) limit of QCD at the effective Lagrangian level. Depending on the value of the ratio N(f)/N(c), different patterns of chiral symmetry breaking can arise, leading in particular to different behaviors of the eta(') mass in the combined large-N limit.

  16. Coupled-channels study of the {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}n process

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, J.; Saghai, B.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Sato, T.

    2008-08-15

    The reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}n is investigated within a dynamical coupled-channels model of meson production reactions in the nucleon resonance region. The meson baryon channels included are {pi}N,{eta}N,{pi}{delta},{sigma}N, and {rho}N. The nonresonant meson-baryon interactions of the model are derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method. One or two excited nucleon states in each of S,P,D, and F partial waves are included to generate the resonant amplitudes. Data of the {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}n reaction from threshold up to a total center-of-mass energy of about 2 GeV are satisfactorily reproduced and the roles played by the following nine nucleon resonances are investigated: S{sub 11}(1535),S{sub 11}(1650),P{sub 11}(1440),P{sub 11}(1710),P{sub 13}(1720),D{sub 13}(1520),D{sub 13}(1700),D{sub 15} (1675), and F{sub 15}(1680). The reaction mechanism and the predicted {eta}N scattering length are discussed.

  17. 78 FR 48463 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Form ETA 9033, Attestation by Employers Using...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ..., Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers for Longshore Activities in U.S. Ports and Form ETA 9033-A, Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers for Longshore Activities in the State of Alaska; Extension... Attestation by Employers Using Alien Crewmembers for Longshore Activities in U.S. Ports (OMB Control...

  18. APPLICATION OF BIAS AND ADJUSTMENT TECHNIQUES TO THE ETA-CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current air quality forecast system, based on linking NOAA's Eta meteorological model with EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, consistently overpredicts surface ozone concentrations, but simulates its day-to-day variability quite well. The ability of bias cor...

  19. Studies of {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} at BABAR and a search for a second-class current

    SciTech Connect

    Amo Sanchez, P. del; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.

    2011-02-01

    We report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.42{+-}0.11(stat){+-}0.07(syst))x10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})<9.9x10{sup -5}.

  20. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  1. FINDING {eta} CAR ANALOGS IN NEARBY GALAXIES USING SPITZER. I. CANDIDATE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Rubab; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S. E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2013-04-10

    The late-stage evolution of the most massive stars such as {eta} Carinae is controlled by the effects of mass loss, which may be dominated by poorly understood eruptive mass ejections. Understanding this population is challenging because no true analogs of {eta} Car have been clearly identified in the Milky Way or other galaxies. We utilize Spitzer IRAC images of seven nearby ({approx}< 4 Mpc) galaxies to search for such analogs. We find 34 candidates with a flat or rising mid-IR spectral energy distributions toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths that emit >10{sup 5} L{sub Sun} in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8.0 {mu}m) and are not known to be background sources. Based on our estimates for the expected number of background sources, we expect that follow-up observations will show that most of these candidates are not dust enshrouded massive stars, with an expectation of only 6 {+-} 6 surviving candidates. Since we would detect true analogs of {eta} Car for roughly 200 years post-eruption, this implies that the rate of eruptions like {eta} Car is less than the core-collapse supernova rate. It is possible, however, that every M > 40 M{sub Sun} star undergoes such eruptions given our initial results. In Paper II we will characterize the candidates through further analysis and follow-up observations, and there is no barrier to increasing the galaxy sample by an order of magnitude. The primary limitation of the present search is that Spitzer's resolution limits us to the shorter wavelength IRAC bands. With the James Webb Space Telescope, such surveys can be carried out at the far more optimal wavelengths of 10-30 {mu}m, allowing identification of {eta} Car analogs for millennia rather than centuries post-eruption.

  2. A Nonparametric Bayesian Approach to Seismic Hazard Modeling Using the ETAS Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, G.

    2015-12-01

    The epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model is one of the most popular tools for modeling seismicity and quantifying risk in earthquake-prone regions. Under the ETAS model, the occurrence times of earthquakes are treated as a self-exciting Poisson process where each earthquake briefly increases the probability of subsequent earthquakes occurring soon afterwards, which captures the fact that large mainshocks tend to produce long sequences of aftershocks. A triggering kernel controls the amount by which the probability increases based on the magnitude of each earthquake, and the rate at which it then decays over time. This triggering kernel is usually chosen heuristically, to match the parametric form of the modified Omori law for aftershock decay. However recent work has questioned whether this is an appropriate choice. Since the choice of kernel has a large impact on the predictions made by the ETAS model, avoiding misspecification is crucially important. We present a novel nonparametric version of ETAS which avoids making parametric assumptions, and instead learns the correct specification from the data itself. Our approach is based on the Dirichlet process, which is a modern class of Bayesian prior distribution which allows for efficient inference over an infinite dimensional space of functions. We show how our nonparametric ETAS model can be fit to data, and present results demonstrating that the fit is greatly improved compared to the standard parametric specification. Additionally, we explain how our model can be used to perform probabilistic declustering of earthquake catalogs, to classify earthquakes as being either aftershocks or mainshocks. and to learn the causal relations between pairs of earthquakes.

  3. Exploring and Modeling High-excitation Emission in the Ejecta and the Wind of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, Andrea

    Eta Carinae is the most massive, most luminous star in our region of the Galaxy. It is an evolved massive star and therefore provides many clues to the fate of the most massive stars. In the 1840s its unstable nature culminated in the Great Eruption when it briefly became the second brightest star in the sky and ejected more than ten solar masses, which today enshroud the surviving star as a bipolar nebula. Every 5.54 years Eta Car's photometry and spectra show dramatic changes which last for several months. Combining data from HST/STIS, Gemini-S/GMOS, and VLT/UVES from 1998 to 2010, I analyzed two spectroscopic cycles. Observations with a variety of different slit position angles made it possible to map the emission across the nebula and the complex outer ejecta of Eta Car permit to observe the star at different stellar latitudes via reflected light. The spectroscopic cycles are thought to be regulated by a hot companion star and therefore give us information to the nature and orbit of the stars hidden behind Eta Car's opaque wind. The observations, covering more than 10 years, made it also possible to observe the ongoing long-term recovery from the Great Eruption. Topics covered in this thesis include: 1) spatial and temporal behavior of the high-excitation emission lines, 2) parameters of the secondary star, 3) He II 4687 emission during the 2009 "Event," 4) changing wind structure during the 2009 "Event," 5) origin of the He I lines, and 6) major changes in the broad-line wind spectrum indicating a decrease in Eta Car's wind density.

  4. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  5. Production and decays of the light pseudoscalar boson {eta} at the CERN LHC in the simplest little Higgs model

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Yan Qishu; Song, Jeonghyeon; Tseng Poyan

    2008-09-01

    In many extensions of the standard model, the Higgs sector often contains an additional pseudoscalar boson. A good example is the SU(3) simplest little Higgs model, which accommodates a light pseudoscalar boson {eta} with quite different characteristics from those in other multi-Higgs-doublet models. We study various phenomenological signatures of the {eta} at the CERN LHC. In particular, we calculate in details both production and decays in the Drell-Yan type channel qq{yields}Z/Z{sup '}{yields}h{eta}, and in the associated production with a tt pair, gg(qq){yields}tt{eta}. We emphasize the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decay mode of the {eta} boson when its mass is below the bb threshold. We show that tt{eta} production is in fact large enough to give a sizable number of events while suppressing the backgrounds. We also comment on the direct gluon fusion process and the indirect decay from the heavy T quark (T{yields}t{eta})

  6. Measurement of branching fractions and charge asymmetries in B decays to an eta meson and a K* meson.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-11-17

    We present measurements of branching fractions and charge asymmetries for the decays B-->etaK*, where K* indicates a spin 0, 1, or 2 Kpi system. The data sample corresponds to 344x10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+ e- collider at SLAC. We measure the branching fractions (in units of 10(-6): B(B0-->etaK*0(892))=16.5+/-1.1+/-0.8, B(B+-->etaK*+(892))=18.9+/-1.8+/-1.3, B(B0-->eta(Kpi)0*0)=11.0+/-1.6+/-1.5, B(B+-->eta(Kpi)0*+)=18.2+/-2.6+/-2.6, B(B0-->etaK2*0(1430))=9.6+/-1.8+/-1.1, and B(B+-->etaK2*+(1430))=9.1+/-2.7+/-1.4. We also determine the charge asymmetries for all decay modes. PMID:17155674

  7. Observation of the Exclusive Reaction e^+e^-\\ to \\phi\\eta at \\sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-17

    The authors report the observation of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta} near {radical}s = 10.58 GeV with 6.5 {sigma} significance in the K{sup +}K{sup -}{gamma}{gamma} final state in a data sample of 224 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. They measure the restricted radiation-corrected cross section to be {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{eta}) = 2.1 {+-} 0.4(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb within the range |cos{theta}*| < 0.8, where {theta}* is the center-of-mass polar angle of the {phi} meson. The {phi} meson is required to be in the invariant mass range of 1.008 < m{sub {phi}} < 1.035 GeV/c{sup 2}. The radiation corrected cross section in the full cos {theta}* range is extrapolated to be 2.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst) fb.

  8. An efficient high power microwave source at 35 GHz using an induction linac free electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Yarema, S.M.

    1986-11-01

    The Electron Laser Facility (ELF) is a free-electron laser (FEL) amplifier operating in the millimeter-wave regime. ELF uses the electron beam produced by the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA), which is a linear-induction accelerator. We discuss here (1) the experimental results reflecting the high-peak-power output and high-extraction efficiency obtained from an FEL amplifier operated with a tapered wiggler magnetic field and (2) the results of studies of the exponential gain and saturated power obtained from an FEL amplifier with a flat wiggler while we parametrically varied the input power to the amplifier and the beam current into the wiggler.

  9. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom��, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh��user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K��ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  10. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-08-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  11. Measurement of the transverse momentum and $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ distributions of Drell–Yan lepton pairs in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8$$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-05-23

    Distributions of transverse momentum pTℓℓ and the related angular variablemore » $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ of Drell-Yan lepton pairs are measured in 20.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Measurements in electron-pair and muon-pair final states are corrected for detector effects and combined. Compared to previous measurements in protonΓÇôproton collisions at √s=7 TeV these new measurements benefit from a larger data sample and improved control of systematic uncertainties. Measurements are performed in bins of lepton-pair mass above, around and below the Z -boson mass peak. The data are compared to predictions from perturbative and resummed QCD calculations. For values of $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$<1 the predictions from the Monte Carlo generator ResBos are generally consistent with the data within the theoretical uncertainties. However, at larger values of $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ this is not the case. Monte Carlo generators based on the parton-shower approach are unable to describe the data over the full range of pTℓℓ while the fixed-order prediction of Dynnlo falls below the data at high values of pTℓℓ. Here, ResBos and the parton-shower Monte Carlo generators provide a much better description of the evolution of the $$\\phi ^*_{\\eta }$$ and pTℓℓ distributions as a function of lepton-pair mass and rapidity than the basic shape of the data.« less

  12. Beam dynamics for induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    An induction linac uses pulsed power that is applied directly, without any intervening resonant cavities, to accelerate a charged particle pulse. This approach can accommodate a large multiple-beam focusing lattice capable of transporting a large total beam current with a long pulse duration, which may be compressed while accelerating as well as afterward. The mean accelerating gradient is relatively low (less than about 1.5 MV/m), but the potential efficiency of energy transfer can be large up to about 50%. A multiple-beam induction linac is therefore a natural candidate accelerator for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) driver. However, the accelerated beams must meet stringent requirements on occupied phase space volume in order to be focused accurately and with small radius onto the fusion target. Dynamical considerations in the beam injector and linac, as well as in the final compression, final focus, and the fusion chamber, determine the quality of the driver beams as they approach the target. Requirements and tolerances derived from beam dynamics strongly influence the linac configuration and component design.

  13. An upgraded version of the Eta Model applied to Antarctic case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Upgrades have been implemented over a number of years in an open source version of the Eta Model, posted at its CPTEC web site (http://etamodel.cptec.inpe.br/). They were summarized in Mesinger et al. (2011) and examined in detail in Mesinger et al.( 2012). In short: within dynamics, two major upgrades are the introduction of "sloping steps" and the use of the piecewise-linear vertical advection of dynamic variables. Several refinements on the calculation of exchange coefficients, conservation in the vertical diffusion, and diagnostic calculation of 10-m winds have been made. Vapor and hydrometeor loading in the hydrostatic equation were included. Within physics, efforts in refining the two Eta convection schemes received most attention. This recent version of the Eta Model has been applied to polynya events, accompanied by katabatic wind, at Terra Nova Bay (TNB), Antarctica. The TNB polynya is an area of coupling between the components of the sea ice-ocean-atmosphere system. Locally enhanced surface exchange processes are considered to have important consequences for the atmosphere (Morelli, 2011) and ocean processes, as well as for ice formation and the associated brine release. Adjustments of the Eta pre-processor have been made to allow for the distinctive polar conditions and for the use of ECMWF data as initial and boundary conditions. It is also being developed a thermodynamic model of sea ice interaction for a more realistic treatment of the sea ice-atmosphere. The numerical simulations have a horizontal resolution of about 8 Km. The results will be compared with observational data at the surface, with soundings and satellite images. The observations, used for the comparison, are available by Antarctic Meteorological Research Center, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Programma Nazionale di Ricerche in Antartide (P.N.R.A.), Osservatorio Meteo-Climatologico. F Mesinger, Chou S C, Gomes J, Jovic D, Lazic L, Lyra A

  14. The QTAIM approach to chemical bonding between transition metals and carbocyclic rings: a combined experimental and theoretical study of (eta(5)-C5H5)Mn(CO)3, (eta(6)-C6H6)Cr(CO)3, and (E)-{(eta(5)-C5H4)CF=CF(eta(5)-C5H4)}(eta(5)-C5H5)2Fe2.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Louis J; Evans, Cameron; Lentz, Dieter; Roemer, Max

    2009-01-28

    Experimental charge densities for (C(5)H(5))Mn(CO)(3) (2), (eta(6)-C(6)H(6))Cr(CO)(3) (3), and (E)-{(eta(5)-C(5)H(4))CF=CF(eta(5)-C(5)H(4))}(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(2)Fe(2) (4) have been obtained by multipole refinement of high-resolution X-ray diffraction data at 100 K. The resultant densities were analyzed using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). The electronic structures of these and related pi-hydrocarbyl complexes have also been studied by ab initio density functional theory calculations, and a generally good agreement between theory and experiment with respect to the topological parameters was observed. The topological parameters indicate significant metal-ring covalency. A consistent area of disagreement concerns the topology of the metal-ring interactions. It is shown that because of the shared-shell bonding between the metal and the ring carbons, an annulus of very flat density rho and very small wedge rho is formed, which leads to topologically unstable structures close to catastrophe points. This in turn leads to unpredictable numbers of metal-C bond paths for ring sizes greater than four and fewer M-C bond paths than expected on the basis of the formal hapticity. This topological instability is a general feature of metal-pi-hydrocarbyl interactions and means that a localized approach based on individual M-C(ring) bond paths does not provide a definitive picture of the chemical bonding in these systems. However, other QTAIM indicators, such as the virial paths, the delocalization indices, and the source function, clearly demonstrate that for the n-hapto (eta(n)-C(n)H(n))M unit, there is generally a very similar level of chemical bonding for all M-C(ring) interactions, as expected on the basis of chemical experience.

  15. Radiation from violently accelerated bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Ulrich H.

    2001-11-01

    A determination is made of the radiation emitted by a linearly uniformly accelerated uncharged dipole transmitter. It is found that, first of all, the radiation rate is given by the familiar Larmor formula, but it is augmented by an amount which becomes dominant for sufficiently high acceleration. For an accelerated dipole oscillator, the criterion is that the center of mass motion become relativistic within one oscillation period. The augmented formula and the measurements which it summarizes presuppose an expanding inertial observation frame. A static inertial reference frame will not do. Secondly, it is found that the radiation measured in the expanding inertial frame is received with 100% fidelity. There is no blueshift or redshift due to the accelerative motion of the transmitter. Finally, it is found that a pair of coherently radiating oscillators accelerating (into opposite directions) in their respective causally disjoint Rindler-coordinatized sectors produces an interference pattern in the expanding inertial frame. Like the pattern of a Young double slit interferometer, this Rindler interferometer pattern has a fringe spacing which is inversely proportional to the proper separation and the proper frequency of the accelerated sources. The interferometer, as well as the augmented Larmor formula, provide a unifying perspective. It joins adjacent Rindler-coordinatized neighborhoods into a single spacetime arena for scattering and radiation from accelerated bodies.

