Science.gov

Sample records for accelerator magnet technology

  1. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, D. L.; Hawkins, S. A.; Poor, S. E.; Reginato, L. L.; Rogers, D., Jr.; Smith, M. W.

    1985-03-01

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinar Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  2. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brix, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-10-01

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  3. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-03-26

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Recent advances in the technology of superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.

    1985-05-01

    Recent progress in technology of high-current-density cables for SSC model magnets is summarized. NbTi cable with J/sub c/ up to 50% higher than Tevatron cable can be expected. Magnetization effects can be predicted and corrected with several new techniques. Development of Superconductor with 2 to 3 ..mu..m filament diameter and high J/sub c/ is expected. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  5. The overview and history of permanent magnet devices in accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, R.H. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    This paper reviews the early history of accelerator development with a particular focus on the important discoveries that opened the door for the application of permanent-magnet materials to this area of science. Researchers began to use permanent-magnet materials in particle accelerators soon after the invention of the alternating gradient principle, that showed magnetic fields could be used to control the transverse envelope of charged-particle beams. Since that time, permanent-magnet materials have found wide application in the modern charged particle accelerator. The history of permanent-magnet use in accelerator physics and technology is outlined, general design considerations are presented, and material properties of concern for particle accelerator applications are discussed.

  6. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  7. Progress in Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Accelerator Magnet Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Prestemon, S.O.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.; Hikichi, Y.; Nishioka, J.; Hasegawa, T.

    2009-08-16

    We report on our progress in the development of the technology for the application of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}(Bi-2212) in Wind-and-React accelerator magnets. A series of superconducting subscale coils has been manufactured at LBNL and reacted at the wire manufacturer SWCC. Selected coils are impregnated and tested in self-field, even though the coils exhibited leakage during the partial melt heat treatment. Other coils have been disassembled after reaction and submitted to critical current (Ic) tests on individual cable sections. We report on the results of the current carrying capacity of the coils. Voltage-current (VI) transitions were reproducibly measured up to a quench currents around 1400 A, which is 25% of the expected performance. The results indicate that the coils are limited by the inner windings. We further compare possibilities to use Bi-2212 and Nb{sub 3}Sn tilted solenoid, and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) racetrack inserts to increase the magnetic field in HD2, a 36 mm bore Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet which recently achieved a bore magnetic field of 13.8 T. The application of Bi-2212 and/or YBCO in accelerator type magnets, if successful, will open the road to higher magnetic fields, far surpassing the limitations of Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology.

  8. Nb3Sn accelerator magnet technology scale up using cos-theta dipole coils

    SciTech Connect

    Nobrega, F.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Carcagno, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is working on the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets using shell-type dipole coils and the wind-and-react method. As a part of the first phase of technology development, Fermilab built and tested six 1 m long dipole model magnets and several dipole mirror configurations. The last three dipoles and two mirrors reached their design fields of 10-11 T. The technology scale up phase has started by building 2 m and 4 m dipole coils and testing them in a mirror configuration in which one of the two coils is replaced by a half-cylinder made of low carbon steel. This approach allows for shorter fabrication times and extensive instrumentation preserving almost the same level of magnetic field and Lorentz forces in the coils as in a complete dipole model magnet. This paper presents details on the 2 m (HFDM07) and 4 m long (HFDM08) Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole mirror magnet design and fabrication technology, as well as the magnet test results which are compared with 1 m long models.

  9. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects.

  10. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  11. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  12. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  13. Accelerating Spectrum Sharing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Lynda L. Brighton; Rangam Subramanian; Hussein Moradi; Jose Loera

    2013-09-01

    Spectrum sharing potentially holds the promise of solving the emerging spectrum crisis. However, technology innovators face the conundrum of developing spectrum sharing technologies without the ability to experiment and test with real incumbent systems. Interference with operational incumbents can prevent critical services, and the cost of deploying and operating an incumbent system can be prohibitive. Thus, the lack of incumbent systems and frequency authorization for technology incubation and demonstration has stymied spectrum sharing research. To this end, industry, academia, and regulators all require a test facility for validating hypotheses and demonstrating functionality without affecting operational incumbent systems. This article proposes a four-phase program supported by our spectrum accountability architecture. We propose that our comprehensive experimentation and testing approach for technology incubation and demonstration will accelerate the development of spectrum sharing technologies.

  14. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  15. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: A Next-Generation Spallation-Neutron Source; Accelerator Performance Demonstration Facility; APEX Free-Electron Laser Project; The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) Program; Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Linac Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operation.

  16. Post-LHC accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2001-06-10

    The design and practicality of future accelerators, such as hadron colliders and neutrino factories being considered to supercede the LHC, will depend greatly on the choice of superconducting magnets. Various possibilities will be reviewed and discussed, taking into account recent progress and projected improvements in magnet design and conductor development along with the recommendations from the 2001 Snowmass workshop.

  17. Future accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1986-05-01

    A general discussion is presented of the acceleration of particles. Upon this foundation is built a categorization scheme into which all accelerators can be placed. Special attention is devoted to accelerators which employ a wake-field mechanism and a restricting theorem is examined. It is shown how the theorem may be circumvented. Comments are made on various acceleration schemes.

  18. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  19. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  20. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  1. Cryogenic Technology for Superconducting Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoyama, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting devices such as magnets and cavities are key components in the accelerator field for increasing the beam energy and intensity, and at the same time making the system compact and saving on power consumption in operation. An effective cryogenic system is required to cool and keep the superconducting devices in the superconducting state stably and economically. The helium refrigeration system for application to accelerators will be discussed in this review article. The concept of two cooling modes -- the liquefier and refrigerator modes -- will be discussed in detail because of its importance for realizing efficient cooling and stable operation of the system. As an example of the practical cryogenic system, the TRISTAN cryogenic system of KEK Laboratory will be treated in detail and the main components of the cryogenic system, including the high-performance multichannel transfer line and liquid nitrogen circulation system at 80K, will also be discussed. In addition, we will discuss the operation of the cryogenic system, including the quench control and safety of the system. The satellite refrigeration system will be discussed because of its potential for wide application in medium-size accelerators and in industry.

  2. Electron acceleration via magnetic island coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, I.; Yumura, T.; Tanaka, K. G.; Fujimoto, M.

    2009-06-01

    Electron acceleration via fast magnetic island coalescence that happens as quick magnetic reconnection triggering (QMRT) proceeds has been studied. We have carried out a three-dimensional full kinetic simulation of the Harris current sheet with a large enough simulation run for two magnetic islands coalescence. Due to the strong inductive electric field associated with the non-linear evolution of the lower-hybrid-drift instability and the magnetic island coalescence process observed in the non-linear stage of the collisionless tearing mode, electrons are significantly accelerated at around the neutral sheet and the subsequent X-line. The accelerated meandering electrons generated by the non-linear evolution of the lower-hybrid-drift instability are resulted in QMRT, and QMRT leads to fast magnetic island coalescence. As a whole, the reconnection triggering and its transition to large-scale structure work as an effective electron accelerator.

  3. Ferroelectric Based Technologies for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Nenasheva, E.; Kazakov, S.; Tagantsev, A.; Yakovlev, V.

    2009-01-22

    Ferroelectrics have unique intrinsic properties that make them extremely attractive for high-energy accelerator applications. Low loss ferroelectric materials can be used as key elements in RF tuning and phase shifting components to provide fast, electronic control. These devices are under development for different accelerator applications for the X, Ka and L-frequency bands. The exact design of these devices depends on the electrical parameters of the particular ferroelectric material to be used--its dielectric constant, loss tangent and tunability. BST based ferroelectric-oxide compounds have been found to be suitable materials for a fast electrically-controlled tuners. We present recent results on the development of BST based ferroelectric compositions synthesized for use in high power technology components. The BST(M) ferroelectrics have been tested using both transverse and parallel dc bias fields to control the permittivity. Fast switching of a newly developed material has been shown and the feasibility of using of ferroelectric-based accelerator components in vacuum and in air has been demonstrated.

  4. Magnetic circuit for hall effect plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H. (Inventor); Jacobson, David T. (Inventor); Jankovsky, Robert S. (Inventor); Hofer, Richard (Inventor); Peterson, Peter (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A Hall effect plasma accelerator includes inner and outer electromagnets, circumferentially surrounding the inner electromagnet along a thruster centerline axis and separated therefrom, inner and outer magnetic conductors, in physical connection with their respective inner and outer electromagnets, with the inner magnetic conductor having a mostly circular shape and the outer magnetic conductor having a mostly annular shape, a discharge chamber, located between the inner and outer magnetic conductors, a magnetically conducting back plate, in magnetic contact with the inner and outer magnetic conductors, and a combined anode electrode/gaseous propellant distributor, located at a bottom portion of the discharge chamber. The inner and outer electromagnets, the inner and outer magnetic conductors and the magnetically conducting back plate form a magnetic circuit that produces a magnetic field that is largely axial and radially symmetric with respect to the thruster centerline.

  5. Thermo-magnetic instabilities in Nb3Sn superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Bordini, Bernardo

    2006-09-01

    The advance of High Energy Physics research using circulating accelerators strongly depends on increasing the magnetic bending field which accelerator magnets provide. To achieve high fields, the most powerful present-day accelerator magnets employ NbTi superconducting technology; however, with the start up of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007, NbTi magnets will have reached the maximum field allowed by the intrinsic properties of this superconductor. A further increase of the field strength necessarily requires a change in superconductor material; the best candidate is Nb3Sn. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are currently working on developing Nb3Sn accelerator magnets, and although these magnets have great potential, it is suspected that their performance may be fundamentally limited by conductor thermo-magnetic instabilities: an idea first proposed by the Fermilab High Field Magnet group early in 2003. This thesis presents a study of thermo-magnetic instability in high field Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. In this chapter the following topics are described: the role of superconducting magnets in High Energy Physics; the main characteristics of superconductors for accelerator magnets; typical measurements of current capability in superconducting strands; the properties of Nb3Sn; a description of the manufacturing process of Nb3Sn strands; superconducting cables; a typical layout of superconducting accelerator magnets; the current state of the art of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets; the High Field Magnet program at Fermilab; and the scope of the thesis.

  6. Virtual reality visualization of accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.; Papka, M.; DeFanti, T.; Levine, D.; Turner, L.; Kettunen, L.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe the use of the CAVE virtual reality visualization environment as an aid to the design of accelerator magnets. They have modeled an elliptical multipole wiggler magnet being designed for use at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The CAVE environment allows the authors to explore and interact with the 3-D visualization of the magnet. Capabilities include changing the number of periods the magnet displayed, changing the icons used for displaying the magnetic field, and changing the current in the electromagnet and observing the effect on the magnetic field and particle beam trajectory through the field.

  7. Recent status of superconductors for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, A.F.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of superconductor wire and cable which has been or will be used for construction of dipole magnets for all of the large European and US superconducting accelerator rings. Included is a simplified view of the construction methods and operating requirements of an accelerator dipole magnet, with emphasis on required superconductor performance. The methods of fabricating Nb-Ti superconductors are described, including the critical parameters and materials requirements. The superconductor performance requirements are summarized in an effort to relate why these are important to accelerator designers. Some of the recently observed time dependent effects are covered briefly.

  8. Recent status of superconductors for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, A.F.

    1992-10-01

    A survey is given of superconductor wire and cable which has been or will be used for construction of dipole magnets for all of the large European and US superconducting accelerator rings. Included is a simplified view of the construction methods and operating requirements of an accelerator dipole magnet, with emphasis on required superconductor performance. The methods of fabricating Nb-Ti superconductors are described, including the critical parameters and materials requirements. The superconductor performance requirements are summarized in an effort to relate why these are important to accelerator designers. Some of the recently observed time dependent effects are covered briefly.

  9. Superconductor Requirements and Characterization for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) strategic plan for U.S. High Energy Physics (HEP) endorses a continued world leadership role in superconducting magnet technology for future Energy Frontier Programs. This includes 10 to 15 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for LHC upgrades and a future 100 TeV scale pp collider, and as ultimate goal that of developing magnet technologies above 20 T based on both High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) and Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) for accelerator magnets. To achieve these objectives, a sound conductor development and characterization program is needed and is herein described. This program is intended to be conducted in close collaboration with U.S. and International labs, Universities and Industry.

  10. Science and Technology of Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerio Lizarraga, Cristhian; Castilla Loaeza, Alejandro; Guillermo Cantón, Gerardo; Duarte, Carlos; Chavez Valenzuela, Daniel; Hernández Chahín, Karim; Cuna, Humberto Maury; Medina Medrano, Luis; Reyes Herrera, Juan; Sosa Güitrón, Salvador; Valdivia García, Alan; Rendón, Bruce Yee

    2016-10-01

    The Mexican Particle Accelerator Community (CMAP) was created in 2015 and currently its members participate in different experiments around the world. Using their expertise, they are working in the development of the particle accelerators area in Mexico. This paper provides a summary of the research done by its members and presents the preliminary design of an electron linear particle accelerator (eLINAC). This proposal will be the first accelerator designed and created in Mexico.

  11. Plasma acceleration above martian magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lundin, R; Winningham, D; Barabash, S; Frahm, R; Holmström, M; Sauvaud, J-A; Fedorov, A; Asamura, K; Coates, A J; Soobiah, Y; Hsieh, K C; Grande, M; Koskinen, H; Kallio, E; Kozyra, J; Woch, J; Fraenz, M; Brain, D; Luhmann, J; McKenna-Lawler, S; Orsini, R S; Brandt, P; Wurz, P

    2006-02-17

    Auroras are caused by accelerated charged particles precipitating along magnetic field lines into a planetary atmosphere, the auroral brightness being roughly proportional to the precipitating particle energy flux. The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms experiment on the Mars Express spacecraft has made a detailed study of acceleration processes on the nightside of Mars. We observed accelerated electrons and ions in the deep nightside high-altitude region of Mars that map geographically to interface/cleft regions associated with martian crustal magnetization regions. By integrating electron and ion acceleration energy down to the upper atmosphere, we saw energy fluxes in the range of 1 to 50 milliwatts per square meter per second. These conditions are similar to those producing bright discrete auroras above Earth. Discrete auroras at Mars are therefore expected to be associated with plasma acceleration in diverging magnetic flux tubes above crustal magnetization regions, the auroras being distributed geographically in a complex pattern by the many multipole magnetic field lines extending into space.

  12. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  13. Quench simulation program for superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Seog-Whan Kim

    2001-08-10

    In the design of superconducting magnets for accelerator and the quench protection systems, it is necessary to calculate the current, voltage and temperature during quench. The quench integral value (MIITs) is used to get a rough idea about the quench, but they need numerical calculations to obtain more detailed picture of the quench. A simulation program named KUENCH, which is not based on the MIITs calculation, was developed to calculate voltage, current and temperature of accelerator magnets during quenches. The software and calculation examples are introduced. The example also gives some important information about effects of copper content in the coil and quench protection heaters.

  14. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  15. New Trends in Induction Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-12-05

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  16. Electron acceleration during guide field magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weigang; Lapenta, Giovanni; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Egedal, Jan

    2008-03-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of the guide field intermittent magnetic reconnection are performed to study electron acceleration and pitch angle distributions. During the growing stage of reconnection, the power-law distribution function for the high-energy electrons and the pitch angle distributions of the low-energy electrons are obtained and compare favorably with observations by the Wind spacecraft. Direct evidence is found for the secondary acceleration during the later reconnection stage. A correlation between the generation of energetic electrons and the induced reconnection electric field is found. Energetic electrons are accelerated first around the X line, and then in the region outside the diffusion region, when the reconnection electric field has a bipolar structure. The physical mechanisms of these accelerations are discussed. The in-plane electrostatic field that traps the low-energy electrons and causes the anisotropic pitch angle distributions has been observed.

  17. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, Claude R. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided.

  18. Rail accelerator technology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Rail accelerators offer a viable means of launching ton-size payloads from the Earth's surface to space. The results of two mission studies which indicate that an Earth-to-Space Rail Launcher (ESRL) system is not only technically feasible but also economically beneficial, particularly when large amounts of bulk cago are to be delivered to space are given. An in-house experimental program at the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was conducted in parallel with the mission studies with the objective of examining technical feasibility issues. A 1 m long - 12.5 by 12.5 mm bore rail accelerator as designed with clear polycarbonate sidewalls to visually observe the plasma armature acceleration. The general character of plasma/projectile dynamics is described for a typical test firing.

  19. Proton acceleration from magnetized overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, Deep Kumar; Das, Nilakshi; Patel, Kartik

    2017-01-01

    Proton acceleration by an ultraintense short pulse circularly polarized laser from an overdense three dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell (PIC) 3D-PIC simulations. The axial magnetic field modifies the dielectric constant of the plasma, which causes a difference in the behaviour of ponderomotive force in case of left and right circularly polarized laser pulse. When the laser is right circularly polarized, the ponderomotive force gets enhanced due to cyclotron effects generating high energetic electrons, which, on reaching the target rear side accelerates the protons via target normal sheath acceleration process. On the other hand, in case of left circular polarization, the effects get reversed causing a suppression of the ponderomotive force at a short distance and lead towards a rise in the radiation pressure, which results in the effective formation of laser piston. Thus, the axial magnetic field enhances the effect of radiation pressure in case of left circularly polarized laser resulting in the generation of high energetic protons at the target front side. The transverse motion of protons get reduced as they gyrate around the axial magnetic field which increases the beam collimation to some extent. The optimum thickness of the overdense plasma target is found to be increased in the presence of an axial magnetic field.

  20. Correcting coils in end magnets of accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, L. R.; Gouffon, P.

    1998-05-01

    We present an empirical investigation of the correcting coils behavior used to homogenize the field distribution of the race-track microtron accelerator end magnets. These end magnets belong to the second stage of the 30.0 MeV cw electron accelerator under construction at IFUSP, the race-track microtron booster, in which the beam energy is raised from 1.97 to 5.1 MeV. The correcting coils are attached to the pole faces and are based on the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field measured. The performance of these coils, when operating the end magnets with currents that differ by +/-10% from the one used in the mappings that originated the coils copper leads, is presented. For one of the magnets, adjusting conveniently the current of the correcting coils makes it possible to homogenize field distributions of different intensities, once their shapes are practically identical to those that originated the coils. For the other one, the shapes are changed and the coils are less efficient. This is related to intrinsic factors that determine the inhomogeneities. However, we obtained uniformity of 0.001% in both cases.

  1. A flexible and configurable system to test accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzy M. Nogiec et al.

    2001-07-20

    Fermilab's accelerator magnet R and D programs, including production of superconducting high gradient quadrupoles for the LHC insertion regions, require rigorous yet flexible magnetic measurement systems. Measurement systems must be capable of handling various types of hardware and extensible to all measurement technologies and analysis algorithms. A tailorable software system that satisfies these requirements is discussed. This single system, capable of distributed parallel signal processing, is built on top of a flexible component-based framework that allows for easy reconfiguration and run-time modification. Both core and domain-specific components can be assembled into various magnet test or analysis systems. The system configured to comprise a rotating coil harmonics measurement is presented. Technologies as Java, OODB, XML, JavaBeans, software bus and component-based architectures are used.

  2. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project

  3. Gyro-induced acceleration of magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Borgogno, D.

    2013-09-15

    The linear and nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection in collisionless high-temperature plasmas with a strong guide field is analyzed on the basis of a two-dimensional gyrofluid model. The linear growth rate of the reconnecting instability is compared to analytical calculations over the whole spectrum of linearly unstable wave numbers. In the strongly unstable regime (large Δ′), the nonlinear evolution of the reconnecting instability is found to undergo two distinctive acceleration phases separated by a stall phase in which the instantaneous growth rate decreases. The first acceleration phase is caused by the formation of strong electric fields close to the X-point due to ion gyration, while the second acceleration phase is driven by the development of an open Petschek-like configuration due to both ion and electron temperature effects. Furthermore, the maximum instantaneous growth rate is found to increase dramatically over its linear value for decreasing diffusion layers. This is a consequence of the fact that the peak instantaneous growth rate becomes weakly dependent on the microscopic plasma parameters if the diffusion region thickness is sufficiently smaller than the equilibrium magnetic field scale length. When this condition is satisfied, the peak reconnection rate asymptotes to a constant value.

  4. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-07-03

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s(-2)). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  5. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability. PMID:26151217

  6. Accelerators-Limitations of Technology A Summary of the Snowmass Accelerator Working Group Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigner, Maury

    1983-04-01

    Hadron colliders and accelerators in the 20 TeV energy range turned out to be the majority interest among active members of the Accelerator Row Group. While other types of accelerator and other energy ranges were discussed, largely on the basis of work done else-where, our primary creative activities at this summer study focused on the hadron facility. Examining both the economic and accelerator physics dimensions of such a facility, we were able to give some hope to the idea that a well designed and concentrated R/D program, elaborating much further on technologies we now possess, might bring a 20 TeV facility within our national reach. The central challenges for this R/D program appear to be 1. Achievement of virtual automation of superconducting magnet, accelerator housing and other accelerator component manufacture and installation. 2. Achievement of a thorough understanding of the field vs. cost relation for superconducting magnets. 3. Achievement of a thorough understanding of the luminosity-aperture-energy relation.

  7. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  8. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Arntz, Floyd; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to linac

  9. Acceleration of superparamagnetic particles with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, R.; Lenk, F.; Bley, T.; Boschke, E.

    2017-04-01

    High magnetic capture efficiency in the context of Biomagnetic Separation (BMS) using superparamagnetic particles (SMPs) requires efficient mixing and high relative velocities between cellular and other targets and SMPs. For this purpose, batch processes or microfluidic systems are commonly used. Here, we analyze the characteristics of an in-house developed batch process experimental setup, the Electromagnetic Sample Mixer (ESM) described earlier. This device uses three electromagnets to increase the relative velocity between SMPs and targets. We carry out simulations of the magnetic field in the ESM and in a simpler paradigmatic setup, and thus were able to calculate the force field acting on the SMPs and to simulate their relative velocities and fluid dynamics due to SMP movement. In this way we were able to show that alternate charging of the magnets induces a double circular stream of SMPs in the ESM, resulting in high relative velocities of SMPs to the targets. Consequently, due to the conservation of momentum, the fluid experiences an acceleration induced by the SMPs. We validated our simulations by microscopic observation of the SMPs in the magnetic field, using a homemade apparatus designed to accommodate a long working-distance lens. By comparing the results of modeling this paradigmatic setup with the experimental observations, we determined that the velocities of the SMPs corresponded to the results of our simulations.

  10. Quench behavior of a superconducting accelerator magnet

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A D; Sampson, W B; Garber, M; Dahl, P F

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented on the minimum energy required to cause quenches to propagate in an accelerator dipole magnet. The amount of stored energy dissipated into the magnet was measured as a function of dipole excitation current. This in turn determines the maximum coil temperature reached in a given magnet. Quench velocities in the longitudinal direction of the conductor were as high as 11m/sec. The azimuthal velocities or turn to turn velocities were found to be a function of the number of fiberglass layers of insulation that the quench had to cross and were on the order of a few tens of centimeters/sec. The field shape of a given magnet was found to be unchanged for more than 100 quenches. The coil to coil connection and inter-coil splice resistances were found to be less than a namo-ohm and therefore of litle consequence in the cryogenic load considerations. No definitive answers were found on how to decrease the rate of training (130 Gauss/Quench average) required from 4.OT to 5.1T.

  11. Particle acceleration by combined diffusive shock acceleration and downstream multiple magnetic island acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; le Roux, J. A.; Li, Gang; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-09-01

    As a consequence of the evolutionary conditions [28; 29], shock waves can generate high levels of downstream vortical turbulence. Simulations [32-34] and observations [30; 31] support the idea that downstream magnetic islands (also called plasmoids or flux ropes) result from the interaction of shocks with upstream turbulence. Zank et al. [18] speculated that a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and downstream reconnection-related effects associated with the dynamical evolution of a “sea of magnetic islands” would result in the energization of charged particles. Here, we utilize the transport theory [18; 19] for charged particles propagating diffusively in a turbulent region filled with contracting and reconnecting plasmoids and small-scale current sheets to investigate a combined DSA and downstream multiple magnetic island charged particle acceleration mechanism. We consider separately the effects of the anti-reconnection electric field that is a consequence of magnetic island merging [17], and magnetic island contraction [14]. For the merging plasmoid reconnection- induced electric field only, we find i) that the particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory, and ii) that the solution is constant downstream of the shock. For downstream plasmoid contraction only, we find that i) the accelerated particle spectrum is a power law in particle speed, flatter than that derived from conventional DSA theory; ii) for a given energy, the particle intensity peaks downstream of the shock, and the peak location occurs further downstream of the shock with increasing particle energy, and iii) the particle intensity amplification for a particular particle energy, f(x, c/c0)/f(0, c/c0), is not 1, as predicted by DSA theory, but increases with increasing particle energy. These predictions can be tested against observations of electrons and ions accelerated at interplanetary shocks and the heliospheric

  12. Measurement of the magnetic field coefficients of particle accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, J.; Ganetis, G.; Hogue, R.; Rogers, E.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1989-01-01

    An important aspect in the development of magnets to be used in particle accelerators is the measurement of the magnetic field in the beam aperture. In general it is necessary to measure the harmonic multipoles in the dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets for a series of stationary currents (plateaus). This is the case for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) which will be ramped to high field over a long period (/approximately/1000 sec.) and then remain on the flat top for the duration of the particle collision phase. In contrast to this mode of operation, the Booster ring being constructed for the Brookhaven AGS, will have a fast ramp rate of approximately 10 Hz. The multipole fields for these Booster magnets must therefore be determined ''on the ramp.'' In this way the effect of eddy currents will be taken into account. The measurement system which we will describe in this paper is an outgrowth of that used for the SSC dipoles. It has the capability of measuring the field multipoles on both a plateau or during a fast ramp. In addition, the same basic coil assembly is used to obtain the magnetic multipoles in dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole magnets. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Section 7.3. accelerator facilities. Technology review of accelerator facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph

    New initiatives in basic science, accelerator engineering and market development, continue to stimulate applications of electron accelerators. Contributions from scientific experts in each of these segments have been assimulated to reflect the present status of accelerator technology in radiation processing.

  14. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  15. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  16. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  17. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, July-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division are discussed. This report covers the last six months of calendar 1980 and is organized around the Division's major projects. These projects reflect a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The major technological innovations promoted by the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) program have been developed; accelerator technologies relevant to the design of a medically practical PIGMI have been identified. A new group in AT Division deals with microwave and magnet studies; we describe the status of some of their projects. We discuss the prototype gyrocon, which has been completed, and the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, which continues to stimulate interest for many possible applications. One section of this report briefly describes the results of a design study for an electron beam ion source that is ideally suited as an injector for a heavy ion linac; another section reports on a turbine engine test facility that will expose operating turbine engines to simulated maneuver forces. In other sections we discuss various activities: the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, the free-electron laser program, the racetrack microtron project, the Proton Storage ring, and H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors.

  18. Systems and methods for the magnetic insulation of accelerator electrodes in electrostatic accelerators

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R

    2013-12-17

    The present invention provides systems and methods for the magnetic insulation of accelerator electrodes in electrostatic accelerators. Advantageously, the systems and methods of the present invention improve the practically obtainable performance of these electrostatic accelerators by addressing, among other things, voltage holding problems and conditioning issues. The problems and issues are addressed by flowing electric currents along these accelerator electrodes to produce magnetic fields that envelope the accelerator electrodes and their support structures, so as to prevent very low energy electrons from leaving the surfaces of the accelerator electrodes and subsequently picking up energy from the surrounding electric field. In various applications, this magnetic insulation must only produce modest gains in voltage holding capability to represent a significant achievement.

  19. Research and Development of Wires and Cables for High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    The latest strategic plans for High Energy Physics endorse steadfast superconducting magnet technology R&D for future Energy Frontier Facilities. This includes 10 to 16 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for the luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider and eventually for a future 100 TeV scale proton-proton (pp) collider. This paper describes the multi-decade R&D investment in the Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which was crucial to produce the first reproducible 10 to 12 T accelerator-quality dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as their scale-up. We also indicate prospective research areas in superconducting Nb3Sn wires and cables to achieve the next goals for superconducting accelerator magnets. Emphasis is on increasing performance and decreasing costs while pushing the Nb3Sn technology to its limits for future pp colliders.

  20. Magnetic Particle Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Luiz C.A.; A. Rios, Rachel V.R.; Fabris, Jose D.; Lago, Rachel M.; Sapag, Karim

    2004-01-01

    An exciting laboratory environment is activated by the preparation and novel use of magnetic materials to decontaminate water through adsorption and magnetic removal of metals and organics. This uncomplicated technique is also adaptable to the possible application of adsorbents to numerous other environmental substances.

  1. Accelerator Technology Program. Status report, January-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents highlights of major projects in the Accelerator Technology Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first section deals with the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility's 2-MeV accelerator on which tests began in May, as scheduled. Then, activities are reported on beam dynamics, inertial fusion, structure development, the racetrack microtron, the CERN high-energy physics experiment NA-12, and LAMPF II. The Proton Storage Ring is discussed next, with emphasis on the computer control system, diagnostics interfacing, and theoretical support. Other sections summarize progress on a portable radiographic linac, developments on the klystron code, and on permanent magnets. Activities of the Theory and Simulation Group are outlined next, followed by discussion of the oscillator experiment and the energy-recovery experiment in the free electron laser project. The last section reports on the accelerator test stand. An unusual and very satisfying activity for the Division was the hosting of the 1983 Particle Accelerator Conference in Santa Fe, March 21-23, 1983. The conference had the largest attendance ever, with 895 registrants, 61 invited papers, and 521 contributed papers.

  2. Magnetic Suspension Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Agreement, intended to support focused research efforts in the area of magnetic suspension systems, was initiated between NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Old Dominion University (ODU) starting January 1, 1997. The original proposal called for a three-year effort, but funding for the second year proved to be unavailable, leading to termination of the agreement following a 5-month no-cost extension. This report covers work completed during the entire 17-month period of the award. This research built on work that had taken place over recent years involving both NASA LARC and the Principal Investigator (PI). The research was of a rather fundamental nature, although specific applications were kept in mind at all times, such as wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), space payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, magnetic bearings for unconventional applications, magnetically levitated ground transportation and electromagnetic launch systems. Fundamental work was undertaken in areas such as the development of optimized magnetic configurations, analysis and modelling of eddy current effects, control strategies for magnetically levitated wind tunnel models and system calibration procedures. Despite the termination of this Cooperative Agreement, several aspects of the research work are currently continuing with alternative forms of support.

  3. Flightweight Carbon Nanotube Magnet Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. N.; Schmidt, H. J.; Ruoff, R. S.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Dikin, D. A.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Virtually all plasma-based systems for advanced airborne/spaceborne propulsion and power depend upon the future availability of flightweight magnet technology. Unfortunately, current technology for resistive and superconducting magnets yields system weights that tend to counteract the performance advantages normally associated with advanced plasma-based concepts. The ongoing nanotechnology revolution and the continuing development of carbon nanotubes (CNT), however, may ultimately relieve this limitation in the near future. Projections based on recent research indicate that CNTs may achieve current densities at least three orders of magnitude larger than known superconductors and mechanical strength two orders of magnitude larger than steel. In fact, some published work suggests that CNTs are superconductors. Such attributes imply a dramatic increase in magnet performance-to-weight ratio and offer real hope for the construction of true flightweight magnets. This Technical Publication reviews the technology status of CNTs with respect to potential magnet applications and discusses potential techniques for using CNT wires and ropes as a winding material and as an integral component of the containment structure. The technology shortfalls are identified and a research and technology strategy is described that addresses the following major issues: (1) Investigation and verification of mechanical and electrical properties, (2) development of tools for manipulation and fabrication on the nanoscale, (3) continuum/molecular dynamics analysis of nanotube behavior when exposed to practical bending and twisting loads, and (4) exploration of innovative magnet fabrication techniques that exploit the natural attributes of CNTs.

  4. Accelerated technology transfer: the UK quantum initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Simon D.

    2016-10-01

    A new generation of quantum technology based systems, exploiting effects such as superposition and entanglement, will enable widespread, highly disruptive applications which are expected to be of great economic significance. However, the technology is only just emerging from the physics laboratory and generally remains at low TRLs. The question is: where, and when, will this impact be first manifest? The UK, with substantial Government backing, has embarked on an ambitious national program to accelerate the process of technology transfer with the objective of seizing a significant and sustainable share of the future economic benefit for the UK. Many challenges and uncertainties remain but the combined and co-ordinated efforts of Government, Industry and Academia are making great progress. The level of collaboration is unusually high and the goal of embedding a "QT Ecosystem" in the UK looks to be attainable. This paper describes the UK national programme, its key players, and their respective roles. It will illustrate some of the likely first commercial applications and provide a status update. Some of the challenges that might prevent realisation of the goal will be highlighted.

  5. Acceleration-augmented LQG control of an active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  6. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  7. Application of permanent magnets in accelerators and electron storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbach, K.

    1985-04-01

    The use of permanent-magnet systems in high-energy accelerators and as sources of synchrotron radiation in electron-storage rings is discussed in a review of recent experimental investigations. Consideration is given to the generic advantages of permanent magnets over electromagnets (higher field strength per magnet size) in small-scale configurations; the magnetic properties of some charge-sheet-equivalent-permanent-magnet materials (CSEMs); and the design of pure-CSEM and CSEM-Fe-hybrid multipole magnetic lenses, dipoles, and undulator/wiggler systems for use in free-electron lasers and the production of elliptically polarized synchrotron light. Drawings and diagrams are provided.

  8. Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2011-11-28

    Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

  9. High average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1995-05-01

    Which current pulsed accelerator technology was developed during the late 60`s through the late 80`s to satisfy the needs of various military related applications such as effects simulators, particle beam devices, free electron lasers, and as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. The emphasis in these devices is to achieve very high peak power levels, with pulse lengths on the order of a few 10`s of nanoseconds, peak currents of up to 10`s of MA, and accelerating potentials of up to 10`s of MV. New which average power systems, incorporating thermal management techniques, are enabling the potential use of high peak power technology in a number of diverse industrial application areas such as materials processing, food processing, stack gas cleanup, and the destruction of organic contaminants. These systems employ semiconductor and saturable magnetic switches to achieve short pulse durations that can then be added to efficiently give MV accelerating, potentials while delivering average power levels of a few 100`s of kilowatts to perhaps many megawatts. The Repetitive High Energy Puled Power project is developing short-pulse, high current accelerator technology capable of generating beams with kJ`s of energy per pulse delivered to areas of 1000 cm{sup 2} or more using ions, electrons, or x-rays. Modular technology is employed to meet the needs of a variety of applications requiring from 100`s of kV to MV`s and from 10`s to 100`s of kA. Modest repetition rates, up to a few 100`s of pulses per second (PPS), allow these machines to deliver average currents on the order of a few 100`s of mA. The design and operation of the second generation 300 kW RHEPP-II machine, now being brought on-line to operate at 2.5 MV, 25 kA, and 100 PPS will be described in detail as one example of the new high average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology.

  10. Test particle acceleration in turbulent reconnecting magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosiano, John; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Plante, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on particle acceleration in a MHD field was investigated by computing test particle trajectories in turbulent MHD reconnecting fields, including reconnection simulations at different magnetic Reynolds numbers. The dynamics of individual particles were investigated making it possible to examine the acceleration mechanism in great detail. It was found that turbulence influences the acceleration in two ways. It enhances the reconnection electric field while producing a stochastic electric field that gives rise to momentum diffusion; and it produces magnetic 'bubbles' and other irregularities that can temporarily trap test particles in the strong reconnection electric field for times comparable to the magnetofluid characteristic time.

  11. Cryogen free superconducting splittable quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Andreev, N.; Kerby, J.; Orlov, Y.; Solyak, N.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A new superconducting quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators was fabricated at Fermilab. The magnet is designed to work inside a cryomodule in the space between SCRF cavities. SCRF cavities must be installed inside a very clean room adding issues to the magnet design, and fabrication. The designed magnet has a splittable along the vertical plane configuration and could be installed outside of the clean room around the beam pipe previously connected to neighboring cavities. For more convenient assembly and replacement a 'superferric' magnet configuration with four racetrack type coils was chosen. The magnet does not have a helium vessel and is conductively cooled from the cryomodule LHe supply pipe and a helium gas return pipe. The quadrupole generates 36 T integrated magnetic field gradient, has 600 mm effective length, and the peak gradient is 54 T/m. In this paper the quadrupole magnetic, mechanical, and thermal designs are presented, along with the magnet fabrication overview and first test results.

  12. Design and Fabrication of Racetrack Coil Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Gupta, R.; Harnden, W.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.D.; Millos, G.; Morrison, L.; Morrison, M.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1998-11-11

    Most accelerator magnets for applications in the field range up to 9 T utilize NbTi superconductor and a cosine theta coil design. For fields above 9 T, it is necessary to use Nb{sub 3}Sn or other strain sensitive materials, and other coil geometries that are more compatible with these materials must be considered. This paper describes their recent efforts to design a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of this alternative magnet design for a dual aperture dipole magnet with the goal of reaching a field level of 15 T, will be described. The experimental program, which consists of a series of steps leading to a high field accelerator quality magnet, will be presented. Fabrication of a racetrack dipole magnet utilizing Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and a wind and react approach will be presented.

  13. Magnetic control of particle injection in plasma based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Martins, S F; Pathak, V B; Fonseca, R A; Mori, W B; Silva, L O

    2011-06-03

    The use of an external transverse magnetic field to trigger and to control electron self-injection in laser- and particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators is examined analytically and through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. A magnetic field can relax the injection threshold and can be used to control main output beam features such as charge, energy, and transverse dynamics in the ion channel associated with the plasma blowout. It is shown that this mechanism could be studied using state-of-the-art magnetic fields in next generation plasma accelerator experiments.

  14. Test results of a Nb3Al/Nb3Sn subscale magnet for accelerator application

    DOE PAGES

    Iio, Masami; Xu, Qingjin; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; ...

    2015-01-28

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) has been developing a Nb3Al and Nb3Sn subscale magnet to establish the technology for a high-field accelerator magnet. The development goals are a feasibility demonstration for a Nb3Al cable and the technology acquisition of magnet fabrication with Nb3Al superconductors. KEK developed two double-pancake racetrack coils with Rutherford-type cables composed of 28 Nb3Al wires processed by rapid heating, quenching, and transformation in collaboration with the National Institute for Materials Science and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The magnet was fabricated to efficiently generate a high magnetic field in a minimum-gap common-coil configuration with twomore » Nb3Al coils sandwiched between two Nb3Sn coils produced by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A shell-based structure and a “bladder and key” technique have been used for adjusting coil prestress during both the magnet assembly and the cool down. In the first excitation test of the magnet at 4.5 K performed in June 2014, the highest quench current of the Nb3Sn coil, i.e., 9667 A, was reached at 40 A/s corresponding to 9.0 T in the Nb3Sn coil and 8.2 T in the Nb3Al coil. The quench characteristics of the magnet were studied.« less

  15. Particle Acceleration Due to Coronal Non-null Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Various topological features, for example magnetic null points and separators, have been inferred as likely sites of magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in the solar atmosphere. In fact, magnetic reconnection is not constrained to solely take place at or near such topological features and may also take place in the absence of such features. Studies of particle acceleration using non-topological reconnection experiments embedded in the solar atmosphere are uncommon. We aim to investigate and characterise particle behaviour in a model of magnetic reconnection which causes an arcade of solar coronal magnetic field to twist and form an erupting flux rope, crucially in the absence of any common topological features where reconnection is often thought to occur. We use a numerical scheme that evolves the gyro-averaged orbit equations of single electrons and protons in time and space, and simulate the gyromotion of particles in a fully analytical global field model. We observe and discuss how the magnetic and electric fields of the model and the initial conditions of each orbit may lead to acceleration of protons and electrons up to 2 MeV in energy (depending on model parameters). We describe the morphology of time-dependent acceleration and impact sites for each particle species and compare our findings to those recovered by topologically based studies of three-dimensional (3D) reconnection and particle acceleration. We also broadly compare aspects of our findings to general observational features typically seen during two-ribbon flare events.

  16. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission in Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-IchiI.; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (m) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient parallel magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. New simulations with an ambient perpendicular magnetic field show the strong interaction between the relativistic jet and the magnetic fields. The magnetic fields are piled up by the jet and the jet electrons are bent, which creates currents and displacement currents. At the nonlinear stage, the magnetic fields are reversed by the current and the reconnection may take place. Due to these dynamics the jet and ambient electron are strongly accelerated in both parallel and perpendicular directions.

  17. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation in Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Richardson, G.; Sol, H.; Preece, R.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient parallel magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. New simulations with an ambient perpendicular magnetic field show the strong interaction between the relativistic jet and the magnetic fields. The magnetic fields are piled up by the jet and the jet electrons are bent, which creates currents and displacement currents. At the nonlinear stage, the magnetic fields are reversed by the current and the reconnection may take place. Due to these dynamics the jet and ambient electron are strongly accelerated in both parallel and perpendicular directions.

  18. Status of high temperature superconductor development for accelerator magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirabayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    High temperature superconductors are still under development for various applications. As far as conductors for magnets are concerned, the development has just been started. Small coils wound by silver sheathed Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 oxide conductors have been reported by a few authors. Essential properties of high T(sub c) superconductors like pinning force, coherent length, intergrain coupling, weak link, thermal property, AC loss and mechanical strength are still not sufficiently understandable. In this talk, a review is given with comparison between the present achievement and the final requirement for high T(sub c) superconductors, which could be particularly used in accelerator magnets. Discussions on how to develop high T(sub c) superconductors for accelerator magnets are included with key parameters of essential properties. A proposal of how to make a prototype accelerator magnet with high T(sub c) superconductors with prospect for future development is also given.

  19. Materials for Accelerator Technologies Beyond the Niobium Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Lance; Larbalestier, David; Ghosh, Arup; Tollestrup, Alvin; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Three niobium-based materials make up the entire present portfolio of superconducting technology for accelerators: Nb-Ti and Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet wires and pure niobium for RF cavities. Because these materials are at a high level of maturity, limits imposed by the boundaries of their superconductivity constrain the energy reach of accelerators to several TeV. We sketch here a plan for targeted development of emerging higher field and higher temperature superconductors that could enable accelerators at significantly higher energies. Niobium-based superconductors are the crucial enablers of present accelerators. The Nb-Ti LHC dipole and quadrupole wires, with transition temperature T{sub c} of 9 K and upper critical field H{sub c2} of 15 T, represent the highest form of superconductor strand art: massive, quarter-ton conductor billets are drawn from 300 mm diameter to {approx}1 mm as a single, multi-kilometer-long piece, while retaining uniformity of the several thousand Nb-Ti filaments to within 5% at the scale of a few micrometers. Strands are twisted into fully transposed cables with virtually no loss, preserving a carefully tuned nanostructure that generates the high flux-pinning forces and high current densities to enable high magnetic fields. Nb{sub 3}Sn, with twice the T{sub c} and H{sub c2}, is now approaching this level of conductor art, where over the last 5 years the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the Next European Dipole (NED) program have demonstrated that Nb{sub 3}Sn can be made into 4 meter long quadrupoles with 12 T fields and 250 T/m gradients. Linear accelerators at TJNAF, ORNL (SNS), and under construction for the European XFEL exploit niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology, with gradients at {approx}20 MV/m. Tremendous research and development is underway to realize high-power goals for Project X at FNAL and for a possible ILC at 35 MV/m gradients. Despite these impressive achievements, the very maturity of these

  20. Stochastic acceleration and magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Alina; Telezhinsky, Igor; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Pohl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Tycho's Supernova remnant (SNR) is also known as historical Supernova SN 1572 of Type Ia. Having exploded in a relatively clean environment and with a known age, it represents an ideal astrophysical testbed for the study of cosmic-ray acceleration and related phenomena. A number of studies suggest that shock acceleration with very efficient magnetic-field amplification is needed to explain the rather soft radio spectrum and the narrow rims observed in X-rays. We show that the wideband spectrum of Tycho's SNR can be alternatively well explained when accounting for stochastic acceleration as a secondary process. The re-acceleration of particles in the turbulent region immediately downstream of the shock provided by the fast-mode waves is efficient enough to impact particle spectra over several decades in energy. Our self-consistent model contains hydrodynamic simulations of the SNR plasma flow. The particle spectra are obtained from the time-dependent transport equation and the background magnetic field is computed either from the induction equation or it follows analytic profiles depending on the considered model. Although not as efficient as standard diffusive shock acceleration, stochastic acceleration leaves its imprint on the particle spectra. This is especially notable in the emission at radio wavelengths and soft γ-rays. Excessively strong magnetic fields and the so-called Alfvénic drift are not required in this scenario. The narrow X-ray and radio rims arise from damping of the turbulent magnetic field. We find a lower limit for the downstream magnetic field strength, Bd = 173 µG and investigate the energy-dependence of the X-ray filament width. We conclude that stochastic re-acceleration is an important mechanism for modifying particle and emission spectra in SNR and that the magnetic-field damping should be taken into account to properly explain the synchrotron intensity profiles of Tycho.

