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Sample records for accelerator facility jlab

  1. LONGITUDINAL PHASE SPACE CHARACTERIZATION OF ELECTRON BUNCHES AT THE JLAB FEL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    We report longitudinal phase space measurements of short electron bunches at the 10kW Free-Electron Laser Facility at Jefferson Lab using broadband synchrotron radiation and a remotely controlled fast streak camera. Accurate measurements are possible because the optical transport system uses only reflective components that do not introduce dispersion. The evolution of longitudinal phase space of the electron beam can be observed in real time while phases of accelerator RF components are being adjusted. This fast and efficient diagnostic enhances the suite of machine setup tools available to JLab FEL operators and applies to other accelerators. The results for certain beam setups will be presented.

  2. High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

    2007-08-01

    Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

  3. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D.; Casagrande, F.

    2014-01-29

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  4. Application of JLab 12GeV helium refrigeration system for the FRIB accelerator at MSU

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Knudsen, Peter N.; Arenius, Dana M.; Casagrande, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The planned approach to have a turnkey helium refrigeration system for the MSU-FRIB accelerator system, encompassing the design, fabrication, installation and commissioning of the 4.5-K refrigerator cold box(es), cold compression system, warm compression system, gas management, oil removal and utility/ancillary systems, was found to be cost prohibitive. Following JLab’s suggestion, MSU-FRIB accelerator management made a formal request to evaluate the applicability of the recently designed 12GeV JLab cryogenic system for this application. The following paper will outline the findings and the planned approach for the FRIB helium refrigeration system.

  5. Incorporation of a PbSe Array Based Spectrograph into EPICS using LabView at the JLab FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hardy; S.V. Benson; Michelle D. Shinn; S. Zhang

    2005-08-21

    A real-time spectrograph with a 1Hz update rate was designed and installed at the JLab FEL facility using a Cal Sensors PbSe array and a Roper Scientific SpectraPro 300 monochrometer. This paper describes the implementation of EPICS channel access on a remote PC running LabView with modification of vendor supplied LabView VI's to allow display of FEL light spectra in real-time on a remote workstation. This allows PC based diagnostics to be used in EPICS.

  6. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

    2010-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  7. EXPERIENCE AND PLANS OF THE JLAB FEL FACILITY AS A USER FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn

    2007-08-26

    Jefferson Lab's IR Upgrade FEL building was planned from the beginning to be a user facility, and includes an associated 600 m2 area containing seven laboratories. The high average power capability (multikilowatt-level) in the near-infrared (1-3 microns), and many hundreds of watts at longer wavelengths, along with an ultrafast (~ 1 ps) high PRF (10's MHz) temporal structure makes this laser a unique source for both applied and basic research. In addition to the FEL, we have a dedicated laboratory capable of delivering high power (many tens of watts) of broadband THz light. After commissioning the IR Upgrade, we once again began delivering beam to users in 2005. In this presentation, I will give an overview of the FEL facility and its current performance, lessons learned over the last two years, and a synopsis of current and future experiments.

  8. Engineering the Big Chill: The Story of JLab's Central Helium Liquefier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    This article tells the story of the Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), one of the US National Laboratories. JLab's successful superconducting radio frequency accelerator was only possible because a group of JLab engineers successfully tackled a complex of difficulties to build a cryogenic system that included the CHL, a task that required advancing the frontier of cryogenic technology. Ultimately, these cryogenic advances were applied far beyond JLab to the benefit of cutting-edge programs at other US national laboratories (Oak Ridge, Brookhaven, and the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at MSU) as well as NASA. This innovation story dramatizes the sort of engineer-driven technological problem solving that allows the successful launch and operation of experimental projects. Along the way, the CHL story also provides an important addition to our understanding of the role played by engineers and industry in creating knowledge at physics laboratories.

  9. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  10. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  11. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy in JLab's Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    John J. LeRose; A. Acha; P. Bydzovsky; C.C. Chang; E. Cisbani; F. Cusano; C.W. de Jager; R. De Leo; R.J. Feuerbach; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; D.W. Higinbotham; M. Iodice; L. Lagamba; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; B. Reitz; M. Sotona; Miloslav Sotona; G.M. Urciuoli

    2006-10-10

    Results are presented from a new experiment (E94-107) in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) producing Boron-12-lambda using electroproduction, (e,e{prime}K+). In the hypernuclear missing-mass spectrum the experiment achieves very good energy resolution (640 keV FWHM) by exploiting the characteristics of the High Resolution spectrometer pair and the exceptional beam quality available at JLab. The spectrometers were used with the addition an INFN provided pair of septum magnets to reach the desired small angles. Also, the Hall A standard complement of equipment was further augmented by the addition of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) to achieve the best possible kaon identification.

  12. Spectroscopic Research of Lambda Hypdernuclei at JLab Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Gogami, Toshiyuki; et. al.,

    2014-03-01

    A Lambda hyperon which has a strangeness can be bound in deep inside of a nucleus since a Λ does not suffer from the Pauli exclusion principle from nucleons. Thus, a Λ could be a useful tool to investigate inside of a nucleus. Since 2000, Lambda hypernuclear spectroscopic experiments by the (e,e'k) reaction have been performed at the experimental hall C in Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab Hall C). An experiment, JLab E05-115 was carried out to investigate Lambda hypernuclei with a wide mass range (the mass number, A = 7, 9, 10, 12, 52). The latest analysis status of JLab E05-115 experiment is discussed in the present article.

  13. Spectroscopic Research of Lambda Hypdernuclei at JLab Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Achenbach, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Ates, O.; Baturin, P.; Badui, R.; Boeglin, W.; Bono, J.; Brash, E.; Carter, P.; Chen, C.; Chiba, A.; Christy, E.; Dalton, M.; Danagoulian, S.; De Leo, R.; Doi, D.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.; Fujii, Y.; Furic, M.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gasparian, A.; Hashimoto, O.; Horn, T.; Hu, B.; Hungerford, Ed. V.; Jones, M.; Kanda, H.; Kaneta, M.; Kato, S.; Kawai, M.; Kawama, D.; Khanal, H.; Kohl, M.; Liyanage, A.; Luo, W.; Maeda, K.; Margaryan, A.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Matsumura, A.; Maxwell, V.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Narayan, A.; Neville, C.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, M. I.; Nunez, A.; Nuruzzaman; Okayasu, Y.; Petkovic, T.; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Rodriguez, V. M.; Samanta, C.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shichijo, A.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Taniya, N.; Tsukada, K.; Veilleux, M.; Vulcan, W.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wood, S. A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ya, L.; Ye, Z.; Yokota, K.; Yuan, L.; Zhamkochyan, S.; Zhu, L.

    A Λ hyperon which has a strangeness can be bound in deep inside of a nucleus since a Λ does not suffer from the Pauli exclusion principle from nucleons. Thus, a Λ could be a useful tool to investigate inside of a nucleus. Since 2000, Λ hypernuclear spectroscopic experiments by the (e,e'k) reaction have been performed at the experimental hall C in Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab Hall C). An experiment, JLab E05-115 was carried out to investigate Λ hypernuclei with a wide mass range (the mass number, A = 7, 9, 10, 12, 52). The latest analysis status of JLab E05-115 experiment is discussed in the present article.

  14. JLAB Web Based Tracking System for Integrated Incident, Accident, Inspection, and Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    S. Prior; R. Lawrence

    2003-09-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, or JLab, is a Department of Energy particle accelerator used to conduct fundamental physics research. In such a facility there are numerous statutory, regulatory, contractual, and best practice requirements for managing and analyzing environmental health and safety (EH&S) related data. A tracking system has been developed at JLab that meets the needs of all levels of the organization, from the front line worker to the most senior management. This paper describes the system implementation and performance to date.

  15. Implementation of the Polarized HD target at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali; David Tedeschi

    2007-01-30

    The original goal of this proposal was to study frozen spin polarized targets (HD target and other technologies) and produce a conceptual design report for the implementation of such a target in the HALL B detector of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). During the first two years of the proposal, we came to the conclusion that the best suited target for JLab was a frozen spin target and helped with the design of such a target. We have not only achieved our original goal but have exceeded it by being involved in the actual building and testing of parts the target. The main reason for this success has been the hiring of a senior research associate, Dr. Oleksandr Dzyubak, who had more than 10 years of experience in the field of frozen spin polarized targets. The current grant has allowed the USC nuclear physics group to strengthen its role in the JLab collaboration and make important contribution to both the detector development and the scientific program.

  16. The “SF” System of Sextupoles for the JLAB 10 KW Free Electron Laser Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    George Biallas, Mark Augustine, Kenneth Baggett, David Douglas, Robin Wines

    2009-05-01

    The characteristics of the system of “SF” Sextupoles for the infrared Free Electron Laser Upgrade1 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) are described. These eleven sextupoles possess a large field integral (2.15 T/m) with +/- 0.2%

  17. Studies of spin-orbit correlations at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Mher Aghasyan, Harut Avakian

    2011-05-01

    Studies of single spin asymmetries for pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering are presented using the polarized \\sim6 GeV electrons from at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) with the Inner Calorimeter. The cross section versus the azimuthal angle {\\phi}_h of the produced neutral pion has a substantial sin {\\phi}_h amplitude. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x_B and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted and compared with published data.

  18. The Hall D Physics Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, John P.

    2012-09-01

    GlueX is one of the flagship experiments of the 12 GeV era at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The energy of the electron accelerator at JLab is presently undergoing an upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV and a 4th experimental hall (Hall D) is being added. The GlueX experimental apparatus consists of a tagged coherent bremsstrahlung photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target. The photoproduced mesons, which are created inside of a 2.2 T solenoid, will then pass through a pair of drift chambers and eventually deposit their energy into either of two calorimeters, depending on their respective angles. GlueX will attempt to map out the light meson spectrum and search for meson-gluon hybrids to better understand the confinement of quarks and gluons in quantum chromodynamics (QCD). There is little data on the photoproduction of light mesons and the GlueX experiment will exceed the current photoproduction data by several orders of magnitude in the first year alone. Photoproduction is specifically well suited to search for meson-gluon hybrids because in the flux tube model the production cross-sections are higher for meson-gluon hybrids from photons, with the spins of the virtual quark-antiquark pair aligned, than from other sources such as pions, with the spins of the quark-antiquark pair anti-aligned. There are also other Hall D experiments proposed to look for physics beyond the Standard Model by studying Eta rare or forbidden decay channels such as eta to two neutral pions. The 12 GeV upgrade of the JLab accelerator and the complete physics program of Hall D will be presented.

  19. Radiation safety training for accelerator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1997-02-01

    In November 1992, a working group was formed within the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) accelerator facilities to develop a generic safety training program to meet the basic requirements for individuals working in accelerator facilities. This training, by necessity, includes sections for inserting facility-specific information. The resulting course materials were issued by DOE as a handbook under its technical standards in 1996. Because experimenters may be at a facility for only a short time and often at odd times during the day, the working group felt that computer-based training would be useful. To that end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) together have developed a computer-based safety training program for accelerator facilities. This interactive course not only enables trainees to receive facility- specific information, but time the training to their schedule and tailor it to their level of expertise.

  20. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C

    2001-10-17

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  1. Radiation Safety Systems for Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    James C. Liu; Jeffrey S. Bull; John Drozdoff; Robert May; Vaclav Vylet

    2001-10-01

    The Radiation Safety System (RSS) of an accelerator facility is used to protect people from prompt radiation hazards associated with accelerator operation. The RSS is a fully interlocked, engineered system with a combination of passive and active elements that are reliable, redundant, and fail-safe. The RSS consists of the Access Control System (ACS) and the Radiation Containment System (RCS). The ACS is to keep people away from the dangerous radiation inside the shielding enclosure. The RCS limits and contains the beam/radiation conditions to protect people from the prompt radiation hazards outside the shielding enclosure in both normal and abnormal operations. The complexity of a RSS depends on the accelerator and its operation, as well as associated hazard conditions. The approaches of RSS among different facilities can be different. This report gives a review of the RSS for accelerator facilities.

  2. Radiation safety at accelerator facilities NCRP activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Kenneth R.

    1997-02-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has issued 13 reports, dating back to 1949, giving guidance and recommendations for radiation protection at accelerator facilities. There are six current reports on the topics of neutron radiation; facility and shielding design; alarms and access control systems; and equipment design, performance, and use. Scientific Committee 46 (SC 46) is currently overseeing the development of two reports that will provide up-to-date guidance for the design of medical accelerator facilities and shielding. SC 46 has also proposed that a report be written to provide guidance for the design and shielding of industrial accelerator and large irradiator facilities. This paper describes the status and contents of these reports.

  3. UCLA Neptune Facility for Advanced Accelerator Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Clayton, Christopher E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Rosenzweig, James B.; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2004-12-07

    The Neptune Laboratory at UCLA is being used for exploring concepts useful for advanced accelerators. This facility hosts a TW-class CO2 laser system and a high-brightness photoinjector producing a 14 MeV electron beam. The goal for the laboratory is to carry out experiments on high-gradient acceleration of externally injected electrons in both laser-driven relativistic plasma waves and EM laser field in vacuum. Experiments on plasma beat-wave acceleration using a prebunched electron beam, a high-energy gain 10-{mu}m inverse free electron laser accelerator, longitudinal electron beam shaping and laser based light-sources are planned.

  4. Laser spectroscopy at accelerator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    The use of lasers in exciting fast atomic and molecular ions produced in accelerators is discussed. Collinear excitation of the ions is most efficient, and several examples of laser-induced fluorescence are given. These include tests of relativistic atomic structure, and atomic and molecular hyperfine measurements. Higher precision can be attained using rf double-resonance techniques in some cases. A variant of this technique, the raman double-resonance technique, is also introduced. The production of an optically-pumped polarized target is also described, together with an experiment on polarized electron pick-up in a fast heavy-ion beam. 16 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Development of a Positron Source for JLab at the IAC

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Tony

    2013-10-12

    We report on the research performed towards the development of a positron sour for Jefferson Lab's (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, VA. The first year of work was used to benchmark the predictions of our current simulation with positron production efficiency measurements at the IAC. The second year used the benchmarked simulation to design a beam line configuration which optimized positron production efficiency while minimizing radioactive waste as well as design and construct a positron converter target. The final year quantified the performance of the positron source. This joint research and development project brought together the experiences of both electron accelerator facilities. Our intention is to use the project as a spring board towards developing a program of accelerator based research and education which will train students to meet the needs of both facilities as well as provide a pool of trained scientists.

  6. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  7. ORION: An Advanced Accelerator Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Dennis

    2002-08-20

    Extending the center-of-mass energy frontier for high-energy physics depends on the research and development that is conducted now in the area of advanced accelerator physics and technology. In this article, we present the design and beam dynamics simulations for the emittance-compensated, RF photoinjector of the ORION Facility.

  8. MEIC Detector and Interaction Region at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhiwen

    2015-09-01

    The Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is envisioned as the next-generation US facility for exploring the strong interaction. The Medium-energy EIC (MEIC) is the first stage of the EIC at Jefferson Lab (JLab). It's aimed at mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark and gluon sea in the nucleon, understanding the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge, and probing the gluon fields in nuclei. A full-acceptance detector is designed to measure the complete final state. Its interaction region allows spectators tagged with high resolution to catch all nuclear and partonic target fragments. The combination of a high luminosity, polarized lepton and ion beams, and detectors fully integrated with the accelerator will allow MEIC to be a unique opportunity to make breakthroughs in the study of nucleon structure and QCD dynamics.

  9. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  10. Accelerating tube of Gamma-4 facility module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zav'yalov, N. V.; Gordeev, V. S.; Puchagin, S. Yu.; Grishin, A. V.; Strabykin, K. V.; Berdnikov, E. S.; Nazarenko, S. T.; Pavlov, V. S.; Demanov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating tube of Gamma-4 electrophysical facility standard module is presented. This accelerating tube is a component part of the energy transmission system of the module which provides delivery of the high-voltage electric pulse from the forming system output to the load unit. A specific feature of the tube design is the use of a dielectric lens to equalize the potential over the surface of the sectioned insulator. The lens made it possible to lower the electric field strength by 30% in the region of the most stressed dielectric rings, thus reducing the probability of the insulator breakdown. To increase the resource of the tube, its dimensions were selected based on the calculated average electric field intensity over the insulator surface equal to 55 kV/cm. The inductance of the tube was 87 nH. 230 shots of the Gamma-1 accelerator were performed using the proposed accelerating tube with an insulator voltage of 2.7 MV. No electrical breakdowns of the insulator were observed in these shots.

  11. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  12. The rare isotope accelerator (RIA) facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Christoph Leemann

    2000-08-01

    The envisioned Rare-Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility would add substantially to research opportunities for nuclear physics and astrophysics by combining increased intensities with a greatly expanded variety of high-quality rare-isotope beams. A flexible superconducting driver linac would provide 100 kW, 400 MeV/nucleon beams of any stable isotope from hydrogen to uranium onto production targets. Combinations of projectile fragmentation, target fragmentation, fission, and spallation would produce the needed broad assortment of short-lived secondary beams. This paper describes the project's background, purpose, and status, the envisioned facility, and the key subsystem, the driver linac. RIA's scientific purposes are to advance current theoretical models, reveal new manifestations of nuclear behavior, and probe the limits of nuclear existence [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show, respectively, examples of RIA research opportunities and the yields projected for pursuing them. Figure 3 outlines a conceptual approach for delivering the needed beams.

  13. Flame acceleration studies in the MINIFLAME facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    Flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) studies have been conducted in a 19.4-cm high, 14.5-cm wide, and 2. 242-m long channel (MINIFLAME) that is a 1:12.6 scale model of the 136-m{sup 3} FLAME facility. Tests were conducted with two levels of hydrogen concentration -- 20% and 30%, with and without obstacles in the channel, and with three levels of transverse top venting -- 0%, 13%, and 50%. The flame acceleration results in MINIFLAME are qualitatively similar to those in FLAME; however, the small-scale results are more benign quantitatively. The results show that insufficient venting, 13% venting in this case, can promote flame acceleration due to turbulence produced by the flow through the vents in smooth channels. However, with obstacle-generated turbulence in the channel, 13% top venting was found to be beneficial. Flame acceleration resulting in DDT was shown to occur in as little as 35 liters of mixture. Comparison of the DDT data with obstacles in MINIFLAME and FLAME supports d/{lambda} scaling of DDT, where {lambda} is the detonation cell width of the mixture and d is the characteristic open diameter of the channel. In the MINIFLAME and FLAME tests, DDT occurred for d/{lambda} greater than approximately three. Comparison with other experiments shows that the value of d/{lambda} for DDT is not constant but depends on the obstacle type, spacing, and channel geometry. The comparison of MINIFLAME and FLAME experiments extends the use of d/{lambda} scaling to different geometries and larger scales than previous studies. Small-scale-model testing of flame acceleration and DDT with the same combustible mixture as the full-scale prototype underpredicts flame speeds, overpressures, and the possibility of DDT. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  14. Design considerations and test facilities for accelerated radiation effects testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Miller, C. G.; Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Test design parameters for accelerated dose rate radiation effects tests for spacecraft parts and subsystems used in long term mission (years) are detailed. A facility for use in long term accelerated and unaccelerated testing is described.

  15. Field Work Proposal: PUBLIC OUTREACH EVENT FOR ACCELERATOR STEWARDSHIP TEST FACILITY PILOT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, Andrew; Areti, Hari

    2015-03-05

    Jefferson Lab’s outreach efforts towards the goals of Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Pilot Program consist of the lab’s efforts in three venues. The first venue, at the end of March is to meet with the members of Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center (VTCRC) (http://www.vtcrc.com/tenant-directory/) in Blacksburg, Virginia. Of the nearly 160 members, we expect that many engineering companies (including mechanical, electrical, bio, software) will be present. To this group, we will describe the capabilities of Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. The description will include not only the facilities but also the intellectual expertise. No funding is requested for this effort. The second venue is to reach the industrial exhibitors at the 6th International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC’15). Jefferson Lab will host a booth at the conference to reach out to the >75 industrial exhibitors (https://www.jlab.org/conferences/ipac2015/SponsorsExhibitors.php) who represent a wide range of technologies. A number of these industries could benefit if they can access Jefferson Lab’s accelerator infrastructure. In addition to the booth, where written material will be available, we plan to arrange a session A/V presentation to the industry exhibitors. The booth will be hosted by Jefferson Lab’s Public Relations staff, assisted on a rotating basis by the lab’s scientists and engineers. The budget with IPAC’15 designations represents the request for funds for this effort. The third venue is the gathering of Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) university presidents. Here we plan to reach the research departments of the universities who can benefit by availing themselves to the infrastructure (material sciences, engineering, medical schools, material sciences, to name a few). Funding is requested to allow for attendance at the SURA Board Meeting. We are coordinating with DOE regarding these costs to raise the projected conference

  16. JLabGeo: A new survey and alignment data manager

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tremblay; C. Curtis

    1999-10-01

    The Survey and Alignment group at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has relied upon the MS-Dos program Geonet, originally developed at Stanford Linear Accelerator, as its central data manager. With the Lab decision to only use Microsoft Windows NT as the platform for PCs, limitations were reached in using Geonet. A program has been developed at Jefferson Lab, JLabGeo, to mimic as many of the Geonet functions as possible, while also expanding and enhancing its capabilities. All of the adjustment programs, originally developed by Dr. Ingolf Burstedde, have been revised in order to work with arrays of any size, and operate as console applications in the NT environment. Integrating the use of a central fileserver as both the source of the executable programs and data files also ensures that all workstations are using the most recent data. Work continues on developing JLabGeo, notably the integration of all of their survey data types into an easily retrievable database, and the development of a central repository for beamline information and ideal coordinates.

  17. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy via (e,e'K+) in JLab's Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    John J. LeRose; A. Acha; P. Bydzovsky; C. Chang; C.C. Chang; E. Cisbani; F. Cusano; C.W. de Jager; R. De Leo; R.J. Feuerbach; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; D.W. Higinbotham; M. Iodice; L. Lagamba; P. Markowitz; S. Marrone; B. Reitz; M. Sotona; Miloslav Sotona; G.M. Urciuoli

    2007-12-17

    Results are presented from a new experiment (E94-107) in Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) producing {12/Lambda} B, {16/Lambda}N, and {9/Lambda}Li using electroproduction, (e,e'K+). In the hypernuclear missing-mass spectrum the experiment achieves very good energy resolution (670 keV FWHM) by exploiting the characteristics of the High Resolution spectrometer pair and the exceptional beam quality available at JLab. The spectrometers were used with the addition an INFN provided pair of septum magnets to reach the desired small angles. Also, the Hall A standard complement of equipment was further augmented by the addition of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) to achieve the best possible kaon identification.

  18. Operational experience on the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1994-09-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is a laser-electron linear accelerator complex designed to provide high brightness beams for testing of advanced acceleration concepts and high power pulsed photon sources. Results of electron beam parameters attained during the commissioning of the nominally 45 MeV energy machine are presented.

  19. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  20. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  1. Plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Nie, Y.; Mete, O.; Hanahoe, K.; Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J.; Smith, J.; Pacey, T.; Li, Y.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.

    2016-09-01

    A plasma accelerator research station (PARS) has been proposed to study the key issues in electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the quasi-nonlinear regime of beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration is analysed. The wakefield excited by various CLARA beam settings are simulated by using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. For a single drive beam, an accelerating gradient up to 3 GV/m can be achieved. For a two bunch acceleration scenario, simulation shows that a witness bunch can achieve a significant energy gain in a 10-50 cm long plasma cell.

  2. Recirculating Linac Accelerators For Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin, Alex Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Kevin Beard

    2012-04-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness. We discuss the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both m+ and m- species. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  3. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Roser, T.

    2011-07-24

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  4. Future directions of accelerator-based NP and HEP facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Progress in particle and nuclear physics has been closely connected to the progress in accelerator technologies - a connection that is highly beneficial to both fields. This paper presents a review of the present and future facilities and accelerator technologies that will push the frontiers of high-energy particle interactions and high intensity secondary particle beams.

  5. Fermilab accelerator control system: Analog monitoring facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Seino, K.; Anderson, L.; Smedinghoff, J.

    1987-10-01

    Thousands of analog signals are monitored in different areas of the Fermilab accelerator complex. For general purposes, analog signals are sent over coaxial or twinaxial cables with varying lengths, collected at fan-in boxes and digitized with 12 bit multiplexed ADCs. For higher resolution requirements, analog signals are digitized at sources and are serially sent to the control system. This paper surveys ADC subsystems that are used with the accelerator control systems and discusses practical problems and solutions, and it describes how analog data are presented on the console system.

  6. The Dust Accelerator Facility at CCLDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, A. J.; Collette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Leblanc, S.; Munsat, T.; Northway, P.; Robertson, S. H.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.; Wagner, M.; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies

    2010-12-01

    At the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Science (CCLDAS) we are in the process of assembling a 3MV macroscopic (~1um) dust particle accelerator. The acceleration unit is being made by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). The accelerator consists of a pelletron generator and potential rings encased in an enclosure held at 6 atm of SF6. A pulsed dust source is used to inject particles into the accelerator. Here we describe advancements in dust accelerator technology at CCLDAS to allow more functionality and ease of use, focusing primarily on dust source control, and the capability to select a precise range in dust mass and velocity. Previously, the dust source was controlled by long plastic rods turning potentiometers inside the SF6 environment providing little to no feedback and repeatability. We describe a fiber optic control system that allows full control of the pulse characteristics being sent to the dust source using a LabVIEW control program to increase usability. An electrostatic Einzel lens is being designed using the ion-optics code SIMION to determine the properties of the electrodes needed for the optimum focusing of the dust beam. Our simulations studies indicate that the dust beam can be directed into a 0.5mm diameter spot. Our planned experiments require a high degree of control over particles size, speed, charge and other characteristics. In order to ensure that only particles of the desired characteristics are allowed to pass into the target chamber, two deflection plates are used to eliminate unwanted particles from the beam. Further simulations are being done to determine the possibility of bending the beamline to allow active selection of particles. The current design of the selection unit uses nuclear accelerator techniques to determine the velocity and charge of each particle and digital timing and logic to choose particles that will be allowed to pass. This requires a high signal to noise ratio due to the need for a well

  7. High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF) in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. C.; Xia, J. W.; Xiao, G. Q.; Xu, H. S.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhou, X. H.; Ma, X. W.; He, Y.; Ma, L. Z.; Gao, D. Q.; Meng, J.; Xu, Z.; Mao, R. S.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yuan, P.; Zhan, W. L.; Shi, J.; Chai, W. P.; Yin, D. Y.; Li, P.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Sheng, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility), a new facility planned in China for heavy ion related researches, consists of two ion sources, a high intensity Heavy Ion Superconducting Linac (HISCL), a 45 Tm Accumulation and Booster Ring (ABR-45) and a multifunction storage ring system. The key features of HIAF are unprecedented high pulse beam intensity and versatile operation mode. The HIAF project aims to expand nuclear and related researches into presently unreachable region and give scientists possibilities to conduct cutting-edge researches in these fields. The general description of the facility is given in this article with a focus on the accelerator design.

  8. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  9. The JLAB UV Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Steven C.; Benson, Steven V.; Moore, Steven Wesley

    2013-05-01

    Recently the JLAB FEL has demonstrated 150 W at 400 nm and 200 W at 700 nm using a 33mm period undulator designed and built by STI Optronics. This paper describes the undulator design and performance. Two key requirements were low phase error, zero steering and offset end fields and small rms trajectory errors. We will describe a new genetic algorithm that allowed phase error minimization to 1.8 degrees while exceeding specifications. The mechanical design, control system and EPICS interface will also be summarized.

  10. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  11. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jack

    2003-06-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space. PMID:12959128

  12. A review of accelerator concepts for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Toepfer, A.J.

    1998-08-01

    The Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) is a facility under consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) for conducting explosively-driven hydrodynamic experiments. The major diagnostic tool at AHF will be a radiography accelerator having radiation output capable of penetrating very dense dynamic objects on multiple viewing axes with multiple pulses on each axis, each pulse having a time resolution capable of freezing object motion ({approx}50-ns) and achieving a spatial resolution {approx}1 mm at the object. Three accelerator technologies are being considered for AHF by the DOE national laboratories at Los Alamos (LANL), Livermore (LLNL), and Sandia (SNL). Two of these are electron accelerators that will produce intense x-ray pulses from a converter target yielding a dose {approx}1,000--2,000 Rads {at} 1 meter. LLNL has proposed a 16--20 MeV, 3--6 kA linear induction accelerator (LIA) driven by FET-switched modulators driving metglas loaded cavities. SNL has proposed a 12-MeV, 40-kA Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) accelerator based on HERMES III pulsed power technology. The third option is a 25--50-GeV proton accelerator capable of {approx}10{sup 13} protons/pulse proposed by LANL. This paper will review the current status of the three accelerator concepts for AHF.

  13. View of new centrifuge at Flight Acceleration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    View of the new centrifuge at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), located in the Flight Acceleration Facility, bldg 29. The 50-ft. arm can swing the three man gondola to create g-forces astronauts will experience during controlled flight and during reentry. The centrifuge was designed primarily for training Apollo astronauts.

  14. Data handling facility for the Sandia Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, W. B.; Neau, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes an on-line data handling facility for Sandia's Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-I, and the upgrade prototype machine Supermite. These accelerators are used for research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) using particle beams. The main objectives in designing the data acquisition system were: (1) process both experiment and machine performance diagnostic signals, (2) record high signal-to-noise ratio, wideband waveforms in a severe EMP environment, (3) support multiple users recording and analyzing data simultaneously, and (4) provide fast turnaround for experimental results. Commercially available equipment is used wherever possible. However, several special purpose devices were developed. This data handling facility is a significant upgrade of an existing system that supports other Sandia particle beam fusion research accelerators.

  15. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. |

    1992-09-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users` facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF`s experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  16. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  17. Recent Progress on High-Current SRF Cavities at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer, William Clemens, James Henry, Peter Kneisel, Kurt Macha, Frank Marhauser, Larry Turlington, Haipeng Wang, Daniel Forehand

    2010-05-01

    JLab has designed and fabricated several prototype SRF cavities with cell shapes optimized for high current beams and with strong damping of unwanted higher order modes. We report on the latest test results of these cavities and on developments of concepts for new variants optimized for particular applications such as light sources and high-power proton accelerators, including betas less than one. We also report on progress towards a first beam test of this design in the recirculation loop of the JLab ERL based FEL. With growing interest worldwide in applications of SRF for high-average power electron and hadron machines, a practical test of these concepts is highly desirable. We plan to package two prototype cavities in a de-mountable cryomodule for temporary installation into the JLab FEL for testing with RF and beam. This will allow verification of all critical design and operational parameters paving the way to a full-scale prototype cryomodule.

  18. Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.; Bender, S.; Meier, K.; Thode, L.E.; Watson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The 10-/mu/m Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) facility is being upgraded. The conventional electron gun and bunchers have been replaced with a much more compact 6-MeV photoinjector accelerator. By adding existing parts from previous experiments, the primary beam energy will be doubled to 40 MeV. With the existing 1-m wiggler (/lambda//sub w/ = 2.7 cm) and resonator, the facility can produce photons with wavelengths from 3 to 100 /mu/m when lasing on the fundamental mode and produce photons in the visible spectrum with short-period wigglers or harmonic operation. After installation of a 150/degree/ bend, a second wiggler will be added as an amplifier. The installation of laser transport tubes between the accelerator vault and an upstairs laboratory will provide experimenters with a radiation-free environment for experiments. Although the initial experimental program of the upgraded facility will be to test the single accelerator-master oscillator/power amplifier configuration, some portion of the operational time of the facility can be dedicated to user experiments. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

  20. TAC Proton Accelerator Facility: The Status and Road Map

    SciTech Connect

    Algin, E.; Akkus, B.; Caliskan, A.; Yilmaz, M.; Sahin, L.

    2011-06-28

    Proton Accelerator (PA) Project is at a stage of development, working towards a Technical Design Report under the roof of a larger-scale Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) Project. The project is supported by the Turkish State Planning Organization. The PA facility will be constructed in a series of stages including a 3 MeV test stand, a 55 MeV linac which can be extended to 100+ MeV, and then a full 1-3 GeV proton synchrotron or superconducting linac. In this article, science applications, overview, and current status of the PA Project will be given.

  1. A new electron accelerator facility for commercial and educational uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, R. M.; Vargas-Aburto, C.

    2001-07-01

    A 5 MeV 150 kW electron accelerator facility (NEO Beam Alliance Inc.) has recently initiated operations in Ohio. NEO Beam is the result of a "partnership" between Kent State University (KSU) and a local plastics company (Mercury Plastics, Inc.). The accelerator will be used for electron beam processing, and for educational activities. KSU has created a university-wide Program on Electron Beam Technology (EBT) to address both instructional (including workforce training and development) and research opportunities. In this work, a description is made of the facility and its genesis. Present curricular initiatives are described. Preliminary dosimetry measurements performed with radiochromic (RC) dye films, calorimeters, and alanine pellets are presented and discussed.

  2. Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

  3. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel

    2013-05-06

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40{sup th} year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  4. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40th year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  5. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments at the SABER Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Thompson, M.C.; Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; Badakov, H.; Cook, A.M.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28

    Electron bunches with the unparalleled combination of high charge, low emittances, and short time duration, as first produced at the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), are foreseen to be produced at the SABER facility. These types of bunches have enabled wakefield driven accelerating schemes of multi-GV/m in plasmas. In the context of the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerators (DWA) such beams, having rms bunch length as short as 20 um, have been used to drive 100 um and 200 um ID hollow tubes above 20 GV/m surface fields. These FFTB tests enabled the measurement of a breakdown threshold in fused silica (with full data analysis still ongoing) [1]. With the construction and commissioning of the SABER facility at SLAC, new experiments would be made possible to test further aspects of DWAs including materials, tube geometrical variations, direct measurements of the Cerenkov fields, and proof of acceleration in tubes >10 cm in length. This collaboration will investigate breakdown thresholds and accelerating fields in new materials including CVD diamond. Here we describe the experimental plans, beam parameters, simulations, and progress to date as well as future prospects for machines based of DWA structures.

  6. Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

  7. The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center pulsed x-ray facility.

    PubMed

    Ipe, N E; McCall, R C; Baker, E D

    1987-04-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high-energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the radio-frequency power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The x-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target window. The window consists of Al 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of Au 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 microseconds. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The maximum absorbed dose rate obtained at 6.35 cm below the target window as measured by an ionization chamber is 258 Gy/h. The major part of the x-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in cabinet made of 1.9-cm-thick (3/4-inch-thick) plywood and lined with 0.32-cm-thick (1/8-inch-thick) Pb to make a very versatile facility. PMID:3570789

  8. Switching the JLab Accelerator Operations Environment from an HP-UX Unix-based to a PC/Linux-based environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mcguckin, Theodore

    2008-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab Accelerator Controls Environment (ACE) was predominantly based on the HP-UX Unix platform from 1987 through the summer of 2004. During this period the Accelerator Machine Control Center (MCC) underwent a major renovation which included introducing Redhat Enterprise Linux machines, first as specialized process servers and then gradually as general login servers. As computer programs and scripts required to run the accelerator were modified, and inherent problems with the HP-UX platform compounded, more development tools became available for use with Linux and the MCC began to be converted over. In May 2008 the last HP-UX Unix login machine was removed from the MCC, leaving only a few Unix-based remote-login servers still available. This presentation will explore the process of converting an operational Control Room environment from the HP-UX to Linux platform as well as the many hurdles that had to be overcome throughout the transition period (including a discussion of

  9. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A; Massey, Thomas N; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W; Brenner, David J

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons.We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target.A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components. PMID:22545061

  10. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will bemore » based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.« less

  11. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A.; Massey, Thomas N.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Brenner, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10–20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components. PMID:22545061

  12. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  13. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  14. SATIF-2 shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last 50 years from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged, such as increased particle beams intensities, higher flexibility, etc., giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These proceedings review recent progress in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities, and evaluate advancements with respect to international co-operation in this field.

  15. Environment, safety, and health considerations for a new accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    J. Donald Cossairt

    2001-04-23

    A study of siting considerations for possible future accelerators at Fermilab is underway. Each candidate presents important challenges in environment, safety, and health (ES&H) that are reviewed generically in this paper. Some of these considerations are similar to those that have been encountered and solved during the construction and operation of other accelerator facilities. Others have not been encountered previously on the same scale. The novel issues will require particular attention coincident with project design efforts to assure their timely cost-effective resolution. It is concluded that with adequate planning, the issues can be addressed in a manner that merits the support of the Laboratory, the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the public.

  16. Performance Evaluation Of An Irradiation Facility Using An Electron Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, R. M.; Filppi, E.; Hullihen, K.

    2011-06-01

    Irradiation parameters over a period of seven years have been evaluated for a radiation processing electron accelerator facility. The parameters monitored during this time were the electron beam energy, linearity of beam current, linearity of dose with the reciprocal value of the samples speed, and dose uniformity along the scanning area after a maintenance audit performed by the electron accelerator manufacturer. The electron energy was determined from the depth-dose curve by using a two piece aluminum wedge and measuring the practical range from the obtained curves. The linearity of dose with beam current, and reciprocal value of the speed and dose uniformity along the scanning area of the electron beam were determined by measuring the dose under different beam current and cart conveyor speed conditions using film dosimetry. The results of the experiments have shown that the energy in the range from 1 to 5 MeV has not changed by more than 15% from the High Voltage setting of the machine over the evaluation period, and dose linearity with beam current and cart conveyor speed has not changed. The dose uniformity along the scanning direction of the beam showed a dose uniformity of 90% or better for energies between 2 and 5 MeV, however for 1 MeV electrons this value was reduced to 80%. This parameter can be improved by changing the beam optics settings in the control console of the accelerator though.

  17. Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total

  18. Detector simulations for EIC at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiwen

    2015-04-01

    An Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is considered to be the next machine to study the internal structure of hadrons and nuclei on the basis of the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Jefferson Lab (JLab) has conducted both EIC accelerator and detector designs. The detector simulation ``EIC_GEMC'' is based on the simulation framework of GEant4 Monte-Carlo (GEMC). It works like a C++ wrapper around GEANT4. Anything specific to a particular detector like geometry, material, field, sensitivity is put into external input. And it has the ability to customize hit processing routine and output according to various detectors. Overall, these features enable simulating individual sub-detectors and the whole detector in the same framework and make it effortless to switch between them. The main features of simulation ``EIC_GEMC'' and some simulation results will be the main focus of the talk.

  19. A polarized target measurement of the electric form factor of the neutron at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    N. Savvinov

    2004-09-01

    The experiment E93-026 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) determined the electric form factor of the neutron G{sub E}{sup n} through quasielastic {rvec d}({rvec e},e'n)p scattering using a longitudinally polarized electron beam and a frozen polarized {sup 15}N D{sub 3} target. The knocked out neutrons were detected in a segmented plastic scintillator detector in coincidence with the scattered electrons. The G{sub E}{sup n} was extracted by comparing the experimental beam-target asymmetry with full theoretical calculations based on different values of G{sub E}{sup n}. Preliminary results of the Fall 2001 run are reported.