  16. Bottomonium Spectroscopy with Mixing of eta{sub b} States and a Light CP-Odd Higgs Boson

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, Florian; Ellwanger, Ulrich; Sanchis-Lozano, Miguel-Angel

    2009-09-11

    The mass of the eta{sub b}(1S), measured recently by the BABAR Collaboration, is significantly lower than expected from QCD predictions for the UPSILON(1S)-eta{sub b}(1S) hyperfine splitting. We suggest that the observed eta{sub b}(1S) mass is shifted downwards due to a mixing with a CP-odd Higgs boson A with a mass m{sub A} in the range 9.4-10.5 GeV compatible with LEP, CLEO, and BABAR constraints. We determine the resulting predictions for the spectrum of the eta{sub b}(nS)-A system and the branching ratios into tau{sup +}tau{sup -} as functions of m{sub A}.

  17. Electrothermal Annealing (ETA) Method to Enhance the Electrical Performance of Amorphous-Oxide-Semiconductor (AOS) Thin-Film Transistors (TFTs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Kim, Eungtaek; Lee, Myung Keun; Park, Jun-Young; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Jun, Sungwoo; Park, Sang-Hee K; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-09-14

    An electro-thermal annealing (ETA) method, which uses an electrical pulse of less than 100 ns, was developed to improve the electrical performance of array-level amorphous-oxide-semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The practicality of the ETA method was experimentally demonstrated with transparent amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs. The overall electrical performance metrics were boosted by the proposed method: up to 205% for the trans-conductance (gm), 158% for the linear current (Ilinear), and 206% for the subthreshold swing (SS). The performance enhancement were interpreted by X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), showing a reduction of oxygen vacancies in a-IGZO after the ETA. Furthermore, by virtue of the extremely short operation time (80 ns) of ETA, which neither provokes a delay of the mandatory TFTs operation such as addressing operation for the display refresh nor demands extra physical treatment, the semipermanent use of displays can be realized. PMID:27552134

  18. A New Measurement of {eta}{sub b}(1S) From {Upsilon}(3S) Radiative Decay at CLEO

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Sean

    2010-08-05

    Using CLEO data, we report on the confirmation of the {eta}{sub b}({sup 1}S{sub 0}) ground state of bottomonium in the radiative decay {Upsilon}(3S){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sub b} We determine its mass to be M({eta}{sub b}) = 9391.8{+-}6.6{+-}2.1 MeV, which corresponds to the hyperfine splitting {Delta}M{sub hf}(1S) = 68.5{+-}6.6{+-}2.0 MeV, and the branching fraction B({Upsilon}(3S){gamma}{eta}{sub b}) = (7.1{+-}1.8{+-}1.1)x10{sup -4}. These results agree with those previously reported by BaBar.

  19. Elementary principles of linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loew, G. A.; Talman, R.

    1983-09-01

    A short chronology of important milestones in the field of linear accelerators is presented. Proton linacs are first discussed and elementary concepts such as transit time, shunt impedance, and Q are introduced. Critical issues such as phase stability and transverse forces are addressed. An elementary discussion of waveguide acclerating structures is also provided. Finally, electron accelerators addressed. Taking SLAC as an exmple, various topics are discussed such as structure design, choice of parameters, frequency optmization, beam current, emittance, bunch length and beam loading. Recent developments and future challenges are mentioned briefly.

  20. ENERGY SPECTRUM OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES ACCELERATED BY SHOCK WAVES: FROM FOCUSED TRANSPORT TO DIFFUSIVE ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Pingbing; Zhang Ming; Gamayunov, Konstantin; Rassoul, Hamid; Luo Xi

    2011-09-10

    The focused transport equation (FTE) includes all the necessary physics for modeling the shock acceleration of energetic particles with a unified description of first-order Fermi acceleration, shock drift acceleration, and shock surfing acceleration. It can treat the acceleration and transport of particles with an anisotropic distribution. In this study, the energy spectrum of pickup ions accelerated at shocks of various obliquities is investigated based on the FTE. We solve the FTE by using a stochastic approach. The shock acceleration leads to a two-component energy spectrum. The low-energy component of the spectrum is made up of particles that interact with shock one to a few times. For these particles, the pitch angle distribution is highly anisotropic, and the energy spectrum is variable depending on the momentum and pitch angle of injected particles. At high energies, the spectrum approaches a power law consistent with the standard diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory. For a parallel shock, the high-energy component of the power-law spectrum, with the spectral index being the same as the prediction of DSA theory, starts just a few times the injection speed. For an oblique or quasi-perpendicular shock, the high-energy component of the spectrum exhibits a double power-law distribution: a harder power-law spectrum followed by another power-law spectrum with a slope the same as the spectral index of DSA. The shock acceleration will eventually go into the DSA regime at higher energies even if the anisotropy is not small. The intensity of the energy spectrum given by the FTE, in the high-energy range where particles get efficient acceleration in the DSA regime, is different from that given by the standard DSA theory for the same injection source. We define the injection efficiency {eta} as the ratio between them. For a parallel shock, the injection efficiency is less than 1, but for an oblique shock or a quasi-perpendicular shock it could be greater.

  1. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  2. Observation of the eta/sub c/(2980) produced in the radiative decay of the psi'(3684)

    SciTech Connect

    Himel, T.M.; Trilling, G.H.; Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Blocker, C.A.; Blondel, A.P.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burke, D.L.; Carithers, W.C.; Chinowsky, W.; Coles, M.W.; Cooper, S.; Dieterle, W.E.; Dillon, J.B.; Dorenbosch, J.; Dorfan, J.M.; Eaton, M.W.; Feldman, G.J.; Franklin, M.E.B.; Gidal, G.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hayes, K.G.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hollebeek, R.J.; Innes, W.R.; Jaros, J.A.; Jenni, P.; Johnson, A.D.; Kadyk, J.A.; Lankford, A.J.; Larsen, R.R.; Levi, M.E.; Lueth, V.; Millikan, R.E.; Nelson, M.E.; Pang, C.Y.; Patrick, J.F.; Perl, M.L.; Richter, B.; Roussarie, A.; Scharre, D.L.; Schindler, R.H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Siegrist, J.L.; Strait, J.; Taureg, H.; Tonutti, M.; Vella, E.N.; Vidal, R.A.; Videau, I.; Weiss, J.M.; Zaccone, H.

    1980-10-06

    In a study of psi'(3684) radiative decays with the Mark II detector at SPEAR, the decay sequence psi'..--> gamma..eta/sub c/(2980) is observed, with the eta/sub c/(2980) decaying into several completely reconstructed hadronic modes. A mass M=2980 +- 8 MeV/c/sup 2/ and a width GAMMA<40 MeV/c/sup 2/ (90% confidence level) are obtained, and estimates of some of the decay branching ratios are presented.

  3. Measurement of th eta and etaprime Transition Form Factors at q^2 = 112 GeV^2

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-05-16

    The authors report a study of the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {eta}'{gamma} at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, using a 232 fb{sup -1} data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider at SLAC.

  4. The Eta Carinae Homunculus in Full 3D with X-Shooter and Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Wolfgang; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Thomas I.; Groh, Jose H.; Gull, Theodore R.; Mehner, Andrea; Corcoran, Michael F.; Damineli, Augusto; Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars like Eta Carinae are extremely rare in comparison to stars such as the Sun, and currently we know of only a handful of stars with masses of more than 100 solar mass in the Milky Way. Such massive stars were much more frequent in the early history of the Universe and had a huge impact on its evolution. Even among this elite club, Eta Car is outstanding, in particular because of its giant eruption around 1840 that produced the beautiful bipolar nebula now known as the Homunculus. In this study, we used detailed spatio-kinematic information obtained from X-shooter spectra to reconstruct the 3D structure of the Homunculus. The small-scale features suggest that the central massive binary played a significant role in shaping the Homunculus.

  5. The detection of companion stars to the Cepheid variables ETA Aquilae and T Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, J. T.; Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the classical Cepheid variables eta Aq1 and T Mon at several phases in their periods were obtained with IUE. For eta Aq1 significant ultraviolet emission is detected at wavelengths less than 1600 A, where little flux is expected from classical Cepheids. Furthermore, the emission at wavelengths less than about 1600 A does not vary with phase. Comparison with model atmosphere flux distributions shows that the nonvariable emission is consistent with the flux expected from a main sequence companion star with an effective temperature of about 9500 K (AO V - A1 V). For T Mon a nonvarying component to the ultraviolet emission is observed for wavelengths less than 2600 A. Comparison with model atmosphere flux distributions suggests that the companion has an effective temperature of around 10,000 K (AO) and is near the main sequence.

  6. Does Turbulence in the Iron Convection Zone Cause the Massive Outbursts of Eta Carinae?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1999-01-01

    Taken at face value, the observed properties of the central object in Eta-Car suggest a very massive, hot main-sequence star, only slightly evolved. If this is so, the star's extraordinarily high steady rate of mass loss must dynamically perturb its outer envelope down to the iron convection zone, where the kinetic energy associated with turbulent convection can be directly fed into mass ejection. Runaway mass loss, triggered by either internal (pulsational, rotational) or external (tidal) forcing, would produce a secular oscillation of the outer envelope. In either case, the oscillation is potentially able to account for the observed approximately 5 yr cycles of visual outbursts in Eta-Car, including the giant eruption of 1843.

  7. The X-ray Variability of Eta Car, 1996-2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Gull, T.; Owocki, S.; Pittard, J.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray photometry in the 2-10 keY band of the the supermassive binary star Eta Car has been measured with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer from 1996-2010. The ingress to X-ray minimum is consistent with a period of 2024 days. The 2009 X-ray minimum began on January 162009 and showed an unexpectedly abrupt recovery starting after 12 Feb 2009. The X-ray colors become harder about half-way through all three minima and continue until flux recovery. The behavior of the fluxes and X-ray colors for the most recent X-ray minimum, along with Chandra high resolution grating spectra at key phases suggests a significant change in the inner wind of Eta Car, a possible indicator that the star is entering a new unstable phase of mass loss.

  8. Recent X-ray Variability of Eta Car Approaching The X-ray Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M.; Swank, J. H.; Ishibashi, K.; Gull, T.; Humphreys, R.; Damineli, A.; Walborn, N.; Hillier, D. J.; Davidson, K.; White, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss recent X-ray spectral variability of the supermassive star Eta Car in the interval since the last X-ray eclipse in 1998. We concentrate on the interval just prior to the next X-ray eclipse which is expected to occur in June 2003. We compare the X-ray behavior during the 2001-2003 cycle with the previous cycle (1996-1998) and note similarities and differences in the temporal X-ray behavior. We also compare a recent X-ray observation of Eta Car obtained with the Chandra high energy transmission grating in October 2002 with an earlier observation from Nov 2002, and interpret these results in terms of the proposed colliding wind binary model for the star. In addition we discuss planned observations for the upcoming X-ray eclipse.

  9. Observations of Orionids and eta-Aquariids in 2006 from Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhurova, Eva; Zhivkova, Desislava

    2010-12-01

    We present observations of the eta-Aquariid and Orionid meteor showers collected during observing expeditions. The 2006 May 4-6 expedition with two observers yielded 63 meteors in 4.14 h of total effective observing time. A radiant was derived from 34 eta-Aquariids. The October campaign surprised all observers with the unusually high Orionid activity about twice as high as the average. In our analysis we include observing data of Boris Stoilov (STOBO), Natasha Ivanova (IVANA) and Ivan Gradinarov (GRAIV). Based on 107 recorded meteors from which 47 were Orionids seen in 9.8 total effective time for the night of 21/22 October, we obtained a mean ZHR equal to 41.5 assuming a population index r = 2.0.

  10. The Abundance of Iron-Peak Elements and the Dust Composition in eta Carinae: Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.; Hartman, H.; Gull, T. R.; Lodders, K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the chemical abundances of the Strontium Filament found in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae. In particular, we derive the abundances of iron-peak elements front spectra of their singly ionized ions present in the optical/IR spectra. In this paper we analyze the spectrum of Mn II using a new non-LTE model for this system. In constructing this models we carried out theoretical calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. We find that relative to Ni the gas phase abundance ratio of Mn is roughly solar, similar to the Cr abundance but in contrast to the large enhancements in the abundances of Sc and Ti. NVe interpret this result as an indication of non-equilibrium condensation in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae.

  11. Acyclic High-Energy Variability in Eta Carinae and WR 140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Eta Carinae and WR 140 are similar long-period colliding wind binaries in which X-ray emission is produced by a strong shock due to the collision of the powerful stellar winds. The change in the orientation and density of this shock as the stars revolve in their orbits influences the X-ray flux and spectrum in a phase dependent way. Monitoring observations with RXTE and other X-ray satellite observatories since the 1990s have detailed this variability but have also shown significant deviations from strict phase dependence (short-term brightness changes or "flares", and cyc1e-to-cyc1e average flux differences). We examine these acylic variations in Eta Car and WR 140 and discuss what they tell us about the stability of the wind-wind collision shock.

  12. Decay {eta}{sub b{yields}}J/{psi}J/{psi} in light cone formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Braguta, V. V.; Kartvelishvili, V.

    2010-01-01

    The decays of pseudoscalar bottomonium {eta}{sub b} into a pair of vector charmonia, J/{psi}J/{psi}, J/{psi}{psi}{sup '}, {psi}{sup '{psi}'}, are considered in the light cone formalism. Relativistic and leading logarithmic radiative corrections to the amplitudes of these processes are resummed. It is shown that the small value for the branching ratio of the decay {eta}{sub b{yields}}J/{psi}J/{psi} obtained within the leading-order nonrelativistic QCD is a consequence of a fine-tuning between certain parameters, which is broken when relativistic and leading logarithmic radiative corrections are taken into account. As a result, the branching ratio obtained in this paper is enhanced by an order of magnitude.

  13. Transition Metal Complexes of Cr, Mo, W and Mn Containing {eta}{sup 1}(S)-2,5-Dimethylthiophene, Benzothiophene and Dibenzothiophene Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, M.

    2000-09-21

    The UV photolysis of hexanes solutions containing the complexes M(CO){sub 6} (M=Cr, Mo, W) or CpMn(CO){sub 3} (Cp={eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) and excess thiophene (T{sup *}) (T{sup *}=2,5-dimethylthiophene (2,5-Me{sub 2}T), benzothiophene (BT), and dibenzothiophene (DBT)) produces the {eta}{sup 1}(S)-T{sup *} complexes (CO){sub 5}M({eta}{sup 1}(S)-T{sup *}) 1-8 or Cp(CO){sub 2}Mn({eta}{sup 1}(S)-T{sup *})9-11, respectively. However, when T{sup *}=DBT, and M=Mo, a mixture of two products result which includes the {eta}{sup 1}(S)-DBT complex (CO){sub 5}Mo({eta}{sup 1}(S)-DBT) 4a and the unexpected {pi}-complex (CO){sub 3}Mo({eta}{sup 6}-DBT) 4b as detected by {sup 1}H NMR. The liability of the {eta}{sup 1}(S)-T{sup *} ligands is illustrated by the rapid displacement of DBT in the complex (CO){sub 5}W({eta}{sup 1}(S)-DBT) (1) by THF, and also in the complexes (CO){sub 5}Cr({eta}{sup 1}(S)-DBT) (5) and CpMn(CO){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}(S)-DBT) (9) by CO (1 atm) at room temperature. Complexes 1-11 have been characterized spectroscopically ({sup 1}H NMR, IR) and when possible isolated as analytically pure solids (elemental analysis, EIMS). Single crystal, X-ray structural determinations are reported for (CO){sub 5}W({eta}{sup 1}(S)-DBT) and Cp(CO){sub 2}Mn({eta}{sup 1}(S)-DBT).

  14. PKC{eta} confers protection against apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic JNK activity in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rotem-Dai, Noa; Oberkovitz, Galia; Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Livneh, Etta

    2009-09-10

    Apoptosis is frequently regulated by different protein kinases including protein kinase C family enzymes. Both inhibitory and stimulatory effects were demonstrated for several of the different PKC isoforms. Here we show that the novel PKC isoform, PKC{eta}, confers protection against apoptosis induced by the DNA damaging agents, UVC irradiation and the anti-cancer drug - Camptothecin, of the breast epithelial adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. The induced expression of PKC{eta} in MCF-7 cells, under the control of the tetracycline-responsive promoter, resulted in increased cell survival and inhibition of cleavage of the apoptotic marker PARP-1. Activation of caspase-7 and 9 and the release of cytochrome c were also inhibited by the inducible expression of PKC{eta}. Furthermore, JNK activity, required for apoptosis in MCF-7, as indicated by the inhibition of both caspase-7 cleavage and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria in the presence of the JNK inhibitor SP600125, was also suppressed by PKC{eta} expression. Hence, in contrast to most PKC isoforms enhancing JNK activation, our studies show that PKC{eta} is an anti-apoptotic protein, acting as a negative regulator of JNK activity. Thus, PKC{eta} could represent a target for intervention aimed to reduce resistance to anti-cancer treatments.