  1. WInd-and-react Bi-2212 coil development for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Acosta, P.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D. R.; Mentink, M. G. T.; Prestemon, S. O.; Meinesz, M.; Hong, S.; Huang, Y.; Miao, H.; Parrell, J.; Sabbi, G.L.

    2009-10-13

    Sub-scale coils are being manufactured and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in order to develop wind-and-react Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} (Bi-2212) magnet technology for future graded accelerator magnet use. Previous Bi-2212 coils showed significant leakage of the conductors core constituents to the environment, which can occur during the partial melt reaction around 890 C in pure oxygen. The main origin of the observed leakage is intrinsic leakage of the wires, and the issue is therefore being addressed at the wire manufacturing level. We report on further compatibility studies, and the performance of new sub-scale coils that were manufactured using improved conductors. These coils exhibit significantly reduced leakage, and carry currents that are about 70% of the witness wire critical current (I{sub c}). The coils demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of round wire Bi-2212 conductors for accelerator magnet technology use. Successful high temperature superconductor coil technology will enable the manufacture of graded accelerator magnets that can surpass the, already closely approached, intrinsic magnetic field limitations of Nb-based superconducting magnets.

  2. Quench antenna for superconducting particle accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ogitsu, T.; Devred, A.; Kim, K.

    1993-10-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and test of an assembly of stationary pickup coils which can be used to localize quench origins. After describing the pickup coils configuration, we develop a simple model of current redistribution which allows interpretation of the measured voltages and determination of the turn of the magnet coil in which the quench started. The technique is illustrated by analyzing the data from a quench of a 5-cm-aperture, 15-m-long SSC dipole magnet prototype.

  3. Accelerating Technologies: Consequences for the Future Wellbeing of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltinski, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Today's students, K-12 and beyond, will face an ominous future unless educators quickly invest in preparing student perspectives for the accelerating technologies that will have global implications for the wellbeing of all humanity. Accelerating technologies are quietly, almost insidiously, transforming the world with little fanfare and certainly…

  4. Technology advances for magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Steve; Hung, John Y.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the state-of-the-art in magnetic bearing technology and applications, and some of advances under development through the joint efforts of Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International and Auburn University. Advances in the areas of nonlinear control systems design, digital controller implementation, and power electronics are discussed.

  5. FIRST-ORDER PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-10

    We demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution in magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.

  6. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE PAGES

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  7. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution in magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.

  8. Prospects for Fermi Particle Acceleration at Coronal Magnetic Reconnection Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, E.; Laming, J. M.; Lukin, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of first order Fermi acceleration of particles interacting with the converging magnetized flows at a reconnection site was introduced recently in an attempt to predict the energy distribution of particles resulting from violent reconnection in galactic microquasars. More careful consideration of this mechanism showed that the spectral index of accelerated particles is related to the total plasma compression within a reconnection region, similar to that in the formulation for diffusive shock acceleration. In the solar context, reconnection regions producing strong compression could be the source of suprathermal "seed particles". A hard spectrum of such suprathermal particles is believed to be necessary to initiate the particle acceleration process at low Mach number coronal mass ejection shocks close to the Sun where the gradual solar energetic particle events originate. As a first step to investigate the efficiency of Fermi acceleration, we explore the degree of plasma compression that can be achieved at reconnection sites in the solar corona. This work presents a set of 2D two-temperature resistive MHD simulations of the dynamics of several magnetic configurations within a range of lower corona plasma parameters. Energy transport processes in the MHD model include anisotropic thermal conduction for electrons and ions and radiative cooling. Magnetic configurations considered are a Harris current sheet, a force-free current sheet, a flux rope sitting above an arcade of magnetic loops, and two merging flux ropes. We demonstrate that only for some magnetic topologies, corresponding in particular to 3D magnetic nulls, the compression ratio, sufficient for first order Fermi acceleration in the reconnection region, can be achieved. These represent the potential sites in the solar corona where a hard seed particle energetic spectrum could be produced.

  9. Particle acceleration, magnetization and radiation in relativistic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, Evgeny V.; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms of particle acceleration and radiation, as well as magnetic field build-up and decay in relativistic collisionless shocks, are open questions with important implications to various phenomena in high-energy astrophysics. While the Weibel instability is possibly responsible for magnetic field build-up and diffusive shock acceleration is a model for acceleration, both have problems and current particle-in-cell simulations show that particles are accelerated only under special conditions and the magnetic field decays on a very short length-scale. We present here a novel model for the structure and the emission of highly relativistic collisionless shocks. The model takes into account (and is based on) non-local energy and momentum transport across the shock front via emission and absorption of high-energy photons. This leads to a pre-acceleration of the fluid and pre-amplification of the magnetic fields in the upstream region. Both have drastic implications on the shock structure. The model explains the persistence of the shock-generated magnetic field at large distances from the shock front. The dissipation of this magnetic field results in a continuous particle acceleration within the downstream region. A unique feature of the model is the existence of an `attractor', towards which any shock will evolve. The model is applicable to any relativistic shock, but its distinctive features show up only for sufficiently large compactness. We demonstrate that prompt and afterglow gamma-ray bursts' shocks satisfy the relevant conditions, and we compare their observations with the predictions of the model.

  10. Electrostatic acceleration of helicon plasma using a cusped magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, S.; Baba, T.; Uchigashima, A.; Iwakawa, A.; Sasoh, A.; Yokota, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Shimizu, H.

    2014-11-10

    The electrostatic acceleration of helicon plasma is investigated using an electrostatic potential exerted between the ring anode at the helicon source exit and an off-axis hollow cathode in the downstream region. In the downstream region, the magnetic field for the helicon source, which is generated by a solenoid coil, is modified using permanent magnets and a yoke, forming an almost magnetic field-free region surrounded by an annular cusp field. Using a retarding potential analyzer, two primary ion energy peaks, where the lower peak corresponds to the space potential and the higher one to the ion beam, are detected in the field-free region. Using argon as the working gas with a helicon power of 1.5 kW and a mass flow rate of 0.21 mg/s, the ion beam energy is on the order of the applied acceleration voltage. In particular, with an acceleration voltage lower than 150 V, the ion beam energy even exceeds the applied acceleration voltage by an amount on the order of the electron thermal energy at the exit of the helicon plasma source. The ion beam energy profile strongly depends on the helicon power and the applied acceleration voltage. Since by this method the whole working gas from the helicon plasma source can, in principle, be accelerated, this device can be applied as a noble electrostatic thruster for space propulsion.

  11. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  12. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Cary, J.; McInnes, L.C.; Mori, W.; Ng, C.; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization

  13. New Pulsed Power Technology for High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-06-27

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  14. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2008-04-01

    The interaction of shock waves with inhomogeneous media is important in many astrophysical problems, e.g. the role of shock compression in star formation. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory, to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. Experiments with flyer-generated shock waves have been performed on the Z machine in Sandia. The Zebra accelerator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) allows for complementary experiments with high repetition rate. First experiments on Zebra demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (around 2 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  15. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; Arntz, F.; /Diversified Tech., Bedford

    2009-12-09

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The gradient of the SLIM-based technology is believed to be achievable in the same range as it is for the gradient of a modern rf-linac technology ({approx}100 MeV per meter). (2) The SLIM concept is based on the nsec TEM pulse mode operation with no laser or rf systems. (3) Main components of SLIM are not stressed while the energy is pumped into the induction system. Components can accept the hard environment conditions such as a radiation dose, mismatch, hard electromagnetic nose level, etc. Only for several nanoseconds the switch is OFF and produces a stress in the induction system. At that time, the delivery of energy to the beam takes place. (4) The energy in the induction system initially is storied in the magnetic field when the switch is ON. That fact makes another benefit: a low voltage power supplies can be used. The reliability of a lower voltage power supply is higher and they are cheaper. (5) The coreless SLIM concept offers to work in the MHz range of repetition rate. The induction system has the high electric efficiency (much higher than the DWA). (6) The array of lined up and activated SLIM cells is believed to be a solid state structure of novel accelerating technology. The electron-hole plasma in the high power solid state structure is precisely controlled by the electromagnetic process of a pulsed power supply.

  16. Properties of the superconductor in accelerator dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teravest, Derk

    Several aspects of the application of superconductors to high field dipole magnets for particle accelerators are discussed. The attention is focused on the 10 tesla (1 m model) magnet that is envisaged for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator. The basic motivation behind the study is the intention of employing superconductors to their utmost performance. An overview of practical supercomputers, their applications and their impact on high field dipole magnets used for particle accelerators, is presented. The LHC reference design for the dipole magnets is outlined. Several models were used to study the influence of a number of factors in the shape and in particular, the deviation from the shape that is due to the flux flow state. For the investigated extrinsic and intrinsic factors, a classification can be made with respect to the effect on the shape of the characteristic of a multifilamentary wire. The optimization of the coil structure for high field dipole magnets, with respect to the field quality is described. An analytical model for solid and hollow filaments, to calculate the effect of filament magnetization in the quality of the dipole field, is presented.

  17. Enabling technologies for petascale electromagnetic accelerator simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Prudencio, Ernesto; Schussman, Greg; Uplenchwar, Ravi; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok; Luo, Xiaojun; Shephard, Mark

    2007-07-01

    The SciDAC2 accelerator project at SLAC aims to simulate an entire three-cryomodule radio frequency (RF) unit of the International Linear Collider (ILC) main Linac. Petascale computing resources supported by advances in Applied Mathematics (AM) and Computer Science (CS) and INCITE Program are essential to enable such very large-scale electromagnetic accelerator simulations required by the ILC Global Design Effort. This poster presents the recent advances and achievements in the areas of CS/AM through collaborations.

  18. Enabling Technologies for Petascale Electromagnetic Accelerator Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Li-Xin; Prudencio, Ernesto; Schussman, Greg; Uplenchwar, Ravi; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok; Luo, Xiaojun; Shephard, Mark; /Rensselaer Poly.

    2007-11-09

    The SciDAC2 accelerator project at SLAC aims to simulate an entire three-cryomodule radio frequency (RF) unit of the International Linear Collider (ILC) main Linac. Petascale computing resources supported by advances in Applied Mathematics (AM) and Computer Science (CS) and INCITE Program are essential to enable such very large-scale electromagnetic accelerator simulations required by the ILC Global Design Effort. This poster presents the recent advances and achievements in the areas of CS/AM through collaborations.

  19. Magnetically accelerated foils for shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, S.; Ford, J.; Wright, S.; Martinez, D.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.

    2009-08-01

    Many astrophysical phenomena involve the interaction of a shock wave with an inhomogeneous background medium. Using scaled experiments with inhomogeneous foam targets makes it possible to study relevant physics in the laboratory to better understand the mechanisms of shock compression and to benchmark astrophysical simulation codes. First experiments on Zebra at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) have demonstrated flyer acceleration to sufficiently high velocities (up to 5 km/s) and that laser shadowgraphy can image sound fronts in transparent targets. Based on this, we designed an optimized setup to improve the flyer parameters (higher speed and mass) to create shock waves in transparent media. Once x-ray backlighting with the Leopard laser at NTF is operational, we will switch to foam targets with parameters relevant for laboratory astrophysics.

  20. Magnet R&D for the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP)

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, S.A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gupta, R.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Harrison, M.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lietzke, A.F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmazle, J.; Stanek, R.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2006-06-01

    In 2004, the US DOE established the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) with the goal of developing a technology base for future upgrades of the LHC. The focus of the magnet program, which is a collaboration of three US laboratories, BNL, FNAL and LBNL, is on development of high gradient quadrupoles using Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor. Other program components address issues regarding magnet design, radiation-hard materials, long magnet scale-up, quench protection, fabrication techniques and conductor and cable R&D. This paper presents an overall view of the program with emphasis on the current quadrupole project and outlines the long-term goals of the program.

  1. Electron Acceleration in Contracting Magnetic Islands during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovikov, D.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.; Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Electron acceleration in solar flares is well known to be efficient at generating energetic particles that produce the observed bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra. One mechanism proposed to explain the observations is electron acceleration within contracting magnetic islands formed by magnetic reconnection in the flare current sheet. In a previous study, a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an eruptive solar flare was analyzed to estimate the associated electron acceleration due to island contraction. That analysis used a simple analytical model for the island structure and assumed conservation of the adiabatic invariants of particle motion. In this paper, we perform the first-ever rigorous integration of the guiding-center orbits of electrons in a modeled flare. An initially isotropic distribution of particles is seeded in a contracting island from the simulated eruption, and the subsequent evolution of these particles is followed using guiding-center theory. We find that the distribution function becomes increasingly anisotropic over time as the electrons’ energy increases by up to a factor of five, in general agreement with the previous study. In addition, we show that the energized particles are concentrated on the Sunward side of the island, adjacent to the reconnection X-point in the flare current sheet. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that the electron energy gain is dominated by betatron acceleration in the compressed, strengthened magnetic field of the contracting island. Fermi acceleration by the shortened field lines of the island also contributes to the energy gain, but it is less effective than the betatron process.

  2. SHARP EDGE EFFECTS OF THE MAGNETS OF A FFAG ACCELERATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO, A.G.

    2004-10-13

    The paper discusses the issues, the consequences and the methods for controlling the edge effects caused by particles entering and leaving magnets with trajectories at non-vanishing angles with the edges in FFAG accelerators made of Non-Scaling Lattices.

  3. National Program on High Field Accelerator Magnet R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Cooley, L.; Zlobin, A. V.; Caspi, S.; Gourlay, S.; Prestemon, S.; Larbalestier, D.; Gupta, R.; Wanderer, P.

    2014-09-26

    A National High-Field Magnet (HFM) Program is proposed as a thrust of the updated DOE-HEP General Accelerator R&D Program. The program responds to Recommendation 24 of the 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) Report.

  4. Field quality study in Nb(3)Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; DiMarco, J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Schlabach, P.; Velev, G.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Four nearly identical Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole models of the same design were built and tested at Fermilab. It provided a unique opportunity of systematic study the field quality effects in Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets. The results of these studies are reported in the paper.

  5. Accelerated nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging through phase multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Moores, B. A.; Eichler, A. Takahashi, H.; Navaretti, P.; Degen, C. L.; Tao, Y.

    2015-05-25

    We report a method for accelerated nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance imaging by detecting several signals in parallel. Our technique relies on phase multiplexing, where the signals from different nuclear spin ensembles are encoded in the phase of an ultrasensitive magnetic detector. We demonstrate this technique by simultaneously acquiring statistically polarized spin signals from two different nuclear species ({sup 1}H, {sup 19}F) and from up to six spatial locations in a nanowire test sample using a magnetic resonance force microscope. We obtain one-dimensional imaging resolution better than 5 nm, and subnanometer positional accuracy.

  6. Diffusive shock acceleration - Acceleration rate, magnetic-field direction and the diffusion limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of diffusive shock acceleration, showing that the acceleration of charged particles at a collisionless shock is a straightforward consequence of the standard cosmic-ray transport equation, provided that one treats the discontinuity at the shock correctly. This is true for arbitrary direction of the upstream magnetic field. Within this framework, it is shown that acceleration at perpendicular or quasi-perpendicular shocks is generally much faster than for parallel shocks. Paradoxically, it follows also that, for a simple scattering law, the acceleration is faster for less scattering or larger mean free path. Obviously, the mean free path can not become too large or the diffusion limit becomes inapplicable. Gradient and curvature drifts caused by the magnetic-field change at the shock play a major role in the acceleration process in most cases. Recent observations of the charge state of the anomalous component are shown to require the faster acceleration at the quasi-perpendicular solar-wind termination shock.

  7. Towards Integrated Design and Modeling of High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets will most likely use a brittle conductor (such as Nb{sub 3}Sn), generate fields around 18 T, handle forces that are 3-4 times higher than in the present LHC dipoles, and store energy that starts to make accelerator magnets look like fusion magnets. To meet the challenge and reduce the complexity, magnet design will have to be more innovative and better integrated. The recent design of several high field superconducting magnets have now benefited from the integration between CAD (e.g. ProE), magnetic analysis tools (e.g. TOSCA) and structural analysis tools (e.g. ANSYS). Not only it is now possible to address complex issues such as stress in magnet ends, but the analysis can be better detailed an extended into new areas previously too difficult to address. Integrated thermal, electrical and structural analysis can be followed from assembly and cool-down through excitation and quench propagation. In this paper we report on the integrated design approach, discuss analysis results and point out areas of future interest.

  8. Enhanced proton acceleration in an applied longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, A.; Toncian, T.; Fiksel, G.

    2016-10-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we examine how an externally applied strong magnetic field impacts proton acceleration in laser-irradiated solid-density targets. We find that a kT-level external magnetic field can sufficiently inhibit transverse transport of hot electrons in a flat laser-irradiated target. While the electron heating by the laser remains mostly unaffected, the reduced electron transport during proton acceleration leads to an enhancement of maximum proton energies and the overall number of energetic protons. The resulting proton beam is much better collimated compared to a beam generated without applying a kT-level magnetic field. A factor of three enhancement of the laser energy conversion efficiency into multi-MeV protons is another effect of the magnetic field. The required kT-level magnetic fields are becoming feasible due to a significant progress that has been made in generating magnetic fields with laser-driven coils using ns-long laser pulses. The possibility of improving characteristics of laser-driven proton beams using such fields is a strong motivation for further development of laser-driven magnetic field capabilities.

  9. Trends in accelerator technology for hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostromin, S. A.; Syresin, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hadron therapy with protons and carbon ions is one of the most effective branches in radiation oncology. It has advantages over therapy using gamma radiation and electron beams. Fifty thousand patients a year need such treatment in Russia. A review of the main modern trends in the development of accelerators for therapy and treatment techniques concerned with respiratory gated irradiation and scanning with the intensity modulated pencil beams is given. The main stages of formation, time structure, and the main parameters of the beams used in proton therapy, as well as the requirements for medicine accelerators, are considered. The main results of testing with the beam of the C235-V3 cyclotron for the first Russian specialized hospital proton therapy center in Dimitrovgrad are presented. The use of superconducting accelerators and gantry systems for hadron therapy is considered.

  10. A novel approach to increasing the reliability of accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, C.M.

    2000-02-07

    When a very large particle accelerator with about 8,000 electromagnets, such as the proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC), has an 85% overall availability goal, then all these magnets and their power supplies must be highly reliable and/or quickly repairable. An interdisciplinary reliability engineering approach, more commonly applied to aircraft and space vehicles, has been taken to design maximum reliability in the NLC main linac quadrupoles, while maintaining magnetic field performance and reducing cost. A specially assembled team of engineers with a variety of experiences with magnets carried out a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) on a standard SLAC quadrupole magnet system. This process helped them identify which components were less reliable. Then they redesigned the quadrupole to avoid all the potential problems. A prototype magnet will be made and tested to ensure that functionality has not been lost.

  11. Flux Rope Acceleration and Enhanced Magnetic Reconnection Rate

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng; Y. Ren; G.S. Choe; Y.-J. Moon

    2003-03-25

    A physical mechanism of flares, in particular for the flare rise phase, has emerged from our 2-1/2-dimensional resistive MHD simulations. The dynamical evolution of current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection and flux-rope acceleration subject to continuous, slow increase of magnetic shear in the arcade are studied by employing a non-uniform anomalous resistivity in the reconnecting current sheet under gravity. The simulation results directly relate the flux rope's accelerated rising motion with an enhanced magnetic reconnection rate and thus an enhanced reconnection electric field in the current sheet during the flare rise phase. The simulation results provide good quantitative agreements with observations of the acceleration of flux rope, which manifests in the form of SXR ejecta or erupting filament or CMEs, in the low corona. Moreover, for the X-class flare events studied in this paper the peak reconnection electric field is about O(10{sup 2} V/m) or larger, enough to accelerate p articles to over 100 keV in a field-aligned distance of 10 km. Nonthermal electrons thus generated can produce hard X-rays, consistent with impulsive HXR emission observed during the flare rise phase.

  12. Pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the enviromental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, Sergey

    1997-05-01

    The project of pulsed electron accelerator for radiation technologies in the environmental applications is considered. An accelerator consists of high voltage generator with vacuum insulation and vacuum diode with plasma cathode on the basis discharge on the surface of dielectric of large dimensions. The main parameters of electron accelerators are following: kinetic energy 0.2 - 2.0 MeV, electron beam current 1 - 30 kA and pulse duration 1- 5 microseconds. The main applications of accelerator for decomposition of wastewaters are considered.

  13. Theta gun, a multistage, coaxial, magnetic induction projectile accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, T. J.; Duggin, B. W.; Cowan, M., Jr.

    1985-11-01

    We experimentally and theoretically studied a multistage coaxial magnetic induction projectile accelerator. We call this system a theta gun to differentiate it from other coaxial accelerator concepts such as the mass driver. We conclude that this system can theoretically attain railgun performance only for large caliber or very high injection velocity and, even then, only for long coil geometry. Our experiments with a three-stage, capacitor bank-driven accelerator are described. The experiments are modeled with a 1-1/2 dimensional equivalent circuit-hydrodynamics code which is also described. We derive an expression for the conditions of coaxial accelerator-railgun velocity breakeven in the absence of ohmic and hydrodynamic effects. This, in conjunction with an expression for the magnetic coupling coefficient, defines a set of geometric relations which the coaxial system must simultaneously satisfy. Conclusions concerning both the existence and configuration of a breakeven coaxial system follow from this requirement. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the coaxial induction projectile accelerator, previously cited in the literature, are critiqued from the viewpoint of our analysis and experimental results. We find that the advantages vis-a-vis the railgun have been overstated.

  14. Enhanced proton acceleration in an applied longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toncian, Toma; Arefiev, Alexey; Fiksel, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we examine how an externally applied strong magnetic impacts proton acceleration in laser-irradiated solid-density targets. We find that a kT-level external magnetic field can sufficiently inhibit transverse transport of hot electrons in a flat laser-irradiated target. While the electron heating by the laser remains mostly unaffected, the reduced electron transport during proton acceleration leads to an enhancement of maximum proton energies and the overall number of energetic protons. The resulting proton beam is much better collimated compared to a beam generated without applying a kT-level magnetic field. A factor of three enhancement of the laser energy conversion efficiency into multi-MeV protons is another effect of the magnetic field. The required kT magnetic fields are becoming feasible due to a significant progress that has been made in generating magnetic fields with laser-driven coils using ns-long laser pulses. The predicted improved characteristics of laser-driven proton beams would be critical for a number of applications. The work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy - National Nuclear Security Administration Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0002008. HPC resources were provided by the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas.

  15. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  16. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; Mori, Warren; Ng, Cho; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  17. Magnetic moment conservation and particles acceleration in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalena, S.; Greco, A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    The present work concerns the study of particle magnetic moment conservation in the presence of turbulent magnetic fields. As we know from the particle orbit theory, for slow temporal and spatial magnetic field variations(i.e. if their characteristic length and time are greater than the particle orbit diameter and the time spent by a particle to execute one orbit, respectively), the magnetic moment, defined as μ = (v^2⊥ /B) (averaged over the particle gyroperiod) is an adiabatic invariant and remains constant during particle motion. But in presence of a well developed magnetic turbulence μ can undergo rapid variations and might not be constant anymore. Of course, this fact could influence particle acceleration and could have a considerable implications in many astrophysical problems, such as coronal heating. In order to reproduce and extend some of the results obtained by Karimabadi et al. 1992, we study the interaction between ions and a single or a couple of electromagnetic waves. We varied both the wave frequency and the cosine of pitch angle at which particles are injected, in order to observe in this very simple case which is the limit for magnetic moment conservation. We also will reconsider the results of Dmitruk and Matthaeus (2006) regarding particle acceleration in turbulence, taking into account statistics of the magnetic moment (see also Lehe et al., 2010). Later we will add more waves to obtain a complete turbulent spectrum. The final aim of this research work is the understanding the behavior of particles magnetic moment during magnetic reconnection phenomena. H. Karimabadi, D. Krauss-Varban and T. Teresawa, JGR, 97, 13853, 1992. P. Dmitruk and W. H. Matthaeus, JGR, 11, A12110, 2006. R. Lehe, I. J. Parrish and E. Quataert, Astrophys. J. 707, 404, 2009.

  18. A review of three magnetic NDT technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. D.; Gu, Y.; Wang, Y. S.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic techniques are most important NDT technologies to characterize the mechanical features of ferromagnetic materials based on the physical principle of magnetic-stress coupling. A review is presented in this paper about the development of the magnetic NDT technologies. After a brief outline of the theoretical studies of the magnetic-stress coupling effect, the three popular magnetic NDT technologies are reviewed, which are magnetic flux leakage (MFL), magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) and recently developed metal magnetic memory (MMM). The first two are ascribed to the active magnetic method, and the last one is the passive method. Based on an extensive literature survey in this field, this paper focuses on the discussion of the physical mechanism and some important experimental results relevant to the three NDT technologies. The challenges for each technique in this field are also summarized.

  19. Evolution of coiled tubing drilling technology accelerates

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.; Adam, B.

    1993-09-01

    This paper reviews the status of coiled tubing technology in oil and gas drilling operations. The paper starts with a description of current coiled tubing technology and provides a cost comparison between conventional and coiled tubing drilling. The results show that offshore operations are already competitive while onshore operations will still lag behind conventional drilling methods. A list of known coiled tubing drilling operations is provided which gives the current borehole diameters and depths associated with this technology. The paper then goes on to provide the advantages and disadvantages of the technology. The advantages include improved well control, a continuous drillstring, reduced mobilization costs, simplified logging and measurement-while drilling measurements, and less tripping required. The disadvantages include high friction with the borehole wall, downhole motors required, limited drillhole size, and fatigued or damaged sections of the tubing cannot be removed. Finally, a review of the reliability of this technology is provided.

  20. The use of induction linacs with nonlinear magnetic drive as high average power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, D. L.; Cook, E. G.; Hawkins, S. A.; Newton, M. A.; Poor, S. E.; Reginato, L. L.; Schmidt, J. A.; Smith, M. W.

    1985-05-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/m, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator is under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to allow us to demonstrate some of these concepts. Progress on this project is reported here.

  1. Ambipolar ion acceleration in an expanding magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmier, Benjamin W.; Bering, Edgar A., III; Carter, Mark D.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.; Díaz, Franklin R. Chang; Glover, Tim W.; Hershkowitz, Noah; Ilin, Andrew V.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Olsen, Chris S.; Squire, Jared P.

    2011-02-01

    The helicon plasma stage in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR®) VX-200i device was used to characterize an axial plasma potential profile within an expanding magnetic nozzle region of the laboratory based device. The ion acceleration mechanism is identified as an ambipolar electric field produced by an electron pressure gradient, resulting in a local axial ion speed of Mach 4 downstream of the magnetic nozzle. A 20 eV argon ion kinetic energy was measured in the helicon source, which had a peak magnetic field strength of 0.17 T. The helicon plasma source was operated with 25 mg s-1 argon propellant and 30 kW of RF power. The maximum measured values of plasma density and electron temperature within the exhaust plume were 1 × 1020 m-3 and 9 eV, respectively. The measured plasma density is nearly an order of magnitude larger than previously reported steady-state helicon plasma sources. The exhaust plume also exhibits a 95% to 100% ionization fraction. The size scale and spatial location of the plasma potential structure in the expanding magnetic nozzle region appear to follow the size scale and spatial location of the expanding magnetic field. The thickness of the potential structure was found to be 104 to 105 λDe depending on the local electron temperature in the magnetic nozzle, many orders of magnitude larger than typical laboratory double layer structures. The background plasma density and neutral argon pressure were 1015 m-3 and 2 × 10-5 Torr, respectively, in a 150 m3 vacuum chamber during operation of the helicon plasma source. The agreement between the measured plasma potential and plasma potential that was calculated from an ambipolar ion acceleration analysis over the bulk of the axial distance where the potential drop was located is a strong confirmation of the ambipolar acceleration process.

  2. The Use of Correcting Coils in End Magnets Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, L. R. P.; Gouffon, P.

    1997-05-01

    The end magnets of the race-track microtron booster (L.R.P. Kassab, PhD Thesis, IFUSP, 1996) , which is the second stage of the 30.0 MeV cw electron accelerator under construction at IFUSP, play a fundamental role in terms of the beam quality. Their efficiency depends on the behavior of the magnetic fields that deflect, focus and return the beam to the accelerating section. The use of correcting coils, based on the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field and attached to the pole faces, assured uniformity of 10-5. We present the performance of these coils when operating the end magnets with currents that differ from the one used in the mappings that originated the coils copper leads. For one of the magnets, adjusting conveniently the current of the correcting coils, made it possible to homogenize field distributions of different intensities, once their shapes are identical to those that originated the coils. For the other one, the shapes are smoothly changed and the coils are less efficient. This is related to intrinsic factors that determine the inhomogeneities. However, in both cases we obtained uniformity of 10-5.

  3. The magnetized universe: its origin and dissipation through acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Hui; Kronberg, Philip

    2010-09-02

    Problems of a magnetic universe and some, possible solutions: The greater the total energy of an astrophysical phenomena, the more restricted are the possible explanations. Magnetic energy is the most challenging because its origin is still considered problematic. We suggest that it is evident that the universe is magnetized because of radio lobes, extra galactic cosmic rays, an observed Faraday rotation measure, and the polarized emission of extra galactic radio structures. The implied energies are so large that only the formation of supermassive black holes, (SMBHs) at the center of every galaxy are remotely energetic enough to supply this immense energy, {approx} (1/10)10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}}c{sup 2}. (Only a galaxy cluster of 1000 galaxies has comparable energy, but is inversely rare.) Yet this energy appears to be largely transformed into accelerated relativistic particles, both electrons and ions. Only a large-scale coherent dynamo within the accretion disk forming the massive black hole makes a reasonable starting point. The subsequent winding of this dynamo derived flux by conducting, angular-momentum-dominated accreting matter produces the immense, coherent magnetic fluxes. We imbed this explanation in a list of similar phenomena at smaller scale and look for physical consistency among the various phenomena, especially the conversion of force-free magnetic energy into acceleration.

  4. Accelerator science and technology in Europe 2008-2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European Framework Research Projects have recently added a lot of meaning to the building process of the ERA - the European Research Area. Inside this, the accelerator technology plays an essential role. Accelerator technology includes large infrastructure and intelligent, modern instrumentation embracing mechatronics, electronics, photonics and ICT. During the realization of the European research and infrastructure project FP6 CARE 2004-2008 (Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe), concerning the development of large accelerator infrastructure in Europe, it was decided that a scientific editorial series of peer-reviewed monographs from this research area will be published in close relation with the projects. It was a completely new and quite brave idea to combine a kind of a strictly research publisher with a transient project, lasting only four or five years. Till then nobody did something like that. The idea turned out to be a real success. The publications now known and valued in the accelerator world, as the (CERN-WUT) Editorial Series on Accelerator Science and Technology, is successfully continued in already the third European project EuCARD2 and has logistic guarantees, for the moment, till the 2017, when it will mature to its first decade. During the realization of the European projects EuCARD (European Coordination for Accelerator R&D 2009-2013 and TIARA (Test Infrastructure of Accelerator Research Area in Europe) there were published 18 volumes in this series. The ambitious plans for the nearest years is to publish, hopefully, a few tens of new volumes. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, published in the monographs of the European Framework Projects (FP) on accelerator technology. The succession of CARE, Eu

  5. The mechanisms of electron heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, J. T. Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2014-09-15

    The heating of electrons in collisionless magnetic reconnection is explored in particle-in-cell simulations with non-zero guide fields so that electrons remain magnetized. In this regime, electric fields parallel to B accelerate particles directly, while those perpendicular to B do so through gradient-B and curvature drifts. The curvature drift drives parallel heating through Fermi reflection, while the gradient B drift changes the perpendicular energy through betatron acceleration. We present simulations in which we evaluate each of these mechanisms in space and time in order to quantify their role in electron heating. For a case with a small guide field (20% of the magnitude of the reconnecting component), the curvature drift is the dominant source of electron heating. However, for a larger guide field (equal to the magnitude of the reconnecting component) electron acceleration by the curvature drift is comparable to that of the parallel electric field. In both cases, the heating by the gradient B drift is negligible in magnitude. It produces net cooling because the conservation of the magnetic moment and the drop of B during reconnection produce a decrease in the perpendicular electron energy. Heating by the curvature drift dominates in the outflow exhausts where bent field lines expand to relax their tension and is therefore distributed over a large area. In contrast, the parallel electric field is localized near X-lines. This suggests that acceleration by parallel electric fields may play a smaller role in large systems where the X-line occupies a vanishing fraction of the system. The curvature drift and the parallel electric field dominate the dynamics and drive parallel heating. A consequence is that the electron energy spectrum becomes extremely anisotropic at late time, which has important implications for quantifying the limits of electron acceleration due to synchrotron emission. An upper limit on electron energy gain that is substantially higher than

  6. Experimental characterization of magnetic materials for the magnetic shielding of cryomodules in particle accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sah, Sanjay; Myneni, Ganapati; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2015-10-26

    The magnetic properties of two important passive magnetic shielding materials (A4K and Amumetal) for accelerator applications, subjected to various processing and heat treatment conditions are studied comprehensively over a wide range of temperatures: from cryogenic to room temperature. Furthermore, we analyze the effect of processing on the extent of degradation of the magnetic properties of both materials and investigate the possibility of restoring these properties by re-annealing.

  7. Electromagnetic nonlinearities in a Roebel-cable-based accelerator magnet prototype: variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruuskanen, J.; Stenvall, A.; Lahtinen, V.; Pardo, E.

    2017-02-01

    Superconducting magnets are the most expensive series of components produced in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). When developing such magnets beyond state-of-the-art technology, one possible option is to use high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that are capable of tolerating much higher magnetic fields than low-temperature superconductors (LTS), carrying simultaneously high current densities. Significant cost reductions due to decreased prototype construction needs can be achieved by careful modelling of the magnets. Simulations are used, e.g. for designing magnets fulfilling the field quality requirements of the beampipe, and adequate protection by studying the losses occurring during charging and discharging. We model the hysteresis losses and the magnetic field nonlinearity in the beampipe as a function of the magnet’s current. These simulations rely on the minimum magnetic energy variation principle, with optimization algorithms provided by the open-source optimization library interior point optimizer. We utilize this methodology to investigate a research and development accelerator magnet prototype made of REBCO Roebel cable. The applicability of this approach, when the magnetic field dependence of the superconductor’s critical current density is considered, is discussed. We also scrutinize the influence of the necessary modelling decisions one needs to make with this approach. The results show that different decisions can lead to notably different results, and experiments are required to study the electromagnetic behaviour of such magnets further.

  8. Magnetically Controlled Plasma Waveguide For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Davis, P; Palastro, J; Michel, P; Leurent, V; Glenzer, S H; Pollock, B; Tynan, G

    2008-05-14

    An external magnetic field applied to a laser plasma is shown produce a plasma channel at densities relevant to creating GeV monoenergetic electrons through laser wakefield acceleration. Furthermore, the magnetic field also provides a pressure to help shape the channel to match the guiding conditions of an incident laser beam. Measured density channels suitable for guiding relativistic short-pulse laser beams are presented with a minimum density of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} which corresponds to a linear dephasing length of several centimeters suitable for multi-GeV electron acceleration. The experimental setup at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where a 1-ns, 150 J 1054 nm laser will produce a magnetically controlled channel to guide a < 75 fs, 10 J short-pulse laser beam through 5-cm of 5 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} plasma is presented. Calculations presented show that electrons can be accelerated to 3 GeV with this system. Three-dimensional resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations are used to design the laser and plasma parameters and quasi-static kinetic simulations indicate that the channel will guide a 200 TW laser beam over 5-cm.

  9. Particle acceleration near X-type magnetic neutral lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeg, Hans-Jorg; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Duric, Nebojsa

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of charged particles near X-type magnetic neutral lines is investigated. The magnetic field is taken to be hyperbolic and time stationary, with a uniform electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The general properties of the orbits of noninteracting particles in that field geometry are examined. Approximate analytic solutions to the orbit equations are derived by considering a magnetic-insulation picture where there is a hole in the magnetic insulation around the neutral line. Scaling laws for the dependence of the energy gain on strengths of the magnetic and electric fields are derived. The kinetic-energy distribution function for accelerated particles is derived for particles flowing past the neutral line. These analytic derivations are supported by computer simulations, in which the relativistic equations of motion for single test particles are numerically solved and the orbits and kinetic-energy gains of the particles are obtained. A number of simulations were performed and one parameter at a time was varied. Applications of the results to magnetic-neutral-line regions in space physics and astrophysics are possible.

  10. Particle acceleration in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totorica, Samuel; Abel, Tom; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    Particle acceleration induced by magnetic reconnection is a promising candidate for producing the nonthermal emissions associated with explosive astrophysical phenomena. We have used two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to explore the possibility of studying particle acceleration from reconnection in laser-driven plasma experiments. For current experimental conditions, we show that nonthermal electrons can be accelerated to energies up to two orders of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy. The nonthermal electrons gain energy primarily by the reconnection electric field near the X-points, and particle injection into the reconnection layer and escape from the finite system establishes a distribution of energies resembling a power-law spectrum. Energetic electrons can also become trapped inside the plasmoids that form in the current layer and gain additional energy from the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. Based on our findings, we provide an analytical estimate of the maximum electron energy and threshold condition for suprathermal electron acceleration in terms of experimentally tunable parameters. Finally, we investigate future experiments with a more energetic laser drive and larger system size. We discuss the influence of plasmoids on the particle acceleration, and the use of proton radiography to probe plasmoids. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  11. Metal vapor arc switch electromagnetic accelerator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongeau, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A multielectrode device housed in an insulator vacuum vessel, the metal vapor vacuum switch has high power capability and can hold off voltages up to the 100 kilovolt level. Such switches can be electronically triggered and can interrupt or commutate at a zero current crossing. The physics of arc initiation, arc conduction, and interruption are examined, including material considerations; inefficiencies; arc modes; magnetic field effects; passive and forced extinction; and voltage recovery. Heating, electrode lifetime, device configuration, and external circuit configuration are discussed. The metal vapor vacuum switch is compared with SCRs, GTOs, spark gaps, ignitrons, and mechanical breakers.

  12. Accelerated Hydrolysis of Aspirin Using Alternating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, Uwe M.

    2009-08-01

    The major problem of current drug-based therapy is selectivity. As in other areas of science, a combined approach might improve the situation decisively. The idea is to use the pro-drug principle together with an alternating magnetic field as physical stimulus, which can be applied in a spatially and temporarily controlled manner. As a proof of principle, the neutral hydrolysis of aspirin in physiological phosphate buffer of pH 7.5 at 40 °C was chosen. The sensor and actuator system is a commercially available gold nanoparticle (NP) suspension which is approved for animal usage, stable in high concentrations and reproducibly available. Applying the alternating magnetic field of a conventional NMR magnet system accelerated the hydrolysis of aspirin in solution.

  13. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1982-05-01

    This report covers the activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the first 6 months of calendar 1981. We discuss the Division's major projects, which reflect a variety of applications and sponsors. The varied technologies concerned with the Proton Storage ring are concerned with the Proton Storage Ring are continuing and are discussed in detail. For the racetrack microtron (RTM) project, the major effort has been the design and construction of the demonstration RTM. Our development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator continues to stimulate interest for many possible applications. Frequent contacts from other laboratories have revealed a wide acceptance of the RFQ principle in solving low-velocity acceleration problems. In recent work on heavy ion fusion we have developed ideas for funneling beams from RFQ linacs; the funneling process is explained. To test as many aspects as possible of a fully integrated low-energy portion of a Pion generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) Accelerator, a prototype accelerator was designed to take advantage of several pieces of existing accelerator hardware. The important principles to be tested in this prototype accelerator are detailed. Our prototype gyrocon has been extensively tested and modified; we discuss results from our investigations. Our work with the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is reviewed in this report.

  14. Accelerator technology program. Status report, October 1984-March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.; Schriber, S.O.

    1986-04-01

    Activities of the racetrack-microtron development programs are highlighted, one of which is being done in collaboration with the National Bureau of Standards and the other with the University of Illinois; the BEAR (Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket) project; work in beam dynamics; the proposed LAMPF II accelerator; and the Proton Storage Ring. Discussed next is radio-frequency and microwave technology, followed by activities in accelerator theory and simulation, and free-electron laser technology. The report concludes with a listing of papers published during this reporting period.

  15. ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Carazo, V; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Guse, S; Harris, J R; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Paul, A C; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Schmidt, R; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sitaraman, S; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2009-06-11

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve {approx}10 MV/m gradients for 10s of nanoseconds pulses and to {approx}100 MV/m gradients for {approx}1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We detail the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  16. ULTRA-COMPACT ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR APPLICATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.; Caporaso, G.; Chen, Y.-J.; Falabella, S.; Guethlein, G.; Harris, J. R.; Hawkins, S.; Holmes, C.; Nelson, S.; Paul, A. C.; Poole, B.; Sanders, D.; Sitaraman, S.; Sullivan, J.; Wang, L.; Watson, J.; Carazo, V.; Guse, S.; Pearson, D.; Schmidt, R.

    2009-12-02

    We report on compact accelerator technology development for potential use as a pulsed neutron source quantitative post verifier. The technology is derived from our on-going compact accelerator technology development program for radiography under the US Department of Energy and for a clinic sized compact proton therapy systems under an industry sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. The accelerator technique relies on the synchronous discharge of a prompt pulse generating stacked transmission line structure with the beam transit. The goal of this technology is to achieve approx10 MV/m gradients for 10 s of nanoseconds pulses and approx100 MV/m gradients for approx1 ns systems. As a post verifier for supplementing existing x-ray equipment, this system can remain in a charged, stand-by state with little or no energy consumption. We describe the progress of our overall component development effort with the multilayer dielectric wall insulators (i.e., the accelerator wall), compact power supply technology, kHz repetition-rate surface flashover ion sources, and the prompt pulse generation system consisting of wide-bandgap switches and high performance dielectric materials.

  17. Experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S.C.

    2000-01-28

    This dissertation reports an experimental study of ion heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection, which is the annihilation and topological rearrangement of magnetic flux in a conductive plasma. Reconnection is invoked often to explain particle heating and acceleration in both laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas. However, a simultaneous account of reconnection and its associated energy conversion has been elusive due to the extreme inaccessibility of reconnection events, e.g. in the solar corona, the Earth's magnetosphere, or in fusion research plasmas. Experiments for this work were conducted on MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment), which creates a plasma environment allowing the reconnection process to be isolated, reproduced, and diagnosed in detail. Key findings of this work are the identification of local ion heating during magnetic reconnection and the determination that non-classical effects must provide the heating mechanism. Measured ion flows are sub-Alfvenic and can provide only slight viscous heating, and classical ion-electron interactions can be neglected due to the very long energy equipartition time. The plasma resistivity in the reconnection layer is seen to be enhanced over the classical value, and the ion heating is observed to scale with the enhancement factor, suggesting a relationship between the magnetic energy dissipation mechanism and the ion heating mechanism. The observation of non-classical ion heating during reconnection has significant implications for understanding the role played by non-classical dissipation mechanisms in generating fast reconnection. The findings are relevant for many areas of space and laboratory plasma research, a prime example being the currently unsolved problem of solar coronal heating. In the process of performing this work, local measurements of ion temperature and flows in a well-characterized reconnection layer were obtained for the first time in either laboratory or observational

  18. Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at The Nagaragawa Convention Center in Gifu, Japan, on October 30 - November 1, 1997. The symposium included 13 sessions in which a total of 35 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of maglev, controls, high critical temperature (T(sub c)) superconductivity, bearings, magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBS), levitation, modeling, and applications. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  19. Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Radisson Hotel Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, on December 1-3, 1999. The symposium included 18 sessions in which a total of 53 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, controls, modeling, electromagnetic launch, magnetic suspension in wind tunnels, applications flywheel energy storage, rotating machinery, vibration isolation, and maglev. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  20. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration mechanisms with colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Haberberger, D.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.

    2015-11-01

    Significant particle energization is observed to occur in many astrophysical environments, and in the standard models this acceleration occurs as a part of the energy conversion processes associated with collisionless shocks or magnetic reconnection. A recent generation of laboratory experiments conducted using magnetized laser-produced plasmas has opened opportunities to study these particle acceleration processes in the laboratory. Ablated plasma plumes are externally magnetized using an externally-applied magnetic field in combination with a low-density background plasma. Colliding unmagnetized plasmas demonstrated ion-driven Weibel instability while colliding magnetized plasmas drive magnetic reconnection. Both magnetized and unmagnetized colliding plasma are modeled with electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations which provide an end-to-end model of the experiments. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we provide predictions of particle acceleration driven by reconnection, resulting from both direct x-line acceleration and Fermi-like acceleration at contracting magnetic fields lines near magnetic islands.