  20. MAGNETIC MODELING VS MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIPOLES FOR THE JLAB 10 KW FREE ELECTRON LASER UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    David Douglas; Robin Wines; Tom Hiatt; George Biallas; Kenneth Baggett; T.J. Schultheiss; V.A. Christina; J.W. Rathke; A. Smirnov; D. Newsham; Y. Luo; D. Yu

    2003-05-01

    Magnetic measurements of the six families of dipoles for the infrared Free Electron Laser Upgrade at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab) are compared to the magnetic models on which their design is based. The magnets were designed in parallel by three organizations. They used ANSYS, Radia or Opera 3D as a 3D magnetic modeling program. Comparison of the discrepancies between model and magnet measurement is presented along with analysis of their potential causes. These dipoles operate in two field ranges. The Injector/ Extractor Dipoles operate around 0.05 T and the Arc Dipoles and Optical Chicane Dipoles operate between 0.22 to 0.71 T. All magnets are required to meet core field and field integral flatness to parts in 104 over their good field region.

  1. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  2. The Status of Turkish Accelerator Center Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yavas, Oe.

    2007-04-23

    Recently, conceptual design of Turkic Accelerator Center (TAC) proposal was completed. Main goal of this proposal is a charm factory that consists of a linac-ring type electron-positron collider. In addition, synchrotron radiation from the positron ring and free electron laser from the electron linac are proposed. The project related with this proposal has been accepted by Turkish government. It is planned that the Technical Design Report of TAC will have been written in next three years. In this period, an infrared oscillator free electron laser (IR FEL) will be constructed as a test facility for TAC. 20 and 50 MeV electron energies will be used to obtain infra red free electron laser. The main parameters of the electron linac, the optical cavities and the free electron laser were determined. The possible use of obtained laser beam in basic and applied research areas such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, semiconductors and photo chemistry were stated.

  3. JLAB Hurricane recovery

    SciTech Connect

    A. Hutton; D. Arenius; J. Benesch; S. Chattopadhyay; E. F. Daly; O. Garza; R. Kazimi; R. Lauzi; L. Merminga; W. Merz; R. Nelson; W. Oren; M. Poelker; P. Powers; J. Preble; V. Ganni; C. R. Reece; R. Rimmer; M. Spata; S. Suhring

    2004-07-01

    Hurricane Isabel, originally a Category 5 storm, arrived at Jefferson Lab on September 18, 2003 with winds of only 75 mph, creating little direct damage to the infrastructure. However, electric power was lost for four days allowing the superconducting cryomodules to warm up and causing a total loss of the liquid helium. The subsequent recovery of the cryomodules and the impact of the considerable amount of opportunistic preventive maintenance provides important lessons for all accelerator complexes, not only those with superconducting elements. The details of how the recovery process was structured and the resulting improvement in accelerator availability will be discussed in detail.

  4. Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

  5. Proposed Dark Current Studies at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.P.; Conde, Manoel Eduardo; Gai, Wei; Power, John Gorham; Yusof, Z.M.; Spentzouris, L.K.; Dolgashev, V.A.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    A study of dark currents has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility (AWA). Emission of dark current is closely related to a breakdown. Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. An imaging system is being put together to identify single emitters on the cathode surface. This will allow us to study dark current properties in the gun. We also plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV). Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after can shed some light on a modification of metal surface after the breakdown.

  6. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5-6 cm2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  7. A new AMS facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Chopra, S.; Pattanaik, J. K.; Ojha, S.; Gargari, S.; Joshi, R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2015-10-01

    Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), a national facility of government of India, is having a 15UD Pelletron accelerator for multidisciplinary ion beam based research programs. Recently, a new accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facility has been developed after incorporating many changes in the existing 15UD Pelletron accelerator. A clean chemistry laboratory for 10Be and 26Al with all the modern facilities has also been developed for the chemical processing of samples. 10Be measurements on sediment samples, inter laboratory comparison results and 26Al measurements on standard samples are presented in this paper. In addition to the 10Be and 26Al AMS facilities, a new 14C AMS facility based on a dedicated 500 kV tandem ion accelerator with two cesium sputter ion sources, is also being setup at IUAC.

  8. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  9. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema

    Andrei Seryi

    2010-01-08

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  10. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Seryi

    2009-09-09

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  11. Application of the National Ignition Facility distinguishable-from-background program to accelerator facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Packard, Eric D; Mac Kenzie, Carolyn

    2013-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory must control potentially activated materials and equipment in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, which requires DOE approval of the process used to release volumetrically contaminated personal property and establishes a dose constraint of 10 µSv y(-1) (1 mrem y(-1)) for clearance of such property. The National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory developed a technical basis document and protocol for determining the radiological status of property that is potentially activated from exposure to neutron radiation produced via fusion of tritium and deuterium. The technical basis included assessment of the neutron energy, the type of materials potentially exposed and the likely activation products, and the sensitivity of radiation detectors used to survey the property. This paper evaluates the National Ignition Facility technical basis document for applicability to the release of property from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's various accelerator facilities considering the different types of particles accelerated, radiations produced, and resultant activation products. Extensive process knowledge regarding the accelerators' operations, accompanied by years of routine surveys, provides an excellent characterization of these facilities. Activation studies conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan corroborate that the long-lived radionuclides produced at accelerator facilities are of the same variety produced at the National Ignition Facility. Consequently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory concludes that the release protocol developed for the National Ignition Facility can be used appropriately at all its accelerator facilities. PMID:23629069

  12. Education Outreach Programs - Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surles-Law, Lisa

    2007-04-01

    Jefferson Lab has a strong record of helping DOE achieve its science education and workforce development goals. The Lab works with the local community to enhance the quality of K-12 STEM education in the public schools. Jefferson Lab serves the nation by providing an educational pipeline for the country's brightest students at the high school and undergraduate levels to help ensure that the next generation of scientists and engineers are capable of solving complex problems. The BEAMS (Becoming Enthusiastic About Math and Science) program, a national-model partnership with Newport News City Public Schools, supports inner-city students as they progress from the 6^th to the 8^th grades. The BEAMS program, unique to Jefferson Lab, has positively influenced math and science standardized test scores for participating schools, closing the scoring gap between traditionally low and average scoring schools. Jefferson Lab's High School Summer Honors Internship Program draws the region's highest achieving high school students. Jefferson Lab scientists transfer essential technical knowledge and enthusiasm for science to these young people at the critical time they begin to make career choices. Undergraduate students interested in STEM fields are selected from a competitive, nationwide pool to work with scientists and engineers on projects related to Jefferson Lab's research program. Each year, the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship program prepares fifteen students to pursue STEM careers of benefit to the nation. Jefferson Lab offers its Teacher Academy in Physical Science program to teachers each summer. This four-week program for upper elementary and middle school teachers offers advanced scientific content and teaching methods in math and science. JLab's unique research environment and expertise in science, math, and technology create the basis for extraordinary educational opportunities that are solidly grounded in the Laboratory's scientific programs. These

  13. Multi-Anode-PMT Analysis for new RICH detector at JLab's CLAS12 spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witchger, Andrew; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to reach energies of 12 GeV. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is undergoing major upgrade too to run to collect data at these high energies. A new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation for CLAS12 in the 3 to 8 GeV/ c range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode Photo-Multiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). The supporting hardware and software systems for MA-PMTs were developed by the collaboration. I am presenting my work on the testing and analysis of these systems and results that will amplify the physical capabilities of the spectrometer.

  14. Status and Plans for an SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-29

    A superconducting RF accelerator test facility is currently under construction at Fermilab. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, 40 MeV injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, and multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and performing beam experiments. With 3 cryomodules installed this facility will initially be capable of generating an 810 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. The facility can accommodate up to 6 cryomodules for a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. This facility will be used to test SRF cryomodules under high intensity beam conditions, RF power equipment, instrumentation, and LLRF and controls systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  15. Accelerated radioactive nuclear beams: Existing and planned facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1992-07-01

    An over-view of existing and planned radioactive nuclear beam facilities world-wide. Two types of production methods are distinguished: projectile fragmentation and the on-line isotope separator (ISOL) method. While most of the projectile fragmentation facilities are already in operation, almost all the ISOL-based facilities are in still the planning stage.

  16. A facility for accelerator research and education at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Church, Mike; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Fermilab is currently constructing the 'SRF Test Accelerator at the New Muon Lab' (NML). NML consists of a photo-emitted RF electron gun, followed by a bunch compressor, low energy test beamlines, SCRF accelerating structures, and high energy test beamlines. The initial primary purpose of NML will be to test superconducting RF accelerating modules for the ILC and for Fermilab's 'Project X' - a proposal for a high intensity proton source. The unique capability of NML will be to test these modules under conditions of high intensity electron beams with ILC-like beam parameters. In addition NML incorporates a photoinjector which offers significant tunability and especially the possibility to generate a bright electron beam with brightness comparable to state-of-the-art accelerators. This opens the exciting possibility of also using NML for fundamental beams research and tests of new concepts in beam manipulations and acceleration, instrumentation, and the applications of beams.

  17. Commissioning Cornell OSTs for SRF cavity testing at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the current quench limitations in SRF cavities is a topic essential for any SRF accelerator that requires high fields. This understanding crucially depends on correct and precise quench identification. Second sound quench detection in superfluid liquid helium with oscillating superleak transducers is a technique recently applied at Cornell University as a fast and versatile method for quench identification in SRF cavities. Having adopted Cornell design, we report in this contribution on our experience with OST for quench identification in different cavities at JLab.

  18. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1994-04-01

    This document begins with a general description of the facility to include historical and up-to-date aspects of design and operation. A user`s guide and a review of research using the facility follows. Next the accelerator utilization and operation and the development of the facilities is given. Personnel currently working at the facility are listed. Lastly, recent publications and literature cited are presented.

  19. Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

  20. Propagation characteristics of neutrons leaking from the accelerator facilities.

    PubMed

    Kitaichi, Masatoshi; Sawamura, Sadashi; Wakisaka, Masashi; Kaneko, Junichi H; Ochiai, Kentaro; Nishitani, Takeo; Sawamura, Teruko

    2004-01-01

    In this study spatial and time distribution of neutrons leaking from Hokkaido University 45 MeV Electron Linac facility have measured and compared with the Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron transport processes inside and outside the facility building has been simulated using MCNP. The neutrons have measured by BF3 counters and 3He counters with polyethylene moderators up to the distance of 330 m from the facility. The spatial distribution of ambient dose equivalent converted from the counts has been compared with the simulation. The distribution estimated from the counts by the BF3 counter has been shown fairly good agreement with the calculation. The spatial distribution of counts obtained at the 45 MeV Electron Linac facility has been compared with that obtained at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) facility of JAERI. The difference between the propagation characteristics of neutrons leaking from those facilities has been discussed. PMID:15353739

  1. Review of Recent Jlab Results

    SciTech Connect

    Elton Smith

    2005-08-21

    High quality polarized electron beams at Jefferson Lab make possible precision measurements of hadronic properties in the regime of strongly interacting QCD. We will describe a few programs at Jefferson Lab that are making measurements that link the basic static properties of hadrons to their quark sub-structure. For example, parity-violating electron proton elastic scattering probes the spatial distribution of strange quarks in the nucleon. The nucleon-Delta transition form factors give us information about the deformation of nucleons and Deltas. Finally, new high statistics measurements of photons scattering off proton and deuteron targets are used to set upper limits on the production of exotic baryons with strangeness S=+1. These examples will be used to illustrate the capabilities and focus of the experimental program at JLab.

  2. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  3. Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Light Ion FacilityUpgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael B.; McMahan, Margaret A.; Gimpel, Thomas L.; Tiffany, William S.

    2006-07-07

    The BASE Light Ion Facility upgrades have been completed. All proton beams are now delivered to Cave 4A. New control software, a larger diameter beam window, and improved quality assurance measures have been added.

  4. FAIR - An International Accelerator Facility for Research with Ions and Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Walter

    2005-06-08

    An overview is given on the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, its science motivation and goals, the facility lay-out and characteristics, the accelerator design challenges, the schedule for construction, and the international interest/participation in the project.

  5. Accelerated field facility development for hot sour gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, L.K.

    1983-10-01

    This paper presents the chronological plan by which a grass roots sweetening facility was constructed in a minimum amount of time. The facility design was based on production with 9% carbon dioxide and 40 ppm hydrogen sulfide. Flowing wellhead temperatures were predicted to be approximately 300/sup 0/F with flowing wellhead pressures to 11,500 psi. The production facility, with a current total nominal capacity of 100 MMcf/D, was installed as five separate parallel sweetening units. The units were put on-stream in phases in order to maintain a sweetening capacity schedule compatible with wells being put on production. The first units were available for service in three months. All five units were complete in nine months, and a permanent facility installation was commissioned three months later. The process design, equipment procurement, and installation phases of the project were pursued concurrently. Three different sweetening systems were operated during the facility development. A conventional DEA (diethanolamine) system was used because of its simple operation. Conversions were made to a proprietary MDEA (methyldiethanolamine) system in order to increase capacity. A proprietary activated MDEA was tested and operated in order to determine sweetening system selection for future facility capacity and for other applications. Included is a discussion of the project development procedure and key considerations that led to minimal development time. General comparisons are made concerning the performance of several sweetening systems.

  6. Development of a 20-MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.G.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R.W.; Bruce, R.L.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lewis, D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /LET Corp., Washington /Argonne /SLAC /Tsinghua U., Beijing

    2005-06-22

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron inector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx} 8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRl, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  7. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D.; Coulter, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R&D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-{beta} Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  8. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J. ); Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D. ); Coulter, K.J. )

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-[beta] Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented.

  9. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing facilities

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2003-08-12

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS to deliver a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in chamber means that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  10. Ultra-Accelerated Natural Sunlight Exposure Testing Facilities

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2004-11-23

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS onto a secondary reflector that delivers a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in a chamber that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  11. Engineered and Administrative Safety Systems for the Control of Prompt Radiation Hazards at Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Vylet, Vashek; Walker, Lawrence S.; /SLAC

    2007-12-17

    The ANSI N43.1 Standard, currently in revision (ANSI 2007), sets forth the requirements for accelerator facilities to provide adequate protection for the workers, the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation produced during and from accelerator operations. The Standard also recommends good practices that, when followed, provide a level of radiation protection consistent with those established for the accelerator communities. The N43.1 Standard is suitable for all accelerator facilities (using electron, positron, proton, or ion particle beams) capable of producing radiation, subject to federal or state regulations. The requirements (see word 'shall') and recommended practices (see word 'should') are prescribed in a graded approach that are commensurate with the complexity and hazard levels of the accelerator facility. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 of the N43.1 Standard address specially the Radiation Safety System (RSS), both engineered and administrative systems, to mitigate and control the prompt radiation hazards from accelerator operations. The RSS includes the Access Control System (ACS) and Radiation Control System (RCS). The main requirements and recommendations of the N43.1 Standard regarding the management, technical and operational aspects of the RSS are described and condensed in this report. Clearly some aspects of the RSS policies and practices at different facilities may differ in order to meet the practical needs for field implementation. A previous report (Liu et al. 2001a), which reviews and summarizes the RSS at five North American high-energy accelerator facilities, as well as the RSS references for the 5 labs (Drozdoff 2001; Gallegos 1996; Ipe and Liu 1992; Liu 1999; Liu 2001b; Rokni 1996; TJNAF 1994; Yotam et al. 1991), can be consulted for the actual RSS implementation at various laboratories. A comprehensive report describing the RSS at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC 2006) can also serve as a reference.

  12. Potential applications of the dielectric wakefield accelerators in the SINBAD facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y. C.; Assmann, R.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B.; Weikum, M.; Zhu, J.; Hüning, M.

    2016-09-01

    Short, high-brightness relativistic electron bunches can drive ultra-high wakefields in the dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWFAs). This effect can be used to generate high power THz coherent Cherenkov radiation, accelerate a witness bunch with gradient two or three orders of magnitude larger than that in the conventional RF linear accelerators, introduce energy modulation within the driving bunch itself, etc. The paper studies potential applications of the DWFAs in the SINBAD facility at DESY. The simulations show that the ultra-short relativistic bunches from the SINBAD injector ARES can excite accelerating wakefields with peak amplitudes as high as GV/m at THz frequencies in proper DWFA structures. In addition, it illustrates that the DWFA structure can serve as a dechirper to compensate the correlated energy spread of the bunches accelerated by the laser plasma wakefield accelerator.

  13. 148-Gd cross section measurements for accelerator target facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, R. K.; Pitcher, E. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Hertel, N. E.

    2002-01-01

    In a series of experiments at LANSCE's WNR facility, 148Gdp roduction was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 pm thin W, Ta, and Au foils and 10 pm thin A1 activation foils, Spallation yields were determined for many short-lived and long-lived spallation products with these foils using gamma and alpha spectroscopy.

  14. Polarized Ion Beams in Figure-8 Rings of JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Kondratenko, Anatoliy; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yury

    2014-07-01

    The Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is designed to provide high polarization of both colliding beams. One of the unique features of JLab's MEIC is figure-8 shape of its rings. It allows preservation and control of polarization of all ion species including small-anomalous-magnetic-moment deuterons during their acceleration and storage. The figure-8 design conceptually expands the capability of obtaining polarized high-energy beams in comparison to conventional designs because of its property of having no preferred periodic spin direction. This allows one to control effectively the beam polarization by means of magnetic insertions with small field integrals. We present a complete scheme for preserving the ion polarization during all stages of acceleration and its control in the collider's experimental straights.

  15. "DIANA" - A New, Deep-Underground Accelerator Facility for Astrophysics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, M.; Leitner, D.; Lemut, A.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

    2009-05-28

    The DIANA project (Dakota Ion Accelerators for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame, University of North Carolina, Western Michigan University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to build a nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility 1.4 km below ground. DIANA is part of the US proposal DUSEL (Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory) to establish a cross-disciplinary underground laboratory in the former gold mine of Homestake in South Dakota, USA. DIANA would consist of two high-current accelerators, a 30 to 400 kV variable, high-voltage platform, and a second, dynamitron accelerator with a voltage range of 350 kV to 3 MV. As a unique feature, both accelerators are planned to be equipped with either high-current microwave ion sources or multi-charged ECR ion sources producing ions from protons to oxygen. Electrostatic quadrupole transport elements will be incorporated in the dynamitron high voltage column. Compared to current astrophysics facilities, DIANA could increase the available beam densities on target by magnitudes: up to 100 mA on the low energy accelerator and several mA on the high energy accelerator. An integral part of the DIANA project is the development of a high-density super-sonic gas-jet target which can handle these anticipated beam powers. The paper will explain the main components of the DIANA accelerators and their beam transport lines and will discuss related technical challenges.

  16. Performance of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and initial experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Conde, M.; Cox, G.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.; Barov, N.

    1997-09-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility has begun its experimental program. This unique facility is designed to address advanced acceleration research which requires very short, intense electron bunches. The facility incorporates two photo-cathode based electron sources. One produces up to 100 nC, multi-kiloamp drive bunches which are used to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures and in plasma. The second source produces much lower intensity witness pulses which are used to probe the fields produced by the drive. The drive and witness pulses can be precisely timed as well as laterally positioned with respect to each other. The authors discuss commissioning, initial experiments, and outline plans for a proposed 1 GeV demonstration accelerator.

  17. Operational experience from a large EPICS-based accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciarlette, D.J.; Gerig, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation x-ray light source which uses the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) to operate its linear accelerator, positron accumulator ring, booster synchrotron, and storage ring equipment. EPICS has been used at the APS since the beginning of installation and commissioning. Currently, EPICS controls approximately 100 VME crates containing over 100,000 process variables. With this complexity, the APS has had to review some of the methods originally employed and make changes as necessary. In addition, due to commissioning and operational needs, higher-level operator software needed to be created. EPICS has been flexible enough to allow this.

  18. Future Hypernuclear Program at JLAB Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Nakamura

    2005-05-01

    Encouraged by the success of the first hypernuclear spectroscopy through the (e,e'K+) reaction (JLab E89-009), a new improved experiment with a newly developed High resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS) and a new configuration of the electron spectrometer is planned at the JLab Hall C. The introduction of the HKS will improve by a factor of two, the energy resolution which was limited by the previous kaon spectrometer. The hypernuclear yield and the signal to noise ratio will be also improved by a factor of 50 and 10, respectively.

  19. Evaluation and analysis of the residual radioactivity for the 15UD Pelletron accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sonkawade, R. G.

    2007-07-01

    For the assessment of radiological impact of the accelerators, it will be better to have the documented information on activation of metal parts of the accelerator components. It is very much essential to get reliable data on these subjects. During acceleration of light ion, the residual radioactivity in the accelerator facility was found near the Analyzing Magnet, single slit, Beam Profile Monitors (BPM), Faraday Cups (FC), bellows, beginning of switching magnet bellows, at the target and the ladder. Study with HPGE detector gives an insight of the formation of the short or long lived radionuclides. The different targets used in the light ion experiment were also monitored and proper decommissioning and decontamination steps were followed. This paper presents the data of residual radioactivity in the 15UD Pelletron accelerator infrastructure. (author)

  20. Ion accelerator facilities at the University of Göttingen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrmacher, M.; Hofsäss, H.

    2005-10-01

    The accelerators at the II. Physikalisches Institut of the University of Göttingen were reinstalled in a new building during the summer of 2003. They cover a wide energy range and are used for many different applications. The highest energies are obtained with the 3 MV Pelletron MaRPel, which is preferentially used for ion beam analysis. Ions in the energy range from 30 keV to 1000 keV are delivered by the 500 kV heavy ion implanter IONAS which is used for analysis, implantation and ion beam modification. ADONIS and STRINGER are mass-separated ion beam deposition (MSIBD) systems which produce 30 keV mass separated beams which can be decelerated to 20 eV to synthesize isotopically pure hard coatings like cubic BN, tetrahedral bounded amorphous C (ta-C) and BxC. The low energy implanter IOSCHKA delivers ions of 10 keV maximum, which can be slowed down to a few eV. The targets can be transferred in UHV to an STM set-up to investigate surface modifications after single ion impacts or the development of surface ripple patterns.

  1. High brightness photocathode injector for BNL Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.; Young, L.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the BNL photocathode (1-1/2 cell) Gun'' operating at 2856 MHZ, is presented. The beam parameters including beam energy, and emittance are calculated. A review of the Gun parameters and full input and output of our analysis with program PARMELA, is given in Section 2, some of our results, are tabulated. The phase plots and the beam parameters, at downstream ends of the elements, from cathode through the cavity, first cell is labeled as element 2; and second cell is labeled as element to the exit of the GUN. The analysis was made for 3 cases, using three different initial values (EO) for the average accelerating gradient (MV/m), for comparison with previous works. For illustration, the field obtained with program SUPERFISH is given, and conclusion including shunt impedances obtained for the cells and the cavity are given in Section 6. PARMELA is used as a standard design program at ATF. At the request of some of the users of program PARMELA, this request of some of the users of program PARMELA, this report include and illustrates some of our data, in the input and output format of the program PARMELA. 5 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS MODEL OF EXPECTED BEAM LOSS ALONG THE SNS ACCELERATOR FACILITY DURING NORMAL OPERATION.

    SciTech Connect

    CATALAN - LASHERAS,N.; COUSINEAU,S.; GALAMBOS,J.; HOLTKAMP,N.; RAPARIA,D.; SHAFER,R.; STAPLES,J.; STOVALL,J.; TANKE,E.; WANGLER,T.; WEI,J.

    2002-06-03

    The most demanding requirement in the design of the SNS accelerator chain is to keep the accelerator complex under hands-on maintenance. This requirement implies a hard limit for residual radiation below 100 mrem/hr at one feet from the vacuum pipe and four hours after shutdown for hundred days of normal operation. It has been shown by measurements as well as simulation [l] that this limit corresponds to 1-2 Watts/meter average beam losses. This loss level is achievable all around the machine except in specific areas where remote handling will be necessary. These areas have been identified and correspond to collimation sections and dumps where a larger amount of controlled beam loss is foreseen. Even if the average level of loss is kept under 1 W/m, there are circumstances under which transient losses occur in the machine. The prompt radiation or potential damage in the accelerator components can not be deduced from an average beam loss of 1 W/m. At the same time, controlled loss areas require a dedicated study to clarify the magnitude and distribution of the beam loss. From the front end to the target, we have estimated the most probable locations for transient losses and given an estimate of their magnitude and frequency. This information is essential to calculate the necessary shielding or determine the safety procedures during machine operation. Losses in controlled areas, and the cleaning systems are the subject of Section 2. The inefficiency of each system will be taken into account for the discussion on Section 3 where n controlled loss is estimated. Section 4 summarizes our findings and presents a global view of the losses along the accelerator chain.

  3. Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Program - Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, Andrew; Areti, Hari

    2015-08-01

    Funding is being requested pursuant to the proposals entitled Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications that was submitted and reviewed through the Portfolio Analysis and Management System (PAMS). The PAMS proposal identifier number is 0000219731. The proposed new type of superconducting cavity, the Elliptical Twin Cavity, is capable of accelerating or decelerating beams in two separate beam pipes. This configuration is particularly effective for high-current, low energy electron beams that will be used for bunched beam cooling of high-energy protons or ions. Having the accelerated beam physically separated from the decelerated beam, but interacting with the same RF mode, means that the low energy beam from the gun can be injected into to the superconducting cavity without bends enabling a small beam emittance to be maintained. A staff engineer who has been working with non-standard complicated cavity structures replaces the senior engineer (in the original budget) who is moving on to be a project leader. This is reflected in a slightly increased engineer time and in reduced costs. The Indirect costs for FY16 are lower than the previous projection. As a result, there is no scope reduction.

  4. Status and specifications of a Project X front-end accelerator test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Steimel, J.; Webber, R.; Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Evans-Peoples, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the construction and operational status of an accelerator test facility for Project X. The purpose of this facility is for Project X component development activities that benefit from beam tests and any development activities that require 325 MHz or 650 MHz RF power. It presently includes an H- beam line, a 325 MHz superconducting cavity test facility, a 325 MHz (pulsed) RF power source, and a 650 MHz (CW) RF power source. The paper also discusses some specific Project X components that will be tested in the facility. Fermilab's future involves new facilities to advance the intensity frontier. In the early 2000's, the vision was a pulsed, superconducting, 8 GeV linac capable of injecting directly into the Fermilab Main Injector. Prototyping the front-end of such a machine started in 2005 under a program named the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS). While the HINS test facility was being constructed, the concept of a new, more versatile accelerator for the intensity frontier, now called Project X, was forming. This accelerator comprises a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac with an associated experimental program, followed by a pulsed 8 GeV superconducting linac to feed the Main Injector synchrotron. The CW Project X design is now the model for Fermilab's future intensity frontier program. Although CW operation is incompatible with the original HINS front-end design, the installation remains useful for development and testing many Project X components.

  5. Proposal of the Next Incarnation of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Higashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Kanazawa, K.; Kubo, K.; Kume, T.; Kuriki, M.; Kuroda, S.; Masuzawa, M.; Naito, T.; Okugi, T.; Sugahara, R.; Takahashi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Toge, N.; Urakawa, J.; Vogel, V.; Yamaoka, H.; Yokoya, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Daresbury /CERN /Hiroshima U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /North Carolina A-T State U. /Oxford U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /DESY /SLAC /University Coll. London /Oregon U. /Tokyo U.

    2005-05-27

    To reach design luminosity, the International Linear Collider (ILC) must be able to create and reliably maintain nanometer size beams. The ATF damping ring is the unique facility where ILC emittances are possible. In this paper we present and evaluate the proposal to create a final focus facility at the ATF which, using compact final focus optics and an ILC-like bunch train, would be capable of achieving 37 nm beam size. Such a facility would enable the development of beam diagnostics and tuning methods, as well as the training of young accelerator physicists.

  6. SINBAD-The accelerator R&D facility under construction at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, U.; Assmann, R.; Brinkmann, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Hüning, M.; Kärtner, F.; Fallahi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Nie, Y.; Osterhoff, J.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at DESY) is a long-term dedicated accelerator research and development facility currently under construction at DESY. It will be located in the premises of the old DORIS accelerator complex and host multiple independent experiments cost-effectively accessing the same central infrastructure like a central high power laser. With the removal of the old DORIS accelerator being completed, the refurbishment of the technical infrastructure is currently starting up. The presently ongoing conversion of the area into the SINBAD facility and the currently foreseen layout is described. The first experiment will use a compact S-band linac for the production of ultra-short bunches at hundred MeV. Once established, one of the main usages will be to externally inject electrons into a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator to boost the energy to GeV-level while maintaining a usable beam quality, ultimately aiming to drive an FEL. The second experiment already under planning is the setup of an attosecond radiation source with advanced technology. Further usage of the available space and infrastructure is revised and national and international collaborations are being established.

  7. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    SciTech Connect

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-29

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  8. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  9. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

    2011-08-22

    Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

  10. The Berkeley accelerator space effects facility (BASE) - A newmission for the 88-inch cyclotron at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.

    2005-09-06

    In FY04, the 88-Inch Cyclotron began a new operating mode that supports a local research program in nuclear science, R&D in accelerator technology and a test facility for the National Security Space (NSS) community (the U.S. Air Force and NRO). The NSS community (and others on a cost recovery basis) can take advantage of both the light- and heavy-ion capabilities of the Cyclotron to simulate the space radiation environment. A significant portion of this work involves the testing of microcircuits for single event effects. The experimental areas within the building that are used for the radiation effects testing are now called the Berkeley Accelerator and Space Effects (BASE) facility. Improvements to the facility to provide increased reliability, quality assurance and new capabilities are underway and will be discussed. These include a 16 AMeV ''cocktail'' of beams for heavy ion testing, a neutron beam, more robust dosimetry, and other upgrades.

  11. A facility for studying irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Flick, Alexander; Toader, Ovidiu; Wang, Peng; Samad, Nassim A.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2014-08-01

    A facility for the study of irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water using in situ proton irradiation has been developed and validated. A specially designed beamline and flowing-water corrosion cell added to the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory provide the capability to study the simultaneous effects of displacement damage and radiolysis on corrosion. A thin sample serves as both a “window” into the corrosion cell through which the proton beam passes completely, and the sample for assessing irradiation accelerated corrosion. The facility was tested by irradiating stainless steel samples at beam current densities between 0.5 and 10 μA/cm2 in 130 °C and 320 °C deaerated water, and 320 °C water with 3 wppm H2. Increases in the conductivity and dissolved oxygen content of the water varied with the proton beam current, suggesting that proton irradiation was accelerating the corrosion of the sample. Conductivity increases were greatest at 320 °C, while DO increases were highest at 130 °C. The addition of 3 wppm H2 suppressed DO below detectable levels. The facility will enable future studies into the effect of irradiation on corrosion in high temperature water with in situ proton irradiation.

  12. Accelerators for the advanced exotic beam facility in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Fuerst, J. D.; Kelly, M. P.; Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J. A.; Shepard, K. W.; Physics

    2007-01-01

    The Office of Science of the Department of Energy is currently considering options for an advanced radioactive beam facility in the U.S which is a reduced scale version of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) project [1,2]. This facility will have unique capabilities compared with others both existing and planned elsewhere. As envisioned at ANL, the facility, called the Advanced Exotic Beam Laboratory (AEBL), would consist of a heavy-ion driver linac, a post-accelerator and experimental areas. Secondary beams of rare isotopes will be available as high quality reaccelerated or stopped beams from a gas catcher and high power ISOL targets, as well as, high energy beams following in-flight fragmentation or fission of heavy ions. The proposed design of the AEBL driver linac is a cw, fully superconducting, 833 MV linac capable of accelerating uranium ions up to 200 MeV/u and protons to 580 MeV with 400 kW beam power. An extensive research and development effort has resolved many technical issues related to the construction of the driver linac and other systems required for AEBL. This paper presents the status of planning, some options for such a facility, as well as, progress in related R&D.

  13. The JLab high power ERL light source

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made

  14. The JLab high power ERL light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, G. R.; Behre, C.; Benson, S. V.; Bevins, M.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Coleman, J.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, H. F.; Evans, R.; Grippo, A.; Gruber, D.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Kelley, M. J.; Merminga, L.; Mammosser, J.; Moore, W.; Nishimori, N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Preble, J.; Rimmer, R.; Shinn, M.; Siggins, T.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Williams, G. P.; Zhang, S.

    2006-02-01

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz ˜ half cycle pulse whose average brightness is >5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted [Carr, et al., Nature 420 (2002) 153]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [Neil, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 662]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 μm in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 ms long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the

  15. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Dixon, Kelly d.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Martin, Floyd D.; Norton, Robert O.; Radovic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields with liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.

  16. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  17. New trends in hadronic physics at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    A. Giusa, V. Bellini, F. Mammoliti, G. Russo, M.L. Sperduto, C.M. Sutera

    2012-04-01

    The 2014-scheduled 12 GeV upgrade of JLab will allow for a whole new range of experiments, extending our knowledge of nucleon structure. The program for the nucleon form factors and elastic scattering parity-violating asymmetry experiments is presented here, along with the benefits of the new large-acceptance forward spectrometer (Super BigBite, SBS) to be installed in Hall A.

  18. Performance of the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility and initial experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Conde, M.; Cox, G.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.; Barov, N.

    1996-10-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility has begun its experimental program. It is designed to address advanced acceleration research requiring very short, intense electron bunches. It incorporates two photocathode based electron sources. One produces up to 100 nC, multi-kiloamp `drive` bunches which are used to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures and in plasma. The second source produces much lower intensity `witness` pulses which are used to probe the fields produced by the drive. The drive and witness pulses can be precisely timed as well as laterally positioned with respect to each other. This paper discusses commissioning, initial experiments, and outline plans for a proposed 1 GeV demonstration accelerator.

  19. Demonstration of two-beam acceleration and 30 GHz power production in the CLIC Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, R.; Braun, H. H.; Carron, G.; Chanudet, M.; Chautard, F.; Delahaye, J. P.; Godot, J. C.; Hutchins, S.; Martinez, C.; Suberlucq, G.; Tenenbaum, P.; Thorndahl, L.; Trautner, H.; Valentini, M.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    1999-05-07

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF II) at CERN has recently demonstrated Two-Beam power production and acceleration at 30 GHz. With 41 MW of 30 GHz power produced in 14 ns pulses at a repetition rate of 5 Hz, the main beam has been accelerated by 28 MeV. The 30 GHz RF power is extracted in low impedance decelerating structures from a low-energy, high-current 'drive beam' which runs parallel to the main beam. The average current in the drive-beam train is 25 A, while the peak current exceeds 2 kA. Crosschecks between measured drive-beam charge, 30 GHz power and main-beam energy gain are in good agreement. In this paper, some relevant experimental and technical issues on drive-beam generation, two-beam power production and acceleration are presented.

  20. Distributed UHV system for the folded tandem ion accelerator facility at BARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Agarwal, A.; Singh, S. K.; Basu, A.; P, Sapna; Sarode, S. P.; Singh, V. P.; Subrahmanyam, N. B. V.; Bhatt, J. P.; Pol, S. S.; Raut, P. J.; Ware, S. V.; Singh, P.; Choudhury, R. K.; Kailas, S.

    2008-05-01

    The 6 MV Folded Tandem Ion Accelerator (FOTIA) Facility at the Nuclear Physics Division, BARC is operational and accelerated beams of both light and heavy ions are being used extensively for basic and applied research. An average vacuum of the order of 10-8-10-9 Torr is maintained for maximum beam transmission and minimum beam energy spreads. The FOTIA vacuum system comprises of about 55 meter long, 100 mm diameter beam lines including various diagnostic devices, two accelerating tubes and four narrow vacuum chambers. The cross sections of the vacuum chambers are 14mm × 24mm for 180°, 38mm × 60mm and 19 × 44 mm for the and 70° & 90° bending magnets and Switching chambers respectively. All the beam line components are UHV compatible, fabricated from stainless steel 304L grade material fitted with metal gaskets. The total volume ~5.8 × 105 cm3 and surface area of 4.6 × 104 cm2, interspersed with total 18 pumping stations. The accelerating tubes are subjected to very high voltage gradient, 20.4 kV/cm, which requires a hydrocarbon free and clean vacuum for smooth operation of the accelerator. Vacuum interlocks are provided to various devices for safe operation of the accelerator. Specially designed sputter ion pumps for higher environmental pressure of 8 atmospheres are used to pump the accelerating tubes and the vacuum chamber for the 180° bending magnet. Fast acting valves are provided for isolating main accelerator against accidental air rush from rest of the beam lines. All the vacuum readings are displayed locally and are also available remotely through computer interface to the Control Room. Vacuum system details are described in this paper.

  1. Commissioning and Testing the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Magnet in JLab's Hall D

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Joshua T.; Biallas, George H.; Brown, G.; Butler, David E.; Carstens, Thomas J.; Chudakov, Eugene A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, F.; Qiang, Yi; Smith, Elton S.; Stevens, Mark A.; Spiegel, Scot L.; Whitlatch, Timothy E.; Wolin, Elliott J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.

    2015-06-01

    JLab refurbished and reconfigured the LASS1, 1.85m bore Solenoid and installed it as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The magnet contains four superconducting coils within an iron yoke. The magnet was built in the early1970's at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and used a second time at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The coils were extensively refurbished and individually tested by JLab. A new Cryogenic Distribution Box provides cryogens and their control valving, current distribution bus, and instrumentation pass-through. A repurposed CTI 2800 refrigerator system and new transfer line complete the system. We describe the re-configuration, the process and problems of re-commissioning the magnet and the results of testing the completed magnet.

  2. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  3. Design of 57.5 MHz cw RFQ structure for the rare isotope accelerator facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Tretyakova, T. E.

    2002-01-29

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility includes a driver linac for production of 400 kW CW heavy-ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy-ions delivered from an ECR ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz four-meter long RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are: (1) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance; (2) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation; (3) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. CW operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as, some aspects of the mechanical design of this low-frequency CW RFQ.

  4. JLab CW Cryomodules for 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Bundy, Richard; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Daly, Edward; Henry, James; Hicks, William; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Marhauser, Frank; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Smith, Karl; Stirbet, Mircea; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2008-01-23

    Fourth generation light sources hold the prospect of unprecedented brightness and optical beam quality for a wide range of scientific applications. Many of the proposed new facilities will rely on large superconducting radio frequency (SRF) based linacs to provide high energy, low emittance CW electron beams. For high average power applications there is a growing acceptance of energy recovery linac (ERL) technology as the way to support large recirculating currents with modest RF power requirements. CW SRF and high current ERLs are two core competencies at Jefferson Lab. JLab has designed and built a number of CW cryomodules of several different types starting with the original CEBAF design, with variations for higher current in the two generations of JLab’s free-electron laser (FEL), through two intermediate prototypes to the final high-performance module for the 12 GeV upgrade. Each of these represent fully engineered and tested configurations with a variety of specifications that could be considered for possible use in fourth generation light sources. Furthermore JLab has been actively pursuing advanced concepts for highcurrent high-efficiency cryomodules for next generation ERL based FEL’s. These existing and proposed designs span the range from about 1mA single-pass to over 100 mA energy recovered current capability. Specialized configurations also exist for high-current non-energy recovered sections such as the injector region where very high RF power is required. We discuss the performance parameters of these existing and proposed designs and their suitability to different classes of fourth generation light sources.