  15. Unassisted eta2-coordination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Jesús R; Forniés, Juan; Martín, L Francisco; Martín, Antonio; Menjón, Babil

    2005-10-17

    The coordination of phenanthrene to the d8 Pt(II) center in (SP-4-2)-[Pt(C6F5)2(CO)(eta2-C14H10)] causes a slight pyramidalization at the metal-bound C atoms (C9 and C10), but no perceptible elongation of the corresponding C-C bond [C(13)-C(14) 132.0(5) vs. 133.8(5) pm in the free ligand].

  16. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  17. ETA receptor specific stimulation of glomerular inflammation and injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, M. A.; Boesen, E. I.; Pollock, J. S.; Savin, V. J.; Pollock, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis ETA receptor activation increases glomerular permeability to albumin (Palb) and elevates pre-inflammatory markers in hyperglycaemic (HG) rats. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given streptozotocin (STZ), n=32 or saline (sham,), n=32. Half of the animals in each group received the ETA-selective antagonist, ABT-627 (atrasentan; p.o.), beginning immediately after hyperglycaemia was confirmed. Glomeruli were isolated by sieving techniques and Palb determined from the change in glomerular volume induced by oncotic gradients of albumin. Glomerular nephrin expression was assessed by immunofluorescence, whereas urinary nephrin was measured by immunoassay. Results Three and six weeks after STZ injection, proteinuria was significantly increased compared to sham controls and was significantly reduced by ABT-627 treatment. Palb was also increased at 3 and 6 wk post-STZ; ABT-627 had no effect on Palb or protein excretion in sham rats. In glomeruli isolated from HG rats, incubation with BQ-123, a selective ETA antagonist, reduced Palb, whereas BQ-788, a selective ETB antagonist had no effect (n=6 rats/group, 5-8 glomeruli/rat). Glomerular and plasma content of soluble inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly increased 6 wk after STZ (ELISA). ABT-627 attenuated these increases. After 6 weeks of hyperglycaemia, glomerular nephrin expression was decreased with a concurrent increase in urinary nephrin excretion; ABT-627 prevented glomerular nephrin loss in the HG rats (n=5-8 rats in the eight groups). Conclusions/Interpretation These observations support the hypothesis that ET-1, via the ETA receptor, directly increases glomerular permeability to albumin, possibly via nephrin loss, as well as early inflammation in the HG rat. PMID:21191784

  18. Decline of the 2-10 keV Emission from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liburd, Jamar; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Richardson, Noel; Russell, Chris; Pollock, Andrew; Owocki, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Eta Car's X-ray spectrum in the 2-10 keV band using processed data from the X-ray Telescope on Swift reveals a peak flux on July 16, 2014 of 0.046 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (3.37+/-0.15×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2). This flux is similar to the previous maximum flux seen by the XRT, 3.53+/-0.13×10(exp -10) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (0.049 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2), ATEL #6298). Since this peak on July 16, the most recent Swift XRT quicklook data show a drop in flux. On July 20, 2014 the XRT flux as seen in the quicklook data was 0.011 photons s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) (8.3+/-0.5×10(exp -11) ergs s(exp -1) cm(exp -2)). This most likely indicates that the 2-10 keV flux is in its declining phase as Eta Car approaches its deep X-ray minimum stage (Hamaguchi et al., 2014, ApJ, 784, 125) associated with periastron passage of the 2024-day binary orbit. The column density derived from analysis of the July 20 XRT quicklook data is 7.2×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2). This is consistent with the column density seen near the same orbital phase in 2003 (7.7×10(exp 22) cm(exp -2), Hamaguchi et al., 2007, ApJ, 663, 522). Eta Car's deep X-ray minimum phase is expected to begin on July 30, 2014. Weekly Swift/XRT observations of Eta Car in the 2-10 keV band are planned throughout the X-ray minimum.

  19. Was the nineteenth century giant eruption of Eta Carinae a merger event in a triple system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, S. F.; van den Heuvel, E. P. J.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the events that led to the giant eruption of Eta Carinae, and find that the mid-nineteenth century (in 1838-1843) giant mass-loss outburst has the characteristics of being produced by the merger event of a massive close binary, triggered by the gravitational interaction with a massive third companion star, which is the current binary companion in the Eta Carinae system. We come to this conclusion by a combination of theoretical arguments supported by computer simulations using the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment. According to this model the ˜90 M⊙ present primary star of the highly eccentric Eta Carinae binary system is the product of this merger, and its ˜30 M⊙ companion originally was the third star in the system. In our model, the Homunculus nebula was produced by an extremely enhanced stellar wind, energized by tidal energy dissipation prior to the merger, which enormously boosted the radiation-driven wind mass-loss. The current orbital plane is then aligned with the equatorial plane of the Homunculus, and the symmetric lobes are roughly aligned with the argument of periastron of the current Eta Carina binary. The merger itself then occurred in 1838, which resulted in a massive asymmetric outflow in the equatorial plane of the Homunculus. The 1843 outburst can in our model be attributed to the subsequent encounter when the companion star (once the outermost star in the triple system) plunges through the bloated envelope of the merger product, once when it passed periastron again. We predict that the system has an excess space velocity of order 50 km s-1 in the equatorial plane of the Homunculus. Our triple model gives a viable explanation for the high runaway velocities typically observed in LBVs.

  20. Photoproduction of the eta prime meson in the effective Lagrangian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.; Zhang, J.F.; Benmerrouche, M.

    1994-04-01

    In the framework of the effective Lagrangian approach, the authors study the {eta}{prime} photoproduction off protons, of great interest at CEBAF I and II. They calculate the contributions from the leading nucleon Born terms, vector meson exchanges, and estimate the resonance contributions, using the transition amplitudes from the recent quark model estimates by Capstick and Roberts. They discuss implications for the CEBAF experiments.

  1. Preliminary results of t and f asymmetries for {eta} photoproduction from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Ross J.; Ritchie, Barry G.; Dugger, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary data for the T and F asymmetries in {eta} photoproduction from the proton, along with comparisons to theoretical predictions. The data used in the present analysis were taken using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab, a cryogenic target which utilized transversely polarized protons in a butanol target, and incident tagged photons with energy between 0.62 and 2.93 GeV.

  2. Spectroscopic and computational studies of a mu-eta(2):eta(2)-disulfido-bridged dinickel(II) species, [{(PhTt(tBu))Ni}(2)(mu-eta(2):eta(2)-S(2))]: comparison of side-on disulfido and peroxo bonding in (Ni(II))(2) and (Cu(II))(2) species.

    PubMed

    Van Heuvelen, Katherine M; Cho, Jaeheung; Riordan, Charles G; Brunold, Thomas C

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a combined spectroscopic and computational approach has been employed to generate a detailed description of the electronic structure of a binuclear side-on disulfido (Ni(II))(2) complex, [{(PhTt(tBu))Ni}(2)(mu-eta(2):eta(2)-S(2))] (1, where PhTt(tBu) = phenyltris[(tert-butylthio)methyl]borate). The disulfido-to-Ni(II) charge-transfer transitions that dominate the electronic absorption spectrum have been assigned on the basis of time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Resonance Raman spectroscopic studies of 1 have revealed that the S-S stretching mode occurs at 446 cm(-1), indicating that the S-S bond is weaker in 1 than in the analogous mu-eta(2):eta(2)-S(2) dicopper species. DFT computational data indicate that the steric bulk of PhTt(tBu) stabilize the side-on core enough to prevent its conversion to the electronically preferred bis(mu-sulfido) (Ni(III))(2) structure. Hence, 1 provides an interesting contrast to its O(2)-derived analogue, [{(PhTt(tBu))Ni}(2)(mu-O)(2)], which was shown previously to assume a bis(mu-oxo) (Ni(III))(2) "diamond core". By a comparison of 1 to analogous disulfidodicopper and peroxodinickel species, new insight has been obtained into the roles that the metal centers, bridging ligands, and supporting ligands play in determining the core structures and electronic properties of these dimers. PMID:20199100

  3. Three-body Final State Interaction in η→3π

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Schott, Diane; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-09-11

    We present an unitary dispersive model for themore » $$\\eta \\to 3 \\pi$$ decay process based upon the Khuri-Treiman equations which are solved by means of the Pasquier inversion method. The description of the hadronic final-state interactions for the $$\\eta \\to 3\\pi$$ decay is essential to reproduce the available data and to understand the existing discrepancies between Dalitz plot parameters from experiment and chiral perturbation theory. Our approach incorporates substraction constants that are fixed by fitting the recent high-statistics WASA-at-COSY data for $$\\eta \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$$. Based on the parameters obtained we predict the slope parameter for the neutral channel to be $$\\alpha=-0.022\\pm 0.004$$. Through matching to next-to-leading order chiral perturbation theory we estimate the quark mass double ratio to be $$Q=21.4 \\pm 0.4$$.« less

  4. Three-body Final State Interaction in η→3π

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Schott, Diane; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Mathieu, V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-09-11

    We present an unitary dispersive model for the $\\eta \\to 3 \\pi$ decay process based upon the Khuri-Treiman equations which are solved by means of the Pasquier inversion method. The description of the hadronic final-state interactions for the $\\eta \\to 3\\pi$ decay is essential to reproduce the available data and to understand the existing discrepancies between Dalitz plot parameters from experiment and chiral perturbation theory. Our approach incorporates substraction constants that are fixed by fitting the recent high-statistics WASA-at-COSY data for $\\eta \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^0$. Based on the parameters obtained we predict the slope parameter for the neutral channel to be $\\alpha=-0.022\\pm 0.004$. Through matching to next-to-leading order chiral perturbation theory we estimate the quark mass double ratio to be $Q=21.4 \\pm 0.4$.

  5. Constraining the Extremely Hard X-ray Excess of Eta Carinae using XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetika; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Madura, Thomas; Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Grefenstette, Brian; Yuasa, Tadayuki; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Richardson, Noel; Groh, Jose H.; Pittard, Julian M.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2016-06-01

    Eta Carinae (η Car), the most luminous (L˜106.7 L⊙), evolved, supermassive star (M≥100 M⊙) in our Galaxy, has been extensively studied over the entire range of wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, and yet it remains to be intriguingly mysterious. η Car is a binary system with an orbital period of 2024 days (5.53 years). The collision of the slow (˜500 km s-1), dense winds from the primary star with the fast (˜3000 km s-1), thin winds from the companion, produces very hot plasma with temperatures of severals of millions of Kelvin via shock heating. Previously, the INTEGRAL and Suzaku observatories have suggested extremely high energy (15-100 keV) emission from η Car, which may arise from inverse Compton scattering of UV/optical photons by high-energy electrons accelerated in the wind colliding regions, or from the super hot plasma at the head-on collision. Recently, within a span of about 1.4 years (March 2014-July 2015), η Car was observed a total of 13 times with NuSTAR. The spectrum from the 2015 July observation, shows a hard X-ray excess above ˜ 17 keV, which can be constrained with a flat power-law (Γ˜0.5) or very hot bremsstrahlung (kT˜10 keV) component. This hard X-ray excess is significantly above the background level below 25 keV and therefore should not be instrumental. The light curves of the narrow sections of energy bands above 10 keV do not show significant variation. We discuss the origin of this extremely hard excess component from combined analysis of the XMM-Newton and NuSTAR data.

  6. Constraining the Extremely Hard X-ray Excess of Eta Carinae using XMM-Newton and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetika; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Madura, Thomas; Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Grefenstette, Brian; Yuasa, Tadayuki; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Richardson, Noel; Groh, Jose H.; Pittard, Julian M.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2016-06-01

    Eta Carinae (η Car), the most luminous (L∼106.7 L⊙), evolved, supermassive star (M≥100 M⊙) in our Galaxy, has been extensively studied over the entire range of wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, and yet it remains to be intriguingly mysterious. η Car is a binary system with an orbital period of 2024 days (5.53 years). The collision of the slow (∼500 km s-1), dense winds from the primary star with the fast (∼3000 km s-1), thin winds from the companion, produces very hot plasma with temperatures of severals of millions of Kelvin via shock heating. Previously, the INTEGRAL and Suzaku observatories have suggested extremely high energy (15-100 keV) emission from η Car, which may arise from inverse Compton scattering of UV/optical photons by high-energy electrons accelerated in the wind colliding regions, or from the super hot plasma at the head-on collision. Recently, within a span of about 1.4 years (March 2014-July 2015), η Car was observed a total of 13 times with NuSTAR. The spectrum from the 2015 July observation, shows a hard X-ray excess above ∼ 17 keV, which can be constrained with a flat power-law (Γ∼0.5) or very hot bremsstrahlung (kT∼10 keV) component. This hard X-ray excess is significantly above the background level below 25 keV and therefore should not be instrumental. The light curves of the narrow sections of energy bands above 10 keV do not show significant variation. We discuss the origin of this extremely hard excess component from combined analysis of the XMM-Newton and NuSTAR data.

  7. Structural Basis for Error-free Replication of Oxidatively Damaged DNA by Yeast DNA Polymerase eta

    SciTech Connect

    T Silverstein; R Jain; R Johnson; L Prakash; S Prakash; A Aggarwal

    2011-12-31

    7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts are formed frequently by the attack of oxygen-free radicals on DNA. They are among the most mutagenic lesions in cells because of their dual coding potential, where, in addition to normal base-pairing of 8-oxoG(anti) with dCTP, 8-oxoG in the syn conformation can base pair with dATP, causing G to T transversions. We provide here for the first time a structural basis for the error-free replication of 8-oxoG lesions by yeast DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}). We show that the open active site cleft of Pol{eta} can accommodate an 8-oxoG lesion in the anti conformation with only minimal changes to the polymerase and the bound DNA: at both the insertion and post-insertion steps of lesion bypass. Importantly, the active site geometry remains the same as in the undamaged complex and provides a basis for the ability of Pol to prevent the mutagenic replication of 8-oxoG lesions in cells.

  8. Recent X-ray Variability of eta Carinae: the Quick Road to Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. Francis; Hamaguchi, K.; Pittard, J. M.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Parkin, E. R.; Okazaki, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report continued monitoring of the superluminous binary system eta Car by the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-ray Timing Observatory (RXTE) through the 2009 X-ray minimum. The RXTE campaign shows that the minimum began on 2009 January 16, consistent with the phasings of the two previous minima, and overall, the temporal behavior of the X-ray emission was similar to that observed by RXTE in the previous two cycles. However, important differences did occur. The 2-10 keV X-ray flux and X-ray hardness decreased in the 2.5-year interval leading up to the 2009 minimum compared to the previous cycle. Most intriguingly, the 2009 X-ray minimum was about one month shorter than either of the previous two minima. During the egress from the 2009 minimum the X-ray hardness increased markedly as it had during egress from the previous two minima, although the maximum X-ray hardness achieved was less than the maximum observed after the two previous recoveries. We suggest that the cycle-to-cycle variations, especially the unexpectedly early recovery from the 2009 X-ray minimum, might have been the result of a decline in eta Car's wind momentum flux produced by a drop in eta Car's mass loss rate or wind terminal velocity (or some combination), though if so the change in wind momentum flux required to match the X-ray variation is surprisingly large.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Implications of the Companion Star in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Groh, Jose H.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Okazaki, Atsuo; Hillier, D. John; Russell, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Eta-Carinae is considered to be a massive colliding wind binary system with a highly eccentric (e approximately 0.9), 5.54-yr orbit. However, the companion star continues to evade direct detection as the primary dwarfs its emission at most wavelengths. Using three-dimensional (3-D) SPH simulations of eta-Car's colliding winds and radiative transfer codes, we are able to compute synthetic observables across multiple wavebands for comparison to the observations. The models show that the presence of a companion star has a profound influence on the observed HST/STIS UV spectrum and H-alpha line profiles, as well as the ground-based photometric monitoring. Here, we focus on the Bore Hole effect, wherein the fast wind from the hot secondary star carves a cavity in the dense primary wind, allowing increased escape of radiation from the hotter/deeper layers of the primary's extended wind photosphere. The results have important implications for interpretations of eta-Car's observables at multiple wavelengths.