  1. Irradiation imposed degradation of the mechanical and electrical properties of electrical insulation for future accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Bogdan, P.; Strychalski, M.; Rijk, G. de

    2014-01-27

    Future accelerators will make extensive use of superconductors made of Nb{sub 3}Sn, which allows higher magnetic fields than NbTi. However, the wind-and-react technology of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet production makes polyimide Kapton® non applicable for the coils' electrical insulation. A Nb{sub 3}Sn technology compatible insulation material should be characterized by high radiation resistivity, good thermal conductivity, and excellent mechanical properties. Candidate materials for the electrical insulation of future accelerator's magnet coils have to be radiation certified with respect to potential degradation of their electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. This contribution presents procedures and results of tests of the electrical and mechanical properties of DGEBA epoxy + D400 hardener, which is one of the candidates for the electrical insulation of future magnets. Two test sample types have been used to determine the material degradation due to irradiation: a untreated one (unirradiated) and irradiated at 77 K with 11 kGy/min intense, 4MeV energy electrons beam to a total dose of 50 MGy.

  2. Superconducting Magnet Technology for the Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Todesco, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Ferracin, P.; Rifflet, J. M.; Sabbi, G. L.; Segreti, M.; Nakamoto, T.; van Weelderen, R.; Xu, Q.

    2015-10-01

    In this section we present the magnet technology for the High Luminosity LHC. After a short review of the project targets and constraints, we discuss the main guidelines used to determine the technology, the field/gradients, the operational margins, and the choice of the current density for each type of magnet. Then we discuss the peculiar aspects of each class of magnet, with special emphasis on the triplet.

  3. Accelerator science and technology in Europe: EuCARD 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the third annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including in this advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution.

  4. Magnetically Controlled Optical Plasma Waveguide for Electron Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B. B.; Davis, P.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Palastro, J. P.; Price, D.; Froula, D. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2009-01-22

    In order to produce multi-Gev electrons from Laser Wakefield Accelerators, we present a technique to guide high power laser beams through underdense plasma. Experimental results from the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that show density channels with minimum plasma densities below 5x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} are presented. These results are obtained using an external magnetic field (<5 T) to limit the radial heat flux from a pre-forming laser beam. The resulting increased plasma pressure gradient produces a parabolic density gradient which is tunable by changing the external magnetic field strength. These results are compared with 1-D hydrodynamic simulations, while quasi-static kinetic simulations show that for these channel conditions 90% of the energy in a 150 TW short pulse beam is guided over 5 cm and predict electron energy gains of 3 GeV.

  5. THE ACCELERATION OF IONS IN SOLAR FLARES DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Knizhnik, K.; Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F. E-mail: swisdak@umd.edu

    2011-12-20

    The acceleration of solar flare ions during magnetic reconnection is explored via particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently and simultaneously follow the motions of both protons and {alpha} particles. We show that the dominant heating of thermal ions during guide field reconnection, the usual type in the solar corona, results from pickup behavior during the entry into reconnection exhausts. In contrast to anti-parallel reconnection, the temperature increment is dominantly transverse, rather than parallel, to the local magnetic field. A comparison of protons and {alpha} reveals a mass-to-charge (M/Q) threshold in pickup behavior that favors the heating of high-M/Q ions, which is consistent with impulsive flare observations.

  6. Particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless pair shocks: a survey of magnetic inclination angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    We investigate particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless pair shocks with two-dimensional particle-in-cell numerical simulations. For fixed upstream bulk Lorentz factor γ0 = 15 and magnetic to kinetic energy fraction σ = 0.1, we explore a range of inclination angles θ between the magnetic field and the shock normal. The inclination is measured in the downstream rest frame and the magnetic field lies in a plane perpendicular to the simulation plane. The downstream energy spectrum for subluminal shocks consists of a relativistic Maxwellian and a high-energy power-law tail modified by an exponential cutoff. For parallel shocks (θ = 0° ), the tail accounts for ˜ 1% of the downstream particle number and ˜ 5% of the energy, and its energy spectral index is -2.7 ± 0.1. Accelerated particles bounce between the upstream and the downstream, and the upstream scattering is provided by oblique filaments, which have both an electromagnetic and an electrostatic component. Such filaments propagate towards the shock and are generated by the accelerated particles that escape upstream. For larger inclination angles the acceleration efficiency increases, and particles are efficiently boosted by the motional upstream electric field when gyrating across the shock. Close to the superluminality threshold θ ≈ 30° , the number and energy fractions of downstream accelerated particles are ˜ 3% and ˜ 12% respectively; the spectral index of the corresponding power-law tail is -2.4 ± 0.1. When the shock becomes superluminal (θ 30° ), the acceleration efficiency abruptly drops. Our results show that the range of upstream-frame inclination angles suitable for efficient acceleration in relativistic magnetized pair shocks is indeed very small 30° /γ0 , as suggested by previous Monte-Carlo simulations. Self-generated shock turbulence is shown to be not large enough to overcome the kinematic constraints for superluminal shocks. These findings place constraints

  7. Accelerating innovation in information and communication technology for health.

    PubMed

    Crean, Kevin W

    2010-02-01

    Around the world, inventors are creating novel information and communication technology applications and systems that can improve health for people in disparate settings. However, it is very difficult to find investment funding needed to create business models to expand and develop the prototype technologies. A comprehensive, long-term investment strategy for e-health and m-health is needed. The field of social entrepreneurship offers an integrated approach to develop needed investment models, so that innovations can reach more patients, more effectively. Specialized financing techniques and sustained support from investors can spur the expansion of mature technologies to larger markets, accelerating global health impacts.

  8. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  9. Comparison of accelerator technologies for use in ADSS

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Ludewig, H.; Raparia, D.; Trbojevic, D.; Todosow, M.; McIntyre, P.; Sattarov, A.

    2011-03-28

    candidates for accelerators that can provide intense CW proton beams are isochronous cyclotrons (IC) and superconducting linacs. We have examined a case study using a hypothetical ADS core configuration to guide our thinking in evaluating those two accelerator technologies for use in ADS systems. Issues of accelerator power, multiplicity of accelerators, and options for core neutronics and fuel form are discussed.

  10. Heating and acceleration of charged particles during magnetic dipolarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, E. E.; Kronberg, E. A.; Daly, P. W.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the thermal and energy characteristics of the plasma components observed during the magnetic dipolarizations in the near tail by the Cluster satellites. It was previously found that the first dipolarization the ratio of proton and electron temperatures ( T p/ T e) was 6-7. At the time of the observation of the first dipolarization front T p/ T e decreases by up to 3-4. The minimum value T p/ T e ( 2.0) is observed behind the front during the turbulent dipolarization phase. Decreases in T p/ T e observed at this time are associated with an increase in T e, whereas the proton temperature either decreases or remains unchanged. Decreases of the value T p/ T e during the magnetic dipolarizations coincide with increase in wave activity in the wide frequency band up to electron gyrofrequency f ce. High-frequency modes can resonantly interact with electrons causing their heating. The acceleration of ions with different masses up to energies of several hundred kiloelectron-volts is also observed during dipolarizations. In this case, the index of the energy spectrum decreases (a fraction of energetic ions increases) during the enhancement of low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations at frequencies that correspond to the gyrofrequency of this ion component. Thus, we can conclude that the processes of the interaction between waves and particles play an important role in increasing the energy of plasma particles during magnetic dipolarizations.

  11. Experimental Study of an Advanced Plasma Thruster using ICRF Heating and Magnetic Nozzle Acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira

    2005-10-01

    Electric propulsion (EP) systems utilize plasma technologies and have been developed for years as one of the most promising space propulsion approaches. It is urgently required to develop high-power plasma thrusters for human expeditions to Mars and future space exploration missions. The advanced thruster is demanded to control thrust and specific impulse by adjusting the exhaust plasma density and velocity. In the VASIMR project, a combined system of efficient ion cyclotron heating and optimized magnetic nozzle design is proposed to control the ratio of specific impulse to thrust at constant power[1]. In this system a flowing plasma is heated by ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequency) waves and the plasma thermal energy is converted to flow energy in a diverging magnetic field nozzle. We have recently performed the first demonstration of ion cyclotron resonance heating and acceleration in a magnetic nozzle by using a fast-flowing plasma with Mach number of nearly unity. Highly ionized plasma is produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic thruster (MPDT). When RF power is launched by a helically-wound antenna, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are excited, and plasma thermal energy and ion temperature drastically increase (nearly ten-fold rise) during the RF pulse. The value of resonance magnetic field is affected by the Doppler shift due to the fast-flowing plasma. Dependences of heating efficiency on both plasma density and input RF power will be presented. Ion acceleration along the field line is also observed in a diverging magnetic field nozzle. Perpendicular component (to the magnetic field) of ion energy decreases, whereas parallel component increases along the diverging magnetic field.[1] F.R. Chang Diaz, ``The VASIMR Engine,'' AIAA 2004-0149. AIAA conf. (Reno,2004); Bulletin of APS (46th APS-DPP), NM2A-3, 2004.

  12. Accelerator Technology Program. Progress report, January-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1980-03-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the first six months of calendar 1980 are discussed. This report is organized around major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be located between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility, followed by a section on the gyrocon, a new type of high-power, high-efficiency radio-frequency (rf) amplifier. The third section discusses the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT Division and the National Bureau of Standards; the fourth section concerns the free-electron studies. The fifth section covers the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, a new concept for the acceleration of low-velocity particles; this section is followed by a section discussing heavy ion fusion accelerator development. The next section reports activities in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The final section deals first with development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, then with accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  13. The final technical report of the CRADA, 'Medical Accelerator Technology'

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Rawls, J.M.

    2000-06-12

    Under this CRADA, Berkeley Lab and the industry partner, General Atomics (GA), have cooperatively developed hadron therapy technologies for commercialization. Specifically, Berkeley Lab and GA jointly developed beam transport systems to bring the extracted protons from the accelerator to the treatment rooms, rotating gantries to aim the treatment beams precisely into patients from any angle, and patient positioners to align the patient accurately relative to the treatment beams. We have also jointly developed a patient treatment delivery system that controls the radiation doses in the patient, and hardware to improve the accelerator performances, including a radio-frequency ion source and its low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system. This project facilitated the commercialization of the DOE-developed technologies in hadron therapy by the private sector in order to improve the quality of life of the nation.

  14. Particle acceleration and plasma dynamics during magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Fan; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; ...

    2015-06-17

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron–positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet (σ ≡ B2 / (4πnemec2) >> 1). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature driftmore » of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra f α (γ - 1)-p and approaches p = 1 for sufficiently large σ and system size. Eventually most of the available magnetic free energy is converted into nonthermal particle kinetic energy. An analytic model is presented to explain the key results and predict a general condition for the formation of power-law distributions. The development of reconnection in these regimes leads to relativistic inflow and outflow speeds and enhanced reconnection rates relative to nonrelativistic regimes. In the 3D simulation, the interplay between secondary kink and tearing instabilities leads to strong magnetic turbulence, but does not significantly change the energy conversion, reconnection rate, or particle acceleration. This paper suggests that relativistic reconnection sites are strong sources of nonthermal particles, which may have important implications for a variety of high-energy astrophysical problems.« less

  15. Particle acceleration and plasma dynamics during magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fan; Liu, Yi -Hsin; Daughton, William; Li, Hui

    2015-06-17

    Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for many explosive phenomena in the universe. The energy release and particle acceleration during reconnection have been proposed as a mechanism for producing high-energy emissions and cosmic rays. We carry out two- and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic simulations to investigate relativistic magnetic reconnection and the associated particle acceleration. The simulations focus on electron–positron plasmas starting with a magnetically dominated, force-free current sheet (σ ≡ B2 / (4πnemec2) >> 1). For this limit, we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection is highly efficient at accelerating particles through a first-order Fermi process accomplished by the curvature drift of particles along the electric field induced by the relativistic flows. This mechanism gives rise to the formation of hard power-law spectra f α (γ - 1)-p and approaches p = 1 for sufficiently large σ and system size. Eventually most of the available magnetic free energy is converted into nonthermal particle kinetic energy. An analytic model is presented to explain the key results and predict a general condition for the formation of power-law distributions. The development of reconnection in these regimes leads to relativistic inflow and outflow speeds and enhanced reconnection rates relative to nonrelativistic regimes. In the 3D simulation, the interplay between secondary kink and tearing instabilities leads to strong magnetic turbulence, but does not significantly change the energy conversion, reconnection rate, or particle acceleration. This paper suggests that relativistic reconnection sites are strong sources of nonthermal particles, which may have important implications for a variety of high-energy astrophysical problems.

  16. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1982-08-01

    We report on the major projects of the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Accelerator Technology Division during the last 6 months of calendar year 1981. We have continued work on the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator; we are doing studies of octupole focusing. We have completed the design study on an unusual electron-linear radiographic machine that could obtain x rays of turbine engines operating under simulated flight-maneuver conditions on a centrifuge. In September we completed the 5-y PIon Generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) program to develop the concept and technology for an accelerator-based facility to treat cancer in a hospital environment. The design and construction package for the site, building, and utilities for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility has been completed, and we have begun to concentrate on tests of the rf power equipment and on the design, procurement, and installation of the 2-MeV proto-type accelerator. The Proton Storage Ring project has continued to mature. The main effort on the racetrack microtron (RTM) has been on the design and construction of various components for the demonstration RTM. On the gyrocon radio-frequency generator project, the gyrocon was rebuilt with a new electron gun and new water-cooled gun-focus coil; these new components have performed well. We have initiated a project to produce a klystron analysis code that will be useful in reducing the electrical-energy demand for accelerators. A free-electron laser amplifier experiment to test the performance of a tapered wiggler at high optical power has been successfully completed.

  17. Magnetic designs and field quality of Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin; Alexander V. Zlobin

    2002-01-14

    This paper presents a new approach to accelerator magnet design, based on simple and robust single-layer coils with minimum number of turns arranged horizontally or vertically in a common iron yoke. Cos-theta and block type coil geometries as well as cold and warm iron yoke designs were studied. Coils and yokes were optimized for the maximum field, minimum field harmonics, and minimum sizes.

  18. Plasma dynamics and heating/acceleration during driven magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Z.; Inoue, Shizuo; Ono, Yasushi; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2015-11-01

    Highlights of the plasma dynamics and energization during driven anti-parallel magnetic reconnection are presented. The MHD condition breaks down in the entire reconnection layer (the reconnection current layer, the separatrix region and the whole downstream), and the plasma dynamics is significantly different from the results of the Hall-MHD model. In particular, we explain (1) how electron and ion dynamics decouple and how the charge separation and electrostatic electric field are produced in the magnetic field reversal region (reconnection current layer and outflow exhaust) and around the separatrix regions, (2) how electrons and ions gain energy in the reconnection current layer, (3) why the electron outflow velocity in the reconnection exhaust reaches super-Alfvenic speed and the ion outflow velocity reaches Alfvenic speed and how the parallel electric field is produced, (4) how electrons are accelerated by the parallel electric field around the separatrix region, and (5) how ions gain energy when they move across the separatrix region into the downstream. Finally we show that electrons and ions gain energy mainly from the inductive reconnection driven electric field and less from the electrostatic electric field.

  19. Comparison Study of Electromagnet and Permanent Magnet Systems for an Accelerator Using Cost-Based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, C

    2004-02-19

    The next generation of particle accelerators will be one-of-a-kind facilities, and to meet their luminosity goals they must have guaranteed availability over their several decade lifetimes. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) is one viable option for a 1 TeV electron-positron linear collider, it has an 85% overall availability goal. We previously showed how a traditional Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of a SLAC electromagnet leads to reliability-enhancing design changes. Traditional FMEA identifies failure modes with high risk but does not consider the consequences in terms of cost, which could lead to unnecessarily expensive components. We have used a new methodology, ''Life Cost-Based FMEA'', which measures risk of failure in terms of cost, in order to evaluate and compare two different technologies that might be used for the 8653 NLC magnets: electromagnets or permanent magnets. The availabilities for the two different types of magnet systems have been estimated using empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus expert opinion on permanent magnet failure modes and industry standard failure data. Labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are predicted using a Monte Carlo simulation of all possible magnet failures over a 30-year lifetime. Our goal is to maximize up-time of the NLC through magnet design improvements and the optimal combination of electromagnets and permanent magnets, while reducing magnet system lifecycle costs.

  20. Allowing for hysteresis in the calculation of fields in the elements of accelerator magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, N. A.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Serednyakov, S. S.; Shcheglov, M. A.; Royak, M. E.; Stupakov, I. M.; Kondratyeva, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    Iron magnetic circuit residual magnetization may contribute as much as several Gs to the magnetic field in charged-particle accelerators. This contribution depends on the magnetization "history." It is not taken into account in most of the existing software that uses the main magnetization curve. Therefore, an error in field calculations usually exceeds 1%, which is unacceptable for accelerators. In this article, a simple phenomenological magnetic-hysteresis model that is suitable for numerical computations is suggested. Approximations based on the proposed model are compared to the results of measurements on partial hysteresis cycles in a steel ring.

  1. Magnetic and Structural Design of a 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ Accelerator Depole Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Hadron Colliders (HC) are the most powerful discovery tools in modern high energy physics. A 100 TeV scale HC with a nominal operation field of at least 15 T is being considered for the post-LHC era. The choice of a 15 T nominal field requires using the Nb3Sn technology. Practical demonstration of this field level in an accelerator-quality magnet and substantial reduction of the magnet costs are the key conditions for realization of such a machine. FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale HC. The magnet design is based on 4-layer shell type coils, graded between the inner and outer layers to maximize the performance. The experience gained during the 11-T dipole R&D campaign is applied to different aspects of the magnet design. This paper describes the magnetic and structural designs and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ dipole and the steps towards the demonstration model.

  2. Magnetic sensing technology for molecular analyses

    PubMed Central

    Issadore, D.; Park, Y. I.; Shao, H.; Min, C.; Lee, K.; Liong, M.; Weissleder, R.; Lee, H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors, based on nanomaterials and miniature electronics, have emerged as a powerful diagnostic platform. Benefiting from the inherently negligible magnetic background of biological objects, magnetic detection is highly selective even in complex biological media. The sensing thus requires minimal sample purification, and yet achieves high signal-to-background contrast. Moreover, magnetic sensors are also well-suited for miniaturization to match the size of biological targets, which enables sensitive detection of rare cells and small amounts of molecular markers. We herein summarize recent advances in magnetic sensing technologies, with an emphasis on clinical applications in point-of-care settings. Key components of sensors, including magnetic nanomaterials, labeling strategies and magnetometry, are reviewed. PMID:24887807

  3. Analysis of accelerants and fire debris using aroma detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.

    1997-01-17

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of electronic aroma detection technologies for the detection and identification of accelerant residues in suspected arson debris. Through the analysis of known accelerant residues, a trained neural network was developed for classifying suspected arson samples. Three unknown fire debris samples were classified using this neural network. The item corresponding to diesel fuel was correctly identified every time. For the other two items, wide variations in sample concentration and excessive water content, producing high sample humidities, were shown to influence the sensor response. Sorbent sampling prior to aroma detection was demonstrated to reduce these problems and to allow proper neural network classification of the remaining items corresponding to kerosene and gasoline.

  4. Magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration in high Mach number shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2015-11-01

    The amplification of magnetic fields is a central ingredient in understanding particle acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. I will present results from multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of shock formation and particle acceleration for different magnetization levels. These first principles simulations, for unprecedented temporal and spatial scales, help bridge the gap between fully kinetic and hybrid modeling. The results show that depending on the magnetization the turbulence responsible for particle injection and acceleration is determined by different processes, which include Weibel and Bell-type instabilities, but also magnetic reconnection. At high Mach numbers both electrons and ions are shown to be efficiently injected and accelerated. I will discuss the importance of these results for current astrophysical models and the possibility of studying these magnetic field amplification and particle acceleration processes in near future high energy density laboratory experiments.

  5. A hybrid data acquisition system for magnetic measurements of accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Martchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G. L.

    2011-06-03

    A hybrid data acquisition system was developed for magnetic measurement of superconducting accelerator magnets at LBNL. It consists of a National Instruments dynamic signal acquisition (DSA) card and two Metrolab fast digital integrator (FDI) cards. The DSA card records the induced voltage signals from the rotating probe while the FDI cards records the flux increment integrated over a certain angular step. This allows the comparison of the measurements performed with two cards. In this note, the setup and test of the system is summarized. With a probe rotating at a speed of 0.5 Hz, the multipole coefficients of two magnets were measured with the hybrid system. The coefficients from the DSA and FDI cards agree with each other, indicating that the numerical integration of the raw voltage acquired by the DSA card is comparable to the performance of the FDI card in the current measurement setup.

  6. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology.

    PubMed

    Herrera-May, Agustín L; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A; García-Ramírez, Pedro J; Manjarrez, Elías

    2009-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration.

  7. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; García-Ramírez, Pedro J.; Manjarrez, Elías

    2009-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration. PMID:22408480

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging provides anatomical definition of normal and abnormal tissues with a contrast and detection sensitivity superior to those of x-ray computed tomography in the human head and pelvis and parts of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Recent improvements in technology should lead to advances in diagnostic imaging of the breast and regions of the abdomen. Selected-region nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of protons, carbon-13, and phosphorus-31 has developed into a basic science tool for in vivo studies on man and a unique tool for clinical diagnoses of metabolic disorders. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance is considered safe if access to the magnet environment is controlled. Technological advances employing field strengths over 2 teslas will require biophysical studies of heating and static field effects.

  9. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the calendar year 1979 are highlighted, with references to more detailed reports. This report is organized around the major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section covers the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; the second section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be built between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility. A new project that achieved considerable momentum during the year is described next - the free-electron laser studies; the following section discusses the status of the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiation program. Next, two more new programs, the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT-Division and the National Bureau of Standards and the radio-frequency (rf) accelerator development for heavy ion fusion, are outlined. Development activities on a new type of high-power, high-efficiency rf amplifier called the gyrocon are then reported, and the final sections cover development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, and linear accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  10. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  11. Pulsed Magnet Arc Designs for Recirculating Linac Muon Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, G.M. Wang

    2009-05-01

    Recirculating linear accelerators (RLAs) using both pulsed quadrupoles and pulsed dipoles can be used to quickly accelerate muons in the 3 – 2000 GeV range. Estimates on the requirements for the pulsed quadrupoles and dipoles are presented.

  12. Final Report to the Department of Energy on the 1994 International Accelerator School: Frontiers of Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, F.A.

    1998-09-17

    The international accelerator school on Frontiers of Accelerator Technology was organized jointly by the US Particle Accelerator School (Dr. Mel Month and Ms. Marilyn Paul), the CERN Accelerator School, and the KEK Accelerator School, and was hosted by the University of Hawaii. The course was held on Maui, Hawaii, November 3-9, 1994 and was made possible in part by a grant from the Department of Energy under award number DE-FG03-94ER40875, AMDT M006. The 1994 program was preceded by similar joint efforts held at Santa Margherita di Pula, Sardinia in February 1985, South Padre Island, Texas in October 1986, Anacapri, Italy in October 1988, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina in October 1990, and Benalmedena, Spain in October/November 1992. The most recent program was held in Montreux, Switzerland in May 1998. The purpose of the program is to disseminate knowledge on the latest ideas and developments in the technology of particle accelerators by bringing together known world experts and younger scientists in the field. It is intended for individuals with professional interest in accelerator physics and technology, for graduate students, for post-docs, for those interested in accelerator based sciences, and for scientific and engineering staff at industrial firms, especially those companies specializing in accelerator components.

  13. Education in a rapidly advancing technology: Accelerators and beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Month, Mel

    2000-06-01

    The field of accelerators and beams (A&B) is one of today's fast changing technologies. Because university faculties have not been able to keep pace with the associated advancing knowledge, universities have not been able to play their traditional role of educating the scientists and engineers needed to sustain this technology for use in science, industry, commerce, and defense. This problem for A&B is described and addressed. The solution proposed, a type of "distance" education, is the U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) created in the early 1980s. USPAS provides the universities with a means of serving the education needs of the institutions using A&B, primarily but not exclusively the national laboratories. The field of A&B is briefly summarized. The need for education outside the university framework, the raison d'être for USPAS, the USPAS method, program structure, and curriculum, and particular USPAS-university connections are explained. The management of USPAS is analyzed, including its unique administrative structure, its institutional ties, and its operations, finance, marketing, and governmental relations. USPAS performance over the years is documented and a business assessment is made. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the future potential for this type of educational program, including possible extrapolation to new areas and/or different environments, in particular, its extra-government potential and its international possibilities.

  14. Education in a rapidly advancing technology: Accelerators and beams

    SciTech Connect

    Month, Mel

    2000-06-01

    The field of accelerators and beams (A and B) is one of today's fast changing technologies. Because university faculties have not been able to keep pace with the associated advancing knowledge, universities have not been able to play their traditional role of educating the scientists and engineers needed to sustain this technology for use in science, industry, commerce, and defense. This problem for A and B is described and addressed. The solution proposed, a type of ''distance'' education, is the U.S. Particle Accelerator School (USPAS) created in the early 1980s. USPAS provides the universities with a means of serving the education needs of the institutions using A and B, primarily but not exclusively the national laboratories. The field of A and B is briefly summarized. The need for education outside the university framework, the raison d'etre for USPAS, the USPAS method, program structure, and curriculum, and particular USPAS-university connections are explained. The management of USPAS is analyzed, including its unique administrative structure, its institutional ties, and its operations, finance, marketing, and governmental relations. USPAS performance over the years is documented and a business assessment is made. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the future potential for this type of educational program, including possible extrapolation to new areas and/or different environments, in particular, its extra-government potential and its international possibilities. (c) 2000 American Association of Physics Teachers.

  15. On the Distribution of Particle Acceleration Sites in Plasmoid-dominated Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Cerutti, Benoît; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  16. ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION SITES IN PLASMOID-DOMINATED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Cerutti, Benoit; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  17. THE MECHANISMS OF ELECTRON ACCELERATION DURING MULTIPLE X LINE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION WITH A GUIDE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2016-04-20

    The interactions between magnetic islands are considered to play an important role in electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection. In this paper, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed to study electron acceleration during multiple X line reconnection with a guide field. Because the electrons remain almost magnetized, we can analyze the contributions of the parallel electric field, Fermi, and betatron mechanisms to electron acceleration during the evolution of magnetic reconnection through comparison with a guide-center theory. The results show that with the magnetic reconnection proceeding, two magnetic islands are formed in the simulation domain. Next, the electrons are accelerated by both the parallel electric field in the vicinity of the X lines and the Fermi mechanism due to the contraction of the two magnetic islands. Then, the two magnetic islands begin to merge into one, and, in such a process, the electrons can be accelerated by both the parallel electric field and betatron mechanisms. During the betatron acceleration, the electrons are locally accelerated in the regions where the magnetic field is piled up by the high-speed flow from the X line. At last, when the coalescence of the two islands into one big island finishes, the electrons can be further accelerated by the Fermi mechanism because of the contraction of the big island. With the increase of the guide field, the contributions of the Fermi and betatron mechanisms to electron acceleration become less and less important. When the guide field is sufficiently large, the contributions of the Fermi and betatron mechanisms are almost negligible.

  18. Low-noise pulsed current source for magnetic-field measurements of magnets for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelyanenko, M. M.; Borisov, V. V.; Donyagin, A. M.; Khodzhibagiyan, H. G.; Kostromin, S. A.; Makarov, A. A.; Shemchuk, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The schematic diagram, design, and technical characteristics of the pulsed current source developed and produced for the magnetic-field measurement system of superconducting magnets for accelerators are described. The current source is based on the current regulator with pass transistor bank in the linear mode. Output current pulses (0-100 A) are produced by utilizing the energy of the preliminarily charged capacitor bank (5-40 V), which is additionally charged between pulses. The output current does not have the mains frequency and harmonics ripple. The relative noise level is less than-100 dB (or 10-5) of RMS value (it is defined as the ratio of output RMS noise current to a maximal output current of 100 A within the operating bandwidth, expressed in dB). The work was performed at the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR).

  19. The Machine Protection System for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Warner, Arden; Liu, Ning; Neswold, Richard; Carmichael, Linden

    2015-11-15

    The Machine Protection System (MPS) for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility (FAST) has been implemented and tested. The system receives signals from several subsystems and devices which conveys the relevant status needed to the safely operate the accelerator. Logic decisions are made based on these inputs and some predefined user settings which in turn controls the gate signal to the laser of the photo injector. The inputs of the system have a wide variety of signal types, encoding methods and urgencies for which the system is designed to accommodate. The MPS receives fast shutdown (FSD) signals generated by the beam loss system and inhibits the beam or reduces the beam intensity within a macropulse when the beam losses at several places along the accelerator beam line are higher than acceptable values. TTL or relay contact signals from the vacuum system, toroids, magnet systems etc., are chosen with polarities that ensure safe operation of the accelerator from unintended events such as cable disconnection in the harsh industrial environment of the experimental hall. A RS422 serial communication scheme is used to interface the operation permit generator module and a large number of movable devices each reporting multi-bit status. The system also supports operations at user defined lower beam levels for system conunissioning. The machine protection system is implemented with two commercially available off-the-shelf VMEbus based modules with on board FPGA devices. The system is monitored and controlled via the VMEbus by a single board CPU

  20. Performance of conduction cooled splittable superconducting magnet package for linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; DiMarco, J.; Kimura, N.; Makarov, A.; Orlov, Y.; V. Poloubotko; Tartaglia, M.; Yamamoto, A.

    2016-02-19

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. Furthermore, the effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.

  1. Nonthermally dominated electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-β plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Xiaocan; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; ...

    2015-09-24

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization.more » We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. Thus, the nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems.« less

  2. Nonthermally dominated electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-β plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaocan; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Li, Gang

    2015-09-24

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization. We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. Thus, the nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems.

  3. NONTHERMALLY DOMINATED ELECTRON ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN A LOW-β PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaocan; Li, Gang; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-10-01

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization. We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. The nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the  highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems.

  4. Studies of $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; ...

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  5. Comparisons of radio frequency technology for superconducting accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimber, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities, normal conducting as well as superconducting, there has been a need to drive them with RF power. At first glance, the function of an RF drive system may seem simple and straightforward, but this belies subtleties that greatly affect the performance of the cavity itself, diminishing efforts in perfecting techniques in design and manufacture. It can also contribute to a significant portion of the initial capital and ongoing running costs of a facility, maintenance labor, downtime and future expenditure as the system ages. The RF `system', should be thought of as just that, the entire collection of components from wall plug to cavity. Following this integrated approach will enable the system to meet or exceed its design goals. This paper seeks to review the current state of RF technology for superconducting structures and to compare these technologies, looking at what has traditionally been used, developments that have enabled higher efficiencies and higher reliabilities as well as looking towards future technologies. It will concentrate on superconducting applications, but much of the narrative is equally applicable to normal conducting structures as well.

  6. Preferential acceleration and magnetic field enhancement in plasmas with e+/e- beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Cong Tuan; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical model of current filaments predicting preferential acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement in a plasma with e+/e- beam injection is presented. When the e+/e- beams are injected into a plasma, current filaments are formed. The beam particles are accelerated or decelerated depending on the types of current filaments in which they are trapped. It is found that in the electron/ion ambient plasma, the e+ beam particles are preferentially accelerated, while the e- beam particles are preferentially decelerated. The preferential particle acceleration/deceleration is absent when the ambient plasma is the e+/e- plasma. We also find that the particle momentum decrease can explain the magnetic field increase during the development of Weibel/filamentation instability. Supporting simulation results of particle acceleration/deceleration and magnetic field enhancement are presented. Our findings can be applied to a wide range of astrophysical plasmas with the e+/e- beam injection.

  7. Nonthermally Dominated Electron Acceleration during Magnetic Reconnection in a Low-beta Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaocan

    2015-07-21

    This work was motivated by electron acceleration during solar flares. After some introductory remarks on proposed particle acceleration mechanisms and questions needing answers, dynamic simulations and simulation results are presented including energy spectra and the formation of the power law distribution. In summary, magnetic reconnection is highly efficient at converting the free magnetic energy stored in a magnetic shear and accelerating electrons to nonthermal energies in low-β regime. The nonthermal electrons have a dominant fraction and form power-law energy spectra with spectral index p ~ 1 in low-β regime. Electrons are preferentially accelerated along the curvature drift direction along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflow. The results can be applied to explain the observations of electron acceleration during solar flares.

  8. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion-relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and Bz = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  9. A diode for accelerating hydrogen nuclides with electron conductivity suppressed by an internal ring magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Kozlovskii, K. I.; Shatokhin, V. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present new experimental data on the acceleration of deuterons in a small-size magnetically insulated diode. Plasma containing deuterons was created at the anode during irradiation of a TiD target by a focused laser beam with a wavelength of 1.06 μm. The accelerating voltage pulse was formed by an Arkadiev-Marx generator. A circular cathode was arranged symmetrically relative to the anode and represented a permanent ring magnet with an inner radius not exceeding 0.02 m and a magnetic induction of up to 0.4 T at the center, which ensured magnetic insulation of the accelerating gap. The experiments showed that the current of accelerated deuterons with energies of up to 300 eV can reach a level of 0.5 kA at pulse durations of ≤0.5 μs.

  10. Magnetized Plasma-filled Waveguide: A New High-Gradient Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Avitzour, Yoav; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-01-22

    Electromagnetic waves confined between the metal plates of a plasma-filled waveguide are investigated. It is demonstrated that when the plasma is magnetized along the metallic plates, there exists a luminous accelerating wave propagating with a very slow group velocity. It is shown that the magnetized plasma 'isolates' the metal wall from the transverse electric field, thereby reducing potential breakdown problems. Applications of the metallic plasma-filled waveguide to particle accelerations and microwave pulse manipulation are described.

  11. Summary of the Persistent Current Effect Measurements in Nb 3 Sn and NbTi Accelerator Magnets at Fermilab

    DOE PAGES

    Velev, G. V.; Chlachidze, G.; DiMarco, J.; ...

    2016-01-06

    In the past 10 years, Fermilab has been executing an intensive R&D program on accelerator magnets based on Nb3Sn superconductor technology. This R&D effort includes dipole and quadrupole models for different programs, such as LARP and 11 T dipoles for the LHC high-luminosity upgrade. Before the Nb3Sn R&D program, Fermilab was involved in the production of the low-beta quadrupole magnets for LHC based on the NbTi superconductor. Additionally, during the 2003-2005 campaign to optimize the operation of the Tevatron, a large number of Tevatron magnets were re-measured. As a result of this field analysis, a systematic study of the persistentmore » current decay and snapback effect in these magnets was performed. This paper summarizes the result of this study and presents a comparison between Nb3Sn and NbTi dipoles and quadrupoles.« less

  12. Electron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave propagating across a magnetic field in periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buts, V. A.; Ognivenko, V. V.

    1990-05-01

    The possibility of the acceleration of charged particles captured by an electromagnetic wave propagating across a constant magnetic field in periodic slow-wave structures is demonstrated. A plane waveguide with perfectly conducting walls is examined as an example of an electrodynamic structure in which such an acceleration mechanism is possible. The acceleration rate is determined, and the stability of captured particle motion is investigated.

  13. PREFACE: Emerging non-volatile memories: magnetic and resistive technologies Emerging non-volatile memories: magnetic and resistive technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-02-01

    In 2010, the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) published an assessment of the potential and maturity of selected emerging research on memory technologies. Eight different technologies of non-volatile memories were compared (ferroelectric gate field-effect transistor, nano-electro-mechanical switch, spin-transfer torque random access memories (STTRAM), various types of resistive RAM, in particular redox RAM, nanothermal phase change RAM, electronic effects RAM, macromolecular memories and molecular RAM). In this report, spin-transfer torque MRAM and redox RRAM were identified as two emerging memory technologies recommended for accelerated research and development leading to scaling and commercialization of non-volatile RAM to and beyond the 16nm generation. Nowadays, there is an intense research and development effort in microelectronics on these two technologies, one based on spintronic phenomena (tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque), the other based on migration of vacancies or ions in an insulating matrix driven by oxydo-reduction potentials. Both technologies could be used for standalone or embedded applications. In this context, it appeared timely to publish a cluster of review articles related to these two technologies. In this cluster, the first two articles introduce the general principles of spin-transfer torque RAM and of thermally assisted RAM. The third presents a broader range of applications for this integrated CMOS/magnetic tunnel junction technology for low-power electronics. The fourth paper presents more advanced research on voltage control of magnetization switching with the aim of dramatically reducing the write energy in MRAM. The last two papers deal with two categories of resistive RAM, one based on the migration of cations, the other one based on nanowires. We thank all the authors and reviewers for their contribution to this cluster issue. Our special thanks are due to Dr Olivia Roche, Publisher, and Dr

  14. Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Srivastava, Rameshwar D.; Ciferno, Jared; Litynski, John; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2013-08-15

    This special section of Energy & Fuels comprises a selection of papers presented at the topical conference “Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation”, sponsored and organized by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting held in Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 28-Nov 2, 2012. That topical conference focused on the latest research and development efforts in five main areas related to fossil energy, with each area focusing on the utilization of both experimental and computational approaches: (1) gas separations (membranes, sorbents, and solvents for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} production), (2) CO{sub 2} utilization (enhanced oil recovery, chemical production, mineralization, etc.), (3) carbon sequestration (flow in natural systems), (4) advanced power cycles (oxy-combustion, chemical looping, gasification, etc.), and (5) fuel processing (H{sub 2} production for fuel cells).

  15. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizunno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission from shocks in order to understand the observed emission from relativistic jets and supernova remnants. The investigation involves the study of collisionless shocks, where the Weibel instability is responsible for particle acceleration as well as magnetic field generation. A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code has been used to investigate the shock processes in electron-positron plasmas. The evolution of theWeibe1 instability and its associated magnetic field generation and particle acceleration are studied with two different jet velocities (0 = 2,5 - slow, fast) corresponding to either outflows in supernova remnants or relativistic jets, such as those found in AGNs and microquasars. Slow jets have intrinsically different structures in both the generated magnetic fields and the accelerated particle spectrum. In particular, the jet head has a very weak magnetic field and the ambient electrons are strongly accelerated and dragged by the jet particles. The simulation results exhibit jitter radiation from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, generated by the Weibel instability, which has different spectral properties than standard synchrotron emission in a homogeneous magnetic field.

  16. Electron acceleration in collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection by laser-produced plasma ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehong; Spitkovksy, Anatoly; Fox, Will; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    We perform particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection generated by ablated plasma expanding into a magnetized background plasma. We find: (1) The simulated proton radiography produces different morphology of the shock structure depending on the orientation of the magnetic field and can be used to identify a shock in the experiment. Electrons are accelerated by the whistler waves generated at oblique sites of the shock. (2) Forced collisionless magnetic reconnection is induced when the expanding plumes carry opposite magnetic polarities and interact with a background plasma. Electrons are accelerated at the reconnection X line and reveal a power-law distribution as the plasma beta is lowered, β = 0.08 . As the plasma beta is increased, β = 0.32 , the 1st order Fermi mechanism against the two plasma plumes contributes to the electron acceleration as well as the X line acceleration. Using 3-D simulations, we also explore the effect of 3-D instabilities (Weibel instability or drift-kink) on particle acceleration and magnetic field annihilation between the colliding magnetized plumes

  17. Using magnetic tape technology for data migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Therrien, David; Cheung, Yim-Ling

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic tape and optical disk library units (jukeboxes) are satisfying the demand for high-capacity cost-effective storage. The choice between optical disk and magnetic tape technology must take into account the cost limitations as well as the performance and reliability requirements of the user environment. Library units require data management software in order to function in an automated and user-transparent way. The most common data management applications are backup and recovery, data migration, and archiving. The medium access patterns that these applications create will be described. Since the most user visible application is data migration, a queue simulator was developed to model its performance against a variety of library units. The major subject of this paper is the design and implementation of this simulator as well as some simulation results. The relative cost and reliability of magnetic tape versus optical disk library units is presented for completeness.

  18. Theoretical and technological building blocks for an innovation accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Harmelen, F.; Kampis, G.; Börner, K.; van den Besselaar, P.; Schultes, E.; Goble, C.; Groth, P.; Mons, B.; Anderson, S.; Decker, S.; Hayes, C.; Buecheler, T.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    Modern science is a main driver of technological innovation. The efficiency of the scientific system is of key importance to ensure the competitiveness of a nation or region. However, the scientific system that we use today was devised centuries ago and is inadequate for our current ICT-based society: the peer review system encourages conservatism, journal publications are monolithic and slow, data is often not available to other scientists, and the independent validation of results is limited. The resulting scientific process is hence slow and sloppy. Building on the Innovation Accelerator paper by Helbing and Balietti [1], this paper takes the initial global vision and reviews the theoretical and technological building blocks that can be used for implementing an innovation (in first place: science) accelerator platform driven by re-imagining the science system. The envisioned platform would rest on four pillars: (i) Redesign the incentive scheme to reduce behavior such as conservatism, herding and hyping; (ii) Advance scientific publications by breaking up the monolithic paper unit and introducing other building blocks such as data, tools, experiment workflows, resources; (iii) Use machine readable semantics for publications, debate structures, provenance etc. in order to include the computer as a partner in the scientific process, and (iv) Build an online platform for collaboration, including a network of trust and reputation among the different types of stakeholders in the scientific system: scientists, educators, funding agencies, policy makers, students and industrial innovators among others. Any such improvements to the scientific system must support the entire scientific process (unlike current tools that chop up the scientific process into disconnected pieces), must facilitate and encourage collaboration and interdisciplinarity (again unlike current tools), must facilitate the inclusion of intelligent computing in the scientific process, must facilitate

  19. Magnetic Nozzles for Plasma Thrusters: Acceleration, Thrust, and Detachment Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    In the unmagnetized case the plasma is accelerated diffusively and some ion streamlines go backwards to the left dielectric wall , where ions are...processes related to the plasma wall interaction, virtual cathode considerations and anomalous diffusion. In this work, anomalous diffusion and virtual...demagnetized, which allows the development of the electric force and ion acceleration there, and increases the plasma flux to the wall . For β0 > 3 − 4

  20. Coalescence of Macroscopic Magnetic Islands and Electron Acceleration from STEREO Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Yao; Li, Gang; Kong, Xiang-Liang; Feng, Shi-Wei

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations have suggested that electrons can be efficiently accelerated in contracting magnetic islands and when magnetic islands coalesce. Using data from the STEREO spacecraft, we report in this article the first observation of macroscopic magnetic-island coalescence and a possible splitting, and the associated electron acceleration. On 24 May 2010, two magnetic islands were observed by both the STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft to propagate out along the current sheet behind a coronal mass ejection (CME) and merge. Electron acceleration to above 10 keV is inferred through the observation of a type-III-like radio burst. The acceleration process occurred at a macroscopic scale, likely during the merging of the two magnetic islands. Our observation of the magnetic-island coalescence is supported by a 2.5-D axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulation of CME in which the merging of post-CME magnetic islands is clearly identified.

  1. Coalescence of Macroscopic Magnetic Islands and Electron Acceleration from STEREO Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H.; CHEN, Y.; Li, G.; Kong, X.; Feng, S.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations have suggested that electrons can be efficiently accelerated in contracting magnetic islands and when magnetic islands coalesce. Using data from the STEREO spacecraft, we report in this article the first observation of macroscopic magnetic-island coalescence and a possible splitting, and the associated electron acceleration. On 24 May 2010, two magnetic islands were observed by both the STEREO-A and STEREO-B spacecraft to propagate out along the current sheet behind a coronal mass ejection (CME) and merge. Electron acceleration to above 10 keV is inferred through the observation of a type-III-like radio burst. The acceleration process occurred at a macroscopic scale, likely during the merging of the two magnetic islands. Our observation of the magnetic-island coalescence is supported by a 2.5-D axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulation of CME in which the merging of post-CME magnetic islands is clearly identified.

  2. Particle Acceleration and Radiation associated with Magnetic Field Generation from Relativistic Collisionless Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Hardee, P. E.; Richardson, G. A.; Preece, R. D.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  3. Magnetic field design for a Penning ion source for a 200 keV electrostatic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Sadati, S. M.; Ebrahimibasabi, E.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the structure of magnetic field for a Penning ion source has been designed and constructed with the use of permanent magnets. The ion source has been designed and constructed for a 200 keV electrostatic accelerator. With using CST Studio Suite, the magnetic field profile inside the ion source was simulated and an appropriate magnetic system was designed to improve particle confinement. Designed system consists of two ring magnets with 9 mm distance from each other around the anode. The ion source was constructed and the cylindrical magnet and designed magnetic system were tested on the ion source. The results showed that the ignition voltage for ion source with the designed magnetic system is almost 300 V lower than the ion source with the cylindrical magnet. Better particle confinement causes lower voltage discharge to occur.