  5. Medical Isotope Production With The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.; Cappiello, M.; Pitcher, E.; O`Brien, H.

    1998-08-01

    In order to meet US tritium needs to maintain the nuclear weapons deterrent, the Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing a dual track program to provide a new tritium source. A record of decision is planned for late in 1998 to select either the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) or the Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) as the technology for new tritium production in the next century. To support this decision, an APT Project was undertaken to develop an accelerator design capable of producing 3 kg of tritium per year by 2007 (START I requirements). The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was selected to lead this effort with Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc. (BREI) / General Atomics (GA) as the prime contractor for design, construction, and commissioning of the facility. If chosen in the downselect, the facility will be built at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and operated by the SRS Maintenance and Operations (M{ampersand}O) contractor, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), with long-term technology support from LANL. These three organizations (LANL, BREI/GA, and WSRC) are working together under the direction of the APT National Project Office which reports directly to the DOE Office of Accelerator Production which has program authority and responsibility for the APT Project.

  6. Upgrading of the AMS facility at the Koffler 14UD Pelletron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, D.; Paul, M.; Ben-Dov, Y.; Bordeanu, C.; Ghelberg, S.; Heber, O.; Hass, M.; Shahar, Y.; Verri, G.

    2004-08-01

    The AMS facility based on a 14UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been upgraded in recent years to support an active and diversified research program. A new dedicated AMS ion source beam line merging at 45° with the existing injection line through a 45° electrostatic deflector is in operation. The multi-sample high-intensity Cs sputter ion source stands on a separate 120 kV platform and is remote-controlled through a hybrid infrared-fiber-optics link operated either manually or by the accelerator-control computer, ensuring safe and reliable operation. Independent current preamplifiers are used in Faraday cup current readings down to the pA range. The accelerator computer-control system was upgraded to LabView 6.1, allowing a PC server to control and read out all hardware components while one or more remote PC clients run the AMS software. Ad hoc sequences of commands, written in a script macro language, are run from a client computer to perform an automated AMS measurement. The present capabilities of the facility in terms of detected radionuclides and their sensitivities are listed.

  7. NIST Accelerator Facilities And Programs In Support Of Industrial Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, F.B.; Desrosiers, M.F.; Hudson, L.T.; Coursey, B.M.; Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.; Seltzer, S.M.

    2003-08-26

    NIST's Ionizing Radiation Division maintains and operates three electron accelerators used in a number of applications including waste treatment and sterilization, radiation hardness testing, detector calibrations and materials modification studies. These facilities serve a large number of governmental, academic and industrial users as well as an active intramural research program. They include a 500 kV cascaded-rectifier accelerator, a 2.5 MV electron Van de Graaff accelerator and a 7 to 32 MeV electron linac, supplying beams ranging in energy from a few keV up to 32 MeV. In response to the recent anthrax incident, NIST along with the US Postal Service and the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) are working to develop protocols and testing procedures for the USPS mail sanitization program. NIST facilities and personnel are being employed in a series of quality-assurance measurements for both electron- and photon-beam sanitization. These include computational modeling, dose verification and VOC (volatile organic compounds) testing using megavoltage electron and photon sources.

  8. First particle acceleration measurements for a shocked multiphase flow at a new horizontal shock tube facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlicz, Greg; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Kathy; Extreme Fluids Team

    2013-11-01

    The horizontal shock tube at Los Alamos, used for over 20 years to study shock-driven mixing between different density gases, has been retrofitted with a new particle seeding system, test section, and diaphragmless driver to investigate the unsteady forces on particles as they are accelerated by a shock wave. Current experiments are performed to measure the acceleration of dispersed glycol droplets, with nominal 0.5 μm diameter, carried in ambient air. Measurements at this facility will be used to develop and validate empirical models implemented in numerical codes. A Particle Image Velocimetry/Accelerometry (PIVA) system is implemented at the facility using eight laser pulses and an eight-frame high speed camera. The lasers are 532 nm Nd:YAGs with pulse widths of 20 ns, and the camera is a Specialised Imaging SIMD with 1280 × 960 resolution at up to 7 million frames per second. With this PIVA arrangement, eight particle fields are collected by independently varying the interframe times. Seven velocity and six acceleration fields are used to study the unsteady drag on the particles. Initial data sets are with a size distribution of known particle diameters. Plans are to vary the particle/gas density ratio, particle diameters, and particle phase (liquid/solid).

  9. HIGH AVERAGE POWER UV FREE ELECTRON LASER EXPERIMENTS AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Williams, Gwyn

    2012-07-01

    Having produced 14 kW of average power at {approx}2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

  10. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D).

  11. The Machine Protection System for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Warner, Arden; Liu, Ning; Neswold, Richard; Carmichael, Linden

    2015-11-15

    The Machine Protection System (MPS) for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility (FAST) has been implemented and tested. The system receives signals from several subsystems and devices which conveys the relevant status needed to the safely operate the accelerator. Logic decisions are made based on these inputs and some predefined user settings which in turn controls the gate signal to the laser of the photo injector. The inputs of the system have a wide variety of signal types, encoding methods and urgencies for which the system is designed to accommodate. The MPS receives fast shutdown (FSD) signals generated by the beam loss system and inhibits the beam or reduces the beam intensity within a macropulse when the beam losses at several places along the accelerator beam line are higher than acceptable values. TTL or relay contact signals from the vacuum system, toroids, magnet systems etc., are chosen with polarities that ensure safe operation of the accelerator from unintended events such as cable disconnection in the harsh industrial environment of the experimental hall. A RS422 serial communication scheme is used to interface the operation permit generator module and a large number of movable devices each reporting multi-bit status. The system also supports operations at user defined lower beam levels for system conunissioning. The machine protection system is implemented with two commercially available off-the-shelf VMEbus based modules with on board FPGA devices. The system is monitored and controlled via the VMEbus by a single board CPU

  12. Beam Based HOM Analysis of Accelerating Structures at the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Schreiber, S.; Castro, P.; Gossel, A.; Huning, M.; Devanz, G.; Jablonka, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O.; Baboi, N.; /SLAC

    2005-08-09

    The beam emittance in future linear accelerators for high energy physics and SASE-FEL applications depends highly on the field performance in the accelerating structures, i.e. the damping of higher order modes (HOM). Besides theoretical and laboratory analysis, a beam based analysis technique was established [1] at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac. It uses a charge modulated beam of variable modulation frequency to excite dipole modes. This causes a modulation of the transverse beam displacement, which is observed at a downstream BPM and associated with a direct analysis of the modes at the HOM-couplers. A brief introduction of eigenmodes of a resonator and the concept of the wake potential is given. Emphasis is put on beam instrumentation and signal analysis aspects, required for this beam based HOM measurement technique.

  13. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2012-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  14. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  15. Meson Spectroscopy At Jlab At 12 Gev

    SciTech Connect

    Fegan, Stuart

    2014-12-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade to the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab will enable a new generation of experiments in hadronic nuclear physics, seeking to address fundamental questions in our understanding of QCD. The existence of exotic states, suggested by both quark models and lattice calculations, would allow gluonic degrees of freedom to be explored, and may help explain the role played by gluons in the QCD interaction. This article will review the meson spectroscopy program being planned at the lab following the 12 GeV upgrade, utilising real and quasi-real photon beams in two of the lab's four experimental halls, whose distinct capabilities will enable an extensive set of spectroscopy experiments to be performed at the same facility.

  16. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  17. Fabrication and Measurement of 12 GeV Prototype Quadrupoles at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tommy Hiatt, Mark Wiseman, Kenneth Baggett, J. Beck, Leigh Harwood, Joseph Meyers, Jeffrey Dail

    2009-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) currently has a maximum beam energy of 6 GeV. The 12 GeV Upgrade Project will double the existing energy and is currently scheduled for completion in 2014. This doubling of energy requires modifications to the beam transport system which includes the addition of several new magnet designs and modifications to many existing designs. Prototyping efforts have been concluded for two different designs of quadrupole magnets required for the upgrade. The design, fabrication and measurement will be discussed.

  18. Accelerator Test Facility for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the needs and possibilities for a Muon Collider beam test facility to carry out the R&D program on the collider front-end and 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  19. ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) source for the HHIRF (Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility) tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Alton, G.D.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Meigs, M.J.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Tatum, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance, ECR, ion source technology has developed rapidly since the original pioneering work of R. Geller and his group at Grenoble in the early 1970s. These ion sources are capable of producing intense beams of highly charged positive ions and are used extensively for cyclotron injection, linac injection, and atomic physics research. In this paper, the advantages of using an ECR heavy-ion source in the terminal of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) 25-MV tandem accelerator is discussed. A possible ECR system for installation in the HHIRF tandem terminal is described.

  20. Evaluation of medical isotope production with the accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.W.; Frey, G.D.; McLean, D.C., Jr; Spicer, K.M.; Davis, S.E.; Baron, S.; Frysinger, J.R.; Blanpied, G.; Adcock, D.

    1997-07-10

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility, with its high beam current and high beam energy, would be an ideal supplier of radioisotopes for medical research, imaging, and therapy. By-product radioisotopes will be produced in the APT window and target cooling systems and in the tungsten target through spallation, neutron, and proton interactions. High intensity proton fluxes are potentially available at three different energies for the production of proton- rich radioisotopes. Isotope production targets can be inserted into the blanket for production of neutron-rich isotopes. Currently, the major production sources of radioisotopes are either aging or abroad, or both. The use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine is growing and changing, both in terms of the number of nuclear medicine procedures being performed and in the rapidly expanding range of procedures and radioisotopes used. A large and varied demand is forecast, and the APT would be an ideal facility to satisfy that demand.

  1. THE JLAMP VUV/SOFT X-RAY USER FACILITY AT JEFFERSON LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    S.V. Benson; D. Douglas; P. Evtushenko; J. Gubeli; F.E. Hannon; K. Jordan; J. M. Klopf; G.R. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn; C. Tennant; G.P. Williams; S. Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is proposing JLAMP (JLab Amplifier), a 4th generation light source covering the 10-100 eV range in the fundamental mode with harmonics stretching towards the oxygen k-edge. The new photon science user facility will feature a two-pass superconducting LINAC to accelerate the electron beam to 600MeV at repetition rates of 4.68MHz continuous wave. The average brightness from a seeded amplifier free electron laser (FEL) will substantially exceed existing light sources in this device's wavelength range, extended by harmonics towards 2 nm. Multiple photon sources will be made available for pump-probe dynamical studies. The status of the machine design and technical challenges associated with the development of the JLAMP are presented here.

  2. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spata, Michael F.

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  3. Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu; Doi, Daisuke; Fujii, Yu; Toshiyuki, Gogami; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M; Kawama, Daisuke; Maeda, Kazushige; Maruta, Tomofumi; Matsumura, Akihiko; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Shichijo, Ayako; Tamura, Hirokazu; Taniya, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Taku; Yokota, Kosuke; Kato, S; Sato, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Motoba, T; Hiyama, E; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Ates, Ozgur; Chen, Chunhua; Christy, Michael; Keppel, Cynthia; Kohl, Karl; Li, Ya; Liyanage, Anusha Habarakada; Tang, Liguang; Walton, T; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhu, Lingyan; Baturin, Pavlo; Boeglin, Werner; Dhamija, Seema; Markowitz, Pete; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Hungerford, Ed; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Gaskell, David; Horn, Tanja; Jones, Mark; Smith, Gregory; Vulcan, William; Wood, Stephen; Johnston, C; Simicevic, Neven; Wells, Stephen; Samantha, Chhanda; Hu, Bitao; Shen, Ji; Wang, W; Zhang, Xiaozhuo; Zhang, Yi; Feng, Jing; Fu, Y; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, S; Jiang, Yi; Lu, H; Yan, Xinhu; Ye, Yunxiu; Gan, Liping; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Danagoulian, Samuel; Gasparian, Ashot; Elaasar, Mostafa; Wesselmann, Frank; Asaturyan, Arshak; Margaryan, Amur; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Androic, Darko; Furic, Miroslav; Petkovic, Tomislav; Seva, Tomislav; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Rodriguez, Victor; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cusanno, Francesco; Garibaldi, Franco; Urciuoli, Guido; De Leo, Raffaele; Maronne, S; Achenbach, Carsten; Pochodzalla, J

    2010-03-01

    Since the 1st generation experiment, E89-009, which was successfully carried out as a pilot experiment of (e,e'K+) hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab Hall C in 2000, precision hypernuclear spectroscopy by the (e,e'K+) reactions made considerable progress. It has evolved to the 2nd generation experiment, E01-011, in which a newly constructed high resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) was installed and the “Tilt method” was adopted in order to suppress large electromagnetic background and to run with high luminosity. Preliminary high-resolution spectra of 7ΛHe and 28ΛAl together with that of 12ΛB that achieved resolution better than 500 keV(FWHM) were obtained. The third generation experiment, E05-115, has completed data taking with an experimental setup combining a new splitter magnet, high resolution electron spectrometer (HES) and the HKS used in the 2nd generation experiment. The data were accumulated with targets of 7Li, 9Be, 10B, 12C and 52Cr as well as with those of CH2 and H2O for calibration. The analysis is under way with particular emphasis of determining precision absolute hypernuclear masses. In this article, hypernuclear spectroscopy program in the wide mass range at JLab Hall C that has undergone three generation is described.

  4. Radiation shielding and patient organ dose study for an accelerator- based BNCT Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, S.V.; Vujic, J.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-10-24

    This study considers the radiation safety aspects of several designs discussed in a previous report of an accelerator-based source of neutrons, based on the [sup 7]Li(p,n) reaction, for a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). determines the optimal radiation shield thicknesses for the patient treatment room. Since this is an experimental facility no moderator or reflector is considered in the bulk wall shield design. This will allow the flexibility of using any postulated moderator/reflector design and assumes sufficient shielding even in the absence of a moderator/reflector. In addition the accelerator is assumed to be capable of producing 100 mA of 2.5 MeV proton beam current. The addition of 1% and 2% [sup 10]B (by weight) to the concrete is also investigated. The second part of this paper determines the radiation dose to the major organs of a patient during a treatment. Simulations use the MIRD 5 anthropomorphic phantom to calculate organ doses from a 20 mA proton beam assuming various envisioned moderator/reflector in place. Doses are tabulated by component and for a given uniform [sup 10]B loading in all organs. These are presented in for a BeO moderator and for an Al/AlF[sub 3] moderator. Dose estimates for different [sup 10]B loadings may be scaled.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry and radioisotope detection at the Argonne FN tandem facility

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.; Kutschera, W.; Paul, M.; Smither, R.K.; Stephenson, E.J.; Yntema, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    The Argonne FN tandem accelerator and standard components of its experimental heavy-ion research facility, have been used as a highly-sensitive mass spectrometer to detect several long-lived radioisotopes and measure their concentration by counting of accelerated ions. Background beams from isobaric nuclei have been eliminated by combining the dispersion from the energy loss in a uniform Al foil stack with the momentum resolution of an Enge split-pole magnetic spectrograph. Radioisotope concentrations in the following ranges have been measured: /sup 14/C//sup 12/C = 10/sup -12/ to 10/sup -13/, /sup 26/Al//sup 27/Al = 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -12/, /sup 32/Si/Si = 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -14/, /sup 36/Cl/Cl = 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -11/. Particular emphasis was put on exploring to what extent the technique of identifying and counting individual ions in an accelerator beam can be conveniently used to determine nuclear quantities of interest when their measurement involves very low radioisotope concentrations. The usefulness of this method can be demonstrated by measuring the /sup 26/Mg(p,n)/sup 26/Al(7.2 x 10/sup 5/ yr) cross section at proton energies in the astrophysically interesting range just above threshold, and by determining the previously poorly known half life of /sup 32/Si.

  6. An accelerator facility for WDM, HEDP, and HIF investigations in Nazarbayev University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaikanov, M.; Baigarin, K.; Tikhonov, A.; Urazbayev, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Remnev, G.; Shubin, B.; Stepanov, A.; Shamanin, V.; Waldron, W. L.

    2016-05-01

    Nazarbayev University (NU) in Astana, Kazakhstan, is planning to build a new multi-MV, ∼10 to several hundred GW/cm2 ion accelerator facility which will be used in studies of material properties at extreme conditions relevant to ion-beam-driven inertial fusion energy, and other applications. Two design options have been considered. The first option is a 1.2 MV induction linac similar to the NDCX-II at LBNL, but with modifications, capable of heating a 1 mm spot size thin targets to a few eV temperature. The second option is a 2 - 3 MV, ∼200 kA, single-gap-diode proton accelerator powered by an inductive voltage adder. The high current proton beam can be focused to ∼1 cm spot size to obtain power densities of several hundred GW/cm2, capable of heating thick targets to temperatures of tens of eV. In both cases, a common requirement to achieving high beam intensity on target and pulse length compression is to utilize beam neutralization at the final stage of beam focusing. Initial experiments on pulsed ion beam neutralization have been carried out on a 0.3 MV, 1.5 GW single-gap ion accelerator at Tomsk Polytechnic University with the goal of creating a plasma region in front of a target at densities exceeding ∼1012 cm-3.

  7. Neutron source in the MCNPX shielding calculating for electron accelerator driven facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of an experimental neutron source facility. It is an accelerator driven system (ADS) utilizing a subcritical assembly driven by electron accelerator. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as a design tool due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the facility shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. A method, based on generating and utilizing neutron source file, was proposed and tested. This method reduces significantly the required computer resources and improves the statistics of the calculated neutron dose outside the shield boundary. However the statistical errors introduced by generating the neutron source were not directly represented in the results, questioning the validity of this methodology, because an insufficiently sampled neutron source can cause error on the calculated neutron dose. This paper presents a procedure for the validation of the generated neutron source file. The impact of neutron source statistic on the neutron dose is examined by calculating the neutron dose as a function of the number of electron particles used for generating the neutron source files. When the value of the calculated neutron dose converges, it means the neutron source has scored sufficient records and statistic does not have apparent impact on the calculated neutron dose. In this way, the validity of neutron source and the shield analyses could be verified. (authors)

  8. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  9. PROPOSAL FOR A PRE-BUNCHED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATION EXPERIMENT AT THE BNL DUV FEL FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,X.J.SHEEHY,B.WU,Z.GAI,W.TING,A.

    2003-05-12

    We propose a pre-bunched Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) experiment in a plasma channel at the BNL DUV-FEL Facility. BNL DUV-FEL facility is uniquely qualified to carry out the proposed experiment because of the high-brightness' electron beam and RF synchronized TW Ti:Sapphire laser system. The DUV-FEL is a 200 MeV linac facility equipped with a photocathode RF gun injector, a 100 fs Ti:Sapphire laser system and a magnetic bunch compressor. The proposed LWFA will inject a 150 MeV, 10 fs electron bunch into a centimeters long plasma channel. Simulation and preliminary experiment showed that, high-brightness 10 fs electron bunch with 20 pC charge could be produced using the technique of longitudinal emittance compensation. The initial experiment will be performed using the existing Ti:Sapphire laser system (50mJ, 100 fs) with 30 {micro}m spot and 4 cm channel, the maximum energy gain will be about 15 MeV. We propose to upgrade the existing SDL laser output to 500 mJ with a shorter pulse length (50 fs). For an electron beam spot size of 20 um, the expected energy gain is about 100 MeV for a 5 TW, 50 fs laser pulse.

  10. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  11. Biological shield design and analysis of KIPT accelerator-driven subcritical facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator-driven subcritical facility. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear research, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. This paper presents the design and analyses of the biological shield performed for the top section of the facility. The neutron source driving the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of a 100-kW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron energy is in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, and it has a uniform spatial distribution. The shield design and the associated analyses are presented including different parametric studies. In the analyses, a significant effort was dedicated to the accurate prediction of the radiation dose outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized for the transport calculation of electrons, photons, and neutrons. Weight window variance-reduction techniques were introduced, and the dose equivalent outside the shield can be calculated with reasonably good statistics.

  12. Progress of Bep Treatments on Nb at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Wu, S. Jin, R.A. Rimmer,X.Y. Lu, K. Zhao

    2010-05-01

    Recent experimental results have indicated that Buffered Electropolishing (BEP) is a promising candidate for the next generation of surface treatment technique for Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in particle accelerators. In order to lay the foundation for using BEP as the next generation surface treatment technique for Nb SRF cavities, some fundamental aspects of BEP treatments for Nb have to be investigated. In this report, recent progress on BEP study at JLab is shown. Improvements on the existing vertical BEP are made to allow water cooling from outside of a Nb single cell cavity in addition to cooling provided by acid circulation so that the temperature of the cavity can be stable during processing. Some investigation on the electrolyte mixture was performed to check the aging effect of the electrolyte. It is shown that good polishing results can still be obtained on Nb at a current density of 171 mA/cm when the BEP electrolyte was at the stationary condition and was more than 1.5 years old.

  13. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  14. Development of a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility Based on an X-Band Magnicon Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.; Tantawi, S. G.; Nantista, C. D.; Hu, Y.; Du, X.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R. W.; Bruce, R. L.; Lewis, D. III

    2006-01-03

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), are developing a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by the 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that was developed jointly by NRL and Omega-P, Inc. Thus far, DLA structures developed by ANL have been tested at the NRL Magnicon Facility without injected electrons, including tests of alumina and magnesium calcium titanate structures at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. The next step is to inject electrons in order to build a compact DLA test accelerator. The Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China has developed a 5-MeV electron injector for the accelerator, and SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive the injector and an accelerator section with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. Also, RWBruce Associates, working with NRL, is developing a means to join ceramic tubes to produce long accelerating sections using a microwave brazing process. The installation and commissioning of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  15. Gadolinium-148 and other spallation production cross section measurements for accelerator target facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Karen Corzine

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research facility and the 1L target at the Lujan Center. The Department of Energy requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on certain radionuclide inventories in the targets to avoid characterizing the facilities as "nuclear facilities." Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten. Allowed isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of Gadolinium-148 is low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total dose burden for the two tungsten targets based on present yield estimates. From a hazard classification standpoint, this severely limits the lifetime of these tungsten targets. The cross section is not well-established experimentally and this is the motivation for measuring the Gadolinium-148 production cross section from tungsten. In a series of experiments at the Weapons Neutron Research facility, Gadolinium-148 production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 mum thin tungsten, tantalum, and gold foils and 10 mum thin aluminum activation foils. In addition, spallation yields were determined for many short-lived and long-lived spallation products with these foils using gamma and alpha spectroscopy and compared with predictions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. The cumulative Gadolinium-148 production cross section measured from tantalum, tungsten, and gold for incident 600-MeV protons were 15.2 +/- 4.0, 8.31 +/- 0.92, and 0.591 +/- 0.155, respectively. The average production cross sections measured at 800 MeV were 28.6 +/- 3.5, 19.4 +/- 1.8, and 3.69 +/- 0.50 for tantalum, tungsten, and gold, respectively. These cumulative

  16. An Efficient RF Source for Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Dudas, A.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng

    2013-12-01

    We propose the development of a highly reliable high efficiency RF source for JLAB with a lower lifetime cost operating at 80% efficiency with system operating costs of about 0.7M$/year for the 6 GeV machine. The design of the RF source will be based upon two injection locked magnetrons in a novel combining architecture for amplitude modulation and a cross field amplifier (CFA) as an output tube for the 12 GeV upgrade. A cost analysis including efficiency and reliability will be performed to determine the optimum system architecture. Several different system architectures will be designed and evaluated for a dual injection locked magnetron source using novel combining techniques and possibly a CFA as the output tube. A paper design for the 1497 MHz magnetron system will be completed. The optimum system architecture with all relevant specifications will be completed so that a prototype can be built.

  17. The spin program with CLAS at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minehart, R. C.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the status of an extensive program to study the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from longitudinally polarized NH3 and ND3 targets using the CLAS detector at JLab. The data span a range in Q 2 from 0.05-4.5 (GeV/c)2 and a range in W, the γ* N invariant mass, up to about 3 GeV. With the excellent particle identification available with the CLA, both inclusive and exclusive scattering can be studied. The experimental techniques are reviewed and some preliminary results are presented. This paper focuses on extraction of the spin structure functiong g 1 for the proton and the deuteron.

  18. Characterization of the radiation environment at the UNLV accelerator facility during operation of the Varian M6 linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, M.; Barzilov, A.; Chen, Y.; Lowe, D.

    2016-10-01

    The bremsstrahlung photon flux from the UNLV particle accelerator (Varian M6 model) was determined using MCNP5 code for 3 MeV and 6 MeV incident electrons. Human biological equivalent dose rates due to accelerator operation were evaluated using the photon flux with the flux-to-dose conversion factors. Dose rates were computed for the accelerator facility for M6 linac use under different operating conditions. The results showed that the use of collimators and linac internal shielding significantly reduced the dose rates throughout the facility. It was shown that the walls of the facility, in addition to the earthen berm enveloping the building, provide equivalent shielding to reduce dose rates outside to below the 2 mrem/h limit.

  19. Accelerated Discovery of Thermoelectric Materials: Combinatorial Facility and High-Throughput Measurement of Thermoelectric Power Factor.

    PubMed

    García-Cañadas, Jorge; Adkins, Nicholas J E; McCain, Stephen; Hauptstein, Bastian; Brew, Ashley; Jarvis, David J; Min, Gao

    2016-06-13

    A series of processes have been developed to facilitate the rapid discovery of new promising thermoelectric alloys. A novel combinatorial facility where elements are wire-fed and laser-melted was designed and constructed. Different sample compositions can be achieved by feeding different element wires at specific rates. The composition of all the samples prepared was tested by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Then, their thermoelectric properties (power factor) at room temperature were screened in a specially designed new high-throughput setup. After the screening, the thermoelectric properties can be mapped with the possibility of identifying compositional trends. As a proof-of-concept, a promising thermoelectric ternary system, Al-Fe-Ti, has been identified, demonstrating the capability of this accelerated approach. PMID:27186664

  20. Overview of progress on the improvement projects for the LANSCE accelerator and target facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Browne, J.; Brun, T.; Donahue, J.B.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hoffman, E.; Pynn, R.; Schriber, S.; Weinacht, D.

    1997-06-01

    Three projects have been initiated since 1994 to improve the performance of the accelerator and target facilities for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LANSCE Reliability Improvement Project (LRIP) was separated into two phases. Phase 1, completed in 1995, targeted near-term improvements to beam reliability and availability that could be completed in one-year`s time. Phase 2, now underway and scheduled for completion in May 1998, consists of two projects: (a) implementation of direct H-injection for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) and (b) an upgrade of the target/moderator system for the short pulse spallation neutron (SPSS) source. The latter will reduce the target change-out time from about 10 months to about three weeks. The third project, the SPSS Enhancement Project, is aimed at increasing the PSR output beam current to 200 {micro}A at 30 Hz and providing up to seven new neutron scattering instruments.

  1. A nuclear physics program at the Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Bum

    2014-04-15

    This paper outlines the new physics possibilities that fall within the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics based on experiments with radioactive ion beams at the future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility in Korea. This ambitious multi-beam facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) and fragmentation capability to produce rare isotopes beams (RIBs) and will be capable of producing and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. The large dynamic range of reaccelerated RIBs will allow the optimization in each nuclear reaction case with respect to cross section and channel opening. The low energy RIBs around Coulomb barrier offer nuclear reactions such as elastic resonance scatterings, one or two particle transfers, Coulomb multiple-excitations, fusion-evaporations, and direct capture reactions for the study of the very neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclides. In contrast, the high energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the study of neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The proposed studies aim at investigating the exotic nuclei near and beyond the nucleon drip lines, and to explore how nuclear many-body systems change in such extreme regions by addressing the following topics: the evolution of shell structure in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; the study of the weak interaction in exotic decay schemes such as beta-delayed two-neutron or two-proton emission; the change of isospin symmetry in isobaric mirror nuclei at the drip lines; two protons or two neutrons radioactivity beyond the drip lines; the role of the continuum states including resonant states above the particle-decay threshold in exotic nuclei; and the effects of nuclear reaction rates triggered by the unbound proton-rich nuclei on nuclear astrophysical processes.

  2. Interaction Region Design and Detector Integration at JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fanglei; Brindza, Paul D.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Ent, Rolf; Morozov, Vasiliy; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel A.; Zhang, Yuhong; Hyde, Charles E.; Sullivan, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The Electron Ion Collider (EIC) will be a next-generation facility for the study of the strong interaction (QCD). JLab's MEIC is designed for high luminosities of up to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. This is achieved in part due to an aggressively small beta-star, which imposes stringent requirements on the collider rings' dynamical properties. Additionally, one of the unique features of MEIC is a full-acceptance detector with a dedicated, small-angle, high-resolution detection system, capable of covering a wide range of momenta (and charge-to-mass ratios) with respect to the original ion beam to enable access to new physics. The detector design relies on a number of features, such as a 50 mrad beam crossing angle, large-aperture ion and electron final focusing quads and spectrometer dipoles as well as a large machine-element-free detection space downstream of the final focusing quads. We present an interaction region design developed with close integration of the detector and beam dynamical aspects. The dynamical aspect of the design rests on a symmetry-based concept for compensation of non-linear effects. The optics and geometry have been optimized to accommodate the detection requirements and to ensure the interaction region's modularity for easiness of integration into the collider ring lattices. As a result, the design offers an excellent detector performance combined with the necessary non-linear dynamical properties.

  3. Upgrade of the Drive LINAC for the AWA Facility Dielectric Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Power, John; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Li, Zenghai; Mihalcea, Daniel; /Northern Illinois U.

    2012-07-02

    We report on the design of a seven-cell, standing-wave, 1.3-GHz rf cavity and the associated beam dynamics studies for the upgrade of the drive beamline LINAC at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. The LINAC design is a compromise between single-bunch operation (100 nC {at} 75 MeV) and minimization of the energy droop along the bunch train during bunch-train operation. The 1.3-GHz drive bunch-train target parameters are 75 MeV, 10-20-ns macropulse duration, and 16 x 60 nC microbunches; this is equivalent to a macropulse current and beam power of 80 A and 6 GW, respectively. Each LINAC structure accelerates approximately 1000 nC in 10 ns by a voltage of 11 MV at an rf power of 10 MW. Due to the short bunch-train duration desired ({approx}10 ns) and the existing frequency (1.3 GHz), compensation of the energy droop along the bunch train is difficult to accomplish by means of the two standard techniques: time-domain or frequency-domain beam loading compensation. Therefore, to minimize the energy droop, our design is based on a large stored energy rf cavity. In this paper, we present our rf cavity optimization method, detailed rf cavity design, and beam dynamics studies of the drive beamline.

  4. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, C. Kester, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  5. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility: CEBAF at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Chrisoph; Douglas, David R; Krafft, Geoffrey A

    2001-08-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory's superconducting radiofrequency (srf) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) provides multi-GeV continuous-wave (cw) beams for experiments at the nuclear and particle physics interface. CEBAF comprises two antiparallel linacs linked by nine recirculation beam lines for up to five passes. By the early 1990s, accelerator installation was proceeding in parallel with commissioning. By the mid-1990s, CEBAF was providing simultaneous beams at different but correlated energies up to 4 GeV to three experimental halls. By 2000, with srf development having raised the average cavity gradient up to 7.5 MV/m, energies up to nearly 6 GeV were routine, at 1-150 muA for two halls and 1-100 nA for the other. Also routine are beams of >75% polarization. Physics results have led to new questions about the quark structure of nuclei, and therefore to user demand for a planned 12 GeV upgrade. CEBAF's enabling srf technology is also being applied in other projects.

  6. JLAMP: AN AMPLIFIER-BASED FEL IN THE JLAB SRF ERL DRIVER

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jordan; Stephen V. Benson; David Douglas; Pavel Evtushenko; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; George R. Neil

    2007-06-13

    Notional designs for energy-recovering linac (“ERL”) -driven high average power free electron lasers (“FEL”s) often invoke amplifier-based architectures. To date, however, amplifier FELs have been limited in average power output to values several orders of magnitude lower than those demonstrated in optical-resonator based systems; this is due at least in part to the limited electron beam powers available from their driver accelerators. In order to directly contrast the performance available from amplifiers to that provided by high-power cavity-based resonators, we have developed a scheme to test an amplifier FEL in the JLab SRF ERL driver. We describe an accelerator system design that can seamlessly and non-invasively integrate a 10 m wiggler into the existing system and which provides, at least in principle, performance that would support high-efficiency lasing in an amplifier configuration. Details of the design and an accelerator performance analysis will be presented

  7. Overview and Status of the 12 GeV Cryogenic System Upgrade At Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Arenius, Jonathan Creel, Venkatarao Ganni, Kelly Dixon, Peter Knudsen

    2010-04-01

    As part of the planned Jefferson Laboratory's electron accelerator (CEBAF) power upgrade, ten additional superconducting RF cryomodules will be added to its accelerator linacs. Although physically the same size as each of the original 40 linac cryomodules, each new cryomodule will have approximately 4 times the acceleration power. To support the additional cryomodule heat loads generated, the existing 2K, 4600W Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) plant capacity will be doubled to a total of 9200W at 2K plus 24,000W at 35K for shield loads. The specified base line process cycle has been modeled after the laboratory s "Ganni Helium Cycle" process technology. In addition, a fourth physics experimental "Hall D" will be constructed which will have an additional stand alone 200W at 4K helium cryogenic plant. In October of 2008, Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) received approval for project "Critical Decision 3" construction phase status from the US Department of Energy.

  8. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  9. AIRIX: an induction accelerator facility developed at CEA for flash radiography in detonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavailler, Claude

    1999-06-01

    AIRIX is an induction linear accelerator which will be used for flash radiography in CEA/DAM. Designed to produce an X-ray dose of more than 500 Rads at 1 meter with an X-ray focal spot size diameter of less than 2 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition), this facility consists in a 4 MeV/3.5 kA pulsed electron injector and 16 MeV induction accelerator powered by 32 high voltage generators. A prototype of this accelerator, called PIVAIR, has been studied and realized in CEA CESTA near Bordeaux. PIVAIR is a validation step for AIRIX at 8 MeV. It includes an injector (4 MeV, 3.5 kA, 60 ns) and 16 inductor cells supplied by 8 high voltage generators (250 kV, 70 ns). Two different technologies of induction cells have been tested (rexolite insulator or ferrite under vacuum). We have chosen ferrite under vacuum cells technology after comparison of results on beam transport and reliability tests. A focusing experiment at 7.2 MeV of the electron beam as been achieved during summer 1997. We have begun to produce X-rays in October 1997. A dose level of 50 Rad at 1 meter has been achieved with an X-ray spot size diameter of 3.5 to 4 mm (LANL-CEA DAM definition). Static flash radiography of very dense object have been achieved from November 97 until February 98. We have been able to test in situ new kinds of very high sensitive X- ray detectors and to check they had reached our very ambitious goals: (1) quantum efficiency at 5 MeV greater than 50% instead of 1% for luminous screens and film; (2) sensitivity less than 10 (mu) Rad (100 time more sensitive than radiographic luminous screens and films); (3) dynamic range greater than 100; (4) resolution less than 2 mm. We will present in this communication brand new kinds of detection systems, called high stopping power detectors, such as: (1) (gamma) camera with segmented thick crystal of BGO and MCP image intensifier; (2) multistep parallel plate avalanche chamber; (3) pixellized CdTe MeV photoconductor matrix. AIRIX accelerator is being

  10. The physics of sub-critical lattices in accelerator driven hybrid systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, J. P.; Lebrat, J. F.; Soule, R.; Martini, M.; Jacqmin, R.; Imel, G. R.; Salvatores, M.

    1999-06-10

    Since 1991, the CEA has studied the physics of hybrid systems, involving a sub-critical reactor coupled with an accelerator. These studies have provided information on the potential of hybrid systems to transmute actinides and, long lived fission products. The potential of such a system remains to be proven, specifically in terms of the physical understanding of the different phenomena involved and their modelling, as well as in terms of experimental validation of coupled systems, sub-critical environment/accelerator. This validation must be achieved through mock-up studies of the sub-critical environments coupled to a source of external neutrons. The MUSE-4 mock-up experiment is planed at the MASURCA facility and will use an accelerator coupled to a tritium target. The great step between the generator used in the past and the accelerator will allow to increase the knowledge in hybrid physic and to decrease the experimental biases and the measurement uncertainties.

  11. Assessment of soil and ground-water activation in the underground facility of the linear accelerator at RAON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangjin; Nam, Shinwoo; Chung, Yonsei; Kim, Suna; Lee, Cheol Woo

    2015-10-01

    RAON is a heavy-ion accelerator complex that is being constructed in Daejeon, Korea. The superconducting linear accelerator of RAON will provide various heavy-ion beams with a maximum power of 400 kW. In order to determine the design requirements of the underground facility for the accelerator, we considered the radiation's influence on the soil and the ground-water under the condition of long-term operation of the accelerator. A source term for prompt neutrons generated by heavy-ion beams losses along the beam lines at a rate of 1 W/m was applied to obtain the activation level of nearby material outside the tunnel by using the simulation codes MCNPX and SP-FISPACT. This report presents the analysis and the result for the tunnel shielding condition obtained from the assessment.

  12. Environmental Management Assessment of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia. During this assessment, activities and records were reviewed and interviews were conducted with personnel from the CEBAF Site Office; the CEBAF management and operating contractor (M&O), Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA); the Oak Ridge Field Office (OR); and the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Office, the Office of Energy Research (ER). The onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from March 8 through March 19, 1993, by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24) located within the office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, ``Environment, Safety and Health Appraisal Program,`` and Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN)-6E-92, ``Departmental Organizational and Management Arrangements,`` establish the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission utilizing systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and through use of supplemental activities which serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  13. Linear induction accelerators at the Los Alamos National Laboratory DARHT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Subrata

    2010-09-07

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory consists of two linear induction accelerators at right angles to each other. The First Axis, operating since 1999, produces a nominal 20-MeV, 2-kA single beam-pulse with 60-nsec width. In contrast, the DARHT Second Axis, operating since 2008, produces up to four pulses in a variable pulse format by slicing micro-pulses out of a longer {approx}1.6-microseconds (flat-top) pulse of nominal beam-energy and -current of 17 MeV and 2 kA respectively. Bremsstrahlung x-rays, shining on a hydro-dynamical experimental device, are produced by focusing the electron beam-pulses onto a high-Z target. Variable pulse-formats allow for adjustment of the pulse-to-pulse doses to record a time sequence of x-ray images of the explosively driven imploding mock device. Herein, we present a sampling of the numerous physics and engineering aspects along with the current status of the fully operational dual axes capability. First successful simultaneous use of both the axes for a hydrodynamic experiment was achieved in 2009.

  14. ATTO SECOND ELECTRON BEAMS GENERATION AND CHARACTERIZATION EXPERIMENT AT THE ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZOLOTOREV, M.; ZHOLENTS, A.; WANG, X.J.; BABZIEN, M.; SKARITKA, J.; RAKOWSKY, G.; YAKIMENKO, V.