  10. Nucleotide sequences of immunoglobulin eta genes of chimpanzee and orangutan: DNA molecular clock and hominoid evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Y.; Hong, K.J.; Byun, S.M.; Hisajima, H.; Ueda, S.; Yaoita, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Miyata, T.; Honjo, T.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationships among hominoids and the dates of their divergence, the complete nucleotide sequences of the constant region of the immunoglobulin eta-chain (C/sub eta1/) genes from chimpanzee and orangutan have been determined. These sequences were compared with the human eta-chain constant-region sequence. A molecular clock (silent molecular clock), measured by the degree of sequence divergence at the synonymous (silent) positions of protein-encoding regions, was introduced for the present study. From the comparison of nucleotide sequences of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin and ..beta..- and delta-globulin genes between humans and Old World monkeys, the silent molecular clock was calibrated: the mean evolutionary rate of silent substitution was determined to be 1.56 x 10/sup -9/ substitutions per site per year. Using the silent molecular clock, the mean divergence dates of chimpanzee and orangutan from the human lineage were estimated as 6.4 +/- 2.6 million years and 17.3 +/- 4.5 million years, respectively. It was also shown that the evolutionary rate of primate genes is considerably slower than those of other mammalian genes.

  11. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  12. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  13. Pros and Cons of the Acceleration Scheme (NF-IDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir

    2008-07-01

    The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and beam shaping can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a nonâ scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. Pros and cons of various stages are discussed here in detail. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. Close proximity of strong solenoids and superc

  14. Search for Planetary-mass Companions of the LHB Star eta Corvi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Massimo; Lisse, Carey; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hulsebus, Alan; Sitko, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The nearby sun-like star eta Corvi (F2V, d = 18 pc, age = 1.2 Gyr) has long been known to possess a bright, dusty Kuiper belt that has been recently resolved with Herschel/PACS. In addition to this structure, eta Corvi is one of the rare mature planetary systems to possess also an inner warm belt (~ 3 AU radius), located within the Terrestrial Habitable Zone (TLZ) of this star. Our characterization of this structure, based on Spitzer/IRS and NASA/IRTF SpeX spectral observations, reveals the signature of ice, organics and silicate dust in this warm belt. This supports the hypothesis that eta Corvi is undergoing a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), delivering life-bearing water- and organic-rich material from the Kuiper belt to the TLZ, at roughly the same age as the Solar System?s LHB. For the past four years we have monitored the brightness of eta Corvi?s warm belt with Spitzer/IRAC, finding that its infrared emission has been stable over a multi-year timescale. In 2012 we have also conducted a search for widely separated substellar-mass companions of this star, whose presence as been suggested as a possible trigger for the LHB currently undergoing in the system. This search has led to the identification of three sources with colors and magnitudes consistent with being late-T and Y dwarf companions of this star. We here propose to acquire a new deep roll-subtracted image of the system, 5 years after our first visit, to test for common proper motion of these candidate companions, and determine if any of this sources is physically associated with eta Corvi. A positive identification of a substellar-mass companions (one of which could be a 3-5 MJ planet at ~360 AU from the star) would be a significant step in understanding the processes leading to LHB-like events in a system analogous to the Solar System.

  15. Kinematics of transition during human accelerated sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Nagahara, Ryu; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Matsuo, Akifumi; Zushi, Koji

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated kinematics of human accelerated sprinting through 50 m and examined whether there is transition and changes in acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. Twelve male sprinters performed a 60-m sprint, during which step-to-step kinematics were captured using 60 infrared cameras. To detect the transition during the acceleration phase, the mean height of the whole-body centre of gravity (CG) during the support phase was adopted as a measure. Detection methods found two transitions during the entire acceleration phase of maximal sprinting, and the acceleration phase could thus be divided into initial, middle, and final sections. Discriminable kinematic changes were found when the sprinters crossed the detected first transition—the foot contacting the ground in front of the CG, the knee-joint starting to flex during the support phase, terminating an increase in step frequency—and second transition—the termination of changes in body postures and the start of a slight decrease in the intensity of hip-joint movements, thus validating the employed methods. In each acceleration section, different contributions of lower-extremity segments to increase in the CG forward velocity—thigh and shank for the initial section, thigh, shank, and foot for the middle section, shank and foot for the final section—were verified, establishing different acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. In conclusion, there are presumably two transitions during human maximal accelerated sprinting that divide the entire acceleration phase into three sections, and different acceleration strategies represented by the contributions of the segments for running speed are employed. PMID:24996923

  16. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  17. The spinning disc: studying radial acceleration and its damping process with smartphone acceleration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, K.; Gröber, S.; Kuhn, J.; Müller, A.

    2014-03-01

    Here, we show the possibility of analysing circular motion and acceleration using the acceleration sensors of smartphones. For instance, the known linear dependence of the radial acceleration on the distance to the centre (a constant angular frequency) can be shown using multiple smartphones attached to a revolving disc. As a second example, the decrease of the radial acceleration and the rotation frequency due to friction can be measured and fitted with a quadratic function, in accordance with theory. Finally, because the disc is not set up exactly horizontal, each smartphone measures a component of the gravitational acceleration that adds to the radial acceleration during one half of the period and subtracts from the radial acceleration during the other half. Hence, every graph shows a small modulation, which can be used to determine the rotation frequency, thus converting a ‘nuisance effect’ into a source of useful information, making additional measurements with stopwatches or the like unnecessary.

  18. DNA polymerase eta undergoes alternative splicing, protects against UV sensitivity and apoptosis, and suppresses Mre11-dependent recombination.

    PubMed

    Thakur, M; Wernick, M; Collins, C; Limoli, C L; Crowley, E; Cleaver, J E

    2001-11-01

    Polymerase eta (pol eta) is a low-fidelity DNA polymerase that is the product of the gene, POLH, associated with the human XP variant disorder in which there is an extremely high level of solar-induced skin carcinogenesis. The complete human genomic sequence spans about 40 kb containing 10 coding exons and a cDNA of 2.14 kb; exon I is untranslated and is 6 kb upstream from the first coding exon. Using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), the gene was mapped to human chromosome band 6p21 and mouse band 17D. The gene is expressed in most tissues, except for very low or undetectable levels in peripheral lymphocytes, fetal spleen, and adult muscle; exon II, however, is frequently spliced out in normal cells and in almost half the transcripts in the testis and fetal liver. Expression of POLH in a multicopy episomal vector proved nonviable, suggesting that overexpression is toxic. Expression from chromosomally integrated linear copies using either an EF1-alpha or CMV promoter was functional, resulting in cell lines with low or high levels of pol eta protein, respectively. Point mutations in the center of the gene and in a C-terminal cysteine and deletion of exon II resulted in inactivation, but addition of a terminal 3 amino acid C-terminal tag, or an N- or C-terminal green fluorescent protein, had no effect on function. A low level of expression of pol eta eliminated hMre11 recombination and partially restored UV survival, but did not prevent UV-induced apoptosis, which required higher levels of expression. Polymerase eta is therefore involved in S-phase checkpoint and signal transduction pathways that lead to arrest in S, apoptosis, and recombination. In normal cells, the predominant mechanism of replication of UV damage involves pol eta-dependent bypass, and Mre11-dependent recombination that acts is a secondary, backup mechanism when cells are severely depleted of pol eta.

  19. Targeted disruption of the CD3 eta locus causes high lethality in mice: modulation of Oct-1 transcription on the opposite strand.

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, H; Goto, S; Taki, S; Shirasawa, T; Nakano, H; Miyatake, S; Aoe, T; Ishida, Y; Maeda, H; Shirai, T

    1994-01-01

    CD3 zeta and eta chains are components of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex and are transcribed from a common gene by alternative splicing. TCR complexes containing the zeta eta dimer have been thought to mediate different functions than complexes containing the zeta 2 dimer. To analyze the role of eta in the development and function of T cells, we generated eta-deficient mice without affecting zeta by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Homozygous mutant embryos developed normally. Unexpectedly, however, these mice exhibited high mortality soon after birth for unknown reason(s). Analysis of surviving homozygous animals revealed that the development and function of T cells were normal in the absence of the eta chain. Recently, the zeta/eta locus was reported to encode a transcription factor, Oct-1, on the opposite DNA strand. Our targeting strategy resulted in modulation of Oct-1 transcription--reduction of the authentic Oct-1 mRNA and induction of aberrant transcripts. Although differences in tissue distribution and DNA binding capacity of Oct-1 between wild-type and eta-deficient mice were not evident from in situ hybridization and gel shift analysis, the high mortality in the eta-deficient strain may well be due to the disturbance of Oct-1 transcription by the mutation in the zeta/eta locus. Such possible complexities have to be taken into account in the interpretation of gene targeting experiments. Images PMID:8131747

  20. Predictions of particle size and lattice diffusion pathway requirements for sodium-ion anodes using eta-Cu6Sn5 thin films as a model system

    SciTech Connect

    Baggetto, Loic; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude; Gorka, Joanna; Bridges, Craig A; Veith, Gabriel M

    2013-01-01

    Geometrically well-defined Cu6Sn5 thin films were used as model systems to estimate the diffusion depth and diffusion pathway requirements of Li and Na ions in alloy anodes. eta-Cu6Sn5 anodes have an initial reversible capacity towards Li of 545 mAh g-1 (Li3.96Sn or 19.8 Li/Cu6Sn5) and a very low initial irreversible capacity of 1.6 Li/Cu6Sn5. In contrast, the reaction with Na is limited with a reversible capacity of 160 mAh g-1 compared to the expected 516 mAh g-1. The potential profile is analogous to that of pure Sn with an average potential of 0.3 V. X-ray diffraction and 119Sn-M ssbauer measurements show that this limited capacity is likely resulting from the limited diffusion of Na into the anode particles not the formation of a low Na-content phase. This is substantiated by the analysis of the structure of eta-Cu6Sn5 which revealed zig-zag and tunnel diffusion pathways with spherical voids with a diameter very close to that of Na+. Moreover, our results also indicate that an alloy of eta-Cu6Sn5 should have optimized particle sizes of about 10 nm in diameter to increase the Na-capacity significantly. An alternative system consisting of a mixture of Cu6Sn5 and Sn of nominal composition Cu6Sn10 has been studied as possible Na-ion anode material possessing higher storage capacity than pure Cu6Sn5. Indeed this mixture of phase delivers a larger initial reversible storage capacity up to 400 mAh g-1. Finally, we have evidenced that the presence of Cu in Cu6Sn5 and in Cu6Sn10 suppresses the anomalous electrolyte decomposition normally measured for pure Sn at 1.2 V during discharge.

  1. Penguins, trees and final state interactions in B decays in broken SU3.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science

    1997-12-01

    The availability of data on B{sub s} decays to strange quasi-two-body final states, either with or without charmonium opens new possibilities for understanding different contributions of weak diagrams and in particular the relative contributions of tree and penguin diagrams. Corresponding B{sub d} and B{sub s} decays to charge conjugate final states are equal in the SU(3) symmetry limit and the dominant SU(3) breaking mechanism is given by ratios of CKM matrix elements. Final State Interactions effects should be small, because strong interactions conserve C and should tend to cancel in ratios between charge conjugate states. Particularly interesting implications of decays into final states containing {eta} and {eta}{prime} are discussed.

  2. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  3. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  4. Estimating ETAS: the effects of truncation, missing data, and model assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, Stefanie; Mignan, Arnaud; Zechar, Jeremy; Werner, Maximilian; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model is widely used to describe the occurrence of earthquakes in space and time, but there has been little discussion of the limits of, and influences on, its estimation. What has been established is that ETAS parameter estimates are influenced by missing data (e.g., earthquakes are not reliably detected during lively aftershock sequences) and by simplifying assumptions (e.g., that aftershocks are isotropically distributed). In this article, we investigate the effect of truncation: how do parameter estimates depend on the cut-off magnitude, Mcut, above which parameters are estimated? We analyze catalogs from southern California and Italy and find that parameter variations as a function of Mcut are caused by (i) changing sample size (which affects e.g. Omori's cconstant) or (ii) an intrinsic dependence on Mcut (as Mcut increases, absolute productivity and background rate decrease). We also explore the influence of another form of truncation - the finite catalog length - that can bias estimators of the branching ratio. Being also a function of Omori's p-value, the true branching ratio is underestimated by 45% to 5% for 1.05< p <1.2. Finite sample size affects the variation of the branching ratio estimates. Moreover, we investigate the effect of missing aftershocks and find that the ETAS productivity parameters (α and K0) and the Omoris c-value are significantly changed only for low Mcut=2.5. We further find that conventional estimation errors for these parameters, inferred from simulations that do not account for aftershock incompleteness, are underestimated by, on average, a factor of six.

  5. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  6. Time-dependent CP-violation Parameters in B0 to eta' K0 Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, K

    2006-09-26

    The authors present measurements of time-dependent CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sup 0}. The data sample corresponds to 347 million B{bar B} pairs produced by e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance in the PEP-II collider, and collected with the BABAR detector. The preliminary results are S = 0.55 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.02, and C = -0.015 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.03, where the first error quoted is statistical, the second systematic.

  7. Discovery and structure-activity relationships of sulfonamide ETA-selective antagonists.

    PubMed

    Stein, P D; Floyd, D M; Bisaha, S; Dickey, J; Girotra, R N; Gougoutas, J Z; Kozlowski, M; Lee, V G; Liu, E C; Malley, M F

    1995-04-14

    Random screening of compounds in an ETA receptor binding assay led to the discovery of a class of benzenesulfonamide ligands. Optimization led to the development of 5-amino-N-(3,4-dimethyl-5-isoxazolyl)-1-naphthalenesulfonamides which were functional antagonists. Structural features which were important to activity included a 1,5-substitution pattern on the naphthalene ring; a sulfonamide NH with a pK value < 7; an amine, preferably with alkyl substituents, at the 5-position; and methyl groups on both the 3- and 4-positions of the isoxazole. PMID:7731020

  8. The Little Homunculus of Eta Carinae: Ejection Date, Gas Temperature and Reddening Values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    HST/STIS spectral monitoring of Eta Carinae and its ejecta reveals the presence of a relatively small bipolar structure inside the central regions of the familiar Homunculus lobes. Astrometric analysis shows that the Little Homunculus was most likely ejected during the 1890 event. Here we employ a simple plasma analysis on the ejecta: (1) identify the forbidden [Fe II] lines, and (2) use them with a Boltzmann distribution to estimate a locus in "gas temperature" -versus- "Reddening" parameter space. Our preliminary result shows that gas temperature of the Little Homunculus may be around 5000 K with reddening E(B-V) approx. = 0.5 of a standard interstellar reddening is valid.

  9. Reaction {gamma}p {sup {yields}} {eta}' (958) p and polarization of recoil protons

    SciTech Connect

    Tryasuchev, V. A.

    2006-02-15

    On the basis of the isobar model extended by including the t-channel, the cross sections for and single-polarization features of the reaction {gamma}p {sup {yields}} {eta}'p are calculated for incident-photon energies up to 5 GeV, two poorly studied resonances, S{sub 11}(1978) and P{sub 13}(2080), being taken into account in this calculation. In order to reduce the ambiguities in the choice of resonances and their parameters that make it possible to reproduce the experimental differential cross sections, it is proposed to measure the polarization of recoil protons in the reaction being considered.

  10. Evaluation of the 29-km Eta Model. Part 1; Objective Verification at Three Selected Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutter, Paul A.; Manobianco, John; Merceret, Francis J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an objective verification of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) 29-km eta model from May 1996 through January 1998. The evaluation was designed to assess the model's surface and upper-air point forecast accuracy at three selected locations during separate warm (May - August) and cool (October - January) season periods. In order to enhance sample sizes available for statistical calculations, the objective verification includes two consecutive warm and cool season periods. Systematic model deficiencies comprise the larger portion of the total error in most of the surface forecast variables that were evaluated. The error characteristics for both surface and upper-air forecasts vary widely by parameter, season, and station location. At upper levels, a few characteristic biases are identified. Overall however, the upper-level errors are more nonsystematic in nature and could be explained partly by observational measurement uncertainty. With a few exceptions, the upper-air results also indicate that 24-h model error growth is not statistically significant. In February and August 1997, NCEP implemented upgrades to the eta model's physical parameterizations that were designed to change some of the model's error characteristics near the surface. The results shown in this paper indicate that these upgrades led to identifiable and statistically significant changes in forecast accuracy for selected surface parameters. While some of the changes were expected, others were not consistent with the intent of the model updates and further emphasize the need for ongoing sensitivity studies and localized statistical verification efforts. Objective verification of point forecasts is a stringent measure of model performance, but when used alone, is not enough to quantify the overall value that model guidance may add to the forecast process. Therefore, results from a subjective verification of the meso-eta model over the Florida peninsula are

  11. STS-54 MS2 Harbaugh and MS3 Helms during training in JSC's ETA / airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS2) Gregory J. Harbaugh, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), is assisted by MS3 Susan J. Helms during Environmental Test Article (ETA) / Airlock training (STB-SS-956) in JSC's Crew Systems Laboratory Bldg 7. Helms readies the EMU glove as Harbaugh looks on. Though not assigned to the scheduled STS-54 extravehicular activity (EVA), Helms will assist Harbaugh in EVA preparations as she does here and will serve as a backup EVA crewmember. Two crewmembers will perform a four-hour-plus spacewalk during STS-54.