  4. Performance of Superconducting Magnet Prototypes for LCLS-II Linear Accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Andreev, Nikolai; DiMarco, Joseph; ...

    2017-01-05

    The new LCLS-II Linear Superconducting Accelerator at SLAC needs superconducting magnet packages installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer an electron beam. Two magnet prototypes were built and successfully tested at Fermilab. Magnets have an iron dominated configuration, quadrupole and dipole NbTi superconducting coils, and splittable in the vertical plane configuration. Magnets inside the Cryomodule are conductively cooled through pure Al heat sinks. Both magnets performance was verified by magnetic measurements at room temperature, and during cold tests in liquid helium. Test results including magnetic measurements are discussed. Special attention was given to the magnet performance at low currentsmore » where the iron yoke and the superconductor hysteresis effects have large influence. Both magnet prototypes were accepted for the installation in FNAL and JLAB prototype Cryomodules.« less

  5. Performance of Superconducting Magnet Prototypes for LCLS-II Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Andreev, Nikolai; DiMarco, Joseph; Makarov, Alexander; Tartaglia, Michael; Velev, George

    2016-12-30

    The new LCLS-II Linear Superconducting Accelerator at SLAC needs superconducting magnet packages installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer an electron beam. Two magnet prototypes were built and successfully tested at Fermilab. Magnets have an iron dominated configuration, quadrupole and dipole NbTi superconducting coils, and splittable in the vertical plane configuration. Magnets inside the Cryomodule are conductively cooled through pure Al heat sinks. Both magnets performance was verified by magnetic measurements at room temperature, and during cold tests in liquid helium. Test results including magnetic measurements are discussed. Special attention was given to the magnet performance at low currents where the iron yoke and the superconductor hysteresis effects have large influence. Both magnet prototypes were accepted for the installation in FNAL and JLAB prototype Cryomodules.

  6. A laser accelerator. [interaction of polarized light beam with electrons in magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.; Ride, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that a laser can efficiently accelerate charged particles if a magnetic field is introduced to improve the coupling between the particle and the wave. Solving the relativistic equations of motion for an electron in a uniform magnetic field and superposed, circularly polarized electromagnetic wave, it is found that in energy-position phase space an electron traces out a curtate cycloid: it alternately gains and loses energy. If, however, the parameters are chosen so that the electron's oscillations in the two fields are resonant, it will continually accelerate or decelerate depending on its initial position within a wavelength of light. A laboratory accelerator operating under these resonant conditions appears attractive: in a magnetic field of 10,000 gauss, and the fields of a 5 x 10 to the 12th W, 10 micron wavelength laser, an optimally positioned electron would accelerate to 700 MeV in only 10 m.

  7. Analysis of Voltage Signals from Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Lizarazo, J.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-30

    We present two techniques used in the analysis of voltage tap data collected during recent tests of superconducting magnets developed by the Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The first technique was used on a quadrupole to provide information about quench origins that could not be obtained using the time-of-flight method. The second technique illustrates the use of data from transient flux imbalances occurring during magnet ramping to diagnose changes in the current-temperature margin of a superconducting cable. In both cases, the results of this analysis contributed to make improvements on subsequent magnets.

  8. Nonresonant Charged-Particle Acceleration by Electrostatic Waves Propagating across Fluctuating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the effect of nonresonant charged-particle acceleration by an electrostatic wave propagating across the background magnetic field. We show that in the absence of resonance (i.e., when particle velocities are much smaller than the wave phase velocity) particles can be accelerated by electrostatic waves provided that the adiabaticity of particle motion is destroyed by magnetic field fluctuations. Thus, in a system with stochastic particle dynamics the electrostatic wave should be damped even in the absence of Landau resonance. The proposed mechanism is responsible for the acceleration of particles that cannot be accelerated via resonant wave-particle interactions. Simplicity of this straightforward acceleration scenario indicates a wide range of possible applications.

  9. Electron acceleration in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection with a guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, J. T. Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F.

    2015-10-15

    Kinetic simulations of 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide field show a dramatic enhancement of energetic electron production when compared with 2D systems. In the 2D systems, electrons are trapped in magnetic islands that limit their energy gain, whereas in the 3D systems the filamentation of the current layer leads to a stochastic magnetic field that enables the electrons to access volume-filling acceleration regions. The dominant accelerator of the most energetic electrons is a Fermi-like mechanism associated with reflection of charged particles from contracting field lines.

  10. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  11. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  12. Microfluidic technologies for accelerating the clinical translation of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Pedro M.; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Karnik, Rohit; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Using nanoparticles for therapy and imaging holds tremendous promise for the treatment of major diseases such as cancer. However, their translation into the clinic has been slow because it remains difficult to produce nanoparticles that are consistent ‘batch-to-batch’, and in sufficient quantities for clinical research. Moreover, platforms for rapid screening of nanoparticles are still lacking. Recent microfluidic technologies can tackle some of these issues, and offer a way to accelerate the clinical translation of nanoparticles. In this Progress Article, we highlight the advances in microfluidic systems that can synthesize libraries of nanoparticles in a well-controlled, reproducible and high-throughput manner. We also discuss the use of microfluidics for rapidly evaluating nanoparticles in vitro under microenvironments that mimic the in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we highlight some systems that can manipulate small organisms, which could be used for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of nanoparticles or for drug screening. We conclude with a critical assessment of the near- and long-term impact of microfluidics in the field of nanomedicine. PMID:23042546

  13. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, a symposium was held. The proceedings are presented. The sessions covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  14. Explosive-magnetic generators as power sources for railgun accelerators of solid projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, A.G.; Bashkatov, Yu.L.; Shvetsov, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors study the feasibility of and establish the requirements for using an explosive-magnetic generator as a power source for a railgun accelerator. They determine the dependence of the generator inductance on the coordinates such as to provide constant acceleration motion. They construct single and three-element plane MK generators which are able to provide this acceleration regime. In experiments involving the acceleration of solid projectiles in a 0.8-m-long railgun accelerator they achieve velocities of 5 km/sec with a projectile whose mass was 1.2-1.3 g. The acceleration to higher velocities is found to depend on increasing the scale of the experiment (railgun length, current density, and electric impulse duration) as well as on proper electrode material selection and on evacuation of the channel.

  15. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    SciTech Connect

    I.Yu. Kostyukov; G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.M. Rax

    2001-12-12

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made.

  16. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  17. Ion acceleration in a solenoid-free plasma expanded by permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Oguni, K.; Yamada, H.; Fujiwara, T.

    2008-08-15

    Ion acceleration is achieved in a low-pressure solenoid-free plasma expanded by permanent magnet arrays. Although a permanent magnet normally forms cusp magnetic fields which prevents plasma diffusion and double layer formation, by employing double concentric arrays of permanent magnets, a constant field area, and a diverging magnetic field can be generated near the outlet of the plasma source. In the source, a rapid potential drop with 4 cm thickness from 50 V to 20 V is generated at the diverging field area for 0.35 mTorr and a supersonic ion beam accelerated through the potential drop is observed in the diffusion chamber. The beam energy can be increased up to over 40 eV with a decrease in gas pressure.

  18. The role of magnetic reconnection on astrophysical jets launching and particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete

    2012-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection events like those associated to solar flares can be also a very powerful mechanism operating on accretion disk/jet systems. We have recently found that the magnetic power released in fast reconnection flares is more than sufficient to accelerate relativistic plasmons and produce the observed radio luminosity of the nuclear jets associated both to galactic stellar mass black holes and low luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The famous observed correlation between the radio luminosity and the black hole mass of these sources, spanning ^10^9 orders of magnitude in mass, can be naturally explained in this model as simply due to the magnetic reconnection activity at the jet launching region of the accretion disk coronae of these sources. A similar process may explain the observed x-ray flares in young stars (YSOs) as well. In this talk, we review this mechanism and show results of numerical MHD tests of its validity. Also, particle acceleration in the magnetic reconnection sites of these sources can be rather efficient . In this talk, we will also discuss this acceleration process showing the energy distribution evolution of several thousands of test particles injected in a three-dimensional MHD domain of magnetic reconnection with embedded turbulence. The particle acceleration rate, which depends on the reconnection rate, is highly enhanced in this case. This is because reconnection becomes fast and independent of magnetic resistivity in the presence of turbulence and allows the formation of a thick volume in the current sheet filled with multiple, simultaneously reconnecting magnetic fluxes. The particles trapped within this volume then suffer several head-on scatterings with the contracting magnetic fluctuations in a first-order Fermi process. Particles are thus exponentially accelerated to energies which are several orders of magnitude larger than their injected energy.

  19. Particle acceleration and transport in a chaotic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, G.; Dasgupta, B.

    2012-12-01

    Time-dependent chaotic magnetic field can arise from a simple asymmetric current wire-loop system (CWLS). Such simple CWLSs exist, for example, in solar flares. Indeed one can use an ensemble of such systems to model solar active region magnetic field [1,2]. Here we use test particle simulation to investigate particle transport and energization in such a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field, and through induction, a chaotic electric field. We first construct an ensemble of simple systems based on the estimated size and field strength of solar active region. By following the trajectories of single charged particles, we will examine how particle energy is changed. Diffusion coefficients in both real space and momentum space can be calculated as well as the average trapped time of the particles within chaotic field region. Particle energy spectrum as a function of time will be examined. [1] Dasgupta, B. and Abhay K. Ram, (2007) Chaotic magnetic fields due to asymmetric current configurations -application to cross field diffusion of particles in cosmic rays, (Presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the DPP, APS, Abstract # BP8.00102) [2] G. Li, B. Dasgupta, G. Webb, and A. K. Ram, (2009) Particle Motion and Energization in a Chaotic Magnetic Field, AIP Conf. Proc. 1183, pp. 201-211; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3266777

  20. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  1. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  2. Acceleration of charged particles in magnetic reconnection Solar flares, the magnetosphere, and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A possible source of free energy available for accelerating charged particles is conversion of magnetic energy to particle energy in reconnecting magnetic fields. Recent simulations using test particles suggests that reconnection may efficiently accelerate particles to the maximum energies that are observed in several astrophysical contexts. A simple analytic formula is used in conjunction with the simulation results to predict the maximum energy achievable in a particular plasma environment with the result that in solar flares reconnection is capable of accelerating particles to several GeV. In magnetospheric substorms the predicted maximum can reach several hundred keV, and near magnetic sector crossings in the solar wind the maximum energy can approach 100 keV.

  3. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  4. Performance of conduction cooled splittable superconducting magnet package for linear accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Kashikhin, Vladimire S.; Andreev, N.; Cheban, S.; ...

    2016-02-19

    New Linear Superconducting Accelerators need a superconducting magnet package installed inside SCRF Cryomodules to focus and steer electron or proton beams. A superconducting magnet package was designed and built as a collaborative effort of FNAL and KEK. The magnet package includes one quadrupole, and two dipole windings. It has a splittable in the vertical plane configuration, and features for conduction cooling. The magnet was successfully tested at room temperature, in a liquid He bath, and in a conduction cooling experiment. The paper describes the design and test results including: magnet cooling, training, and magnetic measurements by rotational coils. Furthermore, themore » effects of superconductor and iron yoke magnetization, hysteresis, and fringe fields are discussed.« less

  5. The Effect of Cooling on Particle Trajectories and Acceleration in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-12-01

    The maximum synchrotron burnoff limit of 160 MeV represents a fundamental limit to radiation resulting from electromagnetic particle acceleration in one-zone ideal plasmas. In magnetic reconnection, however, particle acceleration and radiation are decoupled because the electric field is larger than the magnetic field in the diffusion region. We carry out two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to determine the extent to which magnetic reconnection can produce synchrotron radiation above the burnoff limit. We use the test particle comparison (TPC) method to isolate the effects of cooling by comparing the trajectories and acceleration efficiencies of test particles incident on such a reconnection region with and without cooling them. We find that the cooled and uncooled particle trajectories are typically similar during acceleration in the reconnection region, and derive an effective limit on particle acceleration that is inversely proportional to the average magnetic field experienced by the particle during acceleration. Using the calculated distribution of this average magnetic field as a function of uncooled final particle energy, we find analytically that cooling does not affect power-law particle energy spectra except at energies far above the synchrotron burnoff limit. Finally, we compare fully cooled and uncooled simulations of reconnection, confirming that the synchrotron burnoff limit does not produce a cutoff in the particle energy spectrum. Our results indicate that the TPC method accurately predicts the effects of cooling on particle acceleration in relativistic reconnection, and that, even far above the burnoff limit, the synchrotron energy of radiation produced in reconnection is not limited by cooling.

  6. Scaling magnetized liner inertial fusion on Z and future pulsed-power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S. A.; Stygar, W. A.; Gomez, M. R.; Peterson, K. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Vesey, R. A.; Campbell, E. M.; Betti, R.

    2016-02-15

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S. A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] has demonstrated fusion–relevant plasma conditions [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z accelerator with a peak drive current of about 18 MA. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z as a function of drive current, preheat energy, and applied magnetic field. The results indicate that deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when all of these parameters are at the optimum values: i.e., peak current = 25 MA, deposited preheat energy = 5 kJ, and B{sub z} = 30 T. Much higher yields have been predicted [S. A. Slutz and R. A. Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power accelerators (Z300 and Z800) based on linear-transformer-driver technology have been designed [W. A. Stygar et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 18, 110401 (2015)]. The Z300 design would provide 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide 65 MA. Parameterized Thevenin-equivalent circuits were used to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical MagLIF simulations with currents ranging from what Z can deliver now to what could be achieved by these conceptual future pulsed-power accelerators. 2D simulations of simple MagLIF targets containing just gaseous DT have yields of 18 MJ for Z300 and 440 MJ for Z800. The 2D simulated yield for Z800 is increased to 7 GJ by adding a layer of frozen DT ice to the inside of the liner.

  7. Observation of Ion Acceleration and Heating during Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E.

    2012-12-10

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high pressure downstream region.

  8. Electron acceleration by parallel and perpendicular electric fields during magnetic reconnection without guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, N.; Chen, L.-J.; Germaschewski, K.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-01

    Electron acceleration due to the electric field parallel to the background magnetic field during magnetic reconnection with no guide field is investigated by theory and two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations and compared with acceleration due to the electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The magnitude of the parallel electric potential shows dependence on the ratio of the plasma frequency to the electron cyclotron frequency as (ωpe/Ωe)-2 and on the background plasma density as nb-1/2. In the Earth's magnetotail, the parameter ωpe/Ωe˜9 and the background (lobe) density can be of the order of 0.01 cm-3, and it is expected that the parallel electric potential is not large enough to accelerate electrons up to 100 keV. Therefore, we must consider the effect of the perpendicular electric field to account for electron energization in excess of 100 keV in the Earth's magnetotail. Trajectories for high-energy electrons are traced in a simulation to demonstrate that acceleration due to the perpendicular electric field in the diffusion region is the dominant acceleration mechanism, rather than acceleration due to the parallel electric fields in the exhaust regions. For energetic electrons accelerated near the X line due to the perpendicular electric field, pitch angle scattering converts the perpendicular momentum to the parallel momentum. On the other hand, for passing electrons that are mainly accelerated by the parallel electric field, pitch angle scattering converting the parallel momentum to the perpendicular momentum occurs. In this way, particle acceleration and pitch angle scattering will generate heated electrons in the exhaust regions.

  9. Particle acceleration magnetic field generation, and emission in Relativistic pair jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) are responsible for particle acceleration in relativistic pair jets. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic pair jet propagating through a pair plasma. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. Simulation results show that this instability generates and amplifies highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter' I radiation from deflected electrons can have different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. The growth rate of the Weibel instability and the resulting particle acceleration depend on the magnetic field strength and orientation, and on the initial particle distribution function. In this presentation we explore some of the dependencies of the Weibel instability and resulting particle acceleration on the magnetic field strength and orientation, and the particle distribution function.

  10. New self-magnetically insulated connection of multilevel accelerators to a common load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDevender, J. Pace; Langston, William L.; Pasik, Michael F.; Coats, Rebecca S.; Pointon, Timothy D.; Seidel, David B.; McKee, G. Randal; Schneider, Larry X.

    2015-03-01

    A new way to connect pulsed-power modules to a common load is presented. Unlike previous connectors, the clam shell magnetically insulated transmission line (CSMITL) has magnetic nulls only at large radius where the cathode electric field is kept below the threshold for emission, has only a simply connected magnetic topology to avoid plasma motion along magnetic field lines into highly stressed gaps, and has electron injectors that ensure efficient electron flow even in the limiting case of self-limited MITLs. Multilevel magnetically insulated transmission lines with a posthole convolute are the standard solution but associated losses limit the performance of state-of-the-art accelerators. Mitigating these losses is critical for the next generation of pulsed-power accelerators. A CSMITL has been successfully implemented on the Saturn accelerator. A reference design for the Z accelerator is derived and presented. The design conservatively meets the design requirements and shows excellent transport efficiency in three simulations of increasing complexity: circuit simulations, electromagnetic fields only with Emphasis, fields plus electron and ion emission with Quicksilver.

  11. On the ions acceleration via collisionless magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzola, E.; Curreli, D.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an analysis of the ion outflow from magnetic reconnection throughout fully kinetic simulations with typical laboratory plasma values. A symmetric initial configuration for the density and magnetic field is considered across the current sheet. After analyzing the behavior of a set of nine simulations with a reduced mass ratio and with a permuted value of three initial electron temperatures and magnetic field intensity, the best ion acceleration scenario is further studied with a realistic mass ratio in terms of the ion dynamics and energy budget. Interestingly, a series of shock wave structures are observed in the outflow, resembling the shock discontinuities found in recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations. An analysis of the ion outflow at several distances from the reconnection point is presented, in light of possible laboratory applications. The analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection could be used as a tool for plasma acceleration, with applications ranging from electric propulsion to production of ion thermal beams.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Effects in Propagating Relativistic Ejecta: Reverse Shock and Magnetic Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.I.; Zhang, B.; Giacomazzo, B.; Hardee, P.E.; Nagataki, S.; Hartmann, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    We solve the Riemann problem for the deceleration of arbitrarily magnetized relativistic ejecta injected into a static unmagnetized medium. We find that for the same initial Lorentz factor, the reverse shock becomes progressively weaker with increasing magnetization s (the Poynting-to-kinetic energy flux ratio), and the shock becomes a rarefaction wave when s exceeds a critical value, sc, defined by the balance between the magnetic pressure in the ejecta and the thermal pressure in the forward shock. In the rarefaction wave regime, we find that the rarefied region is accelerated to a Lorentz factor that is significantly larger than the initial value. This acceleration mechanism is due to the strong magnetic pressure in the ejecta.

  13. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the 2nd International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Westin Hotel in Seattle, WA, on 11-13 Aug. 1993. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modelling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  14. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modeling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  15. Particle acceleration at 3D reconnecting magnetic separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare; Stevenson, Julie

    2015-04-01

    We present results of test particle orbit calculations in three different environments which model separator reconnection in three dimensions. The test particle (electron and proton) orbits are calculated using the relativistic guiding centre approximation. We investigate test particle orbits in a time-dependent (analytical) electro-magnetic field configuration [detailed in Threlfall et al. (A&A, in press); arXiv:1410.6465]. These results are also compared with orbits based upon large-scale 3D MHD simulations of both a single reconnecting magnetic separator and an observationally driven 3D model of a solar active region which contains several topological features of interest, including separators. We discuss how the test-particle orbits and the energy gain depend on the initial conditions, and how observations (for example, of solar flares) may be used to constrain model parameters.

  16. A compact permanent magnet cyclotrino for accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.; Clark, D.J.; Kunkel, W.B.; Leung, K.N.; Li, C.Y.

    1995-02-01

    The authors describe the development of a new instrument for the detection of trace amounts of rare isotopes, a Cyclotron Mass Spectrometer (CMS). A compact low energy cyclotron optimized for high mass resolution has been designed and has been fabricated. The instrument has high sensitivity and is designed to measure carbon-14 at abundances of < 10{sup {minus}12}. A novel feature of the instrument is the use of permanent magnets to energize the iron poles of the cyclotron. The instrument uses axial injection, employing a spiral inflector. The instrument has been assembled and preliminary measurements of the magnetic field show that it has a uniformity on the order of 2 parts in 10{sup 4}.

  17. Simulations of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks. II. Magnetic field amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, D.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2014-10-10

    We use large hybrid simulations to study ion acceleration and generation of magnetic turbulence due to the streaming of particles that are self-consistently accelerated at non-relativistic shocks. When acceleration is efficient, we find that the upstream magnetic field is significantly amplified. The total amplification factor is larger than 10 for shocks with Alfvénic Mach number M = 100, and scales with the square root of M. The spectral energy density of excited magnetic turbulence is determined by the energy distribution of accelerated particles, and for moderately strong shocks (M ≲ 30) agrees well with the prediction of resonant streaming instability, in the framework of quasilinear theory of diffusive shock acceleration. For M ≳ 30, instead, Bell's non-resonant hybrid (NRH) instability is predicted and found to grow faster than resonant instability. NRH modes are excited far upstream by escaping particles, and initially grow without disrupting the current, their typical wavelengths being much shorter than the current ions' gyroradii. Then, in the nonlinear stage, most unstable modes migrate to larger and larger wavelengths, eventually becoming resonant in wavelength with the driving ions, which start diffuse. Ahead of strong shocks we distinguish two regions, separated by the free-escape boundary: the far upstream, where field amplification is provided by the current of escaping ions via NRH instability, and the shock precursor, where energetic particles are effectively magnetized, and field amplification is provided by the current in diffusing ions. The presented scalings of magnetic field amplification enable the inclusion of self-consistent microphysics into phenomenological models of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks.

  18. ELECTRON HEATING AND ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Jian; Yuan Feng; Liang, Edison

    2010-01-10

    Both analytical and numerical works show that magnetic reconnection must occur in hot accretion flows. This process will effectively heat and accelerate electrons. In this paper, we use the numerical hybrid simulation of magnetic reconnection plus the test-electron method to investigate the electron acceleration and heating due to magnetic reconnection in hot accretion flows. We consider fiducial values of density, temperature, and magnetic parameter beta{sub e} (defined as the ratio of the electron pressure to the magnetic pressure) of the accretion flow as n{sub 0} approx 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}, T {sup 0}{sub e} approx 2 x 10{sup 9} K, and beta{sub e} = 1. We find that electrons are heated to a higher temperature T{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 9} K, and a fraction eta approx 8% of electrons are accelerated into a broken power-law distribution, dN(gamma) propor to gamma{sup -p}, with p approx 1.5 and 4 below and above approx1 MeV, respectively. We also investigate the effect of varying beta and n{sub 0}. We find that when beta{sub e} is smaller or n{sub 0} is larger, i.e., the magnetic field is stronger, T{sub e} , eta, and p all become larger.

  19. Improving the design and analysis of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ramesh Chandra

    1996-11-01

    High energy particle accelerators are now the primary means of discovering the basic building blocks of matter and understanding the forces between them. In order to minimize the cost of building these machines, superconducting magnets are used in essentially all present day high energy proton and heavy ion colliders. The cost of superconducting magnets is typically in the range of 20--30% of the total cost of building such machines. The circulating particle beam goes through these magnets a large number of times (over hundreds of millions). The luminosity performance and life time of the beam in these machines depends significantly on the field quality in these magnets. Therefore, even a small error in the magnetic field shape may create a large cumulative effect in the beam trajectory to throw the particles of the magnet aperture. The superconducting accelerator magnets must, therefore, be designed and constructed so that these errors are small. In this thesis the research and development work will be described 3which has resulted in significant improvements in the field quality of the superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The design and the field quality improvements in the prototype of the main collider dipole magnet for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will also be presented. RHIC will accelerate and collide two counter rotating beams of heavy ions up to 100 GeV/u and protons up to 250 GeV. It is expected that RHIC will create a hot, dense quark-gluon plasma and the conditions which, according to the Big Bang theory, existed in the early universe.

  20. Applied surface analysis in magnetic storage technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windeln, Johannes; Bram, Christian; Eckes, Heinz-Ludwig; Hammel, Dirk; Huth, Johanna; Marien, Jan; Röhl, Holger; Schug, Christoph; Wahl, Michael; Wienss, Andreas

    2001-07-01

    This paper gives a synopsis of today's challenges and requirements for a surface analysis and materials science laboratory with a special focus on magnetic recording technology. The critical magnetic recording components, i.e. the protective carbon overcoat (COC), the disk layer structure, the read/write head including the giant-magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, are described and options for their characterization with specific surface and structure analysis techniques are given. For COC investigations, applications of Raman spectroscopy to the structural analysis and determination of thickness, hydrogen and nitrogen content are discussed. Hardness measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) scratching techniques are presented. Surface adsorption phenomena on disk substrates or finished disks are characterized by contact angle analysis or so-called piezo-electric mass adsorption systems (PEMAS), also known as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). A quickly growing field of applications is listed for various X-ray analysis techniques, such as disk magnetic layer texture analysis for X-ray diffraction, compositional characterization via X-ray fluorescence, compositional analysis with high lateral resolution via electron microprobe analysis. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) has become a standard method for the absolute measurement of individual layer thicknesses contained in multi-layer stacks and thus, is the successor of ellipsometry for this application. Due to the ongoing reduction of critical feature sizes, the analytical challenges in terms of lateral resolution, sensitivity limits and dedicated nano-preparation have been consistently growing and can only be met by state-of-the-art Auger electron spectrometers (AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) characterization, focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and TEM lamella preparation via FIB. The depth profiling of GMR sensor full stacks was significantly

  1. Seventy Years of Magnetic Disk Drive Technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryder, Mark H.

    2007-03-01

    The first hard disk drive, the IBM RAMAC, was shipped in September 1956. It was the size of a couple of refrigerators, contained fifty 24-inch diameter disks and stored information at an areal density of 2000 bits per square inch. Although ten years ago, the industry was widely perceived as facing a fundamental limit at 36 Gbit per square inch (Gbpsi) in the form of superparamagnetism, current disk drives provide areal densities in excess of 130 Gbpsi and capacities of 750 Gbytes. Although the original projections of superparamagnetism were correct, by changing the way the devices were scaled and, ultimately by changing from longitudinal to perpendicular recording, it has been possible to circumvent superparamagnetic effects. Our current understanding indicates that it may be possible to extend the areal density by yet another factor of 400 from present densities, if advanced technologies such as heat assisted magnetic recording and bit patterned media are implemented. Assuming this proceeds at the recent rate of 40 percent increase in areal density per year, we would reach roughly 50 Terabit per square inch (Tbpsi) in about 2026, 70 years after the development of the first disk drive. To achieve this, however, the industry will need higher sensitivity giant magnetoresistive sensors, high efficiency near-field transducers powered with surface plasmons and self-assembled or nano-imprinted magnetic particle arrays for media. In this presentation, the author will briefly describe the history of recording on magnetic disk drives, then describe the potential for future growth and some of the physics and materials problems that need solution in order to realize this full potential.

  2. Application of magnetic pulse compression to the grid system of the ETA/ATA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Cook, E.G.; Reginato, L.L.; Schmidt, J.A.; Smith, M.W.

    1982-11-02

    During the past year, several magnetic pulse compression systems have been built and applied to the ETA accelerator. In view of their excellent performance, a non-linear magnetic system has been adopted for the ATA grid drive in place of the spark gap driven Blumlein. The magnetic system will give us a much higher reliability and greater flexibility by being independent of the high pressure gas blown system. A further advantage of this system will be the capability of achieving higher rep-rates in case of a future upgrade. System design and performance under burst mode will be described.

  3. Time variations of fields in superconducting magnets and their effects on accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Herrup, D.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Hanft, R.W.; Brown, B.C.; Lamm, M.J.; Kuchnir, M.; McInturff, A.D.

    1988-08-22

    A report on the time dependence of magnetic fields in the superconducting magnets of the Fermilab Tevatron has been published. A field variation of order 1 gauss at the aperture radius is observed. Studies on both full sized Tevatron, dipoles and prototype magnets have been used to elucidate these effects. Explanations based on eddy currents in the coil matrix or on flux creep in the superconducting filaments are explored with these tests. Measurement results and techniques for controlling the effect based on new laboratory tests and the latest accelerator operation are presented. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Double-layer ion acceleration triggered by ion magnetization in expanding radiofrequency plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-04

    Ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit in magnetically expanding low-pressure plasmas are experimentally investigated for four source tube diameters ranging from about 5 to 15 cm. The magnetic-field threshold corresponding to a transition from a simple expanding plasma to a double layer-containing plasma is observed to increase with a decrease in the source tube diameter. The results demonstrate that for the four geometries, the double layer and the accelerated ion beam form when the ion Larmour radius in the source becomes smaller than the source tube radius, i.e., when the ions become magnetized in the source tube.

  5. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Generation in Electron-Positron Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-L.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet front propagating into an ambient electron-positron plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find small differences in the results for no ambient and modest ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The non-linear fluctuation amplitudes of densities, currents, electric, and magnetic fields in the electron-positron shock are larger than those found in the electron-ion shock studied in a previous paper at the comparable simulation time. This comes from the fact that both electrons and positrons contribute to generation of the Weibel instability. Additionally, we have performed simulations with different electron skin depths. We find that growth times scale inversely with the plasma frequency, and the sizes of structures created by the Weibel instability scale proportional to the electron skin depth. This is the expected result and indicates that the simulations have sufficient grid resolution. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron and positron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying nonuniform: small-scale magnetic fields which contribute to the electron's (positron's) transverse deflection behind the jet head. This small scale magnetic field structure

  6. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Generation in Electron-Positron Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet front propagating into an ambient electron-positron plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find small differences in the results for no ambient and modest ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The non-linear fluctuation amplitudes of densities, currents, electric, and magnetic fields in the electron-positron shock are larger than those found in the electron-ion shock studied in a previous paper. This comes from the fact that both electrons and positrons contribute to generation of the Weibel instability. Additionally, we have performed simulations with different electron skin depths. We find that growth times scale inversely with the plasma frequency, and the sizes of structures created by the Weibel instability scale proportional to the electron skin depth. This is the expected result and indicates that the simulations have sufficient grid resolution. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron and positron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields which contribute to the electron's (positron's) transverse deflection behind the jet head. This small scale magnetic field structure is appropriate to the generation

  7. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Generation in Electron-Positron Relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel, and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet front propagating into an ambient electron-positron plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find small differences in the results for no ambient and modest ambient magnetic fields. New simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. Furthermore, the nonlinear fluctuation amplitudes of densities, currents, and electric and magnetic fields in the electron-positron shock are larger than those found in the electron-ion shock studied in a previous paper at a comparable simulation time. This comes from the fact that both electrons and positrons contribute to generation of the Weibel instability. In addition, we have performed simulations with different electron skin depths. We find that growth times scale inversely with the plasma frequency, and the sizes of structures created by tine Weibel instability scale proportionally to the electron skin depth. This is the expected result and indicates that the simulations have sufficient grid resolution. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron and positron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s (positron s) transverse deflection behind the jet head. This

  8. MOA—The Magnetic Field Amplified Thruster, a Novel Concept for a Pulsed Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischauf, Norbert; Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias; Koudelka, Otto

    2008-01-01

    More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfvén had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfvén waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept is MOA—Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Based on computer simulations, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an `afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. This paper presents the recent developments of the MOA Thruster R&D activities at QASAR (www.qasar.at), the company in Vienna, which has been set up to further develop and test the Alfvén wave technology and its applications.

  9. MOA - The Magnetic Field Amplified Thruster, a Novel Concept for a Pulsed Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Frischauf, Norbert; Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias; Koudelka, Otto

    2008-01-21

    More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfven had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfven waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept is MOA - Magnetic field Oscillating Amplified thruster. Based on computer simulations, MOA is a highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an 'afterburner system' for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space-terrestrial application research and utilisation strategy. This paper presents the recent developments of the MOA Thruster R and D activities at QASAR (www.qasar.at), the company in Vienna, which has been set up to further develop and test the Alfven wave technology and its applications.

  10. The accelerated site technology deployment program presents the segmented gate system

    SciTech Connect

    PATTESON,RAYMOND; MAYNOR,DOUG; CALLAN,CONNIE

    2000-02-24

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is working to accelerate the acceptance and application of innovative technologies that improve the way the nation manages its environmental remediation problems. The DOE Office of Science and Technology established the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program (ASTD) to help accelerate the acceptance and implementation of new and innovative soil and ground water remediation technologies. Coordinated by the Department of Energy's Idaho Office, the ASTD Program reduces many of the classic barriers to the deployment of new technologies by involving government, industry, and regulatory agencies in the assessment, implementation, and validation of innovative technologies. The paper uses the example of the Segmented Gate System (SGS) to illustrate how the ASTD program works. The SGS was used to cost effectively separate clean and contaminated soil for four different radionuclides: plutonium, uranium, thorium, and cesium. Based on those results, it has been proposed to use the SGS at seven other DOE sites across the country.

  11. Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Yousry; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

  12. GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

    2014-05-29

    The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

  13. Observations of Particle Acceleration Associated with Small-Scale Magnetic Islands Downstream of Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-04-01

    We have recently shown both theoretically (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015) and observationally (Khabarova et al. 2015) that dynamical small-scale magnetic islands play a significant role in local particle acceleration in the supersonic solar wind. We discuss here observational evidence for particle acceleration at shock waves that is enhanced by the recently proposed mechanism of particle energization by both island contraction and the reconnection electric field generated in merging or contracting magnetic islands downstream of the shocks (Zank et al. 2014, 2015; le Roux et al. 2015). Both observations and simulations suppose formation of magnetic islands in the turbulent wake of heliospheric or interplanetary shocks (ISs) (Turner et al. 2013; Karimabadi et al. 2014; Chasapis et al. 2015). A combination of the DSA mechanism with acceleration by magnetic island dynamics explain why the spectra of energetic particles that are supposed to be accelerated at heliospheric shocks are sometimes harder than predicted by DSA theory (Zank et al. 2015). Moreover, such an approach allows us to explain and describe other unusual behaviour of accelerated particles, such as when energetic particle flux intensity peaks are observed downstream of heliospheric shocks instead of peaking directly at the shock according to DSA theory. Zank et al. (2015) predicted the peak location to be behind the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) and showed that the distance from the shock to the peak depends on particle energy, which is in agreement with Voyager 2 observations. Similar particle behaviour is observed near strong ISs in the outer heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2. Observations show that heliospheric shocks are accompanied by current sheets, and that IS crossings always coincide with sharp changes in the IMF azimuthal angle and the IMF strength, which is typical for strong current sheets. The presence of current sheets in the vicinity of ISs acts to magnetically

  14. The R/D of high power proton accelerator technology in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xialing, Guan

    2002-12-01

    In China, a multipurpose verification system as a first phase of our ADS program consists of a low energy accelerator (150 MeV/3 mA proton LINAC) and a swimming pool light water subcritical reactor. In this paper the activities of HPPA technology related to ADS in China, which includes the intense proton ECR source, the RFQ accelerator and some other technology of HPPA, are described.

  15. Marine Forces Reserve: Accelerating Knowledge Flow through Asynchronous Learning Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    processes , requirements and legalities about which incoming I-Is have negligible opportunities for advance or rapid learning. In short, the active...Current Knowledge Flow Processes .............................................................. 14 3. Alternate Processes to Accelerate Knowledge Flows...the Reserve component presents unique business processes , requirements and legalities about which incoming I-Is have negligible opportunities for

  16. Report of the B-factory group: II, Accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; Cassel, D.G.; Feldman, G.J.; Alam, M.S.; Aleksan, R.; Atwood, W.B.; Bartelt, J.; Bisognano, J.J.; Boyce, J.R.; Cline, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on B-factory accelerators: Storage rings for the {Upsilon}(4S) and continuing Linear colliders for the {Upsilon}(4S) and continuum; and storage rings and linear colliders for the Z. 52 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Enhancement of electron energy during vacuum laser acceleration in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B.

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, the effect of a stationary inhomogeneous magnetic field on the electron acceleration by a high intensity Gaussian laser pulse is investigated. A focused TEM (0,0) laser mode with linear polarization in the transverse x-direction that propagates along the z-axis is considered. The magnetic field is assumed to be stationary in time, but varies longitudinally in space. A linear spatial profile for the magnetic field is adopted. In other words, the axial magnetic field increases linearly in the z-direction up to an optimum point z{sub m} and then becomes constant with magnitude equal to that at z{sub m}. Three-dimensional single-particle simulations are performed to find the energy and trajectory of the electron. The electron rotates around and stays near the z-axis. It is shown that with a proper choice of the magnetic field parameters, the electron will be trapped at the focus of the laser pulse. Because of the cyclotron resonance, the electron receives enough energy from the laser fields to be accelerated to relativistic energies. Using numerical simulations, the criteria for optimum regime of the acceleration mechanism is found. With the optimized parameters, an electron initially at rest located at the origin achieves final energy of γ=802. The dynamics of a distribution of off-axis electrons are also investigated in which shows that high energy electrons with small energy and spatial spread can be obtained.

  18. ELECTRON ACCELERATION BY CASCADING RECONNECTION IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. MAGNETIC GRADIENT AND CURVATURE DRIFT EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Büchner, J.; Bárta, M.; Gan, W.; Liu, S.

    2015-12-10

    We investigate the electron acceleration by magnetic gradient and curvature drift effects in cascading magnetic reconnection of a coronal current sheet via a test particle method in the framework of the guiding center approximation. After several Alfvén transit times, most of the electrons injected at the current sheet are still trapped in the magnetic islands. A small fraction of the injected electrons precipitate into the chromosphere. The acceleration of trapped electrons is dominated by the magnetic curvature drifts, which change the parallel momentum of the electron, and appears to be more efficient than the acceleration of precipitating electrons, which is dominated by the perpendicular momentum change caused by the magnetic gradient drifts. With the resulting trapped energetic electron distribution, the corresponding hard X-ray (HXR) radiation spectra are calculated using an optically thin Bremsstrahlung model. Trapped electrons may explain flare loop top HXR emission as well as the observed bright spots along current sheets trailing coronal mass ejections. The asymmetry of precipitating electrons with respect to the polarity inversion line may contribute to the observed asymmetry of footpoint emission.

  19. Enhancement of electron energy during vacuum laser acceleration in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi, H.; Maraghechi, B.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of a stationary inhomogeneous magnetic field on the electron acceleration by a high intensity Gaussian laser pulse is investigated. A focused TEM (0,0) laser mode with linear polarization in the transverse x-direction that propagates along the z-axis is considered. The magnetic field is assumed to be stationary in time, but varies longitudinally in space. A linear spatial profile for the magnetic field is adopted. In other words, the axial magnetic field increases linearly in the z-direction up to an optimum point z m and then becomes constant with magnitude equal to that at z m . Three-dimensional single-particle simulations are performed to find the energy and trajectory of the electron. The electron rotates around and stays near the z-axis. It is shown that with a proper choice of the magnetic field parameters, the electron will be trapped at the focus of the laser pulse. Because of the cyclotron resonance, the electron receives enough energy from the laser fields to be accelerated to relativistic energies. Using numerical simulations, the criteria for optimum regime of the acceleration mechanism is found. With the optimized parameters, an electron initially at rest located at the origin achieves final energy of γ = 802 . The dynamics of a distribution of off-axis electrons are also investigated in which shows that high energy electrons with small energy and spatial spread can be obtained.

  20. A fiber optic strain measurement and quench localization system for use in superconducting accelerator dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Oort, J.M.; Scanlan, R.M.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    1994-10-17

    A novel fiber-optic measurement system for superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The principal component is an extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer to determine localized strain and stress in coil windings. The system can be used either as a sensitive relative strain measurement system or as an absolute strain detector. Combined, one can monitor the mechanical behaviour of the magnet system over time during construction, long time storage and operation. The sensing mechanism is described, together with various tests in laboratory environments. The test results of a multichannel test matrix to be incorporated first in the dummy coils and then in the final version of a 13T Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator dipole magnet are presented. Finally, the possible use of this system as a quench localization system is proposed.

  1. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  2. Electron Fermi acceleration in collapsing magnetic traps: Computational and analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Gisler, G. ); Lemons, D. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors consider the heating and acceleration of electrons trapped on magnetic field lines between approaching magnetic mirrors. Such a collapsing magnetic trap and consequent electron energization can occur whenever a curved (or straight) flux tube drifts into a relatively straight (or curved) perpendicular shock. The relativistic, three-dimensional, collisionless test particle simulations show that an initial thermal electron distribution is bulk heated while a few individual electrons are accelerated to many times their original energy before they escape the trap. Upstream field-aligned beams and downstream pancake distributions perpendicular to the field are predicted. In the appropriate limit the simulation results agree well with a nonrelativistic analytic model of the distribution of escaping electrons which is based on the first adiabatic invariant and energy conservation between collisions with the mirrors. Space science and astrophysical applications are discussed.

  3. Design and development of a novel nuclear magnetic resonance detection for the gas phase ions by magnetic resonance acceleration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, K.; Tona, M.; Fujihara, A.; Sakurai, M.; Ishikawa, H.

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is a well-established powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of a wide range of materials. However, presently, NMR applications are essentially limited to materials in the condensed phase. Although magnetic resonance was originally demonstrated in gas phase molecular beam experiments, no application to gas phase molecular ions has yet been demonstrated. Here, we present a novel principle of NMR detection for gas phase ions based on a "magnetic resonance acceleration" technique and describe the design and construction of an apparatus which we are developing. We also present an experimental technique and some results on the formation and manipulation of cold ion packets in a strong magnetic field, which are the key innovations to detect NMR signal using the present method. We expect this novel method to lead new realm for the study of mass-selected gas-phase ions with interesting applications in both fundamental and applied sciences.

  4. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future High Energy Proton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interest in high field dipoles has been given a boost by new proposals to build a high-energy proton-proton collider to follow the LHC and programs around the world are taking on the task to answer the need. Studies aiming toward future high-energy proton-proton colliders at the 100 TeV scale are now being organized. The LHC and current cost models are based on technology close to four decades old and point to a broad optimum of operation using dipoles with fields between 5 and 12T when site constraints, either geographical or political, are not a factor. Site geography constraints that limit the ring circumference can drive the required dipole field up to 20T, which is more than a factor of two beyond state-of-the-art. After a brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the challenges facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, High Energy Physics, US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT RADIOGRAPHY ACCELERATOR USING DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; McCarrick, J; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2005-06-02

    We are developing an inexpensive compact accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. Design characteristics are an 8 MeV endpoint energy, 2 kA beam current, a cell gradient of approximately 3 MV/m (for an overall accelerator length is 2-3 m), and <$1/Volt capital costs. Such designs have been made possible with the development of high specific energy dielectrics (>10J/cm{sup 3}), specialized transmission line designs and multi-gap laser triggered low jitter (<1 ns) gas switches. In this geometry, the pulse forming lines, switches, and insulator/beam pipe are fully integrated within each cell to form a compact, stand-alone, stackable unit. We detail our research and modeling to date, recent high voltage test results, and the integration concept of the cells into a radiographic system.

  6. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  7. Magnetic field applications in modern technology and medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1985-05-01

    A brief summary is given of several major applications of magnetism. A description of the range of magnetic field intensities to which humans are exposed in technologies that utilize large stationary magnetic fields is given. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the symposium was to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices. The symposium included 17 technical sessions in which 55 papers were presented. The technical session covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  9. Magnetic levitation technology and its applications in exploration projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Quan-Sheng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Susta, Joseph T.; Hull, John R.; Fesmire, James E.; Augustanowicz, Stan D.; Demko, Jonathan A.; Werfel, Frank N.

    2006-02-01

    An energy efficient cryogenic transfer line with magnetic suspension has been prototyped and cryogenically tested. The prototype transfer line exhibits cryogen saving potential of 30-35% in its suspension state as compared to its solid support state. Key technologies developed include novel magnetic levitation using multiple-pole high temperature superconductor (HTS) and rare earth permanent-magnet (PM) elements and a smart cryogenic actuator as the warm support structure. These technologies have vast applications in extremely low thermal leak cryogenic storage/delivery containers, superconducting magnetic bearings, smart thermal switches, etc. This paper reviews the development work and discusses future applications of established technologies.

  10. Observational evidence for local particle acceleration associated with magnetically confined magnetic islands in the heliosphere - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, O. V.; Zank, G. P.; Malandraki, O. E.; Li, G.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of unusual energetic particle enhancements up to several MeV/nuc at leading edges of corotating interaction regions (CIRs), near the heliospheric current sheet and downstream of interplanetary shocks at 1AU has puzzled observers for a long time. Commonly accepted mechanisms of particle energization, such as a classical diffusive shock acceleration mechanism or magnetic reconnection at current sheets, are unable to explain these phenomena. We present a review of recently obtained observational results that attribute these atypical energetic particle events to local acceleration of particles in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands confined by currents sheets of various origins. The observations are in very good accordance with the theory of stochastic particle energization in the supersonic solar wind via a sea of small-scale flux-ropes interacting dynamically (Zank et al., 2014, 2015; le Roux et al., 2015, 2016).