    2002-02-01

    We are proposing an Atto-second electron beam generation and diagnostics experiment at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test facility (ATF) using 1 {micro}m Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). The proposed experiment will be carried out by an BNL/LBNL collaboration, and it will be installed at the ATF beam line II. The proposed experiment will employ a one-meter long undulator with 1.8 cm period (VISA undulator). The electron beam energy will be 63 MeV with emittance less than 2 mm-mrad and energy spread less than 0.05%. The ATF photocathode injector driving laser will be used for energy modulation by Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL). With 10 MW laser peak power, about 2% total energy modulation is expected. The energy modulated electron beam will be further bunched through either a drift space or a three magnet chicane into atto-second electron bunches. The attosecond electron beam bunches will be analyzed using the coherent transition radiation (CTR).

  15. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  16. Design and high order optimization of the Accelerator Test Facility lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, E.; Tomás, R.; Bambade, P.; Kubo, K.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Seryi, A.; White, G. R.; Woodley, M.

    2014-02-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) aims to test the novel chromaticity correction scheme which is implemented in the final focus systems of future linear colliders such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The ATF2 nominal and ultralow β* lattices are designed to vertically focus the beam at the focal point, or usually referred to as interaction point (IP), down to 37 and 23 nm, respectively. The vertical chromaticities of the nominal and ultralow β* lattices are comparable to those of ILC and CLIC, respectively. When the measured multipole components of the ATF2 magnets are considered in the simulations, the evaluated spot sizes at the IP are well above the design values. In this paper we describe the analysis of the high order aberrations that allows identifying the sources of the observed beam size growth. In order to recover the design spot sizes three solutions are considered, namely final doublet replacement, octupole insertion, and optics modification. Concerning the future linear collider projects, the consequences of magnetic field errors of the focusing quadrupole magnet of the final doublet are also addressed.

  17. Preventing vacuum leaks in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility cavity pair bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, D.P. ); Doolittle, L.R. )

    1994-09-01

    Occasional vacuum leaks have occurred in bellows assemblies of helium pressure vessels at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. The flanged stainless steel bellows assemblies are used to connect the niobium rf cavity pairs to the surrounding liquid helium pressure vessels. An investigation of the source of these leaks has revealed a through-thickness network of microcracks in the cuff weld zones. The cuff material contained a mixture of soft and very hard elongated intermetallic inclusions that were oriented parallel with the weld fusion line; these inclusions served as crack initiation sites. Surface-exposed inclusions, in contact with a chlorine residue from a postweld machining process, induced crevice corrosion during a year of storage. Residual stresses in the weld led to a combination of lamellar tearing and stress corrosion cracking. Propagation of the cracks from one inclusion to another resulted in continuous vacuum leakage paths from the primary (2 K) helium circuit to the vacuum insulation space. Additional vacuum leaks were prevented by reconfiguring the weld geometry and avoiding any processing with chlorinated substances.

  18. Preventing vacuum leaks in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility cavity pair bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Henkel; Lawrence R. Doolittle

    1994-05-01

    Occasional vacuum leaks have occurred in bellows assemblies of helium pressure vessels at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. The flanged stainless steel bellows assemblies are used to connect the niobium rf cavity pairs to the surrounding liquid helium pressure vessels. An investigation of the source of these leaks has revealed a through-thickness network of microcracks in the cuff weld zones. The cuff material contained a mixture of soft and very hard elongated intermetallic inclusions that were oriented parallel with the weld fusion line; these inclusions served as crack initiation sites. Surface-exposed inclusions, in contact with a chlorine residue from a postweld machining process, induced crevice corrosion during a year of storage. Residual stresses in the weld led to a combination of lamellar tearing and stress corrosion cracking. Propagation of the cracks from one inclusion to another resulted in continuous vacuum leakage paths from the primary (2 K) helium circuit to the vacuum insulation space. Additional vacuum leaks were prevented by reconfiguring the weld geometry and avoiding any processing with chlorinated substances.

  19. Radiation impact caused by activation of air from the future GSI accelerator facility fair.

    PubMed

    Gutermuth, F; Wildermuth, H; Radon, T; Fehrenbacher, G

    2005-01-01

    The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt is planning a new accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). Two future experimental areas are regarded to be the most decisive points concerning the activation of air. One is the area for the production of antiprotons. A second crucial experimental area is the so-called Super Fragment Separator. The production of radioactive isotopes in air is calculated using the residual nuclei option of the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The results are compared with the data for the activation of air given by Sullivan and in IAEA report 283. The resulting effective dose is calculated using a program package from the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, the Bundesamt für Stranlenschutz. The results demonstrate that a direct emission of the total radioactivity produced into the air will probably conflict with the limits of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. Special measures have to be planned in order to reduce the amount of radioactivity released into the air. PMID:16381762

  20. Restoration of accelerator facilities damaged by Great East Japan Earthquake at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Takashi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Shimada, Kenzi; Yoshida, Hidetomo P; Shinozuka, Tsutomu; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University is a joint-use institution for education and research in a wide variety of fields ranging from physics to medicine. Accelerator facilities at the CYRIC provide opportunities for implementing a broad research program, including medical research using positron emission tomography (PET), with accelerated ions and radioisotopes. At the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, no human injuries occurred and a smooth evacuation was made in the CYRIC, thanks to the anti-earthquake measures such as the renovation of the cyclotron building in 2009 mainly to provide seismic strengthening, fixation of shelves to prevent the falling of objects, and securement of the width of the evacuation route. The preparation of an emergency response manual was also helpful. However, the accelerator facilities were damaged because of strong shaking that continued for a few minutes. For example, two columns on which a 930 cyclotron was placed were damaged, and thereby the 930 cyclotron was inclined. All the elements of beam transport lines were deviated from the beam axis. Some peripheral devices in a HM12 cyclotron were broken. Two shielding doors fell from the carriage onto the floor and blocked the entrances to the rooms. The repair work on the accelerator facilities was started at the end of July 2011. During the repair work, the joint use of the accelerator facilities was suspended. After the repair work was completed, the joint use was re-started at October 2012, one and a half years after the earthquake. PMID:25030295

  1. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for education and advanced diagnostics development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Han, H. W.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Orozco, D.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, a D-T neutron source and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The ion accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products through acceleration of D ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved, and fluence and energy of the fusion products have been accurately characterized. The D-T neutron source generates up to 6 × 108 neutrons/s. The two x-ray generators produce spectra with peak energies of 35 keV and 225 keV and maximum dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 12 Gy/min, respectively. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  2. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Lifschitz, A.; Shadwick, B. A.; Malka, V.; Specka, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm-3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  3. BNL 56 MHz HOM damper prototype fabrication at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, N.; McIntyre, G.; Daly, E. F.; Clemens, W.; Wu, Q.; Seberg, S.; Bellavia, S.

    2015-05-03

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider’s (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  4. BNL 56 MHz HOM Damper Prototype Fabrication at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Naeem A.; Daly, Edward F.; Clemens, William A.; McIntyre, Gary T.; Wu, Qiong; Seberg, Scott; Bellavia, Steve

    2015-09-01

    A prototype Higher-Order Mode (HOM) Damper was fabricated at JLab for the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider's (RHIC) 56 MHz cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Primarily constructed from high RRR Niobium and Sapphire, the coaxial damper presented significant challenges in electron-beam welding (EBW), brazing and machining via acid etching. The results of the prototype operation brought about changes in the damper design, due to overheating braze alloys and possible multi-pacting. Five production HOM dampers are currently being fabricated at JLab. This paper outlines the challenges faced in the fabrication process, and the solutions put in place.

  5. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-07-13

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), in this Environmental Assessment (EA), reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from the proposed construction of various site improvements and the proposed installation and operation of the Helios light source at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia. Jefferson Lab is operated by the Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc. (SURA) under contract to DOE. With this proposal, DOE intends to construct no more than four major two or three story additions totaling about 151,000 sq. ft. (square feet) to CEBAF Center, the main facility administration building, and the addition of three new single story and one two story operations support structures on the accelerator site. The structures are a 28,000 sq. ft. storage building, a 15,100 sq. ft. technical support building, a 3,500 sq. ft. refrigeration service building, and a two-story 22,600 sq. ft addition to the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility. The proposed action also involves the installation and operation of the Helios (High-Energy Lithography Source) accelerator in the FEL Addition. DOE proposes to take this action to provide Jefferson Lab with improved staff and operations support facilities that, along with the operation of Helios, will provide an increased capability to facilitate accelerator and physics program operations. Support activities necessary to effect the installation and operation of Helios would begin in Fiscal Year (FY) 03. It is expected that the Helios machine should be available to serve developmental and operational activities in support of the physics program later in FY 04. In this EA, DOE presents the no action alternative, alternatives considered and dismissed, and the proposed action alternative. It also evaluates the impacts of each.

  6. Target design optimization for an electron accelerator driven subcritical facility with circular and square beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, M. Y. A; Sofu, T.; Zhong, Z.; Belch, H.; Naberezhnev, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-30

    A subcritical facility driven by an electron accelerator is planned at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) in Ukraine for medical isotope production, materials research, training, and education. The conceptual design of the facility is being pursued through collaborations between ANL and KIPT. As part of the design effort, the high-fidelity analyses of various target options are performed with formulations to reflect the realistic configuration and the three dimensional geometry of each design. This report summarizes the results of target design optimization studies for electron beams with two different beam profiles. The target design optimization is performed via the sequential neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses for a comprehensive assessment of each configuration. First, a target CAD model is developed with proper emphasis on manufacturability to provide a basis for separate but consistent models for subsequent neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses. The optimizations are pursued for maximizing the neutron yield, streamlining the flow field to avoid hotspots, and minimizing the thermal stresses to increase the durability. In addition to general geometric modifications, the inlet/outlet channel configurations, target plate partitioning schemes, flow manipulations and rates, electron beam diameter/width options, and cladding material choices are included in the design optimizations. The electron beam interactions with the target assembly and the neutronic response of the subcritical facility are evaluated using the MCNPX code. the results for the electron beam energy deposition, neutron generation, and utilization in the subcritical pile are then used to characterize the axisymmetric heat generation profiles in the target assembly with explicit simulations of the beam tube, the coolant, the clad, and the target materials. Both tungsten and uranium are considered as target materials. Neutron spectra from tungsten

  7. Characterization of Large GEM Module for the Tracker at Jlab Hall A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammoliti, F.; Bellin, V.; Cisbani, E.; Librizzi, F.; Musico, P.; Noto, F.; Perrino, R.; Re, L.; Sutera, M. C.

    2015-06-01

    A new Large-Acceptance Forward Angle Spectrometer (Super BigBite) is under development at JLab/Hall A for the upcoming experiments in Hall A at Jefferson Lab where a longitudinally polarized electron beam of 11 GeV is now available. This beam, combined with innovative polarized targets will provided luminosity up to 1039/(s·cm2) opening exciting opportunities to investigate unexplored aspects of the inner structure of the nucleon. The tracker of this new apparatus is based on the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology, which has been chosen to optimize cost/performance, position resolution and to meet the high hit rate (>1 MHz/cm2). The first GEM detector modules, designed and built by the INFN Collaboration JLAB12, were tested at the DESY test beam facility in Hamburg, by using an electron beam with energy ranging from 2.0 to 6.0 GeV. In particular, three 40x50 cm2 GEM chambers were equipped with a new implementation of the APV25 readout chip. Measurements were performed at different impact points and angles between the electron beam and the plane of the GEM chambers, with one large chamber in a solenoid magnetic field up to 500 Gauss. In this paper we present the technical features of the tracker and comment on the presently achieved performance.

  8. Physics opportunities with a secondary KL0 beam at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaryan, Moskov

    2016-05-01

    Following a Letter of Intent submitted to PAC43 at JLab, in this talk we discuss the possibility of creating a secondary KL0 beam in Hall-D to be used with the GlueX detector for spectroscopy of excited hyperons.

  9. JLAB Measurements of the Deuteron Electric and Magnetic Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimos G. Petratos

    2000-12-12

    Large-momentum transfer JLab measurements of the deuteron electric and magnetic form factors are reported. The data are compared to theoretical models based on the relativistic impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark-dimensional scaling and perturbative QCD.

  10. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  11. Refurbishment and Testing of the 1970's Era LASS Solenoid Coils for JLab's Hall D

    SciTech Connect

    Anumagalla, Ravi; Biallas, George; Brindza, Paul; Carstens, Thomas; Creel, Jonathan; Egiyan, Hovanes; Martin, Floyd; Qiang, Yi; Spiegel, Scot; Stevens, Mark; Wissmann, Mark; Wolin, Elliott

    2012-07-01

    JLab refurbished the LASS1, 1.85 m bore Solenoid, consisting of four superconducting coils to act as the principal analysis magnet for nuclear physics in the newly constructed, Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The coils, built in 1971 at Stanford Linier Accelerator Center and used a second time at the MEGA Experiment at Los Alamos, had electrical shorts and leaks to the insulating vacuum along with deteriorated superinsulation & instrumentation. Root cause diagnosis of the problems and the repair methods are described along with the measures used to qualify the vessels and piping within the Laboratory's Pressure Safety Program (mandated by 10CFR851). The extraordinary refrigerator operational methods used to utilize the obsolete cryogenic apparatus gathered for the off-line, single coil tests are described.

  12. The JLAB 3D program at 12 GeV (TMDs + GPDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab CEBAF accelerator is undergoing an upgrade that will increase the beam energy up to 12 GeV. The three experimental Halls operating in the 6-GeV era are upgrading their detectors to adapt their performances to the new available kinematics, and a new Hall (D) is being built. The investigation of the three-dimensional nucleon structure both in the coordinate and in the momentum space represents an essential part of the 12-GeV physics program, and several proposals aiming at the extraction of related observables have been already approved in Hall A, B and C. In this proceedings, the focus of the JLab 3D program will be described, and a selection of proposals will be discussed.

  13. Fermilab's SC Accelerator Magnet Program for Future U.S. HEP Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael; Zlobin, Alexander; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The invention of SC accelerator magnets in the 1970s opened wide the possibilities for advancing the energy frontier of particle accelerators, while limiting the machine circumference and reducing their energy consumption. The successful development of SC accelerator magnets based on NbTi superconductor have made possible a proton-antiproton collider (Tevatron) at Fermilab, an electron-proton collider (HERA) at DESY, a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL and recently a proton-proton collider (LHC) at CERN. Further technological innovations and inventions are required as the US HEP looks forward towards the post-LHC energy or/and intensity frontiers. A strong, goal oriented national SC accelerator magnet program must take on this challenge to provide a strong base for the future of HEP in the U.S. The results and experience obtained by Fermilab during the past 30 years will allow us to play a leadership role in the SC accelerator magnet development in the U.S., in particular, focusing on magnets for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory [1]-[2]. In this paper, we summarize the required Muon Collider magnet needs and challenges, summarize the technology advances in the Fermilab accelerator magnet development over the past few years, and present and discuss our vision and long-term plans for these Fermilab-supported accelerator initiatives.

  14. Be aware of neutrons outside short mazes from 10-MV linear accelerators X-rays in radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Brockstedt, S; Holstein, H; Jakobsson, L; Tomaszewicz, A; Knöös, T

    2015-07-01

    During the radiation survey of a reinstalled 10-MV linear accelerator in an old radiation treatment facility, high dose rates of neutrons were observed. The area outside the maze entrance is used as a waiting room where patients, their relatives and staff other than those involved in the actual treatment can freely pass. High fluence rates of neutrons would cause an unnecessary high effective dose to the staff working in the vicinity of such a system, and it can be several orders higher than the doses received due to X-rays at the same location. However, the common knowledge appears to have been that the effect of neutrons at 10-MV X-ray linear accelerator facilities is negligible and shielding calculations models seldom mention neutrons for this operating energy level. Although data are scarce, reports regarding this phenomenon are now emerging. For the future, it is advocated that contributions from neutrons are considered already during the planning stage of new or modified facilities aimed for 10 MV and that estimated dose levels are verified. PMID:25802465

  15. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions "How much?" and "What kind?" of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room , patient "scatterer," and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. PMID:8887513

  16. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions {open_quotes}How much?{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}What kind?{close_quotes} of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient {open_quotes}scatterer,{close_quotes} and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h{sup {minus}1} was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations for the shielding of the future high-intensity accelerator facility FAIR at GSI.

    PubMed

    Radon, T; Gutermuth, F; Fehrenbacher, G

    2005-01-01

    The Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) is planning a significant expansion of its accelerator facilities. Compared to the present GSI facility, a factor of 100 in primary beam intensities and up to a factor of 10,000 in secondary radioactive beam intensities are key technical goals of the proposal. The second branch of the so-called Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is the production of antiprotons and their storage in rings and traps. The facility will provide beam energies a factor of approximately 15 higher than presently available at the GSI for all ions, from protons to uranium. The shielding design of the synchrotron SIS 100/300 is shown exemplarily by using Monte Carlo calculations with the FLUKA code. The experimental area serving the investigation of compressed baryonic matter is analysed in the same way. In addition, a dose comparison is made for an experimental area operated with medium energy heavy-ion beams. Here, Monte Carlo calculations are performed by using either heavy-ion primary particles or proton beams with intensities scaled by the mass number of the corresponding heavy-ion beam. PMID:16381714

  18. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  19. Spin Structure with JLab 6 and 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2012-02-01

    Highlights of JLab 6 GeV results on spin structure study and plan for 12 GeV program. Spin structure study is full of surprises and puzzles. A decade of experiments from JLab yield these exciting results: (1) valence spin structure; (2) precision measurements of g{sub 2}/d{sub 2} - high-twist; (3) spin sum rules and polarizabilities; and (4) first neutron transversity. There is a bright future as the 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly enhance our capability: (1) Precision determination of the valence quark spin structure flavor separation; (2) Precision measurements of g{sub 2}/d{sub 2}; and (3) Precision extraction of transversity/tensor charge.

  20. A MRPC prototype for SOLID-TOF in Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y; Wang, J; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Chen, H; Chen, J; Li, Y; Camsonne, A; Chen, J -P; Gao, H

    2013-03-01

    A prototype of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) for the future SoLID time of flight system at JLab has been developed. The counter, trapezoidal in shape, is assembled with the newly developed low-resistive Chinese glass. It has 10 × 0.25 mm gas gaps and 11 readout strips of different lengths. The strip width is 2.5 cm with a strip-to-strip interval of 3 mm. Preliminary tests performed with cosmic-rays showed an efficiency higher than 95% and a time resolution around 50 ps. Results under diffuse/uniform irradiation performed at JLab with scattered high energy electrons showed a time resolution of 70–80 ps and over-95% efficiency up to an incoming flux of 15 kHz/cm{sup 2}. These performances meet the requirements of the new time of flight system SoLID-TOF.

  1. Risk-Based Decision Process for Accelerated Closure of a Nuclear Weapons Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.; Norland, R. L.; DiSalvo, R.; Anderson, M.

    2003-02-25

    Nearly 40 years of nuclear weapons production at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS or Site) resulted in contamination of soil and underground systems and structures with hazardous substances, including plutonium, uranium and hazardous waste constituents. The Site was placed on the National Priority List in 1989. There are more than 370 Individual Hazardous Substance Sites (IHSSs) at RFETS. Accelerated cleanup and closure of RFETS is being achieved through implementation and refinement of a regulatory framework that fosters programmatic and technical innovations: (1) extensive use of ''accelerated actions'' to remediate IHSSs, (2) development of a risk-based screening process that triggers and helps define the scope of accelerated actions consistent with the final remedial action objectives for the Site, (3) use of field instrumentation for real time data collection, (4) a data management system that renders near real time field data assessment, and (5) a regulatory agency consultative process to facilitate timely decisions. This paper presents the process and interim results for these aspects of the accelerated closure program applied to Environmental Restoration activities at the Site.

  2. Data acquisition, control, and analysis for the Argonne Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.

    1989-01-01

    The AATF has been used to study wakefield acceleration and focusing in plasmas and rf structures. A PC-based system is described which incorporates the functions of beamline control and acquisition, storage, and preliminary analysis of video images from luminescent screen beam diagnostics. General features of the offline analysis of wakefield data are also discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  3. 10-GW CO{sub 2} laser system at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.S.

    1993-12-31

    Design and performance of a high peak-power CO{sub 2} laser system to produce subnanosecond IR pulses for electron acceleration experiment are presented. We discuss theoretical aspects of the picosecond laser pulse propagation in a molecular amplifier and a design approach towards compact Terawatt CO{sub 2} laser systems.

  4. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  5. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1990-04-01

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended.

  6. LLNL/UC (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)/(University of California) AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Southon, J.R.; Caffee, M.W.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Roberts, M.L.; Moore, T.L.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Nelson, D.E.; Loyd, D.H.; Vogel, J.S.

    1990-04-18

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample through-put, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Accelerated Clean-up of the United States Department of Energy, Mound Nuclear Weapons Facility in Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Lehew, J.G.; Bradford, J.D.; Cabbil, C.C.

    2006-07-01

    CH2M HILL is executing a performance-based contract with the United States Department of Energy to accelerate the safe closure of the nuclear facilities at the former Mound plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. The contract started in January 2003 with a target completion date of March 31, 2006. Our accelerated baseline targets completion of the project 2 years ahead of the previous baseline schedule, by spring 2006, and for $200 million less than previous estimates. This unique decommissioning and remediation project is located within the City of Miamisburg proper and is designed for transfer of the property to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse. The project is being performed with the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation and their tenants co-located on the site creating significant logistical, safety and stakeholder challenges. The project is also being performed in conjunction with the United States Department of Energy, United States Environmental Protection Agency, and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency under the Mound 2000 regulatory cleanup process. The project is currently over 95% complete. To achieve cleanup and closure of the Mound site, CH2M HILL's scope includes: - Demolition of 64 nuclear, radiological and commercial facilities - Preparation for Transfer of 9 facilities (including a Category 2 nuclear facility) to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation for industrial reuse - Removal of all above ground utility structures and components, and preparation for transfer of 9 utility systems to Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation - Investigation, remediation, closure, and documentation of all known Potential Release Sites contaminated with radiological and chemical contamination (73 identified in original contract) - Storage, characterization, processing, packaging and shipment of all waste and excess nuclear materials - Preparation for Transfer of the 306 acre site to the

  8. Neutron Induced Reactions with the 17 Mev Facility at the Athens Tandem Accelerator NCSR 'Demokritos'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastou, R.; Kalamara, A.; Serris, M.; Diakaki, M.; Kokkoris, M.; Paneta, V.; Axiotis, M.; Lagoyannis, A.

    In the 5.5 MV tandem T11/25 Accelerator Laboratory of NCSR "Demokritos" monoenergetic neutron beams have been produced in the energy range∼ 15-20 MeV using anew Ti-tritiated target of 373 GBq activity, by means of the 3H(d,n)4He reaction. The corresponding deuteron beam energies obtained from the accelerator, were in the 1.5-4.5MeV range.The maximum flux has been determined to be of the order of 106 n/cm2 s, implementing reference reactions. The 17.1MeV neutron beam has been used for the measurement of 197Au(n,2n) reaction cross section. Theoretical calculations have been performed via the statistical model code EMPIRE and compared to the experimental data of the present work and data from literature.

  9. A dedicated AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility for sup 3 H and sup 14 C

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.L.; Southon, J.R.; Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Nelson, D.E.

    1990-09-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is a high sensitivity technique for the detection of numerous long-lived radionuclides at extremely low concentrations. The present use of this measurement tool is primarily in archaeology and the geosciences. However, novel applications and technological advancements that can have a significant impact on both biomedical research and clinical procedures and environmental investigations have been identified. We are studying a small spectrometer for the simultaneous injection and detection of both hydrogen and carbon radioisotopes. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Neutronics analysis of three beam-filter assemblies for an accelerator-based BNCT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Costes, S.V.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Three moderator materials, AlF{sub 3}/Al, D{sub 2}O and LiF, have been analyzed for clinical usefulness using the reaction {sup 7}Li(p,n) as an accelerator driven neutron source. Proton energies between 2.1 MeV and 2.6 MeV have been investigated. Radiation transport in the reflector/moderator assembly is simulated using the MCNP program. Depth-dose distributions in a head phanton are calculated with the BNCT-RTPE patient treatment planning program from INEEL using the MCNP generated neutron and photon spectra as the subsequent source. Clinical efficacy is compared using the current BMRR protocol for all designs. Depth-dose distributions are compared for a fixed normal tissue tolerance dose of 12.5 Gy-Eq. Radiation analyses also include a complete anthropomorphic phantom. Results of organ and whole body dose components are presented for several designs. Results indicate that high quality accelerator beams may produce clinically favorable treatments to deep-seated tumors when compared to the BMRR beam. Also discussed are problems identified in comparing accelerator and reactor based designs using in-air figures of merit as well as some results of spectrum-averaged RBE`s.

  11. 78 FR 73144 - Acceleration of Broadband Deployment by Improving Wireless Facilities Siting Policies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ...In this document, the Commission seeks comment on potential measures to expedite the environmental and historic preservation review of new wireless facilities and on rules to implement statutory provisions governing State and local review of wireless siting proposals. By this action, the Commission seeks to promote the deployment of infrastructure that is necessary to provide the public with......

  12. The JLab Ampere-Class cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Edward Daly; William Hicks; James Henry; Joseph Preble; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; Katherine Wilson; Genfa Wu

    2005-07-10

    We report on the design of a new cryomodule capable of accelerating high-current beams for future ERL based high power compact FELs. We discuss the factors influencing the design choices, including BBU threshold, frequency, HOM power, real-estate gradient, peak surface fields, and operating efficiency. We present a conceptual design that meets the requirements of compact MW-class FEL, however this module design could be useful for a wide range of applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc. The concepts developed for this design could also be useful for larger ERL-based light sources, XFELs and even linear colliders.

  13. JLAB12 and the Structure of Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contalbrigo, M.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of the partonic degrees of freedom beyond collinear approximation (3D description) has been gained increasing interest in the last decade. The Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, after the CEBAF upgrade to 12 GeV, will become the most complete facility for the investigation of the hadron structure in the valence region by scattering of polarized electron off various polarized nucleon targets. A compendium of the planned experiments is here presented.

  14. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  15. Development of an Electromagnetic Acceleration Facility for Impact and Fracture Studies at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahari, S.; Suryaprasad, I. V. V.; Shiv, N.; Madhavan, S.; Sijoy, C. D.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2011-07-01

    Experimental studies of strain time history and fracture & penetration resulting from the high velocity impact of solid projectiles on solid targets have been initiated. Design, fabrication, testing and commissioning of an electromagnetic impact facility driven by a capacitor bank have been carried out in this regard. The facility presently has an induction coil gun driving a cylindrical hollow/solid projectile on to a target. 3-7 kJ capacitor banks have been used to drive the launchers. The parameters of the coil gun are in consonance with a computer code developed in-house for the validation and optimization of the coil dimension and bank parameters. Systematic studies have been carried out for validation of code and understanding and benchmarking coil performance. Reproducible velocities of the order of 100 m/s have been successfully achieved with projectiles of masses 20 gm. Preliminary impact studies carried out on Alumnium target plates have given the strain time history.

  16. Optimization of parameters for the inline-injection system at Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.; Ko, S.K.

    1995-10-01

    We present some of our parameter optimization results utilizing code PARMLEA, for the ATF Inline-Injection System. The new solenoid-Gun-Solenoid -- Drift-Linac Scheme would improve the beam quality needed for FEL and other experiments at ATF as compared to the beam quality of the original design injection system. To optimize the gain in the beam quality we have considered various parameters including the accelerating field gradient on the photoathode, the Solenoid field strengths, separation between the gun and entrance to the linac as well as the (type size) initial charge distributions. The effect of the changes in the parameters on the beam emittance is also given.

  17. Test simulation of neutron damage to electronic components using accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. B.; Fleming, R. M.; Bielejec, E. S.; McDonald, J. K.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate equivalent bipolar transistor damage response to neutrons and silicon ions. We report on irradiation tests performed at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor, the SNL SPHINX accelerator, and the SNL Ion Beam Laboratory using commercial silicon npn bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and III-V Npn heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Late time and early time gain metrics as well as defect spectra measurements are reported.

  18. Future Facilities Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Albert De Roeck, Rolf Ent

    2009-10-01

    For the session on future facilities at DIS09 discussions were organized on DIS related measurements that can be expected in the near and medium –or perhaps far– future, including plans from JLab, CERN and FNAL fixed target experiments, possible measurements and detector upgrades at RHIC, as well as the plans for possible future electron proton/ion colliders such as the EIC and the LHeC project.

  19. Recent developments of the ion sources at Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bricault, P. G.; Ames, F.; Dombsky, M.; Labrecque, F.; Lassen, J.; Mjos, A.; Minor, G.; Tigelhoefer, A.

    2012-02-15

    This paper describes the recent progresses concerning the on-line ion source at the Tri University Meson Factory/Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (TRIUMF/ISAC) Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility; description of the new design of the surface-ion-source for improved stability of the beam intensity, description of the transport path to the east target station at ISAC, description of the new brazing techniques that solved recurrent problems with water leaks on the target/ion source assembly in the vacuum system, finally, recent developments concerning the Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge (FEBIAD) ion source are reported. In particular, a study on the effect of the plasma chamber volume on the ionization efficiency was completed.

  20. Calibration of a new experimental chamber for PIXE analysis at the Accelerator Facilities Division of Atomic Energy Centre Dhaka (AECD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md. Taufique; Shariff, Md. Asad; Hossein, Amzad; Abedin, Md. Joynal; Fazlul Hoque, A. K. M.; Chowdhuri, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    A new experimental chamber has been installed at the 3 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator Facilities Division in the Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka, to perform different Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) techniques. The calibration of this new setup for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique has been done using a set of thin MicroMatter standards and GUPIX (PIXE spectrum analysis software), which is explicated in this paper. The effective thicknesses of the beryllium window of the X-ray detector and of the different absorbers used were determined. For standardization, the so called instrumental constant H (product of detector solid angle and the correction factor for the setup) as function of X-ray energy were determined and stored inside the GUPIX library for further PIXE analysis.

  1. Multipass beam breakup in the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.J.; Krafft, G.A.

    1986-06-02

    Multipass beam breakup can severely limit current in superconducting linear accelerators due to the inherently high Q's of transverse deflecting modes of the rf cavities. The success of higher-order-mode damping in increasing threshold currents for the 4-pass CEBAF SRF linac design is investigated with computer modeling. This simulation is shown to be in agreement with theoretical analyses which have successfully described beam breakup in the Stanford superconducting, recirculating linac. Numerical evaluation of an analytic treatment by Gluckstern of multipass beam breakup with distributed cavities is also found to be consistent with the computer model. Application of the simulation to the design array of 400 five-cell CEBAF/Cornell cavities with measured higher-order-mode damping indicates that the beam breakup threshold current is at least an order of magnitude above the CEBAF design current of 200 ..mu..A.

  2. Measurement of the Helium Factors at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Elena Khrosinkova

    2007-06-11

    An experiment to measure elastic electron scattering off 3He and 4He at large momentum transfers is presented. The experiment was carried out in the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. Elastic electron scattering off 3He was measured at forward and backward electron scattering angles to extract the isotope's charge and magnetic form factors. The charge form factor of 4He will be extracted from forward-angle electron scattering angle measurements. The data are expected to significantly extend and improve the existing measurements of the three-and four-body form factors. The results will be crucial for the establishment of a canonical standard model for the few- body nuclear systems and for testing predictions of quark dimensional scaling and hybrid nucleon- quark models.

  3. Generation of fast neutrons through deuteron acceleration at the PALS laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, J.; Klír, D.; Velyhan, A.; Řezáč, K.; Cikhardt, J.; Ryć, L.; Krouský, E.; Pfeifer, M.; De Marco, M.; Skála, J.; Dudžák, R.; Ullschmied, J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent experiments at the laser facility PALS focused on the laser driven fusion of deuterons are reviewed. They benefit of high reaction cross-sections and of a high number of multi-MeV deuterons from thick CD2 targets irradiated by intensity of 3× 1016 W cm-2. In the reported experiments fast fusion neutrons with energy up to 16 MeV were produced through 7Li(d, n)8Be and 11B(d, n)12C reactions in a pitcher-catcher target configuration. When using a large area CD2 foil as a secondary catcher target the total maximum neutron yield from the 2H(d, n)3He reaction increased by a factor of about 5, from 4× 108 to 2× 109. This result reveals that most of the deuterons having enough kinetic energy to enter a fusion reaction are emitted from the primary target into vacuum.

  4. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  5. Handling Radioactive Waste from the Proton Accelerator Facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) - Always Surprising? - 13320

    SciTech Connect

    Mueth, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) is the largest national research centre in Switzerland. Its multidisciplinary research is dedicated to a wide field in natural science and technology as well as particle physics. In this context, PSI is operating, amongst others, a large proton accelerator facility since more than 30 years. In two cyclotrons, protons are accelerated to high speeds and then guided along roughly 100 m of beam line to three different target stations to produce secondary particles like mesons and neutrons for experiments and a separately beam line for UCN. The protons induce spallation processes in the target materials, and also at other beam loss points along the way, with emission of protons, neutrons, hydrogen, tritium, helium, heavier fragments and fission processes. In particular the produced neutrons, due to their large penetration depth, will then interact also with the surrounding materials. These interactions of radiation with matter lead to activation and partly to contamination of machine components and the surrounding infrastructures. Maintenance, operation and decommissioning of installations generate inevitably substantial amounts of radioactive operational and dismantling waste like targets, magnets, collimators, shielding (concrete, steel) and of course secondary waste. To achieve an optimal waste management strategy for interim storage or final disposal, radioactive waste has to be characterized, sorted and treated. This strategy is based on radiation protection demands, raw waste properties (size, material, etc.), and requirements to reduce the volume of waste, mainly for legal and economical reasons. In addition, the radiological limitations for transportation of the waste packages to a future disposal site have to be taken into account, as well as special regulatory demands. The characterization is a task of the waste producer. The conditioning processes and quality checks for radioactive waste packages are part of an accredited

  6. Burnup calculations for KIPT accelerator driven subcritical facility using Monte Carlo computer codes-MCB and MCNPX.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.; Talamo, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-06-09

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility, using the KIPT electron accelerator. The neutron source of the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Neutron physics experiments and material structure analyses are planned using this facility. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}375 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products reduce continuously the reactivity during the operation, which reduces the neutron flux level and consequently the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, fuel assemblies should be added after long operating periods to compensate for the lost reactivity. This process requires accurate prediction of the fuel burnup, the decay behavior of the fission produces, and the introduced reactivity from adding fresh fuel assemblies. The recent developments of the Monte Carlo computer codes, the high speed capability of the computer processors, and the parallel computation techniques made it possible to perform three-dimensional detailed burnup simulations. A full detailed three-dimensional geometrical model is used for the burnup simulations with continuous energy nuclear data libraries for the transport calculations and 63-multigroup or one group cross sections libraries for the depletion calculations. Monte Carlo Computer code MCNPX and MCB are utilized for this study. MCNPX transports the

  7. Preliminary Design of JLAB Clas12 Large Superconducting Torus Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B; Taylor, C; Zbasnik, J; Dell'Orco, D; Ross, J; Chen, J; Xu, L; Chen, H; Wagner, B; McMullin, J; Pong, R; Juang, T; Wang, M; Carter, C; Quettier, L; Burkert, V; Elouadrhiri, L; Kashy, D; Leung, E; Schneider, W

    2011-06-01

    Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB) will need a 6-coil Torus producing a required integral of B-dl for an upgrade 12 GeV beam. In Sept. 2009, Wang NMR was awarded a contract to design, fabricate, assemble, deliver, and test at JLAB this ex citing magnet. The preliminary design review was completed by Dec. 2009 and intermediate design review will be completed by July 2010. Proto type coil construction, production of soldered conductor with SSC cable and final design review will be completed in 2010. We shall describe preliminary design and intermediate design for coil/cryostat, Torus central cylinder (hub), 48 cold mass suspensions, two intercoil support rings, cryocontrol tower, and adapter to Torus coil, magnet quench protection, and charge/ discharge con trol, and the two parallel path cooling design using supercritical helium. Because of coil in-plane and out-of-plane EM forces over these huge thin coils in addition to vacuum load, gravity load, and cool down thermal stress, we shall present the finite element analyses (FEA) on coil structure, 48 cold mass supports, intercoil cold rings, coil/ cryostat vacuum vessel, cryotower cryostat, and Torus hub. Finally, we shall shows that all pressure/ vacuum vessels and its weldment has satisfied ASME code.

  8. Development of BPM Electronics at the JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Sexton; Pavel Evtushenko; Kevin Jordan; Jianxun Yan; Steven Dutton; Steven Moore; Richard Evans; James Coleman

    2006-05-01

    A new version of BPM electronics based on the AD8362 RMS detector, which is a direct RF to DC converter, is under development at the JLAB FEL. Each of these new BPM electronics utilizes an embedded ColdFire Microprocessor for data processing and communication with the EPICS control system via TCP/IP. The ColdFire runs RTEMS, which is an open source real-time operating system. The JLAB FEL is a SRF Energy Recovery LINAC capable of running up to 10 mA CW beam with the micropulse up to 74.85 MHz. For diagnostic reasons and for the machine tune up, the micropulse frequency can be reduced to 1.17 MHz, which corresponds to about 160 ?A of beam current. It is required that the BPM system would be functional for all micropulse frequencies. By taking into account the headroom for the beam steering and current variations the dynamic range of the RF front end is required to be about 60 dB. A BPM resolution of at least 100 ?m is required, whereas better resolution is very desirable to make it possible for more accurate measurements of the electron beam optics. Some results of the RF front end development are presented as well as the first measurements made with an electron beam.

  9. Development of BPM Electronics at the JLAB FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.; Yan, J.; Dutton, S.; Moore, W.; Evans, R.; Coleman, J.

    2006-11-01

    A new version of BPM electronics based on the AD8362 RMS detector, which is a direct RF to DC converter, is under development at the JLAB FEL. Each of these new BPM electronics utilizes an embedded ColdFire Microprocessor for data processing and communication with the EPICS control system via TCP/IP. The ColdFire runs RTEMS, which is an open source real-time operating system. The JLAB FEL is a SRF Energy Recovery LINAC capable of running up to 10 mA CW beam with a 74.85 MHz micropulse frequency. For diagnostic reasons and for machine tune up, the micropulse frequency can be reduced to 1.17 MHz, which corresponds to about 160 μA of beam current. It is required that the BPM system would be functional for all micropulse frequencies. By taking into account the headroom for the beam steering and current variations the dynamic range of the RF front end is required to be about 60 dB. A BPM resolution of at least 100 μm is required, whereas better resolution is very desirable to make it possible for more accurate measurements of the electron beam optics. Some results of the RF front end development are presented as well as the first measurements made with an electron beam.

  10. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  11. Experimental Setup and Commissioning of a Test Facility for Gain Evaluation of Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers in High Magnetic Field at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringley, Eric; Cao, Tongtong; Ilieva, Yordonka; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Park, Kijun; Zorn, Carl

    2014-09-01

    At the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) a research and development project for a Detector of Internally-Reflected Cherenkov light for the upcoming Electron Ion Collider is underway. One goal is the development of a compact readout camera that can operate in high magnetic fields. Small-size photon sensors, such as Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT), are key components of the readout. Here we present our work to set up and commission a dedicated test facility at JLab where MCP-PMT gain is evaluated in magnetic fields of up to 5 T, and to develop a test procedure and analysis software to determine the gain. We operate the setup in a single-photon mode, where a light-emitting diode delivers photons to the sensor's photocathode. The PMT spectrum is measured with a flash Analog-to-Digital converter (fADC). We model the spectrum as a sum of an exponential background and a convolution of Poisson and Gaussian distributions of the pedestal and multiple photoelectron peaks, respectively. We determine the PMT's gain from the position of the single-photoelectron peak obtained by fitting the fADC spectrum to the model. Our gain uncertainty is <10%. The facility is now established and will have a long-lasting value for sensor tests and beyond-nuclear-physics applications.