  12. Observation of CP violation in B --> eta'K0 decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-01-19

    We present measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C in B(0) --> eta(')K(0) decays. The data sample corresponds to 384 x 10(6) BB pairs produced by e(+)e(-) annihilation at the Upsilon(4S). The results are S=0.58+/-0.10+/-0.03 and C=-0.16+/-0.07+/-0.03. We observe mixing-induced CP violation with a significance of 5.5 standard deviations in this b --> s penguin dominated mode.

  13. Androgens influence microvascular dilation in PCOS through ET-A and ET-B receptors.

    PubMed

    Wenner, Megan M; Taylor, Hugh S; Stachenfeld, Nina S

    2013-10-01

    Hyperandrogenism and vascular dysfunction often coexist in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We hypothesized that testosterone compromises cutaneous microvascular dilation in women with PCOS via the endothelin-1 ET-B subtype receptor. To control and isolate testosterone's effects on microvascular dilation, we administered a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRHant) for 11 days in obese, otherwise healthy women [controls, 22.0 (4) yr, 36.0 (3.2) kg/m(2)] or women with PCOS [23 (4) yr, 35.4 (1.3) kg/m(2)], adding testosterone (T; 2.5 mg/day) on days 8-11. Using laser Doppler flowmetry and cutaneous microdialysis, we measured changes in skin microcirculatory responsiveness (ΔCVC) to local heating while perfusing ET-A (BQ-123) and ET-B (BQ-788) receptor antagonists under three experimental conditions: baseline (BL; prehormone intervention), GnRHant (day 4 of administration), and T administration. At BL, ET-A receptor inhibition enhanced heat-induced vasodilation in both groups [ΔCVC control 2.03 (0.65), PCOS 2.10 (0.25), AU/mmHg, P < 0.05]; ET-B receptor inhibition reduced vasodilation in controls only [ΔCVC 0.98 (0.39), 1.41 (0.45) AU/mmHg for controls, PCOS] compared with saline [ΔCVC controls 1.27 (0.48), PCOS 1.31 (0.13) AU/mmHg]. GnRHant enhanced vasodilation in PCOS [saline ΔCVC 1.69 (0.23) AU/mmHg vs. BL, P < 0.05] and abolished the ET-A effect in both groups, a response reasserted with T in controls. ET-B receptor inhibition reduced heat-induced vasodilation in both groups during GnRHant and T [ΔCVC, controls: 0.95 (0.21) vs. 0.51 (13); PCOS: 1.27 (0.23) vs. 0.84 (0.27); for GnRHant vs. T, P < 0.05]. These data demonstrate that androgen suppression improves microvascular dilation in PCOS via ET-A and ET-B receptors.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Long-term spectroscopy of eta Carinae (Damineli+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damineli, A.; Stahl, O.; Kaufer, A.; Wolf, B.; Quast, G.; Lopes, D. F.

    1998-06-01

    This Table contains parameters of 655 spectral features in the spectrum of eta Carinae, in the wavelength region 3850-11000 Angstrom. The narrow and broad line components were measured separately, for the spectrum in high excitation state (year 1995) and during the "spectroscopic event" of June/1992. The spectra were collected at ESO (Chile) and LNA (Brazil) at high resolution. Several spectral lines of Fe II, [Fe II], [Fe III], [N II] ands Ca II are identifyed for the first time in the spectrum of this star. Line variability between high and low excitation states is characterized in an objective way (parameter var in the last column). (1 data file).

  15. Single particle dynamics in circular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the theory associated with the transverse dynamics of single particle, in circular accelerators. The discussion begins with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. The case of a single particle in a circular accelerator is considered with a discussion of non-linear terms and chromaticity. The canonical perturbation theory is presented and nonlinear resonances are considered. Finally, the concept of renormalization and residue criterion are examined. (FI)

  16. Nondiffracting accelerating wave packets of Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Ido; Bekenstein, Rivka; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-20

    We present the nondiffracting spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams to the full domain of the wave equation. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending which can have subwavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90°. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and find the new class of accelerating breathers: self-bending beams of periodically oscillating shapes. Finally, we emphasize that in their scalar form, these beams are the exact solutions for nondispersive accelerating wave packets of the most common wave equation describing time-harmonic waves. As such, this work has profound implications to many linear wave systems in nature, ranging from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and membranes. PMID:22680719

  17. Nondiffracting accelerating wave packets of Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Ido; Bekenstein, Rivka; Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-20

    We present the nondiffracting spatially accelerating solutions of the Maxwell equations. Such beams accelerate in a circular trajectory, thus generalizing the concept of Airy beams to the full domain of the wave equation. For both TE and TM polarizations, the beams exhibit shape-preserving bending which can have subwavelength features, and the Poynting vector of the main lobe displays a turn of more than 90°. We show that these accelerating beams are self-healing, analyze their properties, and find the new class of accelerating breathers: self-bending beams of periodically oscillating shapes. Finally, we emphasize that in their scalar form, these beams are the exact solutions for nondispersive accelerating wave packets of the most common wave equation describing time-harmonic waves. As such, this work has profound implications to many linear wave systems in nature, ranging from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and membranes.

  18. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  19. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  20. Linear accelerator: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutzberg, J.

    1972-01-01

    Design is proposed for inexpensive accelerometer which would work by applying pressure to fluid during acceleration. Pressure is used to move shuttle, and shuttle movement is sensed and calibrated to give acceleration readings.

  1. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  2. ETAS, an enzyme-treated asparagus extract, attenuates amyloid beta-induced cellular disorder in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Junetsu; Ito, Tomohiro; Wakame, Koji; Kitadate, Kentaro; Sakurai, Takuya; Sato, Shogo; Ishibashi, Yoshinaga; Izawa, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Kazuto; Ishida, Hitoshi; Takabatake, Ichiro; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    One of the pathological characterizations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) in cerebral cortical cells. The deposition of Abeta in neuronal cells leads to an increase in the production of free radicals that are typified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby inducing cell death. A growing body of evidence now suggests that several plant-derived food ingredients are capable of scavenging ROS in mammalian cells. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS), which is rich in antioxidants, is one of these ingredients. The pre-incubation of differentiated PC 12 cells with ETAS significantly recovered Abeta-induced reduction of cell viability, which was accompanied by reduced levels of ROS. These results suggest that ETAS may be one of the functional food ingredients with anti-oxidative capacity to help prevent AD.

  3. Observation of a backward peak in the gamma d ---> pi0 d cross- section near the eta threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Yordanka Ilieva; Barry Berman; Alexander Kudryavtsev; I.I. Strakovsky; V.E. Tarasov; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; G. Asryan; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Nathan Baltzell; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Angela Biselli; Sylvain Bouchigny; Sergey Boyarinov; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Donald Crabb; Volker Crede; R. De Masi; Enzo De Sanctis; Raffaella De Vita; Pavel Degtiarenko; Alexandre Deur; Richard Dickson; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Kawtar Hafidi; Rafael Hakobyan; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde; Charles Hyde-Wright; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; Narbe Kalantarians; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Mikhail Kossov; Zebulun Krahn; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Kenneth Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Marion MacCormick; Nikolai Markov; Bryan McKinnon; Bernhard Mecking; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Marco Mirazita; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Kei Moriya; Steven Morrow; M. Moteabbed; E. Munevar; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K. Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Oleg Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; David Tedeschi; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Lawrence Weinstein; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2007-05-14

    High-quality cross sections for the reaction gamma+d->pi^0+d have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab over a wide energy range near and above the eta-meson photoproduction threshold. At backward c.m. angles for the outgoing pions, we observe a resonance-like structure near E_gamma=700 MeV. Our model analysis shows that it can be explained by eta excitation in the intermediate state. The effect is the result of the contribution of the N(1535)S_11 resonance to the amplitudes of the subprocesses occurring between the two nucleons and of a two-step process in which the excitation of an intermediate eta meson dominates.

  4. MEQALAC rf accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Brodowski, J.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype MEQALAC capable of replacing the Cockcroft Walton pre-injector at BNL is being fabricated. Ten milliamperes of H/sup -/ beam supplied from a source sitting at a potential of -40 kilovolt is to be accelerated to 750 keV. This energy gain is provided by a 200 Megahertz accelerating system rather than the normal dc acceleration. Substantial size and cost reduction would be realized by such a system over conventional pre-accelerator systems.

  5. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  6. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  7. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  8. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  9. Image of the Eta Carinae Nebula Taken by the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This image is an x-ray view of Eta Carinae Nebula showing bright stars taken with the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2/Einstein Observatory. The Eta Carinae Nebula is a large and complex cloud of gas, crisscrossed with dark lanes of dust, some 6,500 light years from Earth. Buried deep in this cloud are many bright young stars and a very peculiar variable star. The HEAO-2, the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date, was capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects. Shortly after launch, the HEAO-2 was nicknamed the Einstein Observatory by its scientific experimenters in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein, whose concepts of relativity and gravitation have influenced much of modern astrophysics, particularly x-ray astronomy. The HEAO-2, designed and developed by TRW, Inc. under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, was launched aboard an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle on November 13, 1978.

  10. Eta Carinae: A Box of Puzzles...Some Solved, Others Await

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    In the l840's, Eta Carinae brightened to rival Sirius, then faded. Today we see a marginally naked-eye binary with an expanding, very dusty bipolar Homunculus. The energetics of the ejected mass (>l2 to 40 solar masses at 500-700 km/s plus outer bullets/strings up to 3000 km/s} approach that of a supernova. Extragalactic SN surveys detect near-supernovae thought to be like the Great Eruption of the 1840's. Eta Carinae presents an abundance of puzzles: rich in N, but 1/100th the solar C and O abundances; Ti, V, Sr, Sc persist in atomic states.... yet an abundance of molecules and dust exists in the Homunculus. How did molecules and dust form with low C and O? A near supernova occurred in the l840m, yet both binary companions, with total mass > 120 solar masses, survive in a very eccentric orbit. What is the near future of this system: a GRB? a SN? or just two WR stars that ultimately become two SNs? These and other puzzles will be presented

  11. Atmospheric response to a realistic coastal polynya in Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica) simulated by ETA model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, S.; Casini, G.; Parmiggiani, F.

    2009-04-01

    Coastal polynyas are areas of open water (and/or very thin ice) which form adjacent to coasts or blocking feature in polar regions during the wintertime, when the sea water is expected to be ice covered. They are thought to be maintained by strong offshore winds blowing over these area and/or by ocean currents. Sea ice is removed as it forms and drifted offshore. In polynya areas a direct contact is established between the relatively warm sea water and the cold, dry atmosphere. As a consequence, the physical characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer change. The work presented here concerns a real polynya event in the region of Terra Nova Bay (TNB), Antarctica, where a recurring coastal polynya occurs nearby the Italian Antarctic Base. The aim is the study of atmospheric response to the presence of a open water area of realistic size by three-dimensional numerical simulations. Atmospheric numerical modelling is a fundamental tool for the study of air - polynya interactions in the remote polar regions, where observational data are difficult. The numerical model used for the simulations is a recent version of ETA model (Mesinger et al., 2006), with the addition of a piecewise linear advection for the wind field. ECMWF and NCEP data provided the initial and boundary conditions. A previous version of the model had already been successfully used in the Antarctic area (De Carolis et al, 2006, Casini and Morelli, 2007). As a first step to analyze the polynya event, numerical simulation was performed for the period from 12 to 17 July 2006 in order to study the development of the katabatic wind (Morelli and Casini, 2008; Morelli, 2008). Daily satellite images, concerning the period, display that a sea ice free area formed on 15 and 16 July, reaching its maximum extension of about 4000 km2 on 16 July (Morelli et al.,2007). In order to gain insight on the atmospheric response to open water area within a sea ice field, ETA model runs were carried out from 15 to 17 July

  12. Identification of the ETA receptor subtype that mediates endothelin induced autocrine proliferation of normal human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, A; Venuti, A; Di Castro, V; Marcante, M L

    1995-04-01

    Endothelin-1 has a wide range of pharmacological effects in various tissues and acts as autocrine/paracrine factor. The potential of ET-1 to function as an autocrine growth factor was evaluated in normal human keratinocytes. Radioligand binding studies showed that 125I-ET-1 bound to a single class of high-affinity-binding sites on the surface of the cells. The dissociation constant was 0.045 nM with receptor numbers of 1700 sites/cell. Treatment with serum caused increases in expression of binding sites (3500 sites/cell), with no change in binding affinity. ET-1 stimulated thymidine incorporation in these cells that expressed ET receptors. An ET antagonist selective for the ETA receptor subtype (BQ 123) inhibited DNA synthesis stimulated by ET-1 and reduced the basal growth rate of unstimulated cells. These data suggest that the ET-1 induced DNA synthesis is mediated by ETA receptor subtype and that endogenously produced ET-1 promotes the autocrine proliferation of keratinocytes.

  13. Determining Cloud Parameters with the Curve-Of-Growth: Application Eta Car

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vieira, G. L.; Gull, T. R.; Bruhweiler, F.; Nielsen, K. E.; Verner, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the NUV part of the Eta Car spectrum, using data with high spatial and high spectral resolving power obtained with the HST/STIS under the Treasury Program. The NUV spectrum of Eta Car Shows a great contribution of absorption features from neutral and singly ionized elements along the line-of-sight. A large number of velocity systems have been observed. The two most prominent, with Doppler shifts corresponding to -146 and -513 km/s respectively, are shown to be useful for investigations of the gaseous environments responsible for the absorption. The -146 and the -513 km/s velocity systems display different characteristics regarding the ionization state and spectral line width, which suggest that they originate at different distances from the central object. We have investigated the absorption structures before the spectroscopic minimum, occurring during the summer of 2003, with a standard curve-of-growth. We have independently derived the column density and the b-value for the Fe II (-146 km/s) and Ti II (-513 km/s) velocity systems. The excitation temperature has been determined for the -146 km/s velocity system using the photo-ionization code \\textsc(cloudy). The -146 km/s velocity structure shows noticeable variation over the spectroscopic minimum. The sudden appearance and disappearance of Ti II and V II are astonishing. We have made an attempt to analyze these variations with the curve-of-growth method and will present preliminary results.

  14. Localization of endothelin ETA and ETB receptor-mediated constriction in the renal microcirculation of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Endlich, K; Hoffend, J; Steinhausen, M

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to visualize endothelin-1 (ET-1)-mediated constriction in renal vessels of cortical and juxtamedullary glomeruli in the split hydronephrotic rat kidney in vivo and to functionally characterize the ET receptor subtypes involved. 2. ET-1 (10(-9) M) constricted preglomerular vessels (by 6-18%) and efferent arterioles (by 11-13%), and decreased glomerular blood flow (GBF, by 55%) of cortical and juxtamedullary glomeruli. 3. The ETA antagonist BQ-123 (10(-6) M), as well as the ETB antagonist BQ-788 (2 x 10(-7) M) and IRL 1038 (10(-6) M), shifted the concentration-response curve of GBF for ET-1 to the right by one order of magnitude. While BQ-123 antagonized ET-1 constriction only in preglomerular vessels, BQ-788 and IRL 1038 were effective both in preglomerular vessels and efferent arterioles. 4. The ETB agonist IRL 1620 (10(-8) M) reduced GBF by 50% and constricted efferent arterioles (by 20-33%) about two times more than preglomerular vessels (by 6-14%). 5. Our results suggest that in renal cortical and juxtamedullary vessels of rats, ET-1-induced preglomerular vasoconstriction is mediated by ETA and ETB receptors, while efferent vasoconstriction is predominantly mediated by ETB receptors, which might have important consequences for the regulation of glomerular filtration pressure by ET. PMID:8951723

  15. Helicity Asymmetry E In Eta (547) Meson Photoproduction From The Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Brian

    The nucleon resonance spectrum consists of many overlapping excitations. Polarization observables are an important tool for understanding and clarifying these spectra. While there is a large data base of differential cross sections for the process, very few data exist for polarization observables. A program of double polarization experiments has been conducted at Jefferson Lab using a tagged polarized photon beam and a frozen spin polarized target (FROST). The results presented here were taken during the first running period of FROST using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab with photon energies ranging from 329 MeV to 2.35 GeV. Data are presented for the E polarization observable for eta meson photoproduction on the proton from threshold ( W=1500 MeV) to W=1900 MeV. Comparisons to the partial wave analyses of SAID and Bonn-Gatchina along with the isobar analysis of eta-MAID are made. These results will help distinguish between current theoretical predictions and refine future theories.