  11. Accelerated magnetic resonance thermometry in the presence of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madankan, R.; Stefan, W.; Fahrenholtz, S. J.; MacLellan, C. J.; Hazle, J. D.; Stafford, R. J.; Weinberg, J. S.; Rao, G.; Fuentes, D.

    2017-01-01

    A model-based information theoretic approach is presented to perform the task of magnetic resonance (MR) thermal image reconstruction from a limited number of observed samples on k-space. The key idea of the proposed approach is to optimally detect samples of k-space that are information-rich with respect to a model of the thermal data acquisition. These highly informative k-space samples can then be used to refine the mathematical model and efficiently reconstruct the image. The information theoretic reconstruction was demonstrated retrospectively in data acquired during MR-guided laser induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) procedures. The approach demonstrates that locations with high-information content with respect to a model-based reconstruction of MR thermometry may be quantitatively identified. These information-rich k-space locations are demonstrated to be useful as a guide for k-space undersampling techniques. The effect of interactively increasing the predicted number of data points used in the subsampled model-based reconstruction was quantified using the L2-norm of the distance between the subsampled and fully sampled reconstruction. Performance of the proposed approach was also compared with uniform rectilinear subsampling and variable-density Poisson disk subsampling techniques. The proposed subsampling scheme resulted in accurate reconstructions using a small fraction of k-space points, suggesting that the reconstruction technique may be useful in improving the efficiency of thermometry data temporal resolution.

  12. Canted-Cosine-Theta Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for High Energy Physics and Ion Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouwer, Lucas Nathan

    Advances in superconducting magnet technology have historically enabled the construction of new, higher energy hadron colliders. Looking forward to the needs of a potential future collider, a significant increase in magnet field and performance is required. Such a task requires an open mind to the investigation of new design concepts for high field magnets. Part I of this thesis will present an investigation of the Canted-Cosine-Theta (CCT) design for high field Nb3Sn magnets. New analytic and finite element methods for analysis of CCT magnets will be given, along with a discussion on optimization of the design for high field. The design, fabrication, and successful test of the 2.5 T NbTi dipole CCT1 will be presented as a proof-of-principle step towards a high field Nb3Sn magnet. Finally, the design and initial steps in the fabrication of the 16 T Nb3Sn dipole CCT2 will be described. Part II of this thesis will investigate the CCT concept extended to a curved magnet for use in an ion beam therapy gantry. The introduction of superconducting technology in this field shows promise to reduce the weight and cost of gantries, as well as open the door to new beam optics solutions with high energy acceptance. An analytic approach developed for modeling curved CCT magnets will be presented, followed by a design study of a superconducting magnet for a proton therapy gantry. Finally, a new magnet concept called the "Alternating Gradient CCT" (AG-CCT) will be introduced. This concept will be shown to be a practical magnet solution for achieving the alternating quadrupole fields desired for an achromatic gantry, allowing for the consideration of treatment with minimal field changes in the superconducting magnets. The primary motivation of this thesis is to share new developments for Canted-Cosine-Theta superconducting magnets, with the hope this design will improve technology for high energy physics and ion beam cancer therapy.

  13. MAGNETIC-ISLAND CONTRACTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SIMULATED ERUPTIVE SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-03-20

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  14. Magnetic-Island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; Devore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magneto hydro dynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  15. Magnetic-island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  16. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission in Relativistic Pair Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created by relativistic pair jets are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. The growth rates of the Weibel instability depends on the distribution of pair jets. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission in relativistic pair jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Mizuno, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Recent simulations show that the Weibel instability created by relativistic pair jets is responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. The growth rates of the Weibel instability depends on the distribution of pair jets. The Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. This instability is also responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  18. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration in 3D Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Pair Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri; Werner, Gregory; Zhdankin, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process that converts magnetic energy into particle kinetic energy. ``Relativistic'' reconnection is of interest in astrophysical contexts because it can accelerate particles to relativistic energies high enough for synchrotron (or inverse Compton) emission to explain observed high-energy radiation. After several 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of reconnection in pair plasmas demonstrated power-law electron-energy spectra extending to high energies, a few 3D simulations surprisingly confirmed the robustness of nonthermal particle acceleration, despite fundamental differences, such as the development of the relativistic drift-kink instability (RDKI) in 3D. We present a comprehensive PIC study of 3D relativistic pair-plasma reconnection characterizing the effect of the third dimension. We investigate how reconnection dynamics and particle acceleration depend on guide magnetic field Bz and on the simulation box length Lz in the third dimension. We find that, while the RDKI does indeed grow in 3D reconnection, it does not inhibit particle acceleration, even in the absence of guide field. This work was funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  19. In situ baking method for degassing of a kicker magnet in accelerator beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Junichiro Ogiwara, Norio; Yanagibashi, Toru; Kinsho, Michikazu; Yasuda, Yuichi

    2016-03-15

    In this study, the authors propose a new in situ degassing method by which only kicker magnets in the accelerator beam line are baked out without raising the temperature of the vacuum chamber to prevent unwanted thermal expansion of the chamber. By simply installing the heater and thermal radiation shield plates between the kicker magnet and the chamber wall, most of the heat flux from the heater directs toward the kicker magnet. The result of the verification test showed that each part of the kicker magnet was heated to above the target temperature with a small rise in the vacuum chamber temperature. A graphite heater was selected in this application to bake-out the kicker magnet in the beam line to ensure reliability and easy maintainability of the heater. The vacuum characteristics of graphite were suitable for heater operation in the beam line. A preliminary heat-up test conducted in the accelerator beam line also showed that each part of the kicker magnet was successfully heated and that thermal expansion of the chamber was negligibly small.

  20. Test results of a Nb3Al/Nb3Sn subscale magnet for accelerator application

    SciTech Connect

    Iio, Masami; Xu, Qingjin; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sasaki, Ken -ichi; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Sugano, Michinaka; Enomoto, Shun; Higashi, Norio; Terashima, Akio; Tanaka, Kenichi; Okada, Ryutaro; Takahashi, Naoto; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Takeuchi, Takao; Sabbi, Gianluca; Zlobin, Alexander; Barzi, Emanuela

    2015-01-28

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) has been developing a Nb3Al and Nb3Sn subscale magnet to establish the technology for a high-field accelerator magnet. The development goals are a feasibility demonstration for a Nb3Al cable and the technology acquisition of magnet fabrication with Nb3Al superconductors. KEK developed two double-pancake racetrack coils with Rutherford-type cables composed of 28 Nb3Al wires processed by rapid heating, quenching, and transformation in collaboration with the National Institute for Materials Science and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The magnet was fabricated to efficiently generate a high magnetic field in a minimum-gap common-coil configuration with two Nb3Al coils sandwiched between two Nb3Sn coils produced by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A shell-based structure and a “bladder and key” technique have been used for adjusting coil prestress during both the magnet assembly and the cool down. In the first excitation test of the magnet at 4.5 K performed in June 2014, the highest quench current of the Nb3Sn coil, i.e., 9667 A, was reached at 40 A/s corresponding to 9.0 T in the Nb3Sn coil and 8.2 T in the Nb3Al coil. The quench characteristics of the magnet were studied.

  1. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, Glen A.

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  2. Magnetic field simulation of wiggler on LUCX accelerator facility using Radia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutygina, Y. N.; Harisova, A. E.; Shkitov, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    A flat wiggler consisting of NdFeB permanent magnets was installed on a compact linear electron accelerator LUCX (KEK) in Japan. After installing the wiggler on LUCX, the experiments on the generation of undulator radiation (UR) in the terahertz wavelength range is planned. To perform the detailed calculations and optimization of UR characteristics, it is necessary to know the parameters of the magnetic field generated in the wiggler. In this paper extended simulation results of wiggler magnetic field over the entire volume between the poles are presented. The obtained in the Radia simulation magnetic field is compared with the field calculated by another code, which is based on the finite element method.

  3. Magnetic Shielding of the Acceleration Channel Walls in a Long-Life Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; de Grys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a Qualification Life Test (QLT) of the BPT-4000 Hall thruster that recently accumulated greater than 10,000 h it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approximately 5,600 h. Numerical simulations of this thruster using a 2-D axisymmetric, magnetic field-aligned-mesh (MFAM) plasma solver reveal that the process that led to this significant reduction of the erosion was multifaceted. It is found that when the channel receded from its early-in-life geometry to its steady-state configuration several changes in the near-wall plasma and sheath were induced by the magnetic field that, collectively, constituted an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Because all such changes in the behavior of the ionized gas near the eroding surfaces were caused by the topology of the magnetic field there, we term this process "magnetic shielding."

  4. Magnetic Diffusion in Aluminum and Copper on the Z-Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Greg; Hall, Clint

    2001-10-01

    Recent experiments on the Z-Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories were performed to characterize magnetic diffusion in aluminum and copper at currents of 2-4MA/cm and pulse widths of 200ns. Low, medium, and high pressure shots were taken in each material to establish a magnetic diffusion versus current scaling curve and to characterize relative propagation times between the pressure wave front and the onset of magnetic field diffusion at varying depths in the material. Principal diagnostics include unique B-dot probes and VISAR laser interferometry. The diagnostics were fielded on square short circuit loads designed to produce a symmetric current on each of the diagnostic surfaces. Linear current values were scaled by varying the anode surface area and charge voltage of the machine. Target pressure values of 500kbar, 1.0Mbar, and 2.0Mbar were achieved in this manner. As the current ramps up in the load a pressure wave is launched into the conductor and magnetic and thermal diffusion waves are also initiated in the conductor. The pressure wave front compresses the material to densities greater than ambient solid resulting in dissipative energy, and magnetic field diffusion produces ohmic heating which is also dissipative. As larger accelerators are designed and built it is necessary to understand the losses in the conductors and to determine which conductors make the best construction materials. Additionally, recent experiments on the Z-Machine have demonstrated the ability to perform isentropic compression experiments (ICE) which require clear time separation between the pressure wave and the magnetic diffusion front for unambiguous data acquisition. These magnetic diffusion experiments document that time separation and also demonstrate a significant difference in rate of magnetic field diffusion between aluminum and copper.

  5. A procedure for combining rotating-coil measurements of large-aperture accelerator magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Oliver; Fiscarelli, Lucio; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    The rotating search coil is a precise and widely used tool for measuring the magnetic field harmonics of accelerator magnets. This paper deals with combining several such multipole measurements, in order to cover magnet apertures largely exceeding the diameter of the available search coil. The method relies on the scaling laws for multipole coefficients and on the method of analytic continuation along zero-homotopic paths. By acquiring several measurements of the integrated magnetic flux density at different transverse positions within the bore of the accelerator magnet, the uncertainty on the field harmonics can be reduced at the expense of tight tolerances on the positioning. These positioning tolerances can be kept under control by mounting the rotating coil and its motor-drive unit on precision alignment stages. Therefore, the proposed technique is able to yield even more precise results for the higher-order field components than a dedicated rotating search coil of larger diameter. Moreover, the versatility of the measurement bench is enhanced by avoiding the construction of rotating search coils of different measurement radii.

  6. A FLUX ROPE NETWORK AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Daniel; Milosavljevic, Milos; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2013-09-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic pair plasmas with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a kinetic-scale current sheet in a periodic geometry. We include a guide field that introduces an inclination between the reconnecting field lines and explore outside-of-the-current sheet magnetizations that are significantly below those considered by other authors carrying out similar calculations. Thus, our simulations probe the transitional regime in which the magnetic and plasma pressures are of the same order of magnitude. The tearing instability is the dominant mode in the current sheet for all guide field strengths, while the linear kink mode is less important even without the guide field, except in the lower magnetization case. Oblique modes seem to be suppressed entirely. In its nonlinear evolution, the reconnection layer develops a network of interconnected and interacting magnetic flux ropes. As smaller flux ropes merge into larger ones, the reconnection layer evolves toward a three-dimensional, disordered state in which the resulting flux rope segments contain magnetic substructure on plasma skin depth scales. Embedded in the flux ropes, we detect spatially and temporally intermittent sites of dissipation reflected in peaks in the parallel electric field. Magnetic dissipation and particle acceleration persist until the end of the simulations, with simulations with higher magnetization and lower guide field strength exhibiting greater and faster energy conversion and particle energization. At the end of our largest simulation, the particle energy spectrum attains a tail extending to high Lorentz factors that is best modeled with a combination of two additional thermal components. We confirm that the primary energization mechanism is acceleration by the electric field in the X-line region. The highest-energy positrons (electrons) are moderately beamed with median angles {approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree

  7. Prompt particle acceleration around moving X-point magnetic field during impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    We present a model for high-energy solar flares to explain prompt proton and electron acceleration, which occurs around moving X-point magnetic field during the implosion phase of the current sheet. We derive the electromagnetic fields during the strong implosion phase of the current sheets, which is driven by the converging flow derived from the magnetohydrodynamic equations. It is shown that both protons and electrons can be promptly (within 1 second) accelerated to approximately 70 MeV and approximately 200 MeV, respectively. This acceleration mechanism can be applicable for the impulsive phase of the gradual gamma ray and proton flares (gradual GR/P flare), which have been called two-ribbon flares.

  8. Stochastic particle acceleration at shocks in the presence of braided magnetic fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.; Duffy, P.; Gallant, Y. A.

    1996-10-01

    The theory of diffusive acceleration of energetic particles at shock fronts assumes charged particles undergo spatial diffusion in a uniform magnetic field. If, however, the magnetic field is not uniform, but has a stochastic or braided structure, the transport of charged particles across the average direction of the field is more complicated. Assuming quasi-linear behaviour of the field lines, the particles undergo sub-diffusion on short time scales. We derive the propagator for such motion, which differs from the Gaussian form relevant for diffusion, and apply it to a configuration with a plane shock front whose normal is perpendicular to the average field direction. Expressions are given for the acceleration time as a function of the diffusion coefficient of the wandering magnetic field lines and the spatial diffusion coefficient of the charged particles parallel to the local field. In addition we calculate the spatial dependence of the particle density in both the upstream and downstream plasmas. In contrast to the diffusive case, the density of particles at the shock front is lower than it is far downstream. This is a consequence of the partial trapping of particles by structures in the magnetic field. As a result, the spectrum of accelerated particles is a power-law in momentum which is steeper than in the diffusive case. For a phase-space density f{prop.to}p^-s^, we find s=s_diff_[1+1/(2ρ_c_)], where ρ_c_ is the compression ratio of the shock front and s_diff_ is the standard result of diffusive acceleration: s_diff_=3ρ_c_/(ρ_c_-1). A strong shock in a monatomic ideal gas yields a spectrum of s=4.5. In the case of electrons, this corresponds to a radio synchrotron spectral index of α=0.75.

  9. Current and future accelerator technologies for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Hywel; Lomax, Antony; Jolly, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The past few years have seen significant developments both of the technologies available for proton and other charged particle therapies, and of the number and spread of therapy centres. In this review we give an overview of these technology developments, and outline the principal challenges and opportunities we see as important in the next decade. Notable amongst these is the ever-increasing use of superconductivity both in particle sources and for treatment delivery, which is likely to greatly increase the accessibility of charged particle therapy treatments to hospital centres worldwide.

  10. A proton medical accelerator by the SBIR route: An example of technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Medical facilities for radiation treatment of cancer with protons have been established in many laboratories throughout the world. Essentially all of these have been designed as physics facilities, however, because of the requirement for protons up to 250 MeV. Most of the experience in this branch of accelerator technology lies in the national laboratories and a few large universities. A major issue is the transfer of this technology to the commercial sector to provide hospitals with simple, reliable, and relatively inexpensive accelerators for this application. The author has chosen the SBIR route to accomplish this goal. ACCTEK Associates have received grants from the National Cancer Institute for development of the medical accelerator and beam delivery systems. Considerable encouragement and help has been received from Argonne National Laboratory and the Department of Energy. The experiences to date and the pros and cons on this approach to commercializing medical accelerators are described. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  12. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission in Relativistic Pair Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Richardson, G.; Sol, H.; Preece, R.; Fishman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating into an ambient plasma. We find that the growth times depend on the Lorenz factors of jets. The jets with larger Lorenz factors grow slower. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The small scale magnetic field structure generated by the Weibel instability is appropriate to the generation of "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons (positrons) as opposed to synchrotron radiation. The jitter radiation resulting from small scale magnetic field structures may be important for understanding the complex time structure and spectral evolution observed in gamma-ray bursts or other astrophysical sources containing relativistic jets and relativistic collisionless shocks.

  13. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David Juarez

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  14. Particle acceleration at shocks in the presence of a braided magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, J. G.; Duffy, P.; Gallant, Y. A.

    1997-05-01

    The theory of first order Fermi acceleration at shock fronts assumes charged particles undergo spatial diffusion in a uniform magnetic field. If, however, the magnetic field is not uniform, but has a stochastic or braided structure, the transport of charged particles across the average direction of the field is more complicated. Assuming quasi-linear behaviour of the field lines, the particles undergo sub-diffusion ( ~ t^1/2) on short time scales. We investigate this process analytically, using a propagator approach, and numerically, with a Monte-Carlo simulation. It is found that, in contrast to the diffusive case, the density of particles at the shock front is lower than it is far downstream which is a consequence of the partial trapping of particles by structures in the magnetic field. As a result, the spectrum of accelerated particles is a power-law in momentum which is steeper than in the diffusive case. For a phase-space density f ~ p^-s, we find s =s_diff [1 + 1/(2rho_c)], where rho_c is the compression ratio of the shock front and s_diff is the standard result of diffusive acceleration:s_diff = 3rho_c/(rho_c - 1).

  15. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Associated Emission in Collisionless Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron)jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Associated Emission in Collisionless Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman. G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. From Innovation Clusters to Datapalooza: Accelerating Innovation in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culatta, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Education in the United States is entering a very exciting moment. For the first time, all of the digital stars are aligning n such a way that the technology is available to design truly transformational learning experiences. The ubiquity of inexpensive and powerful mobile devices is creating the potential for all students to learn at any time and…

  18. Strong compression of a magnetic field with a laser-accelerated foil.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Namiki, Tomonori; Nishida, Akinori; Kodama, Ryosuke; Sakawa, Youichi; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Morita, Taichi; Nishio, Kento; Ide, Takao

    2012-09-21

    We demonstrate the generation of high magnetic fields for condensed matter research using a high-power laser system. A cavity in which a seed magnetic field is applied is compressed by a kJ ns laser pulse. The time history of the compressed magnetic field is monitored by observing the Faraday effect rotation of polarization of a probe pulse in a glass fiber. To maintain a low-temperature condition in the final high-field region, we put a high-resistance foil around the final compression area. If we assume the length of the compression region is equal to the laser spot size, a magnetic field of more than 800 T is observed by Faraday rotation. Because of the large mass of the compression foil, this high magnetic field is sustained during almost 2 ns. During compression, a rarefaction wave from the backside of the accelerated foil and expanding material from the inner protection foil affect the magnetic field compression history, but the final compressed magnetic field strength agrees with the ratio between the initial sample area and the compressed cavity area.

  19. Final Report: MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS [Grant Number DE-SC0010312

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-10-29

    Our program consisted of the two components: Strand Research and Cable Research, with a focus on Nb3Sn, Bi2212, and YBCO for accelerator magnet applications. We demonstrated a method to refine the grains in Nb3Sn by a factor of two, reaching 45 nm grain sizes, and layer Jcs of 6 kA/mm2 at 12 T. W also measured conductor magnetization for field quality. This has been done both with Nb3Sn conductor, as well as Bi:2212 strand. Work in support of quench studies of YBCO coils was also performed. Cable loss studies in Nb3Sn focused on connecting and comparing persistent magnetization and coupling magnetization for considering their relative impact on HEP machines. In the area of HTS cables, we have investigated both the quench in multistrand YBCO CORC cables, as well as the magnetization of these cables for use in high field magnets. In addition, we examined the magnetic and thermal properties of large (50 T) solenoids.

  20. An Overview of Magnetic Bearing Technology for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Daniel J.; Jansen, Mark J.; Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of the magnetic bearing and its use in exotic applications has been conceptualized for many years, over a century, in fact. Patented, passive systems using permanent magnets date back over 150 years. More recently, scientists of the 1930s began investigating active systems using electromagnets for high-speed ultracentrifuges. However, passive magnetic bearings are physically unstable and active systems only provide proper stiffness and damping through sophisticated controllers and algorithms. This is precisely why, until the last decade, magnetic bearings did not become a practical alternative to rolling element bearings. Today, magnetic bearing technology has become viable because of advances in micro-processing controllers that allow for confident and robust active control. Further advances in the following areas: rotor and stator materials and designs which maximize flux, minimize energy losses, and minimize stress limitations; wire materials and coatings for high temperature operation; high-speed micro processing for advanced controller designs and extremely robust capabilities; back-up bearing technology for providing a viable touchdown surface; and precision sensor technology; have put magnetic bearings on the forefront of advanced, lubrication free support systems. This paper will discuss a specific joint program for the advancement of gas turbine engines and how it implies the vitality of magnetic bearings, a brief comparison between magnetic bearings and other bearing technologies in both their advantages and limitations, and an examination of foreseeable solutions to historically perceived limitations to magnetic bearing.

  1. Technological issues and high gradient test results on X-band molybdenum accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S. G.; Higashi, Y.; Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Yeremian, A. D.

    2011-11-01

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC ( Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK ( Kō Enerugī Kasokuki Kenkyū Kikō). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  2. Technological Issues and High Gradient Test Results on X-Band Molybdenum Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  3. Integrated Design For Magnetically-Driven Liner Inertial Fusion of Preheated and Magnetized Fuel on the Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Vesey, R. A.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetically-driven implosions of metal liners containing magnetized and preheated fuel may enable significant ICF yields to be obtained on pulsed-power accelerators. Simulations of dense (ρ = 1-5 mg/cc), axially-magnetized (Bz = 3-30 T), and preheated (Ti = 200-500 eV) DT fuel, driven by a pulsed-power accelerator similar to the Z machine (Imax = 25-60 MA in 100-300 ns), indicate Gbar pressures and high yields (Efus = 100s kJ-10s MJ) may be feasible. Reduced heat conduction losses and alpha particle trapping can be provided by Bz flux compression, and the fuel ρ R ignition requirement is replaced by one for Bz R. Preheating the fuel prior to compression permits access to ignition temperatures without large convergence ratios or implosion velocities. Integrated simulations allow realistic designs for Z experiments (Imax = 27 MA) with fuel preheat provided by the ZBL laser (Elas = 2-6 kJ). Physics issues include laser deposition timing, evolution of thermal energy and Bz field, magneto-RT instability growth, electrode and laser entrance hole end effects, and anisotropic conductivity and fusion burn in the Bz field. Fusion yields on the order of the absorbed target energy may be possible on Z + ZBL, and high-gain designs using Imax = 60 MA are studied.

  4. Electron Acceleration at Coronal Shocks Propagating Through a Large-scale Streamer-like Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.

    2015-12-01

    Solar type II radio bursts are generally believed to be excited by energetic electrons that are accelerated at solar eruption-driven shocks. Some recent studies have pointed out that coronal streamers may be important on the generation of type II bursts and the morphology of radio dynamic spectra. In our previous study, it was found that closed field of the streamer can play the role of an electron trap via which electrons would receive multiple reflection and acceleration. We further developed a numerical model consisting of a spherical coronal shock moving through a large-scale streamer-like coronal magnetic field. The complex local shock geometry should affect both the efficiency of electron acceleration and properties of accelerated electrons. By examining the injection and escape locations of energetic electrons, it is found that shock electron acceleration is most efficient mainly in two different regions, one is at the shock flank (foreshock regions) when the shock is at lower altitude, the other is at the shock nose (apexes of closed loops) at higher altitude. The effects of large-scale coronal field, pitch-angle scattering and shock compression ratio on the distribution of energetic electrons and electron energy spectrum are also investigated.

  5. Accelerating technology transfer: new relationships for academia, industry and government.

    PubMed

    Satava, R M

    1998-01-01

    The budget deficit, reduction in Defense spending and the lack of return in the "peace dividend" has resulted in reduced federal funding for research. A number of programs have attempted to remedy the problem, with the use of collaborative funding as one of the major solutions. However, within the medical research community, there continues to be a very long technology transfer cycle. By mimicking the processes of non-medical high technology research and employing a number of these innovative solutions to medical research could afford the pathway to success. A template of how this could be accomplished through cooperative efforts of academia, industry and government is presented by using examples of success and failure in the past.

  6. Accelerating Industrial Adoption of Metal Additive Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanian, Kenneth; McDonald, Tom

    2016-03-01

    While metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology has clear benefits, there are still factors preventing its adoption by industry. These factors include the high cost of metal AM systems, the difficulty for machinists to learn and operate metal AM machines, the long approval process for part qualification/certification, and the need for better process controls; however, the high AM system cost is the main barrier deterring adoption. In this paper, we will discuss an America Makes-funded program to reduce AM system cost by combining metal AM technology with conventional computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools. Information will be provided on how an Optomec-led team retrofitted a legacy CNC vertical mill with laser engineered net shaping (LENS®—LENS is a registered trademark of Sandia National Labs) AM technology, dramatically lowering deployment cost. The upgraded system, dubbed LENS Hybrid Vertical Mill, enables metal additive and subtractive operations to be performed on the same machine tool and even on the same part. Information on the LENS Hybrid system architecture, learnings from initial system deployment and continuing development work will also be provided to help guide further development activities within the materials community.

  7. Accelerating cancer systems biology research through Semantic Web technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Sagotsky, Jonathan; Taylor, Thomas; Shironoshita, Patrick; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems biology is an interdisciplinary, rapidly expanding research field in which collaborations are a critical means to advance the field. Yet the prevalent database technologies often isolate data rather than making it easily accessible. The Semantic Web has the potential to help facilitate web-based collaborative cancer research by presenting data in a manner that is self-descriptive, human and machine readable, and easily sharable. We have created a semantically linked online Digital Model Repository (DMR) for storing, managing, executing, annotating, and sharing computational cancer models. Within the DMR, distributed, multidisciplinary, and inter-organizational teams can collaborate on projects, without forfeiting intellectual property. This is achieved by the introduction of a new stakeholder to the collaboration workflow, the institutional licensing officer, part of the Technology Transfer Office. Furthermore, the DMR has achieved silver level compatibility with the National Cancer Institute's caBIG, so users can interact with the DMR not only through a web browser but also through a semantically annotated and secure web service. We also discuss the technology behind the DMR leveraging the Semantic Web, ontologies, and grid computing to provide secure inter-institutional collaboration on cancer modeling projects, online grid-based execution of shared models, and the collaboration workflow protecting researchers' intellectual property.

  8. SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ISLANDS IN THE SOLAR WIND AND THEIR ROLE IN PARTICLE ACCELERATION. I. DYNAMICS OF MAGNETIC ISLANDS NEAR THE HELIOSPHERIC CURRENT SHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Khabarova, O.; Zank, G. P.; Li, G.; Roux, J. A. le; Webb, G. M.; Dosch, A.; Malandraki, O. E.

    2015-08-01

    Increases of ion fluxes in the keV–MeV range are sometimes observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during periods when other sources are absent. These resemble solar energetic particle events, but the events are weaker and apparently local. Conventional explanations based on either shock acceleration of charged particles or particle acceleration due to magnetic reconnection at interplanetary current sheets (CSs) are not persuasive. We suggest instead that recurrent magnetic reconnection occurs at the HCS and smaller CSs in the solar wind, a consequence of which is particle energization by the dynamically evolving secondary CSs and magnetic islands. The effectiveness of the trapping and acceleration process associated with magnetic islands depends in part on the topology of the HCS. We show that the HCS possesses ripples superimposed on the large-scale flat or wavy structure. We conjecture that the ripples can efficiently confine plasma and provide tokamak-like conditions that are favorable for the appearance of small-scale magnetic islands that merge and/or contract. Particles trapped in the vicinity of merging islands and experiencing multiple small-scale reconnection events are accelerated by the induced electric field and experience first-order Fermi acceleration in contracting magnetic islands according to the transport theory of Zank et al. We present multi-spacecraft observations of magnetic island merging and particle energization in the absence of other sources, providing support for theory and simulations that show particle energization by reconnection related processes of magnetic island merging and contraction.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of the Stabilizing Effect of Dielectric Coatings on Magnetically Accelerated Imploding Metallic Liners.

    PubMed

    Awe, T J; Peterson, K J; Yu, E P; McBride, R D; Sinars, D B; Gomez, M R; Jennings, C A; Martin, M R; Rosenthal, S E; Schroen, D G; Sefkow, A B; Slutz, S A; Tomlinson, K; Vesey, R A

    2016-02-12

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70  μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. The inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130  μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  10. Experimental Demonstration of the Stabilizing Effect of Dielectric Coatings on Magnetically Accelerated Imploding Metallic Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awe, T. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Yu, E. P.; McBride, R. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Martin, M. R.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Sefkow, A. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Tomlinson, K.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70 μ m of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR =Rin,0/Rin(z ,t ) ] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. The inner-wall radius Rin(z ,t ) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130 μ m over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  11. Experimental demonstration of the stabilizing effect of dielectric coatings on magnetically accelerated imploding metallic liners

    DOE PAGES

    Awe, Thomas James; Peterson, Kyle J.; Yu, Edmund P.; ...

    2016-02-10

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70 μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. Lastly, the inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130 μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  12. Experimental studies on ion acceleration and stream line detachment in a diverging magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Ogiwara, K.; Aramaki, M.; Tanaka, M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The flow structure of ions in a diverging magnetic field has been experimentally studied in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The flow velocity field of ions has been measured with directional Langmuir probes calibrated with the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. For low ion-temperature plasmas, it is concluded that the ion acceleration due to the axial electric field is important compared with that of gas dynamic effect. It has also been found that the detachment of ion stream line from the magnetic field line takes place when the parameter |fciLB∕Vi| becomes order unity, where fci, LB, and Vi are the ion cyclotron frequency, the characteristic scale length of magnetic field inhomogeneity, and the ion flow velocity, respectively. In the detachment region, a radial electric field is generated in the plasma and the ions move straight with the E×B rotation driven by the radial electric field. PMID:20838424

  13. Experimental demonstration of the stabilizing effect of dielectric coatings on magnetically accelerated imploding metallic liners

    SciTech Connect

    Awe, Thomas James; Peterson, Kyle J.; Yu, Edmund P.; McBride, Ryan D.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Martin, Matthew R.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger A.; Schroen, D. G.; Tomlinson, Kurt

    2016-02-10

    Enhanced implosion stability has been experimentally demonstrated for magnetically accelerated liners that are coated with 70 μm of dielectric. The dielectric tamps liner-mass redistribution from electrothermal instabilities and also buffers coupling of the drive magnetic field to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A dielectric-coated and axially premagnetized beryllium liner was radiographed at a convergence ratio [CR=Rin,0/Rin(z,t)] of 20, which is the highest CR ever directly observed for a strengthless magnetically driven liner. Lastly, the inner-wall radius Rin(z,t) displayed unprecedented uniformity, varying from 95 to 130 μm over the 4.0 mm axial height captured by the radiograph.

  14. Generation of macroscopic magnetic-field-aligned electric fields by the convection surge ion acceleration mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.

    1989-01-01

    The 'convection surge' model for ion acceleration, designed by Mauk (1986) to explain the observed ion distributions and the field-aligned character of middle magnetospheric ion distributions during the expansion phase of a substorm, was extended to include the self-consistent generation of magnetic-field-aligned electric fields. Results from the modified model show that the convection surge mechanism leads to the generation of dynamical macroscopic magnetic field-aligned electric fields that begin their strongest developments very near the magnetic equator and then propagate to higher latitudes. Potential drops as high as 1 to 10 kV might be expected, depending on the mass species of the ions and on the electron temperatures. It is speculated that the convection surge mechanism could be a key player in the transient field-aligned electromagnetic processes observed to operate within the middle magnetosphere.

  15. Aerospace Applications of Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on aerospace applications of magnetic suspension technology are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: pointing and isolation systems; microgravity and vibration isolation; bearing applications; wind tunnel model suspension systems; large gap magnetic suspension systems; control systems; rotating machinery; science and application of superconductivity; and sensors.

  16. Aerospace Applications of Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension with potential aerospace applications, and to review related recent developments in sensors and control approaches, superconducting technology, and design/implementation practices, a workshop was held at NASA-Langley. Areas of concern are pointing and isolation systems, microgravity and vibration isolation, bearing applications, wind tunnel model suspension systems, large gap magnetic suspension systems, controls, rotating machinery, science and applications of superconductivity, and sensors. Papers presented are included.

  17. A model for the magnetic cores of linear induction accelerator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, J.G.; Rose, E.A.

    1995-08-01

    Linear induction cells are used in the electron beam accelerator for the proposed Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility that would be built at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Ferrite cores are used in each cell to produce 250 kV, flat to within {plus_minus}1% for 70 ns. In the course of operating a prototype test stand for the full accelerator, circuit models have been developed for the pulsed power system and the induction cells that have been useful in achieving the {plus_minus}1% flatness requirement. The circuit models use the MicroCap IV{trademark} electronic circuit analysis program, which includes a Jiles-Atherton model for magnetic materials. In addition, the coaxial, ferrite-filled geometry of the cell is modelled by a multiple-section lumped-element transmission line. Propagation of a voltage pulse through the ferrite cores, including saturation effects, can be reproduced. The model has been compared to actual waveforms obtained from prototype operations, and good results have been obtained for a wide range of operating conditions. Interest in possible future applications have led the authors to use the model to predict the behavior of accelerator cells driven by multiple voltage pulses without an intervening magnetic reset of the ferrite cores. Results show that multiple pulses can be applied to the accelerator cells without a magnetic reset, but with some degradation of later pulses. The degradation appears as a droop on the flat portion of the second (and subsequent) pulses. The droop can be corrected by shaping the waveform of the incident pulses.

  18. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators.

  19. Connectivity of diagnostic technologies: improving surveillance and accelerating tuberculosis elimination.

    PubMed

    Andre, E; Isaacs, C; Affolabi, D; Alagna, R; Brockmann, D; de Jong, B C; Cambau, E; Churchyard, G; Cohen, T; Delmee, M; Delvenne, J-C; Farhat, M; Habib, A; Holme, P; Keshavjee, S; Khan, A; Lightfoot, P; Moore, D; Moreno, Y; Mundade, Y; Pai, M; Patel, S; Nyaruhirira, A U; Rocha, L E C; Takle, J; Trébucq, A; Creswell, J; Boehme, C

    2016-08-01

    In regard to tuberculosis (TB) and other major global epidemics, the use of new diagnostic tests is increasing dramatically, including in resource-limited countries. Although there has never been as much digital information generated, this data source has not been exploited to its full potential. In this opinion paper, we discuss lessons learned from the global scale-up of these laboratory devices and the pathway to tapping the potential of laboratory-generated information in the field of TB by using connectivity. Responding to the demand for connectivity, innovative third-party players have proposed solutions that have been widely adopted by field users of the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay. The experience associated with the utilisation of these systems, which facilitate the monitoring of wide laboratory networks, stressed the need for a more global and comprehensive approach to diagnostic connectivity. In addition to facilitating the reporting of test results, the mobility of digital information allows the sharing of information generated in programme settings. When they become easily accessible, these data can be used to improve patient care, disease surveillance and drug discovery. They should therefore be considered as a public health good. We list several examples of concrete initiatives that should allow data sources to be combined to improve the understanding of the epidemic, support the operational response and, finally, accelerate TB elimination. With the many opportunities that the pooling of data associated with the TB epidemic can provide, pooling of this information at an international level has become an absolute priority.

  20. Connectivity of diagnostic technologies: improving surveillance and accelerating tuberculosis elimination

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, C.; Affolabi, D.; Alagna, R.; Brockmann, D.; de Jong, B. C.; Cambau, E.; Churchyard, G.; Cohen, T.; Delmee, M.; Delvenne, J-C.; Farhat, M.; Habib, A.; Holme, P.; Keshavjee, S.; Khan, A.; Lightfoot, P.; Moore, D.; Moreno, Y.; Mundade, Y.; Pai, M.; Patel, S.; Nyaruhirira, A. U.; Rocha, L. E. C.; Takle, J.; Trébucq, A.; Creswell, J.; Boehme, C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY In regard to tuberculosis (TB) and other major global epidemics, the use of new diagnostic tests is increasing dramatically, including in resource-limited countries. Although there has never been as much digital information generated, this data source has not been exploited to its full potential. In this opinion paper, we discuss lessons learned from the global scale-up of these laboratory devices and the pathway to tapping the potential of laboratory-generated information in the field of TB by using connectivity. Responding to the demand for connectivity, innovative third-party players have proposed solutions that have been widely adopted by field users of the Xpert® MTB/RIF assay. The experience associated with the utilisation of these systems, which facilitate the monitoring of wide laboratory networks, stressed the need for a more global and comprehensive approach to diagnostic connectivity. In addition to facilitating the reporting of test results, the mobility of digital information allows the sharing of information generated in programme settings. When they become easily accessible, these data can be used to improve patient care, disease surveillance and drug discovery. They should therefore be considered as a public health good. We list several examples of concrete initiatives that should allow data sources to be combined to improve the understanding of the epidemic, support the operational response and, finally, accelerate TB elimination. With the many opportunities that the pooling of data associated with the TB epidemic can provide, pooling of this information at an international level has become an absolute priority. PMID:27393530

  1. Extraordinary tools for extraordinary science: the impact of SciDAC on accelerator science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-09-01

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook.'' Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  2. Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact ofSciDAC on Accelerator Science&Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-08-10

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook''. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  3. Influence of a strong longitudinal magnetic field on laser wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rassou, S.; Bourdier, A.; Drouin, M.

    2015-07-15

    Optimization of the beam quality and electronic trapped charge in the cavity are key issues of laser wake field acceleration. The effect of an initially applied uniform magnetic field, parallel to the direction of propagation of the pump pulse, on the laser wakefield is explored. First, an analytic model for the laser wakefield is built up in the case when such an external magnetic field is applied. Then, simulations are performed with a 3D quasi-cylindrical particle in cell code in the blowout (or bubble) regime. Transverse currents are generated at the rear of the bubble which amplify the longitudinal magnetic field. For several plasma and laser parameters, the wake shape is altered and trapping can be reduced or cancelled by the magnetic field. When considering optical injection, and when two counterpropagating waves interact with a rather high plasma density, trapping is not affected by the magnetic field. In this range of plasma and laser parameters, it is shown that the longitudinal magnetic field can reduce or even prevent self-injection and enhance beam quality.

  4. Magnetically enhanced cell delivery for accelerating recovery of the endothelium in injured arteries

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Richard F.; Fishbein, Ilia; Zhang, Kehan; Wen, Justin; Levy, Robert J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.; Chorny, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Arterial injury and disruption of the endothelial layer are an inevitable consequence of interventional procedures used for treating obstructive vascular disease. The slow and often incomplete endothelium regrowth after injury is the primary cause of serious short- and long-term complications, including thrombosis, restenosis and neoatherosclerosis. Rapid endothelium restoration has the potential to prevent these sequelae, providing a rationale for developing strategies aimed at accelerating the reendothelialization process. The present studies focused on magnetically guided delivery of endothelial cells (EC) functionalized with biodegradable magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) as an experimental approach for achieving rapid and stable cell homing and expansion in stented arteries. EC laden with polylactide-based MNP exhibited strong magnetic responsiveness, capacity for cryopreservation and rapid expansion, and the ability to disintegrate internalized MNP in both proliferating and contact-inhibited states. Intracellular decomposition of BODIPY558/568-labeled MNP monitored non-invasively based on assembly state-dependent changes in the emission spectrum demonstrated cell proliferation rate-dependent kinetics (average disassembly rates: 6.6 ± 0.8% and 3.6 ± 0.4% per day in dividing and contact-inhibited EC, respectively). With magnetic guidance using a transient exposure to a uniform 1-kOe field, stable localization and subsequent propagation of MNP-functionalized EC, markedly enhanced in comparison to non-magnetic delivery conditions, were observed in stented rat carotid arteries. In conclusion, magnetically guided delivery is a promising experimental strategy for accelerating endothelial cell repopulation of stented blood vessels after angioplasty. PMID:26704936

  5. Electron acceleration at a coronal shock propagating through a large-scale streamer-like magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Fan; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Gang

    2016-04-05

    With a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also found that in general the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not so efficient as that at the top of closed field since at the top a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons is power-law like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of -3 to -6. In conclusion, physical interpretations of the results and implications on the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.

  6. High gradient insulator technology for the dielectric wall accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.; Caporaso, G.; Carder, B.

    1995-04-27

    Insulators composed of finely spaced alternating layers of dielectric and metal are thought to minimize secondary emission avalanche (SEA) growth. Most data to date was taken with small samples (order 10 cm{sup 2} area) in the absence of an ion or electron beam. The authors have begun long pulse (>1 {mu}s) high voltage testing of small hard seal samples. Further, they have performed short pulse (20 ns) high voltage testing of moderate scale bonded samples (order 100 cm{sup 2} area) in the presence of a 1 kA electron beam. Results thus far indicate a 1.0 to 4.0 increase in the breakdown electric field stress is possible with this technology.

  7. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  8. GeV electron acceleration by a Gaussian field laser with effect of beam width parameter in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2017-01-01

    Electron acceleration due to a circularly polarized (CP) Gaussian laser field has been investigated theoretically in magnetized plasma. A Gaussian laser beam possesses trapping forces on electrons during its propagation through plasma. A single particle simulation indicates a resonant enhancement of electron acceleration with a Gaussian laser beam. The plasma is magnetized with an axial magnetic field in same direction as that of laser beam propagation. The dependence of laser beam width parameter on electron energy gain with propagation distance has been presented graphically for different values of laser intensity. Electron energy gain is relatively high where the laser beam parameter is at its minimum value. Enhanced energy gain of the order of GeV is reported with magnetic field under 20 MG in plasma. It is also seen that the axial magnetic field maintains the electron acceleration for large propagation distance even with an increasing beam width parameter.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: The science and technology of superconducting cavities for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padamsee, Hasan

    2001-04-01

    Rapid advances in the performance of superconducting cavities have made RF superconductivity a key technology for accelerators that fulfil a variety of physics needs: high-energy particle physics, nuclear physics, neutron spallation sources and free-electron lasers. New applications are forthcoming for frontier high-energy physics accelerators, radioactive beams for nuclear astrophysics, next-generation light sources, intense proton accelerators for neutron and muon sources. There are now nearly one kilometre of superconducting cavities installed in accelerators around the world, providing more than 5 GV of acceleration. The most recent installation of 20 m for a free-electron laser realized an average gradient a factor of four higher than existing applications. Improved understanding of the physics of RF superconductivity, together with advances in technology, are responsible for the spectacular increases in performance. RF superconductivity is a mature science going well beyond technological know-how and trial-and-error approaches to genuine understanding of the underlying physics. Research continues to push performance levels towards the theoretical limit, which is another factor of two higher than the levels yet achieved.

  10. Important requirements for RF generators for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT)

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-09-01

    All Accelerator-Driven Transmutation applications require very large amounts of RF Power. For example, one version of a Plutonium burning system requires an 800-MeV, 80-mA, proton accelerator running at 100% duty factor. This accelerator requires approximately 110-MW of continuous RF power if one assumes only 10% reserve power for control of the accelerator fields. In fact, to minimize beam spill, the RF controls may need as much as 15 to 20% of reserve power. In addition, unlike an electron accelerator in which the beam is relativistic, a failed RF station can disturb the synchronism of the beam, possibly shutting down the entire accelerator. These issues and more lead to a set of requirements for the RF generators which are stringent, and in some cases, conflicting. In this paper, we will describe the issues and requirements, and outline a plan for RF generator development to meet the needs of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies. The key issues which will be discussed include: operating efficiency, operating linearity, effect on the input power grid, bandwidth, gain, reliability, operating voltage, and operating current.

  11. MHD magnet technology development program summary, September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-01

    The program of MHD magnet technology development conducted for the US Department of Energy by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology during the past five years is summarized. The general strategy is explained, the various parts of the program are described and the results are discussed. Subjects covered include component analysis, research and development aimed at improving the technology base, preparation of reference designs for commercial-scale magnets with associated design evaluations, manufacturability studies and cost estimations, the detail design and procurement of MHD test facility magnets involving transfer of technology to industry, investigations of accessory subsystem characteristics and magnet-flow-train interfacing considerations and the establishment of tentative recommendations for design standards, quality assurance procedures and safety procedures. A systematic approach (framework) developed to aid in the selection of the most suitable commercial-scale magnet designs is presented and the program status as of September 1982 is reported. Recommendations are made for future work needed to complete the design evaluation and selection process and to provide a sound technological base for the detail design and construction of commercial-scale MHD magnets. 85 references.

  12. Accelerator Technology Program: Status report, October 1985--March 1986: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.; Schriber, S.O.

    1988-07-01

    This report presents highlights of the major projects in the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first section details progress associated with the accelerator test stand. Following sections cover achievements in accelerator theory and simulation, LAMPF II accomplishments, and updates on BEAR, beam dynamics, the rf laboratory, p-bar gravity experiment, University of Illinois racetrack microtron, and NBS microtron. Also included are results from the Proton Storage Ring commissioning, developments in very high microwave systems, and advances in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test rf technology. In addition, the Phoenix Project and the Krypton Fluoride Project are discussed. The report concludes with a listing of papers published by AT-Division personnel during this reporting period. 42 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars as high-energy particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Russell J.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Miller, M. Coleman

    1994-01-01

    Interaction of an accretion disk with the magnetic field of a neutron star produces large electromotive forces, which drive large conduction currents in the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit. Here we argue that such large conduction currents will cause microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere. If the minimum plasma density in the magnetosphere is relatively low is less than or aproximately 10(exp 9)/cu cm, current-driven micro-instabilities may cause relativistic double layers to form, producing voltage differences in excess of 10(exp 12) V and accelerating charged particles to very high energies. If instead the plasma density is higher (is greater than or approximately = 10(exp 9)/cu cm, twisting of the stellar magnetic field is likely to cause magnetic field reconnection. This reconnection will be relativistic, accelerating plasma in the magnetosphere to relativistic speeds and a small fraction of particles to very high energies. Interaction of these high-energy particles with X-rays, gamma-rays, and accreting plasma may produce detectable high-energy radiation.

  14. Particle Acceleration in Collapsing Magnetic Traps with a Braking Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, Alexei; Neukirch, Thomas; Threlfall, James

    2016-05-01

    Collapsing magnetic traps (CMTs) are one proposed mechanism for generating non-thermal particle populations in solar flares. CMTs occur if an initially stretched magnetic field structure relaxes rapidly into a lower-energy configuration, which is believed to happen as a by-product of magnetic reconnection. A similar mechanism for energising particles has also been found to operate in the Earth's magnetotail. One particular feature proposed to be of importance for particle acceleration in the magnetotail is that of a braking plasma jet, i.e. a localised region of strong flow encountering stronger magnetic field which causes the jet to slow down and stop. Such a feature has not been included in previously proposed analytical models of CMTs for solar flares. In this work we incorporate a braking plasma jet into a well studied CMT model for the first time. We present results of test particle calculations in this new CMT model. We observe and characterise new types of particle behaviour caused by the magnetic structure of the jet braking region, which allows electrons to be trapped both in the braking jet region and the loop legs. We compare and contrast the behaviour of particle orbits for various parameter regimes of the underlying trap by examining particle trajectories, energy gains and the frequency with which different types of particle orbit are found for each parameter regime.

  15. Experimental Mapping and Benchmarking of Magnetic Field Codes on the LHD Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Gallo, A.; Marconato, N.; Serianni, G.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    For the validation of the numerical models used for the design of the Neutral Beam Test Facility for ITER in Padua [1], an experimental benchmark against a full-size device has been sought. The LHD BL2 injector [2] has been chosen as a first benchmark, because the BL2 Negative Ion Source and Beam Accelerator are geometrically similar to SPIDER, even though BL2 does not include current bars and ferromagnetic materials. A comprehensive 3D magnetic field model of the LHD BL2 device has been developed based on the same assumptions used for SPIDER. In parallel, a detailed experimental magnetic map of the BL2 device has been obtained using a suitably designed 3D adjustable structure for the fine positioning of the magnetic sensors inside 27 of the 770 beamlet apertures. The calculated values have been compared to the experimental data. The work has confirmed the quality of the numerical model, and has also provided useful information on the magnetic non-uniformities due to the edge effects and to the tolerance on permanent magnet remanence.

  16. A Dual Mode Pulsed Electro-Magnetic Cell Stimulator Produces Acceleration of Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Salas, Walter D.; Rizk, Hatem; Mo, Chenglin; Weisleder, Noah; Brotto, Leticia; Abreu, Eduardo; Brotto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test of a dual-mode electric and magnetic biological stimulator (EM-Stim). The stimulator generates pulsing electric and magnetic fields at programmable rates and intensities. While electric and magnetic stimulators have been reported before, this is the first device that combines both modalities. The ability of the dual stimulation to target bone and muscle tissue simultaneously has the potential to improve the therapeutic treatment of osteoporosis and sarcopenia. The device is fully programmable, portable and easy to use, and can run from a battery or a power supply. The device can generate magnetic fields of up to 1.6 mT and output voltages of +/−40 V. The EM-Stim accelerated myogenic differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes as evidenced by morphometric, gene expression, and protein content analyses. Currently, there are many patents concerned with the application of single electrical or magnetic stimulation, but none that combine both simultaneously. However, we applied for and obtained a provisional patent for new device to fully explore its therapeutic potential in pre-clinical models. PMID:23445453

  17. Cost Based Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Systems of Accelerator Magnets.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M

    2003-06-02

    The proposed Next Linear Collider (NLC) has a proposed 85% overall availability goal, the availability specifications for all its 7200 magnets and their 6167 power supplies are 97.5% each. Thus all of the electromagnets and their power supplies must be highly reliable or quickly repairable. Improved reliability or repairability comes at a higher cost. We have developed a set of analysis procedures for magnet designers to use as they decide how much effort to exert, i.e. how much money to spend, to improve the reliability of a particular style of magnet. We show these procedures being applied to a standard SLAC electromagnet design in order to make it reliable enough to meet the NLC availability specs. First, empirical data from SLAC's accelerator failure database plus design experience are used to calculate MTBF for failure modes identified through a FMEA. Availability for one particular magnet can be calculated. Next, labor and material costs to repair magnet failures are used in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the total cost of all failures over a 30-year lifetime. Opportunity costs are included. Engineers choose from amongst various designs by comparing lifecycle costs.

  18. Experimental Mapping and Benchmarking of Magnetic Field Codes on the LHD Ion Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Gallo, A.; Marconato, N.; Nakano, H.; Serianni, G.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-01

    For the validation of the numerical models used for the design of the Neutral Beam Test Facility for ITER in Padua [1], an experimental benchmark against a full-size device has been sought. The LHD BL2 injector [2] has been chosen as a first benchmark, because the BL2 Negative Ion Source and Beam Accelerator are geometrically similar to SPIDER, even though BL2 does not include current bars and ferromagnetic materials. A comprehensive 3D magnetic field model of the LHD BL2 device has been developed based on the same assumptions used for SPIDER. In parallel, a detailed experimental magnetic map of the BL2 device has been obtained using a suitably designed 3D adjustable structure for the fine positioning of the magnetic sensors inside 27 of the 770 beamlet apertures. The calculated values have been compared to the experimental data. The work has confirmed the quality of the numerical model, and has also provided useful information on the magnetic non-uniformities due to the edge effects and to the tolerance on permanent magnet remanence.

  19. High energy focused ion beam technology and applications at the Louisiana Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, G. A.; Dymnikov, A. D.; Rout, B.; Zachry, D. P.

    2007-07-01

    The high energy focused ion beam (HEFIB) system at the Louisiana Accelerator Center (LAC) of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, USA, is constructed on one of the beamlines of a National Electrostatics Corporation 1.7 MV 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator. The HEFIB system has several components, including a versatile magnetic quadrupole sextuplet lens focusing system defined as the Russian magnetic sextuplet (RMS) system having the same demagnifications, the same focal lengths and the same positions of the focal points in xz and yz planes as the Russian quadruplet and a one-piece concrete supporting base and integrated endstation with air isolation. A review of recent microlithography and HEFIB system developments at LAC are presented, as well as new results using heavy ion (HI) beam lithography on crystalline silicon.

  20. Radiation Field Forming for Industrial Electron Accelerators Using Rare-Earth Magnetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, A. N.; Khankin, V. V.; Shvedunov, N. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Yurov, D. S.

    2016-09-01

    The article describes the radiation field forming system for industrial electron accelerators, which would have uniform distribution of linear charge density at the surface of an item being irradiated perpendicular to the direction of its motion. Its main element is non-linear quadrupole lens made with the use of rare-earth magnetic materials. The proposed system has a number of advantages over traditional beam scanning systems that use electromagnets, including easier product irradiation planning, lower instantaneous local dose rate, smaller size, lower cost. Provided are the calculation results for a 10 MeV industrial electron accelerator, as well as measurement results for current distribution in the prototype build based on calculations.

  1. The Effects of Ambulatory Accelerations on the Stability of a Magnetically Suspended Impeller for an Implantable Blood Pump.

    PubMed

    Paul, Gordon; Rezaienia, Mohammed Amin; Rahideh, Akbar; Munjiza, Ante; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the effects of ambulatory accelerations on the stability of a magnetically suspended impeller for use in implantable blood pumps. A magnetic suspension system is developed to control the radial position of a magnetic impeller using coils in the pump casing. The magnitude and periodicity of ambulatory accelerations at the torso are measured. A test rig is then designed to apply appropriate accelerations to the suspension system. Accelerations from 0 to 1 g are applied to the suspended impeller with ambulatory periodicity while the radial position of the impeller and power consumption of the suspension system are monitored. The test is carried out with the impeller suspended in air, water, and a glycerol solution to simulate the viscosity of blood. A model is developed to investigate the effects of the radial magnetic suspension system and fluid damping during ambulatory accelerations. The suspension system reduces the average displacement of the impeller suspended in aqueous solutions within its casing to 100 µm with a power consumption of below 2 W during higher magnitude ambulatory accelerations (RMS magnitude 0.3 g). The damping effect of the fluid is also examined and it is shown that buoyancy, rather than drag, is the primary cause of the damping at the low displacement oscillations that occur during the application of ambulatory accelerations to such a suspension system.

  2. High Power Accelerator and Magnetically Insulated Ion Diode for Ion Ring Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephen Edward

    Ion ring generation for Cornell University's Megavolt Ion Coil Experiment (MICE) requires a suitable pulsed power accelerator to drive a high-power magnetically insulated ion diode. The diode then emits an intense ion-beam which forms an ion ring by using a cusped magnetic field. The goal of this thesis is to provide the necessary beam to form the ion-ring, and the present work consists of two parts: (1) the design, construction, testing, and operation of the pulsed power accelerator; and (2) the design, construction, testing, operation, and physics studies of a magnetically insulated diode for ion ring generation. For the required pulsed-power driver, we use a modified 2-MV, 100 kJ Marx generator, connected to a new 2-Omega-200-nsec pulse-forming line. For the diode, we use a novel applied-B, extraction diode with anode-side as well as cathode-side coils. This coil arrangement forms an easily variable pseudo-separatrix within the gap allowing flexibility for diode studies and optimization. Diode investigations reveal the efficacy of such a pseudo-separatrix located in the gap near the flashboard, in terms of anode turn-on and ion beam current. Further results (1) support the hypothesis that leakage electrons to the flashboard are instrumental for anode turn-on, (2) indicate that the gap electron-population has two different electron sources, and (3) discuss the possible long development time scale for diode development. Extensive computer simulations have also been conducted on the accelerator and diode, and results are compared with experiment. A driving constraint throughout this work is affordability on a university budget; also, unfortunately, some of the experiments had to be cut short due to funding cuts.

  3. Interaction of a Magnetized Shell with an Ambient Medium: Limits on Impulsive Magnetic Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Amir

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of relativistic magnetized ejecta with an ambient medium is studied for a range of structures and magnetization of the unshocked ejecta. We particularly focus on the effect of the ambient medium on the dynamics of an impulsive, high-sigma shell. It is found that for sufficiently high values of the initial magnetization σ0 the evolution of the system is significantly altered by the ambient medium well before the shell reaches its coasting phase. The maximum Lorentz factor of the shell is limited to values well below σ0 for a shell of initial energy E = 1052 E 52 erg and size r 0 = 1012 T 30 cm expelled into a medium having a uniform density ni , we obtain Γmax ~= 180(E 52/T 3 30 ni )1/8 in the high-sigma limit. The reverse shock and any internal shocks that might form if the source is fluctuating are shown to be very weak. The restriction on the Lorentz factor is more severe for shells propagating in a stellar wind. Intermittent ejection of small sub-shells does not seem to help, as the shells merge while still highly magnetized. Lower sigma shells start decelerating after reaching the coasting phase and spreading away. The properties of the reverse shock then depend on the density profiles of the coasting shell and the ambient medium. For a self-similar cold shell the reverse shock becomes strong as it propagates inward, and the system eventually approaches the self-similar solution recently derived by Nakamura & Shigeyama.

  4. Solar flare acceleration of solar wind: influence of active region magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, H; Wilcox, J M; Scherrer, P H

    1981-06-26

    The direction of the photospheric magnetic field at the site of a solar flare is a good predictor of whether the flare will accelerate solar wind plasma. If the field has a southward component, high-speed solar wind plasma is usually observed near the earth about 4 days later. If the field has a northward component, such high-speed solar wind is almost never observed. Southward-field flares may then be expected to have much larger terrestrial effects than northward flares.

  5. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  6. Time-resolved energy spectrum measurement of a linear induction accelerator with the magnetic analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Yang, Guo-Jun; Chen, Si-Fu; Zhang, Zhuo; Wei, Tao; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We recently set up a time-resolved optical beam diagnostic system. Using this system, we measured the high current electron beam energy in the accelerator under construction. This paper introduces the principle of the diagnostic system, describes the setup, and shows the results. A bending beam line was designed using an existing magnetic analyzer with a 300 mm-bending radius and a 60° bending angle at hard-edge approximation. Calculations show that the magnitude of the beam energy is about 18 MeV, and the energy spread is within 2%. Our results agree well with the initial estimates deduced from the diode voltage approach.

  7. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION IN THE JETS OF 4C74.26

    SciTech Connect

    Araudo, A. T.; Blundell, K. M.; Bell, A. R.

    2015-06-20

    We model the multi-wavelength emission in the southern hotspot of the radio quasar 4C74.26. The synchrotron radio emission is resolved near the shock with the MERLIN radio-interferometer, and the rapid decay of this emission behind the shock is interpreted as the decay of the amplified downstream magnetic field as expected for small scale turbulence. Electrons are accelerated to only 0.3 TeV, consistent with a diffusion coefficient many orders of magnitude greater than in the Bohm regime. If the same diffusion coefficient applies to the protons, their maximum energy is only ∼100 TeV.

  8. Observation of multipactor suppression in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure using an applied axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Konecny, R.; Antipov, S.; Chang, C.; Gold, S. H.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.

    2013-11-18

    Efforts by a number of institutions to develop a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure capable of supporting high gradient acceleration when driven by an external radio frequency source have been ongoing over the past decade. Single surface resonant multipactor has been previously identified as one of the major limitations on the practical application of DLA structures in electron accelerators. In this paper, we report the results of an experiment that demonstrated suppression of multipactor growth in an X-band DLA structure through the use of an applied axial magnetic field. This represents an advance toward the practical use of DLA structures in many accelerator applications.

  9. Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of an intense axial magnetic field in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. P.

    2006-08-15

    Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of a short duration intense axial magnetic field has been studied. Resonance occurs between the electrons and the laser field for an optimum magnetic field leading to effective energy transfer from laser to electrons. The value of optimum magnetic field is independent of the laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy. The electrons rotate around the axis of the laser pulse with small angle of emittance and small energy spread. Acceleration gradient increases with laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy.

  10. Giant magnetoresistance materials for magnetic recording technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.; Adams, C.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work focused on a class of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials (LaMnO{sub 3} doped with Ca, Ba, or Sr) that exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition near a ferromagnetic phase transition temperature. This yields a very large magnetoresistance; thus these materials may have important uses as magnetic sensors in a variety of applications, ranging from automobiles to read heads for magnetic storage. In addition, the transport current in the ferromagnetic state is likely to be very highly polarized, which means that additional device applications using the phenomena of spin-polarized tunneling can be envisioned. Use of these materials as magnetic sensors depends upon learning to control the synthesis parameters (principally temperature, pressure and composition) to achieve a specific carrier concentration and/or mobility. A second challenge is the high magnetic fields ({ge}1 Tesla) currently required to achieve a large change in resistance. The authors began an investigation of two novel approaches to this field-sensitivity problem, involving the development of multilayer structures of the TMO materials. Finally, they began to explore the use of epitaxial strain as a means of changing the transport properties in thin-film multilayers.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  12. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  13. The role of Magnetic Reconnection in Compact Sources and Jet Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandra Bahadur; De Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Kadowaki, Luis H. S.

    Almost a decade ago de Gouveia Dal Pino and Lazarian (2005) proposed a model for producing jet plasmons and particle acceleration by magnetic reconnection events in the surrounds of accretion disks around black holes with magnetospheres. Although this model predicts that the amount of magnetic power released by reconnection is more than sufficient to explain observed flares from black hole mass sources in different scales (from microquasars to low luminous active galactic nuclei; see de Gouveia Dal Pino et al. 2010), it still requires refinement and numerical testing. In this work, we take into account relativistic effects by introducing a Pseudo Newtonian approach to the model and also present the results of 2D MHD numerical simulations under this approach.

  14. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  15. Synchronization of multiple magnetically switched modules to power linear induction adder accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, K.W.; Kiekel, P.D.

    1997-02-01

    In applications where multiple magnetic modulators are used to drive a single Linear Induction Voltage Adder (LIVA) or Linear Accelerator (LINAC), it is essential that the outputs of the modulators by synchronized. Output rise times are typically in the 10ns to 20ns range, often making it necessary to synchronize to within less than 1ns. Microprocessor and electronic feedback schemes have been developed and demonstrated that achieve the required level of synchronization, however, they are sophisticated and potentially complex. In a quest for simplicity, this work seeks to determine the achievable level of modulator to modulator timing jitter that can be obtained with simple design practices and passive techniques. Sources of output pulse time jitter in magnetic modulators are reviewed and some basic modulator design principles that can be used to minimize the intrinsic time jitter between modulators are discussed. A novel technique for passive synchronization is presented.

  16. Results of Measurements of Accelerations of Technological Devices onboard the FotonSpacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmin, I. V.; Volkov, M. V.; Egorov, A. V.; Reut, E. F.; Senchenkov, A. S.

    2001-07-01

    This paper generalizes the results of measuring the residual accelerations arising when investigations in space materials science are carried out onboard the unmanned Fotonspacecraft. The levels of vibroaccelerations are analyzed in the frequency band of 1 500 Hz for the technological devices UZ01, UZ04, and POLIZON, developed by the Federal Unitary State Enterprise “Barmin Design Bureau of General Machine Building” (V.P. Barmin KBOM). The levels of accelerations are estimated in the frequency band of 0 1 Hz in the zone of technological operations of these facilities. The basic sources of vibroaccelerations acting upon the frames of devices are determined in the capsule zone, where technological processes of producing new materials take place. In the frequency band of 1 500 Hz the vibroaccelerations are shown to be generated by the operation of Fotonspacecraft units and a drive of capsule translation during the technological process. On the capsule frame they reach the values of (1 3) × 10 3 g. The level of linear accelerations in the infralow-frequency band is determined by rotational motions of the Fotonspacecraft. It depends on the device location with respect to the spacecraft center of mass and does not exceed (1 7) × 10 6 gin the steady-state regime in the zone of technological activity.

  17. Weak magnetic field accelerates chromate removal by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pian; Guan, Xiaohong; Sun, Yuankui; Choi, Wonyong; Qin, Hejie; Wang, Jianmin; Qiao, Junlian; Li, Lina

    2015-05-01

    Weak magnetic field (WMF) was employed to improve the removal of Cr(VI) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the first time. The removal rate of Cr(VI) was elevated by a factor of 1.12-5.89 due to the application of a WMF, and the WMF-induced improvement was more remarkable at higher Cr(VI) concentration and higher pH. Fe2+ was not detected until Cr(VI) was exhausted, and there was a positive correlation between the WMF-induced promotion factor of Cr(VI) removal rate and that of Fe2+ release rate in the absence of Cr(VI) at pH4.0-5.5. These phenomena imply that ZVI corrosion with Fe2+ release was the limiting step in the process of Cr(VI) removal. The superimposed WMF had negligible influence on the apparent activation energy of Cr(VI) removal by ZVI, indicating that WMF accelerated Cr(VI) removal by ZVI but did not change the mechanism. The passive layer formed with WMF was much more porous than without WMF, thereby facilitating mass transport. Therefore, WMF could accelerate ZVI corrosion and alleviate the detrimental effects of the passive layer, resulting in more rapid removal of Cr(VI) by ZVI. Exploiting the magnetic memory of ZVI, a two-stage process consisting of a small reactor with WMF for ZVI magnetization and a large reactor for removing contaminants by magnetized ZVI can be employed as a new method of ZVI-mediated remediation.

  18. Harnessing collaborative technology to accelerate achievement of chronic disease management objectives for Canada.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Leslee J; Healey, Lindsay; Falk, Will

    2007-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues put forth a call to action for the transformation of the Canadian healthcare system through the adoption of a national chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) strategy. They offer examples of best practices and national solutions including investment in clinical information technologies to help support improved care and outcomes. Although we acknowledge that the authors propose CDPM solutions that are headed in the right direction, more rapid deployment of solutions that harness the potential of advanced collaborative technologies is required. We provide examples of how technologies that exist today can help to accelerate the achievement of some key CDPM objectives.

  19. Pre-Implementation and Performance Plan for the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroga, Marcelo

    2007-03-30

    This report discusses the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center (Center) and its innovative economic development program. The chapters describe the organization and the operations of a two-pillar model for training and business acceleration and how the program focuses on the economic development of a disadvantaged Chicago, Illinois, Hispanic community located in Humboldt Park. The Humboldt Park community is located 3 miles west of Chicago's affluent downtown. Humboldt Park residents have income levels below the poverty line and unemployment rates twice the national average.

  20. Direct laser acceleration of electrons in a strong azimuthal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Toncian, Toma; Stark, David; Arefiev, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    Recently published particle-in-cell simulations indicate that a high-intensity laser irradiating an over-critical plasma can induce relativistic transparency and drive a Megatesla magnetic field while propagating into the plasma. At the same time, the quasi-static electric field in this regime is an order of magnitude weaker than the quasi-static magnetic field as a result of ion mobility and the fact that electrons are irradiated by a high intensity laser pulse. We have examined analytically and numerically direct laser acceleration of electrons in such an azimuthal magnetic field. We have considered a general case of a laser beam propagating with a superluminal phase velocity and compared the results to those for a luminal case. Our key finding is that the maximum gamma-factor that can be attained by electrons has a pronounced threshold, with a significant enhancement of the electron energy taking place above the threshold. The threshold is a function of the azimuthal magnetic field and of the initial transverse electron momentum. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1632777.

  1. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  2. Spallation nucleosynthesis by accelerated charged-particles in stellar envelopes of magnetic stars

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2007-02-26

    Recent observations have suggested the presence of radioactive elements, such as Tc, Pm and 84 {<=} Z {<=} 99 elements at the surface of the chemically-peculiar magnetic star HD 101065, also known as Przybylski's star. The peculiar 35 < Z < 82 abundance pattern of HD 101065 has been so far explained by diffusion processes in the stellar envelope . However, such processes cannot be called for to explain the origin of short-lived radio-elements. The large magnetic field observed in Ap stars can be at the origin of a significant acceleration of charged-particles, mainly protons and {alpha}-particles, that in turn can by interaction with the stellar material modify the surface content.The present contribution explores to what extent the irradiation process corresponding to the interaction of the stellar material with energetic particles can by itself only explain the abundances determined by observation at the surface of the chemically peculiar star HD 101065, as well as other chemically peculiar star. Due to the unknown characteristics of the accelerated particles, a purely parametric approach is followed, taken as free parameters the proton and {alpha}-particle flux amplitude and energy distribution as well as the time of irradiation. The specific simulations considered here can explain many different observational aspects. In particular, it is shown that a significant production of Z > 30 heavy elements can be achieved. The most attractive feature of the irradiation process is the significant production of Tc and Pm, as well as actinides and sub-actinides.

  3. Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection as an Ion Acceleration Mechanism of Low- β Laboratory Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Curreli, Davide; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    In this work we present the results from a series of fully-kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection under typical laboratory plasma conditions. The highly-efficient energy conversion obtained from this process is of great interest for applications such as future electric propulsion systems and ion beam accelerators. We analysed initial configurations in low-beta conditions with reduced mass ratio of mi = 512me at magnetic fields between 200G and 5000G and electron temperatures between 0.5 and 10eV. The initial ion density and temperature are kept uniform and equal to 1019 m-3 and 0.0215eV (room temperature) respectively. The analysis has shown that the reconnection process under these conditions can accelerate ions up to velocities as high as a significant fraction of the inflow Alfven speed. The configuration showing the best scenario is further studied with a realistic mass ratio in terms of energetics and outflow ion momentum, with the latter featured by the traditionally used specific impulse. Finally, a more detailed analysis of the reconnection outflow has revealed the formation of different interesting set of shock structures, also recently seen from MHD simulations of relativistic plasmas and certainly subject of future more careful attention. The present work has been possible thanks to the Illinois-KULeuven Faculty/PhD Candidate Exchange Program. Computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 machines.

  4. Capture and Transport of Laser Accelerated Protons by Pulsed Magnetic Fields: Advancements Toward Laser-Based Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris-Mog, Trevor J.

    The interaction of intense laser light (I > 10 18 W/cm2) with a thin target foil leads to the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism (TNSA). TNSA is responsible for the generation of high current, ultra-low emittance proton beams, which may allow for the development of a compact and cost effective proton therapy system for the treatment of cancer. Before this application can be realized, control is needed over the large divergence and the 100% kinetic energy spread that are characteristic of TNSA proton beams. The work presented here demonstrates control over the divergence and energy spread using strong magnetic fields generated by a pulse power solenoid. The solenoidal field results in a parallel proton beam with a kinetic energy spread DeltaE/E = 10%. Assuming that next generation lasers will be able to operate at 10 Hz, the 10% spread in the kinetic energy along with the 23% capture efficiency of the solenoid yield enough protons per laser pulse to, for the first time, consider applications in Radiation Oncology. Current lasers can generate proton beams with kinetic energies up to 67.5 MeV, but for therapy applications, the proton kinetic energy must reach 250 MeV. Since the maximum kinetic energy Emax of the proton scales with laser light intensity as Emax ∝ I0.5, next generation lasers may very well accelerate 250 MeV protons. As the kinetic energy of the protons is increased, the magnetic field strength of the solenoid will need to increase. The scaling of the magnetic field B with the kinetic energy of the protons follows B ∝ E1/2. Therefor, the field strength of the solenoid presented in this work will need to be increased by a factor of 2.4 in order to accommodate 250 MeV protons. This scaling factor seems reasonable, even with present technology. This work not only demonstrates control over beam divergence and energy spread, it also allows for us to now perform feasibility studies to further research what a laser-based proton therapy system

  5. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  6. Advanced Accelerators for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Koyama, Kazuyoshi

    We review advanced accelerators for medical applications with respect to the following key technologies: (i) higher RF electron linear accelerator (hereafter “linac”); (ii) optimization of alignment for the proton linac, cyclotron and synchrotron; (iii) superconducting magnet; (iv) laser technology. Advanced accelerators for medical applications are categorized into two groups. The first group consists of compact medical linacs with high RF, cyclotrons and synchrotrons downsized by optimization of alignment and superconducting magnets. The second group comprises laser-based acceleration systems aimed of medical applications in the future. Laser plasma electron/ion accelerating systems for cancer therapy and laser dielectric accelerating systems for radiation biology are mentioned. Since the second group has important potential for a compact system, the current status of the established energy and intensity and of the required stability are given.

  7. CEBAF Accelerator Achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G. A.; Poelker, M.; Reece, C.; Tiefenback, M.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  8. Validation of Finite-Element Models of Persistent-Current Effects in Nb3Sn Accelerator Magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, X.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; ...

    2015-01-06

    Persistent magnetization currents are induced in superconducting filaments during the current ramping in magnets. The resulting perturbation to the design magnetic field leads to field quality degradation, in particular at low field where the effect is stronger relative to the main field. The effects observed in NbTi accelerator magnets were reproduced well with the critical-state model. However, this approach becomes less accurate for the calculation of the persistent-current effects observed in Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. Here a finite-element method based on the measured strand magnetization is validated against three state-of-art Nb3Sn accelerator magnets featuring different subelement diameters, critical currents, magnet designsmore » and measurement temperatures. The temperature dependence of the persistent-current effects is reproduced. Based on the validated model, the impact of conductor design on the persistent current effects is discussed. The performance, limitations and possible improvements of the approach are also discussed.« less

  9. A charged particle in a homogeneous magnetic field accelerated by a time-periodic Aharonov-Bohm flux

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvoda, T.; Stovicek, P.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a nonrelativistic quantum charged particle moving on a plane under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and driven by a periodically time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm flux. We observe an acceleration effect in the case when the Aharonov-Bohm flux depends on time as a sinusoidal function whose frequency is in resonance with the cyclotron frequency. In particular, the energy of the particle increases linearly for large times. An explicit formula for the acceleration rate is derived with the aid of the quantum averaging method, and then it is checked against a numerical solution and a very good agreement is found. - Highlights: > A nonrelativistic quantum charged particle on a plane. > A homogeneous magnetic field and a periodically time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm flux. > The quantum averaging method applied to a time-dependent system. > A resonance of the AB flux with the cyclotron frequency. > An acceleration with linearly increasing energy; a formula for the acceleration rate.

  10. Particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-beta pair plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Daughton, William; Li, Xiaocan; Liu, Yi -Hsin

    2016-04-29

    Plasma energization through magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime featured by low plasma beta (β=8πnkT0/B2 <<1) and/or high magnetization (σ=B2/(4πnmc2)>>1) is important in a series of astrophysical systems such as solar flares, pulsar wind nebula, and relativistic jets from black holes. In this paper, we review the recent progress on kinetic simulations of this process and further discuss plasma dynamics and particle acceleration in a low-β reconnection layer that consists of electron–positron pairs. We also examine the effect of different initial thermal temperatures on the resulting particle energy spectra. While earlier papers have concluded that the spectral index is smaller for higher σ, our simulations show that the spectral index approaches p = 1 for sufficiently low plasma β, even if σ~1. Since this predicted spectral index in the idealized limit is harder than most observations, it is important to consider effects that can lead to a softer spectrum such as open boundary simulations. Here, we also remark that the effects of three-dimensional reconnection physics and turbulence on reconnection need to be addressed in the future.

  11. Dose optimization for the MRI-accelerator: IMRT in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Hårdemark, B.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2007-12-01

    A combined system of a 6 MV linear accelerator and a 1.5 T MRI scanner is currently being developed. In this system, the patient will be irradiated in the presence of a 1.5 T magnetic field. This causes a strong dose increase at tissue-air interfaces. Around air cavities in the patient, these effects may become problematic. Homogeneous dose distributions can be obtained around regularly shaped symmetrical cavities using opposing beams. However, for more irregularly shaped cavities this approach may not be sufficient. This study will investigate whether IMRT can be used to cope with magnetic field dose effects, in particular for target volumes adjacent to irregularly shaped air cavities. Therefore, an inverse treatment planning approach has been designed based on pre-calculated beamlet dose distribution kernels. Using this approach, optimized dose distributions were calculated for B = 1.5 T and for B = 0 T. Investigated target sites include a prostate cancer, a laryngeal cancer and an oropharyngeal cancer. Differences in the dose distribution between B = 0 and 1.5 T were minimal; only the skin dose increased for B = 1.5 T. Homogeneous dose distributions were obtained for target structures adjacent to air cavities without the use of opposing beams. These results show that a 1.5 T magnetic field does not compromise the ability to achieve desired dose distributions with IMRT.

  12. Magnetic Shielding of the Channel Walls in a Hall Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; deGrys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2011-01-01

    In a qualification life test of a Hall thruster it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approx 5,600 h. Numerical simulations using a two-dimensional axisymmetric plasma solver with a magnetic field-aligned mesh reveal that when the channel receded from its early-in-life to its steady-state configuration the following changes occurred near the wall: (1) reduction of the electric field parallel to the wall that prohibited ions from acquiring significant impact kinetic energy before entering the sheath, (2) reduction of the potential fall in the sheath that further diminished the total energy ions gained before striking the material, and (3) reduction of the ion number density that decreased the flux of ions to the wall. All these changes, found to have been induced by the magnetic field, constituted collectively an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Thus, we term this process in Hall thrusters "magnetic shielding."

  13. Particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a low-beta pair plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Fan; Li, Hui; Daughton, William; ...

    2016-04-29

    Plasma energization through magnetic reconnection in the magnetically dominated regime featured by low plasma beta (β=8πnkT0/B2 <<1) and/or high magnetization (σ=B2/(4πnmc2)>>1) is important in a series of astrophysical systems such as solar flares, pulsar wind nebula, and relativistic jets from black holes. In this paper, we review the recent progress on kinetic simulations of this process and further discuss plasma dynamics and particle acceleration in a low-β reconnection layer that consists of electron–positron pairs. We also examine the effect of different initial thermal temperatures on the resulting particle energy spectra. While earlier papers have concluded that the spectral index ismore » smaller for higher σ, our simulations show that the spectral index approaches p = 1 for sufficiently low plasma β, even if σ~1. Since this predicted spectral index in the idealized limit is harder than most observations, it is important to consider effects that can lead to a softer spectrum such as open boundary simulations. Here, we also remark that the effects of three-dimensional reconnection physics and turbulence on reconnection need to be addressed in the future.« less

  14. Fast Magnetic Reconnection and Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Low-density Electron-Positron Plasmas without Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, Naoki; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic Harris sheets in low-density electron-positron plasmas with no guide field have been studied by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Reconnection rates are of the order of one when the background density in a Harris sheet is of the order of 1% of the density in the current sheet, which is consistent with previous results in the non-relativistic regime. It has been demonstrated that the increase of the Lorentz factors of accelerated particles significantly enhances the collisionless resistivity needed to sustain a large reconnection electric field. It is shown analytically and numerically that the energy spectrum of accelerated particles near the X-line is the product of a power law and an exponential function of energy, γ-1/4exp (- aγ1/2), where γ is the Lorentz factor and a is a constant. However, in the low-density regime, while the most energetic particles are produced near X-lines, many more particles are energized within magnetic islands. Particles are energized in contracting islands by multiple reflection, but the mechanism is different from Fermi acceleration in magnetic islands for magnetized particles in the presence of a guide field. In magnetic islands, strong core fields are generated and plasma beta values are reduced. As a consequence, the fire-hose instability condition is not satisfied in most of the island region, and island contraction and particle acceleration can continue. In island coalescence, reconnection between two islands can accelerate some particles, however, many particles are decelerated and cooled, which is contrary to what has been discussed in the literature on particle acceleration due to reconnection in non-relativistic hydrogen plasmas.

  15. Two-Axis Acceleration of Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Parallel Excitation of Phase-Tagged Slices and Half k-Space Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Jesmanowicz, Andrzej; Nencka, Andrew S.; Li, Shi-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Whole brain functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging requires acquisition of a time course of gradient-recalled (GR) volumetric images. A method is developed to accelerate this acquisition using GR echo-planar imaging and radio frequency (RF) slice phase tagging. For N-fold acceleration, a tailored RF pulse excites N slices using a uniform-field transmit coil. This pulse is the Fourier transform of the profile for the N slices with a predetermined RF phase tag on each slice. A multichannel RF receive coil is used for detection. For n slices, there are n/N groups of slices. Signal-averaged reference images are created for each slice within each slice group for each member of the coil array and used to separate overlapping images that are simultaneously received. The time-overhead for collection of reference images is small relative to the acquisition time of a complete volumetric time course. A least-squares singular value decomposition method allows image separation on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Twofold slice acceleration is demonstrated using an eight-channel RF receive coil, with application to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in the human brain. Data from six subjects at 3 T are reported. The method has been extended to half k-space acquisition, which not only provides additional acceleration, but also facilitates slice separation because of increased signal intensity of the central lines of k-space coupled with reduced susceptibility effects. PMID:22432957

  16. ELECTRON ACCELERATION AT A CORONAL SHOCK PROPAGATING THROUGH A LARGE-SCALE STREAMER-LIKE MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-04-10

    Using a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featuring a partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature is larger than that of the magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of the efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also find that, in general, the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not as efficient as that at the top of the closed field because a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed at the top. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons are power-law-like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of −3 to −6. Physical interpretations of the results and implications for the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.

  17. Electron acceleration at a coronal shock propagating through a large-scale streamer-like magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Guo, Fan; ...

    2016-04-05

    With a test-particle simulation, we investigate the effect of large-scale coronal magnetic fields on electron acceleration at an outward-propagating coronal shock with a circular front. The coronal field is approximated by an analytical solution with a streamer-like magnetic field featured by partially open magnetic field and a current sheet at the equator atop the closed region. We show that the large-scale shock-field configuration, especially the relative curvature of the shock and the magnetic field line across which the shock is sweeping, plays an important role in the efficiency of electron acceleration. At low shock altitudes, when the shock curvature ismore » larger than that of magnetic field lines, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock flanks; at higher altitudes, when the shock curvature is smaller, the electrons are mainly accelerated at the shock nose around the top of closed field lines. The above process reveals the shift of efficient electron acceleration region along the shock front during its propagation. We also found that in general the electron acceleration at the shock flank is not so efficient as that at the top of closed field since at the top a collapsing magnetic trap can be formed. In addition, we find that the energy spectra of electrons is power-law like, first hardening then softening with the spectral index varying in a range of -3 to -6. In conclusion, physical interpretations of the results and implications on the study of solar radio bursts are discussed.« less

  18. Optimization of magnetically accelerated, ultra-high velocity aluminum flyer plates for use in plate impact, shock wave experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Knudson, Marcus D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Lemke, Raymond William; Davis, J. P.; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Giunta, Anthony Andrew; Bliss, David Emery

    2005-05-01

    The intense magnetic field produced by the 20 MA Z accelerator is used as an impulsive pressure source to accelerate metal flyer plates to high velocity for the purpose of performing plate impact, shock wave experiments. This capability has been significantly enhanced by the recently developed pulse shaping capability of Z, which enables tailoring the rise time to peak current for a specific material and drive pressure to avoid shock formation within the flyer plate during acceleration. Consequently, full advantage can be taken of the available current to achieve the maximum possible magnetic drive pressure. In this way, peak magnetic drive pressures up to 490 GPa have been produced, which shocklessly accelerated 850 {micro}m aluminum (6061-T6) flyer plates to peak velocities of 34 km/s. We discuss magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that are used to optimize the magnetic pressure for a given flyer load and to determine the shape of the current rise time that precludes shock formation within the flyer during acceleration to peak velocity. In addition, we present results pertaining to plate impact, shock wave experiments in which the aluminum flyer plates were magnetically accelerated across a vacuum gap and impacted z-cut, {alpha}-quartz targets. Accurate measurements of resulting quartz shock velocities are presented and analyzed through high-fidelity MHD simulations enhanced using optimization techniques. Results show that a fraction of the flyer remains at solid density at impact, that the fraction of material at solid density decreases with increasing magnetic pressure, and that the observed abrupt decrease in the quartz shock velocity is well correlated with the melt transition in the aluminum flyer.

  19. Induction linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birx, Daniel

    1992-03-01

    Among the family of particle accelerators, the Induction Linear Accelerator is the best suited for the acceleration of high current electron beams. Because the electromagnetic radiation used to accelerate the electron beam is not stored in the cavities but is supplied by transmission lines during the beam pulse it is possible to utilize very low Q (typically<10) structures and very large beam pipes. This combination increases the beam breakup limited maximum currents to of order kiloamperes. The micropulse lengths of these machines are measured in 10's of nanoseconds and duty factors as high as 10-4 have been achieved. Until recently the major problem with these machines has been associated with the pulse power drive. Beam currents of kiloamperes and accelerating potentials of megavolts require peak power drives of gigawatts since no energy is stored in the structure. The marriage of liner accelerator technology and nonlinear magnetic compressors has produced some unique capabilities. It now appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, peak currents in kiloamperes and gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, with power efficiencies approaching 50%. The nonlinear magnetic compression technology has replaced the spark gap drivers used on earlier accelerators with state-of-the-art all-solid-state SCR commutated compression chains. The reliability of these machines is now approaching 1010 shot MTBF. In the following paper we will briefly review the historical development of induction linear accelerators and then discuss the design considerations.

  20. Preliminary analysis of patent trends for magnetic fusion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.; Ashton, W.B.; Campbell, R.S.

    1984-02-01

    This study presents a preliminary analysis of development trends in magnetic fusion technology based on data from US patents. The research is limited to identification and description of general patent activity and ownership characteristics for 373 patents. The results suggest that more detailed studies of fusion patents could provide useful R and D planning information.

  1. A fiber optics sensor for strain and stress management in superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Oort, J.M.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    1993-09-20

    A novel cryogenic interferometric fiber optics sensor for the measurement of strain and stress in the coil windings of superconducting accelerator magnets is described. The sensor can operate with two different readout sources, monochromatic laser light and white light respectively. The sensor head is built up as an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer formed with two cleaved fiber surfaces, and can be mounted in several configurations. When read with laser light, the sensor is an extremely sensitive relative strain or temperature detector. When read with white light the absolute strain and pressure can be measured. Results are presented of tests in several configurations at 77 K and 4.2 K, both for the relative and absolute readout method. Finally, the possible use for quench localization using the temperature sensitivity is described.

  2. Ion Acceleration in Plasmas Emerging from a Helicon-heated Magnetic-mirror Device

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Cohen; N.S. Siefert; S. Stange; R.F. Boivin; E.E. Scime; F.M. Levinton

    2003-03-21

    Using laser-induced fluorescence, measurements have been made of metastable argon-ion, Ar{sup +}*(3d{sup 4} f{sub 7/2}), velocity distributions on the major axis of an axisymmetric magnetic-mirror device whose plasma is sustained by helicon wave absorption. Within the mirror, these ions have sub-eV temperature and, at most, a subthermal axial drift. In the region outside the mirror coils, conditions are found where these ions have a field-parallel velocity above the acoustic speed, to an axial energy of {approx}30 eV, while the field-parallel ion temperature remains low. The supersonic Ar{sup +}*(3d{sup 4} f{sub 7/2}) are accelerated to one-third of their final energy within a short region in the plasma column, {le}1 cm, and continue to accelerate over the next 5 cm. Neutral gas density strongly affects the supersonic Ar{sup +}*(3d{sup 4} f{sub 7/2}) density.

  3. Acceleration of plasma flows in the closed magnetic fields: Simulation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Mikeladze, Solomon V.; Sigua, Ketevan I.

    2006-06-15

    Within the framework of a two-fluid description, possible pathways for the generation of fast flows (dynamical as well as steady) in the closed magnetic fields are established. It is shown that a primary plasma flow (locally sub-Alfvenic) is accelerated while interacting with ambient arcade-like closed field structures. The time scale for creating reasonably fast flows (> or approx. 100 km/s) is dictated by the initial ion skin depth, while the amplification of the flow depends on local plasma {beta}. It is shown that distances over which the flows become 'fast' are {approx}0.01R{sub 0} from the interaction surface (R{sub 0} being a characteristic length of the system); later, the fast flow localizes (with dimensions < or approx. 0.05R{sub 0}) in the upper central region of the original arcade. For fixed initial temperature, the final speed (> or approx. 500 km/s) of the accelerated flow and the modification of the field structure are independent of the time duration (lifetime) of the initial flow. In the presence of dissipation, these flows are likely to play a fundamental role in the heating of the finely structured stellar atmospheres; their relevance to the solar wind is also obvious.

  4. The static magnetic field accelerates the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of dental pulp cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jui-Chih

    2010-01-01

    Dental pulp cells (DPCs) can differentiate into osteoblasts and are deemed a promising cell source for bone regeneration. Static magnetic field (SMF) stimulates osteoblast differentiation but the effect in DPCs remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SMF exposure on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of rat DPCs in vitro. Cells were continuously exposed to SMF at 290 mT in the presence/absence of osteogenic induction [dexamethasone (Dex)/β-glycerophosphate (β-GP)]. Results showed that SMF alone did not impair the cell cycle and proliferation. On the other hand, obvious condensation in the metachromatic staining of the extracellular matrix with toluidine blue was observed for SMF-exposed cells as well as the Dex/β-GP treated cells. SMF in combination with Dex/β-GP significantly increased the mRNA expression of osteogenic genes, as well as the ALP activity and extracellular calcium concentration at the early stage, followed by obvious calcium deposits later. Besides, SMF exposure increased the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) at 3 h and accelerated the mRNA expression of osteogenic transcription factor, Cbfa1, advancing its activation time from 168 to 72 h under osteogenic induction. In summary, SMF exposure in combination of Dex/β-GP induction could significantly accelerate the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of DPCs. PMID:20464482

  5. The research on the photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic detecting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhengrong; Wei, Jianxia; En, De; Chen, Caihe; Cui, Yuming; Li, Chao

    2007-01-01

    For high resolution application in seismic detection, the geophone should be smaller in size, more reliable and sensitive. So a kind of photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic detecting technology, which is novel and precise based on waveguide M-Z interference, is presented. The principle of the photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic geophone is introduced in this paper. The seismometer is composed of a waveguide M-Z interferometer, a sensing element, a modulation LD and signal processing system. The silicon crystal is adopted as the substrate. The core of the photoelectronic integrated acceleration is the silicon harmonic oscillator, which is supported by four silicon beams and integrated on the signal beam of the M-Z interferometer . The harmonic oscillator translates the acceleration information of the external vibrational signal into phase variation of optical signal in the sensing arm, which is converted into optical signal by M-Z interferometer, then PIN converts the optical signal into electric signal to process by the signal processing. The experimental curve of seismometer frequency response is achieved.

  6. Measurements of the persistent current decay and snapback effect in Nb3Sn Fermilab-built accelerator prototype magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Chlachidze, G.; DiMarco, J.; Kashikhin, V.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In recent years, Fermilab has been performing an intensive R an D program on Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets. This program has included dipole and quadrupole magnets for different programs and projects, including LARP and VLHC. A systematic study of the persistent current decay and snapback effect in the fields of these magnets was executed at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. The decay and snapback were measured under a range of conditions including variations of the current ramp parameters and flattop and injection plateau durations. This study has mostly focused on the dynamic behavior of the normal sextupole and dodecapole components in dipole and quadrupole magnets respectively. The paper summarizes the recent measurements and presents a comparison with previously measured NbTi magnets.

  7. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  8. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Gene

    2016-02-17

    backscattered laser signals that are shifted by the changes in the fiber that are induced by a local change in the YBCO temperature or strain. One goal of this project was to show that modern technology can be used to interrogate the signals from a (very expensive) YBCO magnet to detect an impending quench in time to protect it from self-destruction. The results show that Rayleigh-backscattering interrogated optical fibers (RIOF) have significant advantages over traditional techniques, including very high spatial resolution and the ability to detect a hot-spot well before the peak local temperature becomes so high that the conductor can be damaged. RIOF quench detection is intrinsically faster than voltage taps, and this intrinsic advantage is greater as the coil size and/or current margin increases. We describe the development and testing program performed under the grant.

  9. Technological requisites of the magnetic fusion energy programme

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    An integral part of magnetic fusion energy research is the development of the technologies necessary for the confinement and heating of reactor-level plasmas. Heating systems based on energetic neutral beam particle injection or radio frequency waves (or both) will be required to heat plasmas to the temperatures at which fusion is self-sustaining. These systems may be used also to drive plasma currents. The magnet systems required to confine reactor-sized plasmas rely on the development of effective superconductors. Issues associated with safety and tritium handling concerns become important considerations in designing reactor concepts.

  10. Properties of the first-order Fermi acceleration in fast magnetic reconnection driven by turbulence in collisional magnetohydrodynamical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Valle, Maria V.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Kowal, G.

    2016-12-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection can occur in different astrophysical sources, producing flare-like emission and particle acceleration. Currently, this process is being studied as an efficient mechanism to accelerate particles via a first-order Fermi process. In this paper, we analyse the acceleration rate and the energy distribution of test particles injected into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) domains with large-scale current sheets where reconnection is made fast by the presence of turbulence. We study the dependence of the particle acceleration time with the relevant parameters of the embedded turbulence: the Alfvén speed VA, the injection power Pinj and scale kinj (kinj = 1/linj). We find that the acceleration time follows a power-law dependence with the particle kinetic energy: tacc ∝ Eα, with 0.2 < α < 0.6 for a vast range of values of c/VA ˜ 20-1000. The acceleration time decreases with the Alfvén speed (and therefore with the reconnection velocity) as expected, having an approximate dependence tacc ∝ (VA/c)-κ, with κ ˜ 2.1-2.4 for particles reaching kinetic energies between 1 and 100 mpc2, respectively. Furthermore, we find that the acceleration time is only weakly dependent on the Pinj and linj parameters of the turbulence. The particle spectrum develops a high-energy tail, which can be fitted by a hard power law already in the early times of the acceleration, consistent with the results of kinetic studies of particle acceleration by magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas.

  11. Prompt nuclear analytical techniques for material research in accelerator driven transmutation technologies: Prospects and quantitative analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Červená, J.; Peřina, V.; Mach, R.; Peka, I.

    1998-04-01

    Accelerator driven transmutation technology (ADTT) is a promissing way toward liquidation of spent nuclear fuel, nuclear wastes and weapon grade Pu. The ADTT facility comprises a high current (proton) accelerator supplying a subcritical reactor assembly with spallation neutrons. The reactor part is supposed to be cooled by molten fluorides or metals which serve, at the same time, as a carrier of nuclear fuel. Assumed high working temperature (400-600°C) and high radiation load in the subcritical reactor and spallation neutron source put forward the problem of optimal choice of ADTT construction materials, especially from the point of their radiation and corrosion resistance when in contact with liquid working media. The use of prompt nuclear analytical techniques in ADTT related material research is considered and examples of preliminary analytical results obtained using neutron depth profiling method are shown for illustration.

  12. Magnetic Tools for Lab-on-a-chip Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Pekas, Nikola Slobodan

    2006-01-01

    This study establishes a set of magnetics-based tools that have been integrated with microfluidic systems. The overall impact of the work begins to enable the rapid and efficient manipulation and detection of magnetic entities such as particles, picoliter-sized droplets, or bacterial cells. Details of design, fabrication, and theoretical and experimental assessments are presented. The manipulation strategy has been demonstrated in the format of a particle diverter, whereby micron-sized particles are actively directed into desired flow channels at a split-flow junction by means of integrated microelectromagnets. Magnetic detection has been realized by deploying Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors--microfabricated structures originally developed for use as readout elements in computer hard-drives. We successfully transferred the GMR technology to the lab-on-a-chip arena, and demonstrated the versatility of the concept in several important areas: real-time, integrated monitoring of the properties of multiphase droplet flows; rapid quantitative determination of the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles in droplets of ferrofluids; and high-speed detection of individual magnetic microparticles and magnetotactic bacteria. The study also includes novel schemes for hydrodynamic flow focusing that work in conjunction with GMR-based detection to ensure precise navigation of the sample stream through the GMR detection volume, therefore effectively establishing a novel concept of a microfabricated magnetic flow cytometer.

  13. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  14. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  15. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton-proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  16. Applications of ultrasensitive magnetic measurement technologies (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschkoff, Eugene C.

    1993-05-01

    The development of reliable, easy-to-use magnetic measurement systems with significantly enhanced levels of sensitivity has opened up a number of broad new areas of application for magnetic sensing. Magnetometers based on optical pumping offer sensitivities at the picotesla level, while those that utilize superconducting quantum interference devices can operate at the femtotesla level. These systems are finding applications in areas as diverse as geophysical exploration, communications, and medical diagnostics. This review briefly surveys the capabilities and application areas for a number of magnetic sensing technologies. The emphasis then focuses on the application of the most sensitive of these to the field of medical diagnostics and functional imaging. Protocols for specific applications to noninvasive presurgical planning and to the noninvasive assay of cortical dysfunction in diseases ranging from epilepsy to migraine and schizophrenia will be described in detail. Data will be presented reporting independent validation of these techniques in ten patients who subsequently underwent surgery. Routine and reliable utilization of this ultrasensitive magnetic sensing technology in the clinic is now feasible and practical.

  17. Evaluation of airborne thermal, magnetic, and electromagnetic characterization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.

    1992-03-01

    The identification of Buried Structures (IBS) or Aerial Surveillance Project was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development to demonstrate airborne methods for locating and identifying buried waste and ordnance at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Two technologies were demonstrated: (a) a thermal infrared imaging system built by Martin Marietta Missile Systems and (b) a magnetic and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical surveying system operated by EBASCO Environmental. The thermal system detects small differences in ground temperature caused by uneven heating and cooling of the ground by the sun. Waste materials on the ground can be detected when the temperature of the waste is different than the background temperature. The geophysical system uses conventional magnetic and EM sensors. These sensors detect disturbances caused by magnetic or conductive waste and naturally occurring magnetic or conductive features of subsurface soils and rock. Both systems are deployed by helicopter. Data were collected at four INEL sites. Tests at the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area (NODA) were made to evaluate capabilities for detecting ordnance on the ground surface. Tests at the Cold Simulated Waste Demonstration Pit were made to evaluate capabilities for detecting buried waste at a controlled site, where the location and depth of buried materials are known. Tests at the Subsurface Disposal Area and Stationary Low-Power Reactor-1 burial area were made to evaluate capabilities for characterizing hazardous waste at sites that are typical of DOE buried waste sites nationwide.

  18. Validation of Finite-Element Models of Persistent-Current Effects in Nb3Sn Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Collings, E. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; DiMarco, J.; Felice, H.; Ghosh, A. K.; Godeke, A.; Gourlay, S. A.; Marchevsky, M.; Prestemon, S. O.; Sabbi, G.; Sumption, M. D.; Velev, G. V.; Xu, X.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-01-06

    Persistent magnetization currents are induced in superconducting filaments during the current ramping in magnets. The resulting perturbation to the design magnetic field leads to field quality degradation, in particular at low field where the effect is stronger relative to the main field. The effects observed in NbTi accelerator magnets were reproduced well with the critical-state model. However, this approach becomes less accurate for the calculation of the persistent-current effects observed in Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. Here a finite-element method based on the measured strand magnetization is validated against three state-of-art Nb3Sn accelerator magnets featuring different subelement diameters, critical currents, magnet designs and measurement temperatures. The temperature dependence of the persistent-current effects is reproduced. Based on the validated model, the impact of conductor design on the persistent current effects is discussed. The performance, limitations and possible improvements of the approach are also discussed.

  19. Application of Fermi scattering theory to a magnetically scanned electron linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sandison, G A; Huda, W

    1988-01-01

    This paper uses a solution to the Fermi electron transport equation for an isotropic point source to characterize the magnetically scanned broad electron beams from the Sagittaire Therac 40 accelerator in the air space above patients. Thick lead collimation is shown to be adequately modeled by an infinitely thin absorbing plate when used to predict penumbra shape. A relationship between broad beam penumbra width and the value of the root-mean-square spatial Gaussian spread sigma (z) of an elementary pencil beam is derived. This relationship is applicable for any rectangular field size. Measurement of the variation in broad beam penumbra width with source-surface distance (SSD) for a 7-MeV beam locates the isotropic source to be coincident with the exit window of the accelerator and indicates that the scattering effect of the monitor chamber may be considered negligibly small. Using this source location accurate predictions of beam profile shape for any clinically used beam energy, SSD, or field size are made in the presence of lead trimmer collimation. Field penumbra beyond the photon collimation system is formed in each lateral direction by two lead blocks whose faces are aligned along a diverging ray emanating from the source. The photon collimator closest to the source restricts the field size causing a variation of both fluence and the mean square angle spread of the electrons across the plane at the level of the lower collimator. This variation is accounted for by introducing an empirical perturbation factor into the mathematical formalism. An interesting feature of this perturbation factor is that it is field size dependent and its effect on penumbra width may be scaled for both beam energy and SSD to accurately predict beam profile shape.

  20. Application of Fermi scattering theory to a magnetically scanned electron linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sandison, G.A.; Huda, W.

    1988-07-01

    This paper uses a solution to the Fermi electron transport equation for an isotropic point source to characterize the magnetically scanned broad electron beams from the Sagittaire Therac 40 accelerator in the air space above patients. Thick lead collimation is shown to be adequately modeled by an infinitely thin absorbing plate when used to predict penumbra shape. A relationship between broad beam penumbra width and the value of the root-mean-square spatial Gaussian spread sigma (z) of an elementary pencil beam is derived. This relationship is applicable for any rectangular field size. Measurement of the variation in broad beam penumbra width with source-surface distance (SSD) for a 7-MeV beam locates the isotropic source to be coincident with the exit window of the accelerator and indicates that the scattering effect of the monitor chamber may be considered negligibly small. Using this source location accurate predictions of beam profile shape for any clinically used beam energy, SSD, or field size are made in the presence of lead trimmer collimation. Field penumbra beyond the photon collimation system is formed in each lateral direction by two lead blocks whose faces are aligned along a diverging ray emanating from the source. The photon collimator closest to the source restricts the field size causing a variation of both fluence and the mean square angle spread of the electrons across the plane at the level of the lower collimator. This variation is accounted for by introducing an empirical perturbation factor into the mathematical formalism. An interesting feature of this perturbation factor is that it is field size dependent and its effect on penumbra width may be scaled for both beam energy and SSD to accurately predict beam profile shape.

  1. Magnet Technology for Power Converters: Nanocomposite Magnet Technology for High Frequency MW-Scale Power Converters

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-27

    Solar ADEPT Project: CMU is developing a new nanoscale magnetic material that will reduce the size, weight, and cost of utility-scale PV solar power conversion systems that connect directly to the grid. Power converters are required to turn the energy that solar power systems create into useable energy for the grid. The power conversion systems made with CMU’s nanoscale magnetic material have the potential to be 150 times lighter and significantly smaller than conventional power conversion systems that produce similar amounts of power.

  2. Development of vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion accelerator injectors and ion implantation technology (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.

    1998-02-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development and upgrade of MEVVA-type ion sources over the last two years since the previous ICIS-95 is reviewed. There are two main application fields for this ion source: heavy ion accelerators and material surface implantation technology. For particle accelerator ion injection to accelerators it is important to enhance the fractions of multiply charged ions in the ion beam as well as controlling the charge state distribution, and to improve of beam current stability (i.e., to minimize the beam noise) and pulse-to-pulse reproducibility. For ion implantation application we need to increase both the implantation dose rate and the source lifetime (between required maintenance downtime) as well as making this kind of source more reliable and of yet low cost. Most of experimental results reported on here have been obtained in a collaborative program between research groups LBNL (Berkeley, USA), GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), HCEI (Tomsk, Russia), and other important contributions have been made by the groups at (BNU, Beijing, China), EDU (Izmir, Turkey), and elsewhere.

  3. Fabrication Technologies of the High Gradient Accelerator Structures at 100MV/M Range

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Juwen; Lewandowski, James; Van Pelt, John; Yoneda, Charles; Gudkov, Boris; Riddone, Germana; Higo, Toshiyasu; Takatomi, Toshikazu; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-07-03

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research has been established in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC baseline design for the main linac stably operating at more than 100 MV/m loaded accelerating gradient. Several prototype CLIC structures were successfully fabricated and high power tested. They operated at 105 MV/m with a breakdown rate that meets the CLIC linear collider specifications of < 5 x 10{sup -7}/pulse/m. This paper summarizes the fabrication technologies including the mechanical design, precision machining, chemical cleaning, diffusion bonding as well as vacuum baking and all related assembly technologies. Also, the tolerances control, tuning and RF characterization will be discussed.

  4. Implementing and diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed power accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Ryan D.; Bliss, David E.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Martin, Matthew R.; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Slutz, Stephen A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Awe, Thomas James; Hess, M. H.; Lemke, Raymond W.; Dolan, D. H.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Jobe, Marc Ronald Lee; Fang, Lu; Hahn, Kelly D.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Maurer, A. J.; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Cuneo, Michael E.; Sinars, Daniel; Tomlinson, Kurt; Smith, Gary; Paguio, Reny; Intrator, Tom; Weber, Thomas; Greenly, John

    2015-11-01

    We report on the progress made to date for a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at diagnosing magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator (0-20 MA in 100 ns). Each experiment consisted of an initially solid Be or Al liner (cylindrical tube), which was imploded using the Z accelerator's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-T axial seed field, B z ( 0 ) , supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by B z ( t ) = B z ( 0 ) x [ R ( 0 ) / R ( t )] 2 , where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, B z ( t ) and dB z / dt values exceeding 10 4 T and 10 12 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields. We report on our latest efforts to do so using three primary techniques: (1) micro B-dot probes to measure the fringe fields associated with flux compression, (2) streaked visible Zeeman absorption spectroscopy, and (3) fiber-based Faraday rotation. We also mention two new techniques that make use of the neutron diagnostics suite on Z. These techniques were not developed under this LDRD, but they could influence how we prioritize our efforts to diagnose magnetic flux compression on Z in the future. The first technique is based on the yield ratio of secondary DT to primary DD reactions. The second technique makes use of the secondary DT neutron time-of-flight energy spectra. Both of these techniques have been used successfully to infer the degree of magnetization at stagnation in fully integrated Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on Z [P. F. Schmit et al. , Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 155004 (2014); P. F. Knapp et al. , Phys. Plasmas, 22 , 056312 (2015)]. Finally, we present some recent developments for designing

  5. Permanent-magnet energy spectrometer for electron beams from radiotherapy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, David J.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Matthews, Kenneth L.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R. Carver, Robert L.; Gibbons, John P.; Clarke, Taylor; Henderson, Alexander; Liang, Edison P.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to adapt a lightweight, permanent magnet electron energy spectrometer for the measurement of energy spectra of therapeutic electron beams. Methods: An irradiation geometry and measurement technique were developed for an approximately 0.54-T, permanent dipole magnet spectrometer to produce suitable latent images on computed radiography (CR) phosphor strips. Dual-pinhole electron collimators created a 0.318-cm diameter, approximately parallel beam incident on the spectrometer and an appropriate dose rate at the image plane (CR strip location). X-ray background in the latent image, reduced by a 7.62-cm thick lead block between the pinhole collimators, was removed using a fitting technique. Theoretical energy-dependent detector response functions (DRFs) were used in an iterative technique to transform CR strip net mean dose profiles into energy spectra on central axis at the entrance to the spectrometer. These spectra were transformed to spectra at 95-cm source to collimator distance (SCD) by correcting for the energy dependence of electron scatter. The spectrometer was calibrated by comparing peak mean positions in the net mean dose profiles, initially to peak mean energies determined from the practical range of central-axis percent depth-dose (%DD) curves, and then to peak mean energies that accounted for how the collimation modified the energy spectra (recalibration). The utility of the spectrometer was demonstrated by measuring the energy spectra for the seven electron beams (7–20 MeV) of an Elekta Infinity radiotherapy accelerator. Results: Plots of DRF illustrated their dependence on energy and position in the imaging plane. Approximately 15 iterations solved for the energy spectra at the spectrometer entrance from the measured net mean dose profiles. Transforming those spectra into ones at 95-cm SCD increased the low energy tail of the spectra, while correspondingly decreasing the peaks and shifting them to slightly lower

  6. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Verweij, A.P.; Wake, M.; Willering, G; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  7. I-NET: interactive neuro-educational technology to accelerate skill learning.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Giby; Berka, Chris; Popovic, Djordje; Chung, Gregory K W K; Nagashima, Sam O; Behneman, Adrienne; Davis, Gene; Johnson, Robin

    2009-01-01

    The learning of a novel task currently rely heavily on conventional classroom instruction with qualitative assessment and observation. Introduction of individualized tutorials with integrated neuroscience-based evaluation techniques could significantly accelerate skill acquisition and provide quantitative evidence of successful training. We have created a suite of adaptive and interactive neuro-educational technologies (I-NET) to increase the pace and efficiency of skill learning. It covers four major themes: 1) Integration of brain monitoring into paced instructional tutorials, 2) Identifying psychophysiological characteristics of expertise using a model population, 3) Developing sensor-based feedback to accelerate novice-to-expert transition, 4) Identifying neurocognitive factors that are predictive of skill acquisition to allow early triage and interventions. We selected rifle marksmanship training as the field of application. Rifle marksmanship is a core skill for the Army and Marine Corps and it involves a combination of classroom instructional learning and field practice involving instantiation of a well-defined set of sensory, motor and cognitive skills. The instrumentation that incorporates the I-NET technologies is called the Adaptive Peak Performance Trainer (APPT). Preliminary analysis of pilot study data for performance data from a novice population that used this device revealed an improved learning trajectory.

  8. Investigation of radiative bow-shocks in magnetically accelerated plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, S. C. Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Cordaro, S. W.; Blesener, I. C.; Hoyt, C. L.; Cahill, A. D.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Gourdain, P. A.; Seyler, C. E.; Greenly, J. B.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2015-05-15

    We present a study of the formation of bow shocks in radiatively cooled plasma flows. This work uses an inverse wire array to provide a quasi-uniform, large scale hydrodynamic flow accelerated by Lorentz forces to supersonic velocities. This flow impacts a stationary object placed in its path, forming a well-defined Mach cone. Interferogram data are used to determine a Mach number of ∼6, which may increase with radial position suggesting a strongly cooling flow. Self-emission imaging shows the formation of a thin (<60 μm) strongly emitting shock region, where T{sub e} ∼ 40–50 eV, and rapid cooling behind the shock. Emission is observed upstream of the shock position which appears consistent with a radiation driven phenomenon. Data are compared to 2-dimensional simulations using the Gorgon MHD code, which show good agreement with the experiments. The simulations are also used to investigate the effect of magnetic field in the target, demonstrating that the bow-shocks have a high plasma β, and the influence of B-field at the shock is small. This consistent with experimental measurement with micro bdot probes.

  9. Impedance Dynamics in the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) Diode on the RITS-6 Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, Timothy; Johnston, Mark; Leckbee, Joshua; Webb, Timothy; Mazarakis, Michael; Kiefer, Mark; Bennett, Nichelle

    2014-10-01

    The RITS-6 inductive voltage adder (IVA) accelerator (3.5-8.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories produces high-power (TW) focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) for flash x-ray radiography applications. The Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce a pinched focus onto a high Z metal converter. The electron flow from the IVA driver into the load region complicates understanding of diode evolution. There is growing evidence that reducing cathode size below some ``optimum'' value in order to achieve desired spot size reduction results in pinch instabilities leading to either reduced dose-rate, early radiation power termination, or both. We are studying evolving pinch dynamics with current and x-ray monitors, optical diagnostics, and spectroscopy, as well as with LSP [1] code simulations. We are also planning changes to anode-cathode materials as well as changes to the diode aspect ratio in an attempt to mitigate the above trends and improve pinch stability while achieving simultaneous spot size reduction. Experiments are ongoing, and latest results will be reported [1]. LSP is a software product of ATK Mission Research, Albuquerque, NM. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Adminis-tration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Development and Test of TQC models, LARP Technological Quadrupole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.C.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Nobrega, F.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.; Tartaglia, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, A.R.; Sabbi, G.

    2008-06-01

    In support of the development of a large-aperture Nb3Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, two-layer quadrupole models (TQC and TQS) with 90mm aperture are being constructed at Fermilab and LBNL within the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). This paper describes the development and test of TQC01b, the second TQC model, and the experience during construction of TQE02 and TQC02, subsequent models in the series. ANSYS analysis of the mechanical structure, its underlying assumptions, and changes based on experience with TQC01 are presented and discussed. Construction experience, in-process measurements, and modifications to the assembly since TQC01 are described. The test results presented here include magnet strain and quench performance during training of TQC01b, as well as quench studies of current ramp rate dependence.

  11. Macroeconomic effects of accelerated implementation of renewable energy technologies in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Marcuse, W; Groncki, P J

    1980-02-01

    The original formulation of the Brookhaven energy system models was directed toward technology assessment for new and competing energy technologies. The Hudson-Jorgenson econometric model was originally formulated to identify the economic impacts of energy futures where energy-use projections departed markedly from historical trends. The two models were married so that the feedback effects of energy and nonenergy demand levels and nonenergy prices generated by the economic model could be reflected in the technology and fuel-mix-selection solutions of the energy model. In turn, the engineering-based energy costs, energy prices, and capital requirements for energy systems characterized in the energy model are used to override the econometric estimates based on historical data in the economic model. Recently, the coupled models have been used to address questions concerning the macroeconomic impacts of accelerating the implementation of renewable energy technologies in the United States. Of particular interest were the scenarios where (1) renewables were included which cost more than conventional alternatives now and in the future, and (2) some renewables that are initially more costly are characterized by a learning curve so that in time their costs come to equal conventional alternatives. A further analysis was done for the first case (renewables always more expensive) under conditions where (1) the incremental costs were paid by the government through deficit financing, and (2) the incremental costs were paid by consumers. This paper presents the formulation of the analysis using the combined energy system - economic model and the results of the study.

  12. Influence of technology on magnetic tape storage device characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gniewek, John J.; Vogel, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    There are available today many data storage devices that serve the diverse application requirements of the consumer, professional entertainment, and computer data processing industries. Storage technologies include semiconductors, several varieties of optical disk, optical tape, magnetic disk, and many varieties of magnetic tape. In some cases, devices are developed with specific characteristics to meet specification requirements. In other cases, an existing storage device is modified and adapted to a different application. For magnetic tape storage devices, examples of the former case are 3480/3490 and QIC device types developed for the high end and low end segments of the data processing industry respectively, VHS, Beta, and 8 mm formats developed for consumer video applications, and D-1, D-2, D-3 formats developed for professional video applications. Examples of modified and adapted devices include 4 mm, 8 mm, 12.7 mm and 19 mm computer data storage devices derived from consumer and professional audio and video applications. With the conversion of the consumer and professional entertainment industries from analog to digital storage and signal processing, there have been increasing references to the 'convergence' of the computer data processing and entertainment industry technologies. There has yet to be seen, however, any evidence of convergence of data storage device types. There are several reasons for this. The diversity of application requirements results in varying degrees of importance for each of the tape storage characteristics.

  13. Summary of the Persistent Current Effect Measurements in Nb 3 Sn and NbTi Accelerator Magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G. V.; Chlachidze, G.; DiMarco, J.; Stoynev, S. E.

    2016-01-06

    In the past 10 years, Fermilab has been executing an intensive R&D program on accelerator magnets based on Nb3Sn superconductor technology. This R&D effort includes dipole and quadrupole models for different programs, such as LARP and 11 T dipoles for the LHC high-luminosity upgrade. Before the Nb3Sn R&D program, Fermilab was involved in the production of the low-beta quadrupole magnets for LHC based on the NbTi superconductor. Additionally, during the 2003-2005 campaign to optimize the operation of the Tevatron, a large number of Tevatron magnets were re-measured. As a result of this field analysis, a systematic study of the persistent current decay and snapback effect in these magnets was performed. This paper summarizes the result of this study and presents a comparison between Nb3Sn and NbTi dipoles and quadrupoles.

  14. Area- and energy-efficient CORDIC accelerators in deep sub-micron CMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, U.; Noll, T. G.

    2012-09-01

    The COordinate Rotate DIgital Computer (CORDIC) algorithm is a well known versatile approach and is widely applied in today's SoCs for especially but not restricted to digital communications. Dedicated CORDIC blocks can be implemented in deep sub-micron CMOS technologies at very low area and energy costs and are attractive to be used as hardware accelerators for Application Specific Instruction Processors (ASIPs). Thereby, overcoming the well known energy vs. flexibility conflict. Optimizing Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers to reduce the hardware complexity is an important research topic at present. In such receivers CORDIC accelerators can be used for digital baseband processing (fixed-point) and in Position-Velocity-Time estimation (floating-point). A micro architecture well suited to such applications is presented. This architecture is parameterized according to the wordlengths as well as the number of iterations and can be easily extended for floating point data format. Moreover, area can be traded for throughput by partially or even fully unrolling the iterations, whereby the degree of pipelining is organized with one CORDIC iteration per cycle. From the architectural description, the macro layout can be generated fully automatically using an in-house datapath generator tool. Since the adders and shifters play an important role in optimizing the CORDIC block, they must be carefully optimized for high area and energy efficiency in the underlying technology. So, for this purpose carry-select adders and logarithmic shifters have been chosen. Device dimensioning was automatically optimized with respect to dynamic and static power, area and performance using the in-house tool. The fully sequential CORDIC block for fixed-point digital baseband processing features a wordlength of 16 bits, requires 5232 transistors, which is implemented in a 40-nm CMOS technology and occupies a silicon area of 1560 μm2 only. Maximum clock frequency from circuit

  15. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Instabilities of a multicomponent plasma with accelerated particles and magnetic field generation in astrophysical objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, Andrei M.; Toptygin, Igor'N.

    2007-02-01

    A system of MHD equations for the description of a magnetized nonequilibrium astrophysical plasma with neutral atoms and suprathermal (in particular, relativistic) particles is formulated. The instabilities of such a plasma, which arise from the presence of neutral and relativistic components, are considered. It is shown that the presence of nonthermal particles interacting with the thermal plasma component via regular and fluctuating electromagnetic fields is responsible for the emergence of specific mechanisms of MHD wave generation. The main generation mechanisms of static and turbulent magnetic fields near shock wave fronts in the Galaxy and interplanetary space are analyzed. We discuss the application of the generation effects of long-wave magnetic fluctuations to the problems of magnetic field origin and relativistic particle acceleration in astrophysical objects of various natures.

  16. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-05-08

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  17. Magnetic Probe Construction using Thick-film Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Sakakibara, S.; Kubota, Y.; and Yamada, H.

    2001-02-02

    Thick-film technology has been successfully adapted for the design and fabrication of magnetic probes of a new type suitable for use in the simultaneous ultra-high vacuum and high-temperature environment of a nuclear fusion device. The maximum usable temperature is expected to be around 900 degrees C. This new probe has a specific sensitivity (coupling area per unit volume) an order of magnitude higher than a conventional coil. The new probe in one implementation is capable of simultaneously measuring magnetic field in three orthogonal directions about a single spatial point and in two frequency ranges. Low-frequency coils have a measured coupling area of 296-323 cm squared and a frequency response of about 300 kHz. High-frequency coils have a design coupling area of 12-15 cm squared.

  18. Measurement of Ion Transverse Energy and the Electric Field in the Acceleration Gap of a Magnetically Insulated Diode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    practical diodes. The principles of the measurements in the present experiment are as follows. The accelerating ions, drawn from a surface - flashover ...magnetic field6 for magnetic insulation at the applied voltge of 400 kV is 5.7 kG. When the high voltage pulse was applied, a surface - flashover plasma ...the presence of multikilovolt Ba+ ions even ignor- ing the normal 10-15 ns turn-on time of the surface flashover anode plasma . 1 In Fig. 3, the total

  19. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskij, K. I.; Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Shatokhin, V. L.; Isaev, A. A.; Martynenko, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10-3-10-1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed.

  20. EXTREME PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN MAGNETIC RECONNECTION LAYERS: APPLICATION TO THE GAMMA-RAY FLARES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: uzdensky@colorado.edu

    2012-02-20

    The gamma-ray space telescopes AGILE and Fermi detected short and bright synchrotron gamma-ray flares at photon energies above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula. This discovery suggests that electron-positron pairs in the nebula are accelerated to PeV energies in a milligauss magnetic field, which is difficult to explain with classical models of particle acceleration and pulsar wind nebulae. We investigate whether particle acceleration in a magnetic reconnection layer can account for the puzzling properties of the flares. We numerically integrate relativistic test-particle orbits in the vicinity of the layer, including the radiation reaction force, and using analytical expressions for the large-scale electromagnetic fields. As they get accelerated by the reconnection electric field, the particles are focused deep inside the current layer where the magnetic field is small. The electrons suffer less from synchrotron losses and are accelerated to extremely high energies. Population studies show that, at the end of the layer, the particle distribution piles up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop and is focused into a thin fan beam. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum peaks above 100 MeV and is close to the spectral shape of a single electron. The flare inverse Compton emission is negligible and no detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This mechanism provides a plausible explanation for the gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula and could be at work in other astrophysical objects such as relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei.

  1. Ultracompact Accelerator Technology for a Next-Generation Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Wu, S S; Hartemann, F V; Barty, C J

    2012-05-14

    This presentation reported on the technology choices and progress manufacturing and testing the injector and accelerator of the 250 MeV ultra-compact Compton Scattering gamma-ray Source under development at LLNL for homeland security applications. This paper summarizes the status of various facets of current accelerator activities at LLNL. The major components for the X-band test station have been designed, fabricated, and await installation. The XL-4 klystron has been delivered, and will shortly be dressed and installed in the ScandiNova modulator. High power testing of the klystron into RF loads will follow, including adjustment of the modulator for the klystron load as necessary. Assembly of RF transport, test station supports, and accelerator components will follow. Commissioning will focus on processing the RF gun to full operating power, which corresponds to 200 MV/m peak electric field on the cathode surface. Single bunch benchmarking of the Mark 1 design will provide confidence that this first structure operates as designed, and will serve as a solid starting point for subsequent changes, such as a removable photocathode, and the use of various cathode materials for enhanced quantum efficiency. Charge scaling experiments will follow, partly to confirm predictions, as well as to identify important causes of emittance growth, and their scaling with charge. Multi-bunch operation will conclude testing of the Mark 1 RF gun, and allow verification of code predictions, direct measurement of bunch-to-bunch effects, and initial implementation compensation mechanisms. Modeling will continue and focus on supporting the commissioning and experimental program, as well as seeking to improve all facets of linac produced Compton gamma-rays.

  2. Development of a PYTHON-based emittance calculator at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. T.

    Beam emittance is an important characteristic describing charged particle beams. In linear accelerators (linac), it is critical to characterize the beam phase space parameters and, in particular, to precisely measure transverse beam emittance. The quadrupole scan (quad-scan) is a well-established technique used to characterize transverse beam parameters in four-dimensional phase space, including beam emittance. A computational algorithm with PYTHON scripts has been developed to estimate beam parameters, in particular beam emittance, using the quad-scan technique in the electron linac at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. This script has been implemented in conjunction with an automated quad-scan tool (also written in PYTHON) and has decreased the time it takes to perform a single quad-scan from an hour to a few minutes. From the experimental data, the emittance calculator quickly delivers several results including: geometrical and normalized transverse emittance, Courant-Snyder parameters, and plots of the beam size versus quadrupole field strength, among others. This paper will discuss the details of the techniques used, the results from several quad-scans preformed at FAST during the electron injector commissioning, and the PYTHON code used to obtain the results.

  3. High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, D.; Jacobson, B.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-03-01

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100's of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ˜1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  4. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  5. Studies of ${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  6. Accelerating the commercialization of university technologies for military healthcare applications: the role of the proof of concept process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Rosibel; DeLong, Hal; Kenyon, Jessica; Wilson, Eli

    2011-06-01

    The von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at UC San Diego (vonliebig.ucsd.edu) is focused on accelerating technology transfer and commercialization through programs and education on entrepreneurism. Technology Acceleration Projects (TAPs) that offer pre-venture grants and extensive mentoring on technology commercialization are a key component of its model which has been developed over the past ten years with the support of a grant from the von Liebig Foundation. In 2010, the von Liebig Entrepreneurism Center partnered with the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), to develop a regional model of Technology Acceleration Program initially focused on military research to be deployed across the nation to increase awareness of military medical needs and to accelerate the commercialization of novel technologies to treat the patient. Participants to these challenges are multi-disciplinary teams of graduate students and faculty in engineering, medicine and business representing universities and research institutes in a region, selected via a competitive process, who receive commercialization assistance and funding grants to support translation of their research discoveries into products or services. To validate this model, a pilot program focused on commercialization of wireless healthcare technologies targeting campuses in Southern California has been conducted with the additional support of Qualcomm, Inc. Three projects representing three different universities in Southern California were selected out of forty five applications from ten different universities and research institutes. Over the next twelve months, these teams will conduct proof of concept studies, technology development and preliminary market research to determine the commercial feasibility of their technologies. This first regional program will help build the needed tools and processes to adapt and replicate this model across other regions in the

  7. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970 to promote vacuum science and technology in academic, industrial and R&D institutions in India. IVS is a member society of the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Applications (IUVSTA). It has organized International and national symposia, short term courses and workshops on different aspects of Vacuum Science and Technology at regular intervals. So far 27 National symposia, 4 International Symposia and 47 courses have been organized at various locations in India. There has been an active participation from R&D establishments, universities and Indian industries during all these events. In view of the current global situation and emerging trends in vacuum technology, the executive committee of the IVS suggested to us that we organize an International Symposium at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata from 15-17 February 2012. At the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre we have a large number of high vacuum systems used in the K130 Cyclotron and K500 Superconducting Cyclotron. Also a large cryogenic system using LHe plant is in operation for cryopanels and a superconducting magnet for K-500 Cyclotron. The main areas covered at the symposium were the production and measurement of vacuums, leak detection, design and development of large vacuum systems, vacuum metallurgy, vacuum materials and the application of high vacuums in cyclotrons, LINACS and other accelerators. This symposium provided an opportunity for interaction between active researchers and technologists and allowed them to review the current situation, report recent experimental results, share the available expertise and consider the future R&D efforts needed in this area. Keeping the industrial significance of vacuum technology in mind, an exhibition of the vacuum related equipment, accessories, products etc by various suppliers and manufactures was organized alongside the symposium. Participation by a large number of exhibitors

  8. Cobalt-60 Machines and Medical Linear Accelerators: Competing Technologies for External Beam Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Healy, B J; van der Merwe, D; Christaki, K E; Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    Medical linear accelerators (linacs) and cobalt-60 machines are both mature technologies for external beam radiotherapy. A comparison is made between these two technologies in terms of infrastructure and maintenance, dosimetry, shielding requirements, staffing, costs, security, patient throughput and clinical use. Infrastructure and maintenance are more demanding for linacs due to the complex electric componentry. In dosimetry, a higher beam energy, modulated dose rate and smaller focal spot size mean that it is easier to create an optimised treatment with a linac for conformal dose coverage of the tumour while sparing healthy organs at risk. In shielding, the requirements for a concrete bunker are similar for cobalt-60 machines and linacs but extra shielding and protection from neutrons are required for linacs. Staffing levels can be higher for linacs and more staff training is required for linacs. Life cycle costs are higher for linacs, especially multi-energy linacs. Security is more complex for cobalt-60 machines because of the high activity radioactive source. Patient throughput can be affected by source decay for cobalt-60 machines but poor maintenance and breakdowns can severely affect patient throughput for linacs. In clinical use, more complex treatment techniques are easier to achieve with linacs, and the availability of electron beams on high-energy linacs can be useful for certain treatments. In summary, there is no simple answer to the question of the choice of either cobalt-60 machines or linacs for radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries. In fact a radiotherapy department with a combination of technologies, including orthovoltage X-ray units, may be an option. Local needs, conditions and resources will have to be factored into any decision on technology taking into account the characteristics of both forms of teletherapy, with the primary goal being the sustainability of the radiotherapy service over the useful lifetime of the equipment.

  9. Accelerated radiation damping for increased spin equilibrium (ARISE): a new method for controlling the recovery of longitudinal magnetization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Susie Y; Witzel, Thomas; Wald, Lawrence L

    2008-11-01

    Control of the longitudinal magnetization in fast gradient-echo (GRE) sequences is an important factor in enabling the high efficiency of balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequences. We introduce a new method for accelerating the return of the longitudinal magnetization to the +z-axis that is independent of externally applied RF pulses and shows improved off-resonance performance. The accelerated radiation damping for increased spin equilibrium (ARISE) method uses an external feedback circuit to strengthen the radiation damping (RD) field. The enhanced RD field rotates the magnetization back to the +z-axis at a rate faster than T(1) relaxation. The method is characterized in GRE phantom imaging at 3T as a function of feedback gain, phase, and duration, and compared with results from numerical simulations of the Bloch equations incorporating RD. A short period of feedback (10 ms) during a refocused interval of a crushed GRE sequence allowed greater than 99% recovery of the longitudinal magnetization when very little T(2) relaxation had time to occur. An appropriate application might be to improve navigated sequences. Unlike conventional flip-back schemes, the ARISE "flip-back" is generated by the spins themselves, thereby offering a potentially useful building block for enhancing GRE sequences.

  10. Principles of Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs*, Richard J.

    The basic concepts involved in induction accelerators are introduced in this chapter. The objective is to provide a foundation for the more detailed coverage of key technology elements and specific applications in the following chapters. A wide variety of induction accelerators are discussed in the following chapters, from the high current linear electron accelerator configurations that have been the main focus of the original developments, to circular configurations like the ion synchrotrons that are the subject of more recent research. The main focus in the present chapter is on the induction module containing the magnetic core that plays the role of a transformer in coupling the pulsed power from the modulator to the charged particle beam. This is the essential common element in all these induction accelerators, and an understanding of the basic processes involved in its operation is the main objective of this chapter. (See [1] for a useful and complementary presentation of the basic principles in induction linacs.)

  11. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  12. Microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence: platform technology for ultrafast and ultrabright assays.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D

    2005-12-15

    We describe an exciting assay platform technology that promises to fundamentally address two underlying physical constraints of modern assays and immunoassays, namely, assay sensitivity and rapidity. By combining the use of metal-enhanced fluorescence with low-power microwave heating, we can indeed significantly increase the sensitivity of surface assays as well as >95 % kinetically complete the assay within a few seconds. Subsequently, this new technology promises to fundamentally change the way we currently employ immunoassays in clinical medicine. This new model platform system can be potentially applied to many other important assays, such as to the clinical assessment of myoglobin, where both assay speed and sensitivity is paramount for the assessment and treatment of acute myocardial infarction. To demonstrate the utility of microwave-accelerated metal-enhanced fluorescence (MAMEF), we show that a simple protein-based assay system can be optically amplified approximately 10-fold by using silver nanostructures, while being kinetically complete in less than 20 s. This new platform approach is subsequently over 10-fold more sensitive and approximately 90 times faster than a control assay that operates both at room temperature and without the use of metal-enhanced fluorescence. Finally, we show that low-power heating by microwaves in our model system does not denature proteins, as evidenced by no protein structural changes, probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

  13. The Boeing photocathode accelerator magnetic pulse compression and energy recovery experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    An 18 MeV, photocathode accelerator operating at 433 MHz is being commissioned for FEL applications. The accelerator consists of a two-cell RF photocathode imjector followed by four new multicell cavities. The two cell injector has previously been operated at a micropulse repetition frequency of 27 MHz, a micropulse charge of 5 nC and 25% duty factor.

  14. Stress management as an enabling technology for high-field superconducting dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie Frank, III

    This dissertation examines stress management and other construction techniques as means to meet future accelerator requirement demands by planning, fabricating, and analyzing a high-field, Nb3Sn dipole. In order to enable future fundamental research and discovery in high energy accelerator physics, bending magnets must access the highest fields possible. Stress management is a novel, propitious path to attain higher fields and preserve the maximum current capacity of advanced superconductors by managing the Lorentz stress so that strain induced current degradation is mitigated. Stress management is accomplished through several innovative design features. A block-coil geometry enables an Inconel pier and beam matrix to be incorporated in the windings for Lorentz Stress support and reduced AC loss. A laminar spring between windings and mica paper surrounding each winding inhibit any stress transferral through the support structure and has been simulated with ALGORRTM. Wood's metal filled, stainless steel bladders apply isostatic, surface-conforming preload to the pier and beam support structure. Sufficient preload along with mica paper sheer release reduces magnet training by inhibiting stick-slip motion. The effectiveness of stress management is tested with high-precision capacitive stress transducers and strain gauges. In addition to stress management, there are several technologies developed to assist in the successful construction of a high-field dipole. Quench protection has been designed and simulated along with full 3D magnetic simulation with OPERARTM. Rutherford cable was constructed, and cable thermal expansion data was analysed after heat treatment. Pre-impregnation analysis techniques were developed due to elemental tin leakage in varying quantities during heat treatment from each coil. Robust splicing techniques were developed with measured resistivites consistent with nO joints. Stress management has not been incorporated by any other high field dipole

  15. Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic-Ray Acceleration by Magnetic Reconnection in Newborn Accretion-induced Collapse Pulsars.

    PubMed

    de Gouveia Dal Pino EM; Lazarian

    2000-06-10

    We here investigate the possibility that the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) events observed above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit are mostly protons accelerated in reconnection sites just above the magnetosphere of newborn millisecond pulsars that are originated by accretion-induced collapse (AIC). We formulate the requirements for the acceleration mechanism and show that AIC pulsars with surface magnetic fields 1012 Gaccelerate particles to energies >/=10(20) eV. Because the expected rate of AIC sources in our Galaxy is very small ( approximately 10(-5) yr(-1)), the corresponding contribution to the flux of UHECRs is negligible and the total flux is given by the integrated contribution from AIC sources produced by the distribution of galaxies located within the distance that is unaffected by the GZK cutoff ( approximately 50 Mpc). We find that reconnection should convert a fraction xi greater, similar0.1 of magnetic energy into UHECRs in order to reproduce the observed flux.

  16. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-259

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.

    2011-10-01

    This agreement allowed NREL to serve as an advisor on SolarTAC - a collaborative effort between Xcel Energy, NREL, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. The collaboration was formed to accelerate pre-commercial and early commercial solar energy technologies to the marketplace. Through this CRADA, NREL participated in the deployment of solar energy generation technologies and related solar equipment for research, testing, validation, and demonstration purposes.

  17. Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration Mission (MiRaTA): Advancing Weather Remote Sensing with Nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoy, K.; Blackwell, W. J.; Bishop, R. L.; Erickson, N.; Fish, C. S.; Neilsen, T. L.; Stromberg, E. M.; Bardeen, J.; Dave, P.; Marinan, A.; Marlow, W.; Kingsbury, R.; Kennedy, A.; Byrne, J. M.; Peters, E.; Allen, G.; Burianek, D.; Busse, F.; Elliott, D.; Galbraith, C.; Leslie, V. V.; Osaretin, I.; Shields, M.; Thompson, E.; Toher, D.; DiLiberto, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) is a 3U CubeSat mission sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). Microwave radiometer measurements and GPS radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements of all-weather temperature and humidity provide key contributions toward improved weather forecasting. The MiRaTA mission will validate new technologies in both passive microwave radiometry and GPS radio occultation: (1) new ultra-compact and low-power technology for multi-channel and multi-band passive microwave radiometers, and (2) new GPS receiver and patch antenna array technology for GPS radio occultation retrieval of both temperature-pressure profiles in the atmosphere and electron density profiles in the ionosphere. In addition, MiRaTA will test (3) a new approach to spaceborne microwave radiometer calibration using adjacent GPSRO measurements. The radiometer measurement quality can be substantially improved relative to present systems through the use of proximal GPSRO measurements as a calibration standard for radiometric observations, reducing and perhaps eliminating the need for costly and complex internal calibration targets. MiRaTA will execute occasional pitch-up maneuvers so that the radiometer and GPSRO observations sound overlapping volumes of atmosphere through the Earth's limb. To validate system performance, observations from both microwave radiometer (MWR) and GPSRO instruments will be compared to radiosondes, global high-resolution analysis fields, other satellite observations, and to each other using radiative transfer models. Both the radiometer and GPSRO payloads, currently at TRL5 but to be advanced to TRL7 at mission conclusion, can be accommodated in a single 3U CubeSat. The current plan is to launch from an International Space Station (ISS) orbit at ~400 km altitude and 52° inclination for low-cost validation over a ~90-day mission to fly in 2016. MiRaTA will demonstrate high fidelity, well-calibrated radiometric

  18. Impact of the Accelerated Reader Technology-Based Literacy Program on Overall Academic Achievement and School Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Terrance; VanderZee, Darrel; Rue, Tom; Swanson, Scott

    A study demonstrated the positive impact of school ownership of the Accelerated Reader (AR) technology-based literacy program on attendance and standardized test scores at a representative sample of 2,500 elementary, middle, and high schools. These schools were compared with approximately 3,500 schools of similar geographic and demographic…

  19. ISABELLE accelerator software, control system, and beam diagnostic philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Cornacchia, M.; Humphrey, J.W.; Niederer, J.; Poole, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The ISABELLE Project combines two large proton accelerators with two storage rings in the same facility using superconducting magnet technology. This combination leads to severe constraints on beam loss in magnets and involves complex treatment of magnetic field imperfections and correction elements. The consequent demands placed upon beam diagnostics, accelerator model programs, and the computer oriented control system are discussed in terms of an illustrative operation scenario.

  20. First observation of rotation acceleration of magnetic island by using rotating resonant magnetic perturbation on the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Hu, Q. M.; Wang, N. C.; Yi, B.; Zheng, M. Y.; Jin, W.; Li, J. C.; Cheng, Z. F.; Yu, Q.; Yu, K. X.; Zhuang, G.

    2013-12-01

    A set of in-vessel saddle coils called dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP) for generating rotating resonant magnetic perturbations has recently been constructed on the J-TEXT tokamak. The phenomenon of tearing mode locking to DRMP and rotating together with the DRMP field has been observed. There is an apparent decrease of the island width during the locking and unlocking procedure. Similar results are obtained in the numerical simulation.

  1. SIMULATIONS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION BEYOND THE CLASSICAL SYNCHROTRON BURNOFF LIMIT IN MAGNETIC RECONNECTION: AN EXPLANATION OF THE CRAB FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Cerutti, B.; Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C. E-mail: greg.werner@colorado.edu E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-06-20

    It is generally accepted that astrophysical sources cannot emit synchrotron radiation above 160 MeV in their rest frame. This limit is given by the balance between the accelerating electric force and the radiation reaction force acting on the electrons. The discovery of synchrotron gamma-ray flares in the Crab Nebula, well above this limit, challenges this classical picture of particle acceleration. To overcome this limit, particles must accelerate in a region of high electric field and low magnetic field. This is possible only with a non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic process, like magnetic reconnection. We present the first numerical evidence of particle acceleration beyond the synchrotron burnoff limit, using a set of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of ultra-relativistic pair plasma reconnection. We use a new code, Zeltron, that includes self-consistently the radiation reaction force in the equation of motion of the particles. We demonstrate that the most energetic particles move back and forth across the reconnection layer, following relativistic Speiser orbits. These particles then radiate >160 MeV synchrotron radiation rapidly, within a fraction of a full gyration, after they exit the layer. Our analysis shows that the high-energy synchrotron flux is highly variable in time because of the strong anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the energetic particles. We discover a robust positive correlation between the flux and the cut-off energy of the emitted radiation, mimicking the effect of relativistic Doppler amplification. A strong guide field quenches the emission of >160 MeV synchrotron radiation. Our results are consistent with the observed properties of the Crab flares, supporting the reconnection scenario.

  2. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K.; Mitchell, Grant W.; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A.; Croglio, Michael P.; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y.; Razzo, Beatrice M.; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R.; Fajgenbaum, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in “omics” technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN’s collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care. PMID:26604862

  3. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physics Experiments, Photonics Applications and Web Engineering, Wilga, May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the XXXth Jubilee SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonicselectronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-275].

  4. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research.

    PubMed

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K; Mitchell, Grant W; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A; Croglio, Michael P; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y; Razzo, Beatrice M; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R; Fajgenbaum, David C

    2015-12-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in "omics" technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN's collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care.

  5. High Brightness Gamma-Ray Production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Jacobson, B.; Murokh, A.; Piiot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2016-10-10

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100’s of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ∼ 1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  6. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  7. An accelerated photo-magnetic imaging reconstruction algorithm based on an analytical forward solution and a fast Jacobian assembly method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouizi, F.; Erkol, H.; Luk, A.; Marks, M.; Unlu, M. B.; Gulsen, G.

    2016-10-01

    We previously introduced photo-magnetic imaging (PMI), an imaging technique that illuminates the medium under investigation with near-infrared light and measures the induced temperature increase using magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT). Using a multiphysics solver combining photon migration and heat diffusion, PMI models the spatiotemporal distribution of temperature variation and recovers high resolution optical absorption images using these temperature maps. In this paper, we present a new fast non-iterative reconstruction algorithm for PMI. This new algorithm uses analytic methods during the resolution of the forward problem and the assembly of the sensitivity matrix. We validate our new analytic-based algorithm with the first generation finite element method (FEM) based reconstruction algorithm previously developed by our team. The validation is performed using, first synthetic data and afterwards, real MRT measured temperature maps. Our new method accelerates the reconstruction process 30-fold when compared to a single iteration of the FEM-based algorithm.

  8. Low-field permanent magnet quadrupoles in a new relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator design

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Sessler, A.

    1995-02-01

    Permanent magnets play a central role in the new relativistic klystron two-beam-accelerator design. The two key goals of this new design, low cost and the suppression of beam break-up instability are both intimately tied to the permanent magnet quadrupole focusing system. A recently completed systems study by a joint LBL-LLNL team concludes that a power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider based on the new TBA design can be as low as $1 billion, and the efficiency (wall plug to rf) is estimated to be 36%. End-to-end simulations of longitudinal and transverse beam dynamics show that the drive beam is stable over the entire TBA unit.

  9. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    DOEpatents

    Wilgen, John [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  10. The evolution of tooling, techniques, and quality control for accelerator dipole magnet cables

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1992-08-01

    The present generation of particle accelerators are utilizing the flattened, compacted, single layer cable design introduced nearly 20 years ago at Rutherford Laboratory. However, the requirements for current density, filament size, dimensional control long lengths, and low current degradation are much more stringent for the present accelerators compared with the earlier Tevatron and HERA accelerators. Also, in order to achieve higher field strengths with efficient use of superconductor, the new designs require wider cables with more strands. These requirements have stimulated an active research effort which has led to significant improvements in critical current density and conductor manufacturing. In addition they have stimulated the development of new cabling techniques, improved tooling, and better measurement techniques. The need to produce over 20 million meters of cable has led to the development of high speed cabling machines and on-line quality assurance measurements. These new developments will be discussed, and areas still requiring improvement will be identified.

  11. A HiPIMS plasma source with a magnetic nozzle that accelerates ions: application in a thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathgate, Stephen N.; Ganesan, Rajesh; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; McKenzie, David R.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a solid fuel electrodeless ion thruster that uses a magnetic nozzle to collimate and accelerate copper ions produced by a high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge (HiPIMS). The discharge is initiated using argon gas but in a practical device the consumption of argon could be minimised by exploiting the self-sputtering of copper. The ion fluence produced by the HiPIMS discharge was measured with a retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) as a function of the magnetic field strength of the nozzle. The ion fraction of the copper was determined from the deposition rate of copper as a function of substrate bias and was found to exceed 87%. The ion fluence and ion energy increased in proportion with the magnetic field of the nozzle and the energy of the ions was found to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a directed velocity. The effectiveness of the magnetic nozzle in converting the randomized thermal motion of the ions into a jet was demonstrated from the energy distribution of the ions. The maximum ion exhaust velocity of at least 15.1 km/s, equivalent to a specific impulse of 1543 s was measured which is comparable to existing Hall thrusters and exceeds that of Teflon pulsed plasma thrusters.

  12. Hybrid Nanocrystalline Permanent Magnets for Beam Focusing in High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Sam; Shen, Yuhui

    2005-07-12

    In this DoE 2004 STTR Phase I research project, bulk hybrid nanograin Nd2Fe14B/Sm2(Co,Fe)17 magnets with MHc = 14.2 kOe and (BH)max = 27.3 MGOe were successfully synthesized. In addition, bulk nanograin PrCo5 magnets with MHc over 15 kOe and bulk hybrid anisotropic nanocomposite Pr2(Fe,Co)14B/Pr(Co,Fe)5 and Pr2(Fe,Co)14B/Pr2(Co,Fe)17 magnets with (BH)max of 28 to 35 MGOe were synthesized. These efforts were guided by the novel model of coercivity mechanism in nanograin magnetic materials and through the use of the innovative rapid RF inductive hot compaction process. With further R&D, a new class of permanent magnets that have the same level of magnetic performance as the mainstream sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with (BH)max = 35 to 45 MGOe and much improved thermal stability will be developed.

  13. Magnetic, Acceleration Fields and Gyroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ)-based attitude estimation with smartphone sensors for indoor pedestrian navigation.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, Valérie; Combettes, Christophe

    2014-12-02

    The dependence of proposed pedestrian navigation solutions on a dedicated infrastructure is a limiting factor to the deployment of location based services. Consequently self-contained Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning (PDR) approaches are gaining interest for autonomous navigation. Even if the quality of low cost inertial sensors and magnetometers has strongly improved, processing noisy sensor signals combined with high hand dynamics remains a challenge. Estimating accurate attitude angles for achieving long term positioning accuracy is targeted in this work. A new Magnetic, Acceleration fields and GYroscope Quaternion (MAGYQ)-based attitude angles estimation filter is proposed and demonstrated with handheld sensors. It benefits from a gyroscope signal modelling in the quaternion set and two new opportunistic updates: magnetic angular rate update (MARU) and acceleration gradient update (AGU). MAGYQ filter performances are assessed indoors, outdoors, with dynamic and static motion conditions. The heading error, using only the inertial solution, is found to be less than 10° after 1.5 km walking. The performance is also evaluated in the positioning domain with trajectories computed following a PDR strategy.

  14. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  15. Ion acceleration enhanced by additional neutralizing electrons in a magnetically expanding double layer plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-15

    Electrons neutralizing an ion beam are additionally supplied to a magnetically expanding double layer (DL) plasma from the downstream side of the DL. The rf power and the argon gas pressure are maintained at 200 W and 55 mPa, respectively, and the source magnetic field is varied in the range of about 70-550 G. It is observed that the ion beam energy corresponding to the DL potential drop increases up to 30 eV with an increase in the magnetic field when supplying the additional electrons, while it saturates at 20 eV for the case of the absence of the additional electrons. The supplied electrons are believed to be an energy source for the DL such that increasing the magnetic field is able to increase the potential drop beyond the limit found in the absence of the supplied electrons.

  16. Forces and Stored Energy in Thin Cosine (n0) Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.

    1996-03-18

    We wish to compute Lorentz forces, equilibrium stress and stored energy in thin multipole magnets (Fig.1), that are proportional to cos(n{theta}) and whose strength varies purely as a Fourier sinusoidal series of the longitudinal coordinate z (say proportional to cos (2m-1){pi}z/L where L denotes the half-period and m = 1,2,3...). We shall demonstrate that in cases where the current is situated on such a surface of discontinuity at r = R (i.e. J = f({theta},z)), by computing the Lorentz force and solving the state of equilibrium on that surface, a closed form solution can be obtained for single function magnets as well as for any combination of interacting nested multi function magnets. The results that have been obtained, indicate that the total axial force on the end of a single multipole magnet n is independent (orthogonal) to any other multipole magnet i as long as n {ne} i. The same is true for the stored energy, the total energy of a nested set of multipole magnets is equal to the some of the energy of the individual magnets (of the same period length 2L). Finally we demonstrate our results on a nested set of magnets a dipole (n = 1) and a quadmpole (n=2) that have an identical single periodicity {omega}{sub 1}. We show that in the limiting 2D case (period 2L tends to infinity), the force reduces to the commonly known 2D case.

  17. MULTI-SHELL MAGNETIC TWISTERS AS A NEW MECHANISM FOR CORONAL HEATING AND SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Musielak, Z. E.

    2015-07-20

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvén waves in an isolated photospheric flux tube and explore the propagation of these waves along such magnetic structure that extends from the photosphere, where these waves are triggered, to the solar corona, and we analyze resulting magnetic shells. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the magnetic flux tube that is rooted in the solar photosphere. The evolution of the solar atmosphere is described by 3D, ideal MHD equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal, based on the physical properties of the multi-shell magnetic twisters and the amount of energy and momentum associated with them, that these multi-shell magnetic twisters may be responsible for the observed heating of the lower solar corona and for the formation of solar wind. Moreover, it is likely that the existence of these twisters can be verified by high-resolution observations.

  18. High energy physics advisory panel`s composite subpanel for the assessment of the status of accelerator physics and technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    In November 1994, Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (OER), initiated a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to five OER programs -- High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy, and Health and Environmental Research. Dr. Krebs asked the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to establish a composite subpanel with representation from the five OER advisory committees and with a balance of membership drawn broadly from both the accelerator community and from those scientific disciplines associated with the OER programs. The Subpanel was also charged to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future research and development needs, management issues, and funding requirements. The Subpanel finds that accelerator science and technology is a vital and intellectually exciting field. It has provided essential capabilities for the DOE/OER research programs with an enormous impact on the nation`s scientific research, and it has significantly enhanced the nation`s biomedical and industrial capabilities. Further progress in this field promises to open new possibilities for the scientific goals of the OER programs and to further benefit the nation. Sustained support of forefront accelerator research and development by the DOE`s OER programs and the DOE`s predecessor agencies has been responsible for much of this impact on research. This report documents these contributions to the DOE energy research mission and to the nation.

  19. A new type of accelerator power supply based on voltage-type space vector PWM rectification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fengjun; Gao, Daqing; Shi, Chunfeng; Huang, Yuzhen; Cui, Yuan; Yan, Hongbin; Zhang, Huajian; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-08-01

    To solve the problems such as low input power factor, a large number of AC current harmonics and instable DC bus voltage due to the diode or thyristor rectifier used in an accelerator power supply, particularly in the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), we designed and built up a new type of accelerator power supply prototype base on voltage-type space vector PWM (SVPWM) rectification technology. All the control strategies are developed in TMS320C28346, which is a digital signal processor from TI. The experimental results indicate that an accelerator power supply with a SVPWM rectifier can solve the problems above well, and the output performance such as stability, tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of the design. The achievement of prototype confirms that applying voltage-type SVPWM rectification technology in an accelerator power supply is feasible; and it provides a good reference for design and build of this new type of power supply.

  20. Impacts of Interior Permanent Magnet Machine Technology for Electric Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Nickel Cobalt magnet with (BH) max at around 5 MG Oe. Next, Barium Ferrite magnets came by 1960s, and Samarium Cobalt magnets appeared in the 1970s...focused IPM motor using ferrite PM materials in 1978. Rahman designed and built the first large 45 kW high efficiency IPM motor utilizing NdBFe

  1. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a

  2. Acceleration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Mediated Thrombolysis by Magnetically Powered Nanomotors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dose control and effectiveness promotion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) for thrombolysis are vitally important to alleviate serious side effects such as hemorrhage in stroke treatments. In order to increase the effectiveness and reduce the risk of stroke treatment, we use rotating magnetic nanomotors to enhance the mass transport of t-PA molecules at the blood clot interface for local ischemic stroke therapy. The in vitro experiments demonstrate that, when combined with magnetically activated nanomotors, the thrombolysis speed of low-concentration t-PA (50 μg mL–1) can be enhanced up to 2-fold, to the maximum lysis speed at high t-PA concentration. Based on the convection enhanced transport theory due to rotating magnetic nanomotors, a theoretical model is proposed and predicts the experimental results reasonably well. The validity and efficiency of this enhanced treatment has been demonstrated in a rat embolic model. PMID:25006696

  3. Performance of a fast digital integrator in on-field magnetic measurements for particle accelerators.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, P; Bottura, L; Fiscarelli, L; Walckiers, L

    2012-02-01

    The fast digital integrator has been conceived to face most demanding magnet test requirements with a resolution of 10 ppm, a signal-to-noise ratio of 105 dB at 20 kHz, a time resolution of 50 ns, an offset of 10 ppm, and on-line processing. In this paper, the on-field achievements of the fast digital integrator are assessed by a specific measurement campaign at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). At first, the architecture and the metrological specifications of the instrument are reported. Then, the recent on-field achievements of (i) ±10 ppm of uncertainty in the measurement of the main field for superconducting magnets characterization, (ii) ±0.02 % of field uncertainty in quality assessment of small-aperture permanent magnets, and (iii) ±0.15 % of drift, in an excitation current measurement of 600 s under cryogenic conditions, are presented and discussed.

  4. Environmental remediation and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into useful green products by accelerated carbonation technology.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mihee; Han, Gi-Chun; Ahn, Ji-Whan; You, Kwang-Suk

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of carbonation technology to the environmental industry as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO(2)), a green house gas, including the presentation of related projects of our research group. An alternative technology to very slow natural carbonation is the co-called 'accelerated carbonation', which completes its fast reaction within few hours by using pure CO(2). Carbonation technology is widely applied to solidify or stabilize solid combustion residues from municipal solid wastes, paper mill wastes, etc. and contaminated soils, and to manufacture precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Carbonated products can be utilized as aggregates in the concrete industry and as alkaline fillers in the paper (or recycled paper) making industry. The quantity of captured CO(2) in carbonated products can be evaluated by measuring mass loss of heated samples by thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. The industrial carbonation technology could contribute to both reduction of CO(2) emissions and environmental remediation.

  5. Environmental Remediation and Conversion of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) into Useful Green Products by Accelerated Carbonation Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mihee; Han, Gi-Chun; Ahn, Ji-Whan; You, Kwang-Suk

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of carbonation technology to the environmental industry as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2), a green house gas, including the presentation of related projects of our research group. An alternative technology to very slow natural carbonation is the co-called ‘accelerated carbonation’, which completes its fast reaction within few hours by using pure CO2. Carbonation technology is widely applied to solidify or stabilize solid combustion residues from municipal solid wastes, paper mill wastes, etc. and contaminated soils, and to manufacture precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Carbonated products can be utilized as aggregates in the concrete industry and as alkaline fillers in the paper (or recycled paper) making industry. The quantity of captured CO2 in carbonated products can be evaluated by measuring mass loss of heated samples by thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. The industrial carbonation technology could contribute to both reduction of CO2 emissions and environmental remediation. PMID:20195442

  6. Investigation of advanced propulsion technologies: The RAM accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    The two principal areas of advanced propulsion investigated are the ram accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater. The concept of the ram accelerator is presented as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerothermodynamics research. The ram accelerator is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled in a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Combustion on and behind the projectile generates thrust which accelerates it to very high velocities. The acceleration can be tailored for the 'soft launch' of instrumented models. The distinctive reacting flow phenomena that have been observed in the ram accelerator are relevant to the aerothermodynamic processes in airbreathing hypersonic propulsion systems and are useful for validating sophisticated CFD codes. The recently demonstrated scalability of the device and the ability to control the rate of acceleration offer unique opportunities for the use of the ram accelerator as a large-scale hypersonic ground test facility. The flowing gas radiation receiver is a novel concept for using solar energy to heat a working fluid for space power or propulsion. Focused solar radiation is absorbed directly in a working gas, rather than by heat transfer through a solid surface. Previous theoretical analysis had demonstrated that radiation trapping reduces energy loss compared to that of blackbody receivers, and enables higher efficiencies and higher peak temperatures. An experiment was carried out to measure the temperature profile of an infrared-active gas and demonstrate the effect of radiation trapping. The success of this effort validates analytical models of heat transfer in this receiver, and confirms the potential of this approach for achieving high efficiency space power and propulsion.

  7. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  8. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  9. The thermometry system of superconducting magnets test bench for the Nica accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, E. V.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Sedykh, G. S.; Volkov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    Precise temperature control in various parts of the magnet and thermostat is one of the vital problems during cryogenic tests. The report describes design of the thermometry system, developed at LHEP JINR. This system is the operational prototype for the NICA thermometry system. Besides, the report describes generic software tools, developed for the TANGO-based control system web client software design.

  10. About possibility of primary cosmic rays proton acceleration up to super-high relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaradze, Nodar; Vanishvili, George; Bakradze, Themur; Kordzadze, Lia; Elizbarashvili, Misha; Bazerashvili, Eka

    2013-02-01

    Theoretical considerations concerning of the charged particles acceleration in general, and in particular, the peculiarities of protons acceleration in the Neutral Layer of Cosmic Space, in the frame of Maxwell Electro-Magnetic Field Theory have been reviewed on the article. A brief historical review of events is given, indicating that protons can be speeding up to ultra-relativistic energies in the Neutral Layer of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field, which is affirmed by anomalously high number of cosmic μ-mesons, generated by protons, through the decay of π- and -mesons, have been discovered in lower layers of the Earth's Atmosphere, as well as in a great depths of underground

  11. Design of the main racetrack microtron accelerator end magnets of the Institute of Physics of University of São Paulo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, L. R.; Martins, M. N.; Takahashi, J.; Gouffon, P.

    1999-03-01

    This work deals with the design of the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP) main racetrack microtron accelerator end magnets. This is the last stage of acceleration, comprised of an accelerating section (1.04 m) and two end magnets (0.1585 T), in which a 5.10 MeV beam, produced by a racetrack microtron booster has its energy raised up to 31.15 MeV after 28 accelerations. Poisson code was used to give the final configuration that includes auxiliary pole pieces (clamps) and auxiliary homogenizing gaps. The clamps create a reverse fringe field region and avoid the vertical defocusing and the horizontal displacement of the beam produced by extended fringe fields; Ptrace code was used to perform the trajectory calculations in the fringe field region. The auxiliary homogenizing gaps improve the field uniformity as they create a ``magnetic shower'' that provides uniformity of +/-0.3%, before the introduction of the correcting coils that will be attached to the pole faces. This method of correction, used in the IFUSP racetrack microtron booster magnets, enabled uniformity of +/-0.001% in an average field of 0.1 T and will also be employed for these end magnets.

  12. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  13. Development of Ta-matrix Nb3Al Strand and Cable for High-Field Accelerator Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Ghosh, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Banno, N.; Iijima, Y.; Nimori, S.; Takigawa, H.; Terashima, A.; Nakamoto, T.; Kuroda, Y.; Maruyama, M.; Takao, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Barzi, E.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.

    2011-08-03

    Research and development of Nb{sub 3}Al strands and cables for a high field accelerator magnet is ongoing under the framework of the CERN-KEK collaboration. In this program, new Ta-matrix Nb{sub 3}Al strands were developed and their mechanical properties and superconducting properties were studied. The non-Cu J{sub c} values of these strands were 750 {approx} 800 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 T and 4.2 K. Using these strands, test fabrication of 27-strand Rutherford cable was carried out in collaboration with NIMS and Fermilab. The properties of the strands extracted from the cable were examined and it was found that there was no degradation of the superconducting properties of the strands. In this paper, we report the fabrication of the strands and the cable in brief and present some of the results obtained by studying their properties.

  14. Picosecond-petawatt laser-block ignition for avalanche fusion of boron by ultrahigh acceleration and ultrahigh magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Lalousis, P.; Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.; Eliezer, S.; Miley, G. H.; Moustaizis, S.; Mourou, G.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion energy from reacting hydrogen (protons) with the boron isotope 11 (HB11) resulting in three stable helium nuclei, is without problem of nuclear radiation in contrast to DT fusion. But the HB11 reaction driven by nanosecond laser pulses with thermal compression and ignition by lasers is extremely difficult. This changed radically when irradiation with picosecond laser pulses produces a non-thermal plasma block ignition with ultrahigh acceleration. This uses the nonlinear (ponderomotive) force to surprizingly resulting in same thresholds as DT fusion even under pessimistic assumption of binary reactions. After evaluation of reactions trapped cylindrically by kilotesla magnetic fields and using the measured highly increased HB11 fusion gains for the proof of an avalanche of the three alphas in secondary reactions, possibilities for an absolutely clean energy source at comptitive costs were concluded.

  15. Magnetic field-aligned electric field acceleration and the characteristics of the optical aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, A. B.; Lyons, L. R.; Hecht, J. H.; Sivjee, G. G.; Meier, R. R.

    1987-01-01

    The long-recognized association of brighter aurora with more deeply penetrating, and hence more energetic, electrons is examined. Using the Knight (1973) relation between the magnetic-field-aligned current density and potential drop (derived from the theory of single-particle motion in the presence of a magnetic-field-aligned electric field), an approximate expression relating the energy flux of the precipitating electrons over discrete aurora and the mean particle energy is derived. This expression is used in conjunction with an auroral optical excitation and emission model to specify the dependence of the red/blue ratio of auroral optical emissions on the brightness of the aurora. It is shown that the quantitative predictions of the discrete auroral theory are in accord with observations of the aurora.

  16. Evaluation of a gamma camera system for the RITS-6 accelerator using the self-magnetic pinch diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Timothy J.; Kiefer, Mark L.; Gignac, Raymond; Baker, Stuart A.

    2015-08-01

    The self-magnetic pinch (SMP) diode is an intense radiographic source fielded on the Radiographic Integrated Test Stand (RITS-6) accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The accelerator is an inductive voltage adder (IVA) that can operate from 2-10 MV with currents up to 160 kA (at 7 MV). The SMP diode consists of an annular cathode separated from a flat anode, holding the bremsstrahlung conversion target, by a vacuum gap. Until recently the primary imaging diagnostic utilized image plates (storage phosphors) which has generally low DQE at these photon energies along with other problems. The benefits of using image plates include a high-dynamic range, good spatial resolution, and ease of use. A scintillator-based X-ray imaging system or "gamma camera" has been fielded in front of RITS and the SMP diode which has been able to provide vastly superior images in terms of signal-to-noise with similar resolution and acceptable dynamic range.

  17. Performance of magnetically injected plasma opening switches for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator 2 (PBFA 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; McDaniel, D.H.; Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Sweeney, M.A.; Moore, W.B.S.; Mowrer, G.R.; Simpson, W.W.; Zagar, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma opening switch experiments using a magnetically injected plasma have been in progress since October 1988. Plasma densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 12} to 2 {times} 10{sup 13} e/cm{sup 3} have been injected from the anode side into the 8 cm gap of the 20 ohm magnetically insulated transmission line of PBFA II using a slowly rising B{sub r,z} magnetic field. This field confines the azimuthally-uniform plasma to produce switches up to 30 cm in length. Four MIP geometries have been investigated to find a higher electrical impedance when the switch opens. These studies have shown that a separation of 10 to 20 cm from the load is important to keep the POS from affecting the load performance. With such a separation, 20 to 30 TW of power at 7 to 11 MV has been delivered to electron and ion diode loads. Data on switch performance with various loads and factors that improve performance are discussed. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Technology evaluation of man-rated acceleration test equipment for vestibular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taback, I.; Kenimer, R. L.; Butterfield, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The considerations for eliminating acceleration noise cues in horizontal, linear, cyclic-motion sleds intended for both ground and shuttle-flight applications are addressed. the principal concerns are the acceleration transients associated with change in direction-of-motion for the carriage. The study presents a design limit for acceleration cues or transients based upon published measurements for thresholds of human perception to linear cyclic motion. The sources and levels for motion transients are presented based upon measurements obtained from existing sled systems. The approaches to a noise-free system recommends the use of air bearings for the carriage support and moving-coil linear induction motors operating at low frequency as the drive system. Metal belts running on air bearing pulleys provide an alternate approach to the driving system. The appendix presents a discussion of alternate testing techniques intended to provide preliminary type data by means of pendulums, linear motion devices and commercial air bearing tables.

  19. Magnetic Refrigeration Technology for High Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Boeder, A; Zimm, C

    2006-09-30

    Magnetic refrigeration was investigated as an efficient, environmentally friendly, flexible alternative to conventional residential vapor compression central air conditioning systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of advanced geometry active magnetic regenerator (AMR) beds were developed to minimize bed size and thus magnet mass by optimizing geometry for fluid flow and heat transfer and other losses. Conventional and magnetocaloric material (MCM) regenerator fabrication and assembly techniques were developed and advanced geometry passive regenerators were built and tested. A subscale engineering prototype (SEP) magnetic air conditioner was designed, constructed and tested. A model of the AMR cycle, combined with knowledge from passive regenerator experiments and FEA results, was used to design the regenerator beds. A 1.5 Tesla permanent magnet assembly was designed using FEA and the bed structure and plenum design was extensively optimized using FEA. The SEP is a flexible magnetic refrigeration platform, with individually instrumented beds and high flow rate and high frequency capability, although the current advanced regenerator geometry beds do not meet performance expectations, probably due to manufacturing and assembly tolerances. A model of the AMR cycle was used to optimize the design of a 3 ton capacity magnetic air conditioner, and the system design was iterated to minimize external parasitic losses such as heat exchanger pressure drop and fan power. The manufacturing cost for the entire air conditioning system was estimated, and while the estimated SEER efficiency is high, the magnetic air conditioning system is not cost competitive as currently configured. The 3 ton study results indicate that there are other applications where magnetic refrigeration is anticipated to have cost advantages over conventional systems, especially applications where magnetic refrigeration, through the use of its aqueous heat transfer fluid, could eliminate intermediate

  20. The Future of Accelerator Physics. The Tamura Symposium Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.

    1996-04-01

    These proceedings represent the papers presented at the Tamura symposium on accelerator physics. The topics discussed include many novel ideas for future exploration, for example, 30TeV X 30TeV collider, Moebius accelerator, new magnets, new table{minus}top terawatt (T3) lasers, free space accelerators, advanced cooling of beams, including optical cooling,etc.. There were 30 papers presented at the symposium and 28 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-15

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  2. Accelerating the commercialization on new technologies. [free market operation of federal alternate energy sources programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, T. J.; Nawrocki, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that federal programs for hastening the adoption of alternative energy sources must operate within the free market structure. Five phases of the free market commercialization process are described. Federal role possibilities include information dissemination and funding to stimulate private sector activities within these five phases, and federally sponsored procedures for accelerating commercialization of solar thermal small power systems are considered.

  3. Vibration isolation technology: Sensitivity of selected classes of experiments to residual accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1990-01-01

    The solution was sought of a 2-D axisymmetric moving boundary problem for the sensitivity of isothermal and nonisothermal liquid columns and the sensitivity of thermo-capillary flows to buoyancy driven convection caused by residual accelerations. The sensitivity of a variety of space experiments to residual accelerations are examined. In all the cases discussed, the sensitivity is related to the dynamic response of a fluid. In some cases the sensitivity can be defined by the magnitude of the response of the velocity field. This response may involve motion of the fluid associated with internal density gradients, or the motion of a free liquid surface. For fluids with internal density gradients, the type of acceleration to which the experiment is sensitive will depend on whether buoyancy driven convection must be small in comparison to other types of fluid motion (such as thermocapillary flow), or fluid motion must be suppressed or eliminated (such as in diffusion studies, or directional solidification experiments). The effect of the velocity on the composition and temperature field must be considered, particularly in the vicinity of the melt crystal interface. As far as the response to transient disturbances is concerned the sensitivity is determined by both the magnitude and frequency the acceleration and the characteristic momentum and solute diffusion times.

  4. Development of millimeter-wave accelerating structures using precision metal forming technology

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    High gradients in radio-frequency (RF) driven accelerators require short wavelengths that have the concomitant requirements of small feature size and high tolerances, 1-2 {micro}m for millimeter wavelengths. Precision metal-forming stampling has the promise of meeting those tolerances with high production rates. This STI will evaluate that promise.

  5. Signature of open magnetic field lines in the extended solar corona and of solar wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Giordano, S.; Benna, C.; Kohl, J. L.; Noci, G.; Michels, J.; Fineschi, S.

    1997-01-01

    The observations carried out with the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) are discussed. The purpose of the observations was to determine the line of sight and radial velocity fields in coronal regions with different magnetic topology. The results showed that the regions where the high speed solar wind flows along open field lines are characterized by O VI 1032 and HI Lyman alpha 1216 lines. The global coronal maps of the line of sight velocity were reconstructed. The corona height, where the solar wind reaches 100 km/s, was determined.

  6. Development of Rutherford-type cables for high field accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Borissov, E.; Elementi, L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lombardo, V.; Rusy, A.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Fermilab's cabling facility has been upgraded to a maximum capability of 42 strands. This facility is being used to study the effect of cabling on the performance of the various strands, and for the development and fabrication of cables in support of the ongoing magnet R&D programs. Rutherford cables of various geometries, packing factors, with and without a stainless steel core, were fabricated out of Cu alloys, NbTi, Nb{sub 3}Al, and various Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The parameters of the upgraded cabling machine and results of cable R&D efforts at Fermilab are reported.

  7. Inflation and acceleration of the universe by nonlinear magnetic monopole fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Övgün, A.

    2017-02-01

    Despite impressive phenomenological success, cosmological models are incomplete without an understanding of what happened at the big bang singularity. Maxwell electrodynamics, considered as a source of the classical Einstein field equations, leads to the singular isotropic Friedmann solutions. In the context of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime, we show that singular behavior does not occur for a class of nonlinear generalizations of the electromagnetic theory for strong fields. A new mathematical model is proposed for which the analytical nonsingular extension of FRW solutions is obtained by using the nonlinear magnetic monopole fields.

  8. Magnetic Recording Media Technology for the Tb/in2 Era"

    ScienceCinema

    Bertero, Gerardo [Western Digital

    2016-07-12

    Magnetic recording has been the technology of choice of massive storage of information. The hard-disk drive industry has recently undergone a major technological transition from longitudinal magnetic recording (LMR) to perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR). However, convention perpendicular recording can only support a few new product generations before facing insurmountable physical limits. In order to support sustained recording areal density growth, new technological paradigms, such as energy-assisted recording and bit-patterined media recording are being contemplated and planned. In this talk, we will briefly discuss the LMR-to-PMR transition, the extendibility of current PMR recording, and the nature and merits of new enabling technologies. We will also discuss a technology roadmap toward recording densities approaching 10 Tv/in2, approximately 40 times higher than in current disk drives.

  9. Magnetic Recording Media Technology for the Tb/In2 Era

    SciTech Connect

    Bertero, Gerardo

    2010-04-07

    Magnetic recording has been the technology of choice of massive storage of information. The hard-disk drive industry has recently undergone a major technological transition from longitudinal magnetic recording (LMR) to perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR). However, convention perpendicular recording can only support a few new product generations before facing insurmountable physical limits. In order to support sustained recording areal density growth, new technological paradigms, such as energy-assisted recording and bit-patterined media recording are being contemplated and planned. In this talk, we will briefly discuss the LMR-to-PMR transition, the extendibility of current PMR recording, and the nature and merits of new enabling technologies. We will also discuss a technology roadmap toward recording densities approaching 10 Tv/in2, approximately 40 times higher than in current disk drives.

  10. Direct measurement of magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, R. D.; Bliss, D. E.; Martin, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Lamppa, D. C.; Dolan, D. H.; Lemke, R. W.; Rovang, D. C.; Rochau, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the progress made to date for directly measuring magnetic flux compression on Z. Each experiment consisted of an initially solid aluminum liner (a cylindrical tube), which was imploded using Z's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-20-T axial seed field, Bz(0), supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by Bz(t) =Bz (0)×[R(0)/R(t)]2, where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, Bz and dBz/dt values exceeding 104 T and 1012 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields directly. We report on our latest efforts to do so using a fiber-optic-based Faraday rotation diagnostic, where the magneto-active portion of the sensor is made from terbium-doped optical fiber. We have now used this diagnostic to measure a flux-compressed magnetic field to over 600 T prior to the imploding liner hitting the on-axis fiber housing. This project was funded in part by Sandia's LDRD program and US DOE-NNSA contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. A Chandra view of non-thermal emission in the northwestern region of supernova remnant RCW 86: Particle acceleration and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Daniel; Lopez, Laura A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Slane, Patrick O.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2013-12-10

    The shocks of supernova remnants are believed to accelerate particles to cosmic ray (CR) energies. The amplification of the magnetic field due to CRs propagating in the shock region is expected to have an impact on both the emission from the accelerated particle population as well as the acceleration process itself. Using a 95 ks observation with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we map and characterize the synchrotron emitting material in the northwest region of RCW 86. We model spectra from several different regions, both filamentary and diffuse, where emission appears to be dominated by synchrotron radiation. The fine spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to obtain accurate emission profiles across three different non-thermal rims in this region. The narrow width (l ≈ 10''-30'') of these filaments constrains the minimum magnetic field strength at the post-shock region to approximately 80 μG.

  12. Accelerating the deployment of a health information technology and informatics workforce through education, training, research, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Nancy; Bloomrosen, Meryl

    2011-01-01

    Supported by stronger and more coordinated US federal funding and policies, driven by goals to deliver care more efficiently, and motivated to provide high quality care for an aging and more diverse population, public-private-sector organisations are redoubling efforts to implement information systems. Thus, there is a critical need to increase and broaden the pool of workers who can help organizations maximise the effectiveness of their investments in technology. There are in the US various current health informatics education and training initiatives and ongoing efforts to accelerate Health IT workforce development.

  13. Analysis and comparison between electric and magnetic power couplers for accelerators in Free Electron Lasers (FEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpico, C.; Grudiev, A.; Vescovo, R.

    2016-10-01

    Free-electron lasers represent a new and exciting class of coherent optical sources possessing broad wavelength tunability and excellent optical-beam quality. The FERMI seeded free-electron laser (FEL), located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste, is driven by a 200 m long, S-band linac: the high energy part of the linac is equipped with 6 m long backward traveling wave (BTW) structures. The structures have small iris radius and a nose cone geometry which allows for high gradient operation. Development of new high-gradient, S-band accelerating structures for the replacement of the existing BTWs is under consideration. This paper investigates two possible solutions for the RF power couplers suitable for a linac driven FEL which require reduced wakefields effects, high operating gradient and very high reliability. The first part of the manuscript focuses on the reduction of residual field asymmetries, while in the second analyzes RF performances, the peak surface fields and the expected breakdown rate. In the conclusion, two solutions are compared and pros and cons are highlighted.

  14. Nanosecond pulse-width electron diode based on dielectric wall accelerator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Quantang; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Cao, S. C.; Shen, X. K.; Jing, Y.; Yu, C. S.; Li, Z. P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R. Q.; Zong, Y.; Wang, Y. R.; Zhao, H. W.

    2013-11-01

    An electron diode using a short section of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been under development at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. Tests have been carried out with spark gap switches triggered by lasers. The stack voltage efficiency of a four-layer of Blumleins reached about 60-70% with gas filled spark gap switching. The generated pulse voltage of peak amplitude of 23 kV and pulse width of 5 ns is used to extract and accelerate an electron beam of 320 mA, measured by a fast current transformer. A nanosecond pulse width electron diode was achieved successfully. Furthermore, the principle of a DWA is well proven and the development details and discussions are presented in this article.

  15. Inflection Points in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Technology-35 Years of Collaborative Research and Development.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael L; Griswold, Mark A; Henkelman, Mark; Hennig, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    The technology for clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has advanced with remarkable speed and in such a manner reflecting the influence of 3 forces-collaboration between disciplines, collaboration between academia and industry, and the enabling of software applications by hardware. The forces are evident in the key developments from the past and emerging trends for the future highlighted in this review article. These developments are associated with MRI system attributes, such as wider, shorter, and stronger magnets; specialty magnets and hybrid devices; k space; and the notion that magnetic field gradients perform a Fourier transform on the spatial distribution of magnetization, phased-array coils and parallel imaging, the user interface, the wide range of contrast possible, and applications that exploit motion-induced phase shifts. An attempt is made to show connections between these developments and how the 3 forces mentioned previously will continue to shape the technology used so productively in clinical MRI.

  16. How Magnets Attract and Repel: Interessement in a Technology Commercialization Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinuzzi, Clay; Nelson, Scott; Thomson, Keela S.; Lorenzini, Francesca; French, Rosemary A.; Pogue, Gregory; London, Noelle

    2016-01-01

    K6015, a South Korean firm seeking to commercialize its magnet technology in the US market, entered a technology commercialization training program structured as a competition. Through this program, K6015 (and others in the program) used several genres to progressively interest different sets of stakeholders. To understand how K6015 applied these…

  17. The Information Edge: Using Data to Accelerate Achievement--Technology Counts, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This special issue presents the ninth edition of "Education Week's" annual report on education technology, "Technology Counts." The annual report found that the nation has made dramatic progress in developing computerized data systems that can reliably guide education decision-making, but still has plenty of work to do before those systems can…

  18. Development of Magnet Technologies for HTS Insert Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesche, Rainer; Uglietti, Davide; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; March, Stephen; Marinucci, Claudio; Stepanov, Boris; Glowa, Natalia

    An existing Nb3Sn laboratory magnet generating a magnetic field of 12 T is intended to be upgraded to 16 T by means of the use of a high temperature superconductor (HTS) insert coil. An outline design of the HTS insert coil is presented. In the design, the aspects of the maximum achievable operation current, the required copper cross-section to ensure a hot spot temperature below 200 K and the resulting forces and stresses have been considered. The length of the insert coil has been selected in such a way that the field uniformity will be better than 1% within a sphere of 3 cm diameter. The protection of the whole magnet system (LTS & HTS insert) is briefly described.

  19. Polarization maintaining fiber magnetic sensor based on the digital phase generated carrier technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueliang; Meng, Zhou; Hu, Zhengliang; Yang, Huayong; Song, Zhangqi; Hu, Yongming

    2008-12-01

    A polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) magnetic field sensor based on a digital phase generated carrier (PGC) technology is presented. A magnetic sensor constructed with two magnetostrictive strips attached on the sensing fiber is joined in the sensing arm of a fiber Michelson interferometer. The fiber optic interferometric system is made of all PMF, which inhibits the polarization-induced signal fading. The light source is a fiber laser which can be modulated directly. The PGC metnod is used to demodulate magnetic field signal avoiding phase induced interferometric signal fading, and ensure the sensing partto be all fiber structure. A fiber optic magnetic field sensor with appreciate size for the fiber optic hydrophone towed array is obtained, which can be used to sense the enviromental magnetic field along the sensing direction.This sensor is a good choice for the directional angle measurement through sensing the Earth magnetic field in the array shape measurement of a fiber optic hydrophone towed array.

  20. Vibration isolation technology: Sensitivity of selected classes of space experiments to residual accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Adebiyi, Adebimpe

    1989-01-01

    Progress performed on each task is described. Order of magnitude analyses related to liquid zone sensitivity and thermo-capillary flow sensitivity are covered. Progress with numerical models of the sensitivity of isothermal liquid zones is described. Progress towards a numerical model of coupled buoyancy-driven and thermo-capillary convection experiments is also described. Interaction with NASA personnel is covered. Results to date are summarized and they are discussed in terms of the predicted space station acceleration environment. Work planned for the second year is also discussed.