  12. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Erik; Bruning, O S; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao; Schirm, Karl-Martin; Torres-Sanchez, R; Valloni, Alessandra; Aulenbacher, Kurt; Bogacz, Slawomir; Hutton, Andrew; Klein, M

    2014-12-01

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  13. Progress on the design of the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Bogacz, A.; Brindza, P.; Camsonne, A.; Daly, E.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Douglas, D.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Geng, R.; Grames, J.; Guo, J.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Jordan, K.; Kimber, A.; Krafft, G.; Li, R.; Michalski, T.; Morozov, V. S.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; /Jefferson Lab /Argonne /DESY /Moscow , Inst. Phys. Tech., Dolgoprydny /Dubna, JINR /Northern Illinois U. /Old Doominion U. /Novosibirsk, GOO Zaryad /SLAC /Texas A-M

    2015-07-14

    The Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab is designed to provide high luminosity and high polarization needed to reach new frontiers in the exploration of nuclear structure. The luminosity, exceeding 1033 cm-2s-1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass (CM) energy and maximum luminosity above 1034 cm-2s-1, is achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. A fully consistent set of parameters have been developed considering the balance of machine performance, required technical development and cost. This paper reports recent progress on the MEIC accelerator design including electron and ion complexes, integrated interaction region design, figure-8-ring-based electron and ion polarization schemes, RF/SRF systems and ERL-based high-energy electron cooling. Luminosity performance is also presented for the MEIC baseline design.

  14. Environmental Assessment for US Department of Energy support of an Iowa State University Linear Accelerator Facility at Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action is financial and technical support of construction and initial operation of an agricultural commodity irradiator (principally for meat), employing a dual mode electron beam generator capable of producing x-rays, at the Iowa State University Linear Accelerator located at Ames, Iowa. The planned pilot commercial-scale facility would be used for the following activities: conducting irradiation research on agricultural commodities, principally meats; in the future, after the pilot phase, as schedules permit, possibly conducting research on other, non-edible materials; evaluating effects of irradiation on nutritional and sensory quality of agricultural products; demonstrating the efficiency of the process to control or eliminate pathogens, and/or to prolong the commodities' post-harvest shelf-life via control or elimination of bacteria, fungi, and/or insects; providing information to the public on the benefits, safety and risks of irradiated agricultural commodities; determining consumer acceptability of the irradiated products; providing data for use by regulatory agencies in developing protocols for various treatments of Iowa agricultural commodities; and training operators, maintenance and quality control technicians, scientists, engineers, and staff of regulatory agencies in agricultural commodity irradiation technology. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Energy Calibration of the JLab Bremsstrahlung Tagging System

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan Stepanyan; S. Boyarinov; H. Egiyan; D. Dale; L. Guo; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Bernhard Mecking; A. Teymurazyan; I. Nakagawa; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Michael Wood

    2007-03-01

    In this report, we present the energy calibration of the Hall B bremsstrahlung tagging system at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The calibration was performed using a magnetic pair spectrometer. The tagged photon energy spectrum was measured in coincidence with e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs as a function of the pair spectrometer magnetic field. Taking advantage of the internal linearity of the pair spectrometer, the energy of the tagging system was calibrated at the level of {+-} 0.1% E{sub {gamma}}. The absolute energy scale was determined using the e{sup +}e{sup -} rate measurements close to the end-point of the photon spectrum. The energy variations across the full tagging range were found to be <3 MeV.

  16. Concepts for the JLab Ampere-Class CW Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rimmer; E.F. Daly; W.R. Hicks; J. Henry; J. Preble; M. Stirbet; H. Wang; K.M. Wilson; G. Wu

    2005-05-01

    We describe the concepts and developments underway at JLab as part of the program to develop a new CW cryomodule capable of transporting ampere-level beam currents in a compact FEL. Requirements include real-estate gradient of at least 10 MV/m and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping, power couplers, tuners etc. are being designed and optimized for this application. Cavity considerations include a large iris for beam halo, low-RF losses, HOM frequencies and Q's, low peak surface fields, field flatness and microphonics. Module considerations include high packing factor, low static heat leak, image current heating of beam-line components, cost and maintainability. This module is being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.

  17. Polarimetries for the Polarized 3 He Target at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ton, Nguyen; Jefferson Lab Polarized 3 He Target Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a Polarized 3 He Target has been used as an effective polarized neutron target for studying nucleon spin structure. For the 12 GeV program at JLab, the first stage upgrade of the target aim to increase luminosity by a factor of 2 (to luminosity ~ 2 ×1036 cm-2s-1) while keep maximum in-beam polarization at 60 % with 30 μA beam current and reach a systematic uncertainty of polarimetry below 3 %. During the 6 GeV era, the target polarization was measured by two polarimetries: adiabatic fast passage-nuclear magnetic resonance (AFP-NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). With the upgrade, a new polarimetry, Pulse-NMR, is being studied in the lab for the up-coming metal coated target. In this talk, we will discuss the detail study of AFP-NMR, EPR, Pulsed-NMR measurements and their corresponding uncertainties.

  18. Charmonium dissociation in matter: perspectives from CERN to Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev

    2010-07-01

    The J/Psi-meson dissociation in nuclear matter remains one of the most surprising problems in physics. In 2000 the NA50 Collaboration at CERN reported anomalous results on J/Psi absorption that was considered as evidence of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. On the other hand, there may be other mechanisms which produce an increase in J/Psi absorption in a hot dense medium due to the modification of the charm mesons. Our detailed calculations were one of the first indications that the CERN data can indeed be well explained by a mechanism different from QGP formation. For further clarification we proposed to study the modification of charm in nuclei through antiproton annihilation, which is now part of the PANDA project at FAIR GSI. The experiment on charmonium dissociation in nuclei is under discussion at JLab as part of its 12 GeV upgrade.

  19. High Gradient Results of ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavity in Collaboration With KEK and Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, F.; Konomi, T.; Saito, K.; Eremeev, G. V.; Geng, R. L.

    2011-07-01

    KEK and Jlab have continued S0-study collaboration on ICHIRO 9-cell cavities since 2008. In 2010, we have started S0 study on ICHIRO#7, full 9-cell cavity with end groups. Surface treatments and vertical tests have been repeated at Jlab. Maximum gradient of 40MV/m was achieved so far. We will describe the details of that and further plan of S0-study on ICHIRO 9-cell.

  20. The Second Generation Hypernuclear Spectroscopy at JLab Hall C (E01-011 experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Akihiko

    2008-11-01

    The second generation Λ hypernuclear spectroscopy by (e,e’K{sup +}) reaction has been carried out successfully at JLab in 2005. New configurations, HKS and Tilt method, significantly improved both energy resolution and statistics. Systematic error depend on tuning procedure was estimated by the blind analysis. Analysis is in the final stage. Third generation experiment (JLab E05-115) will be performed in the summer of 2009 w/ new e’ spectrometer (HES).

  1. Aperture Test for Internal Target Operation in the JLAB High-current ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-01

    A high current beam transmission test has been successfully completed at the JLAB FEL Facility, culminating in very low-loss transmission of a high current CW beam through a small aperture. The purpose of this test was to determine if an ERL is capable of meeting the stringent requirements imposed by the use of a 1018/cm3 internal gas target proposed for the DarkLight experiment*. Minimal beamline modifications were made to create a machine configuration that is substantially different from those used in routine UV or IR FEL operation. A sustained (8 hour) high power beam run was performed, with clean transmission through a 2 mm transverse aperture of 127 mm length simulating the target configuration. A beam size of 50 um (rms) was measured near the center of the aperture. Experimental data from a week-long test run consistently exhibited beam loss of only a few ppm on the aperture while running 4.5 mA current at 100 MeV -- or nearly 0.5 MW beam power. This surpassed the users? expectation and demonstrated a unique capability of an ERL for this type of experiments. This report presents a summary of the experiment, a brief overview of our activities, and outlines future plans.

  2. Investigation of the Effects of Facility Background Pressure on the Performance and Voltage-Current Characteristics of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Spektor, Rostislav

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate In-Space Propulsion Technology office is sponsoring NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a 4 kW-class Hall thruster propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. A study was conducted to assess the impact of varying the facility background pressure on the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster performance and voltage-current characteristics. This present study evaluated the HiVHAc thruster performance in the lowest attainable background pressure condition at NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 to best simulate space-like conditions. Additional tests were performed at selected thruster operating conditions to investigate and elucidate the underlying physics that change during thruster operation at elevated facility background pressure. Tests were performed at background pressure conditions that are three and ten times higher than the lowest realized background pressure. Results indicated that the thruster discharge specific impulse and efficiency increased with elevated facility background pressure. The voltage-current profiles indicated a narrower stable operating region with increased background pressure. Experimental observations of the thruster operation indicated that increasing the facility background pressure shifted the ionization and acceleration zones upstream towards the thruster's anode. Future tests of the HiVHAc thruster are planned at background pressure conditions that are expected to be two to three times lower than what was achieved during this test campaign. These tests will not only assess the impact of reduced facility background pressure on thruster performance, voltage-current characteristics, and plume properties; but will also attempt to quantify the magnitude of the ionization and acceleration zones upstream shifting as a function of increased background pressure.

  3. W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics: The design, construction and performance of the B Factory accelerator facilities, PEP-II and KEKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfan, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    The discovery and elucidation of CP violation in the B-meson system presented daunting challenges for the accelerator and detector facilities. This talk discusses how these challenges were met and overcome in the electron-positron colliding-beam accelerator facilities PEP-II (at SLAC) and KEKB (at KEK). The key challenge was to produce unprecedentedly large numbers of B-mesons in a geometry that provided high-statistics, low-background samples of decays to CP eigenstates. This was realized with asymmetric collisions at the Γ(4S) at peak luminosities in excess of 3 ×1033 /sq. cm/sec. Specialized optics were developed to generate efficient, low background, multi-bunch collisions in an energy-asymmetric collision geometry. Novel technologies for the RF, vacuum and feedback systems permitted the storage of multi-amp, multi-bunch beams of electrons and positrons, thereby generating high peak luminosities. Accelerator uptimes greater than 95 percent, combined with high-intensity injection systems, ensured large integrated luminosity. Both facilities rapidly attained their design specifications and ultimately far exceeded the projected performance expectations for both peak and integrated luminosity.

  4. Investigation of the Effects of Facility Background Pressure on the Performance and Voltage-Current Characteristics of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Spektor, Rostislav

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate In-Space Propulsion Technology office is sponsoring NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a 4 kW-class Hall thruster propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. A study was conducted to assess the impact of varying the facility background pressure on the High Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster performance and voltage-current characteristics. This present study evaluated the HiVHAc thruster performance in the lowest attainable background pressure condition at NASA GRC Vacuum Facility 5 to best simulate space-like conditions. Additional tests were performed at selected thruster operating conditions to investigate and elucidate the underlying physics that change during thruster operation at elevated facility background pressure. Tests were performed at background pressure conditions that are three and ten times higher than the lowest realized background pressure. Results indicated that the thruster discharge specific impulse and efficiency increased with elevated facility background pressure. The voltage-current profiles indicated a narrower stable operating region with increased background pressure. Experimental observations of the thruster operation indicated that increasing the facility background pressure shifted the ionization and acceleration zones upstream towards the thrusters anode. Future tests of the HiVHAc thruster are planned at background pressure conditions that are expected to be two to three times lower than what was achieved during this test campaign. These tests will not only assess the impact of reduced facility background pressure on thruster performance, voltage-current characteristics, and plume properties; but will also attempt to quantify the magnitude of the ionization.

  5. Investigation of differential surface removal due to electropolishing at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Folkie, James; Reece, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Surface chemistry carried out for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities such as Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP) and Electropolishing (EP) aims to uniformly remove the internal surface of a cavity along the entire structure and within each cell from equator to iris in order to obtain an equally etched surface. A uniform removal, however, is not readily achievable due to the complex fluid flow and varying temperatures of the acid mixture, which can lead to differential etching. This needs to be considered when envisaging a certain surface damage removal throughout the interior. The process-specific differential etching influences the target frequency set at the manufacturing stage as well as the field flatness and length of the as-built cavity. We report on analyses of JLab's present EP system using experimental data for six nine-cell cavities that have been processed recently in the frame of the LCLS-II high-Q development plan. In conjunction with numerical simulations, the differential etching and the impact on field flatness is assessed.

  6. Electron Beam Diagnostics Of The JLAB UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel; Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Marchlik, Matthew; Sexton, Daniel; Tennant, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    In this contribution we describe various systems and aspects of the electron beam diagnostics of the JLab UV FEL. The FEL is installed on a new bypass beam line at the existing 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL. Here, we describe a set of the following systems. A combination of OTR and phosphor viewers is used for measurements of the transverse beam profile, transverse emittance, and Twiss parameters. This system is also used for alignment of the optical cavity of the UV oscillator and to ensure the overlap between the electron beam and optical mode in the FEL wiggler. A system of beam position monitors equipped with log-amp based BPM electronics. Bunch length on the order of 120 fs RMS is measured with the help of a modified Martin-Puplett interferometer. The longitudinal transfer function measurement system is used to set up bunch compression in an optimal way, such that the LINAC RF curvature is compensated using only higher order magnetic elements of the beam transport. This set of diagnostic systems made a significant contribution in achieving first lasing of the FEL after only about 60 hours of beam operation.

  7. First Cryogenic Tests with Jlab's New Upgrade cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; Gianluigi Ciovati; Juergen Halbritter; Ganapati Rao Myneni; Jacek Sekutowicz; Genfa Wu

    2004-08-01

    Two types of 7-cell cavities have been developed for the upgrade of CEBAF to 12 GeV. The High Gradient type (HG) has been optimized with respect to the ratio of E{sub peak}/E{sub acc}. The Low Loss (LL) type has optimized shunt impedance and improved geometric factor. Each cavity type features four DESY-type coaxial Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers and a waveguide input coupler. Design goals for these cavities have been set to E{sub acc} = 20 MV/m with an intrinsic Q{sub o} of 8 {center_dot} 10{sup 9} at 2.05 K. A niobium prototype of each cavity has been fabricated at JLab and both cavities have been evaluated at cryogenic temperatures after appropriate surface treatment. In addition, pressure sensitivity as well as Lorentz force detuning were evaluated. The damping of approximately 20 HOMs has been measured to verify the room temperature data. Several single cell cavities were tested in addition to multi cell cavities. We present in this contribution a summary of tests performed on the prototypes of the proposed cavities.

  8. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Kelly D.; Wright, Mathew C.; Ganni, Venkatarao

    2014-01-01

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  9. Linac cryogenic distribution system maintenance and upgrades at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Wright, M.; Ganni, V.

    2014-01-29

    The Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) distribution system to the CEBAF and FEL linacs at Jefferson Lab (JLab) experienced a planned warm up during the late summer and fall of 2012 for the first time after its commissioning in 1991. Various maintenance and modifications were performed to support high beam availability to the experimental users, meet 10 CFR 851 requirements for pressure systems, address operational issues, and prepare the cryogenic interfaces for the high-gradient cryomodules needed for the 12 GeV upgrade. Cryogenic maintenance and installation work had to be coordinated with other activities in the linacs and compete for manpower from other department installation activities. With less than a quarter of the gas storage capacity available to handle the boil-off from the more than 40 cryomodules, 35,000 Nm{sup 3} of helium was re-liquefied and shipped to a vendor via a liquid tanker trailer. Nearly 200 u-tubes had to be removed and stored while seals were replaced on related equipment such as vacuum pump outs, bayonet isolation and process valves.

  10. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  11. A 1 GeV Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Experimental Progress at the l'OASIS Facility of LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C. S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nagler, B.; Michel, P.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A.; Spence, D. J.; Hooker, S. M.; Filip, C.; Cowan, T.

    2004-11-01

    Experimental progress towards a 1 GeV laser-driven plasma-based accelerator will be discussed. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Experimental results on the injector development include the demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities in preformed plasmas and production of quasi-monochromatic electron beams with energy around 100 MeV. Progress on guiding 100 TW laser pulses in capillary-discharge-based plasma channels will be discussed and integration of these channels with the all-optical injector will be reported.

  12. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Lizee, Arnaud

    1996-01-01

    The object of this work, started in March of 1995, is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involves using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, 1-D models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The experiments conducted in the MEPHISTO furnace facility during the USMP-3 spaceflight which took place earlier this year (22 Feb. - 6 Mar. 1996). This experiment represents an unprecedented opportunity to make a quantitative correlation between residual accelerations and the response of an actual experimental solidification system

  13. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sairam, T. Bhatt, Pragya; Safvan, C. P.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra

    2015-11-15

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied.

  14. The DarkLight Experiment at the JLab FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Peter

    2013-10-01

    DarkLight will study the production of gauge bosons associated with Dark Forces theories in the scattering of 100 MeV electrons on proton a target. DarkLight is a spectrometer to measure all the final state particles in e- + p -->e- + p +e- +e+ . QED allows this process and the invariant mass distribution of the e+e- pair is a continuum from nearly zero to nearly the electron beam energy. Dark Forces theories, which allow the dark matter mass scale to be over 1 TeV, predict a gauge boson A' in the mass range of 10-1,000 MeV and decays to an electron-positron pair with an invariant mass of mA'. We aim to search for this process using the 100 MeV, 10 mA electron beam at the JLab Free Electron Laser impinging on a hydrogen target with a 1019 cm-2 density. The resulting luminosity of 6 ×1035/cm2-s gives the experiment enough sensitivity to probe A' couplings of 10-9 α . DarkLight is unique in its design to detect all four particles in the final state. The leptons will be measured in a large high-rate TPC and a silicon sensor will measure the protons. A 0.5 T solenoidal magnetic field provides the momentum resolution and focuses the copious Møller scattering background down the beam line, away from the detectors. A first beam test has shown the FEL beam is compatible with the target design and that the hall backgrounds are manageable. The experiment has been approved by Jefferson Lab for first running in 2017.

  15. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-03-22

    Calculations suggest that experiments relating to disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics. In this regard, the low beam emittance of suggested multi-beam designs are very useful. Possibly even higher focal spot brightness could be obtained by plasma lenses which involve external fields on the beam which is stripped to a higher charge state by passing through a plasma cell. Preliminary results suggest that intensities approx. 10/sup 13/ - 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ are achievable. Given these intensities, deposition experiments with heating of disks to greater than a million degrees Kelvin (100 eV) are expected.

  16. Design of a hard X-ray beamline and end-station for pump and probe experiments at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeku; Eom, Intae; Kang, Tai-Hee; Rah, Seungyu; Nam, Ki Hyun; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Kwon, Soonam; Park, Sang Han; Kim, Kyung Sook; Hyun, Hyojung; Kim, Seung Nam; Lee, Eun Hee; Shin, Hocheol; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Myong-jin; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Ahn, Docheon; Lim, Jun; Yu, Chung-Jong; Song, Changyong; Kim, Hyunjung; Noh, Do Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Kwang-Woo; Ko, In Soo; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Kim, Sunam

    2016-02-01

    The Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser project, a new worldwide-user facility to deliver ultrashort, laser-like x-ray photon pulses, will begin user operation in 2017 after one year of commissioning. Initially, it will provide two beamlines for hard and soft x-rays, respectively, and two experimental end-stations for the hard x-ray beamline will be constructed by the end of 2015. This article introduces one of the two hard x-ray end-stations, which is for hard x-ray pump-probe experiments, and primarily outlines the overall design of this end-station and its critical components. The content of this article will provide useful guidelines for the planning of experiments conducted at the new facility.

  17. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — An example of accelerator: the SPES cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L. A. C.; Prete, G.

    2014-04-01

    The SPES project, under construction at INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, is a research facility for nuclear and applied physics, based on a high-current H- cyclotron with two exits. One exit will be devoted to supply an ISOL facility for the production of radioactive beams, the second one can be used as driver for the ADS system. The main characteristics of the cyclotron are described together with the main building designed to operate high-current proton beams according to radioprotection rules.

  18. Recent optimization of the beam-optical characteristics of the 6 MV van de Graaff accelerator for high brightness beams at the iThemba LABS NMP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradie, J. L.; Eisa, M. E. M.; Celliers, P. J.; Delsink, J. L. G.; Fourie, D. T.; de Villiers, J. G.; Maine, P. M.; Springhorn, K. A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2005-04-01

    With the aim of improving the reliability and stability of the beams delivered to the nuclear microprobe at iThemba LABS, as well as optimization of the beam characteristics along the van de Graaff accelerator beamlines in general, relevant modifications were implemented since the beginning of 2003. The design and layout of the beamlines were revised. The beam-optical characteristics through the accelerator, from the ion source up to the analysing magnet directly after the accelerator, were calculated and the design optimised, using the computer codes TRANSPORT, IGUN and TOSCA. The ion source characteristics and optimal operating conditions were determined on an ion source test bench. The measured optimal emittance for 90% of the beam intensity was about 50π mm mrad for an extraction voltage of 6 kV. These changes allow operation of the Nuclear Microprobe at proton energies in the range 1 MeV-4 MeV with beam intensities of tenths of a pA at the target surface. The capabilities of the nuclear microprobe facility were evaluated in the improved beamline, with particular emphasis to bio-medical samples.

  19. New challenges for HEP computing: RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) and CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    LeVine, M.J. Frankfurt Univ. )

    1990-01-01

    We will look at two facilities; RHIC and CEBF. CEBF is in the construction phase, RHIC is about to begin construction. For each of them, we examine the kinds of physics measurements that motivated their construction, and the implications of these experiments for computing. Emphasis will be on on-line requirements, driven by the data rates produced by these experiments.

  20. New empirical formula for neutron dose level at the maze entrance of 15 MV medical accelerator facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong-Suk; Jang, Ki-Won; Park, Youn-Hwan; Kwon, Jeong-Wan; Choi, Ho-Sin; Lee, Jai-Ki; Kim, Jong-Kyung

    2009-05-15

    An easily applicable empirical formula was derived for use in the assessment of the photoneutron dose at the maze entrance of a 15 MV medical accelerator treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent rates around the Varian medical accelerator head calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were used as the source term in producing the base data. The dose equivalents were validated by measurements with bubble detectors. Irradiation geometry conditions expected to yield higher neutron dose rates in the maze were selected: a 20x20 cm{sup 2} irradiation field, gantry rotation plane parallel to the maze walls, and the photon beams directed to the opposite wall to the maze entrance. The neutron dose equivalents at the maze entrance were computed for 697 arbitrary single-bend maze configurations by extending the Monte Carlo calculations down to the maze entrance. Then, the empirical formula was derived by a multiple regression fit to the neutron dose equivalents at the maze entrance for all the different maze configurations. The goodness of the empirical formula was evaluated by applying it to seven operating medical accelerators of different makes. When the source terms were fixed, the neutron doses estimated from the authors' formula agreed better with the corresponding MCNPX simulations than the results of the Kersey method. In addition, compared with the Wu-McGinley formula, the authors' formula provided better estimates for the mazes with length longer than 8.5 m. There are, however, discrepancies between the measured dose rates and the estimated values from the authors' formula, particularly for the machines other than a Varian model. Further efforts are needed to characterize the neutron field at the maze entrance to reduce the discrepancies. Furthermore, neutron source terms for the machines other than a Varian model should be simulated or measured and incorporated into the formula for accurate extended application to a variety of models.

  1. In-phantom characterisation studies at the Birmingham Accelerator-Generated epIthermal Neutron Source (BAGINS) BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Culbertson, Christopher N; Green, Stuart; Mason, Anna J; Picton, David; Baugh, Gareth; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Yin, Zaizhe; Scott, Malcolm C; Nelson, John M

    2004-11-01

    A broad experimental campaign to validate the final epithermal neutron beam design for the BNCT facility constructed at the University of Birmingham concluded in November 2003. The final moderator and facility designs are overviewed briefly, followed by a summary of the dosimetric methods and presentation of a small subset of the results from this campaign. The dual ionisation chamber technique was used together with foil activation to quantify the fast neutron, photon, and thermal neutron beam dose components in a large rectangular phantom exposed to the beam with a 12 cm diameter beam delimiter in place. After application of a normalisation factor, dose measurements agree with in-phantom MCNP4C predictions within 10% for the photon dose, within 10% for thermal neutron dose, and within 25% for the proton recoil dose along the main beam axis. PMID:15308136

  2. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors, and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.-C.; Chevtsov, P.; Day, A.; Freyberger, A. P.; Hicks, R.; Joyce, M.; Denard, J.-C.

    2004-11-10

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size ({sigma} {approx} 100 {mu}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of ({delta}E/E) < 3 x 10{sup -5}. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are non-invasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1-6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {mu}A down to few {mu}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  3. Energy Spread Monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program: Synchrotron Light Interferometers, Optical Transition Radiation Monitors and Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger; Yu-Chiu Chao; Pavel Chevtsov; Anthony Day; William Hicks; Michele Joyce; Jean-Claude Denard

    2004-05-01

    The hypernuclear physics program at JLAB requires an electron beam with small transverse size (sigma {approx} 100 {micro}m) and an upper limit on the RMS energy spread of delta E / E < 3 x 10{sup -}5. To measure and monitor these parameters, a beam size and energy spread measurement system has been created. The system consists of a set of wire scanners, Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) detectors, and Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI). The energy spread is measured via a set of wire scans performed at specific locations in the transport line, which is an invasive process. During physics operation the energy spread is monitored continuously with the OTR and/or the SLI. These devices are noninvasive [or nearly non-invasive in the case of OTR] and operate over a very wide range of beam energies (1.6 GeV) and currents ({approx}100 {micro}A down to few {micro}A). All components of this system are automated in an EPICS accelerator control environment. The paper presents our operational experience with the beam size and energy spread measurement system and its maintenance.

  4. Measurement of the photon electroproduction cross section at JLAB with the goal of performing a Rosenbluth separation of the DVCS contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Arguello, Alejandro Marti

    2014-07-11

    The study of the inner structure of hadrons allows us to understand the nature of the interactions between partons, quarks and gluons, described by Quantum Chromodynamics. The elastic scattering reactions, which have been studied in order to measure the nucleon form factors, are included in this frame. The inelastic scattering reactions are also included in this frame, they allow us to obtain information about the nucleon structure thanks to the development of the parton distribution functions (PDFs). While through elastic scattering we can obtain information about the charge distribution of the nucleon, and hence, about the spatial distribution of the partons, through inelastic scattering we obtain information about the momentum distributions of partons, by employing the PDFs. However, we can study the exclusive inelastic scattering reactions, such as the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), wich allow us to access to the spatial and momentum distributions simultaneously. This is possible thanks to the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), which allow us to correlate both types of distributions. The process known as DVCS is the easiest way to access the GPDs. This process can be expressed as the scattering of an electron by a proton by means of a virtual photon with the result of the scattered initial particles plus a real photon. We find a process competing with DVCS known as Bethe-Heitler (BH), in which the real photon is radiated by the lepton rather than the quark. Due to the small cross section of DVCS, of the order of nb, in order to conduct these kind of experiments it is necessary to make use of facilities capable of providing high beam intensities. One of these facilities is the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility , where the experiment JLab E07-007, "Complete Separation of Virtual Photon and π⁰ Electroproduction Observables of Unpolarized Protons", took place during the months of October to December of 2010. The main goal of this

  5. The problems associated with the monitoring of complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities.

    PubMed

    Bilski, P; Blomgren, J; d'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2007-01-01

    The European Commission is funding within its Sixth Framework Programme a three-year project (2005-2007) called CONRAD, COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry. The organisational framework for this project is provided by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group EURADOS. One task within the CONRAD project, Work Package 6 (WP6), was to provide a report outlining research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterisation of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators, but also at the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities. The paper provides an overview of the report, which will be available as CERN Yellow Report. PMID:17496292

  6. Simulation of the neutron spectrum from the 7Li(p,n) reaction with a liquid-lithium target at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, M.; Cohen, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eisen, Y.; Feinberg, G.; Giorginis, G.; Halfon, S.; Krása, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Shor, A.

    2013-01-01

    The 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction has been used for the last 25 years to produce quasi-Maxwellian neutrons in order to measure Maxwellian-Averaged Cross-Sections in the relevant temperatures for stellar nucleosynthesis. A liquid-lithium target at the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility is expected to allow us to perform such measurements at higher neutron intensities. Here we describe a Monte Carlo tool, SimLiT, developed to evaluate neutron spectra, intensities and angular distributions resulting from this reaction. We also demonstrate the feasibility to couple SimLiT with an advanced transport code, resulting in a powerful tool for planning and analysis of experiments using the 7Li(p,n) reaction as a neutron source.

  7. Construction of. gamma pi. /sup 0/ spectrometer and photon tagging facility at Bates Linear Accelerator. Final report, July 31, 1979-July 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, E.C.

    1981-08-01

    The funds provided under Contract No. DE-AC02-79ER10486 were totally expended for hardware and supplies required by two related devices at the Bates Linear Accelerator. These were a photon tagging facility and a ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer in Beam Line C of the new South Experimental Hall. Construction was begun in November of 1979 and both systems became fully operational in the summer of 1981. Preliminary data was taken in 1980 with a prototype ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer will be carried out in the fall of 1981 and spring of 1982. The photon tagging system has been used successfully to calibrate the ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer for the BU - MIT collaboration and to test a lead glass detector system for Brandeis University.

  8. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Müller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-01

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  9. The non-orthogonal fixed beam arrangement for the second proton therapy facility at the National Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schreuder, A. N.; Jones, D. T. L.; Conradie, J. L.; Fourie, D. T.; Botha, A. H.; Mueller, A.; Smit, H. A.; O'Ryan, A.; Vernimmen, F. J. A.; Wilson, J.; Stannard, C. E.

    1999-06-10

    The medical user group at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) is currently unable to treat all eligible patients with high energy protons. Developing a second proton treatment room is desirable since the 200 MeV proton beam from the NAC separated sector cyclotron is currently under-utilized during proton therapy sessions. During the patient positioning phase in one treatment room, the beam could be used for therapy in a second room. The second proton therapy treatment room at the NAC will be equipped with two non-orthogonal beam lines, one horizontal and one at 30 degrees to the vertical. The two beams will have a common isocentre. This beam arrangement together with a versatile patient positioning system (commercial robot arm) will provide the radiation oncologist with a diversity of possible beam arrangements and offers a reasonable cost-effective alternative to an isocentric gantry.

  10. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  11. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1998-01-01

    The research accomplishments summarized in this Final Report during the period from 3/95 to 3/98, which included a 12 months no-cost extension granted at the end of the nominal 2 year period of performance. The report has 5 sections, in section 1 the objectives are presented, a task description is given and the background and significance of the work is outlined. In section 2 the research accomplishments are summarized. In section 3 publications and presentations are listed. Student participation is listed in 4. The work is summarized in section 5. and references for sections 1 and 2 are supplied in section 6. The object of this work, is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involved using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, ID models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The experiments conducted in the MEPHISTO furnace facility during the USW-3 space flight which took place between February 22 through March 6, 199). This experiment represents an unprecedented opportunity to make a quantitative correlation between residual accelerations and the response of an actual experimental solidification

  12. FLAME facility: The effect of obstacles and transverse venting on flame acceleration and transition on detonation for hydrogen-air mixtures at large scale

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes research on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) for hydrogen-air mixtures carried out in the FLAME facility, and describes its relevance to nuclear reactor safety. Flame acceleration and DDT can generate high peak pressures that may cause failure of containment. FLAME is a large rectangular channel 30.5 m long, 2.44 m high, and 1.83 m wide. It is closed on the ignition end and open on the far end. The three test variables were hydrogen mole fraction (12--30%), degree of transverse venting (by moving steel top plates---0%, 13%, and 50%), and the absence or presence of certain obstacles in the channel (zero or 33% blockage ratio). The most important variable was the hydrogen mole fraction. The presence of the obstacles tested greatly increased the flame speeds, overpressures, and tendency for DDT compared to similar tests without obstacles. Different obstacle configurations could have greater or lesser effects on flame acceleration and DDT. Large degrees of transverse venting reduced the flame speeds, overpressures, and possibility of DDT. For small degrees of transverse venting (13% top venting), the flame speeds and overpressures were higher than for no transverse venting with reactive mixtures (>18% H/sub 2/), but they were lower with leaner mixtures. The effect of the turbulence generated by the flow out the vents on increasing flame speed can be larger than the effect of venting gas out of the channel and hence reducing the overpressure. With no obstacles and 50% top venting, the flame speeds and overpressures were low, and there was no DDT. For all other cases, DDT was observed above some threshold hydrogen concentration. DDT was obtained at 15% H/sub 2/ with obstacles and no transverse venting. 67 refs., 62 figs.

  13. Development of site-specific synthetic accelerations for safety assessment of DOE facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Aramayo, G.A.; Carley, T.G.; Jones, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic analysis of US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities at Oak Ridge, TN, requires seismic accelerograms that have response spectra that are compatible with the site-specific design response spectra. The development of these accelerograms is accomplished by the application of the Fourier transform to compute the response spectrum of a beginning accelerogram and map it into the frequency domain. The Fourier spectrum is modified according to the difference between the computed spectra and the target spectra. The response spectrum is recomputed and compared again to the target. The modification is repeated until acceptable agreement is achieved. The modified Fourier spectrum is transformed to the time domain and filtered yielding the desired seismic time history. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  15. The André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory - The new accelerator mass spectrometry facility at the University of Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieser, W. E.; Zhao, X.-L.; Clark, I. D.; Cornett, R. J.; Litherland, A. E.; Klein, M.; Mous, D. J. W.; Alary, J.-F.

    2015-10-01

    The University of Ottawa, Canada, has installed a multi-element, 3 MV tandem AMS system as the cornerstone of their new Advanced Research Complex and the principal analytical instrument of the André E. Lalonde Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory. Manufactured by High Voltage Engineering Europa B.V., the Netherlands, it is equipped with a 200 sample ion source, a high resolution, 120° injection magnet, a 90° high energy analysis magnet (mass-energy product 350 MeV-AMU), a 65°, 1.7 m radius electric analyzer and a 2 channel gas ionization detector. It is designed to analyze isotopes ranging from tritium to the actinides and to accommodate the use of fluoride target materials. This system is being extended with a second injection line, consisting of selected components from the IsoTrace Laboratory, University of Toronto. This line will contain a pre-commercial version of the Isobar Separator for Anions, manufactured by Isobarex Corp., Bolton, Ontario, Canada. This instrument uses selective ion-gas reactions in a radio-frequency quadrupole cell to attenuate both atomic and molecular isobars. This paper discusses the specifications of the new AMS equipment, reports on the acceptance test results for 10Be, 14C, 26Al and 127I and presents typical spectra for 10Be and actinide analyses.

  16. The new external microbeam facility at the 5 MV Tandetron accelerator laboratory in Madrid: beam characterisation and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enguita, Olga; Fernández-Jiménez, M. T.; García, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Calderón, T.; Grime, G. W.

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes the new external microbeam on the 15° beamline of the 5 MV Tandetron accelerator recently installed at the CMAM in Madrid. The focusing and beam extraction system was supplied by Oxford Microbeams Ltd. and consists of a high precision quadrupole doublet with an interchangeable Kapton window exit nozzle and front-viewing video microscope. The sample is positioned in the beam using a stepper motor stage. The beam current and beam profile have been determined under different experimental conditions. A simple method based on the signal processing of ion-induced luminescence from quartz targets has been used to determine the beam profile in two dimensions simultaneously, without scanning. This is the first step in the development of a real time beam profile monitoring system, which could be used as part of an automated beam focusing procedure. The beam line will be primarily devoted to archaeometry and cultural heritage studies. As an example we report the characterisation of two Tang appearance antique porcelains.

  17. A new 14 GHz Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) for the heavy ion accelerator facility ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlapp, M.; Pardo, R.C.; Vondrasek, R.C.; Billquist, P.J.; Szczech, J.

    1997-11-01

    A 14 GHz Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) has been designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory. The source is a modification of the AECR at Berkeley and incorporates the latest results from ECR developments to produce intense beams of highly charged ions, including an improved magnetic confinement of the plasma electrons with an axial mirror ratio of 3.5. The aluminum plasma chamber and extraction electrode as well as a biased disk on axis at the microwave injection side donates additional electrons to the plasma, making use of the large secondary electron yield from aluminum oxide. The source is capable of ECR plasma heating using two different frequencies simultaneously to increase the electron energy gain for the production of high charge states. The main design goal is to produce several e{mu}A of at least {sup 238}U{sup 35+} in order to accelerate the beam to coulomb-barrier energies without further stripping. First charge state distributions for gaseous elements have been measured and 210 e{mu}A {sup 16}O{sup 7+} has been achieved. A normalized 90% emittance from 0.1 to 0.2 {pi} mm{sm_bullet}mrad for krypton and oxygen beam has been found.

  18. Investigating the proton structure through polarization transfers in real Compton scattering processes at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Cristiano V.; Salme, Giovanni; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, preliminary results of the analysis of polarization transfers in real Compton scattering (RCS) performed in Hall-C at JLAB are presented, for data collected at large scattering angle (θ{sub cm}=70{degrees}) in the experiment E07-002. A previous experiment, E99-114, has already demonstrated a complete inconsistence of its results with a pQCD mechanism at JLAB energy regime. This kind of experiment, therefore, is of crucial importance for understanding the nature of the reaction mechanism for such a simple process, involving a real photon. Furthermore, RCS experiments allow the extraction of Compton form factors and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), the latter connected to the total angular momentum of the nucleon.

  19. Electroproduction of K{sup +} {Lambda} at JLab Hall-C

    SciTech Connect

    Gogami, Toshiyuki

    2013-08-01

    A Lambda hypernuclear spectroscopic experiment, JLab E05-115 was performed at JLab Hall-C in 2009 by the (e, e’'K{sup +}) reaction. Data of {Lambda} hypernuclei with mass numbers from A = 7 to A = 52 were successfully taken, and the analyses are in progress. A polyethylene (CH{sub 2}) target was used as a proton target to calibrate energy scales, and to study elementary process of the p(e, e’'K{sup +}){Lambda}, {Sigma}{sup 0} reaction. A preliminary differential cross section of K{sup +} {Lambda} electro-production at low Q{sup 2} [~0.01 (GeV/c){sup 2}] and at small kaon angles is reported in the present article.

  20. Hadron Spectroscopy: Providing the link between experiment and theory in the intermediate energy region at JLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Diane

    2014-09-01

    The study of hadronic properties and structure is an important part of understanding QCD. Measuring resonances predicted by the Quark Model as well as other complex states such as hybrids or glue balls can lead to insights on quark-confinement and the behavior of gluons. The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab (JLab) offers a unique set of opportunities in meson and baryon spectroscopy using photon and electron production. This talk will give an update on the experimental results and coordinated efforts from the JLab Physics Analysis Center (JPAC) and George Washington University Data Analysis Center (GWDAC) who's common goals include using observed data to provide insights into the fundamental theory of strong interactions.