  16. THE H{alpha} VARIATIONS OF {eta} CARINAE DURING THE 2009.0 SPECTROSCOPIC EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Fernandez-Lajus, E. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: eflajus@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar

    2010-04-15

    We report on H{alpha} spectroscopy of the 2009.0 spectroscopic event of {eta} Carinae collected via SMARTS observations using the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory 1.5 m telescope and echelle spectrograph. Our observations were made almost every night over a two-month interval around the predicted minimum of {eta} Car. We observed a significant fading of the line emission that reached a minimum 7 days after the X-ray minimum. About 17 days prior to the H{alpha} flux minimum, the H{alpha} profile exhibited the emergence of a broad, P Cygni type, absorption component (near a Doppler shift of -500 km s{sup -1}) and a narrow absorption component (near -144 km s{sup -1} and probably associated with intervening gas from the Little Homunculus Nebula). All these features were observed during the last event in 2003.5 and are probably related to the close periastron passage of the companion. We argue that these variations are consistent with qualitative expectations about changes in the primary star's stellar wind that result from the wind-wind collision with a massive binary companion and from atmospheric eclipses of the companion.

  17. Eclipse and Collapse of the Colliding Wind X-ray Emission from Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray emission from the massive stellar binary system, Eta Carinae, drops strongly around periastron passage; the event is called the X-ray minimum. We launched a focused observing campaign in early 2009 to understand the mechanism of causing the X-ray minimum. During the campaign, hard X-ray emission (<10 keV) from Eta Carinae declined as in the previous minimum, though it recovered a month earlier. Extremely hard X-ray emission between 15-25 keV, closely monitored for the first time with the Suzaku HXD/PIN, decreased similarly to the hard X-rays, but it reached minimum only after hard X-ray emission from the star had already began to recover. This indicates that the X-ray minimum is produced by two composite mechanisms: the thick primary wind first obscured the hard, 2-10 keV thermal X-ray emission from the wind-wind collision (WWC) plasma; the WWC activity then decays as the two stars reach periastron.

  18. High Resolution Temporal and Spectral Monitoring of Eta Carinae's X-Ray Emission the June Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Henley, D.; Pittard, J. M.; Gull, T. R.; Davidson, K.; Swank, J. H.; Petre, R.; Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The supermassive and luminous star Eta Carinae undergoes strong X-ray variations every 5.5 years when its 2-10 keV X-ray emission brightens rapidly with wild fluctuations before dropping by a factor of 100 to a minimum lasting 3 months. The most recent X-ray "eclipse" began in June 2003 and during this time Eta Carinae was intensely observed throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. Here we report the first results of frequent monitoring of the 2-10 keV band X-ray emission by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer along wit high resolution X-ray spectra obtained with the transmission gratings on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We compare these observations to those results obtained during the previous X-ray eclipse in 1998, and interpret the variations in the X-ray brightness, in the amount of absorption, in the X-ray emission measure and in the K-shell emission lines in terms of a colliding wind binary model.

  19. X-ray Monitoring of eta Carinae: Variations on a Theme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2004-01-01

    We present monitoring observations by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer of the 2-10 keV X-ray emission from the supermassive star eta Carinae from 1996 through late 2003. These data cover more than one of the stellar variability cycles in temporal detail and include especially detailed monitoring through two X-ray minima. We compare the current X-ray minimum which began on June 29, 2003 to the previous X-ray minimum which began on December 15, 1997, and refine the X-ray period to 2024 days. We examine the variations in the X-ray spectrum with phase and with time, and also refine our understanding of the X-ray peaks which have a quasi-period of 84 days, with significant variation. Cycle-to-cycle differences are seen in the level of X-ray intensity and in the detailed variations of the X-ray flux on the rise to maximum just prior to the X-ray minimum. Despite these differences the similarities between the decline to minimum, the duration of the minimum, and correlated variations of the X-ray flux and other measures throughout the electromagnetic spectrum leave little doubt that that the X-ray variation is strictly periodic and produced by orbital motion as the wind from eta Carinae collides with the wind of an otherwise unseen companion.

  20. Common suppression pattern of eta and pi0 mesons at high transverse momentum in Au + Au collisions at square root S(NN) = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; Chenawi, K El; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2006-05-26

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of eta mesons have been measured within p(T) = 2-10 GeV/c at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment in Au + Au collisions at square root S(NN) = 200 GeV. In central Au+Au the eta yields are significantly suppressed compared to peripheral Au + Au, d + Au, and p + p yields scaled by the corresponding number of nucleon-nucleon collisions. The magnitude, centrality, and p(T) dependence of the suppression is common, within errors, for eta and pi0. The ratio of eta to pi0 spectra at high p(T) amounts to 0.40 < R(eta/pi)0 < 0.48 for the three systems, in agreement with the world average measured in hadronic and nuclear reactions and, at large scaled momentum, in e+e- collisions.

  1. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  2. Tridentate Coordination Modes of Functionalized Titanocene Thiolates. Crystal Structure of [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3))Ti(&mgr;-eta(5):kappa-P-C(5)H(4)PPh(2))(&mgr;-SPh)(2)W(CO)(3)].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Esther; García, M. Angeles; Gutierrez-Puebla, Enrique; Hernández, Elisa; Mansilla, Noelia; Zamora, Félix

    1998-12-28

    Mixed monosubstituted cyclopentadienyl Ti(IV) derivatives [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)R)(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3))Ti(SPh)(2)] (R = PPh(2), Ph(2)P=O, Ph(2)P=S) react with carbonylmetal fragments of group 6 to generate heterodinuclear compounds [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3))Ti(&mgr;-eta(5):kappa-P-C(5)H(4)PPh(2))(&mgr;-SPh)(2)M(CO)(3)], [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3))(SPh)Ti(&mgr;-eta(5):kappa-P-C(5)H(4)PPh(2))(&mgr;-SPh)M(CO)(4)], [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)P(E)Ph(2))(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3))Ti(&mgr;-SPh)(2)M(CO)(4)] (M = Mo, W; E = O, S) and [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3))Ti(&mgr;-eta(5):kappa-E-C(5)H(4)P(E)Ph(2))(&mgr;-SPh)(2)M(CO)(3)] (M = Mo, W; E = S or M = Mo, E = O). All complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic data. The crystal structure of [(eta(5)-C(5)H(4)SiMe(3))Ti(&mgr;-eta(5):kappa-P-C(5)H(4)PPh(2))(&mgr;-SPh)(2)W(CO)(3)] has been determined by X-ray diffraction techniques, and it was confirmed that the titanium precursor acts as a tridentate metalloligand. The complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic system in space group Pna2(1); a = 23.081(2) Å, b = 14.3046(9) Å, c = 11.6892(8) Å; Z = 4.

  3. Elementary principles of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, G.A.; Talman, R.

    1983-09-01

    These lectures come in five sections. The first is this introduction. The second is a short chronology of what are viewed as important milestones in the field. The third covers proton linacs. It introduces elementary concepts such as transit time, shunt impedance, and Q. Critical issues such as phase stability and transverse forces are discussed. The fourth section contains an elementary discussion of waveguide accelerating structures. It can be regarded as an introduction to some of the more advanced treatments of the subject. The final section is devoted to electron accelerators. Taking SLAC as an example, various topics are discussed such as structure design, choice of parameters, frequency optimization, beam current, emittance, bunch length and beam loading. Recent developments and future challenges are mentioned briefly. 41 figures, 4 tables.

  4. The interacting winds of Eta Carinae: Observed forbidden line changes and the Forbidden Blue(-Shifted) Crab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Corcoran, Michael F.; Teodoro, Mairan; Richardson, Noel; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Groh, Jose H.; Hillier, Desmond John; Damineli, Augusto; Weigelt, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The massive binary, Eta Carinae (EC), produces such massive winds that strong forbidden line emission of singly- and doubly-ionized iron traces wind-wind interactions from the current cycle plus fossil interactions from one, two and three 5.54-year cycles ago.With an eccentricity of >0.9, the >90 solar mass primary (EC-A) and >30 solar mass secondary (EC-B) approach to within 1.5 AU during periastron and recede to nearly 30 AU across apastron. The wind-wind structures move outward driven by the 420 km/s primary wind interacting with the ~3000 km/s secondary wind yielding partially-accelerated compressed primary wind shells that are excited by mid-UV from EC-A and in limited lines of sight, FUV from EC-B.These structures are spectroscopically and spatially resolved by HST's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. At critical binary phases, we have mapped the central 2'x2' region in the light of [Fe III] and [Fe II] with spatial resolution of 0.12' and velocity resolution of 40 km/s.1) The bulk of forbidden emission originates from the large cavity northwest of EC and is due to ionization of massive ejecta from the 1840s and 1890s eruptions. The brightest clumps are the Weigelt Blobs C and D, but there are additionally multiple, fainter emission clumps. Weigelt B appears to have faded.2) Three concentric, red-shifted [FeII] arcs expand at ~470 km/s excited by mid-UV of EC-A.3) The structure of primarily blue-shifted [Fe III] emission resembles a Maryland Blue Crab. The claws appear at the early stages of the high-excitation recovery from the periastron passage, expand at radial velocities exceeding the primary wind terminal velocity, 420 km/s and fade as the binary system approaches periastron with the primary wind enveloping the FUV radiation from EC-B.4) All [Fe III] emission faded by late June 2014 and disappeared by August 2, 2014, the beginning of periastron passage.Comparisons to HST/STIS observations between 1998 to 2004.3 indicate long-term fading of [Fe II

  5. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  6. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  7. Molecular modeling, quantum polarized ligand docking and structure-based 3D-QSAR analysis of the imidazole series as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Both endothelin ETA receptor antagonists and angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonists lower blood pressure in hypertensive patients. A dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonist may be more efficacious antihypertensive drug. In this study we identified the mode and mechanism of binding of imidazole series of compounds as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists. Methods: Molecular modeling approach combining quantum-polarized ligand docking (QPLD), MM/GBSA free-energy calculation and 3D-QSAR analysis was used to evaluate 24 compounds as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists and to reveal their binding modes and structural basis of the inhibitory activity. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening and docking studies were performed to identify more potent dual antagonists. Results: 3D-QSAR models of the imidazole compounds were developed from the conformer generated by QPLD, and the resulting models showed a good correlation between the predicted and experimental activity. The visualization of the 3D-QSAR model in the context of the compounds under study revealed the details of the structure-activity relationship: substitution of methoxymethyl and cyclooctanone might increase the activity against AT1 receptor, while substitution of cyclohexone and trimethylpyrrolidinone was important for the activity against ETA receptor; addition of a trimethylpyrrolidinone to compound 9 significantly reduced its activity against AT1 receptor but significantly increased its activity against ETA receptor, which was likely due to the larger size and higher intensities of the H-bond donor and acceptor regions in the active site of ETA receptor. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening followed by subsequent Glide SP, XP, QPLD and MM/GBSA calculation identified 5 potential lead compounds that might act as dual AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists. Conclusion: This study may provide some insights into the development of novel potent dual ETA and AT1 receptor antagonists. As a result, five compounds are

  8. The novel multispecies Fc-specific Pseudomonas exotoxin A fusion protein α-Fc-ETA' enables screening of antibodies for immunotoxin development.

    PubMed

    Klausz, Katja; Kellner, Christian; Derer, Stefanie; Valerius, Thomas; Staudinger, Matthias; Burger, Renate; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Immunoconjugates that deliver cytotoxic payloads to cancer cells represent a promising class of therapeutic agents which are intensively investigated in various clinical applications. Prerequisites for the generation of effective immunoconjugates are antibodies which efficiently deliver the respective cytotoxic payload. To facilitate the selection of human or mouse antibodies that display favorable characteristics as immunotoxins, we developed a novel Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA)-based screening protein. The α-Fc-ETA' consists of a multispecies-specific Fc-binding domain antibody genetically fused to a truncated ETA version (ETA'). α-Fc-ETA' non-covalently bound to human and mouse antibodies but did not form immune complexes with bovine immunoglobulins. In combination with antibodies harboring human or mouse Fc domains α-Fc-ETA' inhibited proliferation of antigen-expressing tumor cells. The cytotoxic effects were strictly antibody dependent and were observed with low α-Fc-ETA' concentrations. Mouse antibodies directed against CD7 and CD317/HM1.24 that previously had been used for the generation of functional recombinant immunotoxins, also showed activity in combination with α-Fc-ETA' by inhibiting growth of antigen-positive myeloma and leukemia cell lines. In contrast, α-kappa-ETA', a similarly designed human kappa light chain-specific fusion protein, was only specifically active in combination with antibodies containing a human kappa light chain. Thus, the novel α-Fc-ETA' fusion protein is broadly applicable in screening antibodies and Fc-containing antibody derivatives from different species to select for candidates with favorable characteristics for immunotoxin development.

  9. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  10. Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-03-24

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  11. R&D Topics for Neutrino Factory Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J. Scott

    2008-02-01

    The muons in a neutrino factory must be accelerated from the energy of the capture, phase rotation, and cooling systems (around 120 MeV kinetic energy) to the energy of the storage ring (around 25 GeV). This is done with a sequence of accelerators of different types: a linac, one or more recirculating linear accelerators, and finally one or more fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAGs). I discuss the R&D that is needed to arrive at a complete system which we can have confidence will accelerate the beam and for which we can obtain a cost estimate.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF ETA-CMAQ FORECASTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER DISTRIBUTIONS THROUGH COMPARISONS WITH SURFACE NETWORK AND SPECIALIZED MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An air-quality forecasting (AQF) system based on the National Weather Service (NWS) National Centers for Environmental Prediction's (NCEP's) Eta model and the U.S. EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System is used to simulate the distributions of tropospheric ...

  13. Photochemical Synthesis and Ligand Exchange Reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (Eta[superscript 2]-Alkene) Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Berry, David E.; Fawkes, Kelli L.

    2007-01-01

    The photochemical synthesis and subsequent ligand exchange reactions of Ru(CO)[subscript 4] (eta[superscript2]-alkene) compounds has provided a novel experiment for upper-level inorganic chemistry laboratory courses. The experiment is designed to provide a system in which the changing electronic properties of the alkene ligands could be easily…

  14. 78 FR 32460 - Comment Request for Information Collection for ETA Form 232, Domestic Agricultural In-Season Wage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... Federal or State minimum wage, whichever is higher.'' The collection is also required by regulations for... legal federal or State minimum wage rate, whichever is highest unless special procedures apply to the... Agricultural In-Season Wage Report and ETA Form 232-A, Wage Survey Interview Record, Extension with...

  15. 20 CFR 655.1135 - What appeals procedures are available concerning ETA's actions on a facility's Attestation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... through a de novo hearing, the procedures contained in 29 CFR part 18 will apply to such hearings, except... Administrative Law Judges (29 CFR part 18, subpart B), will not apply to any hearing conducted pursuant to this... Nurses? § 655.1135 What appeals procedures are available concerning ETA's actions on a...

  16. 77 FR 69503 - Comment Request for Information Collection on the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Rights and Experience Report, Extension Without Revisions AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration... collection of data on the ETA 218, Benefit Rights and Experience Report, which expires June 30, 2013. DATES... and Experience Report, includes numbers of individuals who were and were not monetarily...

  17. 77 FR 37713 - Comment Request for Information Collection for ETA 9162, Random Audit of EUC 2008 Claimants...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for ETA 9162, Random Audit... collection of data about Random Audit of Claimants in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Program of 2008... is intended to provide data describing random audits of the work search provision of Public Law...

  18. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries in B^0 Meson Decays to eta' K^0_L

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-23

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of CP-violating parameters S and C from fits of the time-dependence of B{sup 0} meson decays to {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0}. The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at PEP-II and correspond to 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. By fitting the time-dependent CP asymmetry of the reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0} events, they find S = 0.60 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.04 and C = 0.10 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 0.03, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic. They also perform a combined fit using both {eta}'K{sub S}{sup 0} and {eta}'K{sub L}{sup 0} data, and find S = 0.36 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03 and C = -0.16 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.02.

  19. Direct observation of. eta. sup 2 -arene complexes of ((C sub 5 Me sub 5 )Rh(PMe sub 3 ))

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.D.; Dong, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been substantial progress in studies of the mechanism of activation of aliphatic aromatic C-H bonds by transition metals. In particular, earlier studies in the authors group have indicated that arenes coordinate to ((Ce{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})) in an {eta}{sup 2} fashion prior to C-H bond oxidative addition, and that this initial coordination permits the activation of aromatic C-H bonds to compete with aliphatic C-H bond activation. The evidence for {eta}{sup 2}-arene coordination relies heavily on indirect experiments (intramolecular isomerization of an aryl deuteride, kinetic isotope effect experiments), as the only direct evidence for arene coordination was with p-di-tert-butylbenzene at low temperature. They report here the room temperature observation of {eta}{sup 2}-arene complexes of ((C{sub 5}Me{sub 5})Rh(PMe{sub 3})) and an equilibrium between and {eta}{sup 2}-arene complex and its aryl hydride counterpart.

  20. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2002-12-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127-22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra (see accompanying posters by Gull, Vieira, and Danks). The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-1 above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30x30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2x0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic miniumum in 2003.

  1. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  2. The Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    The Dielectric Wall Accelerator (DWA), a class of induction accelerators, employs a novel insulating beam tube to impress a longitudinal electric field on a bunch of charged particles. The surface flashover characteristics of this tube may permit the attainment of accelerating gradients on the order of 100 MV/m for accelerating pulses on the order of a nanosecond in duration. A virtual traveling wave of excitation along the tube is produced at any desired speed by controlling the timing of pulse generating modules that supply a tangential electric field to the tube wall. Because of the ability to control the speed of this virtual wave, the accelerator is capable of handling any charge to mass ratio particle; hence it can be used for electrons, protons and any ion. The accelerator architectures, key technologies and development challenges will be described.

  3. Switched matrix accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We also provide an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392 GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  4. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H

    2000-10-04

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  5. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  6. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  7. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, John S.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  8. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  9. Computational Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.; Bohn, Courtlandt L.

    2004-08-27

    The working group on computational accelerator physics at the 11th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. Verification, i.e., showing that a computational application correctly solves the assumed model, and validation, i.e., showing that the model correctly describes the modeled system, were discussed for a number of systems. In particular, the predictions of the massively parallel codes, OSIRIS and VORPAL, used for modeling advanced accelerator concepts, were compared and shown to agree, thereby establishing some verification of both codes. In addition, a number of talks on the status and frontiers of computational accelerator physics were presented, to include the modeling of ultrahigh-brightness electron photoinjectors and the physics of beam halo production. Finally, talks discussing computational needs were presented.

  10. Computational Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.; Bohn, Courtlandt L.

    2004-12-07

    The working group on computational accelerator physics at the 11th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. Verification, i.e., showing that a computational application correctly solves the assumed model, and validation, i.e., showing that the model correctly describes the modeled system, were discussed for a number of systems. In particular, the predictions of the massively parallel codes, OSIRIS and VORPAL, used for modeling advanced accelerator concepts, were compared and shown to agree, thereby establishing some verification of both codes. In addition, a number of talks on the status and frontiers of computational accelerator physics were presented, to include the modeling of ultrahigh-brightness electron photoinjectors and the physics of beam halo production. Finally, talks discussing computational needs were presented.

  11. Special radiation protection aspects of medical accelerators.

    PubMed

    Silari, M

    2001-01-01

    Radiation protection aspects relevant to medical accelerators are discussed. An overview is first given of general safety requirements. Next, shielding and labyrinth design are discussed in some detail for the various types of accelerators, devoting more attention to hadron machines as they are far less conventional than electron linear accelerators. Some specific aspects related to patient protection are also addressed. Finally, induced radioactivity in accelerator components and shielding walls is briefly discussed. Three classes of machines are considered: (1) medical electron linacs for 'conventional' radiation therapy, (2) low energy cyclotrons for production of radionuclides mainly for medical diagnostics and (3) medium energy cyclotrons and synchrotrons for advanced radiation therapy with protons or light ion beams (hadron therapy). PMID:11843087

  12. Self-accelerating the normal DGP branch

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam

    2009-11-01

    We propose a generalised induced gravity brane-world model where the brane action contains an arbitrary f(R) term, R being the scalar curvature of the brane. We show that the effect of the f(R) term on the dynamics of a homogeneous and isotropic brane is twofold: 1. an evolving induced gravity parameter and; 2. a shift on the energy density of the brane. This new shift term, which is absent on the Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) model, plays a crucial role to self-accelerate the generalised normal DGP branch of our model. We analyse as well the stability of de Sitter self-accelerating solutions under homogeneous perturbations and compare our results with the standard 4-dimensional one. Finally, we obtain power law solutions which either correspond to conventional acceleration or super-acceleration of the brane. In the latter case, no phantom matter is invoked on the brane nor in the bulk.

  13. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-01-01

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  14. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  15. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  16. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  17. Charged particle accelerator grating

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Robert B.

    1986-09-02

    A readily disposable and replaceable accelerator grating for a relativistic particle accelerator. The grating is formed for a plurality of liquid droplets that are directed in precisely positioned jet streams to periodically dispose rows of droplets along the borders of a predetermined particle beam path. A plurality of lasers are used to direct laser beams into the droplets, at predetermined angles, thereby to excite the droplets to support electromagnetic accelerating resonances on their surfaces. Those resonances operate to accelerate and focus particles moving along the beam path. As the droplets are distorted or destroyed by the incoming radiation, they are replaced at a predetermined frequency by other droplets supplied through the jet streams.

  18. B{sup (*)}B{sup (*)} intermediate states contribution to {Upsilon}(4S,5S){yields}{eta}{sub b}+{gamma} radiative decay

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Hong-Wei; Li, Xue-Qian; Liu, Xiang

    2010-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the rescattering effects in the radiative decay {Upsilon}(5S){yields}{eta}{sub b}+{gamma}, which were suggested to be crucially important for understanding the anomalous largeness of the branching ratios B({Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(1S)+{pi}{pi}) and B({Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(1S)+{eta}). Our calculations show that the rescattering effects may enhance {Gamma}({Upsilon}(10860){yields}{eta}{sub b}+{gamma}) by four orders, but the tetraquark structure does not. Recently the BABAR and CLEO collaborations have measured the mass of {eta}{sub b} and the branching ratios B({Upsilon}(2S){yields}{eta}{sub b}+{gamma}), B({Upsilon}(3S){yields}{eta}{sub b}+{gamma}). We hope that very soon, {Upsilon}(10860){yields}{eta}{sub b}+{gamma} will be measured and it would be an ideal opportunity for testing whether the rescattering or the tetraquark structure is responsible for the anomaly of B({Upsilon}(5S){yields}{Upsilon}(nS){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}(n=1,2,3)), i.e., the future measurements on the radiative decays of {Upsilon}(5S) might be a touchstone of the two mechanisms.

  19. Scandium and Chromium in the Strontium Filament in the Homunculus of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T.R.; Melendez, M.; Baustista, M.A.; Ballance, C.; Hartman, H.; Lodders, K.; Martinez, M.

    2008-01-01

    We continue a systematic study of chemical abundances of the Strontium Filament found in the ejecta of eta Carinae. To this end we interpret the emission spectrum of Sc II and Cr II using multilevel non-LTE models of these systems. Since the atomic data for these ions was previously unavailable, we carry out ab initio calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. The observed spectrum is emitted from a mostly neutral region with electron density of the order of 10(exp 7) cm (exp -3) and a temperature between 6000 and 7000 K. These conditions are consistent with our previous diagnostics from [Ni II], [Ti II], amd [Sr II]. The observed spectrum indicates an abundance of Sc relative Ni that more than 40 times the solar values, while the Cr/Ni abundance ratio is roughly solar. Various scenarios of depletion and dust destruction are suggested to explain such abnormal abundances.

  20. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  1. The detection of a companion star to the Cepheid variable Eta Aquilae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariska, J. T.; Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra have been obtained with IUE of the classical Cepheid Eta Aquilae at several phases in the 7.18 day period. Significant ultraviolet emission is detected at wavelengths less than 1600 A, where little flux is expected from classical Cepheids. Furthermore, the emission at wavelengths less than about 1600 A does not vary with phase. Comparison with model atmosphere flux distributions shows that the nonvariable emission is consistent with the flux expected from a main-sequence companion star with an effective temperature of about 9500 K (A0 V). The observed ultraviolet flux and spectral type are used to compute a distance of 300 pc to the system, in agreement with the distance predicted using the period luminosity relation.

  2. Revealing the Chamaeleon: Young, low-mass stars surrounding eta and epsilon Chamaeleontis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    The deep southern sky surrounding the Chamaeleon dark clouds is abundant with pre-main sequence stars of various ages. Because of their youth (5-10 Myr) and proximity (d~100 pc), members of the open cluster eta Chamaeleontis and the nearby epsilon Chamaeleontis Association are ideal laboratories to study the formation and evolution of extrasolar planetary systems. To better understand their role as potential planet hosts, this thesis explores the formation, dynamical evolution, accretion and disk properties of both groups' low-mass members. The notable lack of low-mass stars in the young open cluster eta Cha has long been puzzling. Two possible explanations have been suggested; a top-heavy initial mass function or dynamical evolution, which preferentially ejected the low-mass members. Previous efforts to find these stars several degrees from the cluster core have been unsuccessful. By undertaking a wider (95 sq deg) photometric and proper motion survey with extensive follow-up spectroscopy, we have identified eight low-mass stars that were ejected from eta Cha over the past 5-10 Myr. Comparison with recent simulations shows our results are consistent with a dynamical origin for the current configuration of the cluster, without the need to invoke an initial mass function deficient in low-mass objects. Two of the dispersed members exhibited strong, variable H-alpha emission during our observations, including a star which had an event suggestive of accretion from a circumstellar disk. New infrared photometry confirms the presence of the disk. This star demonstrates that infrequent, episodic accretion can continue at low levels long after most disks around `old' pre-main sequence stars have dissipated. Another two confirmed non-members are slightly older than the cluster, but are only 42 arcseconds apart and share similar kinematics and distances. We show that they almost certainly form a wide (4000-6000 AU) ~10 Myr-old binary at 100-150 pc. The system is one of the

  3. Solving the {eta}-problem in hybrid inflation with Heisenberg symmetry and stabilized modulus

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, Stefan; Dutta, Koushik; Kostka, Philipp M.; Bastero-Gil, Mar; King, Steve F. E-mail: mbg@ugr.es E-mail: sfk@hep.phys.soton.ac.uk

    2009-01-15

    We propose a class of models in which the {eta}-problem of supersymmetric hybrid inflation is resolved using a Heisenberg symmetry, where the associated modulus field is stabilized and made heavy with the help of the large vacuum energy during inflation without any fine-tuning. The proposed class of models is well motivated both from string theory considerations, since it includes the commonly encountered case of no-scale supergravity Kaehler potential, and from the perspective of particle physics since a natural candidate for the inflaton in this class of models is the right-handed sneutrino which is massless during the inflationary epoch, and subsequently acquires a large mass at the end of inflation. We study a specific example motivated by sneutrino hybrid inflation with no-scale supergravity in some detail, and show that the spectral index may lie within the latest WMAP range, while the tensor-to-scalar ratio is very small.

  4. Photometric behaviour of eta Carinae, a celestial Chinese lantern: 1974-1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Genderen, A. M.; Sterken, C.; de Groot, M.; Burki, G.

    1999-03-01

    We discuss 24 y of optical photometry of eta Carinae, among which new Geneva photometry made between 1994 and 1998. Various conclusions from our previous photometric studies are confirmed. The core hides a normal S Dor variable (or LBV): it shows light variations on a time scale of 1-4 y, with superimposed micro oscillations whose quasi-period indicates a temperature in the order of 22 000 K. Therefore, a more complicated model for eta Car is necessary to explain its extraordinary appearance and phenomena exhibited in the past and at present. An analysis of the brightness of eta Car in the ultraviolet (UV) passbands of three photometric systems (Walraven, Strömgren and Geneva) reveals the presence of an important variable UV source, which appears to be modulated with the 5.52 y period of the spectroscopic events, related to the possible revolution of an excentric binary of the type proposed by Damineli et al. (1997). Our new data support the luminous disk model suggested by van Genderen et al. (1994, 1995). A very hot companion of the LBV would be responsible for the excitation of the disk. We suspect that the flare-like event in the X-ray flux and in the optical and near-infrared light around 1998.0 was the result of the encounter of the interface of the colliding winds of the binary with an arm-shaped density enhancement in a disk around the LBV (not necessarily ``the" luminous disk). We suppose that this encounter created an intense X-ray/hot spot region. The subsequent steep decline of the flare is ascribed to an eclipse of the X-ray/hot spot by the wind interface. The radio flux variation of the gas torus in the equatorial plane at a distance of 2arcsec from the core, could be the result of the luminous disk becoming optically thin. This would, obviously, start abruptly near the time of periastron passage and would last for a few years thereafter, so that a hot star, normally enshrouded by the disk, is able to excite the outer gas torus. The creation of the X

  5. Alternative orbital parameters for Eta Car's alleged companion star: ``panacea or placebo in a bottle?"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Humphreys, R. M.; Smith, N.

    2003-12-01

    A consensus among some scientists suggests that Eta Carinae has a massive binary companion that revolves around the primary with a 5.5-yr period, although quantitative analysis to support the hypothesis is still lacking. One cause of the uncertainty is due to a lack of well-accepted orbital parameters to refute or prove the validity of a hypothesis rigorously. In order to remedy the situation, Ishibashi (2001) has introduced a new orbital solution that puts the periastron passage roughly at 90 degrees away from outer conjunction. In this work we will examine this orbital model both quantitatively (based on RXTE/PCA and HST/STIS datasets) and qualitatively (with HST imaging datasets).

  6. Electroproduction of Eta Mesons in the S11(1535) Resonance Region at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Mark; Adams, Gary; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Angelescu, Tatiana; Arrington, John; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, Keith; Benmouna, Nawal; Bertoncini, Crystal; Boeglin, Werner; Bosted, Peter; Breuer, Herbert; Christy, Michael; Connell, S.; Cui, Y.; Danagoulian, Samuel; Day, Donal; Dodario, T.; Dunne, James; Dutta, Dipangkar; Khayari, N.El; Ent, R.; Fenker, Howard; Frolov, Valera; Gan, Liping; Gaskell, David; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hinton, Wendy; Holt, Roy; Horn, Tanja; Huber, Garth; Hungerford, Ed; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Joo, Kyungseon; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelly, J.J.; Keppel, Cynthia; Koubarovski, Valeri; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kubarovsky, Valery; Li, Y.; Liang, Y.; Malace, S.; Markowitz, Pete; McKee, Paul; Meekins, David; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Moziak, B.; Navasardyan, Tigran; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Opper, Allena; Ostapenko, Tanya; Reimer, Paul; Reinhold, Joerg; Roche, Julie; ROCK, S.E.; Schulte, Elaine; Segbefia, Edwin; Smith, C.; Smith, Gregory; Stoler, Paul; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Tang, Liguang; Tvaskis, Vladas; Ungaro, Maurizio; Uzzle, Alicia; Vidakovic, S.; Villano, A.; Vulcan, William; WANG, M.; Warren, Glen; Wesselmann, Frank; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Xu, C.; Yuan, Lulin; Zheng, Xiaochao; Guo Zhu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    The differential cross-section for the process p(e,e'p)eta has been measured at Q2 ~ 5.7 and 7.0 (GeV/c)2 for centre-of-mass energies from threshold to 1.8 GeV, encompassing the S11(1535) resonance, which dominates the channel. This is the highest momentum transfer measurement of this exclusive process to date. The helicity-conserving transition amplitude A_1/2, for the production of the S11(1535) resonance, is extracted from the data. This quantity appears to begin scaling as 1/Q3, a predicted signal of the dominance of perturbative QCD, at Q2 ~ 5 (GeV/c)2.