  1. RF System Requirements for a Medium-Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert A; Hannon, Fay E; Guo, Jiquan; Huang, Shichun; Huang, Yulu; Wang, Haipeng; Wang, S

    2015-09-01

    JLab is studying options for a medium energy electron-ion collider that could fit on the JLab site and use CEBAF as a full-energy electron injector. A new ion source, linac and booster would be required, together with collider storage rings for the ions and electrons. In order to achieve the maximum luminosity these will be high-current storage rings with many bunches. We present the high-level RF system requirements for the storage rings, ion booster ring and high-energy ion beam cooling system, and describe the technology options under consideration to meet them. We also present options for staging that might reduce the initial capital cost while providing a smooth upgrade path to a higher final energy. The technologies under consideration may also be useful for other proposed storage ring colliders or ultimate light sources.

  2. Temporal Characterization of Electron Beam Bunches with a Fast Streak Camera at the JLab FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S.V. Benson; D. Douglas; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2005-08-21

    The design and construction of an optical transport that brings synchrotron radiation from electron bunches to a fast streak camera in a remote area has become a useful tool for online observation of bunch length and stability. This paper will report on the temporal measurements we have done, comparison with simulations, and the on-going work for another imaging optical transport system that will make possible the direct measurement of the longitudinal phase space by measuring the bunch length as a function of energy

  3. Development of a methodology to accelerate a spontaneous grass colonization in a tailings storage facility under semiarid mediterranean climate type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Arellano, Eduardo; Morales-Ladron de Guevara, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    Phytostabilization of massive mine tailings (>400 he) under semiarid environments is challenging, particularly when no organic amendments are locally available and no irrigation is possible. Increasing tendency for reprocessing old tailings to recover valued metals further pioneer the need for simple but effective plant covers. The choice of plant species and form of management are thus very important. CODELCO-Chile chose the Cauquenes post-operational tailings storage facility (TFS; 700 ha), that will be reprocessed for copper and other elements in the near future, to evaluate efficacy of the phytostabilization technology under semiarid conditions in central Chile. Surface application of a polymer (Soiltac TM) has been used for wind control of tailings but phytostabilization is considered as a best cost-effective alternative. A field study was performed to define a management program to improve the establishment and cover of an annual native grass (Vulpia myuros var. megalura), a spontaneous colonizer of the TSF. Considered management factors were control of macro herbivores (with and without fence), macronutrient improvement (with and without application of N-rich foliar fertilizer), and improvement of seed retention in the substrate (with and without small-scale rugosity; with and without lived wind-breakers; with and without mechanical wind-breakers). Each treatment was replicated three times and established in 2 m x 2 m quadrats. Plant response variables were monitored after 1 and 2 grass growing seasons. Application of N-rich foliar fertilizer and any wind control mechanism for seed retention in the substrate were effective for significantly improving both grass cover and biomass production in time, irrespective of macro-herbivore control. Seed production was significantly improved when macro herbivores were excluded and was positively and significantly correlated to vegetative biomass production. When applying this management program for tailings

  4. The 12 GeV JLab Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Elton

    2009-01-01

    The upgrade of the CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV will deliver high luminosity and high quality beams, which will open unique opportunities for studies of the quark and gluon structure of hadrons in the valence region. Such physics will be made accessible by substantial additions to the experimental equipment in combination with the increased energy reach of the upgraded machine. The emphasis of the talk will be on the program in a new experimental Hall D designed to search for gluonic excitations.

  5. Silicon Microstrip Detectors for the Jlab SBS Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Persio, F.; Kiprich, S.; Meddi, F.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    The INFN group of Rome is developing two silicon microstrip detector planes to be part of the tracking system of the SBS spectrometer, that will be installed in the experimental Hall A of Jefferson Labortatory, in order to improve its resolution. The detector and the PCB design were the results of models simulated using PSPICE. The entire assembly process will be realized in the INFN Roma clean room CL10000 facility.

  6. Forward Tracking with the JLab/MEIC Detector Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Charles; JLab/MEIC Design Team

    2015-10-01

    At a future electron ion collider (EIC), the quark-gluon structure of the NN force can be probed in e . g . deeply virtual exclusive scattering on a tensor polarized Deuteron and diffractive DIS on the deuteron with tagging of the NN final state. The MEIC design includes two Interaction Points (IPs), each of which can operate simultaneously at full luminosity. The detector and beam-line optics for IP1 are designed to be nearly hermetic for all particles outside the presumed 10-sigma admittance (longitudinal and transverse) of the figure-8 accelerator lattice. The integration of the IP1 detector with the lattice extends 40 m downstream of the IP in both the electron and ion directions. The central region of the detector is a new 4 m long 3 m diameter 3 Tesla solenoid. Analysis in the forward ion direction is enhanced by the 50 mrad crossing angle at the IP, and a two-stage spectrometer integrated into the first 36 m of the accelerator lattice. In this talk I will present the optics and resolution of the forward ion spectrometer, including resolution effects of an initial beam pipe design. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Chapter in book "Many Body Structure of Strongly Interacting Systems, Refereed and Selected Contributions from the Symposium '20 Years of Physics at the Mainz Microtron MAMI,'" Part I, Editors: Arenhövel, H.; Backe, H.; Drechsel, D.; Friedrich, J.; Kaiser, K.-H.; Walcher, Th., p.7-17 (contribution entitled Physics at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Cardman

    2006-09-01

    The Continuous Electron Accelerator Facility, CEBAF, located at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, is devoted to the investigation of the electromagnetic structure of mesons, nucleons, and nuclei using high energy, high duty-cycle electron and photon beams. Selected experimental results of particular interest to the MAMI community are presented.

  8. Review of Activities using the Pulsed Neutron Facility and 2.5-GeV Electron Linac at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Guinyun; Lee, Manwoo; Kim, Kyung Sook; Yang, Sungchul; Kim, Eunae; Shvetshov, Valery; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Naik, Haladhara

    2011-12-13

    We report on activities using a pulsed neutron facility consisting of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target with a water moderator, and a 12 m time-of-flight path. It is possible to measure neutron total cross sections in the neutron energy range from 0.01 eV to a few hundred eV by using the neutron time-of-flight method; photo-neutron cross sections can also measure by using the bremsstrahlung from the electron linac. A {sup 6}LiZnS(Ag) glass scintillator was used as a neutron detector. The neutron flight path from the water-cooled Ta target to the neutron detector was 12.1 m. In this paper, we report total cross sections of Nb and also resonance parameters obtained using the SAMMY fitting program. The present results are compared with the previous experimental results and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VII. We also report on the mass-yield distribution of fission products in the 2.5-GeV bremsstrahlung-induced fission of {sup nat}Pb and {sup 209}Bi measured at the 2.5-GeV electron linac using a recoil catcher and an off-line {gamma}-ray spectrometric technique.

  9. A facile glovebox-free strategy to significantly accelerate the syntheses of well-defined polypeptides by N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) ring opening polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jiong; Fan, Jingwei; He, Xun; Zhang, Shiyi; Wang, Hai; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    A facile N2 flow-accelerated N-carboxyanhydride ring opening polymerization (NCA ROP) is demonstrated, herein, with rigorous kinetic studies to evaluate the methodology in detail. By using n-hexylamine as initiator and γ-benzyl-L-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride (BLG-NCA) as monomer, the NCA ROP via a normal amine mechanism (NAM) reached 90% conversion in 2 h under N2 flow at room temperature in a fume hood, much shorter than the time required for the same polymerization conducted in a glove box (14 h). The efficient removal of CO2 from the reaction by N2 flow drove the carbamic acid-amine equilibrium toward the formation of active nucleophilic amino termini and promoted polymerization. The detailed kinetic studies of the polymerization with different feed ratios and N2 flow rates were conducted, demonstrating the living feature of the NCA ROP and the tuning of the polymerization rate by simply changing the flow rate of N2. Maintenance of the reactivity of the amino ω-chain terminus and control during a subsequent polymerization were confirmed by performing chain extension reactions. The N2 flow method provides a new straightforward strategy to synthesize well-defined polypeptides with predictable molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions (PDI < 1.19). PMID:23794753

  10. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  11. THE JLAB AMPERE-CLASS CRYOMODULE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Edward Daly; William Hicks; James Henry; Joseph Preble; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; Katherine Wilson; Genfa Wu; Gianluigi Ciovati; Thomas Elliott; Peter Kneisel; Stephen Manning; Robert Manus; Karl Smith; Lynn Vogel; Larry Turlington

    2006-06-26

    For the next generation of compact high-power FELs a new cryomodule is required that is capable of accelerating up to Ampere levels of beam current. Challenges include strong HOM damping, high HOM power and high fundamental-mode power (in operating scenarios without full energy recovery). For efficient use of space a high real-estate gradient is desirable and for economic operation good fundamental-mode efficiency is important. The technology must also be robust and should be based on well-proven and reliable technologies. For Ampere-class levels of beam current both halo interception and beam break-up (BBU) are important considerations. These factors tend to drive the designs to lower frequencies where the apertures are larger and the transverse impedances are lower. To achieve these goals we propose to use a compact waveguide-damped multi-cell cavity packaged in an SNS-style cryomodule.

  12. SNEAP 80: symposium of Northeastern Accelerator personnel

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Reports of operations are presented for twenty-seven facilities, along with reports on accelerators in progress, ion sources, insulating gases, charging systems, stripping foils, accelerating tubes, and upgraded accelerator systems. (GHT)

  13. Rare Isotope Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2002-04-01

    The next frontier for low-energy nuclear physics involves experimentation with accelerated beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes. A new facility, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), is proposed to produce large amount of these rare isotopes and post-accelerate them to energies relevant for studies in nuclear physics, astrophysics and the study of fundamental interactions at low energy. The basic science motivation for this facility will be introduced. The general facility layout, from the 400 kW heavy-ion superconducting linac used for production of the required isotopes to the novel production and extraction schemes and the highly efficient post-accelerator, will be presented. Special emphasis will be put on a number of technical breakthroughs and recent R&D results that enable this new facility.

  14. Measurements of the Helium Form Factors at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Khrosinkova, Elena

    2007-10-26

    An experiment to measure elastic electron scattering off {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He at large momentum transfers is presented. The experiment was carried out in the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. Elastic electron scattering off {sup 3}He was measured at forward and backward electron scattering angles to extract the isotope's charge and magnetic form factors. The charge form factor of {sup 4}He will be extracted from forward-angle electron scattering angle measurements. The data are expected to significantly extend and improve the existing measurements of the three- and four-body form factors. The results will be crucial for the establishment of a canonical standard model for the few-body nuclear systems and for testing predictions of quark dimensional scaling and hybrid nucleon-quark models.

  15. Hall B superconducting magnets for the CLAS12 detector at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    L. Quettier, V. Burkert, L. Elouadrhiri, D. Kashy, E. Leung, W. Schneider

    2011-02-01

    Hadron physics has been an essential part of the physics program with the CLAS detector in experimental hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). With the 12 GeV upgrade of the CEBAF machine, hadron physics in Hall B will be extended to a new domain of higher mass resonances and the range of higher transferred momentum using up to 11 GeV electron beams and the upgraded CLAS12 detector. In this paper, status of the hall B superconducting magnets for the 12 GeV upgrade is presented.

  16. Exotic Mesons at JLab Before 2013? The Search for New Forms of Matter at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Bookwalter

    2007-10-01

    A proposal to search for exotic mesons in photoproduction has been accepted for running at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer in Hall B. This program will bolster previously-thin statistics in many photoproduction channels, primarily those with charged particles in the final state, as well as seeking to confirm earlier findings in neutral channels, if possible. The promise of the neutral 3pi channel is discussed. In addition, the experiment seeks to study the spectrum of both exotic and ordinary strangeonia. Limitations of the CLAS detector for meson spectroscopy are discussed, as well as possible solutions to minimize such limitations.

  17. Exotic Mesons at JLab Before 2013? The Search for New Forms of Matter at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, Craig

    2007-10-26

    A proposal to search for exotic mesons in photoproduction has been accepted for running at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer in Hall B. This program will bolster previously-thin statistics in many photoproduction channels, primarily those with charged particles in the final state, as well as seeking to confirm earlier findings in neutral channels, if possible. The promise of the neutral 3{pi} channel is discussed. In addition, the experiment seeks to study the spectrum of both exotic and ordinary strangeonia. Limitations of the CLAS detector for meson spectroscopy are discussed, as well as possible solutions to minimize such limitations.

  18. HOM damping performance of JLAB SL21 cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    C. Thomas; Haipeng Wang; I. Campisi; J. Mammosser; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; K. Beard

    2003-05-01

    The new SL21 cryomodule is the first 70MeV, 8-cavity string superconducting accelerator module to be installed in CEBAF. Each cavity has 7-cells, the center cells have Mark II shape and the end cells have the Mark III shape. The HOM couplers resemble the DESY welded type; two of them assembled at one end of a cavity outside of tuner hub, with 115{sup o} azimuthal apart. There is a {lambda}/4 stub fundamental power waveguide at other end of cavity. The first two passbands of TE111 and TM110 modes have to be damped to avoid beam breakup (BBU) problem at 460{micro}A current. External Q's of the HOM couplers and waveguide were measured on a copper model, on cold niobium cavities and finally in the cryomodule test without beam. This paper presents all HOM data associated with this structure. A threshold current calculated by MATBBU based on the real beam optics and HOM spectrums will be discussed. This information will also benefit next or a high beam current FEL cryomodule HOM.

  19. High precision measurements of the neutron spin structure in Hall A at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Annand, R M; Cates, G; Cisbani, E; Franklin, G B; Liyanage, N; Puckett, A; Rosner, G; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X

    2012-04-01

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) JLab energy upgrade will offer new exciting opportunities to study the nucleon (spin) structure such as high precision, unexplored phase space, flavor decomposition; (2) Large technological efforts is in progress to optimally exploit these opportunities; (3) HallA will be the first hall to get the new beam, first experiment expected to run in 2014; (4) A1n likely one of the first experiments to take data in the new 12 GeV era; and (5) SIDIS exp. will follow in couple of years.

  20. A New Hypernuclear Experiment with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer(HKS) at JLAB Hall C

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Nakamura

    2003-12-01

    As a natural extension of the first successful hypernuclear spectroscopy through the (e,e'K+) reaction (JLAB-E89-009), a new experiment with a newly developed High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS) and new configuration of the electron spectrometer was proposed. The high performance of the HKS and the new electron spectrometer configuration (tilt method) enables us to improve the energy resolution by a factor of 2, the hypernuclear yield by a factor of 50 and the signal to noise ratio by a factor of 10.

  1. Studies of the 3D Structure of the Nucleon at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakian, Harut

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the 3D structure of the nucleon encoded in transverse momentum dependent distribution and fragmentation functions of partons and generalized parton distributions are among the key objectives of the JLab 12 GeV upgrade and the electron ion collider. Main challenges in extracting 3D partonic distributions from precision measurements of hard scattering processes include clear understanding of leading twist QCD fundamentals, higher twist effects, and also correlations of hadron production in target and current fragmentation regions. In this contribution we discuss some ongoing studies and future measurements of spin-orbit correlations at Jefferson Lab.

  2. Accurate measurement of the electron beam polarization in JLab Hall A using Compton polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    S. Escoffier; P.Y. Bertin; M. Brossard; E. Burtin; C. Cavata; N. Colombel; C.W. de Jager; A. Delbart; D. Lhuillier; F. Marie; J. Mitchell; D. Neyret; T. Pussieux

    2005-05-01

    A major advance in accurate electron beam polarization measurement has been achieved at Jlab Hall A with a Compton polarimeter based on a Fabry-Perot cavity photon beam amplifier. At an electron energy of 4.6 GeV and a beam current of 40 uA, a total relative uncertainty of 1.5% is typically achieved within 40 min of data taking. Under the same conditions monitoring of the polarization is accurate at a level of 1%. These unprecedented results make Compton polarimetry an essential tool for modern parity-violation experiments, which require very accurate electron beam polarization measurements.

  3. Theory Support for the Excited Baryon Analysis Program at the JLAB 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Mokeev, Viktor; Aznauryan, Inna; Braun, Vladimir; Capstick, Simon; Cloet, Ian; Edwards, Robert; Gianinni, M.; Lin, Huey-Wen; Roberts, C.D.; Stoler, Paul; Zhao, Qiang; Zou, Bing-Song

    2009-01-01

    This document summarizes the contributions of the Electromagnetic $\\gamma_vNN^*$ Transition Form Factors workshop participants that provide theoretical support of the excited baryon program at the 12 GeV energy upgrade at JLab. The main objectives of the workshop were (a) review the status of the $\\gamma_vNN^*$ transition form factors extracted from the meson electroproduction data, (b) call for the theoretical interpretations of the extracted $N$-$N^*$ transition form factors, that enable access to the mechanisms responsible for the N* formation and to their emergence from QCD.

  4. Studies of the 3D structure of the proton at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, Harut A.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years parton distributions, describing longitudinal momentum, helicity and transversity distributions of quarks and gluons, have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom. Two new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs) and Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) were introduced to describe transverse momentum and spatial distributions of partons. Great progress has been made since then in measurements of different Single Spin Asymmetries (SSAs) in semi-inclusive and hard exclusive processes, providing access to TMDs and GPDs, respectively. Studies of TMDs and GPDs are also among the main driving forces of the JLab 12 GeV upgrade project.

  5. Analysis of the Cause of High External Q Modes in the JLab High Gradient Prototype Cryomodule Renascence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Akcelik, V.; Xiao, L.; Lee, L.; Ng, C.; Ko, K.; Wang, H.; Marhauser, F.; Sekutowicz, J.; Reece, C.; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab

    2008-06-27

    implemented to avoid such problem in the final upgrade design and manufacture. The goal of this work is to utilize advanced simulation tools to understand the high external Q (Q{sub ext}) problem observed in the Renascence cryomodule. In the past years, SLAC has built a set of state-of-the-art advanced simulation tools based on finite-element unstructured meshes and parallel computation implementations on supercomputers [2, 3]. The codes are capable of simulating large complex RF systems with unprecedented resolution and turnaround time. They have been successfully applied to many existing and future accelerator R&D projects to improve the machine performance and to optimize the designs. These tools are essential to perform accurate full system analyses such as the JLab's SRF cavities. We will use the simulation results and the data from the RF measurements to gain a better understanding of the cavity performance and tolerance issues and provide a solid foundation to do the BBU simulation and prediction for the 12GeV Upgrade project by using JLab's BBU codes. In this report, we will focus on the following two main tasks: (1) Ideal cavity simulation--to evaluate the effectiveness of the damping by the higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers, and search for possible trapped modes in a back-to-back cavity pair (e.g. cavity No.4 & No.5). (2) Abnormal cavity study--to understand the cause of the high Q{sub ext} modes in cavity No.5 using an advanced Shape Determination Tool.

  6. Studies of the transverse structure of the nucleon at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Mirazita, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Since the earliest measurements in the '70, hadronic physics deals with a number of surprising phenomena that cannot be explained in the framework of perturbative QCD. Examples are the small fraction of the proton spin carried by the valence quark spins, the persistence at high energies of single spin asymmetries and azimuthal asymmetries in unpolarized processes. It is now believed that the answer to these questions may come from the transverse motion of partons inside the nucleon, which is encoded in the Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) Parton Distribution Functions. Among the large variety of processes that can be described in terms of TMDs, a major role is played by Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS) reactions, in which, together with the scattered electron, one or more hadrons are detected in the final state. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries are the experimental observables sensitive to TMDs. The identification of the final hadrons allows the tagging of the quark involved in the reaction at the parton level, and then the flavor separation of the relevant TMDs. SIDIS reactions are studied at Jefferson Laboratories since many years and are one of the main items in the physics program after the upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator. The large amount of new data that will be available in few years calls for the implementation of new tools, such as multidimensional analyses and refined techniques of TMDs extraction from the experimental asymmetries. In this talk, the more recent results obtained at 6 GeV will be shown and the future measurements will be discussed.

  7. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  8. An Overview of Longitudinal Spin Structure Measurements from JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.

    2013-08-01

    Jefferson Lab is currently one of the facilities leading the investigation of the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past 15 years, several high precision measurements have been completed, extending our knowledge of the polarized structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} down to Q{sup 2} = 0.02 GeV{sup 2}. In particular, the low-Q{sup 2} range ({<=} 0.1 GeV{sup 2}) from these data allows us to make a benchmark-check of Chiral Perturbation theory ({chi}PT). Previous results for the moments of the spin structure functions in this region have shown mixed agreement. For {Gamma}{sub 1}, the first moment of g{sub 1}, we find good consistency between data and theory. However, we have seen a surprisingly large discrepancy with {chi}PT calculations for the {delta}{sub LT} spin polarizability on the neutron, which is significantly less sensitive to the {Delta}-resonance contribution. These proceedings will discuss the recent experimental effort at low Q{sup 2} from Jefferson Lab, including a discussion of preliminary results on the neutron. The new results on the neutron still show a sizeable discrepancy between data and theory. However, new calculations show improved agreement with data for some observables. In addition, new proton data for g{sub 2} is also expected to help resolve the disagreement for {delta}{sub LT}.

  9. Compton scattering off polarized electrons with a high-finesse Fabry-Perot Cavity at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas Falletto; Martial Authier; Maud Baylac; M. Boyer; Francois Bugeon; Etienne Burtin; Christian Cavata; Nathalie Colombel; G. Congretel; R. Coquillard; G. Coulloux; Bertrand Couzy; P Deck; Alain Delbart; D. Desforges; A. Donati; B. Duboue; Stephanie Escoffier; F. Farci; Bernard Frois; P Girardot; J Guillotau; C Henriot; Claude Jeanney; M Juillard; J. P. Jorda; P. Legou; David Lhuillier; Y Lussignol; Phillippe Mangeot; X. Martin; Frederic Marie; Jacques Martino; M. Maurier; Bernard Mazeau; J.F. Millot; F. Molinie; J.-P. Mols; Jean-pierre Mouly; M. Mur; Damien Neyret; T. Pedrol; Stephane Platchkov; G. Pontet; Thierry Pussieux; Yannick Queinec; Philippe Rebourgeard; J. C. Sellier; Gerard Tarte; Christian Veyssiere; Andre Zakarian; Pierre Bertin; Alain Cosquer; Jian-ping Chen; Joseph Mitchell; J.-M. Mackowski; L. Pinard

    2001-03-01

    We built and commissioned a new type of Compton polarimeter to measure the electron beam polarization at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Virginia, USA). The heart of this polarimeter is a high-finesse monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity. Its purpose is to amplify a primary 300 mW laser beam in order to improve the signal to noise ratio of the polarimeter. It is the first time that a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity is enclosed in the vacuum of a particle accelerator to monitor the beam polarization by Compton polarimetry. The measured finesse and amplification gain of the cavity are F=26000 and G=7300. The electron beam crosses this high-power photon source at an angle of 23 mrad in the middle of the cavity where the photon beam power density is estimated to be 0.85MW/cm2. We have used this facility during the HAPPEX experiment (April-July 1999) and we give a preliminary measurement of Compton scattering asymmetry.

  10. Final Report for "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulations".

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J. R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Stoltz, P. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B. T.; Bell, G.; Paul, K.; Veitzer, S.

    2013-04-19

    This final report describes the work that has been accomplished over the past 5 years under the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator and Simulations (ComPASS) at Tech-X Corporation. Tech-X had been involved in the full range of ComPASS activities with simulation of laser plasma accelerator concepts, mainly in collaboration with LOASIS program at LBNL, simulation of coherent electron cooling in collaboration with BNL, modeling of electron clouds in high intensity accelerators, in collaboration with researchers at Fermilab and accurate modeling of superconducting RF cavity in collaboration with Fermilab, JLab and Cockcroft Institute in the UK.

  11. Latest Results of ILC High-Gradient R&D 9-cell Cavities at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli

    2008-02-11

    It has been over a year since JLAB started processing and testing ILC 9-cell cavities in the frame work of ILC high-gradient cavity R&D, aiming at the goal of a 35 MV/m gradient at a Q of 1E10 with a yield of 90%. The necessary cavity processing steps include field flatness tuning, electropolishing (EP), hydrogen out-gassing under vacuum, high-pressure water rinsing, clean room assembly, and low temperature bake. These are followed by RF test at 2 Kelvin. Ultrasonic cleaning with Micro-90, an effective post-EP rinsing recipe discovered at JLAB, is routinely used. Seven industry manufactured 9-cell TESLAshape cavities are processed and tested repeatedly. So far, 33 EP cycles are accumulated, corresponding to more than 65 hours of active EP time. An emphasis put on RF testing is to discern cavity quench characteristics, including its nature and its location. Often times, the cavity performance is limited by thermal-magnetic quench instead of field emission. The quench field in some cavities is lower than 20 MV/m and remains unchanged despite repeated EP, implying material and/or fabrication defects. The quench field in some other cavities is high but changes unpredictably after repeated EP, suggesting processing induced defects. Based on our experience and results, several areas are identified where improvement is needed to improve cavity performance as well as yield.

  12. Highlights of Spin Study at JLab Hall A: Longitudinal and Transverse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. P.

    2011-12-14

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have lead to numerous surprises, puzzles and discoveries. The so called ''spin crisis'' in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. The nucleon spin structrue study has grown from mainly on the longitudinal spin in the last thirty years to recently rapidly increasing interests on the transverse spin. With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, JLab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This proceeding will highlight JLab Hall A's study in the measurements of the moments of spin structure functions at low-to-intermediate Q{sup 2} and in the transverse spin structure.

  13. Highlights of Spin Study at JLab Hall A: Longitudinal and Transverse

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-12-01

    Spin-dependent observables have been a powerful tool to probe the internal structure of the nucleon and to understand the dynamics of the strong interaction. Experiments involving spin degrees of freedom have lead to numerous surprises, puzzles and discoveries. The so called 'spin crisis' in the 1980s revealed the limitation of naive quark-parton models and led to intensive worldwide efforts, both experimental and theoretical, to understand the nucleon spin structure. The nucleon spin structrue study has grown frommainly on the longitudinal spin in the last thirty years to recently rapidly increasing interests on the transverse spin.With high intensity and high polarization of both the electron beam and targets, JLab has the world's highest polarized luminosity and the best figure-of-merit for precision spin structure measurements. It has made a strong impact in this subfield of research. This proceeding will highlight JLab Hall A's study in the measurements of the moments of spin structure functions at low-to-intermediate Q2 and in the transverse spin structure.

  14. The Alto Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, F.; Azaiez, F.; Essabaa, S.; Verney, D.; Cheikh Mhamed, M.; Franchoo, S.; Lau, C.; Li, R.; Roussière, B.; Said, A.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.; Testov, D.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.; Smirnov, V.; Sokol, E.

    2015-06-01

    The ALTO facility consists of two accelerators in the same area. A Tandem accelerator dedicated to stable (ions and cluster) beam physics and a linear electron accelerator dedicated to the production of radioactive beams. This gives a unique opportunity to have in the same place cluster beams for interdisciplinary physics and stable and radioactive beams for astrophysics and nuclear physics.

  15. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  16. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  17. Commissioning and operational results of the 12 GeV helium compression system at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    The new compressor system at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in the spring of 2013 and incorporates many design changes, discussed in previous publications, to improve the operational range, efficiency, reliability and maintainability as compared to previous compressor skids used for this application. The 12 GeV helium compression system has five compressors configured with four pressure levels supporting three pressure levels in the new cold box. During compressor commissioning the compressors were operated independent of the cold box over a wide range of process conditions to verify proper performance including adequate cooling and oil removal. Isothermal and volumetric efficiencies over these process conditions for several built-involume ratios were obtained. This paper will discuss the operational envelope results and the modifications/improvements incorporated into the skids.

  18. STATUS AND TEST RESULTS OF HIGH CURRENT 5-CELL SRF CAVITIES DEVELOPED AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Clemens, William; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Daly, Edward; Forehand, Daniel; Henry, James; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Rimmer, Robert; Tennant, Christopher; Wang, Haipeng

    2008-07-01

    The development of a new compact CW cryomodule for use in future Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) is underway at JLab with the objective of transporting beam current up to Ampere-levels. Design goals include broadband cavity Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping, HOMs tuned to safe frequencies to minimize the power extracted from the beam, good real-estate gradient and cryogenic efficiency and consideration of cost and maintainability. Two 1497 MHz high current niobium five-cell cavities with waveguide end groups have been manufactured recently. We report on the latest results including high field tests in a vertical Dewar at 2K and a detailed assessment of the impedance budget for beam breakup (BBU) instability. The general cryomodule and cavity concept is described as well.

  19. Electrons on the HDice target: Results and analysis of test runs at JLab in 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, Michael; Bass, Christopher; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Deur, Alexandre; Hanretty, Charles; Ho, Dao; Kageya, Tsuneo; Laine, Vivien; Peng, Peng; Sandorfi, Andrew; Wei, Xiangdong; Whisnant, Charles

    2014-06-01

    During the Jefferson Labaratory E06-101 (g14) experiment \\cite{g14} utilizing photons on solid HD and performed in Hall B, two opportunities arose for targets to be subjected to multi-GeV electron beams in week-long campaigns of dose accumulation and NMR polarization measurements. This was in preparation for conditionally approved electron experiments after the 12 GeV JLab upgrade\\cite{trans}. Besides the important thermal effects, evidence consistent with screening of the NMR and with decay of the target polarization was observed during bombardment and for a time afterwards. The solid hydrogens have been the subject of previous radiation damage studies, both for possible polarized DT fusion\\cite{Forrest97} and for production of dynamically polarized nuclear targets\\cite{Radtke04}. We synthesize all this information into an overall picture that can guide on-going development of the HDice target system for future use.

  20. PROGRESS ON THE INTERACTION REGION DESIGN AND DETECTOR INTEGRATION AT JLAB'S MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy; Brindza, Paul; Camsonne, Alexandre; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Ent, Rolf; Gaskell, David; Lin, Fanglei; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Ungaro, Maurizio; Zhang, Yuhong; Hyde, Charles; Park, Kijun; Sullivan, Michael; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2014-07-01

    One of the unique features of JLab's Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) is a full-acceptance detector with a dedicated, small-angle, high-resolution detection system, capable of covering a wide range of momenta (and charge-to-mass ratios) with respect to the original ion beam to enable access to new physics. We present an interaction region design developed with close integration of the detection and beam dynamical aspects. The dynamical aspect of the design rests on a symmetry-based concept for compensation of non-linear effects. The optics and geometry have been optimized to accommodate the detection requirements and to ensure the interaction region's modularity for ease of integration into the collider ring lattices. As a result, the design offers an excellent detector performance combined with the necessary provisions for non-linear dynamical optimization.

  1. Electroweak Measurements of Neutron Densities in CREX and PREX at JLab, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Charles J.; Kumar, Krishna S.; Michaels, Robert W.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of the parity-violating electron scattering asymmetry is an established technique at Jefferson Lab and provides a new opportunity to measure the weak charge distribution and hence pin down the neutron radius in nuclei in a relatively clean and model-independent way. This is because the Z boson of the weak interaction couples primarily to neutrons. We will describe the PREX and CREX experiments on ${}^{208}$Pb and ${}^{48}$Ca respectively; these are both doubly-magic nuclei whose first excited state can be discriminated by the high resolution spectrometers at JLab. The heavier lead nucleus, with a neutron excess, provides an interpretation of the neutron skin thickness in terms of properties of bulk neutron matter. For the lighter ${}^{48}$Ca nucleus, which is also rich in neutrons, microscopic nuclear theory calculations are feasible and are sensitive to poorly constrained 3-neutron forces.

  2. Overview of accelerators in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Accelerators used for medicine include synchrotrons, cyclotrons, betatrons, microtrons, and electron, proton, and light ion linacs. Some accelerators which were formerly found only at physics laboratories are now being considered for use in hospital-based treatment and diagnostic facilities. This paper presents typical operating parameters for medical accelerators and gives specific examples of clinical applications for each type of accelerator, with emphasis on recent developments in the field.

  3. Use of a wire scanner for monitoring residual gas ionization in Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility 20 keV∕u proton∕deuteron low energy beam transport beam line.

    PubMed

    Vainas, B; Eliyahu, I; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D

    2012-02-01

    The ion source end of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility accelerator consists of a proton∕deuteron ECR ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) beam line. An observed reduction of the radio frequency quadrupole transmission with increase of the LEBT current prompted additional study of the LEBT beam properties. Numerous measurements have been made with the LEBT bream profiler wire biased by a variable voltage. Current-voltage characteristics in presence of the proton beam were measured even when the wire was far out of the beam. The current-voltage characteristic in this case strongly resembles an asymmetric diodelike characteristic, which is typical of Langmuir probes monitoring plasma. The measurement of biased wire currents, outside the beam, enables us to estimate the effective charge density in vacuum. PMID:22380317

  4. Longitudinal laser ion acceleration in low density targets: experimental optimization on the Titan laser facility and numerical investigation of the ultra-high intensity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Humières, E.; Chen, S.; Lobet, Mathieu; Sciscio, M.; Antici, Patrizio; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Gangolf, Thomas; Revet, Guilhem; Santos, Joao J.; Schroer, Anna-Marie; Willi, O.; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.; Pepin, Henri; Fuchs, Julien

    2015-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest the possibility of enhancing the efficiency and ease of laser acceleration of protons and ions using underdense or near critical plasmas through electrostatic shocks. Very promising results were recently obtained in this regime. In these experiments, a first ns pulse was focused on a thin target to explode it and a second laser with a high intensity was focused on the exploded foil. The delay between two lasers allowed to control the density gradient seen by the second laser pulse. The transition between various laser ion acceleration regimes depending on the density gradient length was studied. With a laser energy of a few Joules, protons with energies close to the energies of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained for various exploded foils configurations. In the high energy regime (~180 J), protons with energies significantly higher than the ones of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained when exploding the foil while keeping a good beam quality. These results demonstrate that low-density targets are promising candidates for an efficient proton source that can be optimized by choosing appropriate plasma conditions. New experiments were also performed in this regime with gas jets. Scaling shock acceleration in the low density regime to ultra high intensities is a challenge as radiation losses and electron positron pair production change the optimization of the shock process. Using large-scale Particle-In-Cell simulations, the transition to this regime in which intense beams of relativistic ions can be produced is investigated.

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  7. CEBAF accelerator achievements

    SciTech Connect

    Y.C. Chao, M. Drury, C. Hovater, A. Hutton, G.A. Krafft, M. Poelker, C. Reece, M. Tiefenback

    2011-06-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  8. UCLA accelerator research & development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report discusses work on advanced accelerators and beam dynamics at ANL, BNL, SLAC, UCLA and Pulse Sciences Incorporated. Discussed in this report are the following concepts: Wakefield acceleration studies; plasma lens research; high gradient rf cavities and beam dynamics studies at the Brookhaven accelerator test facility; rf pulse compression development; and buncher systems for high gradient accelerator and relativistic klystron applications.

  9. Review of ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.

    1990-06-01

    The field of ion acceleration to higher energies has grown rapidly in the last years. Many new facilities as well as substantial upgrades of existing facilities have extended the mass and energy range of available beams. Perhaps more significant for the long-term development of the field has been the expansion in the applications of these beams, and the building of facilities dedicated to areas outside of nuclear physics. This review will cover many of these new developments. Emphasis will be placed on accelerators with final energies above 50 MeV/amu. Facilities such as superconducting cyclotrons and storage rings are adequately covered in other review papers, and so will not be covered here.

  10. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Møller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2010-11-01

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete NLO set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating e- e- --> e- e- (gamma) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultra-precise Moller experiment coming soon at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. We also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  11. Exotic Effects at the Charm Threshold and Other Novel Physics Topics at JLab-12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-05-03

    I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics topics which can be investigated with the 12 GeV upgrade at J-Lab. The topics include new the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances accessible above the charm threshold, intrinsic charm and strangeness phenomena, the exclusive Sivers effect, hidden-color Fock states of nuclei, local two-photon interactions in deeply virtual Compton scattering, and non-universal antishadowing.

  12. Q0 Improvement of Large-Grain Multi-Cell Cavities by Using JLab's Standard ILC EP Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, R. L.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Liu, K. X.; Lu, X. Y.; Zhao, K.

    2011-07-01

    As reported previously at the Berlin workshop, applying the JLab standard ILC electropolishing (EP) recipe on previously buffered chemical polishing (BCP) etched fine-grain multi-cell cavities results in improvement both in gradient and Q{sub 0}. We recently had the opportunity to experiment with two 1300 MHz 9-cell large-gain niobium cavities manufactured by JLab and Peking University. Both cavities were initially BCP etched and further processed by using JLab's standard ILC EP recipe. Due to fabrication defects, these two cavities only reached a gradient in the range of 20-30 MV/m. Interestingly both cavities demonstrated significant Q{sub 0} improvement in the gradient range of 15-20 MV/m. At 2K, a Q{sub 0} value of 2E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. At a reduced temperature of 1.8K, a Q{sub 0} value of 3E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. These results suggest that a possible path for obtaining higher Q{sub 0} in the medium gradient range is to use the large-grain material for cavity fabrication and EP and low temperature bake for cavity processing.

  13. Science Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Polarized Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Abeyratne, S; Ahmed, S; Barber, D; Bisognano, J; Bogacz, A; Castilla, A; Chevtsov, P; Corneliussen, S; Deconinck, W; Degtiarenko, P; Delayen, J; Derbenev, Ya; DeSilva, S; Douglas, D; Dudnikov, V; Ent, R; Erdelyi, B; Evtushenko, P; Fujii, Yu; Filatov, Yury; Gaskell, D; Geng, R; Guzey, V; Horn, T; Hutton, A; Hyde, C; Johnson, R; Kim, Y; Klein, F; Kondratenko, A; Kondratenko, M; Krafft, G; Li, R; Lin, F; Manikonda, S; Marhauser, F; McKeown, R; Morozov, V; Dadel-Turonski, P; Nissen, E; Ostroumov, P; Pivi, M; Pilat, F; Poelker, M; Prokudin, A; Rimmer, R; Satogata, T; Sayed, H; Spata, M; Sullivan, M; Tennant, C; Terzic, B; Tiefenback, M; Wang, M; Wang, S; Weiss, C; Yunn, B; Zhang, Y

    2012-08-01

    Researchers have envisioned an electron-ion collider with ion species up to heavy ions, high polarization of electrons and light ions, and a well-matched center-of-mass energy range as an ideal gluon microscope to explore new frontiers of nuclear science. In its most recent Long Range Plan, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation endorsed such a collider in the form of a 'half-recommendation.' As a response to this science need, Jefferson Lab and its user community have been engaged in feasibility studies of a medium energy polarized electron-ion collider (MEIC), cost-effectively utilizing Jefferson Lab's already existing Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). In close collaboration, this community of nuclear physicists and accelerator scientists has rigorously explored the science case and design concept for this envisioned grand instrument of science. An electron-ion collider embodies the vision of reaching the next frontier in Quantum Chromodynamics - understanding the behavior of hadrons as complex bound states of quarks and gluons. Whereas the 12 GeV Upgrade of CEBAF will map the valence-quark components of the nucleon and nuclear wave functions in detail, an electron-ion collider will determine the largely unknown role sea quarks play and for the first time study the glue that binds all atomic nuclei. The MEIC will allow nuclear scientists to map the spin and spatial structure of quarks and gluons in nucleons, to discover the collective effects of gluons in nuclei, and to understand the emergence of hadrons from quarks and gluons. The proposed electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab will collide a highly polarized electron beam originating from the CEBAF recirculating superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) with highly polarized light-ion beams or unpolarized light- to heavy-ion beams from a new ion accelerator and storage complex. Since the very

  14. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander J. Iwan D. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involves using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, ID models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The latter are to be conducted during the MEPHISTO experiment scheduled for USMP-3 in early 1996. The models will be used to predict the response of the transport conditions and consequent solute segregation in directionally solidifying tin-bismuth melt. Real-time Seebeck voltage variations across a Sn-Bi melt during directional solidification in MEPHISTO on USMP-1 show a distinct variation which can be correlated with thruster firings. The Seebeck voltage measurement is related to the response of the instantaneous average melt composition at the melt-solid interface. This allows a direct comparison of numerical simulations with the Seebeck signals obtained on USMP-1. The effects of such accelerations on composition for a directionally solidifying Sn-Bi alloy have been simulated numerically. USMP-1 acceleration data was used to assist in our choice of acceleration magnitude and orientation. The results show good agreement with experimental observations. The USMP-3 experiments took place earlier this year (February 22 through March 6). There were several differences between the USMP-3 experiments as compared to USMP-1. Firstly a more concentrated alloy was solidified and, secondly, Primary Reaction Control System thruster burns were requested at particular times during four separate growth runs. This allowed us to monitor the response Seebeck response under well-characterized growth conditions. In addition, we carried out simulations during the experiment in order to interpret the Seebeck signal. Preliminary results are described here.

  15. Liquid Methane Conditioning Capabilities Developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Small Multi- Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) for Accelerated Lunar Surface Storage Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamberger, Helmut H.; Robinson, R. Craig; Jurns, John M.; Grasl, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Glenn Research Center s Creek Road Cryogenic Complex, Small Multi-Purpose Research Facility (SMiRF) recently completed validation / checkout testing of a new liquid methane delivery system and liquid methane (LCH4) conditioning system. Facility checkout validation was conducted in preparation for a series of passive thermal control technology tests planned at SMiRF in FY10 using a flight-like propellant tank at simulated thermal environments from 140 to 350K. These tests will validate models and provide high quality data to support consideration of LCH4/LO2 propellant combination option for a lunar or planetary ascent stage.An infrastructure has been put in place which will support testing of large amounts of liquid methane at SMiRF. Extensive modifications were made to the test facility s existing liquid hydrogen system for compatibility with liquid methane. Also, a new liquid methane fluid conditioning system will enable liquid methane to be quickly densified (sub-cooled below normal boiling point) and to be quickly reheated to saturation conditions between 92 and 140 K. Fluid temperatures can be quickly adjusted to compress the overall test duration. A detailed trade study was conducted to determine an appropriate technique to liquid conditioning with regard to the SMiRF facility s existing infrastructure. In addition, a completely new roadable dewar has been procured for transportation and temporary storage of liquid methane. A new spherical, flight-representative tank has also been fabricated for integration into the vacuum chamber at SMiRF. The addition of this system to SMiRF marks the first time a large-scale liquid methane propellant test capability has been realized at Glenn.This work supports the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project being conducted under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, providing focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts to support NASA s future robotic or human exploration missions.

  16. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  17. JLab High-Current CW Cryomodules for ERL and FEL Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Richard Bundy; Guangfeng Cheng; Gianluigi Ciovati; Edward Daly; Richard Getz; William Hicks; James Henry; Peter Kneisel; Stephen Manning; Robert Manus; Karl Smith; Mircea Stirbet; Larry Turlington; Lynn Vogel; Haipeng Wang; Katherine Wilson; Frank

    2007-06-25

    We describe the activities underway at JLab to develop new CW cryomodules capable of transporting up to Ampere-levels of beam currents for use in ERLs and FELs. Goals include an efficient cell shape, high packing factor for efficient real-estate gradient and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping and ancillary components are optimized for this application. Designs are being developed for low-frequency (750 MHz), Ampere-class compact FELs and for high-frequency (1.5 GHz), 100 mA configurations. These designs and concepts can easily be scaled to other frequencies. We present the results of conceptual design studies, simulations and prototype measurements. These modules are being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as high energy light sources, electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.

  18. Commissioning of helium refrigeration system at JLab for 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system added to the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) for the 12 GeV upgrade will double its previous capacity. It includes a 4.5 K cold box system and compressor system with associated oil removal and gas management systems. At its maximum capacity condition, this new system supports an additional 238 g/s 30 K 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW 35–55 K shield load. Five more design conditions, ranging from liquefaction to refrigeration and a stand-by/reduced load state, were specified for the sizing and selection of its components. The cold box system is comprised of a 300–60 K vertical cold box that incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and a 60–4.5 K horizontal cold box housing seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review the salient 4.5 K system design features and discuss the recent commissioning results.

  19. Non-invasive Energy Spread monitoring for the JLAB Experimental Program Via SLI's

    SciTech Connect

    Arne Freyberger

    2005-03-19

    The hypernuclear physics program at Jefferson Lab [JLAB] requires a tight upper limit on the RMS beam energy spread of sigmaE over E < 3 x 10{sup -5}. The energy spread is determined by measuring the beam width at a dispersive location (D {approx} 4 m) in the transport line to the experimental halls. Ignoring the intrinsic beam size, this low energy spread corresponds to an upper bound on the beam width of sigma{sub beam} < 120 mu-m. Such small beam sizes cannot be measured using direct imaging of the synchrotron light due to diffraction limitations. Using interferometry of the synchrotron light the resolution of the optical system can be made very high. The non-invasive nature of this measurement is also very advantageous as it allows continuous energy spread monitoring. Two synchrotron light interferometers have been built and installed at Jefferson Lab, one each in the Hall-A and Hall-C transport lines. The two devices operate over a beam current range from 10 to 120 mu-A and have a spatial resolution better than 10 mu-m. The structure of the interferometer, the experience gained during its installation, beam measurements and energy spread stability are presented.

  20. HIGH POWER TEST OF RF SEPARATOR FOR 12 GEV UPGRADE OF CEBAF AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, M. Wissmann, J. Mammosser, C. Hovater, M. Spata, G. Krafft, J. Delayen

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF at JLab is in the process of an energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The existing setup of the RF separator cavities in the 5th pass will not be adequate to extract the highest energy (11 GeV) beam to any two existing halls (A, B or C) while simultaneously delivering to the new hall D in the case of the proposed 12 GeV upgrade of the machine. To restore this capability, we are exploring the possibility of extension of existing normal conducting 499 MHz TEM-type rf separator cavities. Detailed numerical studies suggest that six 2-cell normal conducting structures meet the requirements; each 2-cell structure will require up to 4 kW RF input power in contrast with the current nominal operating power of 1.0 to 2.0 kW. A high power test of 4 kW confirms that the cavity meet the requirement.

  1. Bunch Length Measurements at the JLab FEL Using Coherent Transition and Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, P.; Coleman, J.; Jordan, K.; Klopf, J. Michael; Neil, G.; Williams, G. P.

    2006-11-01

    The JLab FEL is routinely operated with sub-picosecond bunches. The short bunch length is important for high gain of the FEL. Coherent transition radiation has been used for the bunch length measurements for many years. This diagnostic can be used only in the pulsed beam mode. It is our goal to run the FEL with CW beam and a 74.85 MHz micropulse repetition rate, which, with the 135 pC nominal bunch charge corresponds to the beam average current of 10 mA, Hence it is very desirable to have the possibility of making bunch length measurements when running CW beam with any micropulse frequency. We use a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interferometer, which is essentially a Michelson interferometer, to measure the spectrum of the coherent synchrotron radiation generated in the last dipole of the magnetic bunch compressor upstream of the FEL wiggler. This noninvasive diagnostic provides bunch length measurements for CW beam operation at any micropulse frequency. We also compare the measurements made with the help of the FTIR interferometer with data obtained using the Martin-Puplett interferometer. Results of the two diagnostics agree within 15 %. Here we present a description of the experimental setup, data evaluation procedure and results of the beam measurements.

  2. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2007-03-19

    The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.

  3. A Test Facility for MEIC ERL Circulator Ring Based Electron Cooler Design

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Douglas, David R.; Hutton, Andrew M.; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Nissen, Edward W.

    2013-05-01

    An electron cooling facility which is capable to deliver a beam with energy up to 55 MeV and average current up to 1.5 A at a high bunch repetition rate up to 750 MHz is required for MEIC. The present cooler design concept is based on a magnetized photo-cathode SRF gun, an SRF ERL and a compact circulator ring. In this paper, we present a proposal of a test facility utilizing the JLab FEL ERL for a technology demonstration of this cooler design concept. Beam studies will be performed and supporting technologies will also be developed in this test facility.

  4. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  5. Development and testing of a deuterium gas target assembly for neutron production via the H-2(d,n)He-3 reaction at a low-energy accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Feautrier, D.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a deuterium gas target intended for use at a low-energy accelerator facility to produce neutrons for basic research and various nuclear applications. The principle source reaction is H-2(d,n)He-3. It produces a nearly mono-energetic group of neutrons. However, a lower-energy continuum neutron spectrum is produced by the H-2(d;n,p)H-2 reaction and also by deuterons which strike various components in the target assembly. The present target is designed to achieve the following objectives: (1) minimize unwanted background neutron production from the target assembly, (2) provide a relatively low level of residual long-term activity within the target components, (3) have the capacity to dissipate up to 150 watts of beam power with good target longevity, and (4) possess a relatively modest target mass in order to minimize neutron scattering from the target components. The basic physical principles that have to be considered in designing an accelerator target are discussed and the major engineering features of this particular target design are outlined. The results of initial performance tests on this target are documented and some conclusions concerning the viability of the target design are presented.

  6. Timelike Compton Scattering off the nucleon: observables and experimental perspectives for JLab at 12 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boër, Marie

    2016-03-01

    Hard exclusive processes such as photoproduction or electroproduction of photon or meson off the nucleon provide access to the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), in the regime where the scattering amplitude is factorized into a hard and a soft part. GPDs contain the correlation between the longitudinal momentum fraction and the transverse spatial densities of quarks and gluons in the nucleon. Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS) correspond to the reaction γN → γ*N → e+e-N, where the photon is scattered off a quark. It is measured through its interference with the associated Bethe-Heitler process, which has the same final state. TCS allows to access the GPDs and test their universality by comparison to the results obtained with the DVCS process (eN → eγN). Also, results obtained with TCS provide additional independent constrains to the GPDs parameterization. We will present the physical motivations for TCS, with our theoretical predictions for TCS observables and their dependencies. We calculated for JLab 12 GeV energies all the single and double beam and/or target polarization observables off the proton and off the neutron. We will also present the experimental perspectives for the next years at JLab. Two proposals were already accepted at JLab: in Hall B, with the CLAS12 spectrometer, in order to measure the unpolarized cross section and in Hall A, with the SoLID spectrometer, in order to measure the unpolarized cross section and the beam spin asymmetry at high intensity. A Letter Of Intent was also submitted in order to measure the transverse target spin asymmetries in Hall C. We will discuss the merits of this different experiments and present some of the expected results.

  7. Proposal for the study of thermophysical properties of high-energy-density matter using current and future heavy-ion accelerator facilities at GSI Darmstadt.

    PubMed

    Tahir, N A; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E; Gryaznov, V; Hoffmann, D H H; Kulish, M; Lomonosov, I V; Mintsev, V; Ni, P; Nikolaev, D; Piriz, A R; Shilkin, N; Spiller, P; Shutov, A; Temporal, M; Ternovoi, V; Udrea, S; Varentsov, D

    2005-07-15

    The subject of high-energy-density (HED) states in matter is of considerable importance to numerous branches of basic as well as applied physics. Intense heavy-ion beams are an excellent tool to create large samples of HED matter in the laboratory with fairly uniform physical conditions. Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, is a unique worldwide laboratory that has a heavy-ion synchrotron, SIS18, that delivers intense beams of energetic heavy ions. Construction of a much more powerful synchrotron, SIS100, at the future international facility for antiprotons and ion research (FAIR) at Darmstadt will lead to an increase in beam intensity by 3 orders of magnitude compared to what is currently available. The purpose of this Letter is to investigate with the help of two-dimensional numerical simulations, the potential of the FAIR to carry out research in the field of HED states in matter. PMID:16090748

  8. Development of Advanced Beam Halo Diagnostics at the Jefferson Lab Free-Electron-Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang, Stephen Benson, Dave Douglas, Frederick Wilson, Hao Zhang, Anatoly Shkvarunets, Ralph Fiorito

    2011-03-01

    High average current and high brightness electron beams are needed for many applications. At the Jefferson Lab FEL facility, the search for dark matter with the FEL laser beam has produced some interesting results, and a second very promising experiment called DarkLight, using the JLab Energy-recovery-linac (ERL) machine has been put forward. Although the required beam current has been achieved on this machine, one key challenge is the management of beam halo. At the University of Md. (UMD) we have demonstrated a high dynamic range halo measurement method using a digital micro-mirror array device (DMD). A similar system has been established at the JLab FEL facility as a joint effort by UMD and JLab to measure the beam halo on the high current ERL machine. Preliminary experiments to characterize the halo were performed on the new UV FEL. In this paper, the limitations of the present system will be analyzed and a discussion of other approaches (such as an optimized coronagraph) for further extending the dynamic range will be presented. We will also discuss the possibility of performing both longitudinal and transverse (3D) halo measurements together on a single system.

  9. Suppression of Multipass, Multibunch Beam Breakup in Two Pass Recirculating Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Tennant; David Douglas; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; Edvard Pozdeyev; Todd Smith

    2004-08-01

    Beam Breakup (BBU) occurs in all accelerators at sufficiently high currents. In recirculating accelerators, such as the energy recovery linacs used for high power FELs, the maximum current has historically been limited by multipass, multibunch BBU, a form that occurs when the electron beam interacts with the higher-order modes (HOMs) of an accelerating cavity on one pass and then again on the second pass. This effect is of particular concern in the designs of modern high average current energy recovery accelerators utilizing superconducting technology. In such two pass machines rotation of the betatron planes by 90a, first proposed by Smith and Rand in 1980 [1], should significantly increase the threshold current of the multibunch BBU. Using a newly developed two-dimensional tracking code, we study the effect of optical suppression techniques on the threshold current of the JLAB FEL Upgrade. We examine several optical rotator schemes and evaluate their performance in terms of the instability threshold current increase.

  10. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2010-11-19

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete NLO set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating e e → e e (γ) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultra-precise Moller experiment coming soon at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. In addition, we also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  11. Electroweak radiative corrections for polarized Moller scattering at the future 11 GeV JLab experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs; Barkanova, Svetlana; Ilyichev, Alexander; Zykunov, Vladimir

    2010-11-19

    We perform updated and detailed calculations of the complete NLO set of electroweak radiative corrections to parity violating e– e– → e– e– (γ) scattering asymmetries at energies relevant for the ultra-precise Moller experiment coming soon at JLab. Our numerical results are presented for a range of experimental cuts and relative importance of various contributions is analyzed. In addition, we also provide very compact expressions analytically free from non-physical parameters and show them to be valid for fast yet accurate estimations.

  12. Interfacing to accelerator instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    As the sensory system for an accelerator, the beam instrumentation provides a tremendous amount of diagnostic information. Access to this information can vary from periodic spot checks by operators to high bandwidth data acquisition during studies. In this paper, example applications will illustrate the requirements on interfaces between the control system and the instrumentation hardware. A survey of the major accelerator facilities will identify the most popular interface standards. The impact of developments such as isochronous protocols and embedded digital signal processing will also be discussed.

  13. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  14. Overview of SNS accelerator shielding analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, I.; Gallmeier, F. X.; Ferguson, P.; Iverson, E.; Lu, W.

    2012-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source is an accelerator driven neutron scattering facility for materials research. During all phases of SNS development, including design, construction, commissioning and operation, extensive neutronics work was performed in order to provide adequate shielding, to assure safe facility operation from radiation protection point of view, and to optimize performance of the accelerator and target facility. Presently, most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, safe operation and adequate radiation background in the future. Although the accelerator is built and in operation mode, there is extensive demand for shielding and activation analyses. It includes redesigning some parts of the facility, facility upgrades, designing additional structures, storage and transport containers for accelerator structures taken out of service, and performing radiation protection analyses and studies on residual dose rates inside the accelerator. (authors)

  15. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thiessen, H.A.

    1987-12-01

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  16. Above scaling short-pulse ion acceleration from flat foil and ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, Kirk; Hegelich, B. Manuel; Cort Gautier, D.; Johnson, J. Randy; Kline, John L.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernández, Juan C.; Gaillard, Sandrine; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Cowan, Thomas E.; Malekos, Steve; Korgan, Grant

    2006-10-01

    Ion-driven Fast Ignition (IFI) has certain advantages over electron-driven FI due to a possible large reduction in the amount of energy required. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility have yielded ion energies and efficiencies many times in excess of recent published scaling laws, leading to even more potential advantages of IFI. Proton energies in excess of 35 MeV have been observed from targets produced by the University of Nevada, Reno - dubbed ``Pizza-top Cone'' targets - at intensities of only 1x10^19 W/cm^2 with 20 joules in 600 fs. Energies in excess of 24 MeV were observed from simple flat foil targets as well. The observed energies, above any published scaling laws, are attributed to target production, preparation, and shot to shot monitoring of many laser parameters, especially the laser ASE prepulse level and laser pulse duration. The laser parameters are monitored in real-time to keep the laser in optimal condition throughout the run providing high quality, reproducible shots.

  17. Studies of thermophysical properties of high-energy-density states in matter using intense heavy ion beams at the future FAIR accelerator facilities: The HEDgeHOB collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Shutov, A.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Gryaznov, V.; Deutsch, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Ni, P.; Piriz, A. R.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.; Wouchuk, G.

    2006-06-01

    Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are believed to be a very efficient and novel tool to create states of High-Energy-Density (HED) in matter. This paper shows with the help of numerical simulations that the heavy ion beams that will be generated at the future Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR)[W.F. Henning, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B 214, 211 (2004)] will allow one to use two different experimental schemes to study HED states in matter. First scheme named HIHEX (Heavy Ion Heating and EXpansion), will generate high-pressure, high-entropy states in matter by volumetric isochoric heating. The heated material will then be allowed to expand isentropically. Using this scheme, it will be possible to study important regions of the phase diagram that are either difficult to access or are even unaccessible using traditional methods of shock compression. The second scheme would allow one to achieve low-entropy compression of a sample material like hydrogen or water to produce conditions that are believed to exist in the interiors of the giant planets. This scheme is named LAPLAS (LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences).

  18. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  19. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. ); Gluckstern, R. ); Ko, K.; Kroll, N. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Ce

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  20. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  1. Longitudinal Space Charge Effects in the JLAB IR FEL SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Beard; C. Behre; S. Benson; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; D. Douglas; H. F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; K. Jordan; L. Merminga; G. Neil; J. Preble; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; G. P. Williams; B. Yunn; S. Zhang

    2004-09-01

    Observations of energy spread asymmetry when operating the Linac on either side of crest and longitudinal emittance growth have been confirmed by extending PARMELA simulations from the injector to the end of the first SRF Linac module. The asymmetry can be explained by the interaction of the accelerating electric field with that from longitudinal space charge effects within the electron bunch. This can be a major limitation to performance in FEL accelerators.

  2. Elliptical Cavity Shape Optimization for Acceleration and HOM Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang; Robert Rimmer; Genfa Wu

    2005-05-01

    We report a survey of center cell shapes developed for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) multi-cell cavities for different projects. Using a set of normalized parameters, we compare the designs for different frequencies and particle velocities for the fundamental mode. Using dispersion curves of High Order Modes (HOM) (frequency verse phase advance) calculated by MAFIA for a single cell, we further optimize the cavity shape to avoid a light cone line crossing at the dangerous resonance frequencies determined by the beam bunch structure and eliminate the trapped (or high R/Q) modes with a low group velocity. We developed this formulation to optimize a 5-cell, 750MHz cavity shape, with good real-estate accelerating gradient and a strong HOM damping waveguide structure for the JLab 1MW ERL-FEL project.

  3. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  4. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  5. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  6. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  7. Charge Lifetime Study of K2CsSb Photocathode Inside a JLAB DC High Voltage Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Mammei, R.; Rao, T.; Suleiman, R.; Poelker, M.; Smedley, J.; McCarter, J.L.

    2011-10-01

    Two photocathodes are frequently considered for generating high average current electron beams and/or beams with high brightness for current and future accelerator applications: GaAs:Cs and K2CsSb. Each photocathode has advantages and disadvantages, and need to demonstrate performance at 'production' accelerator facilities. To this end a K2CsSb photocathode was manufactured at Brookhaven National Lab and delivered to Jefferson Lab within a compact vacuum apparatus at pressure {approx} 5 x 10{sup -11} Torr. This photocathode was installed inside a dc high voltage photogun biased at voltages up to 200 kV, and illuminated with laser light at 440 or 532 nm, to generate beams up to 20 mA. Photocathode charge lifetime measurements indicate that under some conditions this cathode has exceptionally high charge lifetime, without measurable QE decay, even from the center of the photocathode where operation using GaAs photocathodes is precluded due to ion bombardment. These studies also suggest a complex QE decay mechanism likely related to chemistry and localized heating via the laser beam.

  8. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well as the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).

  9. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12 GeV program at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) for the Proton Polarimeter Back Tracker (BT) of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS BT GEM trackers consist of two sets of five large GEM chambers of size 60×200 cm2. The GEM chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules, each with an active area of 60×50 cm2. We have built and tested several prototypes and the construction of GEM modules for SBS BT is ongoing. We describe in this paper the design and construction of the GEM module prototype as well as the preliminary results on performance from tests carried out in our detector lab and during test beam at Fermi National Laboratory (Fermilab).

  10. FLEXIBLE APPLICATION OF THE JLAB PANSOPHY INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR PROJECT REPORTS, PROCESS MONITORING, AND R&D SAMPLE TRACKING

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie Bookwalter; Bonnie Madre; Charles Reece

    2008-02-12

    The use and features of the JLab SRF Institute IT system Pansophy1,2 continue to expand. In support of the cryomodule rework project for CEBAF a full set of web-based travelers has been implemented and an integrated set of live summary reports has been created. A graphical user interface within the reports enables navigation to either higher-level summaries or drill-down to the original source data. In addition to collection of episodic data, Pansophy is now used to capture, coordinate, and display continuously logged process parameter that relate to technical water systems and clean room environmental conditions. In a new expansion, Pansophy is being used to collect and track process and analytical data sets associated with SRF material samples that are part of the surface creation, processing, and characterization R&D program.

  11. Large size GEM for Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) polarimeter for Hall A 12GeV program at JLab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gnanvo, Kondo; Liyanage, Nilanga; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Sacher, Seth; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    We report on the R&D effort in the design and construction of a large size GEM chamber for the Proton Polarimeter of the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS) in Hall A at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab). The SBS Polarimeter trackers consist of two sets of four large chambers of size 200 cm x 60 cm2. Each chamber is a vertical stack of four GEM modules with an active area of 60 cm x 50 cm. We have built and tested several GEM modules and we describe in this paper the design and construction of the final GEM as well asmore » the preliminary results on performances from tests carried out in our detector lab and with test beams at (Fermilab).« less

  12. The ISAC post-accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Marchetto, M.

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration chain of the ISAC facility boosts the energy of both radioactive and stable light and heavy ions for beam delivery to both a medium energy area in ISAC-I and a high energy area in ISAC-II. The post-accelerator comprises a 35.4 MHz RFQ to accelerate beams of A/q ≤ 30 from 2 keV/u to 150 keV/u and a post stripper, 106.1 MHz variable energy drift tube linac (DTL) to accelerate ions of A/q ≤ 6 to a final energy between 0.15 MeV/u to 1.5 MeV/u. A 40 MV superconducting linac further accelerates beam from 1.5 MeV/u to energies above the Coulomb barrier. All linacs operate cw to preserve beam intensity.

  13. Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Uesugi, T.; Wildnerc, E.

    2010-03-01

    The Accelerator Physics Working Group addressed the worldwide R&D activities performed in support of future neutrino facilities. These studies cover R&D activities for Super Beam, Beta Beam and muon-based Neutrino Factory facilities. Beta Beam activities reported the important progress made, together with the research activity planned for the coming years. Discussion sessions were also organized jointly with other working groups in order to define common ground for the optimization of a future neutrino facility. Lessons learned from already operating neutrino facilities provide key information for the design of any future neutrino facility, and were also discussed in this meeting. Radiation damage, remote handling for equipment maintenance and exchange, and primary proton beam stability and monitoring were among the important subjects presented and discussed. Status reports for each of the facility subsystems were presented: proton drivers, targets, capture systems, and muon cooling and acceleration systems. The preferred scenario for each type of possible future facility was presented, together with the challenges and remaining issues. The baseline specification for the muon-based Neutrino Factory was reviewed and updated where required. This report will emphasize new results and ideas and discuss possible changes in the baseline scenarios of the facilities. A list of possible future steps is proposed that should be followed up at NuFact10.

  14. Experimental Plans to Explore Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration in the THZ Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Elsen, E.; Flottmann, K.; Gerth, C.; Kube, G.; Schmidt, B.; Osterhoff, J.; Stoltz, P.

    2011-09-07

    Dielectric wakefield accelerators have shown great promise toward high-gradient acceleration. We investigate the performances of a possible experiment under consideration at the FLASH facility in DESY to explore wakefield acceleration with an enhanced transformer ratio. The experiment capitalizes on a unique pulse shaping capability recently demonstrated at this facility. In addition, the facility incorporates a superconducting linear accelerator that could generate bunch trains with closely spaced bunches thereby opening the exploration of potential dynamical effects in dielectric wakefield accelerators.

  15. Future HEP Accelerators: The US Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pushpalatha; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-11-02

    Accelerator technology has advanced tremendously since the introduction of accelerators in the 1930s, and particle accelerators have become indispensable instruments in high energy physics (HEP) research to probe Nature at smaller and smaller distances. At present, accelerator facilities can be classified into Energy Frontier colliders that enable direct discoveries and studies of high mass scale particles and Intensity Frontier accelerators for exploration of extremely rare processes, usually at relatively low energies. The near term strategies of the global energy frontier particle physics community are centered on fully exploiting the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), while the intensity frontier HEP research is focused on studies of neutrinos at the MW-scale beam power accelerator facilities, such as Fermilab Main Injector with the planned PIP-II SRF linac project. A number of next generation accelerator facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and long-term future programs of accelerator-based HEP research. In this paper, we briefly review the post-LHC energy frontier options, both for lepton and hadron colliders in various regions of the world, as well as possible future intensity frontier accelerator facilities.

  16. Basic concepts in plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Robert

    2006-03-15

    In this article, we present the underlying physics and the present status of high gradient and high-energy plasma accelerators. With the development of compact short pulse high-brightness lasers and electron and positron beams, new areas of studies for laser/particle beam-matter interactions is opening up. A number of methods are being pursued vigorously to achieve ultra-high-acceleration gradients. These include the plasma beat wave accelerator (PBWA) mechanism which uses conventional long pulse ( approximately 100 ps) modest intensity lasers (I approximately 10(14)-10(16) W cm(-2)), the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) which uses the new breed of compact high-brightness lasers (<1 ps) and intensities >10(18) W cm(-2), self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SMLWFA) concept which combines elements of stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) and electron acceleration by nonlinear plasma waves excited by relativistic electron and positron bunches the plasma wakefield accelerator. In the ultra-high intensity regime, laser/particle beam-plasma interactions are highly nonlinear and relativistic, leading to new phenomenon such as the plasma wakefield excitation for particle acceleration, relativistic self-focusing and guiding of laser beams, high-harmonic generation, acceleration of electrons, positrons, protons and photons. Fields greater than 1 GV cm(-1) have been generated with monoenergetic particle beams accelerated to about 100 MeV in millimetre distances recorded. Plasma wakefields driven by both electron and positron beams at the Stanford linear accelerator centre (SLAC) facility have accelerated the tail of the beams. PMID:16483948

  17. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  18. Recent Activities at Tokai Tandem Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Tetsuro

    2010-05-12

    Recent activities at the JAEA-Tokai tandem accelerator facility are presented. The terminal voltage of the tandem accelerator reached 19.1 MV by replacing acceleration tubes. The multi-charged positive-ion injector was installed in the terminal of the tandem accelerator, supplying high-current noble-gas ions. A superconducting cavity for low-velocity ions was developed. Radioactive nuclear beams of {sup 8,9}Li and fission products, produced by the tandem accelerator and separated by the ISOL, were supplied with experiment. Recent results of nuclear physics experiments are reported.

  19. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  20. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  1. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  2. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  3. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  4. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration of Positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Spencer

    2016-03-01

    Recent particle beam and laser-driven plasma wakefield experiments have produced high-quality electron beams accelerated by a GeV or more in less than a meter. Efforts are underway to put these beams to work as sources for free-electron lasers. By contrast, little work has been done to demonstrate the tractability of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) of positrons beams. The reasons for this are threefold: 1) positron beams are only useful for high-energy physics experiments, whereas electron beams are also useful as light sources, 2) there is a dearth of positron sources for PWFA experiments, and 3) the dynamics of accelerating positron beams in plasma is fundamentally different than that of electron beams. This talk will focus on the physics of accelerating positrons in plasma and contrast the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven nonlinear plasma wakes. We describe recent experiments at the FACET test facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory that for the first time demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of a positron beams in plasma. We also discuss an alternative acceleration technique called hollow channel acceleration that aims to symmetrize the dynamics of electron and positron beam-driven wakes.

  5. Vacuum Brazing of Accelerator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajvir; Pant, K. K.; Lal, Shankar; Yadav, D. P.; Garg, S. R.; Raghuvanshi, V. K.; Mundra, G.

    2012-11-01

    Commonly used materials for accelerator components are those which are vacuum compatible and thermally conductive. Stainless steel, aluminum and copper are common among them. Stainless steel is a poor heat conductor and not very common in use where good thermal conductivity is required. Aluminum and copper and their alloys meet the above requirements and are frequently used for the above purpose. The accelerator components made of aluminum and its alloys using welding process have become a common practice now a days. It is mandatory to use copper and its other grades in RF devices required for accelerators. Beam line and Front End components of the accelerators are fabricated from stainless steel and OFHC copper. Fabrication of components made of copper using welding process is very difficult and in most of the cases it is impossible. Fabrication and joining in such cases is possible using brazing process especially under vacuum and inert gas atmosphere. Several accelerator components have been vacuum brazed for Indus projects at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore using vacuum brazing facility available at RRCAT, Indore. This paper presents details regarding development of the above mentioned high value and strategic components/assemblies. It will include basics required for vacuum brazing, details of vacuum brazing facility, joint design, fixturing of the jobs, selection of filler alloys, optimization of brazing parameters so as to obtain high quality brazed joints, brief description of vacuum brazed accelerator components etc.

  6. High-resolution kaon spectrometer (HKS) for medium-heavy Mass Lambda-hypernuclear structure studies at the Jlab (E01-011 Collaboration)

    SciTech Connect

    T. Petkovic; Y. Fujii; O. Hashimoto; H. Kanda; K. Maeda; S. N. Nakamura; Y. Okayasu; T. Takahashi; H. Tamura; K. Tsukada; H. Yamaguchi; S. Kato; H. Noumi; Y. Sato; T. Motoba; O. K. Baker; M. Christy; L. Cole; P. Gueye; C. Keppel; L. Tang; A. Uzzle; L. Yuan; P. Baturin; P. Markowitz; J. Reinhold; A. Daniel; E. Hungerford; K. Lan; T. Miyoshi; V. M. Rodriguez; G. H. Xu; R. Carlini; R. Ent; H. Fenker; D. Mack; G. Smith; W. Vulcan; S. Wood; C. Yan; A. Ahmidouch; S. Danagoulian; L. Gan; A. Gasparian; D. Dehnhard; H. Juengst; N. Simicevic; S. Wells; R. Asaturyan; A. Margaryan; H. Mkrtchyan; S. Stepanyan; V. Tadevosyan; D. Androic; I. Bertovic; M. Furic; M. Planinic; T. Seva; T. Angelescu; V. P. Likhachev

    2005-05-01

    An experimental technique for single-Lambda spectroscopy of the light and medium-heavy mass Lambda-hypernuclei developed at the Jlab by the E01-011 Collaboration has been described. The technique is based on the electroproduction of Lambda-hypernuclei by the (e,eK+) reaction and newly constructed 2nd generation high resolution large solid angle kaon spectrometer (HKS).

  7. 25 MV tandem accelerator at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    A new heavy-ion accelerator facility is under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A brief description of the scope and status of this project is presented with emphasis on the first operational experience with the 25 MV tandem accelerator.

  8. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  9. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: A Next-Generation Spallation-Neutron Source; Accelerator Performance Demonstration Facility; APEX Free-Electron Laser Project; The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) Program; Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Linac Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operation.

  10. Future Research Program at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2007-09-06

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  11. Future Spin Physics at JLab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2006-10-02

    The project to upgrade the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV is presented. Most of the research program supporting that upgrade, will require a highly polarized beam, as will be illustrated by a few selected examples. To carry out that research program will require an extensively upgraded instrumentation in two of the existing experimental halls and the addition of a fourth hall. The plans for a high-luminosity electron-ion collider are briefly discussed.

  12. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  13. Linear accelerator for tritium production

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, R.W.; Billen, J.H.; Chan, K.C.; Genzlinger, R.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Rusnak, B.; Schrage, D.L.; Stovall, J.E.; Takeda, H.; Wood, R.; Wangler, T.P.; Young, L.M.

    1996-06-01

    For many years now, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working to develop a conceptual design of a facility for accelerator production of tritium (APT). The APT accelerator will produce high energy protons which will bombard a heavy metal target, resulting in the production of large numbers of spallation neutrons. These neutrons will be captured by a low-{ital Z} target to produce tritium. This paper describes the latest design of a room-temperature, 1.0 GeV, 100 mA, cw proton accelerator for tritium production. The potential advantages of using superconducting cavities in the high-energy section of the linac are also discussed and a comparison is made with the baseline room-temperature accelerator. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  15. Investigation of personal and fixed head oxygen deficiency hazard monitor performance for helium gas

    SciTech Connect

    D. Arenius; D. Curry; A. Hutton; K. Mahoney; S. Prior; H. Robertson

    2002-05-10

    On May 14, 2001, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) conducted a planned liquid helium release into its accelerator tunnel to study the effectiveness of the JLAB facility to vent the helium and therefore limit the oxygen deficiency hazard (ODH). During the test, it was discovered that a wide range of various oxygen deficiency monitors, of different manufacturers, were providing substantial conflicting measurements of the true oxygen level where health effects are of concern. Yet, when tested separately with nitrogen gas as the diluting gas into air, the same models performed very well. This problem, which is associated with helium displacement of air, was found for both personal oxygen monitors and fixed installation monitors from many different manufacturers. By informing other facilities of its findings, JLAB became aware this problem also exists among other national laboratories and facilities. Many manufacturers do not have data on the effects of helium displacing air for their devices. Some manufacturers have now duplicated the test results conducted at JLAB. Since both fixed installation and personal oxygen monitors have become standard safety device in many research facilities and industries in the United States and abroad, it is important that these facilities are aware of the problem and how it is being addressed at JLAB. This paper discusses the methods, procedures and materials used by JLAB to qualify its ODH sensors for helium. Data and graphs of JLAB's findings are provided.

  16. Argonne's new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne's AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  17. Accelerator Center: National symbol or white elephant?

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-02

    This article discusses the possible future of the National Accelerator Center facility in South Africa. This state of the art facility with a 200-megaelectrol-volt proton cyclotron, carries out important nuclear physics research but takes a huge part of South Africa`s total science research budget.

  18. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R.; Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. |; Castro, J.R. ||

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  19. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Vansteenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e(-) beam and the 10(exp 11) Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a approximately 1.5 percent/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power CW CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  20. Inverse free electron laser accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; Sandweiss, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1992-07-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e- beam and the 1011 Watt CO2 laser beam of BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP), and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a ≊1.5%/cm tapered period configuration. The CO2 laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO2 laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  1. Studies of semi-inclusive and hard exclusive processes at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avagyan

    2008-06-19

    The main goal of experiments proposed for the {\\tt CLAS12} detector in conjunction with the 12-GeV CEBAF accelerator is the study of the nucleon through hard exclusive, semi-inclusive, and inclusive processes. This will provide new insights into nucleon dynamics at the elementary quark and gluon level. In this contribution we provide an overview of ongoing studies of the structure of nucleon in terms of quark and gluon degrees of freedom and future physics program planned with CLAS and {\\tt CLAS12}.

  2. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  3. TRACKING ACCELERATOR SETTINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    D OTTAVIO,T.; FU, W.; OTTAVIO, D.P.

    2007-10-15

    Recording setting changes within an accelerator facility provides information that can be used to answer questions about when, why, and how changes were made to some accelerator system. This can be very useful during normal operations, but can also aid with security concerns and in detecting unusual software behavior. The Set History System (SHS) is a new client-server system developed at the Collider-Accelerator Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory to provide these capabilities. The SHS has been operational for over two years and currently stores about IOOK settings per day into a commercial database management system. The SHS system consists of a server written in Java, client tools written in both Java and C++, and a web interface for querying the database of setting changes. The design of the SHS focuses on performance, portability, and a minimal impact on database resources. In this paper, we present an overview of the system design along with benchmark results showing the performance and reliability of the SHS over the last year.

  4. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  5. Accelerating deactivation

    SciTech Connect

    FISHBACK, K.M.

    1999-02-01

    In recent years, the focus of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has shifted from defense production to facility stabilization, decommissioning, and environmental restoration. This shift from production to cleanup requires a parallel shift from operations-focused management to project-focused management for an efficient facility deactivation. In the operation-focused management organization, activities are planned and executed based on production goals and are typically repetitive and cyclic. In the project-focused management environment, activities are based on a defined scope/end objective, start date, and completion date. Since the workforce used to perform production operations is also usually relied onto perform facility deactivation, it is important to shift from an operations management approach to a project management approach. It is best if the transition is accomplished quickly so the project can move forward and workers don't spend a lot of energy anticipating change. Therefore, it is essential that managers, planners, and other workers understand the key elements associated with planning a deactivation project. This paper describes a planning approach that has been used successfully to plan deactivation projects consistent with the requirements provided in DOE Order 430.1A Life Cycle Asset Management and the companion Deactivation Implementation Guide, G430. 1A-3, while exceeding schedule expectations and reducing costs. Although the planning of a deactivation project closely mirrors the classic project planning for construction projects, there are unique variations associated with facility deactivation. The key elements of planning a deactivation project are discussed relative to scope, schedule, and cost. Management tools such as project metrics and histograms are discussed as desired outputs from the planning process. In addition, lessons learned from planning deactivation projects across the DOE complex are discussed relative to making the

  6. Acceleration Environment of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Kelly, Eric; Keller, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment on the International Space Station has been accomplished by two accelerometer systems since 2001. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System records the quasi-steady microgravity environment, including the influences of aerodynamic drag, vehicle rotation, and venting effects. Measurement of the vibratory/transient regime, comprised of vehicle, crew, and equipment disturbances, has been accomplished by the Space Acceleration Measurement System-II. Until the arrival of the Columbus Orbital Facility and the Japanese Experiment Module, the location of these sensors, and therefore, the measurement of the microgravity acceleration environment, has been limited to within the United States Laboratory. Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency has developed a vibratory acceleration measurement system called the Microgravity Measurement Apparatus which will be deployed within the Japanese Experiment Module to make distributed measurements of the Japanese Experiment Module's vibratory acceleration environment. Two Space Acceleration Measurement System sensors from the United States Laboratory will be re-deployed to support vibratory acceleration data measurement within the Columbus Orbital Facility. The additional measurement opportunities resulting from the arrival of these new laboratories allows Principal Investigators with facilities located in these International Space Station research laboratories to obtain microgravity acceleration data in support of their sensitive experiments. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project, at NASA Glenn Research Center, in Cleveland, Ohio, has supported acceleration measurement systems and the microgravity scientific community through the processing, characterization, distribution, and archival of the microgravity acceleration data obtained from the International Space Station acceleration measurement systems. This paper summarizes the PIMS capabilities available

  7. High-precision three-dimensional field mapping of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer for hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kato, Seigo; Matsui, Jumei; Sako, Katsuhisa; Brindza, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS), which consists of two quadrupole magnets and one dipole magnet, was designed and constructed for high-resolution spectroscopy of hypernuclei using the (e,e'K+) reaction in Hall C, Jefferson Lab (JLab). It was used to analyze momenta of around 1.2 GeV/c K^+ s with a resolution of 2 ×10^-4 (FWHM). To achieve the target resolution, a full three-dimensional magnetic field measurement of each magnet was successfully performed, and a full three-dimensional magnetic field map of the HKS magnets was reconstructed. Using the measured field map, the initial reconstruction function was generated. The target resolution would be achieved via careful tuning of the reconstruction function of HKS with the p(e,e'K+)Lambda,Sigma^0 and C-12 (e,e'K+)12_Lambda B_g.s. reactions. After tuning of the initial reconstruction function generated from the measured map, the estimated HKS momentum resolution was 2.2×10^-4 (FWHM).

  8. Commissioning results of Nb3Sn cavity vapor diffusion deposition system at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Clemens, William A.; Macha, Kurt M.; Park, HyeKyoung; Williams, R.

    2015-09-01

    Nb3Sn as a BCS superconductor with a superconducting critical temperature higher than that of niobium offers potential benefit for SRF cavities via a lower-than-niobium surface resistance at the same temperature and frequency. A Nb3Sn vapor diffusion deposition system designed for coating of 1.5 and 1.3 GHz single-cell cavities was built and commissioned at JLab. As the part of the commissioning, RF performance at 2.0 K of a single-cell 1.5 GHz CEBAF-shaped cavity was measured before and after coating in the system. Before Nb3Sn coating the cavity had a Q0 of about 1010 and was limited by the high field Q-slope at Eacc ≅ 27 MV/m. Coated cavity exhibited the superconducting transition at about 17.9 K. The low-field quality factor was about 5∙109 at 4.3 K and 7∙109 at 2.0 K decreasing with field to about 1∙109 at Eacc ≅ 8 MV/m at both temperatures. The highest field was limited by the available RF power.

  9. Outlook of an Improved Measurement of Parity Violation in Moeller Scattering at JLab (e2ePV)

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, David

    2008-06-01

    Jefferson Laboratory has the potential to make a dramatically improved measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering (e + e â e + e). In the context of the Standard Model, the measurement would yield the best determination of sin2  W at low energy ( sin2  W = ±0.00025), and one of the best at any energy scale. As a new physics search via the running of the weak mixing angle, the experiment would have unparalleled sensitivity to new parity-violating e ? e interactions, probing electron substructure to 29 TeV (95% CL). In terms of specific models, pulls of 6A are allowed in R-parity violating SUSY, about 5A in E6 Z2, and almost 3A in R-parity conserving SUSY. The latter makes an improved Moeller measurement complementary to searches for SUSY loop-induced Electric Dipole Moments. Interpretability limits are well below the projected experimental error. A conceptual design for a 12 GeV JLab experiment is presented.

  10. The Fair Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Beams), under construction at the GSI site in Darmstadt, Germany, will be addressing a wealth of outstanding questions within the realm of subatomic, atomic and plasma physics through a combination of novel accelerators, storage rings and innovative experimental setups. The envisaged programme of FAIR yields a breadth that is unprecedented at an accelerator-based infrastructure. A brief review of the FAIR infrastructure and scientific reach is made, together with an update of the status of the construction.

  11. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-03-26

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brix, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-10-01

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  13. Cascaded proton acceleration by collisionless electrostatic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T. J.; Shen, B. F. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Zhang, X. M. E-mail: zhxm@siom.ac.cn; Yi, L. Q.; Wang, W. P.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Shi, Y.; Liu, C.; Pei, Z. K.

    2015-07-15

    A new scheme for proton acceleration by cascaded collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is proposed. By irradiating a foil target with a moderate high-intensity laser beam, a stable CES field can be induced, which is employed as the accelerating field for the booster stage of proton acceleration. The mechanism is studied through simulations and theoretical analysis, showing that a 55 MeV seed proton beam can be further accelerated to 265 MeV while keeping a good energy spread. This scheme offers a feasible approach to produce proton beams with energy of hundreds of MeV by existing available high-intensity laser facilities.

  14. Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration experiment at ATF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Fernow, R.; Kusche, K. P.; Liu, Y.; Kimura, W. D.; Kim, G. H.; Romea, R. D.; Steinhauer, L. C.

    Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration was demonstrated using an axicon optical system at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF S-band linac and a high power 10.6 MICROMETERSCO2 laser were used for the experiment. Experimental arrangement and the laser and the electron beams synchronization are discussed. The electrons were accelerated more than 0.7 MeV for a 34 MW CO2 laser power. More than 3.7 MeV acceleration was measured with 0.7 GW CO2 laser power, which is more than 20 times of the previous ICA experiment. The experimental results are compared with computer program TRANSPORT simulations.

  15. Pulse Power Supply for Plasma Dynamic Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuanzong; Liu, Jian; Feng, Chunhua; Wang, Long

    2008-06-01

    A new concept of a coaxial plasma dynamic accelerator with a self-energized magnetic compressor coil to simulate the effects of space debris impact is demonstrated. A brief description is presented about the pulse power supply system including the charging circuit, start switch and current transfer system along with some of the key techniques for this kind of accelerator. Using this accelerator configuration, ceramic beads of 100 fim in diameter were accelerated to a speed as high as 18 km/sec. The facility can be used in a laboratory setting to study impact phenomena on solar array materials, potential structural materials for use in space.

  16. JLab Measurement of the He4 Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camsonne, A.; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, N.; Acha, A.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B. D.; Arrington, J.; Baldwin, A.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Decowski, P.; Dutta, C.; Folts, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Hahn, B.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Kelleher, A.; Khrosinkova, E.; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lee, B.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R. A.; Lott, G.; Lu, H.; Marcucci, L. E.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Meekins, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Norum, B.; Petratos, G. G.; Puckett, A.; Qian, X.; Rondon, O.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Segal, J.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R. R.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B. B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W.-M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The charge form factor of He4 has been extracted in the range 29 fm-2≤Q2≤77 fm-2 from elastic electron scattering, detecting He4 recoil nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the high resolution spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The measurements have uncovered a second diffraction minimum for the form factor, which was predicted in the Q2 range of this experiment. The data are in qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations based on realistic interactions and accurate methods to solve the few-body problem.

  17. RF System Modelling for the JLab 12 GeV Upgrade and RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Jean Delayen; J. Hovater; Stefan Simrock

    2003-10-01

    Jefferson Lab is using the MATLAB/Simulink library for RF systems developed for TTF as a tool to develop a model of its 12 GeV upgrade and the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) to study the behavior and performance of the RF control system. The library includes elements describing a superconducting cavity with mechanical modes excited by Lorentz Force effects and a klystron including saturation characteristics. It can be applied to gradient and phase or in-phase and quadrature control for cavities operating in either a self-excited loop or generator driven mode. We will provide an overview of the theory behind the library components and present initial modeling results for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade and the RIA systems.

  18. Exotic Hybrid Meson Spectroscopy with the GlueX detector at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David W.

    2014-03-01

    The GlueX experiment is scheduled to begin taking data in 2015. The goal is to discover evidence for the existence of exotic hybrid mesons and to map out their spectrum in the light quark sector. Recent theoretical developments using Lattice QCD predict exotic hybrid states in a mass range accessible using the newly upgraded 12GeV electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab. Hybrid mesons, and in particular exotic hybrid mesons, provide the ideal laboratory for testing QCD in the confinement regime since these mesons explicitly manifest the gluonic degrees of freedom. The experiment will use 9 GeV linearly polarized photons produced via coherent bremsstrahlung to produce the exotic hybrids. The decay products will be detected in the solenoid-based GlueX detector currently under construction at Jefferson Lab. The status of the GlueX experiment including detector parameters will be presented along with theoretical motivation for the experiment.

  19. The JLab 12 GeV Energy Upgrade of CEBAF for QCD and Hadronic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cardman, Lawrence; Harwood, Leigh

    2007-06-25

    CEBAF at Jefferson Lab is a 5-pass, recirculating cw electron linac operating at ~6 GeV and devoted to basic research in nuclear physics. The 12 GeV Upgrade is a major project, sponsored by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, that will expand its research capabilities substantially by doubling the maximum energy and adding major new experimental apparatus. We anticipate that the project will receive Critical Decision 2 approval this year and begin construction in 2008. The research program motivating the Upgrade includes: the study of hybrid mesons, which involve excited states of the glue, to explore the nature of quark confinement; dramatic improvements in our understanding of the QCD structure of the hadrons through the extension of our knowledge of their parton distribution functions to high xBjorken, where they are dominated by underlying valence quark structure, and a program of nucleon “tomography” via measurements of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), a broad program of experiments in the physics of nuclei that aims to understand the QCD basis for the nucleon-nucleon force and how nucleons and mesons arise as an approximation to the underlying quark-gluon structure; and precision tests of the Standard Model through parity violating deep inelastic and Møller scattering. The Upgrade includes: doubling the accelerating voltages of the linacs by adding 10 new high-performance cryomodules; the requisite expansion of the 2K cryogenics plant and rf power systems to support these cryomodules; upgrading the beam transport system from 6 to 12 GeV through extensive re-use and/or modification of existing hardware; and the addition of one recirculation arc, a new experimental area, and the beamline to it; and the construction of major new experimental equipment for the GPD, high-xBjorken, and hybrid meson programs. The presentation will describe the science briefly and provide some details about the accelerator plans.

  20. Status and future prospects for United States accelerators and accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H

    1994-12-01

    The recent performance and future prospects of accelerators in the United States are reviewed. The next decade promises significant improvements and major new facilities. There is uncertainty beyond that because of the SSC cancellation and the new, enhanced importance of international accelerator projects.

  1. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  2. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  3. The US Muon Accelerator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, Y.; Kirk, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, Steve; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-01

    An accelerator complex that can produce ultra-intense beams of muons presents many opportunities to explore new physics. A facility of this type is unique in that, in a relatively straightforward way, it can present a physics program that can be staged and thus move forward incrementally, addressing exciting new physics at each step. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC) and the Fermilab Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) have recently submitted a proposal to create a Muon Accelerator Program that will have, as a primary goal, to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for an energy-frontier Muon Collider by the end of a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a description of a Muon Collider facility and gives an overview of the proposal.

  4. JLab Measurement of the 4He Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Camsonne, Alexandre; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Acha, Armando; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Arrington, John; Baldwin, Alan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Decowski, Piotr; Dutta, Chiranjib; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Gomez, Javier; Hahn, Brian; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jian; Iodice, Mauro; Kelleher, Aidan; Khrosinkova, Elena; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, Elena; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Lee, Byungwuek; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lott, Gordon; Lu, H.; Marcucci, Laura; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Norum, Blaine; Petratos, Gerassimos; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Hashemi, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Viviani, Michele; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W. -M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2014-04-01

    The charge form factor of 4He has been extracted in the range 29 fm-2 <= Q2 <= 77 fm-2 from elastic electron scattering, detecting 4He nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the High Resolution Spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The results are in qualitative agreement with realistic meson-nucleon theoretical calculations. The data have uncovered a second diffraction minimum, which was predicted in the Q2 range of this experiment, and rule out conclusively long-standing predictions of dimensional scaling of high-energy amplitudes using quark counting.

  5. Measurements of the electric form factor of the neutron at JLab via recoil polarimetry in the reaction: d(e, e-prime n)p

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Finn

    2004-11-01

    Preliminary results are reported for measurements of the ratio of the electric form factor to the magnetic form factor of the neutron, GEn/GMn, obtained via recoil polarimetry from the quasielastic 2H(e, e?n) 1H reaction at Q2 values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c)2. The measurements, conducted in Hall C of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, together with other recent polarization measurements, are the result of a decade long effort to establish a firm experimental database for the important, but elusive, electric form factor of the neutron.

  6. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diancheng

    2013-12-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q2 values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c)2. The asymmetry at Q2=1.9 (GeV/c)2 can be used to extract the weak coupling combination 2C2u - C2d, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q2 values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first APV data in the resonance region beyond the Δ (1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for APV at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

  8. Hadron accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; MacKay, Ranald; Peach, Ken; Smith, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Over the last twenty years the treatment of cancer with protons and light nuclei such as carbon ions has moved from being the preserve of research laboratories into widespread clinical use. A number of choices now exist for the creation and delivery of these particles, key amongst these being the adoption of pencil beam scanning using a rotating gantry; attention is now being given to what technologies will enable cheaper and more effective treatment in the future. In this article the physics and engineering used in these hadron therapy facilities is presented, and the research areas likely to lead to substantive improvements. The wider use of superconducting magnets is an emerging trend, whilst further ahead novel high-gradient acceleration techniques may enable much smaller treatment systems. Imaging techniques to improve the accuracy of treatment plans must also be developed hand-in-hand with future sources of particles, a notable example of which is proton computed tomography.

  9. Accelerating Spectrum Sharing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Lynda L. Brighton; Rangam Subramanian; Hussein Moradi; Jose Loera

    2013-09-01

    Spectrum sharing potentially holds the promise of solving the emerging spectrum crisis. However, technology innovators face the conundrum of developing spectrum sharing technologies without the ability to experiment and test with real incumbent systems. Interference with operational incumbents can prevent critical services, and the cost of deploying and operating an incumbent system can be prohibitive. Thus, the lack of incumbent systems and frequency authorization for technology incubation and demonstration has stymied spectrum sharing research. To this end, industry, academia, and regulators all require a test facility for validating hypotheses and demonstrating functionality without affecting operational incumbent systems. This article proposes a four-phase program supported by our spectrum accountability architecture. We propose that our comprehensive experimentation and testing approach for technology incubation and demonstration will accelerate the development of spectrum sharing technologies.

  10. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  11. Commissioning and operational results of helium refrigeration system at JLab for the 12GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Peter N.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system at the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL-2) for the 12 GeV upgrade was commissioned in late spring of 2013, following the commissioning of the new compressor system, and has been supporting 12 GeV LINAC commissioning since that time. Six design modes were tested during commissioning, consisting of a maximum capacity, nominal capacity, maximum liquefaction, maximum refrigeration, maximum fill and a stand-by/reduced load condition. The maximum capacity was designed to support a 238 g/s, 30 K and 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s, 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW, 35-55 K shield load. The other modes were selected to ensure proper component sizing and selection to allow the cold box to operate over a wide range of conditions and capacities. The cold box system is comprised of two physically independent cold boxes with interconnecting transfer-lines. The outside (upper) 300-60 K vertical cold box has no turbines and incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and 80-K beds. The inside (lower) 60-4.5 K horizontal cold box houses seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander and a 20-K bed. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will summarize the analysis of the test data obtained over the wide range of operating conditions and capacities which were tested.

  12. Particle Transportation Through the JLab Hall A BigBite Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalmi, Sheren

    2015-04-01

    The BigBite spectrometer of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab is under refurbishment for use in an experiment (E120-10-103) to measure deep inelastic electron scattering off helium-3 and tritium mirror nuclei in the valence quark region (high Bjorken x range). The experiment will use an 11 GeV upgraded beam to determine the ratio of the neutron to proton F2 inelastic structure functions, and the ratio of the down to up quark, d/u, quark probability distributions in the nucleon. The BigBite spectrometer is based on a custom-shaped dipole magnet, which provides for large momentum and angular acceptances needed for the above measurements. Simulations using a ROOT-based Monte Carlo model for tracking and visualizing scattered electrons passing through the BigBite magnet will be presented. The optics parameters of the dipole magnet have been extracted from a field map produced by a TOSCA magnetostatics calculation. The simulations are necessary to estimate the phase space of the scattered electrons inside the relocated detectors of the spectrometer, and check for electrons which could possibly miss a detector and escape detection. This work is supported by Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission SACM, Kent State University, NSF Grant PHY-1405814, and DOE Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177. Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242.

  13. Upgrade of the Cherenkov Detector of the JLab Hall A BigBite Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The BigBite Spectrometer of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab will be used in the upcoming MARATHON experiment at Jefferson Lab to measure the ratio of neutron to proton F2 inelastic structure functions and the ratio of up to down, d/u, quark nucleon distributions at medium and large values of Bjorken x. In preparation for this experiment, the BigBite Cherenkov detector is being modified to increase its overall efficiency for detecting electrons. This large volume counter is based on a dual system of segmented mirrors reflecting Cherenkov radiation to twenty photomultipliers. In this talk, a description of the detector and its past performance will be presented, along with the motivations for improvements and their implementation. An update on the status of the rest of the BigBite detector package, will be also presented. Additionally, current issues related to obtaining C4 F8 O, the commonly used radiator gas, which has been phased out of production by U.S. gas producers, will be discussed. This work is supported by Kent State University, NSF Grant PHY-1405814, and DOE Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  14. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  15. The deuteron accelerator preliminary design for BISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Zhu, F.; Wang, Z.; Gao, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-06-01

    BISOL, which was named as Beijing_ISOL before (Cui et al., 2013), is the abbreviation of Beijing Isotope-Separation-On-Line neutron beam facility. It is proposed jointly by Peking University (PKU) and China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) for basic science study and application. It is a double driven facility that can be driven by a reactor or a deuteron accelerator. The deuteron driver accelerator should accelerate the deuteron beam up to 40 MeV with maximum beam current of 10 mA. Proton beams up to 33 MeV and He2+ beams up to 81.2 MeV can also be accelerated in this accelerator. The accelerator can be operated on either CW (continuous waveform) or pulsed mode, and the ion energy can be adjusted in a wide range. The accelerator will also allow independent operation of the RIB (Radioactive Ion Beams) system. It will be mainly charged by PKU group. Details of the deuteron accelerator preliminary design for BISOL will be given in this paper.

  16. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  17. A New Control Room for SLAC Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Roger; Guerra, E.; Stanek, M.; Hoover, Z.Van; Warren, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-04

    We are planning to construct a new control room at SLAC to unify and improve the operation of the LCLS, SPEAR3, and FACET accelerator facilities, and to provide the space and flexibility needed to support the LCLS-II and proposed new test beam facilities. The existing control rooms for the linac and SPEAR3 have been upgraded in various ways over the last decade, but their basic features have remained unchanged. We propose to build a larger modern Accelerator Control Room (ACR) in the new Research Support Building (RSB) which is currently under construction at SLAC. Shifting the center of control for the accelerator facilities entails both technical and administrative challenges. In this paper, we describe the history, concept, and status of this project.

  18. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  19. A single pass electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Marlin N.; Vroom, David A.

    1995-02-01

    Higher volumes, increasing competition and the need to improve quality have led us to re-examine the process for irradiation of tubing and wire. Traditionallyin Raychem, product irradiation has involved the use of large multi-purpose facilities that were designed to handle relatively small volumes of a large variety of products as a separate process. Today, with larger volumes of certain products, there is an interest in combining processes to improve quality and reduce cost. We have recently designed and constructed a small, low voltage accelerator system that can be placed in-line with another manufacturing process and can uniformly irradiate a tube or wire product in a single pass. The system is comprised of two conventional accelerator systems having elongated filaments and placed on opposite sides of a linear product path. The ribbon shaped electron beams from these two accelerators are scanned, after acceleration toward the product path, in a conventional manner and 180 degrees out of phase from each other. The two accelerated electron beams then enter a third magnetic field that is synchronous with the scanning magnets and whose oscillating polarity is such that the ribbon beams are converged onto a tubular shaped window close to and around a segment of the product path. Trials with a prototype system have produced tubing having a dose concentricity of better than ± 10 percent on a single pass through the system.

  20. RF Surface Impedance Characterization of Potential New Materials for SRF-based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping; Eremeev, Grigory V.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. Lawrence; Kelley, Michael J.

    2012-09-01

    In the development of new superconducting materials for possible use in SRF-based accelerators, it is useful to work with small candidate samples rather than complete resonant cavities. The recently commissioned Jefferson Lab RF Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system can presently characterize the central region of 50 mm diameter disk samples of various materials from 2 to 40 K exposed to RF magnetic fields up to 14 mT at 7.4 GHz. We report the recent measurement results of bulk Nb, thin film Nb on Cu and sapphire substrates, Nb{sub 3}Sn sample, and thin film MgB{sub 2} on sapphire substrate provided by colleagues at JLab and Temple University.

  1. Overview of the IFMIF test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möslang, A.; Antonnucci, C.; Daum, E.; Haines, J. R.; Jitsukawa, I.; Noda, K.; Zinkle, S.

    1998-10-01

    During the past few years, a reference design has been developed for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). According to the mission and specification of the general requirements, this reference design includes relevant machine parameters and conceptual designs for the major device subsystems - Test Facilities, Lithium Target Facilities and Accelerator Facilities. Major engineering efforts have been undertaken to establish a test cell design that follows closely the users requirements of the fusion materials community and allows safe and completely remote controlled handling. After a short description of the facility requirements, concepts for the two independent test cells, various test assemblies, remote handling equipment and hot cell facilities are presented.

  2. FACET: SLAC___s New User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.-J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.A.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.D.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.T.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-05-16

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The first User Run started in spring 2012 with 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams. The facility is designed to provide short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. The creation of drive and witness bunches and shaped bunch profiles is possible with 'Notch' Collimation. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. Positrons will be available at FACET in future user runs. We present the User Facility and the available tools and opportunities for future experiments.

  3. A new small accelerator for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, M.; Huber, R.; Jacob, S. A. W.; Synal, H.-A.; Schroeder, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    A new small and compact radiocarbon dating facility based on a 500 kV Pelletron accelerator has been built. The novel feature is that it operates with 1{sup +} ions. The interfering molecules are destroyed by collisions in the gas stripper. The results of first test measurements demonstrate that stability, background and transmission are equal to the performance of conventional AMS systems based on larger accelerators.

  4. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  5. Inverse Free Electron Laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.; Gallardo, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Sandweiss, J.

    1992-09-01

    The study of the INVERSE FREE ELECTRON LASER, as a potential mode of electron acceleration, is being pursued at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recent studies have focussed on the development of a low energy, high gradient, multi stage linear accelerator. The elementary ingredients for the IFEL interaction are the 50 MeV Linac e{sup {minus}} beam and the 10{sup 11} Watt CO{sub 2} laser beam of BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Center for Accelerator Physics (CAP) and a wiggler. The latter element is designed as a fast excitation unit making use of alternating stacks of Vanadium Permendur (VaP) ferromagnetic laminations, periodically interspersed with conductive, nonmagnetic laminations, which act as eddy current induced field reflectors. Wiggler parameters and field distribution data will be presented for a prototype wiggler in a constant period and in a {approximately} 1.5 %/cm tapered period configuration. The CO{sub 2} laser beam will be transported through the IFEL interaction region by means of a low loss, dielectric coated, rectangular waveguide. Short waveguide test sections have been constructed and have been tested using a low power cw CO{sub 2} laser. Preliminary results of guide attenuation and mode selectivity will be given, together with a discussion of the optical issues for the IFEL accelerator. The IFEL design is supported by the development and use of 1D and 3D simulation programs. The results of simulation computations, including also wiggler errors, for a single module accelerator and for a multi-module accelerator will be presented.

  6. The ATLAS Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) is a superconducting low-energy heavy ion accelerator. Its primary purpose is to provide beams for research in nuclear structure physics. This report begins with a brief history of ATLAS and then describes the current design of the facility. Also summarized are the experimental equipment and research programs. It concludes with a proposal for turning ATLAS into a radioactive beam facility.

  7. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  8. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  9. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator: Overview and status

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Chojnacki, E.; Gai, W.; Ho, C.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Rosing, M.; Simpson, J.

    1993-08-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) is a new facility for advanced accelerator research, with a particular emphasis on studies of high gradient ({approximately}100 MeV/m) wakefield acceleration. A novel high current short pulse L-Band photocathode and preaccelerator will provide 100 nC electron bunches at 20 MeV to be used as a drive beam, while a second high brightness gun will be used to generate a 5 MeV witness beam for wakefield measurements. We will present an overview of the various AWA systems, the status of construction, and initial commissioning results.

  10. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L.C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  11. Argonne plasma wake-field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cole, B.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Norem, J.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1989-03-14

    Four years after the initial proposal of the Plasma Wake-field Accelerator (PWFA), it continues to be the object of much investigation, due to the promise of the ultra-high accelerating gradients that can exist in relativistic plasma waves driven in the wake of charged particle beams. These wake-fields are of interest both in the laboratory, for acceleration and focusing of electrons and positrons in future linear colliders, and in nature as a possible cosmic ray acceleration mechanism. The purpose of the present work is to review the recent experimental advances made in PWFA research at Argonne National Laboratory. Some of the topics discussed are: the Argonne Advanced Accelerator Test Facility; linear plasma wake-field theory; measurement of linear plasma wake-fields; review of nonlinear plasma wave theory; and experimental measurement of nonlinear plasma wake-fields. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility: Users handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Auble, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The primary objective of this handbook is to provide information for those who plan to carry out research programs at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The accelerator systems and experimental apparatus available are described. The mechanism for obtaining accelerator time and the responsibilities of those users who are granted accelerator time are described. The names and phone numbers of ORNL personnel to call for information about specific areas are given. (LEW)

  13. Accelerators for Inertial Fusion Energy Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangerter, R. O.; Faltens, A.; Seidl, P. A.

    2014-02-01

    Since the 1970s, high energy heavy ion accelerators have been one of the leading options for imploding and igniting targets for inertial fusion energy production. Following the energy crisis of the early 1970s, a number of people in the international accelerator community enthusiastically began working on accelerators for this application. In the last decade, there has also been significant interest in using accelerators to study high energy density physics (HEDP). Nevertheless, research on heavy ion accelerators for fusion has proceeded slowly pending demonstration of target ignition using the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a laser-based facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A recent report of the National Research Council recommends expansion of accelerator research in the US if and when the NIF achieves ignition. Fusion target physics and the economics of commercial energy production place constraints on the design of accelerators for fusion applications. From a scientific standpoint, phase space and space charge considerations lead to the most stringent constraints. Meeting these constraints almost certainly requires the use of multiple beams of heavy ions with kinetic energies > 1 GeV. These constraints also favor the use of singly charged ions. This article discusses the constraints for both fusion and HEDP, and explains how they lead to the requirements on beam parameters. RF and induction linacs are currently the leading contenders for fusion applications. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both options. We also discuss the principal issues that must yet be resolved.

  14. Design and Optimization of Large Accelerator Systems through High-Fidelity Electromagnetic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Cho; Akcelik, Volkan; Candel, Arno; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Kabel, Andreas; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Prudencio, Ernesto; Schussman, Greg; Uplenchwar1, Ravi; Xiao1, Liling; Ko1, Kwok; Austin, T.; Cary, J.R.; Ovtchinnikov, S.; Smith, D.N.; Werner, G.R.; Bellantoni, L.; /SLAC /TechX Corp. /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    SciDAC1, with its support for the 'Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology' (AST) project, witnessed dramatic advances in electromagnetic (EM) simulations for the design and optimization of important accelerators across the Office of Science. In SciDAC2, EM simulations continue to play an important role in the 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation' (ComPASS), through close collaborations with SciDAC CETs/Institutes in computational science. Existing codes will be improved and new multi-physics tools will be developed to model large accelerator systems with unprecedented realism and high accuracy using computing resources at petascale. These tools aim at targeting the most challenging problems facing the ComPASS project. Supported by advances in computational science research, they have been successfully applied to the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in High Energy Physics (HEP), the JLab 12-GeV Upgrade in Nuclear Physics (NP), as well as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in Basic Energy Sciences (BES).

  15. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  16. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  17. Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, R. C.

    2006-07-01

    The proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Project will provide world-class intensities of radioactive beams created by any of the known production mechanisms. A driver linac will be used to accelerate any stable isotope from protons through uranium to energies of ⩾400 MeV/u and intensities of ⩾100 kW. Lighter elements will be used to produce radioactive ion beams by the isotope separation on line (ISOL) method. Typically heavier elements will be used to produce radioactive ion beams by the particle fragmentation (PF) method. A hybrid method of stopping radioactive ion beams produced by the PF method in a gas cell will also be employed. The RIA project has strong support from the nuclear science community as evidenced by RIA being the highest priority for major new construction in the most recent Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Long Range Plan [2002 NSAC Long-Range Plan: Opportunities in Nuclear Science, A long-range plan for the next decade, April 2002]. In addition, RIA is tied for third position for the near term priorities of the Department of Energy (DoE) 20-year plan [DOE Office of Science, Facilities for the future of science: a twenty-year outlook. http://www.sc.doe.gov/Sub/Facilities_for_future/facilities_future.htm]. The status of the RIA design is presented.

  18. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  19. Transverse spin physics at CLAS and CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Harutyun Avagyan

    2011-10-01

    We present ongoing and future measurement of spin-azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of pions in deep inelastic scattering using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The azimuthal modulations of the double and single spin asymmetries have been measured in a wide kinematic range, providing access to transverse momentum distributions of partons. An extensive experimental program has been proposed for the upgraded JLab, which will allow precision studies of the transverse structure of the nucleon

  20. University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U.; Steva, D. P.

    2003-02-24

    The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.

  1. Operation of the accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Batzka, B.; Billquist, P.J.

    1995-08-01

    Fiscal Year 1994 was the first year of seven-day operation since ATLAS became a national user facility in 1985. ATLAS made the most of the opportunity this year by providing 5200 hours of beam on-target to the research program. A record number of 60 experiments were completed and the {open_quotes}facility reliability{close_quotes} remained near the 90% level. Seven-day operation was made possible with the addition to the staff of two operator positions providing single-operator coverage during the weekend period. The normally scheduled coverage was augmented by an on-call list of system experts who respond to emergencies with phone-in advice and return to the Laboratory when necessary. This staffing approach continues but we rearranged our staffing patterns so that we now have one cryogenics engineer working a shift pattern which includes 8-hour daily coverage during the weekend. ATLAS provided a beam mix to users consisting of 26 different isotopic species, 23% of which were for A>100 in FY 1994. Approximately 60% of the beam time was provided by the Positive Ion Injector, slightly less than the usage rate of FY 1993. Experiments using uranium or lead beams accounted for 16.4% of the total beam time. The ECR ion source and high-voltage platform functioned well throughout the year. A new technique for solid material production in the source was developed which uses a sputtering process wherein the sample of material placed near the plasma chamber wall is biased negatively. Plasma ions are accelerated into the sample and material is sputtered from the surface into the plasma. This technique is now used routinely for many elements. Runs of calcium, germanium, nickel, lead, tellurium, and uranium were carried out with this technique.

  2. VitisGen: accelerating grape cultivar improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VitisGen is a multiple institute collaborative project funded by the USDA SCRI program, with a long term goal to accelerate grape cultivar improvement by using cutting-edge molecular marker technologies, rigorous centralized facilities to characterize traits, and molecular breeding expertise. The ge...

  3. Accelerated Decontamination and Decommissioning at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, M.C.; Douglas, L.M.; Marske, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Hanford Site has over 100 facilities that have been declared surplus and are scheduled to be decommissioned. In addition to these surplus facilities, there is a significant number of facilities that are currently being shut down, deactivated, and transferred to the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) program. In the last year, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, have developed and implemented an initiative to accelerate the D&D work at the Hanford Site. The strategy associated with accelerated D&D is to reduce the number of surplus facilities, eliminate potential safety hazards, demonstrate meaningful cleanup progress, and recycle materials for other uses. This initiative has been extremely successful and has resulted in the safe demolition of 13 facilities in fiscal year (FY) 1993. In addition, four facilities have been completed in FY 1994 and demolition of several other facilities is currently underway.

  4. RCRA FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent facilities that are regulated by the EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facilities regulated under RCRA generate, dispose of, treate or transport hazardous waste. RCRA is a law enacted by Congress in 1976 and amended in 1984 to include ...

  5. Status of BINP proton tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdakov, A.; Davydenko, V.; Dolgushin, V.; Dranichnikov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Farrell, J. P.; Khilchenko, A.; Kobets, V.; Konstantinov, S.; Krivenko, A.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Tiunov, M.; Savkin, V.; Shirokov, V.; Sorokin, I.

    2007-08-01

    The status of a unique 2.0 MeV, 10 mA proton tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation is presented. The accelerator is intended to be used in facilities generating resonant gamma rays for explosives detection and epithermal neutrons for boron neutron-capture therapy of brain tumors. A magnetically coupled DC voltage multiplier derived from an industrial ELV-type electron accelerator is used as a high voltage source for the accelerator. A dc high current negative ion source has been developed for injection into the tandem. In the tandem accelerator there is set of nested potential electrodes with openings which form a channel for accelerating the negative hydrogen ion beam and subsequently accelerating the proton beam after stripping in the gas target. The electrodes are connected to a high voltage feedthrough insulator to which required potentials are applied from the high voltage power supply by means of a resistor voltage divider. In the paper the first experimental results obtained with the vacuum insulated tandem accelerator are also given.

  6. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  7. UCLA accelerator research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  8. Measuring sin2θw in PV-DIS with the Baseline Spectrometers at JLab 12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul

    2007-07-18

    The couplings of leptons to quarks are fundamental parameters of the electroweak interaction. Within the framework of the Standard Model, these couplings can be related to sin2θw. Parity violation (PV) in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is proportional to these couplings and hence sensitive sin2θw. PV-DIS, first measured at SLAC in the mid-1970's, was used to establish the Standard Model. The high quality and intensity of the upgraded 11 GeV CEBAF beam at Jefferson Laboratory will make it an ideal tool for PV studies. In DIS the asymmetry from parity violation is large (APV ≈10-4 Q2), allowing precise measurements with modest beam-time. This talk will explore a PV-DIS measurement which can be made using the baseline spectrometers that will exist as part of the 12 GeV JLab upgrade.

  9. FACET: The New User Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.J.; Erikson, R.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Li, S.Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; Seryi, A.; Wittmer, W.; /Michigan State U.

    2011-12-13

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Its high power electron and positron beams make it a unique facility, ideal for beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration studies. The first 2 km of the SLAC linac produce 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron and positron beams with short bunch lengths of 20 {mu}m. A final focusing system can produce beam spots 10 {mu}m wide. User-aided Commissioning took place in summer 2011 and FACET will formally come online in early 2012. We present the User Facility, the current features, planned upgrades and the opportunities for further experiments. Accelerators are our primary tool for discovering the fundamental laws to the universe. Each new frontier we probe requires a new, more powerful method. Accelerators are therefore increasing in size and cost. The future of this field requires new accelerating techniques that can reach the high energies required over shorter distances. New concepts for high gradient acceleration include utilizing the wakes in plasma and dielectric and metallic structures. FACET was built to provide a test bed for novel accelerating concepts with its high charge and highly compressed beams. As a test facility unlike any other, it has also attracted groups interested in beam diagnostic techniques and terahertz studies. The first phase of the construction was completed in May 2011. Beam commissioning began in June and was interleaved with the installation of five experiments. Users were invited to aid with the commissioning for the month of August during which time experimental hardware and software were checked out and some first measurements were taken. FACET is currently in the process of becoming a Department of Energy User Facility for High Energy Physics.

  10. Pentaquark Searches at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2007-01-01

    Since LEPS collaboration reported the first evidence for a S=+1 baryon resonance in early 2003 with a mass of 1.54 GeV, dubbed Θ+, more than ten experiments have confirmed this exotic state, among these two carried out at Jefferson Laboratory. At the same time, there are a number of experiments, mostly at high energies, that report null results. To try to clarify this situation, during the past year, The CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a second generation high-statistics experimental program to search for exotics baryons. Here the preliminary results from these experiments are reported.

  11. Argonne`s new Wakefield Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1992-07-20

    The first phase of a high current, short bunch length electron beam research facility, the AWA, is near completion at Argonne. At the heart of the facility is a photocathode based electron gun and accelerating sections designed to deliver 20 MeV pulses with up to 100 nC per pulse and with pulse lengths of approximately 15 ps (fw). Using a technique similar to that originated at Argonne`s AATF facility, a separate weak probe pulse can be generated and used to diagnose wake effects produced by the intense pulses. Initial planned experiments include studies of plasma wakefields and dielectric wakefield devices, and expect to demonstrate large, useful accelerating gradients (> 100 MeV/m). Later phases of the facility will increase the drive bunch energy to more than 100 MeV to enable acceleration experiments up to the GeV range. Specifications, design details, and commissioning progress are presented.

  12. A new microwave EB accelerator for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cracknell, P. J.

    1995-02-01

    A new high beam power microwave electron linear accelerator, LINTEC 1020, has been built and installed for the AEA, EBIS (Harwell) Limited medical sterilisation irradiation facility. LINTEC microwave electron beam accelerator designs are based upon travelling wave RF structures working at 1300 MHz, with beam powers from 10 to 45 k Watts at 5 to 12 MeV. The accelerator design, installation and operating details are described together with performance characteristics of alternative equipments.

  13. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-15

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  14. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  15. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  16. Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration experiment at ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Pogorelsky, I.; Fernow, R.; Kusche, K.P.; Liu, Y.; Kimura, W.D.; Kim, G.H.; Romea, R.D.; Steinhauer, L.C.

    1994-09-01

    Inverse Cerenkov laser acceleration was demonstrated using an axicon optical system at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF S-band linac and a high power 10.6 {mu}m CO{sub 2} laser were used for the experiment. Experimental arrangement and the laser and the electron beams synchronization are discussed. The electrons were accelerated more than 0.7 MeV for a 34 MW CO{sub 2} laser power. More than 3.7 MeV acceleration was measured with 0.7 GW CO{sub 2} laser power, which is more than 20 times of the previous ICA experiment. The experimental results are compared with computer program TRANSPORT simulations.

  17. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  18. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  19. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  20. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)