  7. Simultaneous photoproduction of eta and pi0 mesons on the proton.

    PubMed

    Ajaka, J; Assafiri, Y; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Bouchigny, S; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Di Salvo, R; Döring, M; Fantini, A; Fichen, L; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Guidal, M; Hourany, E; Kunne, R; Lapik, A; Sandri, P Levi; Moricciani, D; Mushkarenkov, A; Nedorezov, V; Oset, E; Randieri, C; Rudnev, N; Russo, G; Schaerf, C; Sperduto, M; Sutera, M; Turinge, A

    2008-02-01

    The analysis of the gammap-->etapi(0)p reaction has been performed using data from the GRAAL experiment. The total and differential cross sections and the beam asymmetry have been obtained from threshold up to 1.5 GeV of beam energy. The two resonances S11(1535) and Delta(1700) are expected to be excited in the intermediate states of this reaction. The results are used to test predictions based on the assumption that both resonances are dynamically generated from the meson-baryon interaction provided by chiral Lagrangians. The term involving the Delta(1700) excitation, followed by the decay into etaDelta(1232), is found to be dominant.

  8. Light scalar susceptibilities and the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Torres Andres, Ricardo; Gomez Nicola, Angel

    2011-05-23

    We have performed a thermal analysis of the light scalar susceptibilities in the context of SU(3)-Chiral Perturbation Theory to one loop taking into account the QCD source of isospin breaking (IB), i.e corrections coming from m{sub u{ne}}m{sub d}. We find that the value of the connected scalar susceptibility in the infrared regime and below the critical temperature is entirely dominated by the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing, which leads to model-independent O(Vegr;{sup 0}) corrections, where {epsilon}{approx}m{sub d}-m{sub u}, in the combination {chi}{sub uu}-{chi}{sub ud} of flavour breaking susceptibilities.

  9. A Complex Two Dimensional Spectroscopic Database: The HST Treasury Archive for Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, R. M.; Davidson, K.; Gray, M.; Koppelman, M. D.; Qian, A.; Martin, J. C.; Ishibashi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The HST Treasury Program on eta Carinae produced one of the most complex and ambitious spectroscopic datasets obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. The archival database includes the STIS/CCD and MAMA data during its recent spectroscopic event in 2003, plus all of the STIS observations of the object and its ejecta obtained during its spectroscopic cycle beginning in 1998. The database permits users to query via instrument, target, date, wavelength range, position angle, and position and allows the user to display the spectrum and download it in fits format. We have also developed software for ease of extraction and display and analysis. The user can go from an initial query to doing science in only 20 minutes! A demonstration of the database and software will be available at the poster.

  10. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  11. ESS Accelerator Cryoplant Process Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Arnold, P.; Hees, W.; Hildenbeutel, J.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a neutron-scattering facility being built with extensive international collaboration in Lund, Sweden. The ESS accelerator will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.0 GeV, with a nominal current of 62.5 mA. The superconducting part of the accelerator is about 300 meters long and contains 43 cryomodules. The ESS accelerator cryoplant (ACCP) will provide the cooling for the cryomodules and the cryogenic distribution system that delivers the helium to the cryomodules. The ACCP will cover three cryogenic circuits: Bath cooling for the cavities at 2 K, the thermal shields at around 40 K and the power couplers thermalisation with 4.5 K forced helium cooling. The open competitive bid for the ACCP took place in 2014 with Linde Kryotechnik AG being selected as the vendor. This paper summarizes the progress in the ACCP development and engineering. Current status including final cooling requirements, preliminary process design, system configuration, machine concept and layout, main parameters and features, solution for the acceptance tests, exergy analysis and efficiency is presented.

  12. [Ti II] and [Ni II] Emission from the Strontium Filament of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Hartman, H.; GUll, T. R.; Smith, N.; Lodders, K.

    2007-01-01

    We study the nature of the [Ti II] and [Ni II] emission from the so-called strontium filament found in the ejecta of eta Carinae. To this purpose we employ multilevel models of the Ti II and Ni II systems which are used to investigate the physical condition of the filament and the excitation mechanisms of the observed lines. For the Ti II ion, for which no atomic data was previously available, we carry out ab initio calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. It is found that the observed spectrum is consistent with the lines being excited in a mostly neutral region with an electron density of the order of 10(exp 7) per cubic centimeter and a temperature around 6000 K. In analyzing three observations with different slit orientations recorded between March 2000 and November 2001 we find line ratios that change among various observations, in a way consistent with changes of up to an order of magnitude in the strength of the continuum radiation field. These changes result from different samplings of the extended filament, due to the different slit orientations used for each observation, and yield clues on the spatial extent and optical depth of the filament. The observed emission indicates a large Ti/Ni abundance ratio relative to solar abundances. It is suggested that the observed high Ti/Ni ratio in gas is caused by dust-gas fractionation processes and does not reflect the absolute Ti/Ni ratio in the ejecta of eta Carinae. We study the condensation chemistry of Ti, Ni and Fe within the filament and suggest that the observed gas phase overabundance of Ti is likely the result of selective photo-evaporation of Ti-bearing grains. Some mechanisms for such a scenario are proposed.

  13. Properties of the -513 km/s Ejecta in the Spectrum of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danks, Anthony; Gull, Theodore; Vieira, G.; Johansson, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the spectral region 2400-3160A of Eta Carinae, we have identified approximately 500 absorption lines each with up to twenty velocity components. The -512 kilometers per second component is truely unique as 1) the typical line width is less than 3 kilometers per second, 2) the identified lines are in Fe I, Fe II, V II and Ti II, and 3) the lines originate from lower levels up to 2000 cm-1 above the ground level. We have measured the velocity centers, full width at half maximum and equivalent widths for approximately 100 absorption lines. Initial results were very confusing as we found more variation in central velocities than would be expected from known STIS echelle wavelength standards. Upon further review, we found that the reporteded wavelengths in the NIST and Kurucz databases were not sufficiently accurate. S. Johansson searched FTS laboratory measurements performed at Lund for V II and Ti II and provided much improved wavelength measures. Likewise, we find more variation in column density than expected statistically from the accuracy of the equivalent widths for lines originating from the same energy level. We are reviewing the published gf values and our measurements to improve the measured column densities. Some spectroscopy of the ejecta has already been accomplished at two different epochs. Preliminary measures of equivalent widths indicate there may be some variation with time, but we await measurements planned for July 2003 during the upcoming spectroscopic minimum of Eta Carinae. These observations were accomplished through STScI and funding was from STIS GTO resources.

  14. Properties of the -513 km/s Ejecta in the Spectrum of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danks, A.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.; Johansson, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the spectral region 2400-3160A of Eta Carinae, we have identified approximately 500 absorption lines each with up to twenty velocity components. The -512 kilometers per second component is truly unique as 1) the typical line width is less than 3 kilometers per second, 2) the identified lines are in Fe I, Fe II, VII and Ti II, and 3) the lines originate from lower levels up to 2000 cm-1 above the ground level. We have measured the velocity centers, full width at half maximum and equivalent widths for approximately 100 absorption lines. Initial results were very confusing as we found bore variation in central velocities than would be expected from known STIS echelle wavelength standards. Upon further review, we found that the reported wavelengths in the NIST and Kurucz databases were not sufficiently accurate. S. Johansson searched FTS laboratory measurements performed at Lund for V II and Ti II and provided much improved wavelength measures. Likewise, we find more variation in column density than expected statistically from the accuracy of the equivalent widths for lines originating from the same energy level. We are reviewing the published gf values and our measurements to improve the measured column densities. Some spectroscopy of the ejecta has already been accomplished at two different epochs. Preliminary measures of equivalent widths indicate there may be some variation with time, but we await measurements planned for July 2003 during the upcoming spectroscopic minimum of Eta Carinae. The observations were accomplished through STScI and funding was from STIS GTO resources.

  15. XMM-Newton Observations of the 2003 X-Ray Minimum of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Corcoran, M. F.; White, N. E.; Damineli, A.; Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.

    2004-01-01

    The XMM-Newton X-ray observatory took part in the multi-wavelength observing campaign of the massive, evolved star Eta Carinae in 2003 during its recent X-ray minimum in June 2003. This paper reports on the first results of these observations, which were performed (1) before the minimum (five times in January, 2003), (2) near the X-ray maximum just before the minimum (two times in June) and (3) during the minimum (four times in July-August). Hard X-ray emission from the point source of Eta Carinae was detected even during the minimum. The observed flux above 3 keV was approx. 3x10(exp -12) ergs cm(exp -2)/s, which is about one percent of the flux before the minimum. Light curves from the individual observations show no time variability on the scale of a few kilo-seconds. Changes in the spectral shape occurred, but these changes were smaller than expected if the minimum is produced solely by an increase of hydrogen column density. Fits of the hard X-Ray source by an absorbed 1T model show a constant plasma temperature at around 5 keV and an increase of column density from 5x10(exp 22) cm(exp -2) to 2x10(exp 23) cm(exp -2). The spectra below 6 keV significantly deviate from the models that fit the higher energy emission. The X-ray minimum seems to be dominated by an apparent decrease of the emission measure, suggesting that the brightest part of the X-ray emitting region is completely obscured during the minimum in the form of an eclipse. Partial covering plasma emission models might be considered for the spectral variation. The spectra also showed strong iron K line emission from both hot and cold gases, and weak line emission from Ni, Ca, Ar, S and Si.

  16. Elemental and Molecular Relative Abundances in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kober, G. V.; Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K.; Bruhweiler, F.; Verner, K.; Stahl, O.; Weis, K.; Bomans, D.

    2006-01-01

    We are measuring relative elemental abundances for the ejecta in the line of sight from Eta Carinae using high dispersion spectroscopy with the HST/STIS and the VLT/UVES. While multiple velocity components have been identified, we focus on the -513 and -146 km/s components originating from the Homunculus and the Little Homunculus. Complicating factors are the complex nebular structures in the immediate vicinity of the bright, massive star: the very bright emission structures, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, the broad, clumpy structures of the extended wind apparently not photoionized by Eta Car B, and general scattered starlight from the extended wind and the dusty core of the circumstellar material. We have used the 3050 to 3160A region of overlap between STIS and UVES to intercompare equivalent widths of absorption lines to estimate the 'contributing factor', namely the amount of light originating from the star compared to nebular structures. While the extracted STIS spectra are from 0.1" wide aperture, the UVES spectra are limited by the 1" seeing conditions. Curiously we find that the scattering contribution in the UVES spectra changes with time, apparently with orbital phase of the 5.54-year period. This indicates that the dust may be modified by changes in the central source with phase. The noticeable drop in scattered light appears to occur about 1.7 years (phase 0.35) after the spectroscopic minimum. Relative abundances of iron peak elements and some molecules will be estimated. Observations in this study were accomplished with HST through STSci and with VLT through ESO and funded under STIS GTO resources.

  17. [Ti II] and [Ni II] Emission from the Strontium Filament of eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Hartman, H.; Gull, T. R.; Smith, N.; Lodders, K.

    2005-01-01

    We study the nature of the [Ti II] and [Ni II] emission from the so-called strontium filament found in the ejecta of eta Carinae. To this purpose we employ multilevel models of the Ti II and Ni II systems which are used to investigate the physical condition of the filament and the excitation mechanisms of the observed lines. For the Ti II ion, for which no atomic data was previously available, we carry out ab initio calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. It is found that the observed spectrum is consistent with the lines being excited in a mostly neutral region with electron density of the order of 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3) and a temperature around 6000 K. In analyzing three observations with different slit orientations recorded between March 2000 and November 2001 we find line ratios that change among various observations, in a way consistent with changes of up to an order of magnitude in the strength of the continuum radiation field. These changes result from different samplings of the extended filament, due to the different slit orientations used for each observation, and yield clues on the spatial extent and optical depth of the filament. The observed emission indicates a large Ti/Ni abundance ratio relative to solar abundances. It is suggested that the observed high Ti/Ni ratio in gas is caused dust-gas fractionation processes and does not reflect the absolute Ti/Ni ratio in the ejecta of eta Carinae. The condensation chemistry shows that if dust condensed in a sequence of layers according to decreasing temperature and increasing distance from the central star, the most refractory dust could be selectively affected by photoevaporation. Thus, Ti would be released back to the gas and the Ti/Ni ratio in the gas would increase to the observed super-solar ratio.

  18. Accelerated coffee pulp composting.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, G; Olguín, E J; Mercado, G

    1999-02-01

    The effect of two abundant, easily available and very low-cost agro-industrial organic residues, i.e., filter cake from the sugar industry and poultry litter, on the composting stabilization time of coffee pulp and on the quality of the produced compost, was evaluated. Piles of one cubic meter were built and monitored within the facilities of a coffee processing plant in the Coatepec region of the State of Veracruz, Mexico. Manual aeration was carried out once a week. A longer thermophilic period (28 days) and a much lower C/N ratio (in the range of 6.9-9.1) were observed in the piles containing the amendments, as compared to the control pile containing only coffee pulp (14 days and a C/N ratio of 14.4, respectively). The maximum assimilation rate of the reducing sugars was 1.6 g kg-1 d-1 (from 7.5 to 5.3%) during the first two weeks when accelerators were present in the proportion of 20% filter cake plus 20% poultry litter, while they accumulated at a rate of 1.2 g kg-1 d-1 (from 7.4 to 9.13%) during the same period in the control pile. The best combination of amendments was 30% filter cake with 20% poultry litter, resulting in a final nitrogen content as high as 4.81%. The second best combination was 20% filter cake with 10% poultry litter, resulting in a compost which also contained a high level of total nitrogen (4.54%). It was concluded that the use of these two residues enhanced the composting process of coffee pulp, promoting a shorter stabilization period and yielding a higher quality of compost.

  19. Angular velocities, angular accelerations, and coriolis accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1975-01-01

    Weightlessness, rotating environment, and mathematical analysis of Coriolis acceleration is described for man's biological effective force environments. Effects on the vestibular system are summarized, including the end organs, functional neurology, and input-output relations. Ground-based studies in preparation for space missions are examined, including functional tests, provocative tests, adaptive capacity tests, simulation studies, and antimotion sickness.

  20. eta-prime photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 1.527 to 2.227 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    M. Dugger; J. P. Ball; P. Collins; E. Pasyuk; B. G. Ritchie

    2006-01-13

    Differential cross sections for the reaction gamma p {yields} eta-prime p have been measured with the CLAS spectrometer and a tagged photon beam with energies from 1.527 to 2.227 GeV. The results reported here possess much greater accuracy than previous measurements. Analyses of these data indicate for the first time the coupling of the eta prime N channel to both the S{sub 11}(1535) and P{sub 11}(1710) resonances, known to couple strongly to the eta N channel in photoproduction on the proton, and the importance of j=3/2 resonances in the process.

  1. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  2. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  3. Accelerators (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  4. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  5. Accelerators (3/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  6. Accelerators (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  7. Accelerators (5/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-09

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  8. Accelerators (4/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-08

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  9. Accelerators (3/5)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-07

    1a) Introduction and motivation 1b) History and accelerator types 2) Transverse beam dynamics 3a) Longitudinal beam dynamics 3b) Figure of merit of a synchrotron/collider 3c) Beam control 4) Main limiting factors 5) Technical challenges Prerequisite knowledge: Previous knowledge of accelerators is not required.

  10. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  11. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  12. Microscale acceleration history discriminators

    DOEpatents

    Polosky, Marc A.; Plummer, David W.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of micromechanical acceleration history discriminators is claimed. These discriminators allow the precise differentiation of a wide range of acceleration-time histories, thereby allowing adaptive events to be triggered in response to the severity (or lack thereof) of an external environment. Such devices have applications in airbag activation, and other safety and surety applications.

  13. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  14. KEK digital accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  15. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  16. Cascaded radiation pressure acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, Xiaomei E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Lingang; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-07-15

    A cascaded radiation-pressure acceleration scheme is proposed. When an energetic proton beam is injected into an electrostatic field moving at light speed in a foil accelerated by light pressure, protons can be re-accelerated to much higher energy. An initial 3-GeV proton beam can be re-accelerated to 7 GeV while its energy spread is narrowed significantly, indicating a 4-GeV energy gain for one acceleration stage, as shown in one-dimensional simulations and analytical results. The validity of the method is further confirmed by two-dimensional simulations. This scheme provides a way to scale proton energy at the GeV level linearly with laser energy and is promising to obtain proton bunches at tens of gigaelectron-volts.

  17. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  18. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  19. Analyzing radial acceleration with a smartphone acceleration sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    This paper continues the sequence of experiments using the acceleration sensor of smartphones (for description of the function and the use of the acceleration sensor, see Ref. 1) within this column, in this case for analyzing the radial acceleration.

  20. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .