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Sample records for accelerator network gan

  1. Remote operations in a global accelerator network

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, Steve; Satogata, Todd; Agarwal, Deborah; Rice, David

    2003-05-08

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  2. REMOTE OPERATIONS IN A GLOBAL ACCELERATOR NETWORK.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA,T.; AGARWAL,D.; RICE,D.

    2003-05-12

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  3. REMOTE OPERATIONS IN A GLOBAL ACCELERATOR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.SATOGATA,TAGARWAL,DRICE,D

    2003-05-12

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  4. Collaboration tools for the global accelerator network: Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Olson, Gary; Olson, Judy

    2002-09-15

    The concept of a ''Global Accelerator Network'' (GAN) has been put forward as a means for inter-regional collaboration in the operation of internationally constructed and operated frontier accelerator facilities. A workshop was held to allow representatives of the accelerator community and of the collaboratory development community to meet and discuss collaboration tools for the GAN environment. This workshop, called the Collaboration Tools for the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) Workshop, was held on August 26, 2002 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to provide input about collaboration tools in general and to provide a strawman for the GAN collaborative tools environment. The participants at the workshop represented accelerator physicists, high-energy physicists, operations, technology tool developers, and social scientists that study scientific collaboration.

  5. Network acceleration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Patricia (Inventor); Awrach, James Michael (Inventor); Maccabe, Arthur Barney (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Splintered offloading techniques with receive batch processing are described for network acceleration. Such techniques offload specific functionality to a NIC while maintaining the bulk of the protocol processing in the host operating system ("OS"). The resulting protocol implementation allows the application to bypass the protocol processing of the received data. Such can be accomplished this by moving data from the NIC directly to the application through direct memory access ("DMA") and batch processing the receive headers in the host OS when the host OS is interrupted to perform other work. Batch processing receive headers allows the data path to be separated from the control path. Unlike operating system bypass, however, the operating system still fully manages the network resource and has relevant feedback about traffic and flows. Embodiments of the present disclosure can therefore address the challenges of networks with extreme bandwidth delay products (BWDP).

  6. Growth of GaN nanowall network on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    GaN nanowall network was epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN nanowalls overlap and interlace with one another, together with large numbers of holes, forming a continuous porous GaN nanowall network. The width of the GaN nanowall can be controlled, ranging from 30 to 200 nm by adjusting the N/Ga ratio. Characterization results of a transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction show that the GaN nanowall is well oriented along the C axis. Strong band edge emission centered at 363 nm is observed in the spectrum of room temperature photoluminescence, indicating that the GaN nanowall network is of high quality. The sheet resistance of the Si-doped GaN nanowall network along the lateral direction was 58 Ω/. The conductive porous nanowall network can be useful for integrated gas sensors due to the large surface area-to-volume ratio and electrical conductivity along the lateral direction by combining with Si micromachining. PMID:23270331

  7. Growth of GaN nanowall network on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Aihua; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    GaN nanowall network was epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN nanowalls overlap and interlace with one another, together with large numbers of holes, forming a continuous porous GaN nanowall network. The width of the GaN nanowall can be controlled, ranging from 30 to 200 nm by adjusting the N/Ga ratio. Characterization results of a transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction show that the GaN nanowall is well oriented along the C axis. Strong band edge emission centered at 363 nm is observed in the spectrum of room temperature photoluminescence, indicating that the GaN nanowall network is of high quality. The sheet resistance of the Si-doped GaN nanowall network along the lateral direction was 58 Ω/. The conductive porous nanowall network can be useful for integrated gas sensors due to the large surface area-to-volume ratio and electrical conductivity along the lateral direction by combining with Si micromachining. PMID:23270331

  8. Accelerating, hyperaccelerating, and decelerating networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagen, M. J.; Mattick, J. S.

    2005-07-01

    Many growing networks possess accelerating statistics where the number of links added with each new node is an increasing function of network size so the total number of links increases faster than linearly with network size. In particular, biological networks can display a quadratic growth in regulator number with genome size even while remaining sparsely connected. These features are mutually incompatible in standard treatments of network theory which typically require that every new network node possesses at least one connection. To model sparsely connected networks, we generalize existing approaches and add each new node with a probabilistic number of links to generate either accelerating, hyperaccelerating, or even decelerating network statistics in different regimes. Under preferential attachment for example, slowly accelerating networks display stationary scale-free statistics relatively independent of network size while more rapidly accelerating networks display a transition from scale-free to exponential statistics with network growth. Such transitions explain, for instance, the evolutionary record of single-celled organisms which display strict size and complexity limits.

  9. Accelerating Learning By Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    Electronic neural networks made to learn faster by use of terminal teacher forcing. Method of supervised learning involves addition of teacher forcing functions to excitations fed as inputs to output neurons. Initially, teacher forcing functions are strong enough to force outputs to desired values; subsequently, these functions decay with time. When learning successfully completed, terminal teacher forcing vanishes, and dynamics or neural network become equivalent to those of conventional neural network. Simulated neural network with terminal teacher forcing learned to produce close approximation of circular trajectory in 400 iterations.

  10. Neural networks and orbit control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1994-07-01

    An overview of the architecture, workings and training of Neural Networks is given. We stress the aspects which are important for the use of Neural Networks for orbit control in accelerators and storage rings, especially its ability to cope with the nonlinear behavior of the orbit response to `kicks` and the slow drift in the orbit response during long-term operation. Results obtained for the two NSLS storage rings with several network architectures and various training methods for each architecture are given.

  11. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  12. Application of local area networks to accelerator control systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Linstadt, E.; Melen, R.

    1983-03-01

    The history and current status of SLAC's SDLC networks for distributed accelerator control systems are discussed. These local area networks have been used for instrumentation and control of the linear accelerator. Network topologies, protocols, physical links, and logical interconnections are discussed for specific applications in distributed data acquisition and control system, computer networks and accelerator operations.

  13. Accelerating commutation circuits in quantum computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Huang, Xu; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zeng-ke

    2012-12-01

    In a high speed and packet-switched quantum computer network, a packet routing delay often leads to traffic jams, becoming a severe bottleneck for speeding up the transmission rate. Based on the delayed commutation circuit proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 110502 (2006), we present an improved scheme for accelerating network transmission. For two more realistic scenarios, we utilize the characteristic of a quantum state to simultaneously implement a data switch and transmission that makes it possible to reduce the packet delay and route a qubit packet even before its address is determined. This circuit is further extended to the quantum network for the transmission of the unknown quantum information. The analysis demonstrates that quantum communication technology can considerably reduce the processing delay time and build faster and more efficient packet-switched networks.

  14. Transformation of c-oriented nanowall network to a flat morphology in GaN films on c-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Kesaria, Manoj; Shetty, Satish; Cohen, P.I.; Shivaprasad, S.M.

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} High quality wurtzite structures GaN nanowall network formed on c-plane sapphire. {yields} Tapering of nanowalls at the apex cause electron confinement effects. {yields} Temperature dependent transformation of the six fold nanowall network to a flat morphology. {yields} Growth kinetics is influenced by adatom diffusion, interactions and bonding for GaN layer. -- Abstract: The work significantly optimizes growth parameters for nanostructured and flat GaN film in the 480-830 {sup o}C temperature range. The growth of ordered, high quality GaN nanowall hexagonal honeycomb like network on c-plane sapphire under nitrogen rich (N/Ga ratio of 100) conditions at temperatures below 700 {sup o}C is demonstrated. The walls are c-oriented wurtzite structures 200 nm wide at base and taper to 10 nm at apex, manifesting electron confinement effects to tune optoelectronic properties. For substrate temperatures above 700 {sup o}C the nanowalls thicken to a flat morphology with a dislocation density of 10{sup 10}/cm{sup 2}. The role of misfit dislocations in the GaN overlayer evolution is discussed in terms of growth kinetics being influenced by adatom diffusion, interactions and bonding at different temperatures. The GaN films are characterized by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), field emission scanning electron (FESEM), high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and cathodoluminescence (CL).

  15. The Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Jackson; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Clare, Loren P.

    2008-01-01

    A document describes the Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator (IONAC) an electronic apparatus, now under development, for relaying data at high rates in spacecraft and interplanetary radio-communication systems utilizing a delay-tolerant networking protocol. The protocol includes provisions for transmission and reception of data in bundles (essentially, messages), transfer of custody of a bundle to a recipient relay station at each step of a relay, and return receipts. Because of limitations on energy resources available for such relays, data rates attainable in a conventional software implementation of the protocol are lower than those needed, at any given reasonable energy-consumption rate. Therefore, a main goal in developing the IONAC is to reduce the energy consumption by an order of magnitude and the data-throughput capability by two orders of magnitude. The IONAC prototype is a field-programmable gate array that serves as a reconfigurable hybrid (hardware/ firmware) system for implementation of the protocol. The prototype can decode 108,000 bundles per second and encode 100,000 bundles per second. It includes a bundle-cache static randomaccess memory that enables maintenance of a throughput of 2.7Gb/s, and an Ethernet convergence layer that supports a duplex throughput of 1Gb/s.

  16. Growth of high quality GaN layer on carbon nanotube-graphene network structure as intermediate layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Taeo Hoon; Park, Ah Hyun; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Myung Jong; Suh, Eun-Kyung

    2015-03-01

    In general, high-quality GaN layers are synthesized on low-temperature (LT) GaN buffer layer on a single crystal sapphire substrate. However, large differences in fundamental properties such as lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients between GaN layer and sapphire substrate generate high density of threading dislocation (TD) that leads to deterioration of optical and structural properties. Graphene has been attracting much attention due to its excellent physical properties However, direct epitaxial growth of GaN film onto graphene layer on substrates is not easily accessible due to the lack of chemical reactivity on graphene which consisted of C-C bond of sp2 hexagonally arranged carbon atoms with no dangling bonds. In this work, an intermediate layer for the GaN growth on sapphire substrate was constructed by inserting carbon nanotubes and graphene hybrid structure (CGH) Optical and structural properties of GaN layer grown on CGH were compared with those of GaN layer directly grown on sapphire CNTs act as nucleation sites and play a crucial role in the growth of single crystal high-quality GaN on graphene layer. Also, graphene film acts as a mask for epitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaN layer, which can effectively reduce TD density. A grant from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) institutional program.

  17. Role of quantum confinement in giving rise to high electron mobility in GaN nanowall networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhasker, H. P.; Thakur, Varun; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Dhar, S.

    2015-10-01

    Origin of unprecedentedly high electron mobility observed in the c-axis oriented GaN nanowall networks is investigated by studying the depth distribution of structural, electrical and optical properties of several such high mobility samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technique for different time durations. It has been found that in two hour grown samples, walls are tapered continuously from the bottom to the top. While in four hour grown samples, walls are flat-topped with the top surface containing certain secondary tip structures. These additional features run along the length of the walls to form a well-connected network. Our study reveals that the carriers are quantum mechanically confined not only in the secondary tip structures but also in the wider part of the walls. The secondary tip structures, which are found to offer higher mobility than the rest of the network, are also identified as the regions of stronger confinement. The effect of mobility enhancement observed in these samples has been attributed to a 2D quantum confinement of electrons in the central vertical plane of the walls.

  18. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  19. Method Accelerates Training Of Some Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    Three-layer networks trained faster provided two conditions are satisfied: numbers of neurons in layers are such that majority of work done in synaptic connections between input and hidden layers, and number of neurons in input layer at least as great as number of training pairs of input and output vectors. Based on modified version of back-propagation method.

  20. Accelerating coordination in temporal networks by engineering the link order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    Social dynamics on a network may be accelerated or decelerated depending on which pairs of individuals in the network communicate early and which pairs do later. The order with which the links in a given network are sequentially used, which we call the link order, may be a strong determinant of dynamical behaviour on networks, potentially adding a new dimension to effects of temporal networks relative to static networks. Here we study the effect of the link order on linear coordination (i.e., synchronisation) dynamics. We show that the coordination speed considerably depends on specific orders of links. In addition, applying each single link for a long time to ensure strong pairwise coordination before moving to a next pair of individuals does not often enhance coordination of the entire network. We also implement a simple greedy algorithm to optimise the link order in favour of fast coordination.

  1. Modeling of UH-60A Hub Accelerations with Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2002-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, flight test hub accelerations and the corresponding three N/rev pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) are studied. The present quantitative effort on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations considers the lateral and longitudinal vibrations. An earlier study had considered the vertical vibration. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database is used. A physics based "maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)", derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, is used. Fundamentally, the lateral vibration data show high vibration levels (up to 0.3 g's) at low airspeeds (for example, during landing flares) and at high airspeeds (for example, during turns). The results show that the advance ratio and the gross weight together can predict the vertical and the longitudinal vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together cannot predict the lateral vibration. The hub accelerations and the advance ratio can be used to satisfactorily predict the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal vibration. The present study shows that neural network based representations of all three UH-60A pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) can be obtained using the hub accelerations along with the gross weight and the advance ratio. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot vibration. The present conclusions potentially allow for the identification of neural network relationships between the experimental hub accelerations obtained from wind tunnel testing and the experimental pilot vibration data obtained from flight testing. A successful establishment of the above neural network based link between the wind tunnel hub accelerations and the flight test vibration data can increase the value of wind tunnel testing.

  2. Accelerated Training for Large Feedforward Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepniewski, Slawomir W.; Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new training algorithm, the scaled variable metric (SVM) method. Our approach attempts to increase the convergence rate of the modified variable metric method. It is also combined with the RBackprop algorithm, which computes the product of the matrix of second derivatives (Hessian) with an arbitrary vector. The RBackprop method allows us to avoid computationally expensive, direct line searches. In addition, it can be utilized in the new, 'predictive' updating technique of the inverse Hessian approximation. We have used directional slope testing to adjust the step size and found that this strategy works exceptionally well in conjunction with the Rbackprop algorithm. Some supplementary, but nevertheless important enhancements to the basic training scheme such as improved setting of a scaling factor for the variable metric update and computationally more efficient procedure for updating the inverse Hessian approximation are presented as well. We summarize by comparing the SVM method with four first- and second- order optimization algorithms including a very effective implementation of the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Our tests indicate promising computational speed gains of the new training technique, particularly for large feedforward networks, i.e., for problems where the training process may be the most laborious.

  3. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    DOE PAGES

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies thatmore » important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.« less

  4. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  5. Linear induction accelerator and pulse forming networks therefor

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, Malcolm T.; Ginn, Jerry W.

    1989-01-01

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities.

  6. Electron mobility of self-assembled and dislocation free InN nanorods grown on GaN nano wall network template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; De, Arpan; Ghatak, Jay; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetically controlled two-step growth process for the formation of an array of dislocation free high mobility InN nanorods (NRs) on GaN nanowall network (NWN) by Molecular Beam Epitaxy is demonstrated here. The epitaxial GaN NWN is formed on c-sapphire under nitrogen rich conditions, and then changing the source from Ga to In at appropriate substrate temperature yields the nucleation of a self assembled spontaneous m-plane side faceted-InN NR. By HRTEM, the NRs are shown to be dislocation-free and have a low band gap value of 0.65 eV. Hall measurements are carried out on a single InN NR along with J-V measurements that yield mobility values as high as ≈4453 cm2/V s and the carrier concentration of ≈1.1 × 1017 cm-3, which are unprecedented in the literature for comparable InN NR diameters.

  7. An accelerated training method for back propagation networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective is to provide a training procedure for a feed forward, back propagation neural network which greatly accelerates the training process. A set of orthogonal singular vectors are determined from the input matrix such that the standard deviations of the projections of the input vectors along these singular vectors, as a set, are substantially maximized, thus providing an optimal means of presenting the input data. Novelty exists in the method of extracting from the set of input data, a set of features which can serve to represent the input data in a simplified manner, thus greatly reducing the time/expense to training the system.

  8. The ADVANCE network: accelerating data value across a national community health center network

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Gold, Rachel; Cottrell, Erika; Bauer, Vance; Brickman, Andrew; Puro, Jon; Nelson, Christine; Mayer, Kenneth H; Sears, Abigail; Burdick, Tim; Merrell, Jonathan; Matthews, Paul; Fields, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) clinical data research network (CDRN) is led by the OCHIN Community Health Information Network in partnership with Health Choice Network and Fenway Health. The ADVANCE CDRN will ‘horizontally’ integrate outpatient electronic health record data for over one million federally qualified health center patients, and ‘vertically’ integrate hospital, health plan, and community data for these patients, often under-represented in research studies. Patient investigators, community investigators, and academic investigators with diverse expertise will work together to meet project goals related to data integration, patient engagement and recruitment, and the development of streamlined regulatory policies. By enhancing the data and research infrastructure of participating organizations, the ADVANCE CDRN will serve as a ‘community laboratory’ for including disadvantaged and vulnerable patients in patient-centered outcomes research that is aligned with the priorities of patients, clinics, and communities in our network. PMID:24821740

  9. Accelerating Very Deep Convolutional Networks for Classification and Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Zou, Jianhua; He, Kaiming; Sun, Jian

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to accelerate the test-time computation of convolutional neural networks (CNNs), especially very deep CNNs [1] that have substantially impacted the computer vision community. Unlike previous methods that are designed for approximating linear filters or linear responses, our method takes the nonlinear units into account. We develop an effective solution to the resulting nonlinear optimization problem without the need of stochastic gradient descent (SGD). More importantly, while previous methods mainly focus on optimizing one or two layers, our nonlinear method enables an asymmetric reconstruction that reduces the rapidly accumulated error when multiple (e.g., ≥ 10) layers are approximated. For the widely used very deep VGG-16 model [1] , our method achieves a whole-model speedup of 4 × with merely a 0.3 percent increase of top-5 error in ImageNet classification. Our 4 × accelerated VGG-16 model also shows a graceful accuracy degradation for object detection when plugged into the Fast R-CNN detector [2] . PMID:26599615

  10. Accelerated Biofluid Filling in Complex Microfluidic Networks by Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM).

    PubMed

    Yu, Zeta Tak For; Cheung, Mei Ki; Liu, Shirley Xiaosu; Fu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    Rapid fluid transport and exchange are critical operations involved in many microfluidic applications. However, conventional mechanisms used for driving fluid transport in microfluidics, such as micropumping and high pressure, can be inaccurate and difficult for implementation for integrated microfluidics containing control components and closed compartments. Here, a technology has been developed termed Vacuum-Pressure Accelerated Movement (V-PAM) capable of significantly enhancing biofluid transport in complex microfluidic environments containing dead-end channels and closed chambers. Operation of the V-PAM entails a pressurized fluid loading into microfluidic channels where gas confined inside can rapidly be dissipated through permeation through a thin, gas-permeable membrane sandwiched between microfluidic channels and a network of vacuum channels. Effects of different structural and operational parameters of the V-PAM for promoting fluid filling in microfluidic environments have been studied systematically. This work further demonstrates the applicability of V-PAM for rapid filling of temperature-sensitive hydrogels and unprocessed whole blood into complex irregular microfluidic networks such as microfluidic leaf venation patterns and blood circulatory systems. Together, the V-PAM technology provides a promising generic microfluidic tool for advanced fluid control and transport in integrated microfluidics for different microfluidic diagnosis, organs-on-chips, and biomimetic studies. PMID:27409528

  11. Transport and optical properties of c-axis oriented wedge shaped GaN nanowall network grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bhasker, H. P.; Dhar, S.; Thakur, Varun; Kesaria, Manoj; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2014-02-21

    The transport and optical properties of wedge-shaped nanowall network of GaN grown spontaneously on cplane sapphire substrate by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (PAMBE) show interesting behavior. The electron mobility at room temperature in these samples is found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of a continuous film. Our study reveals a strong correlation between the mobility and the band gap in these nanowall network samples. However, it is seen that when the thickness of the tips of the walls increases to an extent such that more than 70% of the film area is covered, it behaves close to a flat sample. In the sample with lower surface coverage (≈40% and ≈60%), it was observed that the conductivity, mobility as well as the band gap increase with the decrease in the average tip width of the walls. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments show a strong and broad band edge emission with a large (as high as ≈ 90 meV) blue shift, compared to that of a continuous film, suggesting a confinement of carriers on the top edges of the nanowalls. The PL peak width remains wide at all temperatures suggesting the existence of a high density of tail states at the band edge, which is further supported by the photoconductivity result. The high conductivity and mobility observed in these samples is believed to be due to a “dissipation less” transport of carriers, which are localized at the top edges (edge states) of the nanowalls.

  12. Network effect of knowledge spillover: Scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    We study how knowledge spillover networks affect research and development (R&D) activities and economic growth. For this purpose, we extend a Schumpeterian growth model to the one on networks that depict the knowledge spillover relationships of R&D. We show that scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth.

  13. An adaptive cryptographic accelerator for network storage security on dynamically reconfigurable platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li; Liu, Jing-Ning; Feng, Dan; Tong, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Existing security solutions in network storage environment perform poorly because cryptographic operations (encryption and decryption) implemented in software can dramatically reduce system performance. In this paper we propose a cryptographic hardware accelerator on dynamically reconfigurable platform for the security of high performance network storage system. We employ a dynamic reconfigurable platform based on a FPGA to implement a PowerPCbased embedded system, which executes cryptographic algorithms. To reduce the reconfiguration latency, we apply prefetch scheduling. Moreover, the processing elements could be dynamically configured to support different cryptographic algorithms according to the request received by the accelerator. In the experiment, we have implemented AES (Rijndael) and 3DES cryptographic algorithms in the reconfigurable accelerator. Our proposed reconfigurable cryptographic accelerator could dramatically increase the performance comparing with the traditional software-based network storage systems.

  14. Neural Network Based Representation of UH-60A Pilot and Hub Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2000-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, experimental hub accelerations and the corresponding pilot floor vertical vibration are studied. The present physics-based, quantitative effort represents an initial systematic study on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database was used. A 'maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)', derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, was used. Three neural network based representation-cases were considered. The pilot floor vertical vibration was considered in the first case and the hub accelerations were separately considered in the second case. The third case considered both the hub accelerations and the pilot floor vertical vibration. Neither the advance ratio nor the gross weight alone could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration over the entire flight envelope. The hub accelerations data were modeled and found to be of very acceptable quality. The hub accelerations alone could not be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. Thus, the hub accelerations alone do not drive the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the hub accelerations, along with either the advance ratio or the gross weight or both, could be used to satisfactorily predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot floor vertical vibration.

  15. G-NetMon: a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; DeMar, Phil; Holmgren, Don; Singh, Amitoj; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    At Fermilab, we have prototyped a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system, called G-NetMon, to support large-scale scientific collaborations. In this work, we explore new opportunities in network traffic monitoring and analysis with GPUs. Our system exploits the data parallelism that exists within network flow data to provide fast analysis of bulk data movement between Fermilab and collaboration sites. Experiments demonstrate that our G-NetMon can rapidly detect sub-optimal bulk data movements.

  16. Real-time Optical Network for Accelerator Control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Keun

    2012-06-27

    The timing requirements of a modern accelerator complex call for several features. The first is a system for high precision relative timing among accelerator components. Stabilized fiber links have already been demonstrated to achieve sub-10 femtoseconds relative timing precision. The second is a system for timing distribution of absolute time with sufficient precision to identify a specific RF bucket. The White Rabbit technology is a promising candidate to deliver the absolute time that is linked to the GPS clock. In this study we demonstrated that these two technologies can be combined in a way that the absolute time information can be delivered to the stabilized fiber link system. This was accomplished by researching the design of the stabilized fiber and White Rabbit systems and devising adaptation modules that facilitate co-existence of both systems in the same FPGA environment. We built a prototype system using off-the-shelf products and implemented a proof-of-concept version of the FPGA firmware. The test verified that the White Rabbit features operate correctly under the stabilized fiber system environment. This work demonstrates that turn-key femtosecond timing systems with absolute time information can be built cost effectively and deployed in various accelerator environments. This will lead to many new applications in chemistry, biology and surface dynamics, to name a few.

  17. Neural network technique for orbit correction in accelerators/storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors are exploring the use of Neural Networks, using the SNNS simulator, for orbit control in accelerators (primarily circular accelerators) and storage rings. The orbit of the beam in those machines are measured by orbit monitors (input nodes) and controlled by orbit corrector magnets (output nodes). The physical behavior of an accelerator is changing slowly in time. Thus, an adoptive algorithm is necessary. The goal is to have a trained net which will predict the exact corrector strengths which will minimize a measured orbit. The relationship between {open_quotes}kick{close_quotes} from the correctors and {open_quotes}response{close_quotes} from the monitors is in general non-linear and may slowly change during long-term operation of the machine. In the study, several network architectures are examined as well as various training methods for each architecture.

  18. Effect of the accelerating growth of communications networks on their structure.

    PubMed

    Dorogovtsev, S N; Mendes, J F

    2001-02-01

    Motivated by data on the evolution of the Internet and World Wide Web we consider scenarios of self-organization of nonlinearly growing networks into free-scale structures. We find that the accelerating growth of networks establishes their structure. For growing networks with preferential linking and increasing density of links, two scenarios are possible. In one of them, the value of the exponent gamma of the distribution of the number of incoming links is between 3/2 and 2. In the other scenario, gamma>2 and the distribution is necessarily nonstationary.

  19. Wafer-scale epitaxial lift-off of optoelectronic grade GaN from a GaN substrate using a sacrificial ZnO interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Akhil; Rogers, David J.; Ton-That, Cuong; Zhu, Liangchen; Phillips, Matthew R.; Sundaram, Suresh; Gautier, Simon; Moudakir, Tarik; El-Gmili, Youssef; Ougazzaden, Abdallah; Sandana, Vinod E.; Teherani, Ferechteh H.; Bove, Philippe; Prior, Kevin A.; Djebbour, Zakaria; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-08-01

    Full 2 inch GaN epilayers were lifted off GaN and c-sapphire substrates by preferential chemical dissolution of sacrificial ZnO underlayers. Modification of the standard epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process by supporting the wax host with a glass substrate proved key in enabling full wafer scale-up. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction confirmed that intact epitaxial GaN had been transferred to the glass host. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of the bottom surface of the lifted-off GaN layer revealed strong near-band-edge (3.33 eV) emission indicating a superior optical quality for the GaN which was lifted off the GaN substrate. This modified ELO approach demonstrates that previous theories proposing that wax host curling was necessary to keep the ELO etch channel open do not apply to the GaN/ZnO system. The unprecedented full wafer transfer of epitaxial GaN to an alternative support by ELO offers the perspective of accelerating industrial adoption of the expensive GaN substrate through cost-reducing recycling.

  20. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves. PMID:23155997

  1. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves.

  2. Estimation of Respiration Rate from Three-Dimensional Acceleration Data Based on Body Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guan-Zheng; Guo, Yan-Wei; Zhu, Qing-Song; Huang, Bang-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory monitoring is widely used in clinical and healthcare practice to detect abnormal cardiopulmonary function during ordinary and routine activities. There are several approaches to estimate respiratory rate, including accelerometer(s) worn on the torso that are capable of sensing the inclination changes due to breathing. In this article, we present an adaptive band-pass filtering method combined with principal component analysis to derive the respiratory rate from three-dimensional acceleration data, using a body sensor network platform previously developed by us. In situ experiments with 12 subjects indicated that our method was capable of offering dynamic respiration rate estimation during various body activities such as sitting, walking, running, and sleeping. The experimental studies also suggested that our frequency spectrum-based method was more robust, resilient to motion artifact, and therefore outperformed those algorithms primarily based on spatial acceleration information. PMID:22035321

  3. Feasibility of Using Neural Network Models to Accelerate the Testing of Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Verification testing is an important aspect of the design process for mechanical mechanisms, and full-scale, full-length life testing is typically used to qualify any new component for use in space. However, as the required life specification is increased, full-length life tests become more costly and lengthen the development time. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, we theorized that neural network systems may be able to model the operation of a mechanical device. If so, the resulting neural network models could simulate long-term mechanical testing with data from a short-term test. This combination of computer modeling and short-term mechanical testing could then be used to verify the reliability of mechanical systems, thereby eliminating the costs associated with long-term testing. Neural network models could also enable designers to predict the performance of mechanisms at the conceptual design stage by entering the critical parameters as input and running the model to predict performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of using neural networks to predict the performance and life of mechanical systems. To do this, we generated a neural network system to model wear obtained from three accelerated testing devices: 1) A pin-on-disk tribometer; 2) A line-contact rub-shoe tribometer; 3) A four-ball tribometer.

  4. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  5. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  6. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors.

  7. GPU technology as a platform for accelerating physiological systems modeling based on Laguerre-Volterra networks.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Agathoklis; Kostoglou, Kyriaki; Mitsis, Georgios D; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    The use of a GPGPU programming paradigm (running CUDA-enabled algorithms on GPU cards) in biomedical engineering and biology-related applications have shown promising results. GPU acceleration can be used to speedup computation-intensive models, such as the mathematical modeling of biological systems, which often requires the use of nonlinear modeling approaches with a large number of free parameters. In this context, we developed a CUDA-enabled version of a model which implements a nonlinear identification approach that combines basis expansions and polynomial-type networks, termed Laguerre-Volterra networks and can be used in diverse biological applications. The proposed software implementation uses the GPGPU programming paradigm to take advantage of the inherent parallel characteristics of the aforementioned modeling approach to execute the calculations on the GPU card of the host computer system. The initial results of the GPU-based model presented in this work, show performance improvements over the original MATLAB model. PMID:26736993

  8. Accelerated intoxication of GABAergic synapses by botulinum neurotoxin A disinhibits stem cell-derived neuron networks prior to network silencing

    PubMed Central

    Beske, Phillip H.; Scheeler, Stephen M.; Adler, Michael; McNutt, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that specifically cleave SNARE proteins in peripheral synapses, preventing neurotransmitter release. Neuronal responses to BoNT intoxication are traditionally studied by quantifying SNARE protein cleavage in vitro or monitoring physiological paralysis in vivo. Consequently, the dynamic effects of intoxication on synaptic behaviors are not well-understood. We have reported that mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) are highly sensitive to BoNT based on molecular readouts of intoxication. Here we study the time-dependent changes in synapse- and network-level behaviors following addition of BoNT/A to spontaneously active networks of glutamatergic and GABAergic ESNs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings indicated that BoNT/A rapidly blocked synaptic neurotransmission, confirming that ESNs replicate the functional pathophysiology responsible for clinical botulism. Quantitation of spontaneous neurotransmission in pharmacologically isolated synapses revealed accelerated silencing of GABAergic synapses compared to glutamatergic synapses, which was consistent with the selective accumulation of cleaved SNAP-25 at GAD1+ pre-synaptic terminals at early timepoints. Different latencies of intoxication resulted in complex network responses to BoNT/A addition, involving rapid disinhibition of stochastic firing followed by network silencing. Synaptic activity was found to be highly sensitive to SNAP-25 cleavage, reflecting the functional consequences of the localized cleavage of the small subpopulation of SNAP-25 that is engaged in neurotransmitter release in the nerve terminal. Collectively these findings illustrate that use of synaptic function assays in networked neurons cultures offers a novel and highly sensitive approach for mechanistic studies of toxin:neuron interactions and synaptic responses to BoNT. PMID:25954159

  9. Evolution on neutral networks accelerates the ticking rate of the molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Manrubia, Susanna; Cuesta, José A

    2015-01-01

    Large sets of genotypes give rise to the same phenotype, because phenotypic expression is highly redundant. Accordingly, a population can accept mutations without altering its phenotype, as long as the genotype mutates into another one on the same set. By linking every pair of genotypes that are mutually accessible through mutation, genotypes organize themselves into neutral networks (NNs). These networks are known to be heterogeneous and assortative, and these properties affect the evolutionary dynamics of the population. By studying the dynamics of populations on NNs with arbitrary topology, we analyse the effect of assortativity, of NN (phenotype) fitness and of network size. We find that the probability that the population leaves the network is smaller the longer the time spent on it. This progressive 'phenotypic entrapment' entails a systematic increase in the overdispersion of the process with time and an acceleration in the fixation rate of neutral mutations. We also quantify the variation of these effects with the size of the phenotype and with its fitness relative to that of neighbouring alternatives.

  10. Roma Gans: Still Writing at 95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Joanna

    1991-01-01

    Recounts discussions with reading educator Roma Gans over a 25-year period. Presents Gans' views about reading, teachers, her family, and her years at Teachers College, Columbia. Notes that Gans has seen the teaching of reading come full circle since her first teaching assignment in 1919. (RS)

  11. G-NetMon: A GPU-accelerated Network Performance Monitoring System for Large Scale Scientific Collaborations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; DeMar, Phil; Holmgren, Don; Singh, Amitoj; Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    At Fermilab, we have prototyped a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system, called G-NetMon, to support large-scale scientific collaborations. Our system exploits the data parallelism that exists within network flow data to provide fast analysis of bulk data movement between Fermilab and collaboration sites. Experiments demonstrate that our G-NetMon can rapidly detect sub-optimal bulk data movements.

  12. Genomic and network patterns of schizophrenia genetic variation in human evolutionary accelerated regions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E; Pollard, Katherine S; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T

    2015-05-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia.

  13. Ghrelin accelerates synapse formation and activity development in cultured cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While ghrelin was initially related to appetite stimulation and growth hormone secretion, it also has a neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases and regulates cognitive function. The cellular basis of those processes is related to synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Previous studies have shown that ghrelin not only stimulates synapse formation in cultured cortical neurons and hippocampal slices, but also alters some of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the hypothalamus, amygdala and other subcortical areas. However, direct evidence for ghrelin’s ability to modulate the activity in cortical neurons is not available yet. In this study, we investigated the effect of acylated ghrelin on the development of the activity level and activity patterns in cortical neurons, in relation to its effect on synaptogenesis. Additionally, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of the receptor for acylated ghrelin – growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a) during development. Results We performed electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry on dissociated cortical cultures from neonates, treated chronically with acylated ghrelin. On average 76 ± 4.6% of the cortical neurons expressed GHSR-1a. Synapse density was found to be much higher in ghrelin treated cultures than in controls across all age groups (1, 2 or 3 weeks). In all cultures (control and ghrelin treated), network activity gradually increased until it reached a maximum after approximately 3 weeks, followed by a slight decrease towards a plateau. During early developmental stages (1–2 weeks), the activity was much higher in ghrelin treated cultures and consequently, they reached the plateau value almost a week earlier than controls. Conclusions Acylated ghrelin leads to earlier network formation and activation in cultured cortical neuronal networks, the latter being a possibly consequence of accelerated synaptogenesis. PMID:24742241

  14. Oxygen in GaN.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, Chris G.; Neugebauer, Jörg

    1997-03-01

    Oxygen is commonly present during epitaxial growth of GaN. We have proposed that unintentional incorporation of O, as well as Si, is responsible for the frequently observed n-type conductivity in as-grown GaN. Here we present results from comprehensive density-functional-pseudopotential studies of GaN:O under pressure, and of O interactions with native defects and dopant impurities. We find that the O donor undergoes a DX-like transition under pressure: a large outward relaxation introduces a deep level in the band gap. This behavior explains the carrier freezeout in GaN under pressure.^1 Si donors do not exhibit the transition, consistent with experiment. Results for these impurities in AlGaN will also be discussed. We have also investigated the interaction between O and native defects. Most notably we find a large binding energy between O and the gallium vacancy (V_Ga), which we have proposed to be the source of the yellow luminescence. Finally, we have studied the interaction between O and Mg acceptors. The incorporation of the O donor is significantly enhanced in Mg-doped material. In addition, we calculate a binding energy of 0.6 eV for Mg-O complexes. The presence of O during growth can thus be detrimental to p-type GaN. ^1 C. Wetzel et al., Proc. ICPS-23 (World Scientific, Singapore, 1996), p. 2929.

  15. SU-E-T-52: Beam Data Comparison for 20 Linear Accelerators in One Network

    SciTech Connect

    LoSasso, T; Lim, S; Tang, G; Chan, M; Li, J; Obcemea, C; Song, Y; Ma, R; Yang, G; Xiong, W; Huang, D; Burman, C; Mechalakos, J; Hunt, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare photon beam data for the 20 Varian linear accelerators (TrueBeam, iX, and EX models) in use at five centers in the same network with the intent to model with one set of beam data in Eclipsec. Methods: Varian linear accelerators, TrueBeam (3), 21 EX, iX, and Trilogy (14), and 6 EX (3), installed between 1999 and 2014 have their 6 MV and 15 MV x-ray beams reevaluated. Full commissioning, including output factors (St), percent depth doses (PDD), and off-axis profiles, was recently performed for a TrueBeam with a cc04 ion chamber in an IBA Blue phantom. Similarly, a subset of beam data for each of the other accelerators was measured recently as follows: for 3×3, 10×10, and 30×30 cm{sup 2} field sizes, flatness and penumbra (80–20%) were measured at dmax and 10 cm depths, PDD were measured at 10 and 20 cm depths, and St were measured at 5 cm depth. Measurement results for all machines were compared. Results: For 15 high-energy (6 and 15 MV) and 3 low-energy machines (6MV only): 1) PDD agreed within 1.4% at 10 and 20 cm depths; 2) penumbra agreed within 1.0 mm at dmax and 10 cm depths; 3) flatness was within 1.3% at dmax and 10 cm depths; and 4) with exception of the three low energy machines, output factors were within 1.1% and 0.5% for 3×3 and 30×30 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Measurement uncertainty, not quantified here, accounts for some of these differences. Conclusion: Measured beam data from 15 high-energy Varian linacs are consistent enough that they can be classified using one beam data set in Eclipse. Two additional high-energy machines are removed from this group until their data are further confirmed. Three low-energy machines will be in a separate class based upon differences in output factors (St)

  16. Accelerating the development of an AIDS vaccine: the AIDS vaccine for Asia Network (Avan).

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Chiu, Joseph; Kim, Jerome; Benenson, Michael; Kent, Stephen J; Tamashiro, Hiko; Manrique, Amapola; Bernstein, Alan; Goyal, Rajat; Ditangco, Rossana A; Cooper, David A; Osmanov, Saladin; Mathieson, Bonnie; Sandstrom, Eric; Esparza, Jose; Hoff, Rodney; Shao, Yiming

    2011-09-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major public health problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. The development of a safe and effective HIV vaccine is central to stopping the epidemic and would be a great public health tool. The AIDS Vaccine for Asia Network (AVAN) is a group of concerned investigators committed to assisting regional and global HIV vaccine efforts. AVAN's focus on improving the coordination and harmonization of research, ethical reviews, clinical trial capacity, regulatory frameworks, vaccine manufacturing, community participation, and government advocacy could help accelerate HIV vaccine efforts in the region. At a meeting in November 2010, researchers from various countries in Asia presented their progress in HIV vaccine research and development. Six working groups discussed the current status, gaps and methods to strengthen capacity and infrastructure in various areas related to AIDS vaccine research and development. These discussions led to the development of prioritized action plans for the next 5 years. This report describes the gaps and challenges HIV vaccine research faces in the region and recommends improvement and standardization of facilities, and coordination and harmonization of all activities related to AIDS vaccine research and development, including possible technology transfer when a vaccine becomes available.

  17. Kinetics of optically excited charge carriers at the GaN surface: Influence of catalytic Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Winnerl, Andrea Pereira, Rui N.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2015-10-21

    In this work, we use GaN with different deposited Pt nanostructures as a controllable model system to investigate the kinetics of photo-generated charge carriers in hybrid photocatalysts. We combine conductance and contact potential difference measurements to investigate the influence of Pt on the processes involved in the capture and decay of photo-generated charge carriers at and close to the GaN surface. We found that in the presence of Pt nanostructures the photo-excitation processes are similar to those found in Pt free GaN. However, in GaN with Pt nanostructures, photo-generated holes are preferentially trapped in surface states of the GaN covered with Pt and/or in electronic states of the Pt and lead to an accumulation of positive charge there, whereas negative charge is accumulated in localized states in a shallow defect band of the GaN covered with Pt. This preferential accumulation of photo-generated electrons close to the surface is responsible for a dramatic acceleration of the turn-off charge transfer kinetics and a stronger dependence of the surface photovoltage on light intensity when compared to a Pt free GaN surface. Our study shows that in hybrid photocatalysts, the metal nanostructures induce a spatially inhomogeneous surface band bending of the semiconductor that promotes a lateral drift of photogenerated charges towards the catalytic nanostructures.

  18. Anelasticity of GaN Epitaxial Layer in GaN LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. C.; Yang, C. T.; Liu, C. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the anelasticity of the GaN layer in the GaN light-emitting-diode device was studied. The present results show that the forward-voltage of GaN LED increases with time, as the GaN light-emitting-diode was maintained at a constant temperature of 100 °C. We found that the increase of the forward-voltage with time attributes to the delay-response of the piezoelectric fields (internal electrical fields in GaN LED device). And, the delay-response of the internal electrical fields with time is caused by the anelasticity (time-dependent strain) of the GaN layer. Therefore, using the correlation of strain-piezoelectric-forward voltage, a plot of thermal strain of the GaN layer against time can be obtained by measuring the forward-voltage of the studied GaN LED against time. With the curves of the thermal strain of GaN epi-layers versus time, the anelasticity of the GaN compound can be studied. The key anelasticity parameter, characteristic relaxation time, of the GaN is defined to be 2623.76 min in this work.

  19. GaN High Power Devices

    SciTech Connect

    PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHI,G.C.; CHU,S.N.G.

    2000-07-17

    A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers, GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors, GaN heterostructure and metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.

  20. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Brain Network Connectivity Maintains Cognition across the Lifespan Despite Accelerated Decay of Regional Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Richard N.A.; Tyler, Lorraine K.; Razi, Adeel; Geerligs, Linda; Ham, Timothy E.; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of wellbeing across the lifespan depends on the preservation of cognitive function. We propose that successful cognitive aging is determined by interactions both within and between large-scale functional brain networks. Such connectivity can be estimated from task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), also known as resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI). However, common correlational methods are confounded by age-related changes in the neurovascular signaling. To estimate network interactions at the neuronal rather than vascular level, we used generative models that specified both the neural interactions and a flexible neurovascular forward model. The networks' parameters were optimized to explain the spectral dynamics of rs-fMRI data in 602 healthy human adults from population-based cohorts who were approximately uniformly distributed between 18 and 88 years (www.cam-can.com). We assessed directed connectivity within and between three key large-scale networks: the salience network, dorsal attention network, and default mode network. We found that age influences connectivity both within and between these networks, over and above the effects on neurovascular coupling. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that the relationship between network connectivity and cognitive function was age-dependent: cognitive performance relied on neural dynamics more strongly in older adults. These effects were driven partly by reduced stability of neural activity within all networks, as expressed by an accelerated decay of neural information. Our findings suggest that the balance of excitatory connectivity between networks, and the stability of intrinsic neural representations within networks, changes with age. The cognitive function of older adults becomes increasingly dependent on these factors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintaining cognitive function is critical to successful aging. To study the neural basis of cognitive function across the lifespan, we studied a

  1. Polar properties of a hexagonally bonded GaN sheet under biaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yanlin; Yayama, Tomoe; Okada, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    Using the density functional theory, we study the geometric and electronic structures of a GaN sheet possessing a honeycomb network. The sheet preserves the planar conformation under an equilibrium lattice constant of 3.2 Å, and has a semiconducting electronic structure with an indirect band gap of 2.28 eV. The biaxial compressive strain causes structural buckling, leading to polarization normal to the atomic layer. An external electric field normal to the layer also induces structural buckling with a height proportional to the field strength. The polarity of the buckled GaN sheet is tunable by attaching H atoms on Ga and N atoms.

  2. A high efficiency C-band internally-matched harmonic tuning GaN power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Zhao, B. C.; Zheng, J. X.; Zhang, H. S.; Zheng, X. F.; Ma, X. H.; Hao, Y.; Ma, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high efficiency C-band gallium nitride (GaN) internally-matched power amplifier (PA) is presented. This amplifier consists of 2-chips of self-developed GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with 16 mm total gate width on SiC substrate. New harmonic manipulation circuits are induced both in the input and output matching networks for high efficiency matching at fundamental and 2nd-harmonic frequency, respectively. The developed amplifier has achieved 72.1% power added efficiency (PAE) with 107.4 W output power at 5 GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this amplifier exhibits the highest PAE in C-band GaN HEMT amplifiers with over 100 W output power. Additionally, 1000 hours' aging test reveals high reliability for practical applications.

  3. A Method of Social Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing Acceleration for e-Learning System: The Distance Learning Network Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różewski, Przemysław

    Nowadays, e-learning systems take the form of the Distance Learning Network (DLN) due to widespread use and accessibility of the Internet and networked e-learning services. The focal point of the DLN performance is efficiency of knowledge processing in asynchronous learning mode and facilitating cooperation between students. In addition, the DLN articulates attention to social aspects of the learning process as well. In this paper, a method for the DLN development is proposed. The main research objectives for the proposed method are the processes of acceleration of social collaboration and knowledge sharing in the DLN. The method introduces knowledge-disposed agents (who represent students in educational scenarios) that form a network of individuals aimed to increase their competence. For every agent the competence expansion process is formulated. Based on that outcome the process of dynamic network formation performed on the social and knowledge levels. The method utilizes formal apparatuses of competence set and network game theories combined with an agent system-based approach.

  4. Mechanical properties of nanoporous GaN and its application for separation and transfer of GaN thin films.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shanjin; Zhang, Yu; Leung, Benjamin; Yuan, Ge; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Hao; Fan, Yingmin; Sun, Qian; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke; Han, Jung

    2013-11-13

    Nanoporous (NP) gallium nitride (GaN) as a new class of GaN material has many interesting properties that the conventional GaN material does not have. In this paper, we focus on the mechanical properties of NP GaN, and the detailed physical mechanism of porous GaN in the application of liftoff. A decrease in elastic modulus and hardness was identified in NP GaN compared to the conventional GaN film. The promising application of NP GaN as release layers in the mechanical liftoff of GaN thin films and devices was systematically studied. A phase diagram was generated to correlate the initial NP GaN profiles with the as-overgrown morphologies of the NP structures. The fracture toughness of the NP GaN release layer was studied in terms of the voided-space-ratio. It is shown that the transformed morphologies and fracture toughness of the NP GaN layer after overgrowth strongly depends on the initial porosity of NP GaN templates. The mechanical separation and transfer of a GaN film over a 2 in. wafer was demonstrated, which proves that this technique is useful in practical applications.

  5. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in GaN nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chi-Yuan; Chia, Chih-Ta; Chen, Hung-Ying; Gwo, Shangjr; Lin, Kung-Hsuan

    2014-11-24

    We present ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy on GaN nanorods at room temperature. The studied GaN nanorods, with diameters of ∼50 nm and lengths of ∼400 nm, were grown on the silicon substrate. After femtosecond optical pulses excited carriers in the GaN nanorods, the carriers thermalized within a few picoseconds. Subsequently, the electrons are trapped by the surface states on the order of 20 ps. After the surface electric field was reformed in the GaN nanorods, we found the lifetime of the residue carriers in GaN nanorods is longer than 1.7 ns at room temperature, while the lifetime of carriers in GaN thin film is typically a few hundred picoseconds. Our findings indicate that GaN nanorods have higher electrical quality compared with GaN thin film.

  6. Accelerated growth in outgoing links in evolving networks: deterministic versus stochastic picture.

    PubMed

    Sen, Parongama

    2004-04-01

    In several real-world networks such as the Internet, World Wide Web, etc., the number of links grow in time in a nonlinear fashion. We consider growing networks in which the number of outgoing links is a nonlinear function of time but new links between older nodes are forbidden. The attachments are made using a preferential attachment scheme. In the deterministic picture, the number of outgoing links m (t) at any time t is taken as N (t)(theta) where N (t) is the number of nodes present at that time. The continuum theory predicts a power-law decay of the degree distribution: P (k) proportional to k-(1-2/ (1-theta ) ), while the degree of the node introduced at time t(i) is given by k(t(i),t)=t(theta)(i) [t/t(i) ]((1+theta)/2) when the network is evolved till time t. Numerical results show a growth in the degree distribution for small k values at any nonzero theta. In the stochastic picture, m (t) is a random variable. As long as is independent of time, the network shows a behavior similar to the Barabási-Albert (BA) model. Different results are obtained when is time dependent, e.g., when m (t) follows a distribution P (m) proportional to m(-lambda). The behavior of P (k) changes significantly as lambda is varied: for lambda>3, the network has a scale-free distribution belonging to the BA class as predicted by the mean field theory; for smaller values of lambda it shows different behavior. Characteristic features of the clustering coefficients in both models have also been discussed.

  7. Accelerated growth in outgoing links in evolving networks:Deterministic versus stochastic picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Parongama

    2004-04-01

    In several real-world networks such as the Internet, World Wide Web, etc., the number of links grow in time in a nonlinear fashion. We consider growing networks in which the number of outgoing links is a nonlinear function of time but new links between older nodes are forbidden. The attachments are made using a preferential attachment scheme. In the deterministic picture, the number of outgoing links m (t) at any time t is taken as N (t)θ where N (t) is the number of nodes present at that time. The continuum theory predicts a power-law decay of the degree distribution: P (k) ∝ k-1-2/ ( 1-θ ) , while the degree of the node introduced at time ti is given by k(ti,t)=tθi [t/ ti ](1+θ)/2 when the network is evolved till time t . Numerical results show a growth in the degree distribution for small k values at any nonzero θ . In the stochastic picture, m (t) is a random variable. As long as < m (t) > is independent of time, the network shows a behavior similar to the Barabási-Albert (BA) model. Different results are obtained when < m (t) > is time dependent, e.g., when m (t) follows a distribution P (m) ∝ m-λ . The behavior of P (k) changes significantly as λ is varied: for λ>3 , the network has a scale-free distribution belonging to the BA class as predicted by the mean field theory; for smaller values of λ it shows different behavior. Characteristic features of the clustering coefficients in both models have also been discussed.

  8. Neural Network Models of Simple Mechanical Systems Illustrating the Feasibility of Accelerated Life Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Jones, Steven P.; Jansen, Ralph

    1996-01-01

    A complete evaluation of the tribological characteristics of a given material/mechanical system is a time-consuming operation since the friction and wear process is extremely systems sensitive. As a result, experimental designs (i.e., Latin Square, Taguchi) have been implemented in an attempt to not only reduce the total number of experimental combinations needed to fully characterize a material/mechanical system, but also to acquire life data for a system without having to perform an actual life test. Unfortunately, these experimental designs still require a great deal of experimental testing and the output does not always produce meaningful information. In order to further reduce the amount of experimental testing required, this study employs a computer neural network model to investigate different material/mechanical systems. The work focuses on the modeling of the wear behavior, while showing the feasibility of using neural networks to predict life data. The model is capable of defining which input variables will influence the tribological behavior of the particular material/mechanical system being studied based on the specifications of the overall system.

  9. Piezotronic Effect in Polarity-Controlled GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenfu; Pu, Xiong; Han, Changbao; Du, Chunhua; Li, Linxuan; Jiang, Chunyan; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-08-25

    Using high-quality and polarity-controlled GaN nanowires (NWs), we studied the piezotronic effect in crystal orientation defined wurtzite structures. By applying a normal compressive force on c-plane GaN NWs with an atomic force microscopy tip, the Schottky barrier between the Pt tip and GaN can be effectively tuned by the piezotronic effect. In contrast, the normal compressive force cannot change the electron transport characteristics in m-plane GaN NWs whose piezoelectric polarization axis is turned in the transverse direction. This observation provided solid evidence for clarifying the difference between the piezotronic effect and the piezoresistive effect. We further demonstrated a high sensitivity of the m-plane GaN piezotronic transistor to collect the transverse force. The integration of c-plane GaN and m-plane GaN indicates an overall response to an external force in any direction.

  10. A GPU-accelerated cortical neural network model for visually guided robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Michael; Oros, Nicolas; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Humans and other terrestrial animals use vision to traverse novel cluttered environments with apparent ease. On one hand, although much is known about the behavioral dynamics of steering in humans, it remains unclear how relevant perceptual variables might be represented in the brain. On the other hand, although a wealth of data exists about the neural circuitry that is concerned with the perception of self-motion variables such as the current direction of travel, little research has been devoted to investigating how this neural circuitry may relate to active steering control. Here we present a cortical neural network model for visually guided navigation that has been embodied on a physical robot exploring a real-world environment. The model includes a rate based motion energy model for area V1, and a spiking neural network model for cortical area MT. The model generates a cortical representation of optic flow, determines the position of objects based on motion discontinuities, and combines these signals with the representation of a goal location to produce motor commands that successfully steer the robot around obstacles toward the goal. The model produces robot trajectories that closely match human behavioral data. This study demonstrates how neural signals in a model of cortical area MT might provide sufficient motion information to steer a physical robot on human-like paths around obstacles in a real-world environment, and exemplifies the importance of embodiment, as behavior is deeply coupled not only with the underlying model of brain function, but also with the anatomical constraints of the physical body it controls. PMID:26494281

  11. A GPU-accelerated cortical neural network model for visually guided robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Michael; Oros, Nicolas; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Humans and other terrestrial animals use vision to traverse novel cluttered environments with apparent ease. On one hand, although much is known about the behavioral dynamics of steering in humans, it remains unclear how relevant perceptual variables might be represented in the brain. On the other hand, although a wealth of data exists about the neural circuitry that is concerned with the perception of self-motion variables such as the current direction of travel, little research has been devoted to investigating how this neural circuitry may relate to active steering control. Here we present a cortical neural network model for visually guided navigation that has been embodied on a physical robot exploring a real-world environment. The model includes a rate based motion energy model for area V1, and a spiking neural network model for cortical area MT. The model generates a cortical representation of optic flow, determines the position of objects based on motion discontinuities, and combines these signals with the representation of a goal location to produce motor commands that successfully steer the robot around obstacles toward the goal. The model produces robot trajectories that closely match human behavioral data. This study demonstrates how neural signals in a model of cortical area MT might provide sufficient motion information to steer a physical robot on human-like paths around obstacles in a real-world environment, and exemplifies the importance of embodiment, as behavior is deeply coupled not only with the underlying model of brain function, but also with the anatomical constraints of the physical body it controls.

  12. GaN based nanorods for solid state lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shunfeng; Waag, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, GaN nanorods are emerging as a very promising novel route toward devices for nano-optoelectronics and nano-photonics. In particular, core-shell light emitting devices are thought to be a breakthrough development in solid state lighting, nanorod based LEDs have many potential advantages as compared to their 2 D thin film counterparts. In this paper, we review the recent developments of GaN nanorod growth, characterization, and related device applications based on GaN nanorods. The initial work on GaN nanorod growth focused on catalyst-assisted and catalyst-free statistical growth. The growth condition and growth mechanisms were extensively investigated and discussed. Doping of GaN nanorods, especially p-doping, was found to significantly influence the morphology of GaN nanorods. The large surface of 3 D GaN nanorods induces new optical and electrical properties, which normally can be neglected in layered structures. Recently, more controlled selective area growth of GaN nanorods was realized using patterned substrates both by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Advanced structures, for example, photonic crystals and DBRs are meanwhile integrated in GaN nanorod structures. Based on the work of growth and characterization of GaN nanorods, GaN nanoLEDs were reported by several groups with different growth and processing methods. Core/shell nanoLED structures were also demonstrated, which could be potentially useful for future high efficient LED structures. In this paper, we will discuss recent developments in GaN nanorod technology, focusing on the potential advantages, but also discussing problems and open questions, which may impose obstacles during the future development of a GaN nanorod based LED technology.

  13. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  14. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  15. Nanoscale anisotropic plastic deformation in single crystal GaN.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Xu, Ke; Fan, Ying Min; Niu, Mu Tong; Zeng, Xiong Hui; Wang, Jian Feng; Yang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Elasto-plastic mechanical deformation behaviors of c-plane (0001) and nonpolar GaN single crystals are studied using nanoindentation, cathodoluminescence, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanoindentation tests show that c-plane GaN is less susceptible to plastic deformation and has higher hardness and Young's modulus than the nonpolar GaN. Cathodoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy characterizations of indent-induced plastic deformation reveal that there are two primary slip systems for the c-plane GaN, while there is only one most favorable slip system for the nonplane GaN. We suggest that the anisotropic elasto-plastic mechanical properties of GaN are relative to its anisotropic plastic deformation behavior.PACS: 62.20.fq; 81.05.Ea; 61.72.Lk.

  16. Improved Strain-Free GaN Growth with a Nearly Lattice-Matched AlInN Interlayer by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae Su; Jeong, Hyun; Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Yong Seok; Park, Ah Hyun; Kim, Hun; Jea Lee, Kang; Suh, Eun-Kyung

    2010-11-01

    Using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, a strain-free GaN layer has been successfully grown by employing a 40-nm-thick nearly lattice-matched (NLM) Al1-xInxN as an interlayer. The Al1-xInxN interlayers having an InN molar fraction of x˜0.11 and 0.13 led to crack-networking at the GaN surface due to excessive tensile strain by lattice-mismatching. In the case of the GaN layer with a NLM Al1-xInxN interlayer (x˜0.18), however, strain-free GaN structure with improved structural and optical properties was demonstrated from the results of atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence. By using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the origin on strain-free state and improved properties of the GaN layer with the NLM AlInN interlayer was investigated. Based on TEM observations, we suggest that the faulted zone-like growth mechanism on roughed AlInN surface and partial compensation of tensile thermal stress are major factors on the improved strain-free GaN film.

  17. Improvement of optical quality of semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN on m-plane sapphire by in-situ epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monavarian, Morteza; Izyumskaya, Natalia; Müller, Marcus; Metzner, Sebastian; Veit, Peter; Can, Nuri; Das, Saikat; Özgür, Ümit; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Morkoç, Hadis; Avrutin, Vitaliy

    2016-04-01

    Among the major obstacles for development of non-polar and semipolar GaN structures on foreign substrates are stacking faults which deteriorate the structural and optical quality of the material. In this work, an in-situ SiNx nano-network has been employed to achieve high quality heteroepitaxial semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN on m-plane sapphire with reduced stacking fault density. This approach involves in-situ deposition of a porous SiNx interlayer on GaN that serves as a nano-mask for the subsequent growth, which starts in the nanometer-sized pores (window regions) and then progresses laterally as well, as in the case of conventional epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO). The inserted SiNx nano-mask effectively prevents the propagation of defects, such as dislocations and stacking faults, in the growth direction and thus reduces their density in the overgrown layers. The resulting semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN layers exhibit relatively smooth surface morphology and improved optical properties (PL intensity enhanced by a factor of 5 and carrier lifetimes by 35% to 85% compared to the reference semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN layer) which approach to those of the c-plane in-situ nano-ELO GaN reference and, therefore, holds promise for light emitting and detecting devices.

  18. Self-catalyzed anisotropic growth of GaN spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsha, Avinash; Sahoo, Prasana; Dhara, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    GaN spirals with homogeneous size are grown using chemical-vapor-deposition technique in a self catalytic process. Raman and photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal wurtzite GaN phase. Nucleation of GaN sphere takes place with the agglomeration Ga clusters and simultaneous reaction with NH3. A growth mechanism involving diffusion limited aggregation process initiating supersaturation and subsequent neck formation along with possible role of thermodynamic fluctuation in different crystalline facets of GaN, is described for the anisotropic spiral structures. Temperature dependent PL spectra show strong excitonic emissions along with the presence of free-to-bound transition.

  19. Later Leaders in Education: Roma Gans--Teacher of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almy, Millie

    1990-01-01

    Retired teacher Roma Gans is described in terms of her early life and education, early teaching experience, teaching experience at Teachers College, publishing experience, citizenship, and retirement. (DG)

  20. Dislocation filtering in GaN nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Colby, Robert; Liang, Zhiwen; Wildeson, Isaac H; Ewoldt, David A; Sands, Timothy D; García, R Edwin; Stach, Eric A

    2010-05-12

    Dislocation filtering in GaN by selective area growth through a nanoporous template is examined both by transmission electron microscopy and numerical modeling. These nanorods grow epitaxially from the (0001)-oriented GaN underlayer through the approximately 100 nm thick template and naturally terminate with hexagonal pyramid-shaped caps. It is demonstrated that for a certain window of geometric parameters a threading dislocation growing within a GaN nanorod is likely to be excluded by the strong image forces of the nearby free surfaces. Approximately 3000 nanorods were examined in cross-section, including growth through 50 and 80 nm diameter pores. The very few threading dislocations not filtered by the template turn toward a free surface within the nanorod, exiting less than 50 nm past the base of the template. The potential active region for light-emitting diode devices based on these nanorods would have been entirely free of threading dislocations for all samples examined. A greater than 2 orders of magnitude reduction in threading dislocation density can be surmised from a data set of this size. A finite element-based implementation of the eigenstrain model was employed to corroborate the experimentally observed data and examine a larger range of potential nanorod geometries, providing a simple map of the different regimes of dislocation filtering for this class of GaN nanorods. These results indicate that nanostructured semiconductor materials are effective at eliminating deleterious extended defects, as necessary to enhance the optoelectronic performance and device lifetimes compared to conventional planar heterostructures. PMID:20397703

  1. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) method for measurements of soil moisture in cropped fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. This study evaluates the applicability of the Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for integral quantification of seasonal soil moisture in the root zone at the scale of a field or small watershed, making use of the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator relative to other landscape materials. GANS measurements were performed at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations and seasonal conditions. Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a lowland Bornim farmland (Brandenburg) cropped with sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. At both sites depth profiles of soil moisture were measured at several locations in parallel by frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) for comparison and calibration. Initially, calibration parameters derived from a previous study with corn cover were tested under sunflower and winter rye periods at the same farmland. GANS soil moisture based on these parameters showed a large discrepancy compared to classical soil moisture measurements. Therefore, two new calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for GANS were evaluated in this study. This included different sets of calibration parameters based on different growing periods of sunflower. New calibration parameters showed a good agreement with FDR network during sunflower period (RMSE = 0.023 m3 m-3), but they underestimated soil moisture in the winter rye period. The GANS approach resulted to be highly affected by temporal changes of biomass and crop types which suggest the need of neutron corrections for long-term observations with crop rotation. Finally

  2. P-type doping of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.

    2000-04-10

    After implantation of As, As + Be, and As + Ga into GaN and annealing for short durations at temperatures as high as 1500 C, the GaN films remained highly resistive. It was apparent from c-RBS studies that although implantation damage did not create an amorphous layer in the GaN film, annealing at 1500 C did not provide enough energy to completely recover the radiation damage. Disorder recovered significantly after annealing at temperatures up to 1500 C, but not completely. From SIMS analysis, oxygen contamination in the AIN capping layer causes oxygen diffusion into the GaN film above 1400 C. The sapphire substrate (A1203) also decomposed and oxygen penetrated into the backside of the GaN layer above 1400 C. To prevent donor-like oxygen impurities from the capping layer and the substrate from contaminating the GaN film and compensating acceptors, post-implantation annealing should be done at temperatures below 1500 C. Oxygen in the cap could be reduced by growing the AIN cap on the GaN layer after the GaN growth run or by depositing the AIN layer in a ultra high vacuum (UHV) system post-growth to minimize residual oxygen and water contamination. With longer annealing times at 1400 C or at higher temperatures with a higher quality AIN, the implantation drainage may fully recover.

  3. GaN Electronics For High Power, High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHU,S.N.G.

    2000-06-12

    A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers. GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors and GaN metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.

  4. Atomic force microscopy studies of homoepitaxial GaN layers grown on GaN template by laser MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. S.; Singh, A.; Tanwar, S.; Tyagi, P. K.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Kushvaha, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    We have grown homoepitaxial GaN films on metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown 3.5 µm thick GaN on sapphire (0001) substrate (GaN template) using an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) laser assisted molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) system. The GaN films were grown by laser ablating a polycrystalline solid GaN target in the presence of active r.f. nitrogen plasma. The influence of laser repetition rates (10-30 Hz) on the surface morphology of homoepitaxial GaN layers have been studied using atomic force microscopy. It was found that GaN layer grown at 10 Hz shows a smooth surface with uniform grain size compared to the rough surface with irregular shape grains obtained at 30 Hz. The variation of surface roughness of the homoepitaxial GaN layer with and without wet chemical etching has been also studied and it was observed that the roughness of the film decreased after wet etching due to the curved structure/rough surface.

  5. Single crystalline Sc2O3/Y2O3 heterostructures as novel engineered buffer approach for GaN integration on Si (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnawska, L.; Giussani, A.; Zaumseil, P.; Schubert, M. A.; Paszkiewicz, R.; Brandt, O.; Storck, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2010-09-01

    The preparation of GaN virtual substrates on Si wafers via buffer layers is intensively pursued for high power/high frequency electronics as well as optoelectronics applications. Here, GaN is integrated on the Si platform by a novel engineered bilayer oxide buffer, namely, Sc2O3/Y2O3, which gradually reduces the lattice misfit of ˜-17% between GaN and Si. Single crystalline GaN(0001)/Sc2O3(111)/Y2O3(111)/Si(111) heterostructures were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized ex situ by various techniques. Laboratory-based x-ray diffraction shows that the epitaxial Sc2O3 grows fully relaxed on the Y2O3/Si(111) support, creating a high quality template for subsequent GaN overgrowth. The high structural quality of the Sc2O3 film is demonstrated by the fact that the concentration of extended planar defects in the preferred {111} slip planes is below the detection limit of synchrotron based diffuse x-ray scattering studies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis reveal that the full relaxation of the -7% lattice misfit between the isomorphic oxides is achieved by a network of misfit dislocations at the Sc2O3/Y2O3 interface. X-ray reflectivity and TEM prove that closed epitaxial GaN layers as thin as 30 nm can be grown on these templates. Finally, the GaN thin film quality is studied using a detailed Williamson-Hall analysis.

  6. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  7. GaN for LED applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    In order to improve the synthesis of GaN the effect of various growth and doping parameters has been studied. Although Be, Li, Mg, and Dy can be used to overcompensate native donors, the most interesting acceptor element is Zn. The emission spectrum and the luminescence efficiency depend on the growth temperature (below 800 C), on the partial pressure of the doping impurity, and on the duration of growth. Blue-green electroluminescence with a power efficiency of 0.1 percent and a brightness of 850 fL (at 0.6 mA and 22.5 V) was obtained. Some diodes allow the color of the emitted light to change by reversing the polarity of the bias. Continuous operation of a diode over a period of 5 months showed no evidence of degradation. The luminescence properties of ion-implanted GaN were studied. Delay effects were found in the electroluminescence of diodes, although, with a dc bias, a 70-MHz modulation was possible.

  8. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  9. GaN hexagonal pyramids formed by a photo-assisted chemical etching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Ying; Xiu, Xiang-Qian; Hua, Xue-Mei; Xie, Zi-Li; Liu, Bin; Chen, Peng; Han, Ping; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Dou

    2014-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to systematically study the effects of etching conditions on GaN by a convenient photo-assisted chemical (PAC) etching method. The solution concentration has an evident influence on the surface morphology of GaN and the optimal solution concentrations for GaN hexagonal pyramids have been identified. GaN with hexagonal pyramids have higher crystal quality and tensile strain relaxation compared with as-grown GaN. A detailed analysis about evolution of the size, density and optical property of GaN hexagonal pyramids is described as a function of light intensity. The intensity of photoluminescence spectra of GaN etched with hexagonal pyramids significantly increases compared to that of as-grown GaN due to multiple scattering events, high quality GaN with pyramids and the Bragg effect.

  10. Strain Relief Analysis of InN Quantum Dots Grown on GaN

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We present a study by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the strain state of individual InN quantum dots (QDs) grown on GaN substrates. Moiré fringe and high resolution TEM analyses showed that the QDs are almost fully relaxed due to the generation of a 60° misfit dislocation network at the InN/GaN interface. By applying the Geometric Phase Algorithm to plan-view high-resolution micrographs, we show that this network consists of three essentially non-interacting sets of misfit dislocations lying along the directions. Close to the edge of the QD, the dislocations curve to meet the surface and form a network of threading dislocations surrounding the system. PMID:21794190

  11. GaN quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudin, B.; Adelmann, C.; Gogneau, N.; Sarigiannidou, E.; Monroy, E.; Fossard, F.; Rouvière, J. L.

    2004-03-01

    The conditions to grow GaN quantum dots (QDs) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy will be examined. It will be shown that, depending on the Ga/N ratio value, the growth mode of GaN deposited on AlN can be either of the Stranski-Krastanow (SK) or of the Frank-Van der Merwe type. Accordingly, quantum wells or QDs can be grown, depending on the desired application. In the particular case of modified SK growth mode, it will be shown that both plastic and elastic strain relaxation can coexist. Growth of GaN QDs with N-polarity will also be discussed and compared to their counterpart with Ga polarity.

  12. Epitaxy of GaN Nanowires on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Vishnuvarthan; Largeau, Ludovic; Madouri, Ali; Glas, Frank; Zhang, Hezhi; Oehler, Fabrice; Cavanna, Antonella; Babichev, Andrey; Travers, Laurent; Gogneau, Noelle; Tchernycheva, Maria; Harmand, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-10

    Epitaxial growth of GaN nanowires on graphene is demonstrated using molecular beam epitaxy without any catalyst or intermediate layer. Growth is highly selective with respect to silica on which the graphene flakes, grown by chemical vapor deposition, are transferred. The nanowires grow vertically along their c-axis and we observe a unique epitaxial relationship with the ⟨21̅1̅0⟩ directions of the wurtzite GaN lattice parallel to the directions of the carbon zigzag chains. Remarkably, the nanowire density and height decrease with increasing number of graphene layers underneath. We attribute this effect to strain and we propose a model for the nanowire density variation. The GaN nanowires are defect-free and they present good optical properties. This demonstrates that graphene layers transferred on amorphous carrier substrates is a promising alternative to bulk crystalline substrates for the epitaxial growth of high quality GaN nanostructures.

  13. Epitaxy of GaN Nanowires on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Vishnuvarthan; Largeau, Ludovic; Madouri, Ali; Glas, Frank; Zhang, Hezhi; Oehler, Fabrice; Cavanna, Antonella; Babichev, Andrey; Travers, Laurent; Gogneau, Noelle; Tchernycheva, Maria; Harmand, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-10

    Epitaxial growth of GaN nanowires on graphene is demonstrated using molecular beam epitaxy without any catalyst or intermediate layer. Growth is highly selective with respect to silica on which the graphene flakes, grown by chemical vapor deposition, are transferred. The nanowires grow vertically along their c-axis and we observe a unique epitaxial relationship with the ⟨21̅1̅0⟩ directions of the wurtzite GaN lattice parallel to the directions of the carbon zigzag chains. Remarkably, the nanowire density and height decrease with increasing number of graphene layers underneath. We attribute this effect to strain and we propose a model for the nanowire density variation. The GaN nanowires are defect-free and they present good optical properties. This demonstrates that graphene layers transferred on amorphous carrier substrates is a promising alternative to bulk crystalline substrates for the epitaxial growth of high quality GaN nanostructures. PMID:27414518

  14. GaN grown on nano-patterned sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Kong; Meixin, Feng; Jin, Cai; Hui, Wang; Huaibing, Wang; Hui, Yang

    2015-04-01

    High-quality gallium nitride (GaN) film was grown on nano-patterned sapphire substrates (NPSS) and investigated using XRD and SEM. It was found that the optimum thickness of the GaN buffer layer on the NPSS is 15 nm, which is thinner than that on micro-patterned sapphire substrates (MPSS). An interesting phenomenon was observed for GaN film grown on NPSS:GaN mainly grows on the trench regions and little grows on the sidewalls of the patterns at the initial growth stage, which is dramatically different from GaN grown on MPSS. In addition, the electrical and optical properties of LEDs grown on NPSS were characterized. Project supported by the Suzhou Nanojoin Photonics Co., Ltd and the High-Tech Achievements Transformation of Jiangsu Province, China (No.BA2012010).

  15. Nanoheteroepitaxial growth of GaN on Si nanopillar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersee, S. D.; Sun, X. Y.; Wang, X.; Fairchild, M. N.; Liang, J.; Xu, J.

    2005-06-01

    Nanoheteroepitaxial growth of GaN by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition on dense arrays of (111) Si nanopillars has been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and electron-diffraction analysis of 0.15-μm-thick GaN layers indicate single-crystal films. Most of the mismatch defects were in-plane stacking faults and the threading dislocation concentration was <108cm-2 at the interface and decreased away from the interface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicated that grain-boundary defects could heal and were followed by high quality, single-crystal GaN. Facetted voids were also present at the GaN /Si interface and are believed to be an additional strain-energy reduction mechanism. The unusual defect behavior in these samples appears to be related to the high compliance of the nanopillar silicon substrate.

  16. Epitaxy growth kinetics of GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bei; Ma, Ronghui; Zhang, Hui

    2003-03-01

    Group III nitrides, such as GaN, AlN and InGaN, have attracted a lot of attention due to the development of blue-green and ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers. A GaN crystal can be grown from the vapor phase by either evaporation of Gallium (Ga) metal or sublimation of GaN powder in ammonia (NH 3) atmosphere at a temperature-controlled growth furnace. In this paper, an integrated GaN growth model using a sublimation growth model has been developed based on the conservation of momentum, mass, chemical species and energy together with necessary boundary conditions that account for heterogeneous chemical reactions both at the source and seed surfaces. For the growth rate, the effects of the gas-flow rate, source temperature, temperature difference, and the gap width of the growth cell on the growth process have been studied.

  17. Novel high frequency devices with graphene and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei

    This work focuses on exploring new materials and new device structures to develop novel devices that can operate at very high speed. In chapter 2, the high frequency performance limitations of graphene transistor with channel length less than 100 nm are explored. The simulated results predict that intrinsic cutoff frequency fT of graphene transistor can be close to 2 THz at 15 nm channel length. In chapter 3, we explored the possibility of developing a 2D materials based vertical tunneling device. An analytical model to calculate the channel potentials and current-voltage characteristics in a Symmetric tunneling Field-Effect-Transistor (SymFET) is presented. The symmetric resonant peak in SymFET is a good candidate for high-speed analog applications. Rest of the work focuses on Gallium Nitride (GaN), several novel device concepts based on GaN heterostructure have been proposed for high frequency and high power applications. In chapter 4, we compared the performance of GaN Schottky diodes on bulk GaN substrates and GaN-on-sapphire substrates. In addition, we also discussed the lateral GaN Schottky diode between metal/2DEGs. The advantage of lateral GaN Schottky diodes is the intrinsic cutoff frequency is in the THz range. In chapter 5, a GaN Heterostructure barrier diode (HBD) is designed using the polarization charge and band offset at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction. The polarization charge at AlGaN/GaN interface behaves as a delta-doping which induces a barrier without any chemical doping. The IV characteristics can be explained by the barrier controlled thermionic emission current. GaN HBDs can be directly integrated with GaN HEMTs, and serve as frequency multipliers or mixers for RF applications. In chapter 6, a GaN based negative effective mass oscillator (NEMO) is proposed. The current in NEMO is estimated under the ballistic limits. Negative differential resistances (NDRs) can be observed with more than 50% of the injected electrons occupied the negative

  18. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  19. Comparative study on cost evaluation and network visualization of particle accelerator components for heavy ion inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, A.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, Nob; Barnard, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    By visualizing accelerator system components in heavy ion inertial fusion, the connection between the components becomes clear. We clarify an influential component on the entire cost by the relation of node connections due to the visualization result. Since a low cost component affects a high cost component, not only the cost estimation but also the relation between the components is considerable and important issue. A cost estimation result changing with an induction core cost indicates no influences in the rate of details.

  20. ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on Gan Island (AMIE-Gan) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Long, CL; Del Genio, A; Deng, M; Fu, X; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Johnson, R; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Webster, P; Xie, S; Zhang, C

    2011-04-11

    The overarching campaign, which includes the ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) deployment in conjunction with the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) and the Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns, is designed to test several current hypotheses regarding the mechanisms responsible for Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation and propagation in the Indian Ocean area. The synergy between the proposed AMF2 deployment with DYNAMO/CINDY2011, and the corresponding funded experiment on Manus, combine for an overarching ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) with two components: AMF2 on Gan Island in the Indian Ocean (AMIE-Gan), where the MJO initiates and starts its eastward propagation; and the ARM Manus site (AMIE-Manus), which is in the general area where the MJO usually starts to weaken in climate models. AMIE-Gan will provide measurements of particular interest to Atmospheric System Research (ASR) researchers relevant to improving the representation of MJO initiation in climate models. The framework of DYNAMO/CINDY2011 includes two proposed island-based sites and two ship-based locations forming a square pattern with sonde profiles and scanning precipitation and cloud radars at both island and ship sites. These data will be used to produce a Variational Analysis data set coinciding with the one produced for AMIE-Manus. The synergy between AMIE-Manus and AMIE-Gan will allow studies of the initiation, propagation, and evolution of the convective cloud population within the framework of the MJO. As with AMIE-Manus, AMIE-Gan/DYNAMO also includes a significant modeling component geared toward improving the representation of MJO initiation and propagation in climate and forecast models. This campaign involves the deployment of the second, marine-capable, AMF; all of the included measurement systems; and especially the scanning and vertically pointing radars. The campaign will include sonde

  1. GaN Technology for Power Electronic Applications: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Tyler J.; Pushpakaran, Bejoy N.; Bayne, Stephen B.

    2016-06-01

    Power semiconductor devices based on silicon (Si) are quickly approaching their limits, set by fundamental material properties. In order to address these limitations, new materials for use in devices must be investigated. Wide bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) have suitable properties for power electronic applications; however, fabrication of practical devices from these materials may be challenging. SiC technology has matured to point of commercialized devices, whereas GaN requires further research to realize full material potential. This review covers fundamental material properties of GaN as they relate to Si and SiC. This is followed by a discussion of the contemporary issues involved with bulk GaN substrates and their fabrication and a brief overview of how devices are fabricated, both on native GaN substrate material and non-native substrate material. An overview of current device structures, which are being analyzed for use in power switching applications, is then provided; both vertical and lateral device structures are considered. Finally, a brief discussion of prototypes currently employing GaN devices is given.

  2. High nitrogen pressure solution growth of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockowski, Michal

    2014-10-01

    Results of GaN growth from gallium solution under high nitrogen pressure are presented. Basic of the high nitrogen pressure solution (HNPS) growth method is described. A new approach of seeded growth, multi-feed seed (MFS) configuration, is demonstrated. The use of two kinds of seeds: free-standing hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN (HVPE-GaN) obtained from metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-GaN/sapphire templates and free-standing HVPE-GaN obtained from the ammonothermally grown GaN crystals, is shown. Depending on the seeds’ structural quality, the differences in the structural properties of pressure grown material are demonstrated and analyzed. The role and influence of impurities, like oxygen and magnesium, on GaN crystals grown from gallium solution in the MFS configuration is presented. The properties of differently doped GaN crystals are discussed. An application of the pressure grown GaN crystals as substrates for electronic and optoelectronic devices is reported.

  3. Synthesis of p-type GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Wook; Park, Youn Ho; Kim, Ilsoo; Park, Tae-Eon; Kwon, Byoung Wook; Choi, Won Kook; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2013-09-21

    GaN has been utilized in optoelectronics for two decades. However, p-type doping still remains crucial for realization of high performance GaN optoelectronics. Though Mg has been used as a p-dopant, its efficiency is low due to the formation of Mg-H complexes and/or structural defects in the course of doping. As a potential alternative p-type dopant, Cu has been recognized as an acceptor impurity for GaN. Herein, we report the fabrication of Cu-doped GaN nanowires (Cu:GaN NWs) and their p-type characteristics. The NWs were grown vertically via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using a Au/Ni catalyst. Electrical characterization using a nanowire-field effect transistor (NW-FET) showed that the NWs exhibited n-type characteristics. However, with further annealing, the NWs showed p-type characteristics. A homo-junction structure (consisting of annealed Cu:GaN NW/n-type GaN thin film) exhibited p-n junction characteristics. A hybrid organic light emitting diode (OLED) employing the annealed Cu:GaN NWs as a hole injection layer (HIL) also demonstrated current injected luminescence. These results suggest that Cu can be used as a p-type dopant for GaN NWs.

  4. Effect of photocatalytic oxidation technology on GaN CMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Pan, Guoshun; Lu, Xinchun

    2016-01-01

    GaN is so hard and so chemically inert that it is difficult to obtain a high material removal rate (MRR) in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process. This paper discusses the application of photocatalytic oxidation technology in GaN planarization. Three N-type semiconductor particles (TiO2, SnO2, and Fe2O3) are used as catalysts and added to the H2O2-SiO2-based slurry. By optical excitation, highly reactive photoinduced holes are produced on the surface of the particles, which can oxidize OH- and H2O absorbed on the surface of the catalysts; therefore, more OH* will be generated. As a result, GaN MRRs in an H2O2-SiO2-based polishing system combined with catalysts are improved significantly, especially when using TiO2, the MRR of which is 122 nm/h. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows the variation trend of chemical composition on the GaN surface after polishing, revealing the planarization process. Besides, the effect of pH on photocatalytic oxidation combined with TiO2 is analyzed deeply. Furthermore, the physical model of GaN CMP combined with photocatalytic oxidation technology is proposed to describe the removal mechanism of GaN.

  5. GaN resistive hydrogen gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Feng; Chevtchenko, Serguei; Moon, Yong-Tae; Morkoç, Hadis; Fawcett, Timothy J.; Wolan, John T.

    2005-08-01

    GaN epilayers grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy have been used to fabricate resistive gas sensors with a pair of planar ohmic contacts. Detectible sensitivity to H2 gas for a wide range of gas mixtures in an Ar ambient has been realized; the lowest concentration tested is ˜0.1% H2 (in Ar), well below the lower combustion limit in air. No saturation of the signal is observed up to 100% H2 flow. Real-time response to H2 shows a clear and sharp response with no memory effects during the ramping cycles of H2 concentration. The change in current at a fixed voltage to hydrogen was found to change with sensor geometry. This appears to be consistent with a surface-adsorption-induced change of conductivity; a detailed picture of the gas sensing mechanism requires further systematic studies.

  6. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  7. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  8. Role of the ganSPQAB Operon in Degradation of Galactan by Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Watzlawick, Hildegard; Morabbi Heravi, Kambiz; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2016-10-15

    Bacillus subtilis possesses different enzymes for the utilization of plant cell wall polysaccharides. This includes a gene cluster containing galactan degradation genes (ganA and ganB), two transporter component genes (ganQ and ganP), and the sugar-binding lipoprotein-encoding gene ganS (previously known as cycB). These genes form an operon that is regulated by GanR. The degradation of galactan by B. subtilis begins with the activity of extracellular GanB. GanB is an endo-β-1,4-galactanase and is a member of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 53. This enzyme was active on high-molecular-weight arabinose-free galactan and mainly produced galactotetraose as well as galactotriose and galactobiose. These galacto-oligosaccharides may enter the cell via the GanQP transmembrane proteins of the galactan ABC transporter. The specificity of the galactan ABC transporter depends on the sugar-binding lipoprotein, GanS. Purified GanS was shown to bind galactotetraose and galactotriose using thermal shift assay. The energy for this transport is provided by MsmX, an ATP-binding protein. The transported galacto-oligosaccharides are further degraded by GanA. GanA is a β-galactosidase that belongs to GH family 42. The GanA enzyme was able to hydrolyze short-chain β-1,4-galacto-oligosaccharides as well as synthetic β-galactopyranosides into galactose. Thermal shift assay as well as electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that galactobiose is the inducer of the galactan operon regulated by GanR. DNase I footprinting revealed that the GanR protein binds to an operator overlapping the -35 box of the σ(A)-type promoter of Pgan, which is located upstream of ganS IMPORTANCE: Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive soil bacterium that utilizes different types of carbohydrates, such as pectin, as carbon sources. So far, most of the pectin degradation systems and enzymes have been thoroughly studied in B. subtilis Nevertheless, the B. subtilis utilization system of galactan, which is

  9. Expanding the role of community mobilization to accelerate progress towards ending vertical transmission of HIV in Uganda: the Networks model

    PubMed Central

    Mburu, Gitau; Iorpenda, Kate; Muwanga, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Efforts to prevent vertical transmission of HIV have gained momentum globally since the launch of the “Global plan towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children by 2015 and keeping their mothers alive”, reflecting the growing consensus that we now have low-cost, efficacious interventions that promise to end vertical transmission of HIV. Uganda is one of the 22 focus countries in the global plan and one of the 10 countries with the highest need for prevention of vertical transmission globally. In the context of current shortfalls in the prevention of vertical HIV transmission, this paper presents the results of the Networks project, a community mobilisation model implemented by the International HIV/AIDS Alliance in Uganda, and draws out the theoretical foundations and promising community mobilization practices relevant to prevention of vertical transmission. Methods A retrospective review of the Network project's activities, documentation and evaluation was performed. Results The Networks project, through community mobilisation and greater involvement of people living with HIV, reached an estimated 1.3 million people with at least one health service. By clustering 750 groups of people living with HIV into larger coalitions, the project supported existing groups to amalgamate their collective strengths and skills in outreach, referral and literacy activities; and improved reach and coverage of HIV services through strengthened linkages with healthcare facilities. Our analysis of the Networks model shows that it could contribute to the prevention of vertical transmission of HIV as a replicable and sustainable community mobilisation approach. In particular, the Networks model increased the uptake of decentralized interventions for preventing vertical transmission through community referrals; promoted male involvement through peer sensitisation; and linked communities to advocacy channels for advancing maternal health and prevention of

  10. Carrier decay and luminescence characteristics in hadron irradiated MOCVD GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Pavlov, J.; Jasiunas, A.; Jonkus, V.; Meskauskaite, D.; Tekorius, A.

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline GaN is a promising material for producing of the radiation hard particle detectors of different types capable to operate in harsh areas of particle accelerators. Moreover, GaN crystals show rather efficient luminescence properties in several spectral bands under excitation by high energy radiation. Thereby, GaN material can be employed for fabrication of a combined device which is able to operate both as scintillating and charge collecting detector. However, the efficiency of such detectors and their functionality has insufficiently been investigated. This work is addressed to study the evolution of the efficiency of photon and hadron induced luminescence. To evaluate the density of excess carriers induced by the high energy protons, a correlation between the microwave probed photoconductivity transients and the proton induced luminescence intensity has been examined using 1.6 MeV protons to produce a nearly homogeneous and rather strong excitation in 2.6 μm thick MOCVD grown GaN epi-layers. To estimate the radiation hardness of such material, the evolution of the photoconductivity transients and of the proton induced photoluminescence characteristics has been studied by in situ measurements of the changes of luminescence intensity and photoconductivity decay rate during the exposure to a proton beam reaching fluences up to 1015 cm-2. The production rate of radiation defects, determined from in situ and post-irradiation examination of the changes of radiative and non-radiative recombination have been examined by combining penetrative hadron (nuclear reactor neutrons and 24 GeV/c protons) irradiations with those of the 1.6 MeV protons. The parameters of the efficiency κP of carrier pair generation by a single proton of κP = nP/NP cong 1.3 × 107 cm-3 per proton and κPApr = 40 carrier pairs per a micrometer of layer depth per proton have been estimated. The production rate of radiation defects is estimated to be KP cong 0.6 cm-1 for both penetrative

  11. Harnessing person-generated health data to accelerate patient-centered outcomes research: the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America PCORnet Patient Powered Research Network (CCFA Partners).

    PubMed

    Chung, Arlene E; Sandler, Robert S; Long, Millie D; Ahrens, Sean; Burris, Jessica L; Martin, Christopher F; Anton, Kristen; Robb, Amber; Caruso, Thomas P; Jaeger, Elizabeth L; Chen, Wenli; Clark, Marshall; Myers, Kelly; Dobes, Angela; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners Patient-Powered Research Network (PPRN) seeks to advance and accelerate comparative effectiveness and translational research in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Our IBD-focused PCORnet PPRN has been designed to overcome the major obstacles that have limited patient-centered outcomes research in IBD by providing the technical infrastructure, patient governance, and patient-driven functionality needed to: 1) identify, prioritize, and undertake a patient-centered research agenda through sharing person-generated health data; 2) develop and test patient and provider-focused tools that utilize individual patient data to improve health behaviors and inform health care decisions and, ultimately, outcomes; and 3) rapidly disseminate new knowledge to patients, enabling them to improve their health. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners PPRN has fostered the development of a community of citizen scientists in IBD; created a portal that will recruit, retain, and engage members and encourage partnerships with external scientists; and produced an efficient infrastructure for identifying, screening, and contacting network members for participation in research.

  12. Harnessing person-generated health data to accelerate patient-centered outcomes research: the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America PCORnet Patient Powered Research Network (CCFA Partners).

    PubMed

    Chung, Arlene E; Sandler, Robert S; Long, Millie D; Ahrens, Sean; Burris, Jessica L; Martin, Christopher F; Anton, Kristen; Robb, Amber; Caruso, Thomas P; Jaeger, Elizabeth L; Chen, Wenli; Clark, Marshall; Myers, Kelly; Dobes, Angela; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners Patient-Powered Research Network (PPRN) seeks to advance and accelerate comparative effectiveness and translational research in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Our IBD-focused PCORnet PPRN has been designed to overcome the major obstacles that have limited patient-centered outcomes research in IBD by providing the technical infrastructure, patient governance, and patient-driven functionality needed to: 1) identify, prioritize, and undertake a patient-centered research agenda through sharing person-generated health data; 2) develop and test patient and provider-focused tools that utilize individual patient data to improve health behaviors and inform health care decisions and, ultimately, outcomes; and 3) rapidly disseminate new knowledge to patients, enabling them to improve their health. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners PPRN has fostered the development of a community of citizen scientists in IBD; created a portal that will recruit, retain, and engage members and encourage partnerships with external scientists; and produced an efficient infrastructure for identifying, screening, and contacting network members for participation in research. PMID:26911821

  13. Pulsed laser annealing of Be-implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.T.; Tan, L.S.; Chor, E.F.

    2005-11-01

    Postimplantation thermal processing of Be in molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown GaN by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) was investigated. It has been found that the activation of Be dopants and the repair of implantation-induced defects in GaN films cannot be achieved efficiently by conventional RTA alone. On the other hand, good dopant activation and surface morphology and quality were obtained when the Be-implanted GaN film was annealed by PLA with a 248 nm KrF excimer laser. However, observations of off-resonant micro-Raman and high-resolution x-ray-diffraction spectra indicated that crystal defects and strain resulting from Be implantation were still existent after PLA, which probably degraded the carrier mobility and limited the activation efficiency to some extent. This can be attributed to the shallow penetration depth of the 248 nm laser in GaN, which only repaired the crystal defects in a thin near-surface layer, while the deeper defects were not annealed out well. This situation was significantly improved when the Be-implanted GaN was subjected to a combined process of PLA followed by RTA, which produced good activation of the dopants, good surface morphology, and repaired bulk and surface defects well.

  14. Structural defects in bulk GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; dos Reis, R.; Mancuso, M.; Song, C. Y.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Bockowski, M.

    2014-10-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies of undoped and Mg doped GaN layers grown on the HVPE substrates by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution (HNPS) with the multi-feed-seed (MFS) configuration are shown. The propagation of dislocations from the HVPE substrate to the layer is observed. Due to the interaction between these dislocations in the thick layers much lower density of these defects is observed in the upper part of the HNPS layers. Amorphous Ga precipitates with attached voids pointing toward the growth direction are observed in the undoped layer. This is similar to the presence of Ga precipitates in high-pressure platelets, however the shape of these precipitates is different. The Mg doped layers do not show Ga precipitates, but MgO rectangular precipitates are formed, decorating the dislocations. Results of TEM studies of HVPE layers grown on Ammonothermal substrates are also presented. These layers have superior crystal quality in comparison to the HNPS layers, as far as density of dislocation is concern. Occasionally some small inclusions can be found, but their chemical composition was not yet determined. It is expected that growth of the HNPS layers on these substrate will lead to large layer thickness obtained in a short time and with high crystal perfection needed in devices.

  15. High Voltage GaN Schottky Rectifiers

    SciTech Connect

    CAO,X.A.; CHO,H.; CHU,S.N.G.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHYI,J.-I.; DANG,G.T.; HAN,JUNG; LEE,C.-M.; PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; WILSON,R.G.; ZHANG,A.P.

    1999-10-25

    Mesa and planar GaN Schottky diode rectifiers with reverse breakdown voltages (V{sub RB}) up to 550V and >2000V, respectively, have been fabricated. The on-state resistance, R{sub ON}, was 6m{Omega}{center_dot} cm{sup 2} and 0.8{Omega}cm{sup 2}, respectively, producing figure-of-merit values for (V{sub RB}){sup 2}/R{sub ON} in the range 5-48 MW{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. At low biases the reverse leakage current was proportional to the size of the rectifying contact perimeter, while at high biases the current was proportional to the area of this contact. These results suggest that at low reverse biases, the leakage is dominated by the surface component, while at higher biases the bulk component dominates. On-state voltages were 3.5V for the 550V diodes and {ge}15 for the 2kV diodes. Reverse recovery times were <0.2{micro}sec for devices switched from a forward current density of {approx}500A{center_dot}cm{sup -2} to a reverse bias of 100V.

  16. Stability of Carbon Incorpoated Semipolar GaN(1101) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori

    2011-08-01

    The structural stability of carbon incorporated GaN(1101) surfaces is theoretically investigated by performing first-principles pseudopotential calculations. The calculated surface formation energies taking account of the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions demonstrate that several carbon incorporated surfaces are stabilized depending on the growth conditions. Using surface phase diagrams, which are obtained by comparing the calculated adsorption energy with vapor-phase chemical potentials, we find that the semipolar surface forms NH2 and CH2 below ˜1660 K while the polar GaN(0001) surface with CH3 is stabilized below ˜1550 K. This difference could be one of possible explanations for p-type doping on the semipolar GaN(1101) surface.

  17. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750-800, 900, and 130-180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  18. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Romanov, Alexey E.; Young, Erin C.; Roberston, Christian A.; Beltz, Glenn E.; Speck, James S.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  19. High-Sensitivity GaN Microchemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-ah; Yang, Baohua; Liao, Anna; Moon, Jeongsun; Prokopuk, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Systematic studies have been performed on the sensitivity of GaN HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) sensors using various gate electrode designs and operational parameters. The results here show that a higher sensitivity can be achieved with a larger W/L ratio (W = gate width, L = gate length) at a given D (D = source-drain distance), and multi-finger gate electrodes offer a higher sensitivity than a one-finger gate electrode. In terms of operating conditions, sensor sensitivity is strongly dependent on transconductance of the sensor. The highest sensitivity can be achieved at the gate voltage where the slope of the transconductance curve is the largest. This work provides critical information about how the gate electrode of a GaN HEMT, which has been identified as the most sensitive among GaN microsensors, needs to be designed, and what operation parameters should be used for high sensitivity detection.

  20. ECR, ICP, and RIE plasma etching of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; McClellan, G.B.; Rieger, D.J.; Hafich, M.J.

    1996-06-01

    The group III-nitrides continue to generate interest due to their wide band gaps and high dielectric constants. These materials have made significant impact on the compound semiconductor community as blue and ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs). Realization of more advanced devices; including lasers and high temperature electronics, requires dry etch processes which are well controlled, smooth, highly anisotropic and have etch rates exceeding 0.5 {mu}m/min. In this paper, we compare electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and reactive ion etch (RIE) etch results for GaN. These are the first ICP etch results reported for GaN. We also report ECR etch rates for GaN as a function of growth technique.

  1. Desorption Induced Formation of Negative Nanowires in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, E.A.; Kim, B.-J.

    2011-06-01

    We report in-situ transmission electron microscopy studies of the formation of negative nanowires created by thermal decomposition of single crystal GaN. During annealing, vertical negative nanowires are formed in [0 0 0 1] by preferential dissociation of GaN along the 1 0 {bar 1} 0 prism planes, while lateral negative nanowires grow in close-packed 1 0 {bar 1} 0 by the self-catalytic solid-liquid-vapor (SLV) mechanism. Our quantitative measurements show that the growth rates of the laterally grown negative nanowires are independent of the wire diameter, indicating that the rate-limiting step is the decomposition of GaN on the surface of the Ga droplets that catalyze their creation. These nanoscale features offer controllable templates for the creation and integration of a broad range of nanoscale materials systems, with potential applications in nanoscale fluidics.

  2. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750–800, 900, and 130–180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  3. Strong atomic ordering in Gd-doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Higashi, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Shigehiko; Asahi, Hajime; Sato, Kazuhisa; Konno, Toyohiko J.

    2012-09-03

    Gd-doped GaN (Ga{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}N) thin films were grown on a GaN(001) template by radio frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Three samples with a different Gd composition were prepared in this study: x = 0.02, 0.05, and 0.08. XRD and TEM results revealed that the low Gd concentration GaN possesses the wurtzite structure. On the other hand, it was found that an ordered phase with a quadruple-periodicity along the [001] direction in the wurtzite structure is formed throughout the film with x = 0.08. We proposed the atomistic model for the superlattice structure observed here.

  4. Surface morphology of GaN: Flat versus vicinal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.H.; Seutter, S.M.; Zheng, L.X.; Cheung, S.H.; Ng, Y.F.; Wu, H.; Tong, S.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The surface morphology of GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A comparison is made between flat and vicinal surfaces. The wurtzite structure of GaN leads to special morphological features such as step pairing and triangularly shaped islands. Spiral mounds due to growth at screw threading dislocations are dominant on flat surfaces, whereas for vicinal GaN, the surfaces show no spiral mound but evenly spaced steps. This observation suggests an effective suppression of screw threading dislocations in the vicinal films. This finding is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Continued growth of the vicinal surface leads to step bunching that is attributed to the effect of electromigration.

  5. Mg doping and its effect on the semipolar GaN(1122) growth kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahourcade, L.; Wirthmueller, A.; Monroy, E.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Laufer, A.; Eickhoff, M.

    2009-10-26

    We report the effect of Mg doping on the growth kinetics of semipolar GaN(1122) synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Mg tends to segregate on the surface, inhibiting the formation of the self-regulated Ga film which is used as a surfactant for the growth of undoped and Si-doped GaN(1122). We observe an enhancement of Mg incorporation in GaN(1122) compared to GaN(0001). Typical structural defects or polarity inversion domains found in Mg-doped GaN(0001) were not observed for the semipolar films investigated in the present study.

  6. Conductivity based on selective etch for GaN devices and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  7. Temperature dependent growth of GaN nanowires using CVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, R.

    2016-05-01

    Growth of GaN nanowires have been carried out on sapphire substrates with Au as a catalyst using chemical vapour deposition technique. GaN nanowires growth have been studied with the experimental parameter as growth temperature. Diameter of grown GaN nanowires are in the range of 50 nm to 100 nm while the nanowire length depends on growth temperature. Morphology of the GaN nanowires have been studied by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline nature has been observed by XRD patterns. Optical properties of grown GaN nanowires have been investigated by photoluminescence spectra.

  8. Dislocation luminescence in GaN single crystals under nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Xu, Ke; Fan, Ying Min; Wang, Jian Feng; Zhang, Ji Cai; Ren, Guo Qiang

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study on the dislocation luminescence in GaN by nanoindentation, cathodoluminescence, and Raman. The dislocation luminescence peaking at 3.12 eV exhibits a series of special properties in the cathodoluminescence measurements, and it completely disappears after annealing at 500°C. Raman spectroscopy shows evidence for existence of vacancies in the indented region. A comprehensive investigation encompassing cathodoluminescence, Raman, and annealing experiments allow the assignment of dislocation luminescence to conduction-band-acceptor transition involving Ga vacancies. The nanoscale plasticity of GaN can be better understood by considering the dislocation luminescence mechanism.

  9. Highly transparent ammonothermal bulk GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, WK; Ehrentraut, D; Downey, BC; Kamber, DS; Pakalapati, RT; Do Yoo, H; D'Evelyn, MP

    2014-10-01

    A novel apparatus has been employed to grow ammonothermal (0001) gallium nitride (GaN) with diameters up to 2 in The crystals have been characterized by x-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and optical spectroscopy. High crystallinity GaN with FWHM values about 20-50 arcsec and dislocation densities below 1 x 10(5) cm(-2) have been obtained. High optical transmission was achieved with an optical absorption coefficient below 1 cm(-1) at a wavelength of 450 nm. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ferromagnetism in undoped One-dimensional GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Jeganathan, K. E-mail: jagan@physics.bdu.ac.in; Purushothaman, V.; Debnath, R.; Arumugam, S.

    2014-05-15

    We report an intrinsic ferromagnetism in vertical aligned GaN nanowires (NW) fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy without any external catalyst. The magnetization saturates at ∼0.75 × emu/gm with the applied field of 3000 Oe for the NWs grown under the low-Gallium flux of 2.4 × 10{sup −8} mbar. Despite a drop in saturation magnetization, narrow hysteresis loop remains intact regardless of Gallium flux. Magnetization in vertical standing GaN NWs is consistent with the spectral analysis of low-temperature photoluminescence pertaining to Ga-vacancies associated structural defects at the nanoscale.

  11. First-principles study of d0 ferromagnetism in alkali-metal doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The d0 ferromagnetism in GaN has been studied based on density functional theory. Our results show that GaN with sufficient hole become spin-polarized. Alkali-metal doping can introduce holes in GaN. Among them, both of Li- and Na-doping induce ferromagnetism in GaN and Na-doped GaN behaves as half-metallic ferromagnet. Moreover, at a growth temperature of 2000 K under N-rich condition, both concentrations can exceed 18%, which is sufficient to produce detectable macroscopic magnetism in GaN. The Curie temperature of Li- and Na-doped GaN is estimated to be 304 and 740 K, respectively, which are well above room temperature.

  12. GaN nanowire arrays by a patterned metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. C.; Yuan, G. D.; Wu, R. W.; Lu, H. X.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wei, T. B.; Wang, J. X.; Li, J. M.; Zhang, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    We developed an one-step and two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce self-organized GaN nanowire arrays. In one-step approach, GaN nanowire arrays are synthesized uniformly on GaN thin film surface. However, in a two-step etching processes, GaN nanowires are formed only in metal uncovered regions, and GaN regions with metal-covering show nano-porous sidewalls. We propose that nanowires and porous nanostructures are tuned by sufficient and limited etch rate, respectively. PL spectra shows a red-shift of band edge emission in GaN nanostructures. The formation mechanism of nanowires was illustrated by two separated electrochemical reactions occur simultaneously. The function of metals and UV light was illustrated by the scheme of potential relationship between energy bands in Si, GaN and standard hydrogen electrode potential of solution and metals.

  13. Optimization-driven identification of genetic perturbations accelerates the convergence of model parameters in ensemble modeling of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Zomorrodi, Ali R; Lafontaine Rivera, Jimmy G; Liao, James C; Maranas, Costas D

    2013-09-01

    The ensemble modeling (EM) approach has shown promise in capturing kinetic and regulatory effects in the modeling of metabolic networks. Efficacy of the EM procedure relies on the identification of model parameterizations that adequately describe all observed metabolic phenotypes upon perturbation. In this study, we propose an optimization-based algorithm for the systematic identification of genetic/enzyme perturbations to maximally reduce the number of models retained in the ensemble after each round of model screening. The key premise here is to design perturbations that will maximally scatter the predicted steady-state fluxes over the ensemble parameterizations. We demonstrate the applicability of this procedure for an Escherichia coli metabolic model of central metabolism by successively identifying single, double, and triple enzyme perturbations that cause the maximum degree of flux separation between models in the ensemble. Results revealed that optimal perturbations are not always located close to reaction(s) whose fluxes are measured, especially when multiple perturbations are considered. In addition, there appears to be a maximum number of simultaneous perturbations beyond which no appreciable increase in the divergence of flux predictions is achieved. Overall, this study provides a systematic way of optimally designing genetic perturbations for populating the ensemble of models with relevant model parameterizations.

  14. Synthesis of p-type GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Park, Youn Ho; Kim, Ilsoo; Park, Tae-Eon; Kwon, Byoung Wook; Choi, Won Kook; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2013-08-01

    GaN has been utilized in optoelectronics for two decades. However, p-type doping still remains crucial for realization of high performance GaN optoelectronics. Though Mg has been used as a p-dopant, its efficiency is low due to the formation of Mg-H complexes and/or structural defects in the course of doping. As a potential alternative p-type dopant, Cu has been recognized as an acceptor impurity for GaN. Herein, we report the fabrication of Cu-doped GaN nanowires (Cu:GaN NWs) and their p-type characteristics. The NWs were grown vertically via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using a Au/Ni catalyst. Electrical characterization using a nanowire-field effect transistor (NW-FET) showed that the NWs exhibited n-type characteristics. However, with further annealing, the NWs showed p-type characteristics. A homo-junction structure (consisting of annealed Cu:GaN NW/n-type GaN thin film) exhibited p-n junction characteristics. A hybrid organic light emitting diode (OLED) employing the annealed Cu:GaN NWs as a hole injection layer (HIL) also demonstrated current injected luminescence. These results suggest that Cu can be used as a p-type dopant for GaN NWs.GaN has been utilized in optoelectronics for two decades. However, p-type doping still remains crucial for realization of high performance GaN optoelectronics. Though Mg has been used as a p-dopant, its efficiency is low due to the formation of Mg-H complexes and/or structural defects in the course of doping. As a potential alternative p-type dopant, Cu has been recognized as an acceptor impurity for GaN. Herein, we report the fabrication of Cu-doped GaN nanowires (Cu:GaN NWs) and their p-type characteristics. The NWs were grown vertically via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using a Au/Ni catalyst. Electrical characterization using a nanowire-field effect transistor (NW-FET) showed that the NWs exhibited n-type characteristics. However, with further annealing, the NWs showed p-type characteristics. A homo

  15. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  16. PosMed (Positional Medline): prioritizing genes with an artificial neural network comprising medical documents to accelerate positional cloning.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuko; Makita, Yuko; Heida, Naohiko; Asano, Satomi; Matsushima, Akihiro; Ishii, Manabu; Mochizuki, Yoshiki; Masuya, Hiroshi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kobayashi, Norio; Toyoda, Tetsuro

    2009-07-01

    PosMed (http://omicspace.riken.jp/) prioritizes candidate genes for positional cloning by employing our original database search engine GRASE, which uses an inferential process similar to an artificial neural network comprising documental neurons (or 'documentrons') that represent each document contained in databases such as MEDLINE and OMIM. Given a user-specified query, PosMed initially performs a full-text search of each documentron in the first-layer artificial neurons and then calculates the statistical significance of the connections between the hit documentrons and the second-layer artificial neurons representing each gene. When a chromosomal interval(s) is specified, PosMed explores the second-layer and third-layer artificial neurons representing genes within the chromosomal interval by evaluating the combined significance of the connections from the hit documentrons to the genes. PosMed is, therefore, a powerful tool that immediately ranks the candidate genes by connecting phenotypic keywords to the genes through connections representing not only gene-gene interactions but also other biological interactions (e.g. metabolite-gene, mutant mouse-gene, drug-gene, disease-gene and protein-protein interactions) and ortholog data. By utilizing orthologous connections, PosMed facilitates the ranking of human genes based on evidence found in other model species such as mouse. Currently, PosMed, an artificial superbrain that has learned a vast amount of biological knowledge ranging from genomes to phenomes (or 'omic space'), supports the prioritization of positional candidate genes in humans, mouse, rat and Arabidopsis thaliana.

  17. Properties of amorphous GaN from first-principles simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, B.; Drabold, D. A.

    2011-08-01

    Amorphous GaN (a-GaN) models are obtained from first-principles simulations. We compare four a-GaN models generated by “melt-and-quench” and the computer alchemy method. We find that most atoms tend to be fourfold, and a chemically ordered continuous random network is the ideal structure for a-GaN albeit with some coordination defects. Where the electronic structure is concerned, the gap is predicted to be less than 1.0 eV, underestimated as usual by a density functional calculation. We observe a highly localized valence tail and a remarkably delocalized exponential conduction tail in all models generated. Based upon these results, we speculate on potential differences in n- and p-type doping. The structural origin of tail and defect states is discussed. The vibrational density of states and dielectric function are computed and seem consistent with experiment.

  18. Refractive index of erbium doped GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Alajlouni, S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zavada, J. M.

    2014-08-25

    GaN is an excellent host for erbium (Er) to provide optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safe 1540 nm wavelength window. Er doped GaN (GaN:Er) epilayers were synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing a pulsed growth scheme, the crystalline quality of GaN:Er epilayers was significantly improved over those obtained by conventional growth method of continuous flow of reaction precursors. X-ray diffraction rocking curve linewidths of less than 300 arc sec were achieved for the GaN (0002) diffraction peak, which is comparable to the typical results of undoped high quality GaN epilayers and represents a major improvement over previously reported results for GaN:Er. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the GaN:Er epilayers in the 1540 nm wavelength window and a linear dependence on Er concentration was found. The observed refractive index increase with Er incorporation and the improved crystalline quality of the GaN:Er epilayers indicate that low loss GaN:Er optical waveguiding structures are feasible.

  19. Plasma chemistry dependent ECR etching of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Rieger, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) etching of GaN in Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/Ar, C1{sub 2}/SF{sub 6}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/H{sub 2}/Ar and BCl{sub 3}/SF{sub 6}/Ar plasmas is reported as a function of percent H{sub 2} and SF{sub 6}. GaN etch rates were found to be 2 to 3 times greater in Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/Ar discharges than in BCl{sub 3}/H{sub 2}/Ar discharges independent of the H{sub 2} concentration. In both discharges, the etch rates decreased as the H{sub 2} concentration increased above 10%. When SF{sub 6} was substituted for H{sub 2}, the GaN etch rates in BCl{sub 3}-based plasmas were greater than those for the Cl{sub 2}-based discharges as the SF{sub 6} concentration increased. GaN etch rates were greater in Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/Ar discharges as compared to Cl{sub 2}SF{sub 6}/Ar discharges whereas the opposite trend was observed for BCl{sub 3}-based discharges. Variations in surface morphology and near-surface stoichiometry due to plasma chemistries were also investigated using atomic force microscopy and Auger spectroscopy, respectively.

  20. Photoluminescence of Zn-implanted GaN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, J. I.; Hutchby, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The photoluminescence spectrum of Zn-implanted GaN peaks at 2.87 eV at room temperature. The emission efficiency decreases linearly with the logarithm of the Zn concentration in the range from 1 x 10 to the 18th to 20 x 10 to the 18th Zn/cu cm.

  1. Properties of H, O and C in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    The electrical properties of the light ion impurities H, O and C in GaN have been examined in both as-grown and implanted material. H is found to efficiently passivate acceptors such as Mg, Ca and C. Reactivation occurs at {ge} 450 C and is enhanced by minority carrier injection. The hydrogen does not leave the GaN crystal until > 800 C, and its diffusivity is relatively high ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 2}/s) even at low temperatures (< 200 C) during injection by wet etching, boiling in water or plasma exposure. Oxygen shows a low donor activation efficiency when implanted into GaN, with an ionization level of 30--40 meV. It is essentially immobile up to 1,100 C. Carbon can produce low p-type levels (3 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}) in GaN during MOMBE, although there is some evidence it may also create n-type conduction in other nitrides.

  2. GaN as a radiation hard particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J.; Bates, R.; Cunningham, W.; Blue, A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Vaitkus, J.; Gaubas, E.; O'Shea, V.

    2007-06-01

    Semiconductor tracking detectors at experiments such as ATLAS and LHCb at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be subjected to intense levels of radiation. The proposed machine upgrade, the Super-LHC (SLHC), to 10 times the initial luminosity of the LHC will require detectors that are ultra-radiation hard. Much of the current research into finding a detector that will meet the requirements of the SLHC has focused on using silicon substrates with enhanced levels of oxygen, for example Czochralski silicon and diffusion oxygenated float zone silicon, and into novel detector structures such as 3D devices. Another avenue currently being investigated is the use of wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN). Both SiC and GaN should be intrinsically more radiation hard than silicon. Pad and guard ring structures were fabricated on three epitaxial GaN wafers. The epitaxial GaN thickness was either 2.5 or 12 μm and the fabricated detectors were irradiated to various fluences with 24 GeV/c protons and 1 MeV neutrons. Detectors were characterised pre- and post-irradiation by performing current-voltage ( I- V) and charge collection efficiency (CCE) measurements. Devices fabricated on 12 μm epitaxial GaN irradiated to fluences of 1016 protons cm-2 and 1016 neutrons cm-2 show maximum CCE values of 26% and 20%, respectively, compared to a maximum CCE of 53% of the unirradiated device.

  3. Substitutional and interstitial carbon in wurtzite GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. F.

    2002-09-01

    First-principles theoretical results are presented for substitutional and interstitial carbon in wurtzite GaN. Carbon is found to be a shallow acceptor when substituted for nitrogen (CN) and a shallow donor when substituted for gallium (CGa). Interstitial carbon (CI) is found to assume different configurations depending on the Fermi level: A site at the center of the c-axis channel is favored when the Fermi level is below 0.9 eV (relative to the valence band maximum) and a split-interstitial configuration is favored otherwise. Both configurations produce partly filled energy levels near the middle of the gap, and CI should therefore exhibit deep donor behavior in p-type GaN and deep acceptor behavior in n-type GaN. Formation energies for CN, CGa, and CI are similar, making it likely that CN acceptors will be compensated by other carbon species. CGa is predicted to be the primary compensating species when growth occurs under N-rich conditions while channel CI is predicted to be the primary compensating species under Ga-rich growth conditions. Self-compensation is predicted to be more significant under Ga-rich growth conditions than under N-rich conditions. Experimental evidence for self-compensation is discussed. Four carbon complexes are discussed. CN-VGa is found to be unstable when the Fermi level is above the middle of the gap due to the high stability of gallium vacancies (VGa). The CN-VGa complex was previously suggested as a source of the broad 2.2 eV luminescence peak often observed in n-type GaN. The present results indicate that this is unlikely. The CI-CN complex is capable of forming in carbon doped GaN grown under Ga-rich conditions if the mobility of the constituents is high enough. Experimental evidence for its existence is discussed.

  4. Sputtering of Si, SiC, InAs, InP, Ge, GaAs, GaSb, and GaN by electrosprayed nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Borrajo-Pelaez, Rafael; Grustan-Gutierrez, Enric; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2013-11-14

    This article presents a characterization of the damage caused by energetic beams of electrosprayed nanodroplets striking the surfaces of single-crystal semiconductors including Si, SiC, InAs, InP, Ge, GaAs, GaSb, and GaN. The sputtering yield (number of atoms ejected per projectile's molecule), sputtering rate, and surface roughness are measured as functions of the beam acceleration potential. The maximum values of the sputtering yields range between 1.9 and 2.2 for the technological important but difficult to etch SiC and GaN respectively, and 4.5 for Ge. The maximum sputtering rates for the non-optimized beam flux conditions used in our experiments vary between 409 nm/min for SiC and 2381 nm/min for GaSb. The maximum sputtering rate for GaN is 630 nm/min. Surface roughness increases modestly with acceleration voltage, staying within 2 nm and 20 nm for all beamlet acceleration potentials and materials except Si. At intermediate acceleration potentials, the surface of Si is formed by craters orders of magnitude larger than the projectiles, yielding surface roughness in excess of 60 nm. The effect of projectile dose is studied in the case of Si. This parameter is correlated with the formation of the large craters typical of Si, which suggests that the accumulation of damage following consecutive impacts plays an important role in the interaction between beamlet and target.

  5. Surface-normal emission from subwavelength GaN membrane grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjin; Shi, Zheng; Li, Xin; He, Shumin; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Hongbo

    2014-01-13

    We present here the fabrication of subwavelength GaN membrane grating with a double-side process. Controllable GaN membrane thickness is achieved by backside thinning technique, which is essential to realize guided-mode resonant GaN grating in the visible range. Subwavelength GaN grating can serve as an optical resonator and accommodate surface-normal emission coupling. The measured photoluminescence (PL) spectra are sensitive to the parameters and shapes of GaN gratings. Both numerical simulation and reflectivity measurement are in consistent with the PL experimental results. This work opens a promising way to embed GaN-based photon emitter inside subwavelength grating to further produce a surface emitting device with a single layer GaN grating.

  6. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry–Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ∼1 μm and a length of ∼15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry–Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm‑2. The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices.

  7. Photo-induced Doping in GaN Epilayers with Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Lin, T N; Inciong, M R; Santiago, S R M S; Yeh, T W; Yang, W Y; Yuan, C T; Shen, J L; Kuo, H C; Chiu, C H

    2016-03-18

    We demonstrate a new doping scheme where photo-induced carriers from graphene quantum dots (GQDs) can be injected into GaN and greatly enhance photoluminescence (PL) in GaN epilayers. An 8.3-fold enhancement of PL in GaN is observed after the doping. On the basis of time-resolved PL studies, the PL enhancement is attributed to the carrier transfer from GQDs to GaN. Such a carrier transfer process is caused by the work function difference between GQDs and GaN, which is verified by Kelvin probe measurements. We have also observed that photocurrent in GaN can be enhanced by 23-fold due to photo-induced doping with GQDs. The improved optical and transport properties from photo-induced doping are promising for applications in GaN-based optoelectronic devices.

  8. Enhancing the field emission properties of Se-doped GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Enling; Wu, Guishuang; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    Pure and Se-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on Pt-coated Si(111) substrates via chemical vapor deposition. The GaN NWs exhibit a uniform density with an average diameter of 20-120 nm. The structure of the NWs is wurtzite hexagonal, and the growth direction is along [0001]. Field emission measurements show that the Se-doped GaN NWs possess a low turn-on field (2.9 V μm(-1)) compared with the pure GaN NWs (7.0 V μm(-1)). In addition, density functional theory calculations indicate that the donor states near the Fermi level are mainly formed through the hybridization between Se 4p and N 2p orbitals and that the Fermi level move towards the vacuum level. Consequently, the work functions of Se-doped GaN NWs are lower than those of pure GaN NWs.

  9. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry-Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ∼1 μm and a length of ∼15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry-Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm(-2). The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices.

  10. Computational synthesis of single-layer GaN on refractory materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Arunima K.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2014-08-04

    The synthesis of single-layer materials relies on suitable substrates. In this paper, we identify suitable substrates for the stabilization and growth of single-layer GaN and characterize the effect of the substrate on the electronic structure of single-layer GaN. We identify two classes of epitaxial substrates, refractory metal diborides and transition-metal dichalcogenides. We find that the refractory diborides provide epitaxial stabilization for the growth and functionalization of single layer GaN. We show that chemical interactions of single layer GaN with the diboride substrates result in n-type doping of the single-layer GaN. Transition-metal dichalcogenides, on the other hand, although epitaxially matched, cannot provide sufficient thermodynamic stabilization for the growth of single layer GaN. Nonetheless, energy band alignments of GaN/metal chalcogenides show that they make good candidates for heterostructures.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of GaN nanowire doubly clamped resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Maliakkal, Carina B. Mathew, John P.; Hatui, Nirupam; Rahman, A. Azizur; Deshmukh, Mandar M.; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2015-09-21

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) have been intensely researched as building blocks for nanoscale electronic and photonic device applications; however, the mechanical properties of GaN nanostructures have not been explored in detail. The rigidity, thermal stability, and piezoelectric properties of GaN make it an interesting candidate for nano-electromechanical systems. We have fabricated doubly clamped GaN NW electromechanical resonators on sapphire using electron beam lithography and estimated the Young's modulus of GaN from resonance frequency measurements. For wires of triangular cross section with side ∼90 nm, we obtained values for the Young's modulus to be about 218 and 691 GPa, which are of the same order of magnitude as the values reported for bulk GaN. We also discuss the role of residual strain in the nanowire on the resonant frequency and the orientation dependence of the Young's modulus in wurtzite crystals.

  12. Enhancing the field emission properties of Se-doped GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enling; Wu, Guishuang; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    Pure and Se-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on Pt-coated Si(111) substrates via chemical vapor deposition. The GaN NWs exhibit a uniform density with an average diameter of 20–120 nm. The structure of the NWs is wurtzite hexagonal, and the growth direction is along [0001]. Field emission measurements show that the Se-doped GaN NWs possess a low turn-on field (2.9 V μm‑1) compared with the pure GaN NWs (7.0 V μm‑1). In addition, density functional theory calculations indicate that the donor states near the Fermi level are mainly formed through the hybridization between Se 4p and N 2p orbitals and that the Fermi level move towards the vacuum level. Consequently, the work functions of Se-doped GaN NWs are lower than those of pure GaN NWs.

  13. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry-Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ˜1 μm and a length of ˜15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry-Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm-2. The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of GaN nanowire doubly clamped resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliakkal, Carina B.; Mathew, John P.; Hatui, Nirupam; Rahman, A. Azizur; Deshmukh, Mandar M.; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2015-09-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) have been intensely researched as building blocks for nanoscale electronic and photonic device applications; however, the mechanical properties of GaN nanostructures have not been explored in detail. The rigidity, thermal stability, and piezoelectric properties of GaN make it an interesting candidate for nano-electromechanical systems. We have fabricated doubly clamped GaN NW electromechanical resonators on sapphire using electron beam lithography and estimated the Young's modulus of GaN from resonance frequency measurements. For wires of triangular cross section with side ˜90 nm, we obtained values for the Young's modulus to be about 218 and 691 GPa, which are of the same order of magnitude as the values reported for bulk GaN. We also discuss the role of residual strain in the nanowire on the resonant frequency and the orientation dependence of the Young's modulus in wurtzite crystals.

  15. Study of radiation detection properties of GaN pn diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Mutsuhito; Kushimoto, Maki; Mitsunari, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kohei; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoku; Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru; Nakano, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    Recently, GaN, which has remarkable properties as a material for optical devices and high-power electron devices, has also attracted attention as a material for radiation detectors. We previously suggested the use of BGaN as a neutron detector material. However, the radiation detection characteristics of GaN itself are not yet adequately understood. For realizing a BGaN neutron detector, the understanding of the radiation detection characteristics of GaN, which is a base material of the neutron detector, is important. In this study, we evaluated the radiation detection characteristics of GaN. We performed I-V and energy spectrum measurements under alpha ray, gamma ray, and thermal neutron irradiations to characterize the radiation detection characteristics of a GaN diode. The obtained results indicate that GaN is an effective material for our proposed new BGaN-based neutron detector.

  16. Photo-induced Doping in GaN Epilayers with Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Lin, T. N.; Inciong, M. R.; Santiago, S. R. M. S.; Yeh, T. W.; Yang, W. Y.; Yuan, C. T.; Shen, J. L.; Kuo, H. C.; Chiu, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new doping scheme where photo-induced carriers from graphene quantum dots (GQDs) can be injected into GaN and greatly enhance photoluminescence (PL) in GaN epilayers. An 8.3-fold enhancement of PL in GaN is observed after the doping. On the basis of time-resolved PL studies, the PL enhancement is attributed to the carrier transfer from GQDs to GaN. Such a carrier transfer process is caused by the work function difference between GQDs and GaN, which is verified by Kelvin probe measurements. We have also observed that photocurrent in GaN can be enhanced by 23-fold due to photo-induced doping with GQDs. The improved optical and transport properties from photo-induced doping are promising for applications in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26987403

  17. Structural properties of free-standing 50 mm diameter GaN waferswith (101_0) orientation grown on LiAlO2

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, Jacek; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Maruska, Herbert-Paul; Chai, Bruce H.; Hill, David W.; Chou, Mitch M.C.; Gallagher, John J.; Brown, Stephen

    2005-09-27

    (10{und 1}0) GaN wafers grown on (100) face of {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Despite good lattice matching in this heteroepitaxial system, high densities of planar structural defects in the form of stacking faults on the basal plane and networks of boundaries located on prism planes inclined to the layer/substrate interface were present in these GaN layers. In addition, significant numbers of threading dislocations were observed. High-resolution electron microscopy indicates that stacking faults present on the basal plane in these layers are of low-energy intrinsic I1type. This is consistent with diffraction contrast experiments.

  18. Direct growth of freestanding GaN on C-face SiC by HVPE

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Hao, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yuanbin; Huo, Qin

    2015-01-01

    In this work, high quality GaN crystal was successfully grown on C-face 6H-SiC by HVPE using a two steps growth process. Due to the small interaction stress between the GaN and the SiC substrate, the GaN was self-separated from the SiC substrate even with a small thickness of about 100 μm. Moreover, the SiC substrate was excellent without damage after the whole process so that it can be repeatedly used in the GaN growth. Hot phosphoric acid etching (at 240 °C for 30 min) was employed to identify the polarity of the GaN layer. According to the etching results, the obtained layer was Ga-polar GaN. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were done to characterize the quality of the freestanding GaN. The Raman measurements showed that the freestanding GaN film grown on the C-face 6H-SiC was stress-free. The optical properties of the freestanding GaN layer were determined by photoluminescence (PL) spectra. PMID:26034939

  19. Si in GaN -- On the nature of the background donor

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, C.; Chen, A.L.; Suski, T.; Ager, J.W. III; Walukiewicz, W.

    1996-08-01

    A characterization of the Si impurity in GaN is performed by Raman spectroscopy. Applying hydrostatic pressure up to 25 GPa the authors study the behavior of the LO phonon-plasmon mode in a series of high mobility Si doped GaN films. In contrast to earlier results on unintentionally doped bulk GaN crystals no freeze out of the free carriers could be observed in Si doped samples. The authors find that Si is a shallow hydrogenic donor throughout the pressure range studied. This result positively excludes Si incorporation as a dominant source of free electrons in previously studied bulk GaN samples.

  20. Direct growth of freestanding GaN on C-face SiC by HVPE.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Hao, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yuanbin; Huo, Qin

    2015-06-02

    In this work, high quality GaN crystal was successfully grown on C-face 6H-SiC by HVPE using a two steps growth process. Due to the small interaction stress between the GaN and the SiC substrate, the GaN was self-separated from the SiC substrate even with a small thickness of about 100 μm. Moreover, the SiC substrate was excellent without damage after the whole process so that it can be repeatedly used in the GaN growth. Hot phosphoric acid etching (at 240 °C for 30 min) was employed to identify the polarity of the GaN layer. According to the etching results, the obtained layer was Ga-polar GaN. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were done to characterize the quality of the freestanding GaN. The Raman measurements showed that the freestanding GaN film grown on the C-face 6H-SiC was stress-free. The optical properties of the freestanding GaN layer were determined by photoluminescence (PL) spectra.

  1. Optical and field emission properties of layer-structure GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Zhen; Li, Enling; Shi, Wei; Ma, Deming

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The layer-structure GaN nanowires with hexagonal-shaped cross-sections are produced via a process based on the CVD method. • The diameter of the layer-structure GaN nanowire gradually decreases from ∼500 nm to ∼200 nm along the wire axis. • The layer-structure GaN nanowire film possesses good field emission property. - Abstract: A layer-structure gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires, grown on Pt-coated n-type Si (1 1 1) substrate, have been synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The results show: (1) SEM indicates that the geometry structure is layer-structure. HRTEM indicates that GaN nanowire’s preferential growth direction is along [0 0 1] direction. (2) The room temperature PL emission spectrum of the layer-structure GaN nanowires has a peak at 375 nm, which proves that GaN nanowires have potential application in light-emitting nano-devices. (3) Field-emission measurements show that the layer-structure GaN nanowires film has a low turn-on field of 4.39 V/μm (at room temperature), which is sufficient for electron emission devices, field emission displays and vacuum nano-electronic devices. The growth mechanism for GaN nanowires has also been discussed briefly.

  2. Dislocation-induced nanoparticle decoration on a GaN nanowire.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Qingyun; Huang, Nan; Qiu, Jianhang; Staedler, Thorsten; Liu, Baodan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    GaN nanowires with homoepitaxial decorated GaN nanoparticles on their surface along the radial direction have been synthesized by means of a chemical vapor deposition method. The growth of GaN nanowires is catalyzed by Au particles via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Screw dislocations are generated along the radial direction of the nanowires under slight Zn doping. In contrast to the metal-catalyst-assisted VLS growth, GaN nanoparticles are found to prefer to nucleate and grow at these dislocation sites. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis demonstrates that the GaN nanoparticles possess two types of epitaxial orientation with respect to the corresponding GaN nanowire: (I) [1̅21̅0]np//[1̅21̅0]nw, (0001)np//(0001)nw; (II) [1̅21̅3]np//[12̅10]nw, (101̅0)np//(101̅0)nw. An increased Ga signal in the energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) profile lines of the nanowires suggests GaN nanoparticle growth at the edge surface of the wires. All the crystallographic results confirm the importance of the dislocations with respect to the homoepitaxial growth of the GaN nanoparticles. Here, screw dislocations situated on the (0001) plane provide the self-step source to enable nucleation of the GaN nanoparticles.

  3. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  4. Spontaneous nucleation and growth of GaN nanowires: the fundamental role of crystal polarity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Kong, Xiang; Gotschke, Tobias; Calarco, Raffaella; Geelhaar, Lutz; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver

    2012-12-12

    We experimentally investigate whether crystal polarity affects the growth of GaN nanowires in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and whether their formation has to be induced by defects. For this purpose, we prepare smooth and coherently strained AlN layers on 6H-SiC(0001) and SiC(0001̅) substrates to ensure a well-defined polarity and an absence of structural and morphological defects. On N-polar AlN, a homogeneous and dense N-polar GaN nanowire array forms, evidencing that GaN nanowires form spontaneously in the absence of defects. On Al-polar AlN, we do not observe the formation of Ga-polar GaN NWs. Instead, sparse N-polar GaN nanowires grow embedded in a Ga-polar GaN layer. These N-polar GaN nanowires are shown to be accidental in that the necessary polarity inversion is induced by the formation of Si(x)N. The present findings thus demonstrate that spontaneously formed GaN nanowires are irrevocably N-polar. Due to the strong impact of the polarity on the properties of GaN-based devices, these results are not only essential to understand the spontaneous formation of GaN nanowires but also of high technological relevance.

  5. Self-induced GaN nanowire growth: surface density determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koryakin, A. A.; Repetun, L.; Sibirev, N. V.; Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    A new numerical approach for the determination of the GaN nanowire surface density on an AlN/Si substrate as a function of the growth time and gallium flux is presented. Within this approach, the GaN island solid-like coalescence and island-nanowire transition are modeled by the Monte-Carlo method. We show the importance of taking into consideration the island coalescence for explaining that the maximum of GaN island surface density is several times larger than the maximum of GaN nanowire surface density. Also, we find that the nanowire surface density decreases with an increase of the gallium flux.

  6. Dependence of adhesion strength between GaN LEDs and sapphire substrate on power density of UV laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Junsu; Sin, Young-Gwan; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Jaegu

    2016-10-01

    Selective laser lift-off (SLLO) is an innovative technology used to manufacture and repair micro-light-emitting diode (LED) displays. In SLLO, laser is irradiated to selectively separate micro-LED devices from a transparent sapphire substrate. The light source used is an ultraviolet (UV) laser with a wavelength of 266 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns, and repetition rate of 30 kHz. Controlled adhesion between a LED and the substrate is key for a SLLO process with high yield and reliability. This study examined the fundamental relationship between adhesion and laser irradiation. Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate: Ga precipitation caused by the thermal decomposition of GaN and roughened interface caused by thermal damage on the sapphire. The competition between these two mechanisms leads to a non-trivial SLLO condition that needs optimization. This study helps understand the SLLO process, and accelerate the development of a process for manufacturing micro-LED displays via SLLO for future applications.

  7. Understanding of surface pit formation mechanism of GaN grown in MOCVD based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Yuan, Gao; Xiao-Wei, Xue; Jiang-Jiang, Li; Xun, Wang; Yan-Hui, Xing; Bi-Feng, Cui; De-Shu, Zou

    2016-06-01

    Frank’s theory describes that a screw dislocation will produce a pit on the surface, and has been evidenced in many material systems including GaN. However, the size of the pit calculated from the theory deviates significantly from experimental result. Through a careful observation of the variations of surface pits and local surface morphology with growing temperature and V/III ratio for c-plane GaN, we believe that Frank’s model is valid only in a small local surface area where thermodynamic equilibrium state can be assumed to stay the same. If the kinetic process is too vigorous or too slow to reach a balance, the local equilibrium range will be too small for the center and edge of the screw dislocation spiral to be kept in the same equilibrium state. When the curvature at the center of the dislocation core reaches the critical value 1/r 0, at the edge of the spiral, the accelerating rate of the curvature may not fall to zero, so the pit cannot reach a stationary shape and will keep enlarging under the control of minimization of surface energy to result in a large-sized surface pit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204009 and 61204011) and the Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 4142005).

  8. UV-photoassisted etching of GaN in KOH

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Auh, K.H.; Han, J.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-03-01

    The etch rate of GaN under ultraviolet-assisted photoelectrochemical conditions in KOH solutions is found to be a strong function of illumination intensity, solution molarity, sample bias, and material doping level. At low e-h pair generation rates, grain boundaries are selectively etched, while at higher illumination intensities etch rates for unintentionally doped (n {approximately} 3 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}) GaN are {ge} 1,000 {angstrom} {center_dot} min{sup {minus}1}. The etching is diffusion-limited under the conditions with an activation energy of {approximately} 0.8 kCal{center_dot}mol{sup {minus}1}. The etched surfaces are rough, but retain their stoichiometry.

  9. Status of GaN HEMT performance and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Daniel S.; Brown, J. D.; Vetury, R.; Lee, S.; Gibb, S. R.; Krishnamurthy, K.; Poulton, M. J.; Martin, J.; Shealy, J. B.

    2008-02-01

    This report will focus on the status of GaN HEMT based amplifier technology development at RFMD. This technology is based around GaN on semi-insulating SiC substrates for optimal thermal performance. RFMD's 0.5μm gate technology features high performance advanced field plate structures, including a unit power cell producing high gain (21dB), high power density (3-5W/mm at 28V) and high efficiency (65-70 percent) at cellular frequencies. We will report on transistor and module performance relevant to applications ranging from high power, high bandwidth amplifiers, to switches and ICs for radar, electronic warfare, cellular infrastructure and homeland security. Additionally, we will report on reliability results that demonstrate capability for dependable, high voltage operation.

  10. GaN UV detectors for protein studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J.; Bates, R.; Cunningham, W.; Blue, A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Manolopoulos, S.; O'Shea, V.

    2006-07-01

    GaN and its ternary alloy AlGaN have been investigated as UV detector materials for applications in protein structure studies. Interdigitated metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) finger photodiodes, with finger spacings/widths of 5 and 10 μm, were successfully fabricated on six different GaN/AlGaN materials. Current-Voltage ( I- V) characteristics and spectral response measurements were made on completed devices. The results showed negligible difference in performance between the 5 μm finger spacing/width diode design and the 10 μm finger spacing/width diode design. Using these results, a 46 channel diode array, with a finger spacing/width of 10 μm, was successfully fabricated on 2.5 μm thick epitaxial GaN. This 46 channel diode array will be used in a protein structure experiment at the Daresbury SRS.

  11. ITON Schottky contacts for GaN based UV photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhove, N.; John, J.; Lorenz, A.; Cheng, K.; Borghs, G.; Haverkort, J. E. M.

    2006-12-01

    Lateral Schottky ultraviolet detectors were fabricated in GaN using indium-tin-oxynitride (ITON) as a contact metal. The GaN semiconductor material was grown on 2 in. sapphire substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The Schottky contact has been realized using ITON that has been deposited using sputter techniques. I- V characteristics have been measured with and without UV illumination. The device shows photo-to-dark current ratios of 10 3 at -1 V bias. The spectral responsivity of the UV detectors has been determined. The high spectral responsivity of more than 30 A/W at 240 nm is explained by a high internal gain caused by generation-recombination centers at the ITON/GaN interface. Persistent photocurrent effect has been observed in UV light (on-off) switching operation, time constant and electron capture coefficient of the transition has been determined.

  12. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for Measurement of Integral Soil Water Content at the Small Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. One largest initiative to cover the measuring gap of soil moisture between point scale and remote sensing observations is the COSMOS network (Zreda et al., 2012). Here, cosmic-ray neutron sensing, which may be more precisely named ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS), is applied. The measuring principle is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. Soil water content contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters is inversely correlated to the neutron flux at the air-ground interface. This approach is now implemented, e.g. in USA (Zreda et al., 2012) and Germany (Rivera Villarreyes et al., 2011), based on its simple installation and integral measurement of soil moisture at the small catchment scale. The present study performed Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing on farmland at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam and Berlin cropped with corn in 2010, sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. In order to test this methodology, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, several calibration approaches, role of vegetation cover and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations were also evaluated. Observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil moisture from GANS compared quantitatively with mean values derived from a network of classical devices under vegetated and non- vegetated conditions. The GANS approach responded well

  13. Thermal functionalization of GaN surfaces with 1-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan U; Cimalla, Volker; Eichapfel, Georg; Himmerlich, Marcel; Krischok, Stefan; Ambacher, Oliver

    2013-05-28

    A thermally induced functionalization process for gallium nitride surfaces with 1-alkenes is introduced. The resulting functionalization layers are characterized with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared to reference samples without and with a photochemically generated functionalization layer. The resulting layers show very promising characteristics as functionalization for GaN based biosensors. On the basis of the experimental results, important characteristics of the functionalization layers are estimated and a possible chemical reaction scheme is proposed. PMID:23617559

  14. Photoluminescence of ion-implanted GaN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, J. I.; Hutchby, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-five elements were implanted in GaN. Their photoluminescence spectra were measured and compared to those of an unimplanted control sample. Most impurities emit a peak at about 2.15 eV. Mg, Zn, Cd, Ca, As, Hg, and Ag have more characteristic emissions. Zn provides the most efficient recombination center. A set of midgap states is generated during the damage-annealing treatment.

  15. Optical properties of Yb ions in GaN epilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadwisienczak, W. M.; Lozykowski, H. J.

    2003-07-01

    In recent years, an important effort in semiconductor materials research has been devoted to III-nitrides semiconductors doped with rare earth ions due to the high potential of these materials in light-emitting device applications. Ytterbium (Yb 3+) is one of a few lanthanide ions which have not been investigated as an optically active center in these materials yet. In this paper we report the observation of luminescence from GaN films grown on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrate by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and doped by implantation with Yb 3+ ions. The high resolution photo- and cathodoluminescence spectra of GaN:Yb 3+ were studied at different excitation conditions in temperatures ranging from 8 to 330 K and revealed weak thermal quenching. The luminescence emission lines are assigned to transitions between the spin-orbit levels 2F 5/2 → 2F 7/2 of Yb 3+ (4f 13). The analysis of the Yb luminescence spectra allowed us to suggest the energy level diagram of the crystal-field-split 4f 13 levels for the Yb ion center. The most probable lattice location of Yb in GaN is the substitutional Ga site. Furthermore, the luminescence kinetics of internal transitions of Yb 3+ incorporated in GaN was investigated by means of decay and time-resolved luminescence measurements. It was found that the ytterbium decay is non-exponential with dominant exponential term of ˜100 μs with little dependence on the ambient temperature. The results indicate that Yb-doped GaN epilayer may be suitable as a material for near infrared optoelectronic devices.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polar and nonpolar GaN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudin, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    Growth, structural and optical properties of GaN quantum dots are reviewed, with a special emphasis on plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The versatility of this technique makes it particularly adapted to growth of quantum dots, either polar (c-plane) or nonpolar (a-plane and m-plane). After describing in detail the growth process and analyzing the morphology of the dots, we review the optical properties of these nanostructures and discuss the properties of single dots.

  17. UV-Photoassisted Etching of GaN in KOH

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Auh, K.H.; Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Han, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren F.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-12

    The etch rate of GaN under W-assisted photoelectrochemical conditions in KOH solutions is found to be a strong function of illumination intensity, solution molarity, sample bias and material doping level. At low e-h pair generation rates, grain boundaries are selectively etched, while at higher illumination intensities etch rates for unintentionally doped (n - 3x 10^12Gcm-3) GaN are 2 1000 .min-l. The etching is diffusion limited under our conditions with an activation energy of - 0.8kCal.mol-1. The etched surfaces are rough, but retain their stoichiometry. PEC etching is found to selectively reveal grain boundaries in GaN under low light illumination conditions. At high lamp powers the rates increase with sample temperature and the application of bias to the PEC cell, while they go through a maximum with KOH solution molarity. The etching is diffusion-limited, producing rough surface morphologies that are suitable in a limited number of device fabrication steps. The surfaces however appear to remain relatively close to their stoichiometric composition.

  18. Magnesium diffusion profile in GaN grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzarti, Z.; Halidou, I.; Bougrioua, Z.; Boufaden, T.; El Jani, B.

    2008-07-01

    The diffusion of magnesium has been studied in GaN layers grown on sapphire substrate by atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapor-phase-epitaxy (MOVPE) in a "home-made" reactor. Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to visualise the Mg profiles in two kinds of multi-sublayer GaN structures. One structure was grown with a variable flow of Ga precursor (TMG) and the second one with a variable growth temperature. In both cases, the Mg dopant precursor (Cp 2Mg) flow was kept constant. Using the second Fick's law to fit the experimental SIMS data, we have deduced an increasing then a saturating Mg diffusion coefficient versus the Mg concentration. Mg incorporation was found to get higher for lower growth rate, i.e. when TMG flow is reduced. Furthermore, based on the temperature-related behaviour we have found that the activation energy for Mg diffusion coefficient in GaN was 1.9 eV. It is suggested that Mg diffuses via substitutional sites.

  19. Metal contacts on ZnSe and GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Duxstad, K J

    1997-05-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been focused on the development of blue light emitting materials and devices. The focus has been on GaN and ZnSe, direct band gap semiconductors with bands gaps of 3.4 and 2.6 eV, respectively. To have efficient, reliable devices it is necessary to have thermally and electrically stable Ohmic contacts. This requires knowledge of the metal-semiconductor reaction behavior. To date few studies have investigated this behavior. Much information has accumulated over the years on the behavior of metals on Si and GaAs. This thesis provides new knowledge for the more ionic wide band gap semiconductors. The initial reaction temperatures, first phases formed, and phase stability of Pt, Pd, and Ni on both semiconductors were investigated. The reactions of these metals on ZnSe and GaN are discussed in detail and correlated with predicted behavior. In addition, comparisons are made between these highly ionic semiconductors and Si and GaAs. The trends observed here should also be applicable to other II-VI and III-Nitride semiconductor systems, while the information on phase formation and stability should be useful in the development of contacts for ZnSe and GaN devices.

  20. Dislocation core structures in Si-doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Rhode, S. L. Fu, W. Y.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Horton, M. K.; Pennycook, T. J.; Dusane, R. O.; Moram, M. A.

    2015-12-14

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the core structures of threading dislocations in plan-view geometry of GaN films with a range of Si-doping levels and dislocation densities ranging between (5 ± 1) × 10{sup 8} and (10 ± 1) × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. All a-type (edge) dislocation core structures in all samples formed 5/7-atom ring core structures, whereas all (a + c)-type (mixed) dislocations formed either double 5/6-atom, dissociated 7/4/8/4/9-atom, or dissociated 7/4/8/4/8/4/9-atom core structures. This shows that Si-doping does not affect threading dislocation core structures in GaN. However, electron beam damage at 300 keV produces 4-atom ring structures for (a + c)-type cores in Si-doped GaN.

  1. Epitaxially-Grown GaN Junction Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Denbaars, S.P.; Lester, L.F.; Mishra, U.K.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-05-19

    Junction field effect transistors (JFET) are fabricated on a GaN epitaxial structure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The DC and microwave characteristics of the device are presented. A junction breakdown voltage of 56 V is obtained corresponding to the theoretical limit of the breakdown field in GaN for the doping levels used. A maximum extrinsic transconductance (gm) of 48 mS/mm and a maximum source-drain current of 270 mA/mm are achieved on a 0.8 µ m gate JFET device at VGS= 1 V and VDS=15 V. The intrinsic transconductance, calculated from the measured gm and the source series resistance, is 81 mS/mm. The fT and fmax for these devices are 6 GHz and 12 GHz, respectively. These JFETs exhibit a significant current reduction after a high drain bias is applied, which is attributed to a partially depleted channel caused by trapped hot-electrons in the semi-insulating GaN buffer layer. A theoretical model describing the current collapse is described, and an estimate for the length of the trapped electron region is given.

  2. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  3. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  4. Structure and electronic properties of GaN tubelike clusters and single-walled GaN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren; Zou, Yanbo; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2015-06-01

    Extensive studies of the geometric structures, stabilities and electronic properties of gallium nitride (GaN)n tubelike clusters and single-walled GaN nanotubes (GaNNTs) were carried out using density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. A family of stable tubelike structures with Ga-N alternating arrangement was observed when n≥8 and their structural units (four-membered rings (4MRs) and six-membered rings (6MRs)) obey the general developing formula. The size-dependent properties of the frontier molecular orbital surfaces explain why the long and stable tubelike clusters can be obtained successfully. They also illustrate the reason why GaNNTs can be synthesized experimentally. Our results also reveal that the single-walled GaNNTs, which as semiconductors with a large bandgap, can be prepared by using the proper assembly of tubelike clusters.

  5. On the Helmert-blocking technique: its acceleration by block Choleski decomposition and formulae to insert observations into an adjusted network.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Eduardo; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    The Helmert-blocking technique is a common approach to adjust large geodetic networks like Europeans and Brazilians. The technique is based upon a division of the network into partial networks called blocks. This way, the global network adjustment can be done by manipulating these blocks. Here we show alternatives to solve the block system that arises from the application of the technique. We show an alternative that optimizes its implementation as the elapsed processing time is decreased by about 33%. We also show that to insert observations into an adjusted network it is not necessary to readjust the whole network. We show the formulae to insert new observations into an adjusted network that are more efficient than simply readjusting the whole new network. PMID:26064634

  6. On the Helmert-blocking technique: its acceleration by block Choleski decomposition and formulae to insert observations into an adjusted network

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Eduardo; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The Helmert-blocking technique is a common approach to adjust large geodetic networks like Europeans and Brazilians. The technique is based upon a division of the network into partial networks called blocks. This way, the global network adjustment can be done by manipulating these blocks. Here we show alternatives to solve the block system that arises from the application of the technique. We show an alternative that optimizes its implementation as the elapsed processing time is decreased by about 33%. We also show that to insert observations into an adjusted network it is not necessary to readjust the whole network. We show the formulae to insert new observations into an adjusted network that are more efficient than simply readjusting the whole new network. PMID:26064634

  7. Flexible GaN Light-Emitting Diodes Using GaN Microdisks Epitaxial Laterally Overgrown on Graphene Dots.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kunook; Yoo, Hyobin; Hyun, Jerome K; Oh, Hongseok; Tchoe, Youngbin; Lee, Keundong; Baek, Hyeonjun; Kim, Miyoung; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2016-09-01

    The epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) of GaN microdisks on graphene microdots and the fabrication of flexible light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using these microdisks is reported. An ELOG technique with only patterned graphene microdots is used, without any growth mask. The discrete micro-LED arrays are transferred onto Cu foil by a simple lift-off technique, which works reliably under various bending conditions. PMID:27346527

  8. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  9. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  10. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  11. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  12. Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  13. Network cosmology.

    PubMed

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology.

  14. Multi-wavelength emitting InGan/GaN quantum well grown on V-shaped gan(1101) microfacet.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun-Sil; Ju, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jin Soo; Ahn, Haeng-Keun; Lee, June Key; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Shin, Dong-Chan; Lee, In-Hwan

    2007-11-01

    InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were successfully grown on the inclined GaN(1101) microfacets. Conventional photolithography and subsequent growth of GaN were employed to generate the V-shaped microfacets along (1120) direction. The well-developed microfacets observed by scanning electron microscopy and the clear transmission electron microscope interfacial images indicated that the MQW was successfully grown on the GaN microfacets. Interestingly, cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra measured on the microfacets showed a continuous change in the luminescence peak positions. The CL peaks were shifted to a longer wavelength from 420 nm to 440 nm as the probing points were changed along upward direction. This could be attributed to the nonuniform distribution of the In composition and/or the wavefunction overlapping between adjacent wells. Present works thus propose a novel route to fabricate a monolithic white light emitting diode without phosphors by growing the InGaN/GaN MQWs on (1101) facet.

  15. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  16. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerf, Vinton G.

    1991-01-01

    The demands placed on the networks transporting the information and knowledge generated by the increased diversity and sophistication of computational machinery are described. What is needed to support this increased flow, the structures already in place, and what must be built are topics of discussion. (KR)

  17. Nanoheteroepitaxy of GaN on AlN/Si(111) nanorods fabricated by nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Shin, In-Su; Jin, Lu; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Yongjo; Yoon, Euijoon

    2016-06-01

    Nanoheteroepitaxy (NHE) of GaN on an AlN/Si(111) nanorod structure was investigated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Silica nanosphere lithography was employed to fabricate a periodic hexagonal nanorod array with a narrow gap of 30 nm between the nanorods. We were successful in obtaining a fully coalesced GaN film on the AlN/Si(111) nanorod structure. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that threading dislocation (TD) bending and termination by stacking faults occurred near the interface between GaN and the AlN/Si(111) nanorods, resulting in the reduction of TD density for the NHE GaN layer. The full width at half-maximum of the X-ray rocking curve for (102) plane of the NHE GaN was found to decrease down to 728 arcsec from 1005 arcsec for the GaN layer on a planar AlN/Si(111) substrate, indicating that the crystalline quality of the NHE GaN was improved. Also, micro-Raman measurement showed that tensile stress in the NHE GaN layer was reduced significantly as much as 70% by introducing air voids between the nanorods.

  18. Structural effects of field emission from GaN nanofilms on SiC substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Ru-Zhi Zhu, Man-Kang; Yan, Hui; Liu, Peng; Wang, Bi-Ben

    2014-04-21

    GaN nanofilms (NFs) with different structures are grown on SiC substrates by pulsed laser deposition under different conditions. The synthesized GaN NFs are studied by X-ray diffraction, field-emission (FE) scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The GaN NFs are composed of diversified GaN nanoparticles with a diameter of 9–38 nm, thickness of 10–50 nm, and roughness of 0.22–13.03 nm. FE from the GaN NFs is structure dependent, which is explained by stress changing the band gap of the NFs. By structure modulation, the turn-on field of GaN NFs can be as low as 0.66 V/μm at a current density of 1 μA/cm{sup 2}, with a current density of up to 1.1 mA/cm{sup 2} at a field of 4.18 V/μm. Fowler-Nordheim curves of some samples contain multiple straight lines, which originate from the structural change and diversification of GaN nanoparticles under an applied field. Overall, our results suggest that GaN NFs with excellent FE properties can be prepared on SiC substrates, which provides a new route to fabricate high-efficiency FE nanodevices.

  19. Opportunities and challenges in GaN metal organic chemical vapor deposition for electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koh; Yamaoka, Yuya; Ubukata, Akinori; Arimura, Tadanobu; Piao, Guanxi; Yano, Yoshiki; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Tabuchi, Toshiya

    2016-05-01

    The current situation and next challenge in GaN metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for electron devices of both GaN on Si and GaN on GaN are presented. We have examined the possibility of increasing the growth rate of GaN on 200-mm-diameter Si by using a multiwafer production MOCVD machine, in which the vapor phase parasitic reaction is well controlled. The impact of a high-growth-rate strained-layer-superlattice (SLS) buffer layer is presented in terms of material properties. An SLS growth rate of as high as 3.46 µm/h, which was 73% higher than the current optimum, was demonstrated. As a result, comparable material properties were obtained. Next, a typical result of GaN doped with Si of 1 × 1016 cm-3 grown at the growth rate of 3.7 µm/h is shown. For high-voltage application, we need a thick high-purity GaN drift layer with a low carbon concentration, of less than 1016 cm-3. It is shown that achieving a high growth rate by precise control of the vapor phase reaction is still challenge in GaN MOCVD.

  20. Integral Quantification of Soil Water Content at the Intermediate Catchment Scale by Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. One new measurement methodology for integral quantifications of mean areal soil water content at the intermediate catchment scale is the aboveground sensing of cosmic-ray neutrons, more precisely ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS). Ground albedo natural neutrons, are generated by collisions of secondary cosmic rays with land surface materials (soil, water, biomass, snow, etc). Neutrons measured at the air/ground interface correlate with soil moisture contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters. This correlation is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. The present study performed ground albedo neutron sensing in different locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with corn in 2010 and sunflowers in 2011, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains, Germany) in 2011. In order to test this method, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, calibration approach, and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations are also evaluated. Our observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil water content from GANS compared quantitatively with mean water content values derived from a network of classical devices (RMSE = 0.02 m3/m3 and r2 = 0.98) in three calibration periods with cropped-field conditions. Then, same calibration parameters corresponded

  1. Prospects for the application of GaN power devices in hybrid electric vehicle drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming; Chen, Chingchi; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-07-01

    GaN, a wide bandgap semiconductor successfully implemented in optical and high-speed electronic devices, has gained momentum in recent years for power electronics applications. Along with rapid progress in material and device processing technologies, high-voltage transistors over 600 V have been reported by a number of teams worldwide. These advances make GaN highly attractive for the growing market of electrified vehicles, which currently employ bipolar silicon devices in the 600-1200 V class for the traction inverter. However, to capture this billion-dollar power market, GaN has to compete with existing IGBT products and deliver higher performance at comparable or lower cost. This paper reviews key achievements made by the GaN semiconductor industry, requirements of the automotive electric drive system and remaining challenges for GaN power devices to fit in the inverter application of hybrid vehicles.

  2. Step-induced misorientation of GaN grown on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Smalc-Koziorowska, J.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Komninou, Ph.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Georgakilas, A.

    2008-07-14

    In the growth of nonpolar (1120) a-plane GaN on r-plane (1102) sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, misoriented crystallites are observed close to the substrate. They have average diameter {approx}10 nm and are oriented with the (0001){sub GaN} plane approximately parallel to the (2113){sub sapph.} plane and [0110]{sub GaN} parallel [1101]{sub sapph.}. This semipolar orientation is promoted by a low misfit (2.4%) between (1011){sub GaN} and (1210){sub sapph.} planes. Its introduction, after nitridation treatment, is due to GaN nucleation on (2113){sub sapph.} step facets inclined at 26 deg. relative to the r-plane. Two variants are observed, leading to twinning when they abut inside the epilayer.

  3. Polarity of semipolar wurtzite crystals: X-ray photoelectron diffraction from GaN(101⁻1) and GaN(202⁻1) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyuk, O. Jiříček, P.; Bartoš, I.; Paskova, T.

    2014-09-14

    Polarity of semipolar GaN(101⁻1) (101⁻1⁻) and GaN(202⁻1) (202⁻1⁻) surfaces was determined with X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) using a standard MgKα source. The photoelectron emission from N 1s core level measured in the a-plane of the crystals shows significant differences for the two crystal orientations within the polar angle range of 80–100° from the (0001) normal. It was demonstrated that XPD polar plots recorded in the a-plane are similar for each polarity of the GaN(101⁻1) and GaN(202⁻1) crystals if referred to (0001) crystal axes. For polarity determinations of all important GaN(h0h⁻l) semipolar surfaces, the above given polar angle range is suitable.

  4. GaN: From three- to two-dimensional single-layer crystal and its multilayer van der Waals solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onen, A.; Kecik, D.; Durgun, E.; Ciraci, S.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) GaN is a III-V compound semiconductor with potential optoelectronic applications. In this paper, starting from 3D GaN in wurtzite and zinc-blende structures, we investigated the mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of the 2D single-layer honeycomb structure of GaN (g -GaN ) and its bilayer, trilayer, and multilayer van der Waals solids using density-functional theory. Based on high-temperature ab initio molecular-dynamics calculations, we first showed that g -GaN can remain stable at high temperature. Then we performed a comparative study to reveal how the physical properties vary with dimensionality. While 3D GaN is a direct-band-gap semiconductor, g -GaN in two dimensions has a relatively wider indirect band gap. Moreover, 2D g -GaN displays a higher Poisson ratio and slightly less charge transfer from cation to anion. In two dimensions, the optical-absorption spectra of 3D crystalline phases are modified dramatically, and their absorption onset energy is blueshifted. We also showed that the physical properties predicted for freestanding g -GaN are preserved when g -GaN is grown on metallic as well as semiconducting substrates. In particular, 3D layered blue phosphorus, being nearly lattice-matched to g -GaN , is found to be an excellent substrate for growing g -GaN . Bilayer, trilayer, and van der Waals crystals can be constructed by a special stacking sequence of g -GaN , and they can display electronic and optical properties that can be controlled by the number of g -GaN layers. In particular, their fundamental band gap decreases and changes from indirect to direct with an increasing number of g -GaN layers.

  5. Fabrication of low-density GaN/AlN quantum dots via GaN thermal decomposition in MOCVD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Senlin; Xiong, Hui; Tian, Wu; Li, Yang; Fang, Yanyan; Wu, Zhihao; Dai, Jiangnan; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    With an appropriate high anneal temperature under H2 atmosphere, GaN quantum dots (QDs) have been fabricated via GaN thermal decomposition in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Based on the characterization of atomic force microscopy (AFM), the obtained GaN QDs show good size distribution and have a low density of 2.4 × 10(8) cm(-2). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis demonstrates that the GaN QDs were formed without Ga droplets by thermal decomposition of GaN.

  6. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  7. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  8. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  9. Fabrication of GaN Microporous Structure at a GaN/Sapphire Interface as the Template for Thick-Film GaN Separation Grown by HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianli; Cheng, Hongjuan; Zhang, Song; Lan, Feifei; Qi, Chengjun; Xu, Yongkuan; Wang, Zaien; Li, Jing; Lai, Zhanping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a microporous structure at the GaN/sapphire interface has been obtained by an electrochemical etching method via a selective etching progress using an as-grown GaN/sapphire wafer grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The as-prepared GaN interfacial microporous structure has been used as a template for the following growth of thick-film GaN crystal by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), facilitating the fabrication of a free-standing GaN substrate detached from a sapphire substrate. The evolution of the interfacial microporous structure has been investigated by varying the etching voltages and time, and the formation mechanism of interfacial microporous structure has been discussed in detail as well. Appropriate interfacial microporous structure is beneficial for separating the thick GaN crystal grown by HVPE from sapphire during the cooling down process. The separation that occurred at the place of interfacial microporous can be attributed to the large thermal strain between GaN and sapphire. This work realized the fabrication of a free-standing GaN substrate with high crystal quality and nearly no residual strain.

  10. Features of molecular beam epitaxy of the GaN (0001) and GaN (0001-bar) layers with the use of different methods of activation of nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Mizerov, A. M. Jmerik, V. N.; Kaibyshev, V. K.; Komissarova, T. A.; Masalov, S. A.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2009-08-15

    The results of comparative studies of the growth kinetics of the GaN layers of different polarity during ammonia molecular beam epitaxy and plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA MBE) of nitrogen with the use of sapphire substrates and GaN(0001-bar)/c-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} templates grown by gas-phase epitaxy from metalorganic compounds are presented. The possibility is shown of obtaining the GaN layers with an atomically smooth surface during molecular beam epitaxy with plasma activation of nitrogen. For this purpose, it is suggested to carry out the growth in conditions enriched with metal near the mode of formation of the Ga drops at a temperature close to the decomposition temperature of GaN (TS {approx} 760 deg. C). The conclusion is made that an increase in the growth temperature positively affects the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the GaN (0001-bar) layers. A high quality of the GaN (0001) films grown by the PA MBE method at a low temperature of {approx}700 deg. C on the GaN/c-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} templates is shown.

  11. Visible fiber lasers excited by GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakanishi, Jun; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes and discusses visible fiber lasers that are excited by GaN laser diodes. One of the attractive points of visible light is that the human eye is sensitive to it between 400 and 700 nm, and therefore we can see applications in display technology. Of course, many other applications exist. First, we briefly review previously developed visible lasers in the gas, liquid, and solid-state phases and describe the history of primary solid-state visible laser research by focusing on rare-earth doped fluoride media, including glasses and crystals, to clarify the differences and the merits of primary solid-state visible lasers. We also demonstrate over 1 W operation of a Pr:WPFG fiber laser due to high-power GaN laser diodes and low-loss optical fibers (0.1 dB/m) made by waterproof fluoride glasses. This new optical fiber glass is based on an AlF3 system fluoride glass, and its waterproof property is much better than the well known fluoride glass of ZBLAN. The configuration of primary visible fiber lasers promises highly efficient, cost-effective, and simple laser systems and will realize visible lasers with photon beam quality and quantity, such as high-power CW or tunable laser systems, compact ultraviolet lasers, and low-cost ultra-short pulse laser systems. We believe that primary visible fiber lasers, especially those excited by GaN laser diodes, will be effective tools for creating the next generation of research and light sources.

  12. GaN Nanowire Devices: Fabrication and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Reum

    The development of microelectronics in the last 25 years has been characterized by an exponential increase of the bit density in integrated circuits (ICs) with time. Scaling solid-state devices improves cost, performance, and power; as such, it is of particular interest for companies, who gain a market advantage with the latest technology. As a result, the microelectronics industry has driven transistor feature size scaling from 10 μm to ~30 nm during the past 40 years. This trend has persisted for 40 years due to optimization, new processing techniques, device structures, and materials. But when noting processor speeds from the 1970's to 2009 and then again in 2010, the implication would be that the trend has ceased. To address the challenge of shrinking the integrated circuit (IC), current research is centered on identifying new materials and devices that can supplement and/or potentially supplant it. Bottom-up methods tailor nanoscale building blocks---atoms, molecules, quantum dots, and nanowires (NWs)---to be used to overcome these limitations. The Group IIIA nitrides (InN, AlN, and GaN) possess appealing properties such as a direct band gap spanning the whole solar spectrum, high saturation velocity, and high breakdown electric field. As a result nanostructures and nanodevices made from GaN and related nitrides are suitable candidates for efficient nanoscale UV/ visible light emitters, detectors, and gas sensors. To produce devices with such small structures new fabrication methods must be implemented. Devices composed of GaN nanowires were fabricated using photolithography and electron beam lithography. The IV characteristics of these devices were noted under different illuminations and the current tripled from 4.8*10-7 A to 1.59*10 -6 A under UV light which persisted for at least 5hrs.

  13. Devices for medical diagnosis with GaN lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasny, Miroslaw; Mierczyk, Zygmunt

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents laser-induced fluroescence method (LIF) employing endogenous ("autofluroescence") and exogenous fluorophores. LIF is applied for clinical diagnosis in dermatology, gynaecology, urology, lung tumors as well as for early dentin caries. We describe the analysers with He-Ne, He-Cd, and SHG Nd:YAG lasers and new generation systems based on blue semiconductor GaN lasers that have been implemented into clinical practice till now. The LIF method, fundamental one for many medical applications, with excitation radiation of wavelength 400 nm could be appl,ied only using tunable dye lasers or titanium lasers adequte for laboratory investigations. Development of GaN laser shows possibility to design portable, compact diagnostic devices as multi-channel analysers of fluorescence spectra and surface imaging devoted to clinical application. The designed systems used for spectra measurement and registration of fluorescence images include lasers of power 5-30 mW and generate wavelengths of 405-407 nm. They are widely used in PDT method for investigation of superficial distribution of accumulation kinetics of all known photosensitizers, their elimination, and degradation as well as for treatment of superficial lesions of mucosa and skin. Excitation of exogenous porphrins in Soret band makes possible to estimate their concentration and a period of healthy skin photosensitivity that occurs after photosensitiser injections. Due to high sensitivity of spectrum analysers, properties of photosensitisers can be investigated in vitro (e.g. their aggregation, purity, chromatographic distributions) when their concentrations are 2-3 times lower in comparison to concentrations investigated with typical spectrofluorescence methods. Dentistry diagnosis is a new field in which GaN laser devices can be applied. After induction with blue light, decreased autofluorescence intensity can be observed when dentin caries occur and strong characteristic bands of endogenous porphyrines

  14. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  15. Chlorine-based plasma etching of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Briggs, R.D.; Pearton, S.J.; Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.; Constantine, C.; Baratt, C.

    1997-02-01

    The wide band gap group-III nitride materials continue to generate interest in the semiconductor community with the fabrication of green, blue, and ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs), blue lasers, and high temperature transistors. Realization of more advanced devices requires pattern transfer processes which are well controlled, smooth, highly anisotropic and have etch rates exceeding 0.5 {micro}m/min. The utilization of high-density chlorine-based plasmas including electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) systems has resulted in improved GaN etch quality over more conventional reactive ion etch (RIE) systems.

  16. High field effects of GaN HEMTs.

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Joy; Shul, Randy John

    2004-09-01

    This report represents the completion of a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to develop and fabricate geometric test structures for the measurement of transport properties in bulk GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. A large part of this study was spent examining fabrication issues related to the test structures used in these measurements, due to the fact that GaN processing is still in its infancy. One such issue had to do with surface passivation. Test samples without a surface passivation, often failed at electric fields below 50 kV/cm, due to surface breakdown. A silicon nitride passivation layer of approximately 200 nm was used to reduce the effects of surface states and premature surface breakdown. Another issue was finding quality contacts for the material, especially in the case of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure samples. Poor contact performance in the heterostructures plagued the test structures with lower than expected velocities due to carrier injection from the contacts themselves. Using a titanium-rich ohmic contact reduced the contact resistance and stopped the carrier injection. The final test structures had an etch constriction with varying lengths and widths (8x2, 10x3, 12x3, 12x4, 15x5, and 16x4 {micro}m) and massive contacts. A pulsed voltage input and a four-point measurement in a 50 {Omega} environment was used to determine the current through and the voltage dropped across the constriction. From these measurements, the drift velocity as a function of the applied electric field was calculated and thus, the velocity-field characteristics in n-type bulk GaN and AlGaN/GaN test structures were determined. These measurements show an apparent saturation velocity near to 2.5x10{sup 7} cm/s at 180 kV/cm and 3.1x10{sup 7} cm/s, at a field of 140 kV/cm, for the bulk GaN and AlGaN heterostructure samples, respectively. These experimental drift velocities mark the highest velocities measured in these materials to date and confirm

  17. Role of oxygen at screw dislocations in GaN.

    PubMed

    Arslan, I; Browning, N D

    2003-10-17

    Here we report the first direct atomic scale experimental observations of oxygen segregation to screw dislocations in GaN using correlated techniques in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The amount of oxygen present in each of the three distinct types of screw dislocation core is found to depend on the evolution and structure of the core, and thus gives rise to a varying concentration of localized states in the band gap. Contrary to previous theoretical predictions, the substitution of oxygen for nitrogen is observed to extend over many monolayers for the open core dislocation. PMID:14611410

  18. H enhancement of N vacancy migration in GaN.

    SciTech Connect

    Wixom, Ryan R.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2005-06-01

    We have used density functional theory to investigate diffusion of V{sub N}{sup +} in the presence of H{sup +}. Optimal migration pathways were determined using the climbing image nudged elastic band and directed dimer methods. Our calculations indicate that the rate-limiting barrier for VN{sub N}{sup +} migration will be reduced by 0.58 eV by interplay with H{sup +}, which will enhance migration by more than an order of magnitude at typical GaN growth temperatures.

  19. Stress related aspects of GaN technology physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, Ephraim

    2015-03-01

    Simple, easy-to-use and physically meaningful analytical models have been developed for the assessment of the combined effect of the lattice and thermal mismatch on the induced stresses in an elongated bi-material assembly, as well as on the thermal mismatch on the thermal stresses in a tri-material assembly, in which the lattice mismatched stresses are eliminated in one way or another. This could be done, e.g., by using a polished or an etched substrate. The analysis is carried out in application to Gallium Nitride (GaN)-Silicon Carbide (SiC) and GaN-diamond (C) filmsubstrate assemblies. The calculated data are obtained, assuming that no annealing or other stress reduction means is applied. The data agree reasonably well with the reported (available) in-situ measurements. The most important conclusion from the computed data is that even if a reasonably good lattice match takes place (as, e.g., in the case of a GaN film fabricated on a SiC substrate, when the mismatch strain is only about 3%) and, in addition, the temperature change (from the fabrication/growth temperature to the operation temperature) is significant (as high as 1000 °C), the thermal stresses are still considerably lower than the lattice-mismatch stresses. Although there are structural and technological means for further reduction of the lattice-mismatch stresses (e.g., by high temperature annealing or by providing one or more buffering layers, or by using patterned or porous substrates), there is still a strong incentive to eliminate completely the lattice mismatch stresses. This seems to be indeed possible, if polished or otherwise flattened (e.g., chemically etched) substrates and sputter deposited GaN film is employed. In such a case only thermal stresses remain, but even these could be reduced, if necessary, by using compliant buffering layers, including layers of variable compliance, or by introducing variable compliance into the properly engineered substrate. In any event, it is expected

  20. Photoluminescence enhancement from GaN by beryllium doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Gutiérrez, R.; Ramos-Carrazco, A.; Berman-Mendoza, D.; Hirata, G. A.; Contreras, O. E.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2016-10-01

    High quality Be-doped (Be = 0.19 at.%) GaN powder has been grown by reacting high purity Ga diluted alloys (Be-Ga) with ultra high purity ammonia in a horizontal quartz tube reactor at 1200 °C. An initial low-temperature treatment to dissolve ammonia into the Ga melt produced GaN powders with 100% reaction efficiency. Doping was achieved by dissolving beryllium into the gallium metal. The powders synthesized by this method regularly consist of two particle size distributions: large hollow columns with lengths between 5 and 10 μm and small platelets in a range of diameters among 1 and 3 μm. The GaN:Be powders present a high quality polycrystalline profile with preferential growth on the [10 1 bar 1] plane, observed by means of X-ray diffraction. The three characteristics growth planes of the GaN crystalline phase were found by using high resolution TEM microscopy. The optical enhancing of the emission in the GaN powder is attributed to defects created with the beryllium doping. The room temperature photoluminescence emission spectra of GaN:Be powders, revealed the presence of beryllium on a shoulder peak at 3.39 eV and an unusual Y6 emission at 3.32eV related to surface donor-acceptor pairs. Also, a donor-acceptor-pair transition at 3.17 eV and a phonon replica transition at 3.1 eV were observed at low temperature (10 K). The well-known yellow luminescence band coming from defects was observed in both spectra at room and low temperature. Cathodoluminescence emission from GaN:Be powders presents two main peaks associated with an ultraviolet band emission and the yellow emission known from defects. To study the trapping levels related with the defects formed in the GaN:Be, thermoluminescence glow curves were obtained using UV and β radiation in the range of 50 and 150 °C.

  1. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  2. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  3. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  4. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  5. The Louisiana Accelerated Schools Project First Year Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Edward P.; And Others

    The Louisiana Accelerated Schools Project (LASP) is a statewide network of schools that are changing from the traditional mode of schooling for at-risk students, which stresses remediation, to one of acceleration, which stresses accelerated learning for all students. The accelerated schools process provides a systematic approach to the…

  6. The influence of Fe doping on the surface topography of GaN epitaxial material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Cui; Haibo, Yin; Lijuan, Jiang; Quan, Wang; Chun, Feng; Hongling, Xiao; Cuimei, Wang; Jiamin, Gong; Bo, Zhang; Baiquan, Li; Xiaoliang, Wang; Zhanguo, Wang

    2015-10-01

    Fe doping is an effective method to obtain high resistivity GaN epitaxial material. But in some cases, Fe doping could result in serious deterioration of the GaN material surface topography, which will affect the electrical properties of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in HEMT device. In this paper, the influence of Fe doping on the surface topography of GaN epitaxial material is studied. The results of experiments indicate that the surface topography of Fe-doped GaN epitaxial material can be effectively improved and the resistivity could be increased after increasing the growth rate of GaN materials. The GaN material with good surface topography can be manufactured when the Fe doping concentration is 9 × 1019 cm-3. High resistivity GaN epitaxial material which is 1 × 109 Ω·cm is achieved. Project supported by the Knowledge Innovation Engineering of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. YYY-0701-02), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61204017, 61334002), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China, and the National Science and Technology Major Project.

  7. Influence of surface scattering on the thermal properties of spatially confined GaN nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yang; Zhu, Lin-Li

    2016-08-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), the notable representative of third generation semiconductors, has been widely applied to optoelectronic and microelectronic devices due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we investigate the surface scattering effect on the thermal properties of GaN nanofilms. The contribution of surface scattering to phonon transport is involved in solving a Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The confined phonon properties of GaN nanofilms are calculated based on the elastic model. The theoretical results show that the surface scattering effect can modify the cross-plane phonon thermal conductivity of GaN nanostructures completely, resulting in the significant change of size effect on the conductivity in GaN nanofilm. Compared with the quantum confinement effect, the surface scattering leads to the order-of-magnitude reduction of the cross-plane thermal conductivity in GaN nanofilm. This work could be helpful for controlling the thermal properties of GaN nanostructures in nanoelectronic devices through surface engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11302189 and 11321202) and the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130101120175).

  8. Influence of surface scattering on the thermal properties of spatially confined GaN nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yang; Zhu, Lin-Li

    2016-08-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), the notable representative of third generation semiconductors, has been widely applied to optoelectronic and microelectronic devices due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we investigate the surface scattering effect on the thermal properties of GaN nanofilms. The contribution of surface scattering to phonon transport is involved in solving a Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The confined phonon properties of GaN nanofilms are calculated based on the elastic model. The theoretical results show that the surface scattering effect can modify the cross-plane phonon thermal conductivity of GaN nanostructures completely, resulting in the significant change of size effect on the conductivity in GaN nanofilm. Compared with the quantum confinement effect, the surface scattering leads to the order-of-magnitude reduction of the cross-plane thermal conductivity in GaN nanofilm. This work could be helpful for controlling the thermal properties of GaN nanostructures in nanoelectronic devices through surface engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11302189 and 11321202) and the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130101120175).

  9. One-step graphene coating of heteroepitaxial GaN films.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Kyung; Huh, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sung-Dae; Moon, Daeyoung; Yoon, Duhee; Joo, Kisu; Kwak, Jinsung; Chu, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Kibog; Kim, Young-Woon; Yoon, Euijoon; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2012-11-01

    Today, state-of-the-art III-Ns technology has been focused on the growth of c-plane nitrides by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using a conventional two-step growth process. Here we show that the use of graphene as a coating layer allows the one-step growth of heteroepitaxial GaN films on sapphire in a MOCVD reactor, simplifying the GaN growth process. It is found that the graphene coating improves the wetting between GaN and sapphire, and, with as little as ~0.6 nm of graphene coating, the overgrown GaN layer on sapphire becomes continuous and flat. With increasing thickness of the graphene coating, the structural and optical properties of one-step grown GaN films gradually transition towards those of GaN films grown by a conventional two-step growth method. The InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure grown on a GaN/graphene/sapphire heterosystem shows a high internal quantum efficiency, allowing the use of one-step grown GaN films as 'pseudo-substrates' in optoelectronic devices. The introduction of graphene as a coating layer provides an atomic playground for metal adatoms and simplifies the III-Ns growth process, making it potentially very useful as a means to grow other heteroepitaxial films on arbitrary substrates with lattice and thermal mismatch.

  10. Theoretical study for heterojunction surface of NEA GaN photocathode dispensed with Cs activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Meishan; Kong, Yike

    2016-09-01

    For the disadvantages of conventional negative electron affinity (NEA) GaN photocathodes activated by Cs or Cs/O, new-type NEA GaN photocathodes with heterojunction surface dispensed with Cs activation are investigated based on first-principle study with density functional theory. Through the growth of an ultrathin n-type GaN cap layer on p-type GaN emission layer, a p-n heterojunction is formed on the surface. According to the calculation results, it is found that Si atoms tend to replace Ga atoms to result in an n-type doped cap layer which contributes to the decreasing of work function. After the growth of n-type GaN cap layer, the atom structure near the p-type emission layer is changed while that away from the surface has no obvious variations. By analyzing the E-Mulliken charge distribution of emission surface with and without cap layer, it is found that the positive charge of Ga and Mg atoms in the emission layer decrease caused by the cap layer, while the negative charge of N atom increases. The conduction band moves downwards after the growth of cap layer. Si atom produces donor levels around the valence band maximum. The absorption coefficient of GaN emission layer decreases and the reflectivity increases caused by n-type GaN cap layer.

  11. Design, fabrication and characterising of 100 W GaN HEMT for Ku-band application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunjiang, Ren; Shichang, Zhong; Yuchao, Li; Zhonghui, Li; Yuechan, Kong; Tangsheng, Chen

    2016-08-01

    Ku-band GaN power transistor with output power over 100 W under the pulsed operation mode is presented. A high temperature A1N nucleation together with an Fe doped GaN buffer was introduced for the developed GaN HEMT. The AlGaN/GaN hetero-structure deposited on 3 inch SiC substrate exhibited a 2DEG hall mobility and density of ˜2100 cm2/(V·s) and 1.0 × 1013 cm-2, respectively, at room temperature. Dual field plates were introduced to the designed 0.25 μm GaN HEMT and the source connected field plate was optimized for minimizing the peak field plate near the drain side of the gate, while maintaining excellent power gain performance for Ku-band application. The load-pull measurement at 14 GHz showed a power density of 5.2 W/mm for the fabricated 400 μm gate periphery GaN HEMT operated at a drain bias of 28 V. A Ku-band internally matched GaN power transistor was developed with two 10.8 mm gate periphery GaN HEMT chips combined. The GaN power transistor exhibited an output power of 102 W at 13.3 GHz and 32 V operating voltage under pulsed operation mode with a pulse width of 100 μs and duty cycle of 10%. The associated power gain and power added efficiency were 9.2 dB and 48%, respectively. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the PAE is the highest for Ku-band GaN power transistor with over 100 W output power.

  12. Annealing effects on polycrystalline GaN using nitrogen and ammonia ambients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariff, A.; Zainal, N.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes effects of using post-annealing treatment in different conditions on the properties of polycrystalline GaN layer grown on m-plane sapphire substrate by electron beam (e-beam) evaporator. Without annealing, GaN surface was found to have a low RMS roughness with agglomeration of GaN grains in a specific direction and the sample consisted of gallium oxide (Ga2O3) material. When the post-annealing treatment was carried out in N2 ambient at 650 °C, initial re-crystallization of the GaN grains was observed while the evidence of Ga2O3 almost disappeared. As the NH3 annealing was conducted at 950 °C, more effect of re-crystallization occurred but with less grains coalescence. Three dominant XRD peaks of GaN in (10 1 bar 0) , (0002) and (10 1 bar 1) orientations were evident. Near band edge (NBE) related emission in GaN was also observed. The significant improvement was attributed to simultaneous recrystallization and effective reduction of N deficiency density. The post-annealing in a mixture of N2 and NH3 ambient at 950 °C was also conducted, but has limited the effectiveness of the N atoms to incorporate on the GaN layer due to 'clouding' effect by the inert N2 gas. Further increase in the annealing temperature at 980 °C and 1100 °C, respectively caused severe deteriorations of the structural and optical properties of the GaN layer. Overall, this work demonstrated initial potential in improving polycrystalline GaN material in simple and inexpensive manner.

  13. Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Weyher, J.L.; Lazar, S.; Macht, L.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar,R.J.; Muller, S.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.

    2006-08-10

    Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN in molten eutectic of KOH + NaOH (E etch) and in hot sulfuric and phosphoric acids (HH etch) is discussed in detail. Three size grades of pits are formed by the preferential E etching at the outcrops of threading dislocations on the Ga-polar surface of GaN. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the calibration tool it is shown that the largest pits are formed on screw, intermediate on mixed and the smallest on edge dislocations. This sequence of size does not follow the sequence of the Burgers values (and thus the magnitude of the elastic energy) of corresponding dislocations. This discrepancy is explained taking into account the effect of decoration of dislocations, the degree of which is expected to be different depending on the lattice deformation around the dislocations, i.e. on the edge component of the Burgers vector. It is argued that the large scatter of optimal etching temperatures required for revealing all three types of dislocations in HVPE-grown samples from different sources also depends upon the energetic status of dislocations. The role of kinetics for reliability of etching in both etches is discussed and the way of optimization of the etching parameters is shown.

  14. Size dictated thermal conductivity of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechem, Thomas E.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Fuller, Elliot J.; Talin, A. Alec; Rost, Christina M.; Maria, Jon-Paul; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal conductivity of n- and p-type doped gallium nitride (GaN) epilayers having thicknesses of 3-4 μm was investigated using time domain thermoreflectance. Despite possessing carrier concentrations ranging across 3 decades (1015-1018 cm-3), n-type layers exhibit a nearly constant thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The thermal conductivity of p-type epilayers, in contrast, reduces from 160 to 110 W/mK with increased doping. These trends—and their overall reduction relative to bulk—are explained leveraging established scattering models where it is shown that, while the decrease in p-type layers is partly due to the increased impurity levels evolving from its doping, size effects play a primary role in limiting the thermal conductivity of GaN layers tens of microns thick. Device layers, even of pristine quality, will therefore exhibit thermal conductivities less than the bulk value of 240 W/mK owing to their finite thickness.

  15. DX-like behavior of oxygen in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Christian; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu; Ager III, Joel W.; Grzegory, Izabella; Meyer, Bruno K.

    2001-02-01

    The role of oxygen as a shallow donor and a DX-state in GaN is elucidated by recent Raman experiments under hydrostatic pressure and the findings of first principles OK calculations. A pressure induced transfer of electrons from a shallow donor state to a deep DX-like state of the same donor can be correlated with vibrational gap modes by monitoring the freeze-out dynamics. Both features are unique to oxygen doped GaN and cannot be observed in Si-doped material. The gap modes can be well explained by a linear chain model of impurity vibrations of substitutional O on the N site. A mode variation, and switching steps in its pressure behavior, which occurs in parallel to the carrier freeze-out are proposed to reflect three different charge states of the strongly localized states of O. This DX-type behavior as well as the experimental threshold pressure values are in excellent agreement with the theory results.

  16. High Quality, Low Cost Ammonothermal Bulk GaN Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrentraut, D; Pakalapati, RT; Kamber, DS; Jiang, WK; Pocius, DW; Downey, BC; McLaurin, M; D'Evelyn, MP

    2013-12-18

    Ammonothermal GaN growth using a novel apparatus has been performed on c-plane, m-plane, and semipolar seed crystals with diameters between 5 mm and 2 in. to thicknesses of 0.5-3 mm. The highest growth rates are greater than 40 mu m/h and rates in the 10-30 mu m/h range are routinely observed for all orientations. These values are 5-100x larger than those achieved by conventional ammonothermal GaN growth. The crystals have been characterized by X-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), optical spectroscopy, and capacitance-voltage measurements. The crystallinity of the grown crystals is similar to or better than that of the seed crystals, with FWHM values of about 20-100 arcsec and dislocation densities of 1 x 10(5)-5 x 10(6) cm(-2). Dislocation densities below 10(4) cm(-2) are observed in laterally-grown crystals. Epitaxial InGaN quantum well structures have been successfully grown on ammonothermal wafers. (C) 2013 The Japan Society of Applied Physics

  17. Properties of GaN grown on sapphire substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, R. K.; Debnam, W. J.; Fripp, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    Epitaxial growth of GaN on sapphire substrates using an open-tube growth furnace has been carried out to study the effects of substrate orientation and transfer gas upon the properties of the layers. It has been found that for the (0001) substrates, surface appearance was virtually independent of carrier gas and of doping levels. For the (1(-1)02) substrates surface faceting was greatly reduced when He was used as a transfer gas as opposed to H2. Faceting was also reduced when the GaN was doped with Zn, and the best surfaces for the (1(-1)02) substrates were obtained in a Zn-doped run using He as the transfer gas. The best sample in terms of electrical properties for the (1(-1)02) substrate had a mobility greater than 400 sq cm/V per sec and a carrier concentration of about 10 to the 17th per cu cm. This sample was undoped and used He as the transfer gas. The best (0001) sample was also grown undoped with He as the transfer gas and had a mobility of 300 sq cm/V per sec and a carrier concentration of 1 x 10 to the 18th per cu cm.

  18. Si Donor Incorporation in GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhihua; Robin, Eric; Rozas-Jiménez, Elena; Cros, Ana; Donatini, Fabrice; Mollard, Nicolas; Pernot, Julien; Daudin, Bruno

    2015-10-14

    With increasing interest in GaN based devices, the control and evaluation of doping are becoming more and more important. We have studied the structural and electrical properties of a series of Si-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with a typical dimension of 2-3 μm in length and 20-200 nm in radius. In particular, high resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) has illustrated a higher Si incorporation in NWs than that in two-dimensional (2D) layers and Si segregation at the edge of the NW with the highest doping. Moreover, direct transport measurements on single NWs have shown a controlled doping with resistivity from 10(2) to 10(-3) Ω·cm, and a carrier concentration from 10(17) to 10(20) cm(-3). Field effect transistor (FET) measurements combined with finite element simulation by NextNano(3) software have put in evidence the high mobility of carriers in the nonintentionally doped (NID) NWs. PMID:26426262

  19. Magneto-ballistic transport in GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoruvo, Giovanni; Allain, Adrien; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Matioli, Elison

    2016-09-01

    The ballistic filtering property of nanoscale crosses was used to investigate the effect of perpendicular magnetic fields on the ballistic transport of electrons on wide band-gap GaN heterostructures. The straight scattering-less trajectory of electrons was modified by a perpendicular magnetic field which produced a strong non-linear behavior in the measured output voltage of the ballistic filters and allowed the observation of semi-classical and quantum effects, such as quenching of the Hall resistance and manifestation of the last plateau, in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. A large measured phase coherence length of 190 nm allowed the observation of universal quantum fluctuations and weak localization of electrons due to quantum interference up to ˜25 K. This work also reveals the prospect of wide band-gap GaN semiconductors as a platform for basic transport and quantum studies, whose properties allow the investigation of ballistic transport and quantum phenomena at much larger voltages and temperatures than in other semiconductors.

  20. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  1. Highly c-axis oriented growth of GaN film on sapphire (0001) by laser molecular beam epitaxy using HVPE grown GaN bulk target

    SciTech Connect

    Kushvaha, S. S.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Maurya, K. K.; Dalai, M. K.; Sharma, Nita D.

    2013-09-15

    Growth temperature dependant surface morphology and crystalline properties of the epitaxial GaN layers grown on pre-nitridated sapphire (0001) substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) were investigated in the range of 500–750 °C. The grown GaN films were characterized using high resolution x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The x-ray rocking curve full width at a half maximum (FWHM) value for (0002) reflection dramatically decreased from 1582 arc sec to 153 arc sec when the growth temperature was increased from 500 °C to 600 °C and the value further decreased with increase of growth temperature up to 720 °C. A highly c-axis oriented GaN epitaxial film was obtained at 720 °C with a (0002) plane rocking curve FWHM value as low as 102 arc sec. From AFM studies, it is observed that the GaN grain size also increased with increasing growth temperature and flat, large lateral grains of size 200-300 nm was obtained for the film grown at 720 °C. The micro-Raman spectroscopy studies also exhibited the high-quality wurtzite nature of GaN film grown on sapphire at 720 °C. The SIMS measurements revealed a non-traceable amount of background oxygen impurity in the grown GaN films. The results show that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and crystalline quality of the epitaxial GaN films on sapphire grown by LMBE.

  2. W-band GaN MMIC PA with 257 mW output power at 86.5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xu; Xubo, Song; Yuanjie, Lü; Yuangang, Wang; Shaobo, Dun; Jiayun, Yin; Yulong, Fang; Guodong, Gu; Zhihong, Feng; Shujun, Cai

    2015-08-01

    A three-stage W-band GaN monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifier (MMIC PA) is reported. In order to manage coupling effects between all the parts of the W-band MMIC, all matching and bias networks have been first optimized using circuit simulating software and then systematically simulated on 3D full-wave electromagnetic simulator. The fabricated MMIC PA achieves a 257 mW output power at 86.5 GHz in continuous-wave mode, with an associated power added efficiency of 5.4% and an associated power gain of 6.1 dB. The power density is 459 mW/mm. Moreover, the MMIC PA offers over 100 mW in the 83-90 GHz bandwidth. Those performances were measured at drain bias of 12 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306113).

  3. Characterization of bulk grown GaN and AlN single crystal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghothamachar, Balaji; Bai, Jie; Dudley, Michael; Dalmau, Rafael; Zhuang, Dejin; Herro, Ziad; Schlesser, Raoul; Sitar, Zlatko; Wang, Buguo; Callahan, Michael; Rakes, Kelly; Konkapaka, Phanikumar; Spencer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Sublimation method, spontaneously nucleated as well as seeded on SiC substrates, has been employed for growing AlN bulk crystals. For GaN growth, in addition to the sublimation method using sapphire substrates, ammonothermal growth (analogous to the hydrothermal method) on HVPE GaN seeds is also being used. Thick plates/films of AlN and GaN grown by these methods have been characterized by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). Results from a recent set of growth experiments are discussed.

  4. Characterization of Bulk Grown GaN and AlN Single Crystal Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Raghothamachar,B.; Bai, J.; Dudley, M.; Dalmau, R.; Zhuang, D.; Herro, Z.; Schlesser, R.; Sitar, Z.; Wang, B.; Callahan, M.

    2006-01-01

    Sublimation method, spontaneously nucleated as well as seeded on SiC substrates, has been employed for growing AlN bulk crystals. For GaN growth, in addition to the sublimation method using sapphire substrates, ammonothermal growth (analogous to the hydrothermal method) on HVPE GaN seeds is also being used. Thick plates/films of AlN and GaN grown by these methods have been characterized by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) and high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). Results from a recent set of growth experiments are discussed.

  5. Density Functional Theory for Green Chemical Catalyst Supported on S-Terminated GaN(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Mami; Tsukamoto, Shiro; Ishii, Akira

    2011-12-01

    A novel function of nitried-based semiconductor is successfully developed for organic synthesis, in which palladium supported on the surface of S-terminated GaN(0001) serves as a unique green chemical catalyst. In this study we determined the structure of Pd-catalyst supported on S-terminated GaN(0001) surface by means of the density functional theory (DFT) within a Local Density Approximation (LDA). The important role of S on the case of GaN substrate is to make the number of the valence electron to be close to 0, it happened same way for GaAs substrate.

  6. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  7. Microstructural properties and dislocation evolution on a GaN grown on patterned sapphire substrate: A transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Ruh, H.; Noh, Y. K.; Kim, M. D.; Oh, J. E.

    2010-03-01

    The microstructural properties of a GaN layer grown on a patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) were studied in detail using transmission electron microscope techniques to determine dislocation and growth behaviors. Regular and uniform recrystallized GaN islands were observed on the protruding pattern. On a flat sapphire surface, the crystallographic orientation relationship of ⟨1¯21¯0⟩GaN on FS//⟨11¯00⟩sapphire and {11¯01}GaN on FS//{12¯13}sapphire existed between the GaN and the substrate. On the other hand, the orientation relationship of ⟨1¯21¯0⟩GaN layer//⟨1¯21¯0⟩GaN island on IS//⟨11¯00⟩sapphire and {11¯01}GaN layer//{0002}GaN island on IS//{12¯13}sapphire was confirmed among the GaN layer, the recrystallized GaN islands on an inclined sapphire surface and the PSS. The flat surface among the protruding patterns began to fill rapidly with GaN. Then, the GaN gradually overgrew the protruding pattern and coalesced near the summit as the growth time increased. The generation of threading dislocations was observed in the vicinity of the coalescence points near the top of the protruding patterns.

  8. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  9. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  10. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  11. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of GaN/(0001)AlN and AlN/(0001)GaN growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. W.; Carlson, E. P.; Therrien, R. J.; Christman, J. A.; Nemanich, R. J.; Davis, R. F.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanisms of growth of GaN on AlN and AlN on GaN via gas source-molecular beam epitaxy with NH3 as the nitrogen source have been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and Auger electron spectroscopy. The growth of GaN on AlN at low temperatures (650-750 °C) occurs via a Stranski-Krastanov 2D→3D type mechanism with the transition to 3D growth occurring at ≈10-15 Å. The mechanism changes to Frank van der Merwe (FM)/layer-by-layer growth above 800 °C. The growth of AlN on GaN occurred via a FM layer-by-layer mechanism within the 750-900 °C temperature range investigated. We propose a model based on the interaction of ammonia and atomic hydrogen with the GaN/AlN surfaces which indicates that the surface kinetics of hydrogen desorption and ammonia decomposition are the factors that determine the GaN growth mechanism.

  13. Ultralow threading dislocation density in GaN epilayer on near-strain-free GaN compliant buffer layer and its applications in hetero-epitaxial LEDs.

    PubMed

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Ching-Hsiang; Yu, Sheng-Fu; Ko, Chung-Ting; Yang, Jer-Ren; Lin, Ray-Ming; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2015-09-02

    High threading dislocation (TD) density in GaN-based devices is a long unresolved problem because of the large lattice mismatch between GaN and the substrate, which causes a major obstacle for the further improvement of next-generation high-efficiency solid-state lighting and high-power electronics. Here, we report InGaN/GaN LEDs with ultralow TD density and improved efficiency on a sapphire substrate, on which a near strain-free GaN compliant buffer layer was grown by remote plasma atomic layer deposition. This "compliant" buffer layer is capable of relaxing strain due to the absorption of misfit dislocations in a region within ~10 nm from the interface, leading to a high-quality overlying GaN epilayer with an unusual TD density as low as 2.2 × 10(5) cm(-2). In addition, this GaN compliant buffer layer exhibits excellent uniformity up to a 6" wafer, revealing a promising means to realize large-area GaN hetero-epitaxy for efficient LEDs and high-power transistors.

  14. Ultralow threading dislocation density in GaN epilayer on near-strain-free GaN compliant buffer layer and its applications in hetero-epitaxial LEDs

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Ching-Hsiang; Yu, Sheng-Fu; Ko, Chung-Ting; Yang, Jer-Ren; Lin, Ray-Ming; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2015-01-01

    High threading dislocation (TD) density in GaN-based devices is a long unresolved problem because of the large lattice mismatch between GaN and the substrate, which causes a major obstacle for the further improvement of next-generation high-efficiency solid-state lighting and high-power electronics. Here, we report InGaN/GaN LEDs with ultralow TD density and improved efficiency on a sapphire substrate, on which a near strain-free GaN compliant buffer layer was grown by remote plasma atomic layer deposition. This “compliant” buffer layer is capable of relaxing strain due to the absorption of misfit dislocations in a region within ~10 nm from the interface, leading to a high-quality overlying GaN epilayer with an unusual TD density as low as 2.2 × 105 cm−2. In addition, this GaN compliant buffer layer exhibits excellent uniformity up to a 6” wafer, revealing a promising means to realize large-area GaN hetero-epitaxy for efficient LEDs and high-power transistors. PMID:26329829

  15. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma capsulatum isolated from infected bats randomly captured in Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina, using the polymorphism of (GA)(n) microsatellite and its flanking regions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Maria Lucia; Hernández-García, Lorena; Estrada-Bárcenas, Daniel; Salas-Lizana, Rodolfo; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M; García de la Cruz, Saúl; Galvão-Dias, Maria A; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo; Canteros, Cristina E; Bojórquez-Torres, Georgina; Bogard-Fuentes, Carlos A; Zamora-Tehozol, Erick

    2012-02-01

    The genetic diversity of 47 Histoplasma capsulatum isolates from infected bats captured in Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina was studied, using sequence polymorphism of a 240-nucleotides (nt) fragment, which includes the (GA)(n) length microsatellite and its flanking regions within the HSP60 gene. Three human clinical strains were used as geographic references. Based on phylogenetic analyses of 240-nt fragments achieved, the relationships among H. capsulatum isolates were resolved using neighbour-joining and maximum parsimony methods. The tree topologies obtained by both methods were identical and highlighted two major clusters of isolates. Cluster I had three sub-clusters (Ia, Ib, and Ic), all of which contained Mexican H. capsulatum samples, while cluster II consisted of samples from Brazil and Argentina. Sub-cluster Ia included only fungal isolates from the migratory bat Tadarida brasiliensis. An average DNA mutation rate of 2.39 × 10(-9) substitutions per site per year was estimated for the 240-nt fragment for all H. capsulatum isolates. Nucleotide diversity analysis of the (GA)(n) and flanking regions from fungal isolates of each cluster and sub-cluster underscored the high similarity of cluster II (Brazil and Argentina), sub-clusters Ib, and Ic (Mexico). According to the genetic distances among isolates, a network of the 240-nt fragment was graphically represented by (GA)(n) length haplotype. This network showed an association between genetic variation and both the geographic distribution and the ecotype dispersion of H. capsulatum, which are related to the migratory behaviour of the infected bats studied. PMID:22289776

  16. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  17. Controlled morphology of regular GaN microrod arrays by selective area growth with HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekhal, Kaddour; Bae, Si-Young; Lee, Ho-Jun; Mitsunari, Tadashi; Tamura, Akira; Deki, Manato; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The selective area growth (SAG) of GaN was implemented on patterned GaN/sapphire templates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) to fabricate regular arrays of Ga-polar GaN microrods. The control of growth parameters such as H2/N2 carrier gas ratio, growth temperature, and absolute NH3/HCl gas flow resulted in changes in the growth morphology. In particular, for an optimized mixed-carrier gas ratio of H2 to N2, we achieved vertically well-aligned microrods. The topmost regions of the GaN microrods were terminated with pyramidal facets, indicating typical Ga polarity. The optical properties of the grown microrods were characterized by cathodoluminescence (CL) at a low temperature. This revealed that the GaN microrods had high crystal quality since they exhibited suppressed yellow luminescence as well as strong band edge emission.

  18. Synthesis and excellent field emission properties of three-dimensional branched GaN nanowire homostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enling; Sun, Lihe; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional branched GaN nanowire homostructures have been synthesized on the Si substrate via a two-step approach by chemical vapor deposition. Structural characterization reveals that the single crystal GaN nanowire trunks have hexagonal wurtzite characteristics and grow along the [0001] direction, while the homoepitaxial single crystal branches grow in a radial direction from the six-sided surfaces of the trunks. The field emission measurements demonstrate that the branched GaN nanowire homostructures have excellent field emission properties, with low turn-on field at 2.35 V/μm, a high field enhancement factor of 2938, and long emission current stability. This indicates that the present branched GaN nanowire homostructures will become valuable for practical field emission applications.

  19. Step-Free GaN Hexagons Grown by Selective-Area Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kasu, Makoto

    2009-09-01

    Selective-area metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy of GaN has been investigated using the optimized growth conditions for the layer (Frank-van der Merwe) growth and GaN-template substrates with low dislocation density. The surface of a GaN hexagon with 16-µm diameter has a single wide terrace over almost the whole area (step-free surface), when there are no screw-type dislocations in the finite area. Step-free GaN hexagons grew in the two-dimensional nucleus growth mode and had approximately an eight times lower growth rate than that of a GaN film grown in the step-flow mode under the growth conditions used in this study.

  20. Radiative defects in GaN nanocolumns: Correlation with growth conditions and sample morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, P.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Grandal, J.; Ristic, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.-A.; Calleja, E.

    2011-02-21

    Low-temperature photoluminescence is studied in detail in GaN nanocolumns (NCs) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under various conditions (substrate temperature and impinging Ga/N flux ratio). The relative intensities of the different emission lines, in particular those related to structural defects, appear to be correlated with the growth conditions, and clearly linked to the NC sample morphology. We demonstrate, in particular, that all lines comprised between 3.10 and 3.42 eV rapidly lose intensity when the growth conditions are such that the NC coalescence is reduced. The well-known line around 3.45 eV, characteristic of GaN NC samples, shows, however, a behavior that is exactly the opposite of the other lines, namely, for growth conditions leading to reduced NC coalescence, this line tends to become more prominent, thus proving to be intrinsic to individual GaN NCs.

  1. Depth dependence of defect density and stress in GaN grown on SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Faleev, N.; Temkin, H.; Ahmad, I.; Holtz, M.; Melnik, Yu.

    2005-12-15

    We report high resolution x-ray diffraction studies of the relaxation of elastic strain in GaN grown on SiC(0001). The GaN layers were grown with thickness ranging from 0.29 to 30 {mu}m. High level of residual elastic strain was found in thin (0.29 to 0.73 {mu}m thick) GaN layers. This correlates with low density of threading screw dislocations of 1-2x10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, observed in a surface layer formed over a defective nucleation layer. Stress was found to be very close to what is expected from thermal expansion mismatch between the GaN and SiC. A model based on generation and diffusion of point defects accounts for these observations.

  2. Tuning electronic and magnetic properties of GaN nanosheets by surface modifications and nanosheet thickness.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meixia; Yao, Tingzhen; Ao, Zhimin; Wei, Peng; Wang, Danghui; Song, Haiyang

    2015-04-14

    Density-functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the effects of surface modifications and nanosheet thickness on the electronic and magnetic properties of gallium nitride (GaN) nanosheets (NSs). Unlike the bare GaN NSs terminating with polar surfaces, the systems with hydrogenated Ga (H-GaN), fluorinated Ga (F-GaN), and chlorinated Ga (Cl-GaN) preserve their initial wurtzite structures and exhibit ferromagnetic states. The abovementioned three different decorations on Ga atoms are energetically more favorable for thicker GaN NSs. Moreover, as the thickness increases, H-GaN and F-GaN NSs undergo semiconductor to metal and half-metal to metal transition, respectively, while Cl-GaN NSs remain completely metallic. The predicted diverse and tunable electronic and magnetic properties highlight the potential of GaN NSs for novel electronic and spintronic nanodevices.

  3. Surface potential barrier in m-plane GaN studied by contactless electroreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Lukasz; Misiewicz, Jan; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Kudrawiec, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Contactless electroreflectance (CER) is used to study the surface potential barrier in m-plane GaN UN+ [GaN (d = 20,30,50,70 nm)/GaN:Si] structures grown by using molecular beam epitaxy. Clear bandgap-related transitions followed by Franz-Keldysh oscillations (FKO) have been observed in the CER spectra of all samples at room temperature. The built-in electric fields in the undoped cap layers have been determined from the FKO period. From the built-in electric field and the undoped GaN layer thickness, the Fermi level location at the air-exposed m-plane GaN surface has been estimated as 0.42 ± 0.05 eV below the conduction band.

  4. Electrical characterization of Schottky contacts to N-polar GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, B. P.; Meyer, D. J.; Katzer, D. S.; Storm, D. F.; Binari, S. C.

    2013-08-01

    The Schottky barrier heights of several metals (Cu, Au, Pd, Ni, and Pt) to N-polar GaN were extracted using current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements. The dependence of barrier height on metal was found to vary linearly with the electronegativity of the metal as predicted by the metal-induced gap states (MIGS)-and-electronegativity model. However, the magnitude of the barrier heights are lower than those predicted by the MIGS model for GaN and lower than the experimentally measured barrier heights for Ga-polar GaN. It is likely that the polarization-induced charge at the N-polar GaN surface is responsible for the reduced barrier height.

  5. High breakdown single-crystal GaN p-n diodes by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Meng; Zhao, Yuning; Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Guowang; Verma, Jai; Fay, Patrick; Nomoto, Kazuki; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang; Protasenko, Vladimir; Song, Bo; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bader, Samuel

    2015-12-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown GaN p-n vertical diodes are demonstrated on single-crystal GaN substrates. A low leakage current <3 nA/cm{sup 2} is obtained with reverse bias voltage up to −20 V. With a 400 nm thick n-drift region, an on-resistance of 0.23 mΩ cm{sup 2} is achieved, with a breakdown voltage corresponding to a peak electric field of ∼3.1 MV/cm in GaN. Single-crystal GaN substrates with very low dislocation densities enable the low leakage current and the high breakdown field in the diodes, showing significant potential for MBE growth to attain near-intrinsic performance when the density of dislocations is low.

  6. High breakdown single-crystal GaN p-n diodes by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Meng; Nomoto, Kazuki; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang; Zhao, Yuning; Protasenko, Vladimir; Song, Bo; Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Guowang; Verma, Jai; Bader, Samuel; Fay, Patrick; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep

    2015-12-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown GaN p-n vertical diodes are demonstrated on single-crystal GaN substrates. A low leakage current <3 nA/cm2 is obtained with reverse bias voltage up to -20 V. With a 400 nm thick n-drift region, an on-resistance of 0.23 mΩ cm2 is achieved, with a breakdown voltage corresponding to a peak electric field of ˜3.1 MV/cm in GaN. Single-crystal GaN substrates with very low dislocation densities enable the low leakage current and the high breakdown field in the diodes, showing significant potential for MBE growth to attain near-intrinsic performance when the density of dislocations is low.

  7. Microstructure of GaN Grown on (111) Si by MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Han, J.; Provencio, P.

    1998-12-17

    Gallium nitride was grown on (111) Si by MOCVD by depositing an AIN buffer at 108O"C and then GaN at 1060 {degrees}C. The 2.2pm layer cracked along {1-100} planes upon cooling to room temperature, but remained adherent. We were able to examine the microstructure of material between cracks with TEM. The character and arrangement of dislocation are much like those of GaN grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: -2/3 pure edge and - 1/3 mixed (edge + screw), arranged in boundaries around domains of GaN that are slightly disoriented with respect to neighboring material. The 30 nm AIN buffer is continuous, indicating that AIN wets the Si, in contrast to GaN on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  8. Formation of helical dislocations in ammonothermal GaN substrate by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibuchi, Kayo; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kimoto, Yasuji; Nishikawa, Koichi; Kachi, Tetsu

    2016-03-01

    GaN substrate produced by the basic ammonothermal method and an epitaxial layer on the substrate was evaluated using synchrotron radiation x-ray topography and transmission electron microscopy. We revealed that the threading dislocations present in the GaN substrate are deformed into helical dislocations and the generation of the voids by heat treatment in the substrate for the first observation in the GaN crystal. These phenomena are formed by the interactions between the dislocations and vacancies. The helical dislocation was formed in the substrate region, and not in the epitaxial layer region. Furthermore, the evaluation of the influence of the dislocations on the leakage current of Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on the epitaxial layer is discussed. The dislocations did not affect the leakage current characteristics of the epitaxial layer. Our results suggest that the deformation of dislocations in the GaN substrate does not adversely affect the epitaxial layer.

  9. Thermal Conductivity and Large Isotope Effect in GaN from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2012-08-28

    We present atomistic first principles results for the lattice thermal conductivity of GaN and compare them to those for GaP, GaAs, and GaSb. In GaN we find a large increase to the thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment, ~65% at room temperature. We show that both the high thermal conductivity and its enhancement with isotopic enrichment in GaN arise from the weak coupling of heat-carrying acoustic phonons with optic phonons. This weak scattering results from stiff atomic bonds and the large Ga to N mass ratio, which give phonons high frequencies and also a pronounced energy gap between acoustic and optic phonons compared to other materials. Rigorous understanding of these features in GaN gives important insights into the interplay between intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering and isotopic scattering in a range of materials.

  10. Enhanced cell growth on nanotextured GaN surface treated by UV illumination and fibronectin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-01

    Semiconductors are important materials used for the development of high-performance biomedical devices. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a well-known III-nitride semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties as well as high chemical stability and biocompatibility. The formation of tight interfaces between GaN substrates and cells would be crucial for GaN-based devices used for probing and manipulating biological processes of cells. Here we report a strategy to greatly enhance cell adhesion and survival on nanotextured GaN surface which was treated by UV illumination and fibronectin (FN) adsorption. Cell studies showed that the UV/FN treatment greatly enhanced cell adhesion and growth on nanotextured GaN surfaces. These observations suggest new opportunities for novel nanotextured GaN-based biomedical devices.

  11. High-resistance GaN epilayers with low dislocation density via growth mode modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. Y.; Xu, F. J.; Wang, J. M.; Lu, L.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2016-09-01

    High-resistance GaN with low dislocation density adopting growth mode modification has been investigated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The sheet resistance of the order of 1016 Ω/sq has been achieved at room temperature by diminishing the oxygen impurity level close to the substrate with an AlN blocking layer. Attributed to this method which offers more freedom to tailor the growth mode, a three-dimensional (3D) growth process is introduced by adjusting the growth pressure and temperature at the initial stage of the GaN epitaxy to improve the crystalline quality. The large 3D GaN grains formed during this period roughen the surface, and the following coalescence of the GaN grains causes threading dislocations bending, which finally remarkably reduces the dislocation density.

  12. Swelling or erosion on the surface of patterned GaN damaged by heavy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan; Lan, Chune; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yugang; Xu, Fujun; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-06-08

    Wurtzite undoped GaN epilayers (0 0 0 1) was implanted with 500 keV Au+ ions at room temperature under different doses, respectively. Ion implantation was performed through photoresist masks on GaN to produce alternating strips. The experimental results showed that the step height of swelling and decomposition in implanted GaN depended on ion dose and annealing temperature, i.e., damage level and its evolution. This damage evolution is contributed to implantation-induced defect production, and defect migration/accumulation occurred at different levels of displacement per atom. The results suggest that the swelling is due to the formation of porous structures in the amorphous region of implanted GaN. The decomposition of implanted area can be attributed to the disorder saturation and the diffusion of surface amorphous layer.

  13. Above room-temperature ferromagnetism of Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. T.; Wadekar, P. V.; Kao, H. S.; Chen, T. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Tu, L. W.; Huang, H. C.; Ho, N. J.

    2014-02-10

    One-dimensional nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductors were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Delta-doping technique was adopted to dope GaN nanorods with Mn. The structural and magnetic properties were investigated. The GaMnN nanorods with a single crystalline structure and with Ga sites substituted by Mn atoms were verified by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, respectively. Secondary phases were not observed by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the magnetic hysteresis curves show that the Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods are ferromagnetic above room temperature. The magnetization with magnetic field perpendicular to GaN c-axis saturates easier than the one with field parallel to GaN c-axis.

  14. Femtosecond dynamics of exciton bleaching in bulk GaN at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yin-Chieh; Chern, Gia-Wei; Lin, Kung-Hsuan; Liang, Jian-Chin; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2002-07-01

    Femtosecond transient transmission pump-probe technique was used to investigate exciton dynamics in a nominally undoped GaN thin film at room temperature. An exciton ionization time of 100-250 femtoseconds was observed by the time-resolved pump-probe measurement. A comparison experiment with pre-excited free carriers also confirmed the observation of the exciton ionization process in bulk GaN.

  15. Mass transport, faceting and behavior of dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, S.; Kashima, T.; Kariya, M.; Yukawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2000-07-01

    The behavior of threading dislocations during mass transport of GaN was investigated in detail by transmission electron microscopy. Mass transport occurred at the surface. Therefore, growing species are supplied from the in-plane direction. The behavior of threading dislocations was found to be strongly affected by the mass transport process as well as the high crystallographic anisotropy of the surface energy of the facets particular to GaN.

  16. Strain dependent electron spin dynamics in bulk cubic GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, A.; Buß, J. H.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.; Schupp, T.; Zado, A.; As, D. J.

    2015-03-07

    The electron spin dynamics under variable uniaxial strain is investigated in bulk cubic GaN by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. Spin relaxation is found to be approximately independent of the applied strain, in complete agreement with estimates for Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation. Our findings clearly exclude strain-induced relaxation as an effective mechanism for spin relaxation in cubic GaN.

  17. High efficiency DC-DC converter using GaN transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tómaş, Cosmin-Andrei; Grecu, Cristian; Pantazicǎ, Mihaela; Marghescu, Ion

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents a new high-efficiency power switching supply using the Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology. There are compared two solutions, the first using standard MOS transistors and the second using the new GaN transistor. The actual green technologies for obtaining the maximum energy and minimum losses have pushed the semiconductor industry into a continuous research regarding high power and high frequency devices, having uses in both digital communications and switching power supplies.

  18. The dispersion of BED ° in unintentional doped GaN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingcheng, Bao; Fungleng, Zhang; Ke, Shi; Rensong, Dai; Xurong, Xu

    1986-09-01

    The polarization and the wavelength of the photoluminescence of BED ° in not intentionaly doped GaN crystal wafers are observed to be dependent on the excitation intensity (I-exc). When I-exc increases from 1 KW/CM 2 to 1000 KW/CM 2, they vary at first quadratically, and then, appear saturated. This phenomenon is resulted from dispersion effect of BED ° in GaN crystal wafers, which is proposed earlier (1).

  19. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  20. Strain dependent electron spin dynamics in bulk cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, A.; Buß, J. H.; Schupp, T.; Zado, A.; As, D. J.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-03-01

    The electron spin dynamics under variable uniaxial strain is investigated in bulk cubic GaN by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. Spin relaxation is found to be approximately independent of the applied strain, in complete agreement with estimates for Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation. Our findings clearly exclude strain-induced relaxation as an effective mechanism for spin relaxation in cubic GaN.

  1. Temperature Dependence of the Piezotronic and Piezophototronic Effects in a-axis GaN Nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingfu; Yu, Ruomeng; Peng, Wenbo; Wu, Wenzhuo; Li, Shuti; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-12-22

    The temperature dependence of the piezotronic and piezophototronic effects in a-axis GaN nanobelts from 77 to 300 K is investigated. The piezotronic effect is enhanced by over 440% under lower temp-eratures. Two independent processes are discovered to form a competing mechanism through the investigation of the temperature dependence of the piezophototronic effect in a-axis GaN nanobelts.

  2. Defect Formation in GaN Epitaxial Layers due to SHI Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; Kumar, V.; Singh, R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2011-07-15

    GaN epitaxial layers were irradiated with 200 MeV swift heavy Ag ions at various fluences. These samples were then characterized by XRD and TEM. Increase in peak width (FWHM) with incident ion dose showed reduction in crystallinity of epitaxial layers. Cross sectional TEM images confirmed that at highest fluence (5x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) electronic energy loss process caused structural defect formation in GaN layer.

  3. Comparison of Electronic and Optical Properties of GaN Monolayer and Bulk Structure: a First Principle Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Muhammad; Hussain, Fayyaz; Rashid, Muhammad; Ullah, Hafeez; Sattar, Atif; Iqbal, Faisal; Ahmad, Ejaz

    2016-03-01

    The semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) architectures materials have potential applications in electronics and optics. The design and search of new 2D materials have attracted extensive attention recently. In this study, first principle calculation has been done on 2D gallium nitride (GaN) monolayer with respect to its formation and binding energies. The electronic and optical properties are also investigated. It is found that the single isolated GaN sheet is forming mainly ionic GaN bonds despite a slightly weaker GaN interaction as compared with its bulk counterpart. The dielectric constant value of 2D GaN is smaller as compared to 3D GaN due to less effective electronic screening effect in the layer, which is accompanied by lesser optical adsorption range and suggested to be a promising candidate in electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  4. First-principle study on electronic structure and optical properties of GaN nanowires with different cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yike; Liu, Lei; Xia, Sihao; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Meishan

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the properties of intrinsic gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) in terms of formation energy, band structure, density of state (DOS) and optical properties with plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on first-principles. Results show that after relaxation, N atoms of the outer layers move outwards, while Ga atoms move inwards, and the relaxation of surface atomic structure appears less obvious with the increasing cross-sectional area. Comparing different cross-sections of GaN NWs, it is found that the formation energy decreases and the stability goes stronger with the increasing size. With the increasing cross-section, the bandgap is decreased. Moreover, through comparative investigation in optical properties between GaN NWs and bulk GaN, a valuable phenomenom is found that the static dielectric constants of GaN NWs are notably lower, which contributes remarkably to the excellent absorbing performance of GaN NWs.

  5. Scanning reflection electron microscopy study of surface defects in GaN films formed by epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Kuroda, Naotaka; Sunakawa, Haruo; Usui, Akira

    2000-09-01

    We have used scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM) to detect surface defects in GaN films formed by facet-initiated epitaxial lateral overgrowth. SREM revealed individual threading dislocations and single atomic steps on the GaN surface, and provided images of crystallographic tilting near the surfaces. We found that one of the two tilted GaN crystals in the overgrown areas became dominant and that the surface changed to a single domain after 50-μm-thick GaN deposition. Our SREM results also showed that the deposition of thick (over 100 μm) GaN films significantly improves the crystallographic structures of the overgrown regions, and reduces the threading dislocations in the GaN films.

  6. Improved performance of GaN metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet detectors by depositing SiO2 nanoparticles on a GaN surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Li, Dabing; Jiang, Hong; Li, Zhiming; Song, Hang; Chen, Yiren; Miao, Guoqing

    2011-03-01

    GaN metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) ultraviolet detectors were investigated by depositing different density of SiO2 nanoparticles (SNPs) on the GaN. It was shown that the dark current of the detectors with SNPs was more than one order of magnitude lower than that without SNPs and the peak responsivity was enhanced after deposition of the SNPs. Atomic force microscopy observations indicated that the SNPs usually formed at the termination of screw and mixed dislocations, and further current-voltage measurements showed that the leakage of the Schottky contact for the GaN MSM detector decreased with deposited the SNPs. Moreover, the leakage obeyed the Frenkel-Poole emission model, which meant that the mechanism for improving the performance is the SNPs passivation of the dislocations followed by the reduction in the dark current.

  7. Teleportation with Multiple Accelerated Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagheer, A.; Hamdoun, H.; Metwally, N.

    2015-09-01

    As the current revolution in communication is underway, quantum teleportation can increase the level of security in quantum communication applications. In this paper, we present a quantum teleportation procedure that capable to teleport either accelerated or non-accelerated information through different quantum channels. These quantum channels are based on accelerated multi-qubit states, where each qubit of each of these channels represents a partner. Namely, these states are the W state, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, and the GHZ-like state. Here, we show that the fidelity of teleporting accelerated information is higher than the fidelity of teleporting non-accelerated information, both through a quantum channel that is based on accelerated state. Also, the comparison among the performance of these three channels shows that the degree of fidelity depends on type of the used channel, type of the measurement, and value of the acceleration. The result of comparison concludes that teleporting information through channel that is based on the GHZ state is more robust than teleporting information through channels that are based on the other two states. For future work, the proposed procedure can be generalized later to achieve communication through a wider quantum network.

  8. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  9. Growth and characterization of horizontal GaN wires on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Xinbo; May Lau, Kei; Lu, Xing; Lucas, Ryan; Kuech, Thomas F.; Choi, Jonathan W.; Gopalan, Padma

    2014-06-30

    We report the growth of in-plane GaN wires on silicon by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Triangular-shaped GaN microwires with semi-polar sidewalls are observed to grow on top of a GaN/Si template patterned with nano-porous SiO{sub 2}. With a length-to-thickness ratio ∼200, the GaN wires are well aligned along the three equivalent 〈 112{sup ¯}0 〉 directions. Micro-Raman measurements indicate negligible stress and a low defect density inside the wires. Stacking faults were found to be the only defect type in the GaN wire by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The GaN wires exhibited high conductivity, and the resistivity was 20–30 mΩ cm, regardless of the wire thickness. With proper heterostructure and doping design, these highly aligned GaN wires are promising for photonic and electronic applications monolithically integrated on silicon.

  10. Behavior of aluminum adsorption and incorporation at GaN(0001) surface: First-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Zhenzhen; Xiong, Zhihua Wan, Qixin; Qin, Guangzhao

    2013-11-21

    First-principles calculations are performed to study the energetics and atomic structures of aluminum adsorption and incorporation at clean and Ga-bilayer GaN(0001) surfaces. We find the favorable adsorption site changes from T4 to T1 as Al coverage increased to 1 monolayer on the clean GaN(0001) surface, and a two-dimensional hexagonal structure of Al overlayer appears. It is interesting the Al atoms both prefer to concentrate in one deeper Ga layer of clean and Ga-bilayer GaN(0001) surface, respectively, while different structures could be achieved in above surfaces. For the case of clean GaN(0001) surface, corresponding to N-rich and moderately Ga-rich conditions, a highly regular superlattice structure composed of wurtzite GaN and AlN becomes favorable. For the case of Ga-bilayer GaN(0001) surface, corresponding to extremely Ga-rich conditions, the Ga bilayer is found to be sustained stable in Al incorporating process, leading to an incommensurate structure directly. Furthermore, our calculations provide an explanation for the spontaneous formation of ordered structure and incommensurate structure observed in growing AlGaN films. The calculated results are attractive for further development of growth techniques and excellent AlGaN/GaN heterostructure electronic devices.

  11. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A A; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-30

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  12. Uniform GaN thin films grown on (100) silicon by remote plasma atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Shih, Huan-Yu; Lin, Ming-Chih; Chen, Liang-Yih; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2015-01-01

    The growth of uniform gallium nitride (GaN) thin films was reported on (100) Si substrate by remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RP-ALD) using triethylgallium (TEG) and NH3 as the precursors. The self-limiting growth of GaN was manifested by the saturation of the deposition rate with the doses of TEG and NH3. The increase in the growth temperature leads to the rise of nitrogen content and improved crystallinity of GaN thin films, from amorphous at a low deposition temperature of 200 °C to polycrystalline hexagonal structures at a high growth temperature of 500 °C. No melting-back etching was observed at the GaN/Si interface. The excellent uniformity and almost atomic flat surface of the GaN thin films also infer the surface control mode of the GaN thin films grown by the RP-ALD technique. The GaN thin films grown by RP-ALD will be further applied in the light-emitting diodes and high electron mobility transistors on (100) Si substrate.

  13. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth. PMID:27025461

  14. Enhancing the field emission properties of Se-doped GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Enling; Wu, Guishuang; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    Pure and Se-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on Pt-coated Si(111) substrates via chemical vapor deposition. The GaN NWs exhibit a uniform density with an average diameter of 20-120 nm. The structure of the NWs is wurtzite hexagonal, and the growth direction is along [0001]. Field emission measurements show that the Se-doped GaN NWs possess a low turn-on field (2.9 V μm(-1)) compared with the pure GaN NWs (7.0 V μm(-1)). In addition, density functional theory calculations indicate that the donor states near the Fermi level are mainly formed through the hybridization between Se 4p and N 2p orbitals and that the Fermi level move towards the vacuum level. Consequently, the work functions of Se-doped GaN NWs are lower than those of pure GaN NWs. PMID:27197556

  15. Hybrid device based on GaN nanoneedles and MEH-PPV/PEDOT:PSS polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Min Jeong; Gwon, Dong-Oh; Lee, Chan-Mi; Lee, Gang Seok; Jeon, In-Jun; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Yi, Sam Nyung; Ha, Dong Han

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A hybrid device was demonstrated by using MEH-PPV, PEDOT:PSS, and GaN nanoneedles. • I–V curve of the hybrid device showed its rectification behaviour, similar to a diode. • EL peak originated by the different potential barriers at MEH-PPV and GaN interface. - Abstract: A hybrid device that combines the properties of organic and inorganic semiconductors was fabricated and studied. It incorporated poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)- 1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as organic polymers and GaN nanoneedles as an inorganic semiconductor. Layers of the two polymers were spin coated on to the GaN nanoneedles. The one peak in the electroluminescence spectrum originated from the MEH-PPV layer owing to the different potential barriers of electrons and holes at its interface with the GaN nanoneedles. However, the photoluminescence spectrum showed peaks due to both GaN nanoneedles and MEH-PPV. Such hybrid structures, suitably developed, might be able to improve the efficiency of optoelectronic devices.

  16. GaN etching in BCl{sub 3}Cl{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Han, J.; Bridges, M.M.; Pearton, S.J.; Lee, J.W.; Lester, L.F.

    1998-04-01

    GaN etching can be affected by a wide variety of parameters including plasma chemistry and plasma density. Chlorine-based plasmas have been the most widely used plasma chemistries to etch GaN due to the high volatility of the GaCl{sub 3} and NCl etch products. The source of Cl and the addition of secondary gases can dramatically influence the etch characteristics primarily due to their effect on the concentration of reactive Cl generated in the plasma. In addition, high-density plasma etch systems have yielded high quality etching of GaN due to plasma densities which are 2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than reactive ion etch (RIE) plasma systems. The high plasma densities enhance the bond breaking efficiency of the GaN, the formation of volatile etch products, and the sputter desorption of the etch products from the surface. In this study, the authors report GaN etch results for a high-density inductively coupled plasma (ICP) as a function of BCl{sub 3}:Cl{sub 2} flow ratio, dc-bias, chamber-pressure, and ICP source power. GaN etch rates ranging from {approximately}100 {angstrom}/min to > 8,000 {angstrom}/min were obtained with smooth etch morphology and anisotropic profiles.

  17. Using the kinetic Wulff plot to design and control nonpolar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Benjamin; Sun, Qian; Yerino, Christopher D.; Han, Jung; Coltrin, Michael E.

    2012-02-01

    For nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN heteroepitaxially grown on sapphire substrates, the development of growth procedures to improve surface morphology and microstructure has been driven in a largely empirical way. This work attempts to comprehensively link the intrinsic properties of GaN faceted growth, across orientations, in order to understand, design and control growth methods for nonpolar (1 1 2 0) GaN and semipolar (1 1 2 2) GaN on foreign substrates. This is done by constructing a comprehensive series of kinetic Wulff plots (or v-plots) by monitoring the advances of convex and concave facets in selective area growth. A methodology is developed to apply the experimentally determined v-plots to the interpretation and design of evolution dynamics in nucleation and island coalescence. This methodology offers a cohesive and rational model for GaN heteroepitaxy along polar, nonpolar and semipolar orientations, and is broadly extensible to the heteroepitaxy of other materials. We demonstrate furthermore that the control of morphological evolution, based on invoking a detailed knowledge of the v-plots, holds a key to the reduction of microstructural defects through effective bending of dislocations and blocking of stacking faults. The status and outlook of semipolar and nonpolar GaN growth on sapphire substrates will be presented.

  18. Size dictated thermal conductivity of GaN

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Fuller, Elliot James; Talin, Albert Alec; Rost, Christina M.; Maria, Jon -Paul; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal conductivity on n- and p-type doped gallium nitride (GaN) epilayers having thickness of 3-4 μm was investigated using time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). Despite possessing carrier concentrations ranging across 3 decades (1015 – 1018 cm–3), n-type layers exhibit a nearly constant thermal conductivity of 180 W/mK. The thermal conductivity of p-type epilayers, in contrast, reduces from 160 to 110 W/mK with increased doping. These trends–and their overall reduction relative to bulk–are explained leveraging established scattering models where it is shown that size effects play a primary role in limiting thermal conductivity for layers even tens of microns thick. GaNmore » device layers, even of pristine quality, will therefore exhibit thermal conductivities less than the bulk value of 240 W/mK owing to their finite thickness.« less

  19. Inversion domains in GaN grown on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, L.T.; Northrup, J.E.; OKeefe, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Planar defects observed in GaN films grown on (0001) sapphire have been identified as inversion domain boundaries (IDBs) by a combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, multiple dark field imaging, and convergent beam electron diffraction techniques. Films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), metalorganic vapor deposition (MOCVD), and hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) were investigated and all were found to contain IDBs. The IDBs in the MBE and HVPE films extended from the interface to the film surface and formed columnar domains that ranged in width from 3 to 20 nm in the MBE films and up to 100 nm in the HVPE films. For the films investigated, the MBE films had the highest density, and the MOCVD films had the lowest density of IDBs. The nucleation of inversion domains (IDs) may result from step-related inhomogeneities of the GaN/sapphire interface. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control overmore » the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.« less

  1. Ge doping of GaN beyond the Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, A.; Schörmann, J.; Jiménez-Rodriguez, M.; Lim, C. B.; Walther, F.; Rohnke, M.; Mouton, I.; Amichi, L.; Bougerol, C.; Den Hertog, M. I.; Eickhoff, M.; Monroy, E.

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of germanium as n-type dopant in wurtzite GaN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, reaching carrier concentrations of up to 6.7  ×  1020 cm‑3 at 300 K, well beyond the Mott density. The Ge concentration and free carrier density were found to scale linearly with the Ge flux in the studied range. All the GaN:Ge layers present smooth surface morphology with atomic terraces, without trace of pits or cracks, and the mosaicity of the samples has no noticeable dependence on the Ge concentration. The variation of the GaN:Ge band gap with the carrier concentration is consistent with theoretical calculations of the band gap renormalization due to electron–electron and electron–ion interaction, and Burstein–Moss effect.

  2. Enhanced water splitting with silver decorated GaN photoelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Syed, Z. A.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Gong, Y.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2016-07-01

    By means of a cost-effective approach, we demonstrate a GaN-based photoelectrode decorated with self-organized silver nano-islands employed for solar powered hydrogen generation, demonstrating 4 times increase in photocurrent compared with a reference sample without using any silver. Our photoelectrode exhibits a 60% incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency. The enhanced hydrogen generation is attributed to a significantly increased carrier generation rate as a result of strongly localized electric fields induced by surface plasmon coupling effect. The silver coating also contributes to the good chemical stability of our photoelectrode in a strong alkali electrolyte. This work paves the way for the development of GaN and also InGaN based photoelectrodes with ultra-high solar hydrogen conversion efficiency.

  3. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S R J; Wang, George T

    2016-03-14

    We demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444 kW cm(-2) and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control over the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates. PMID:26899502

  4. GaN Based Electronics And Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fan

    2002-03-01

    The Group III-nitrides were initially researched for their promise to fill the void for a blue solid state light emitter. Electronic devices from III-nitrides have been a more recent phenomenon. The thermal conductivity of GaN is three times that of GaAs. For high power or high temperature applications, good thermal conductivity is imperative for heat removal or sustained operation at elevated temperatures. The development of III-N and other wide bandgap technologies for high temperature applications will likely take place at the expense of competing technologies, such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI), at moderate temperatures. At higher temperatures (>300°C), novel devices and components will become possible. The automotive industry will likely be one of the largest markets for such high temperature electronics. One of the most noteworthy advantages for III-N materials over other wide bandgap semiconductors is the availability of AlGaN/GaN and InGaN/GaN heterostructures. A 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) has been shown to exist at the AlGaN/GaN interface, and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) from these materials can exhibit 2DEG mobilities approaching 2000 cm2 / V?s at 300K. Power handling capabilities of 12 W/mm appear feasible, and extraordinary large signal performance has already been demonstrated, with a current state-of-the-art of >10W/mm at X-band. In this talk, high speed and high temperature AlGaN/GaN HEMTs as well as MOSHEMTs, high breakdown voltage GaN (>6KV) and AlGaN (9.7 KV) Schottky diodes, and their applications will be presented.

  5. Ultrathin GaN nanowires: Electronic, thermal, and thermoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoody, A. H.; Ramayya, E. B.; Maurer, L. N.; Knezevic, I.

    2014-03-01

    We present a comprehensive computational study of the electronic, thermal, and thermoelectric (TE) properties of gallium nitride nanowires (NWs) over a wide range of thicknesses (3-9 nm), doping densities (1018-1020 cm-3), and temperatures (300-1000 K). We calculate the low-field electron mobility based on ensemble Monte Carlo transport simulation coupled with a self-consistent solution of the Poisson and Schrödinger equations. We use the relaxation-time approximation and a Poisson-Schrödinger solver to calculate the electron Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity. Lattice thermal conductivity is calculated using a phonon ensemble Monte Carlo simulation, with a real-space rough surface described by a Gaussian autocorrelation function. Throughout the temperature range, the Seebeck coefficient increases while the lattice thermal conductivity decreases with decreasing wire cross section, both boding well for TE applications of thin GaN NWs. However, at room temperature these benefits are eventually overcome by the detrimental effect of surface roughness scattering on the electron mobility in very thin NWs. The highest room-temperature ZT of 0.2 is achieved for 4-nm-thick NWs, while further downscaling degrades it. In contrast, at 1000 K, the electron mobility varies weakly with the NW thickness owing to the dominance of polar optical phonon scattering and multiple subbands contributing to transport, so ZT increases with increasing confinement, and reaches 0.8 for optimally doped 3-nm-thick NWs. The ZT of GaN NWs increases with increasing temperature beyond 1000 K, which further emphasizes their suitability for high-temperature TE applications.

  6. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  7. High electron mobility GaN grown under N-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Wu, F.; Mates, T.; Speck, J. S.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.

    2007-11-26

    An alternative approach is presented for the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of high-quality GaN. Under N-rich growth conditions, an unexpected layer-by-layer growth mode was found for a wide range of growth temperatures in the GaN thermal decomposition regime (>750 deg. C). Consequently, superior surface morphologies with roughness of less than 1 nm (rms) have been achieved. For lightly Si-doped GaN films, room-temperature electron mobilities exceeding 1100 cm{sup 2}/V s were measured, surpassing the commonly insulating nature of GaN grown under N-rich conditions at low temperature.

  8. A growth diagram for plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of GaN nanocolumns on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Grandal, J.; Calleja, E.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Lopez-Romero, D.

    2009-12-15

    The morphology of GaN samples grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) was systematically studied as a function of impinging Ga/N flux ratio and growth temperature (730-850 deg. C). Two different growth regimes were identified: compact and nanocolumnar. A growth diagram was established as a function of growth parameters, exhibiting the transition between growth regimes, and showing under which growth conditions GaN cannot be grown due to thermal decomposition and Ga desorption. Present results indicate that adatoms diffusion length and the actual Ga/N ratio on the growing surface are key factors to achieve nanocolumnar growth.

  9. Crystallographic Wet Chemical Etching of Semipolar GaN (11-22) Grown on m-Plane Sapphire Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Kwan; Lee, Sung Nam; Song, Keun-Man; Yoon, Jae-Sik; Lee, Ji-Myon

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the etch rates and etched surface morphology of semipolar GaN using a potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. Semipolar (11-22) GaN could be etched easily using a KOH solution and the etch rate was higher than that of Ga-polar c-plane GaN (0001). The etch rate was anisotropic and the highest etch rate was measured to be approximately 116 nm/min for the (1011) plane and 62 nm/min for the (11-20) plane GaN using a 4 M KOH solution at 100 °C, resulting in specific surface features, such as inclined trigonal cells.

  10. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  11. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  12. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures on GaN templates and native GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jr-Tai Hsu, Chih-Wei; Forsberg, Urban; Janzén, Erik

    2015-02-28

    Severe surface decomposition of semi-insulating (SI) GaN templates occurred in high-temperature H{sub 2} atmosphere prior to epitaxial growth in a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition system. A two-step heating process with a surface stabilization technique was developed to preserve the GaN template surface. Utilizing the optimized heating process, a high two-dimensional electron gas mobility ∼2000 cm{sup 2}/V·s was obtained in a thin AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure with an only 100-nm-thick GaN spacer layer homoepitaxially grown on the GaN template. This technique was also demonstrated viable for native GaN substrates to stabilize the surface facilitating two-dimensional growth of GaN layers. Very high residual silicon and oxygen concentrations were found up to ∼1 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} at the interface between the GaN epilayer and the native GaN substrate. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed that the residual carbon doping controlled by growth conditions of the GaN epilayer can be used to successfully compensate the donor-like impurities. State-of-the-art structural properties of a high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure was then realized on a 1 × 1 cm{sup 2} SI native GaN substrate; the full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curves of the GaN (002) and (102) peaks are only 21 and 14 arc sec, respectively. The surface morphology of the heterostructure shows uniform parallel bilayer steps, and no morphological defects were noticeable over the entire epi-wafer.

  13. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures on GaN templates and native GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Tai, Jr.; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Forsberg, Urban; Janzén, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Severe surface decomposition of semi-insulating (SI) GaN templates occurred in high-temperature H2 atmosphere prior to epitaxial growth in a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition system. A two-step heating process with a surface stabilization technique was developed to preserve the GaN template surface. Utilizing the optimized heating process, a high two-dimensional electron gas mobility ˜2000 cm2/V.s was obtained in a thin AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure with an only 100-nm-thick GaN spacer layer homoepitaxially grown on the GaN template. This technique was also demonstrated viable for native GaN substrates to stabilize the surface facilitating two-dimensional growth of GaN layers. Very high residual silicon and oxygen concentrations were found up to ˜1 × 1020 cm-3 at the interface between the GaN epilayer and the native GaN substrate. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed that the residual carbon doping controlled by growth conditions of the GaN epilayer can be used to successfully compensate the donor-like impurities. State-of-the-art structural properties of a high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure was then realized on a 1 × 1 cm2 SI native GaN substrate; the full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curves of the GaN (002) and (102) peaks are only 21 and 14 arc sec, respectively. The surface morphology of the heterostructure shows uniform parallel bilayer steps, and no morphological defects were noticeable over the entire epi-wafer.

  14. Piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamond, N.; Chrétien, P.; Houzé, F.; Lu, L.; Largeau, L.; Maugain, O.; Travers, L.; Harmand, J. C.; Glas, F.; Lefeuvre, E.; Tchernycheva, M.; Gogneau, N.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the first piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires (NWs). We perform a systematic multi-scale analysis, going from single wire properties to macroscopic device fabrication and characterization, which allows us to establish for GaN NWs the relationship between the material properties and the piezo-generation, and to propose an efficient piezo-generator design. The piezo-conversion of individual MBE-grown p-doped GaN NWs in a dense array is assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with a Resiscope module yielding an average output voltage of 228 ± 120 mV and a maximum value of 350 mV generated per NW. In the case of p-doped GaN NWs, the piezo-generation is achieved when a positive piezo-potential is created inside the nanostructures, i.e. when the NWs are submitted to compressive deformation. The understanding of the piezo-generation mechanism in our GaN NWs, gained from AFM analyses, is applied to design a piezo-generator operated under compressive strain. The device consists of NW arrays of several square millimeters in size embedded into spin-on glass with a Schottky contact for rectification and collection of piezo-generated carriers. The generator delivers a maximum power density of ˜12.7 mW cm-3. This value sets the new state of the art for piezo-generators based on GaN NWs and more generally on nitride NWs, and offers promising prospects for the use of GaN NWs as high-efficiency ultra-compact energy harvesters.

  15. Zn-dopant dependent defect evolution in GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing; Liu, Baodan; Wang, Yujia; Zhuang, Hao; Liu, Qingyun; Yuan, Fang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-10-21

    Zn doped GaN nanowires with different doping levels (0, <1 at%, and 3-5 at%) have been synthesized through a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The effect of Zn doping on the defect evolution, including stacking fault, dislocation, twin boundary and phase boundary, has been systematically investigated by transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Undoped GaN nanowires show a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure with good crystallinity. Several kinds of twin boundaries, including (101¯3), (101¯1) and (202¯1), as well as Type I stacking faults (…ABABCBCB…), are observed in the nanowires. The increasing Zn doping level (<1 at%) induces the formation of screw dislocations featuring a predominant screw component along the radial direction of the GaN nanowires. At high Zn doping level (3-5 at%), meta-stable cubic zinc blende (ZB) domains are generated in the WZ GaN nanowires. The WZ/ZB phase boundary (…ABABACBA…) can be identified as Type II stacking faults. The density of stacking faults (both Type I and Type II) increases with increasing the Zn doping levels, which in turn leads to a rough-surface morphology in the GaN nanowires. First-principles calculations reveal that Zn doping will reduce the formation energy of both Type I and Type II stacking faults, favoring their nucleation in GaN nanowires. An understanding of the effect of Zn doping on the defect evolution provides an important method to control the microstructure and the electrical properties of p-type GaN nanowires.

  16. Piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jamond, N; Chrétien, P; Houzé, F; Lu, L; Largeau, L; Maugain, O; Travers, L; Harmand, J C; Glas, F; Lefeuvre, E; Tchernycheva, M; Gogneau, N

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the first piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires (NWs). We perform a systematic multi-scale analysis, going from single wire properties to macroscopic device fabrication and characterization, which allows us to establish for GaN NWs the relationship between the material properties and the piezo-generation, and to propose an efficient piezo-generator design. The piezo-conversion of individual MBE-grown p-doped GaN NWs in a dense array is assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with a Resiscope module yielding an average output voltage of 228 ± 120 mV and a maximum value of 350 mV generated per NW. In the case of p-doped GaN NWs, the piezo-generation is achieved when a positive piezo-potential is created inside the nanostructures, i.e. when the NWs are submitted to compressive deformation. The understanding of the piezo-generation mechanism in our GaN NWs, gained from AFM analyses, is applied to design a piezo-generator operated under compressive strain. The device consists of NW arrays of several square millimeters in size embedded into spin-on glass with a Schottky contact for rectification and collection of piezo-generated carriers. The generator delivers a maximum power density of ∼12.7 mW cm(-3). This value sets the new state of the art for piezo-generators based on GaN NWs and more generally on nitride NWs, and offers promising prospects for the use of GaN NWs as high-efficiency ultra-compact energy harvesters. PMID:27363777

  17. Piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamond, N.; Chrétien, P.; Houzé, F.; Lu, L.; Largeau, L.; Maugain, O.; Travers, L.; Harmand, J. C.; Glas, F.; Lefeuvre, E.; Tchernycheva, M.; Gogneau, N.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the first piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires (NWs). We perform a systematic multi-scale analysis, going from single wire properties to macroscopic device fabrication and characterization, which allows us to establish for GaN NWs the relationship between the material properties and the piezo-generation, and to propose an efficient piezo-generator design. The piezo-conversion of individual MBE-grown p-doped GaN NWs in a dense array is assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with a Resiscope module yielding an average output voltage of 228 ± 120 mV and a maximum value of 350 mV generated per NW. In the case of p-doped GaN NWs, the piezo-generation is achieved when a positive piezo-potential is created inside the nanostructures, i.e. when the NWs are submitted to compressive deformation. The understanding of the piezo-generation mechanism in our GaN NWs, gained from AFM analyses, is applied to design a piezo-generator operated under compressive strain. The device consists of NW arrays of several square millimeters in size embedded into spin-on glass with a Schottky contact for rectification and collection of piezo-generated carriers. The generator delivers a maximum power density of ∼12.7 mW cm‑3. This value sets the new state of the art for piezo-generators based on GaN NWs and more generally on nitride NWs, and offers promising prospects for the use of GaN NWs as high-efficiency ultra-compact energy harvesters.

  18. Piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jamond, N; Chrétien, P; Houzé, F; Lu, L; Largeau, L; Maugain, O; Travers, L; Harmand, J C; Glas, F; Lefeuvre, E; Tchernycheva, M; Gogneau, N

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the first piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires (NWs). We perform a systematic multi-scale analysis, going from single wire properties to macroscopic device fabrication and characterization, which allows us to establish for GaN NWs the relationship between the material properties and the piezo-generation, and to propose an efficient piezo-generator design. The piezo-conversion of individual MBE-grown p-doped GaN NWs in a dense array is assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with a Resiscope module yielding an average output voltage of 228 ± 120 mV and a maximum value of 350 mV generated per NW. In the case of p-doped GaN NWs, the piezo-generation is achieved when a positive piezo-potential is created inside the nanostructures, i.e. when the NWs are submitted to compressive deformation. The understanding of the piezo-generation mechanism in our GaN NWs, gained from AFM analyses, is applied to design a piezo-generator operated under compressive strain. The device consists of NW arrays of several square millimeters in size embedded into spin-on glass with a Schottky contact for rectification and collection of piezo-generated carriers. The generator delivers a maximum power density of ∼12.7 mW cm(-3). This value sets the new state of the art for piezo-generators based on GaN NWs and more generally on nitride NWs, and offers promising prospects for the use of GaN NWs as high-efficiency ultra-compact energy harvesters.

  19. Heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on vertical Si{110} sidewalls formed on trench-etched Si(001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jarod C.; Shen, Haoting; Yuwen, Yu; Wang, Ke; Mayer, Theresa S.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-07-01

    A maskless Si trench structure was developed to integrate crystallographically non-polar GaN microstructures with semi-polar facets on Si(001). GaN "fins" were preferentially grown by MOCVD on Si{110} trench sidewalls formed by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of Si(001) such that GaN(0001)//Si{110} and GaN(10-10)//Si(001), resulting in a non-polar crystal structure with respect to the Si(001) substrate surface. No masking layer was required to prevent GaN growth on the Si(001) top surface of the trenches, instead, it was found that GaN nucleated preferentially on the Si{110} trench sidewalls. GaN was also observed to nucleate at the top corner of the trenches due to Si etching and exposure of high-index Si facets during the pre-growth H2 anneal. This undesired GaN nucleation was successfully suppressed by reducing the H2 anneal time and/or increasing the growth temperature and decreasing the precursor V/III to enhance Ga-adatom diffusion. Cross-sectional TEM studies confirmed that the GaN fins were crystallographically non-polar with respect to the Si(001) substrate surface and were bounded by semi-polar and non-polar facets. The reported Si fabrication and GaN growth process shows promise for the integration of non-polar and semi-polar GaN microstructures on industry standard Si(001) substrates.

  20. Crystallographically tilted and partially strain relaxed GaN grown on inclined {111} facets etched on Si(100) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansah Antwi, K. K.; Soh, C. B.; Wee, Q.; Tan, Rayson J. N.; Yang, P.; Tan, H. R.; Sun, L. F.; Shen, Z. X.; Chua, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    High resolution X-ray diffractometry (HR-XRD), Photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscope measurements are reported for GaN deposited on a conventional Si(111) substrate and on the {111} facets etched on a Si(100) substrate. HR-XRD reciprocal space mappings showed that the GaN(0002) plane is tilted by about 0.63° ± 0.02° away from the exposed Si{111} growth surface for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate, while no observable tilt existed between the GaN(0002) and Si(111) planes for GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The ratio of integrated intensities of the yellow to near band edge (NBE) luminescence (IYL/INBE) was determined to be about one order of magnitude lower in the case of GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate compared with GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The Raman E2(high) optical phonon mode at 565.224 ± 0.001 cm-1 with a narrow full width at half maximum of 1.526 ± 0.002 cm-1 was measured, for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) indicating high material quality. GaN deposition within the trench etched on the Si(100) substrate occurred via diffusion and mass-transport limited mechanism. This resulted in a differential GaN layer thickness from the top (i.e., 1.8 μm) of the trench to the bottom (i.e., 0.3 μm) of the trench. Mixed-type dislocation constituted about 80% of the total dislocations in the GaN grown on the inclined Si{111} surface etched on Si(100).

  1. Crystallographically tilted and partially strain relaxed GaN grown on inclined (111) facets etched on Si(100) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ansah Antwi, K. K.; Soh, C. B.; Wee, Q.; Tan, Rayson J. N.; Tan, H. R.; Yang, P.; Sun, L. F.; Shen, Z. X.; Chua, S. J.

    2013-12-28

    High resolution X-ray diffractometry (HR-XRD), Photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscope measurements are reported for GaN deposited on a conventional Si(111) substrate and on the (111) facets etched on a Si(100) substrate. HR-XRD reciprocal space mappings showed that the GaN(0002) plane is tilted by about 0.63° ± 0.02° away from the exposed Si(111) growth surface for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate, while no observable tilt existed between the GaN(0002) and Si(111) planes for GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The ratio of integrated intensities of the yellow to near band edge (NBE) luminescence (I{sub YL}/I{sub NBE}) was determined to be about one order of magnitude lower in the case of GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate compared with GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The Raman E{sub 2}(high) optical phonon mode at 565.224 ± 0.001 cm{sup −1} with a narrow full width at half maximum of 1.526 ± 0.002 cm{sup −1} was measured, for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) indicating high material quality. GaN deposition within the trench etched on the Si(100) substrate occurred via diffusion and mass-transport limited mechanism. This resulted in a differential GaN layer thickness from the top (i.e., 1.8 μm) of the trench to the bottom (i.e., 0.3 μm) of the trench. Mixed-type dislocation constituted about 80% of the total dislocations in the GaN grown on the inclined Si(111) surface etched on Si(100)

  2. GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, George

    2015-07-03

    For nearly 4 ½ years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) led a very successful, DoE-funded team effort to develop GaN-on-Si materials and devices, targeting high-voltage (>1 kV), high-power, cost-effective electronics for grid applications. This effort, called the GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA) program, was initially made up of MIT/LL, the MIT campus group of Prof. Tomas Palacios (MIT), and the industrial partner M/A Com Technology Solutions (MTS). Later in the program a 4th team member was added (IQE MA) to provide commercial-scale GaN-on-Si epitaxial materials. A basic premise of the GIGA program was that power electronics, for ubiquitous utilization -even for grid applications - should be closer in cost structure to more conventional Si-based power electronics. For a number of reasons, more established GaN-on-SiC or even SiC-based power electronics are not likely to reach theses cost structures, even in higher manufacturing volumes. An additional premise of the GIGA program was that the technical focus would be on materials and devices suitable for operating at voltages > 1 kV, even though there is also significant commercial interest in developing lower voltage (< 1 kV), cost effective GaN-on-Si devices for higher volume applications, like consumer products. Remarkable technical progress was made during the course of this program. Advances in materials included the growth of high-quality, crack-free epitaxial GaN layers on large-diameter Si substrates with thicknesses up to ~5 μm, overcoming significant challenges in lattice mismatch and thermal expansion differences between Si and GaN in the actual epitaxial growth process. Such thick epilayers are crucial for high voltage operation of lateral geometry devices such as Schottky barrier (SB) diodes and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). New “Normally-Off” device architectures were demonstrated – for safe operation of power electronics circuits. The trade-offs between lateral and

  3. Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined

  4. Synthesis and field emission studies of tower-like GaN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tower-like GaN nanowires were successfully fabricated on Au-coated Si substrates by chemical vapor deposition. The tower-like nanowire consisted of a nanowire at the center and microcrystal layers stacked one by one around the nanowire. The tower-like nanowires grew along the [0001] direction, and the exposed surfaces of the microcrystal layers are 101¯1 and 101¯1¯ facets. The growth mechanism of the tower-like GaN nanowires was proposed. The field emission property of tower-like GaN nanowires was tested. Due to the sharp tips, nearly vertical alignment and rough surfaces caused by the microcrystal layers, the tower-like GaN nanowires show excellent performance in field emission with a turn-on field of 2.44 V/μm which is lower than those of other GaN one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. PACS 81.15.Gh; 68.37.Lp; 68.37.Vj PMID:25404876

  5. Nanoscale lateral epitaxial overgrowth of GaN on Si (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Zang, K.Y.; Wang, Y.D.; Chua, S.J.; Wang, L.S.

    2005-11-07

    We demonstrate that GaN can selectively grow by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition into the pores and laterally over the nanoscale patterned SiO{sub 2} mask on a template of GaN/AlN/Si. The nanoporous SiO{sub 2} on GaN surface with pore diameter of approximately 65 nm and pore spacing of 110 nm was created by inductively coupled plasma etching using anodic aluminum oxide template as a mask. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy shows that the threading-dislocation density was largely reduced in this nanoepitaxial lateral overgrowth region. Dislocations parallel to the interface are the dominant type of dislocations in the overgrown layer of GaN. A large number of the threading dislocations were filtered by the nanoscale mask, which leads to the dramatic reduction of the threading dislocations during the growth within the nano-openings. More importantly, due to the nanoscale size of the mask area, the very fast coalescence and subsequent lateral overgrowth of GaN force the threading dislocations to bend to the basal plane within the first 50 nm of the film thickness. The structure of overgrown GaN is a truncated hexagonal pyramid which is covered with six {l_brace}1101{r_brace} side facets and (0001) top surface depending on the growth conditions.

  6. Individual GaN nanowires exhibit strong piezoelectricity in 3D.

    PubMed

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Bernal, Rodrigo A; Kuljanishvili, Irma; Parpoil, Victor; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2012-02-01

    Semiconductor GaN NWs are promising components in next generation nano- and optoelectronic systems. In addition to their direct band gap, they exhibit piezoelectricity, which renders them particularly attractive in energy harvesting applications for self-powered devices. Nanowires are often considered as one-dimensional nanostructures; however, the electromechanical coupling leads to a third rank tensor that for wurtzite crystals (GaN NWs) possesses three independent coefficients, d(33), d(13), and d(15). Therefore, the full piezoelectric characterization of individual GaN NWs requires application of electric fields in different directions and measurements of associated displacements on the order of several picometers. In this Letter, we present an experimental approach based on scanning probe microscopy to directly quantify the three-dimensional piezoelectric response of individual GaN NWs. Experimental results reveal that GaN NWs exhibit strong piezoelectricity in three dimensions, with up to six times the effect in bulk. Based on finite element modeling, this finding has major implication on the design of energy harvesting systems exhibiting unprecedented levels of power density production. The presented method is applicable to other piezoelectric NW materials as well as wires manufactured along different crystallographic orientations.

  7. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi Gan locus, involved in galactan catabolism.

    PubMed

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-10-01

    beta-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK(2). Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-beta-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-beta-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny.

  8. Ultrathin GaN quantum disk nanowire LEDs with sub-250 nm electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, A T M Golam; May, Brelon J; Chisholm, Matthew F; Duscher, Gerd J; Myers, Roberto C

    2016-04-21

    By quantum confining GaN at monolayer thickness with AlN barriers inside of a nanowire, deep ultraviolet LEDs are demonstrated. Full three-dimensional strain dependent energy band simulations are carried out within multiple quantum disk (MQD) GaN/AlN nanowire superlattice heterostructures. It is found that, even within the same nanowire MQD, the emission energy of the ultrathin GaN QDs varies from disk to disk due to the changing strain distribution and polarization charge induced energy band bending along the axial nanowire direction. MQD heterostructures are grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form self-assembled catalyst-free nanowires with 1 to 2 monolayer thick GaN insertions within an AlN matrix. Photoluminescence peaks are observed at 295 nm and 283 nm from the 2 ML and 1 ML thick MQD samples, respectively. Polarization-doped nanowire LEDs are grown incorporating 1 ML thick GaN MQD active regions from which we observe deep ultraviolet electroluminescence. The shortest LED wavelength peak observed is 240 nm and attributed to electron hole recombination within 1 ML thick GaN QDs.

  9. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi Gan locus, involved in galactan catabolism.

    PubMed

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-10-01

    beta-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK(2). Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-beta-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-beta-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  10. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi gan Locus, Involved in Galactan Catabolism▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-01-01

    β-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK2. Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-β-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-β-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  11. Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Pan, Guoshun; Lu, Xinchun

    2016-08-01

    Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of GaN were deeply investigated in this paper. Working as an ideal homogeneous substrate material in LED industry, GaN ought to be equipped with a smooth and flat surface. Taking the strong chemical stability of GaN into account, photocatalytic oxidation technology was adopted in GaN CMP process to realize efficient removal. It was found that, because of the improved reaction rate of photocatalytic oxidation, GaN material removal rate (MRR) increases by a certain extent with catalyst concentration increasing. Cross single line analysis on the surface after polishing by Phase Shift MicroXAM-3D was carried out to prove the better removal effect with higher catalyst concentration. Ultraviolet intensity field in H2O2-SiO2-based polishing system was established and simulated, revealing the variation trend of ultraviolet intensity around the outlet of the slurry. It could be concluded that, owing to the higher planarization efficiency and lower energy damage, the UV lamp of 125 W is the most appropriate lamp in this system. Based on the analysis, defects removal model of this work was proposed to describe the effects of higher catalyst concentration and higher power of UV lamp.

  12. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra of GaN epitaxial layer grown on Si (111) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dan-Mei; Zhao, De-Gang; Jiang, De-Sheng; Liu, Zong-Shun; Zhu, Jian-Jun; Chen, Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Xiang; Shi, Ming

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) properties of GaN grown on Si (111) substrate are studied. The main emission peaks of GaN films grown on Si (111) are investigated and compared with those grown on sapphire substrates. The positions of free and bound exciton luminescence peaks, i.e., FXA and D0X peaks, of GaN films grown on Si (111) substrates undergo red shifts compared with those grown on sapphire. This is attributed to the fact that the GaN films grown on sapphire are under the action of compressive stress, while those grown on Si (111) substrate are subjected to tensile stress. Furthermore, the positions of these peaks may be additionally shifted due to different stress conditions in the real sample growth. The emission peaks due to stacking faults are found in GaN films grown on Si (111) and an S-shaped temperature dependence of PL spectra can be observed, owing to the influence of the quantum well (QW) emission by the localized states near the conduction band gap edge and the temperature-dependent distribution of the photo-generated carriers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61474110, 61377020, 61376089, 61223005, and 61176126) and the National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (Grant No. 60925017).

  13. Properties of Gallium Disorder and Gold Implants in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Weber, William J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V; DB Poker, SC Moss, K-H Heinig

    2001-04-25

    Epitaxial single-crystal GaN films on sapphire were implanted 60? off the <0001> surface normal with 1 MeV Auor 3 MeV Au over a fluence range from 0.88 to 86.2 ions/nm2 at 180 and 300 K. The implantation damage was studied in-situ using 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS/C). The disordering rate in the near-surface region is faster than at the damage peak. In all cases, results show an intermediate stage of Ga disorder saturation at the damage peak. Migration of Au implants in GaN is observed during ion implantation at 300 K. As a result of thermal annealing at 870 K for 20 min, some Au implants in GaN diffuse into the amorphized surface region, while the remaining Au atoms distribute around the mean ion-projected-range. These results suggest a high mobility of both Ga defects and Au implants in GaN. Deeper damage implantation by 3 MeV Au indicates that GaN cannot be completely amorphized up to the highest ion fluence (86.2 ions/nm) applied at 300 K.

  14. Synthesis, microstructure, and cathodoluminescence of [0001]-oriented GaN nanorods grown on conductive graphite substrate.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Liu, Baodan; Wang, Zaien; Yang, Bing; Yin, Yao; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Zhang, Guifeng; Jiang, Xin

    2013-11-27

    One-dimensional GaN nanorods with corrugated morphology have been synthesized on graphite substrate without the assistance of any metal catalyst through a feasible thermal evaporation process. The morphologies and microstructures of GaN nanorods were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results from HRTEM analysis indicate that the GaN nanorods are well-crystallized and exhibit a preferential orientation along the [0001] direction with Ga(3+)-terminated (101̅1) and N(3-)-terminated (101̅1̅) as side facets, finally leading to the corrugated morphology surface. The stabilization of the electrostatic surface energy of {101̅1} polar surface in a wurtzite-type hexagonal structure plays a key role in the formation of GaN nanorods with corrugated morphology. Room-temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements show a near-band-edge emission (NBE) in the ultraviolet range and a broad deep level emission (DLE) in the visible range. The crystallography and the optical emissions of GaN nanorods are discussed. PMID:24164686

  15. GaN detector development for particle and X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Barnes, A.; Farley, R. A.; Germain, M.; Sellin, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on preliminary alpha particle and X-ray measurements on a number of prototype GaN PIN diodes. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential use of GAN based radiation detectors for radiation hard, high temperature, solar blind space applications. The devices have a planar structure consisting of a 2 μm epitaxial GaN layer grown on a highly doped n-type AlxGa1-xN nucleation layer, which in turn is deposited on a p-type 4H-SiC substrate. Au ohmic contacts were applied to the top of the GaN layer and the bottom of the substrate. A number of different sized devices were tested with contact diameters ranging from 0.4 mm to 0.7 mm. All devices showed good diode behaviour with reverse leakage currents in the tens to hundreds of micro-amp range. C-V measurements showed that the GaN layers were fully depleted for biases >20 V. When exposed to a 5.5 MeV alpha particle source, the devices showed a spectroscopic response with energy resolutions of ∼25% FWHM at room temperature (RT) and 10 V bias and 20% FWHM at -50 °C. These values are consistent with the previous measurements. No response to 60 keV photons could be measured.

  16. Transport properties, specific heat and thermal conductivity of GaN nanocrystalline ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkowski, Czeslaw; ChuchmaLa, Andrzej; Zaleski, Andrzej J.; Matusiak, Marcin; Mucha, Jan; GLuchowski, PaweL; Strek, WiesLaw

    2010-10-15

    The structural and transport properties (resistivity, thermopower and Hall effect), specific heat and thermal conductivity have been measured for GaN nanocrystalline ceramic prepared by hot pressing. It was found that the temperature dependence of resistivity in temperature range 10-300 K shows the very low activation energy, which is ascribed to the shallow donor doping originating in amorphous phase of sample. The major charge carriers are electrons, what is indicated by negative sign of Hall constant and Seebeck coefficient. The thermopower attains large values (-58 {mu}V/K at 300 K) and was characterized by linear temperature dependence which suggests the diffusion as a major contribution to Seebeck effect. The high electron concentration of 1.3x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and high electronic specific heat coefficient determined to be 2.4 mJ/molK{sup 2} allow to conclude that GaN ceramic demonstrates the semimetallic-like behavior accompanied by very small mobility of electrons ({approx}0.1 cm{sup 2}/V s) which is responsible for its high resistivity. A low heat conductivity of GaN ceramics is associated with partial amorphous phase of GaN grains due to high pressure sintering. - Graphical Abstract: Thermal resistivity and thermopower measurements indicates the high phonon scattering and lack of phonon-drag contribution to thermopower in GaN nanoceramics pressed under 4 GPa at 800 {sup o}C.

  17. Barrier heights of GaN Schottky contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten U.; Mönch, Winfried

    1997-06-01

    Silver and lead contacts prepared by evaporation onto clean n-GaN(0001) surfaces are rectifying. Their zero-bias barrier heights and ideality factors were determined from the current-voltage characteristics. The observed linear correlation between the barrier heights and the ideality factors is attributed to nonuniform distributions of barrier heights along the interfaces. The barrier heights of ideal Schottky contacts depend on the applied voltage due to the image-force lowering only and their ideally factors nif are approximately 1.01. By extrapolation of our experimental data to n = 1.01, we obtain barrier heights of 0.82 eV and 0.73 eV for uniform Ag- and Pb/n-GaN(0001) contacts, respectively. By applying the idea of metal-induced gap states (MIGS), the barrier heights of ideal Schottky contacts have been predicted to vary linearly as a function of the difference of the metal and the semiconductor electronegativities. The zero-charge-transfer barrier height and slope parameter are characteristic of the respective semiconductor. The zero-charge-transfer barrier heights have been calculated using an empirical tight-binding approach and the slope parameters are given by the optical dielectric constants. The experimental barrier heights of GaN Schottky contacts confirm the predictions of the MIGS-and-electronegativity model.

  18. Radiation Characterization of Commercial GaN Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Richard D.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Hoffman, James P.; Thrivikraman, Tushar; Jenabi, Masud; Gim, Yonggyu; Miyahira, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Radiative feedback from primordial protostars and final mass of the first star Commercially available devices fabricated from GaN are beginning to appear from a number of different suppliers. Based on previous materials and prototype device studies, it is expected that these commercial devices will be quite tolerant to the types of radiation encountered in space. This expectation needs to be verified and the study described herein was undertaken for that purpose. All of the parts discussed in this report are readily available commercially. The parts chosen for study are all targeted for RF applications. Three different studies were performed: 1) a preliminary DDD/TID test of a variety of part types was performed by irradiating with 50 MeV protons, 2) a detailed DDD/TID study of one particular part type was performed by irradiating with 50 MeV protons, and 3) a SEB/SEGR test was performed on a variety of part types by irradiating with heavy ions. No significant degradation was observed in the tests performed in this study.

  19. Intermediate Nucleation State of GaN Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. X.; Xie, M. H.; Tong, S. Y.

    2001-03-01

    Homoexpitaxial nucleation of GaN during molecular-beam epitaxy is followed by scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). We observe a metastable nucleation state, which manifests as “ghost” islands in STM images. These “ghost” islands can be irreversibly driven into normal islands by continuous STM imaging. It is further established that the “ghost” island formation is related to the presence of excess Ga atoms on the surface: Normal islands are only seen under the N-rich or stoichiometric flux condition, whereas “ghost” islands are observed under Ga-rich conditions. For intermediate excess-Ga coverages, both normal and “ghost” islands are present, however, they show distinctly different sizes, suggesting different nucleation states for the two. A growth model is proposed to account for the formation of metastable, “ghost” islands. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is carried out and main features of the surface are reproduced. We acknowledge financial support from HK RGC under grant Nos. 7396/00P, 7142/99P, and 7121/00P.

  20. Fabrication of high-quality \\{11\\bar{2}2\\} GaN substrates using the Na flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Mihoko; Nakamura, Koshi; Che, Songbek; Murakami, Kosuke; Takazawa, Hideo; Imanishi, Masayuki; Imade, Mamoru; Morita, Yukihiro; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) substrates fabricated along the nonpolar and semipolar directions are the most promising materials for realizing optical and electronic devices with low power consumption. In this study, we carry out the Na flux growth on \\{ 11\\bar{2}2\\} -plane GaN templates grown heteroepitaxially on sapphires. The GaN crystals are grown at low supersaturation using the Na flux method with the dipping technique. The crystallinity of the grown GaN crystals is improved compared to that of the seed substrates. Then it improves further by lowering the supersaturation. Finally, we succeed in fabricating a 2-in. \\{ 11\\bar{2}2\\} -plane GaN single crystal with high transparency and crystallinity.

  1. Enhanced water splitting stability with controlled NiO co-catalyst on GaN photoanode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hee; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2014-10-01

    Arrayed NiO co-catalyst on GaN is proposed to improve water splitting efficiency and to obtain stable photoelectrolysis without dissolution of photoanode. The characteristics of photoanodes were investigated by changing the height of NiO on n-GaN. The photoanode stability and performance of GaN with NiO was significantly improved compared to the reference GaN at zero bias. SEM measurements showed negligible etching of NiO and GaN surfaces, which confirmed considerably improved stability compared to the reference n-GaN. In summary, enhanced water splitting efficiency and photoanode stability were achieved by combining GaN with NiO co-catalyst which are advantageous for water splitting applications.

  2. Development of patterned sapphire substrate and the application to the growth of non-polar and semi-polar GaN for light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadatomo, Kazuyuki; Okada, Narihito

    2011-03-01

    The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) are usually fabricated on the patterned sapphire substrate (PSS). The PSS reduces the dislocation density in the GaN layer and enhances the light extraction efficiency (LEE) from the LED chip by scattering the light confined in GaN layer attributed to the critical angle between GaN (n=2.4) and sapphire substrate (n=1.7) (or air (n=1.0)). On the other hand, non-polar GaN and semipolar GaN are attracted much attention to eliminate the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE). Recently, we have developed novel technology to grow non-polar or semi-polar GaN on the PSS with high quality and large diameter by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). For example, m-plane GaN grown on a-plane PSS and {112 (see manuscript)} plane GaN grown on r-plane PSS. The growth of c-plane GaN from the c-plane-like sidewall of the r-plane PSS results in {112 (see manuscript)} GaN on the r-plane PSS. The full widths at half maximum of X-ray rocking curves (FWHM-XRC) of the {112(see manuscript)} GaN along the azimuths parallel and perpendicular to the c-direction were 533 and 260 arcsec, respectively. Dislocation density of the GaN was approximately 2×108 cm-2. These non-polar and semi-polar GaN are expected to be suitable for novel GaN substrate or GaN template for LEDs.

  3. Characterization of vertical GaN p-n diodes and junction field-effect transistors on bulk GaN down to cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilyalli, I. C.; Aktas, O.

    2015-12-01

    There is great interest in wide-bandgap semiconductor devices and most recently in vertical GaN structures for power electronic applications such as power supplies, solar inverters and motor drives. In this paper the temperature-dependent electrical behavior of vertical GaN p-n diodes and vertical junction field-effect transistors fabricated on bulk GaN substrates of low defect density (104 to 106 cm-2) is described. Homoepitaxial MOCVD growth of GaN on its native substrate and the ability to control the doping in the drift layers in GaN have allowed the realization of vertical device architectures with drift layer thicknesses of 6 to 40 μm and net carrier electron concentrations as low as 1 × 1015 cm-3. This parameter range is suitable for applications requiring breakdown voltages of 1.2 kV to 5 kV. Mg, which is used as a p-type dopant in GaN, is a relatively deep acceptor (E A ≈ 0.18 eV) and susceptible to freeze-out at temperatures below 200 K. The loss of holes in p-GaN has a deleterious effect on p-n junction behavior, p-GaN contacts and channel control in junction field-effect transistors at temperatures below 200 K. Impact ionization-based avalanche breakdown (BV > 1200 V) in GaN p-n junctions is characterized between 77 K and 423 K for the first time. At higher temperatures the p-n junction breakdown voltage improves due to increased phonon scattering. A positive temperature coefficient in the breakdown voltage is demonstrated down to 77 K; however, the device breakdown characteristics are not as abrupt at temperatures below 200 K. On the other hand, contact resistance to p-GaN is reduced dramatically above room temperature, improving the overall device performance in GaN p-n diodes in all cases except where the n-type drift region resistance dominates the total forward resistance. In this case, the electron mobility can be deconvolved and is found to decrease with T -3/2, consistent with a phonon scattering model. Also, normally-on vertical junction

  4. Migration mechanisms and diffusion barriers of carbon and native point defects in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrtsos, Alexandros; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    Carbon related defects are readily incorporated in GaN due to its abundance during growth both with MBE and MOCVD techniques. Employing first-principles calculations, we compute the migration barriers of carbon interstitials and we discuss possible relevant mechanisms of diffusion in the wurtzite GaN crystal. In addition, we calculate the migration barriers for the diffusion of the native defects of the crystal, i.e., gallium and nitrogen interstitials and vacancies. The minimum energy path and the migration barriers of these defects are obtained using the nudged elastic band method with the climbing image modification. In addition, the dimer method is used to independently determine the results. The results yield a quantitative description of carbon diffusion in GaN allowing for the determination of the most preferable migration paths.

  5. Large area, freestanding GaN nanocolumn membrane with bottom subwavelength nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjin; Hu, Fangren; Kanamori, Yoshiaki; Wu, Tong; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2010-03-15

    We propose, fabricate and characterize the freestanding GaN nanocolumn membrane with bottom subwavelength nanostructures. The GaN nanocolumns are epitaxially grown on freestanding nanostructured silicon substrate that is achieved by a combination of self-assemble technique and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. Optical reflection is greatly suppressed in the visible range due to the graded refractive index effect of subwavelength nanostructures. The freestanding GaN nanocolumn membrane is realized by removing silicon substrate from the backside, eliminating the silicon absorption of the emitted light and leading to a strong blue emission from the bottom side. The obtained structures also demonstrate the potential application for anti-reflective (AR) coating and GaN-Si hybrid microelectromechanical system (MEMS).

  6. A low cost, green method to synthesize GaN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Li, Yong-He; Su, Chao-hua; Song, Xue-Mei; Yan, Hui; Wang, Ru-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of gallium nitride nanowires (GaN NWs) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are successfully demonstrated in this work. The simple and green synthesis route is to introduce gallium oxide (Ga2O3) and nitrogen (N2) for the growth of nanowires. The prepared GaN nanowires have a single crystalline wurtzite structure, which the length of some nanowires is up to 20 μm, with a maximum diameter about 140 nm. The morphology and quantity of the nanowires can be modulated by the growth substrate and process parameters. In addition, the photoluminescence and field emission properties of the prepared GaN nanowires have been investigated, which were found to be largely affected by their structures. This work renders an environmentally benign strategy and a facile approach for controllable structures on nanodevice. PMID:26643613

  7. Hole mediated magnetism in Mn-doped GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiu-Wen; Li, Jingbo; Chang, Kai; Li, Shu-Shen; Xia, Jian-Bai

    2011-04-01

    The hole-mediated magnetism in Mn-doped GaN nanowires is investigated using the k .p method and the mean-field model. The Curie temperature (TC) as a function of the hole density p can be explained based on the calculated band structure of the nanowires. For low Mn concentration, TC vs. p shows many peaks stem from the peaks of the one-dimensional density of states. When the Mn concentration is increased, TC is enhanced, and the peaks of TC versus p are fully merged by the thermal distribution of the holes in the valence band. It is found that the Curie temperature in Mn-doped GaN wire can be higher than room temperature, in agreement with experiment [Song et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17, 5073 (2005)]. The ferromagnetism in Mn-doped GaN wire is slightly anisotropic due to the small spin-orbit coupling.

  8. Enhance ferromagnetism by stabilizing the cation vacancies in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhen-kun; Zhang, Deng-Yu; Tang, Li-Ming; Wang, Ling-Ling; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The magnetic properties related to cation vacancies in GaN are investigated by first-principles calculations. The results show that a neutral Ga-vacancy induces 3 μ B magnetic moment in GaN, but is difficult to form due to the high formation energy. It is found that the Ga-vacancy formation energy can be reduced by adding electrons with uniform compensating positive background charge, by nano-structure engineering, or by co-doping donor-like defects. The Ga-vacancy induced colossal magnetic moment in Gd-doped GaN can be modulated by co-doping the donor like defects. It is suggested that ferromagnetism enhanced by stabilizing the cation vacancies may be applied to other wide band-gap semiconductors as well.

  9. Cubic and hexagonal GaN nanoparticles synthesized at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaeed, M. A.; Ibrahim, K.; Saron, K. M. A.; Salhin, A.

    2013-12-01

    This study involves a simple and low cost chemical method for the synthesis of Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanoparticles at low temperature. Structural and optical characterizations were carried out using various techniques in order to investigate the properties of the nanoparticles. The Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) images showed that the nanoparticles consist of cubic and hexagonal shapes, indicating crystallized structural quality of the GaN nanoparticles. The average size of the nanoparticles was found to be 51 nm. The X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman analysis further confirmed the hexagonal and cubic phases of GaN nanoparticles. The room temperature photoluminescence deduced h-GaN energy gaps of 2.95, 3.12 and 3.13 eV.

  10. Analysis and modelling of GaN Schottky-based circuits at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, D.; Grajal, J.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents an analysis of the capabilities of GaN Schottky diodes for frequency multipliers and mixers at millimeter wavelengths. By using a Monte Carlo (MC) model of the diode coupled to a harmonic balance technique, the electrical and noise performances of these circuits are investigated. Despite the lower electron mobility of GaN compared to GaAs, multipliers based on GaN Schottky diodes can be competitive in the first stages of multiplier chains, due to the excellent power handling capabilities of this material. The performance of these circuits can be improved by taking advantage of the lateral Schottky diode structures based on AlGaN/GaN HEMT technology.

  11. Effect of Capping on Electrical and Optical Properties of GaN Layers Grown by HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.; Puzyk, M. V.; Papchenko, B. P.

    2016-04-01

    Gallium nitride, grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and capped with a thin AlGaN layer, was studied by photoluminescence (PL) methods. The concentration of free electrons in GaN was found from the time-resolved PL data, and the concentrations of point defects were estimated from the steady-state PL measurements. The intensity of PL from GaN decreases moderately after capping it with Si-doped AlGaN, and it decreases dramatically after capping with Mg-doped AlGaN. At the same time, the concentration of free electrons and the concentrations of main radiative defects in GaN are not affected by the AlGaN capping. We demonstrate that PL is a powerful tool for nondestructive characterization of semiconductor layers buried under overlying device structures.

  12. On the phenomenon of large photoluminescence red shift in GaN nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Slimane, Ahmed Ben; Najar, Adel; Elafandy, Rami; San-Román-Alerigi, Damián P; Anjum, Dalaver; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S

    2013-07-31

    We report on the observation of broad photoluminescence wavelength tunability from n-type gallium nitride nanoparticles (GaN NPs) fabricated using the ultraviolet metal-assisted electroless etching method. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy measurements performed on the nanoparticles revealed large size dispersion ranging from 10 to 100 nm. Nanoparticles with broad tunable emission wavelength from 362 to 440 nm have been achieved by exciting the samples using the excitation power-dependent method. We attribute this large wavelength tunability to the localized potential fluctuations present within the GaN matrix and to vacancy-related surface states. Our results show that GaN NPs fabricated using this technique are promising for tunable-color-temperature white light-emitting diode applications.

  13. Measurement of the electrostatic edge effect in wurtzite GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Alex; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Klein, Benjamin; Bertness, Kris A.; Blanchard, Paul T.; Sanford, Norman A.

    2014-11-24

    The electrostatic effect of the hexagonal corner on the electronic structure in wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) was directly measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating electrostatic simulations with the measured potential difference between the nanowire face and the hexagonal vertices, the surface state concentration and band bending of GaN NWs were estimated. The surface band bending is important for an efficient design of high electron mobility transistors and for opto-electronic devices based on GaN NWs. This methodology provides a way to extract NW parameters without making assumptions concerning the electron affinity. We are taking advantage of electrostatic modeling and the high precision that KPFM offers to circumvent a major source of uncertainty in determining the surface band bending.

  14. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  15. Microstructure of GaN epitaxy on SiC using AlN buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, F.A.; Krusor, B.S.; Major, J.S. Jr.; Plano, W.E.; Welch, D.F.

    1995-07-17

    The crystalline structure of GaN epilayers on (0001) SiC substrates has been studied using x-ray diffraction and transmission microscopy. The films were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, using AlN buffer layers. X-ray diffraction measurements show negligible strain in the epilayer, and a long-range variation in orientation. Transmission electron lattice images show that the AlN buffer layer consists of small crystallites. The nature of the buffer layer and its interfaces with the substrate and the GaN film is discussed. The defect structure of the GaN film away from the substrate consists mostly of threading dislocations with a density of {similar_to}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy of single crystalline GaN nanowires on a flexible Ti foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Gabriele; Corfdir, Pierre; Gao, Guanhui; Pfüller, Carsten; Trampert, Achim; Brandt, Oliver; Geelhaar, Lutz; Fernández-Garrido, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembled growth of vertically aligned GaN nanowire ensembles on a flexible Ti foil by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of single nanowires by transmission electron microscopy reveals that they are single crystalline. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that in comparison to standard GaN nanowires grown on Si, the nanowires prepared on the Ti foil exhibit an equivalent crystalline perfection, a higher density of basal-plane stacking faults, but a reduced density of inversion domain boundaries. The room-temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanowire ensemble is not influenced or degraded by the bending of the substrate. The present results pave the way for the fabrication of flexible optoelectronic devices based on GaN nanowires on metal foils.

  17. Lattice-matched HfN buffer layers for epitaxy of GaN on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, Robert; Yang, Qing; Feick, Henning; Gebauer, Joerg; Weber, Eicke R.; Shinkai, Satoko; Sasaki, Katsutaka

    2002-05-08

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using sputter-deposited hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 (mu)m. Initial results for GaN grown on the (111) surface show a photoluminescence peak width of 17 meV at 11 K, and an asymmetric x-ray rocking curve width of 20 arcmin. Wurtzite GaN on HfN/Si(001) shows reduced structural quality and peculiar low-temperature luminescence features. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  18. A low cost, green method to synthesize GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Li, Yong-He; Su, Chao-hua; Song, Xue-Mei; Yan, Hui; Wang, Ru-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of gallium nitride nanowires (GaN NWs) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are successfully demonstrated in this work. The simple and green synthesis route is to introduce gallium oxide (Ga2O3) and nitrogen (N2) for the growth of nanowires. The prepared GaN nanowires have a single crystalline wurtzite structure, which the length of some nanowires is up to 20 μm, with a maximum diameter about 140 nm. The morphology and quantity of the nanowires can be modulated by the growth substrate and process parameters. In addition, the photoluminescence and field emission properties of the prepared GaN nanowires have been investigated, which were found to be largely affected by their structures. This work renders an environmentally benign strategy and a facile approach for controllable structures on nanodevice. PMID:26643613

  19. Self-induced growth of vertical GaN nanowires on silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaresan, V.; Largeau, L.; Oehler, F.; Zhang, H.; Mauguin, O.; Glas, F.; Gogneau, N.; Tchernycheva, M.; Harmand, J.-C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the self-induced growth of GaN nanowires on silica. Although the amorphous structure of this substrate offers no possibility of an epitaxial relationship, the nanowires are remarkably aligned with the substrate normal whereas, as expected, their in-plane orientation is random. Their structural and optical characteristics are compared to those of GaN nanowires grown on standard crystalline Si (111) substrates. The polarity inversion domains are much less frequent, if not totally absent, in the nanowires grown on silica, which we find to be N-polar. This work demonstrates that high-quality vertical GaN nanowires can be elaborated without resorting to bulk crystalline substrates.

  20. Effect of buffer layer growth temperature on epitaxial GaN films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, P.; Singh, D.; Kumar, R.; Ganguli, T.; Srinivasa, R. S.; Major, S. S.

    2012-06-05

    Epitaxial GaN films were deposited by reactive sputtering of a GaAs target in 100 % nitrogen at 700 deg. C on ZnO buffer layers grown at different substrate temperatures over sapphire substrates. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements and the corresponding analysis show that the growth temperature of buffer layers significantly affects the micro-structural parameters of GaN epilayer, such as lateral coherence length, tilt and twist, while the vertical coherence length remains unaffected. The optimum substrate temperature for buffer layer growth has been found to be 300 deg. C. High epitaxial quality GaN film grown on such a buffer layer exhibited micro strain of 1.8x10{sup -4} along with screw and edge type dislocation densities of 7.87x10{sup 9} and 1.16x10{sup 11}, respectively.

  1. Surface antireflection properties of GaN nanostructures with various effective refractive index profiles.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Zhao, Hongping

    2014-12-29

    GaN nanostructures with various effective refractive index profiles (Linear, Cubic, and Quintic functions) were numerically studied as broadband omnidirectional antireflection structures for concentrator photovoltaics by using three-dimensional finite difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method. Effective medium theory was used to design the surface structures corresponding to different refractive index profiles. Surface antireflection properties were calculated and analyzed for incident light with wavelength, polarization and angle dependences. The surface antireflection properties of GaN nanostructures based on six-sided pyramid with both uniform and non-uniform patterns were also investigated. Results indicate a significant dependence of the surface antireflection on the refractive index profiles of surface nanostructures as well as their pattern uniformity. The GaN nanostructures with linear refractive index profile show the best performance to be used as broadband omnidirectional antireflection structures.

  2. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  3. Room-Temperature Transport of Indirect Excitons in (Al ,Ga )N /GaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedichkin, F.; Guillet, T.; Valvin, P.; Jouault, B.; Brimont, C.; Bretagnon, T.; Lahourcade, L.; Grandjean, N.; Lefebvre, P.; Vladimirova, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the exciton propagation in polar (Al ,Ga )N /GaN quantum wells over several micrometers and up to room temperature. The key ingredient to achieve this result is the crystalline quality of GaN quantum wells grown on GaN substrate that limits nonradiative recombination. From the comparison of the spatial and temporal dynamics of photoluminescence, we conclude that the propagation of excitons under continuous-wave excitation is assisted by efficient screening of the in-plane disorder. Modeling within drift-diffusion formalism corroborates this conclusion and suggests that exciton propagation is still limited by the exciton scattering on defects rather than by exciton-exciton scattering so that improving interface quality can boost exciton transport further. Our results pave the way towards room-temperature excitonic devices based on gate-controlled exciton transport in wide-band-gap polar heterostructures.

  4. Lithographically defined carbon growth templates for ELOG of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. B.; Fan, Hongyou; Thaler, G.; Koleske, D. D.

    2008-06-01

    We report the initial use of lithographically defined carbon growth templates for use as an epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) mask for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) heteroepitaxial GaN on sapphire. Interferometric lithography is used to define high aspect ratio structures in SU-8, which are then pyrolyzed in a reducing atmosphere up to 1200 °C. The resist structures convert to amorphous carbon, shrinking 80% in the vertical direction and 53% in the horizontal direction, but maintain their pattern geometry and adhesion to the substrate. These templates are capable of surviving GaN nucleation layer growth temperatures (˜530 °C), GaN crystal growth and high-temperature annealing up to 1050 °C. This new approach to ELOG offers several advantages, requiring fewer processing steps, and favorable selectivity tendencies as well as the capability to create growth masks which are difficult or impossible to fabricate using a top-down etching approach.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of epitaxial ZnO on GaN and YSZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Wei; Ke, Dong-Jie; Chao, Yen-Cheng; Chang, Li; Liang, Mei-Hui; Ho, Yen-Teng

    2007-01-01

    ZnO thin films were epitaxially grown by atomic layer deposition on both of GaN/c-sapphire and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates for comparison. X-ray diffraction, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that epitaxial ZnO films have better structural qualities and optical properties on GaN than on YSZ, whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the surface of ZnO films on YSZ is smoother than on GaN. From the ZnO thickness measured by TEM, the growth rate of ZnO on GaN is about one (0 0 0 2) monolayer per cycle, which is roughly four times of that on YSZ.

  6. Global analysis of GaN growth using a solution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, D.; Gejo, R.; Kangawa, Y.; Liu, L.; Kawamura, F.; Mori, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Kakimoto, K.

    2008-04-01

    The solution growth technique is one of the key methods for fabricating gallium nitride (GaN) wafers with small dislocation density. Since the growth rate of GaN using the solution technique is small, the key issue of the technique is to enhance the growth rate of the crystal. We studied how nitrogen is transferred from the surface of the flux to the interface between the top of the flux and the crystal in a muffle furnace using a global model that includes radiative, convective and conductive heat and mass transfer, including nitrogen transfer. The average growth rate of GaN increased when the temperature difference between the furnace wall and a crucible wall became large. This phenomenon is based on mixing of the flux due to natural convection.

  7. Supersaturation in nucleus and spiral growth of GaN in metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kasu, Makoto

    2010-10-01

    Nucleus and spiral growth mechanisms of GaN were experimentally studied by varying the degree of supersaturation, σ, in selective-area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The spiral growth rate of GaN increased proportionally to σ2 in the σ range from 0.0632 to 0.230. The nucleus growth rate of GaN was much smaller than the spiral one in the σ range. The nucleation rate was almost zero at σ lower than 0.130, suddenly increased at higher σ values, and reached ˜107 cm-2 s-1 at σ of 0.230. These results are consistent with a theoretical analysis [W. K. Burton, N. Cabrera, and F. C. Frank, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 243, 299 (1951)].

  8. Valence band offset of β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A sample of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure has been grown by dry thermal oxidation of GaN on a sapphire substrate. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the β-Ga2O3 layer was formed epitaxially on GaN. The valence band offset of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure is measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the valence band of the β-Ga2O3/GaN structure is 1.40 ± 0.08 eV. PMID:23046910

  9. Simulation of optimum parameters for GaN MSM UV photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhelfi, Mohanad A.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Hashim, M. R.; Al-Rawi, Ali Amer; Hassan, Z.

    2016-07-01

    In this study the optimum parameters of GaN M-S-M photodetector are discussed. The evaluation of the photodetector depends on many parameters, the most of the important parameters the quality of the GaN film and others depend on the geometry of the interdigited electrode. In this simulation work using MATLAB software with consideration of the reflection and absorption on the metal contacts, a detailed study involving various electrode spacings (S) and widths (W) reveals conclusive results in device design. The optimum interelectrode design for interdigitated MSM-PD has been specified and evaluated by effect on quantum efficiency and responsivity.

  10. Lattice location of deuterium in plasma and gas charged Mg doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Barbour, J.C.; Seager, C.H.; Myers, S.M. Jr.; Wright, A.F.; Han, J.

    1999-12-02

    The authors have used ion channeling to examine the lattice configuration of deuterium in Mg doped GaN grown by MOCVD. The deuterium is introduced both by exposure to deuterium gas and to ECR plasmas. A density functional approach including lattice relaxation, was used to calculate total energies for various locations and charge states of hydrogen in the wurtzite Mg doped GaN lattice. Computer simulations of channeling yields were used to compare results of channeling measurements with calculated yields for various predicted deuterium lattice configurations.

  11. Surface-Effect-Induced Optical Bandgap Shrinkage in GaN Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Young S; Lee, Geunsik; Holmes, Mark J; Chan, Christopher C S; Reid, Benjamin P L; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Nicholas, Robin J; Taylor, Robert A; Kim, Kwang S; Han, Sang W; Yang, Woochul; Jo, Y; Kim, J; Im, Hyunsik

    2015-07-01

    We investigate nontrivial surface effects on the optical properties of self-assembled crystalline GaN nanotubes grown on Si substrates. The excitonic emission is observed to redshift by ∼100 meV with respect to that of bulk GaN. We find that the conduction band edge is mainly dominated by surface atoms, and that a larger number of surface atoms for the tube is likely to increase the bandwidth, thus reducing the optical bandgap. The experimental findings can have important impacts in the understanding of the role of surfaces in nanostructured semiconductors with an enhanced surface/volume ratio.

  12. Eliminating stacking faults in semi-polar GaN by AlN interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Dadgar, A.; Ravash, R.; Veit, P.; Schmidt, G.; Mueller, M.; Dempewolf, A.; Bertram, F.; Wieneke, M.; Christen, J.; Krost, A.

    2011-07-11

    We report on the elimination of stacking faults by the insertion of low-temperature AlN interlayers in nearly (1016) and (1104) oriented semi-polar GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on Si(112) and Si(113), respectively. The elimination of these defects is visualized by cathodoluminescence (CL) as well as scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and STEM-CL. A possible annihilation mechanism is discussed which leads to the conclusion that the elimination mechanism is most likely valid for all layers with (1101) surfaces, enabling heteroepitaxial semi- and non-polar GaN free from stacking faults.

  13. Simulations of Operation Dynamics of Different Type GaN Particle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gaubas, Eugenijus; Ceponis, Tomas; Kalesinskas, Vidas; Pavlov, Jevgenij; Vysniauskas, Juozas

    2015-01-01

    The operation dynamics of the capacitor-type and PIN diode type detectors based on GaN have been simulated using the dynamic and drift-diffusion models. The drift-diffusion current simulations have been implemented by employing the software package Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus. The monopolar and bipolar drift regimes have been analyzed by using dynamic models based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem. The carrier multiplication processes determined by impact ionization have been considered in order to compensate carrier lifetime reduction due to introduction of radiation defects into GaN detector material. PMID:25751080

  14. Germanium-catalyzed growth of single-crystal GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Umar; Wang, Hong; Peyrot, David; Olivier, Aurélien; Zhang, Jun; Coquet, Philippe; Ng, Serene Lay Geok

    2016-04-01

    We report the use of Germanium (Ge) as catalyst for Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanowires growth. High-yield growth has been achieved with Ge nanoparticles obtained by dewetting a thin layer of Ge on a Si (100) substrate. The nanowires are long and grow straight with very little curvature. The GaN nanowires are single-crystalline and show a Wurtzite structure growing along the [0001] axis. The growth follows a metal-free Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism, further allowing a CMOS technology compatibility. The synthesis of nanowires has been done using an industrial Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) system.

  15. Characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Ikai; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Chen, Wen-Yen; Hsu, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Gary Z. L.

    2013-06-15

    The characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on LiAlO{sub 2} substrate was studied by cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence measurements. We demonstrated that the cathodoluminescence from oblique semi-polar surfaces of mushroom-shaped GaN was much brighter than that from top polar surface due to the reduction of polarization field on the oblique semi-polar surfaces. It implies that the oblique semi-polar surface is superior for the light-emitting surface of wurtzite nano-devices.

  16. X-ray detectors based on GaN Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Duboz, Jean-Yves; Frayssinet, Eric; Chenot, Sebastien; Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Idir, Mourad

    2010-10-18

    GaN Schottky diodes have been fabricated and tested as x-ray detectors in the range from 6 to 21 keV. The spectral response has been measured and is compared to its theoretical value. The study of the response and its temporal dynamics as a function of the bias allows to identify a photovoltaic behavior at low bias and a photoconductive one at larger reverse biases. The GaN diode turned out to be linear as a function of the incident power. The noise and detectivity are given and discussed.

  17. Microstructural evolution in H ion induced splitting of freestanding GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Senz, S.; Goesele, U.; Chicoine, M.; Schiettekatte, F.; Suesskraut, F.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2008-07-21

    We investigated the microstructural transformations during hydrogen ion-induced splitting of GaN thin layers. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy data show that the implanted region is decorated with a high density of 1-2 nm bubbles resulting from vacancy clustering during implantation. These nanobubbles persist up to 450 deg. C. Ion channeling data show a strong dechanneling enhancement in this temperature range tentatively attributed to strain-induced lattice distortion. The dechanneling level decreases following the formation of plateletlike structures at 475 deg. C. Extended internal surfaces develop around 550 deg. C leading to the exfoliation of GaN thin layer.

  18. Nucleation and Growth of GaN on GaAs (001) Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Hafich, Michael J.; Heller, Edwin J.; Lee, Stephen R.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Ruvimov, Sergei; Sullivan, John P.

    1999-05-03

    The nucleation of GaN thin films on GaAs is investigated for growth at 620 "C. An rf plasma cell is used to generate chemically active nitrogen from N2. An arsenic flux is used in the first eight monolayer of nitride growth to enhance nucleation of the cubic phase. Subsequent growth does not require an As flux to preserve the cubic phase. The nucleation of smooth interfaces and GaN films with low stacking fault densities is dependent upon relative concentrations of active nitrogen species in the plasma and on the nitrogen to gallium flux ratio.

  19. Temperature dependence of the electron Landé g-factor in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Schupp, T.; As, D. J.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron Landé g-factor in bulk cubic GaN is investigated over an extremely broad temperature range from 15 K up to 500 K by time-resolved Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. The g-factor is found to be approximately constant over the full investigated temperature range. Calculations by k .p -theory predict a negligible temperature dependence g(T) in complete agreement with the experiment as a consequence of the large band-gap and small spin orbit splitting in cubic GaN.

  20. Investigation of structural and optical properties of GaN on flat and porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, Saleh H.; Selman, Abbas M.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, gallium nitride (GaN) layers were successfully grown on Flat-Si and porous silicon (PSi) using a radio frequency-magnetron sputtering system. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images showed that the grown film on Flat-Si had smoother surface, even though there were some cracks on it. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the peak intensity of all the grown layers on PSi was higher than that of the grown layer on Flat-Si. Our detailed observation showed that PSi is a promising substrate to obtain GaN films.

  1. Determination of satellite valley position in GaN emitter from photoexcited field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Argon plasma etched GaN field-emitter rods with nanometer-scale diameter were fabricated on GaN grown on an n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated both without and under illumination by using light sources with various wavelengths. The Fowler-Nordheim current-voltage characteristics of the cathodes show a change in slope for illuminated cathodes. The electron affinity difference ΔE between the different valleys in the conduction band has been ascertained and is in the range from 1.18 up to 1.21 eV.

  2. Modeling of radiation damage recovery in particle detectors based on GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Pavlov, J.

    2015-12-01

    The pulsed characteristics of the capacitor-type and PIN diode type detectors based on GaN have been simulated using the dynamic and drift-diffusion models. The drift-diffusion current simulations have been implemented by employing the commercial software package Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus. The bipolar drift regime has been analyzed. The possible internal gain in charge collection through carrier multiplication processes determined by impact ionization has been considered in order to compensate carrier lifetime reduction due to radiation defects introduced into GaN material of detector.

  3. Simulations of operation dynamics of different type GaN particle sensors.

    PubMed

    Gaubas, Eugenijus; Ceponis, Tomas; Kalesinskas, Vidas; Pavlov, Jevgenij; Vysniauskas, Juozas

    2015-01-01

    The operation dynamics of the capacitor-type and PIN diode type detectors based on GaN have been simulated using the dynamic and drift-diffusion models. The drift-diffusion current simulations have been implemented by employing the software package Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus. The monopolar and bipolar drift regimes have been analyzed by using dynamic models based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem. The carrier multiplication processes determined by impact ionization have been considered in order to compensate carrier lifetime reduction due to introduction of radiation defects into GaN detector material. PMID:25751080

  4. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  5. Growth optimization and characterization of GaN epilayers on multifaceted (111) surfaces etched on Si(100) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ansah-Antwi, KwaDwo Konadu Chua, Soo Jin; Soh, Chew Beng; Liu, Hongfei

    2015-11-15

    The four nearest Si(111) multifaceted sidewalls were exposed inside an array of 3 μm-wide square holes patterned on an Si(100) substrate, and this patterned Si(100) substrate was used as a substrate for the deposition of a gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer. Subsequently the effect that the growth pressure, the etched-hole profiles, and the etched-hole arrangement had upon the quality of the as-grown GaN was investigated. The coalescence of the as-grown GaN epilayer on the exposed Si(111) facets was observed to be enhanced with reduced growth pressure from 120 to 90 Torr. A larger Si(001) plane area at the bottom of the etched holes resulted in bidirectional GaN domains, which resulted in poor material quality. The bidirectional GaN domains were observed as two sets of six peaks via a high-resolution x-ray diffraction phi scan of the GaN(10-11) reflection. It was also shown that a triangular array of etched holes was more desirable than square arrays of etched holes for the growth high-quality and continuous GaN films.

  6. Nobel Lecture: Growth of GaN on sapphire via low-temperature deposited buffer layer and realization of p -type GaN by Mg doping followed by low-energy electron beam irradiation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    This is a personal history of one of the Japanese researchers engaged in developing a method for growing GaN on a sapphire substrate, paving the way for the realization of smart television and display systems using blue LEDs. The most important work was done in the mid to late 1980s. The background to the author's work and the process by which the technology enabling the growth of GaN and the realization of p -type GaN was established are reviewed.

  7. Growth of GaN on Sapphire via Low-Temperature Deposited Buffer Layer and Realization of p-Type GaN by Mg Doping Followed by Low-Energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    This is a personal history of one of the Japanese researchers engaged in developing a method for growing GaN on a sapphire substrate, paving the way for the realization of smart television and display systems using blue LEDs. The most important work was done in the mid- to late 80s. The background to the author's work and the process by which the technology enabling the growth of GaN and the realization of p-type GaN was established are reviewed.

  8. The hardware accelerator array for logic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N H

    1991-05-01

    Hardware acceleration exploits the parallelism inherent in large circuit simulations to achieve significant increases in performance. Simulation accelerators have been developed based on the compiled code algorithm or the event-driven algorithm. The greater flexibility of the event-driven algorithm has resulted in several important developments in hardware acceleration architecture. Some popular commercial products have been developed based on the event-driven algorithm and data-flow architectures. Conventional data-flow architectures require complex switching networks to distribute operands among processing elements resulting in considerable overhead. An accelerator array architecture based on a nearest-neighbor communication has been developed in this thesis. The design is simulated in detail at the behavioral level. Its performance is evaluated and shown to be superior to that of a conventional data-flow accelerator. 14 refs., 48 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Effect of residual stress on the microstructure of GaN epitaxial films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhu, Yunnong; Lin, Zhiting; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-04-01

    The stress-free GaN epitaxial films have been directly grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 850 °C, and the effect of different stress on the microstructure of as-grown GaN epitaxial films has been explored in detail. The as-grown stress-free GaN epitaxial films exhibit very smooth surface without any particles and grains, which is confirmed by the smallest surface root-mean-square roughness of 2.3 nm measured by atomic force microscopy. In addition, they also have relatively high crystalline quality, which is proved by the small full-width at half maximum values of GaN(0002) and GaN (10 1 bar 2) X-ray rocking curves as 0.27° and 0.68°, respectively. However, when the growth temperature is lower or higher than 850 °C, internal or thermal stress would be increased in as-grown GaN epitaxial films. To release the larger stress, a great number of dislocations are generated. Many irregular particulates, hexagonal GaN gains and pits are therefore produced on the films surface, and the crystalline quality is greatly reduced consequently. This work has demonstrated the direct growth of stress-free GaN epitaxial films with excellent surface morphology and high crystalline quality by PLD, and presented a comprehensive study on the origins and the effect of stress in GaN layer. It is instructional to achieve high-quality nitride films by PLD, and shows great potential and broad prospect for the further development of high-performance GaN-based devices.

  10. High-electron-mobility GaN grown on free-standing GaN templates by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, Erin C. H. Kaun, Stephen W.; Burke, Peter G.; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.; Wu, Yuh-Renn

    2014-05-21

    The dependence of electron mobility on growth conditions and threading dislocation density (TDD) was studied for n{sup −}-GaN layers grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. Electron mobility was found to strongly depend on TDD, growth temperature, and Si-doping concentration. Temperature-dependent Hall data were fit to established transport and charge-balance equations. Dislocation scattering was analyzed over a wide range of TDDs (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2} to ∼2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}) on GaN films grown under similar conditions. A correlation between TDD and fitted acceptor states was observed, corresponding to an acceptor state for almost every c lattice translation along each threading dislocation. Optimized GaN growth on free-standing GaN templates with a low TDD (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}) resulted in electron mobilities of 1265 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 296 K and 3327 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 113 K.

  11. Hierarchical growth of GaN nanowires for light emitting diode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Rishabh; Ra, Yong-Ho; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Obheroi, Sonika; Navamathavan, R.

    2016-02-01

    Gallium nitride nanostructures have been receiving considerable attention as building blocks for nanophotonic technologies due to their unique high aspect ratios, promising the realization of photonic and biological nanodevices such as blue light emitting diodes (LEDs), short-wavelength ultraviolet nanolasers and nanofluidic biochemical sensors. In this study, we report on the hierarchical growth of GaN nanowires (NWs) by dynamically adjusting the growth parameters using pulsed flow metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. We carried out two step growth processes to grow hierarchical GaN NWs. At the first step the GaN NWs were grown at 950°C and in the second stage, we suitably decreased the growth temperature to 710°C to grow the hierarchical structures. The surface morphology, structural and optical characterization of the grown hierarchical GaN NWs were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, respectively. These kind of hierarchical NWs are promising to allow flat band quantum structures that are shown to improve the efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  12. Structural and luminescence properties of GaN nanowires grown using cobalt phthalocyanine as catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Shivesh; Rodríguez-Fernández, Carlos; de Lima, Mauricio M.; Cantarero, Andres; Dhar, Subhabrata

    2015-12-01

    Catalyst free methods have usually been employed to avoid any catalyst induced contamination for the synthesis of GaN nanowires with better transport and optical properties. Here, we have used a catalytic route to grow GaN nanowires, which show good optical quality. Structural and luminescence properties of GaN nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid technique using cobalt phthalocyanine as catalyst are systematically investigated as a function of various growth parameters such as the growth temperature and III/V ratio. The study reveals that most of the nanowires, which are several tens of microns long, grow along [ 10 1 ¯ 0 ] direction. Interestingly, the average wire diameter has been found to decrease with the increase in III/V ratio. It has also been observed that in these samples, defect related broad luminescence features, which are often present in GaN, are completely suppressed. At all temperatures, photoluminescence spectrum is found to be dominated only by a band edge feature, which comprises of free and bound excitonic transitions. Our study furthermore reveals that the bound excitonic feature is associated with excitons trapped in certain deep level defects, which result from the deficiency of nitrogen during growth. This transition has a strong coupling with the localized vibrational modes of the defects.

  13. CFD and reaction computational analysis of the growth of GaN by HVPE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempisty, P.; Łucznik, B.; Pastuszka, B.; Grzegory, I.; Boćkowski, M.; Krukowski, S.; Porowski, S.

    2006-10-01

    GaCl synthesis reaction during hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) growth of GaN in horizontal flow reactor has been analyzed using computerized fluid dynamics (CFD) and molecular estimates of the reaction rates. Finite element code FIDAP (commercially available from Fluent Inc.) [Fidap User Manual, Fluent Inc. [1

  14. Diffusion mechanism and the thermal stability of fluorine ions in GaN after ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. J.; Yuan, L.; Chen, K. J.; Xu, F. J.; Shen, B.

    2009-04-15

    The diffusion mechanisms of fluorine ions in GaN are investigated by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Instead of incorporating fluorine ions close to the sample surface by fluorine plasma treatment, fluorine ion implantation with an energy of 180 keV is utilized to implant fluorine ions deep into the GaN bulk, preventing the surface effects from affecting the data analysis. It is found that the diffusion of fluorine ions in GaN is a dynamic process featuring an initial out-diffusion followed by in- diffusion and the final stabilization. A vacancy-assisted diffusion model is proposed to account for the experimental observations, which is also consistent with results on molecular dynamic simulation. Fluorine ions tend to occupy Ga vacancies induced by ion implantation and diffuse to vacancy rich regions. The number of continuous vacancy chains can be significantly reduced by a dynamic thermal annealing process. As a result, strong local confinement and stabilization of fluorine ions can be obtained in GaN crystal, suggesting excellent thermal stability of fluorine ions for device applications.

  15. High-breakdown-voltage pn-junction diodes on GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizumi, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Shin; Tanabe, Tatsuya; Kiyama, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    GaN pn-junction diodes have been grown on GaN and sapphire substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy and their electrical characteristics have been studied. For the diode on the GaN substrate, the reverse leakage current is lower and the breakdown voltage VB is higher than those on the sapphire substrate owing to the lower dislocation density. The breakdown voltage is further improved with decreasing Mg concentration in p-GaN layers. Analysis of the depletion-layer capacitance of pn diodes has revealed that the Mg acceptors are fully ionized in the depletion layer. By optimizing the growth conditions, the diodes on GaN substrates show extremely low leakage current and the ideal hard breakdown at -925 V. The breakdown field is estimated to be 3.27 MV/cm. The specific on-resistance RON of 6.3 mΩ cm 2 is obtained, leading to the figure of merit, VB2/R, of 136 MW/cm 2.

  16. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  17. Piezotronic Effect in Strain-Gated Transistor of a-Axis GaN Nanobelt.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruomeng; Wang, Xingfu; Peng, Wenbo; Wu, Wenzhuo; Ding, Yong; Li, Shuti; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-10-27

    Due to the non-centrosymmetric crystal structures, wurtzite family semiconducting materials possess piezoelectric properties and exhibit polarizations along certain directions upon straining. Utilizing strain-induced piezoelectric polarization charges to modulate the energy band structures and thus to tune/control the transport processes of charge carriers is referred to as the piezotronic effect. Distinct from the previous studies of c-axis GaN nanowires, here we systematically study the piezotronic-effect-induced modifications of energy band structures and the corresponding influence on electronic transport properties of a-axis GaN nanobelts. The physical mechanism is carefully illustrated and further confirmed by theoretical simulations via finite element analysis. The spatial distributions of local carrier concentration and the energy band diagrams of a-axis GaN under various straining conditions are calculated. This work provides a thorough understanding of strain-gated transport properties of a-axis GaN piezotronic transistors and its future applications in semiconductor devices.

  18. Instability and Spontaneous Reconstruction of Few-Monolayer Thick GaN Graphitic Structures.

    PubMed

    Kolobov, A V; Fons, P; Tominaga, J; Hyot, B; André, B

    2016-08-10

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors are a very hot topic in solid state science and technology. In addition to van der Waals solids that can be easily formed into 2D layers, it was argued that single layers of nominally 3D tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors, such as GaN or ZnO, also become flat in the monolayer limit; the planar structure was also proposed for few-layers of such materials. In this work, using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that contrary to the existing consensus the graphitic structure of few-layer GaN is unstable and spontaneously reconstructs into a structure that remains hexagonal in plane but with covalent interlayer bonds that form alternating octagonal and square (8|4 Haeckelite) rings with pronounced in-plane anisotropy. Of special interest is the transformation of the band gap from indirect in planar GaN toward direct in the Haeckelite phase, making Haeckelite few-layer GaN an appealing material for flexible nano-optoelectronics.

  19. Evaluation of the influence mode on the CVC GaN HEMT using numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnes, Ya M.; Tikhomirov, V. G.; Petrov, V. A.; Gudkov, A. G.; Marzhanovskiy, I. N.; Kukhareva, E. S.; Vyuginov, V. N.; Volkov, V. V.; Zybin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Done numerically simulated the effects of certain modes of operation on the CVC of field microwave transistors on the basis of heterostructures AlGaN / GaN (HEMT). The results of these studies suggest the possibility of quite efficient use of numerical simulation for the development of HEMT microwave transistors allowing for the real instrument designs.

  20. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  1. Uniaxial strain effects on the optoelectronic properties of GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Kong, Yike; Wang, Meishan

    2016-09-01

    Considering the importance of strain engineering on semiconductors, GaN nanowires under uniaxial compression deformation and stretch deformation are researched using first principle calculations with density functional theory. It is found that the deformation will destroy the stability of the nanowires except a weak stretch. The compression deformation is more difficult than the stretch deformation. Besides, the work function of the nanowires is reduced under increasing compression while that under increasing stretch is reversed. With increasing diameter, the band gaps of the nanowires gradually exhibit a linear decreasing relation as the elongation of uniaxial length of GaN nanowires. With increasing compression, the band gaps change from direct to indirect. The optical calculations exhibit a redshift for the imaginary part of dielectric function. This study demonstrates strain engineering can effectively adjust the optoelectronic characteristics of GaN nanowire. Moderate compression, which induces a lower work function with a direct band gap, can improve the photoemission performance of GaN nanowires.

  2. Thermal boundary conductance between Al films and GaN nanowires investigated with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Wang; Jones, Reese E; Hopkins, Patrick E; Beechem, Thomas E

    2014-05-28

    GaN nanowires are being pursued for optoelectronic and high-power applications. In either use, increases in operating temperature reduce both performance and reliability making it imperative to minimize thermal resistances. Since interfaces significantly influence the thermal response of nanosystems, the thermal boundary resistance between GaN nanowires and metal contacts has major significance. In response, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations to study the thermal boundary conductance between GaN nanowires and Al films as a function of nanowire dimensions, packing density, and the depth the nanowire is embedded into the metal contact. At low packing densities, the apparent Kapitza conductance between GaN nanowires and an aluminum film is shown to be larger than when contact is made between films of these same materials. This enhancement decreases toward the film-film limit, however, as the packing density increases. For densely packed nanowires, maximizing the Kapitza conductance can be achieved by embedding the nanowires into the films, as the conductance is found to be proportional to the total contact area.

  3. Diffusion of oxygen in bulk GaN crystals at high temperature and at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovyi, B.; Nikolenko, A.; Weyher, J. L.; Grzegory, I.; Dziecielewski, I.; Sarzynski, M.; Strelchuk, V.; Tsykaniuk, B.; Belyaev, O.; Petrusha, I.; Turkevich, V.; Kapustianyk, V.; Albrecht, M.; Porowski, S.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies of diffusion of oxygen in bulk wurtzite-type GaN crystals grown by Halide Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) are reported. Oxygen concentration profiles were studied in as-grown GaN crystals and also after annealing of crystals at temperatures up to 3400 K and pressures up to 9 GPa. Investigated crystals contained large conical defects i.e. pinholes of significantly higher oxygen concentration (NO=(2-4)×1019 cm-3) than that in the bulk matrix (NO<1×1017 cm-3). The pinholes were revealed by a photo-etching method in as-grown and annealed GaN samples. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy was applied to measure the profiles of free electron concentration, which directly corresponds to the concentration of oxygen impurity. Lateral scanning across the interfaces between pinholes and matrix in the as-grown HVPE GaN crystals showed sharp step-like carrier concentration profiles. Annealing at high temperature and high pressure resulted in the diffusion blurring of the profiles. Analysis of obtained data allowed for the first time for estimation of oxygen diffusion coefficients DO(T, P). The obtained values of DO(T, P) are anomalously small similarly to the values obtained by Harafuji et al. by molecular dynamic calculations for self-diffusion of nitrogen. Whereas oxygen and nitrogen are on the same sublattice it could explain the similarity of their diffusion coefficients.

  4. GaN m -plane: Atomic structure, surface bands, and optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landmann, M.; Rauls, E.; Schmidt, W. Â. G.; Neumann, M. Â. D.; Speiser, E.; Esser, N.

    2015-01-01

    Density-functional-theory calculations are combined with many-body perturbation theory in order to elucidate the geometry, electronic, and optical properties of the w z -GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface, i.e., the so-called m -plane. The optical absorption and reflection anisotropy related to electronic transitions between surface states are identified by comparison with measured data covering transition energies from 2.4 up to 5.4 eV. Our results show a surface relaxation mechanism consistent with the electron counting rule that causes a moderate buckling of the GaN surface dimers and gives rise to two distinct surface states: The doubly occupied N dangling bonds form a surface band that is resonant with the GaN valence-band edge at the center of the Brillouin zone, whereas the empty Ga dangling bonds occur within the GaN band gap closely following the dispersion of the conduction-band edge. These two states contribute strongly to the formation of surface excitons that redshift the optical absorption with respect to the bulk optical response. The surface optical absorption i.e., the excitonic onset below the bulk band gap followed by a broad absorption band at higher energies related to the dispersion of the surface band structure, is calculated in agreement with the experimental data.

  5. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  6. Photoluminescence Observation of GaN Thin Films Treated by Inductively-Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keiji; Itoh, Noriyoshi; Nakano, Yoshitaka; Sugai, Hideo

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports observations of photoluminescence from plasma-treated GaN thin films. A 10 mTorr Ar ICP was used, and irradiation of 313 nm ultraviolet (UV) light from Hg-Xe light source induced the photoluminescence of the GaN film. In both in-situ and ex-situ observations, significant yellow luminescence was observed visually, and the ex-situ observed luminescence ranges in a wavelength of 500-800 nm corresponding to defect-states-related transition. The measurements also revealed that the luminescence also contains UV emission at a wavelength of ~365 nm attributed to transition related to near band edges. In order to examine effects of the plasma on the luminescence, the ex-situ observation was made as a function of the plasma treatment time. As the treatment time increased, both the UV and the luminescence intensity decreased, and the decrease in the emission became significant when the 313 nm UV light was irradiated onto the plasma-exposed GaN surface. These results suggested that plasma-induced defect formation leads to the luminescence degradation, and that the photoluminescence observation will be useful for damage monitoring of the GaN surface. This work is partly supported by the 2nd stage Knowledge Cluster Initiative and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  7. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  8. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  9. Epitaxial GaN films by hyperthermal ion-beam nitridation of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, J. W.; Ivanov, T.; Neumann, L.; Hoeche, Th.; Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2012-06-01

    Epitaxial GaN film formation on bare 6H-SiC(0001) substrates via the process of transformation of Ga droplets into a thin GaN film by applying hyperthermal nitrogen ions is investigated. Pre-deposited Ga atoms in well defined amounts form large droplets on the substrate surface which are subsequently nitridated at a substrate temperature of 630 Degree-Sign C by a low-energy nitrogen ion beam from a constricted glow-discharge ion source. The Ga deposition and ion-beam nitridation process steps are monitored in situ by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. Ex situ characterization by x-ray diffraction and reflectivity techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and electron microscopy shows that the thickness of the resulting GaN films depends on the various amounts of pre-deposited gallium. The films are epitaxial to the substrate, exhibit a mosaic like, smooth surface topography and consist of coalesced large domains of low defect density. Possible transport mechanisms of reactive nitrogen species during hyperthermal nitridation are discussed and the formation of GaN films by an ion-beam assisted process is explained.

  10. Ultrathin GaN quantum disk nanowire LEDs with sub-250 nm electroluminescence

    DOE PAGES

    Chisholm, Matthew F.; Golam Sarwar, A. T. M.; Myers, Roberto C.; Mays, Brelon J.; Duscher, Gerd J.

    2016-03-18

    By quantum confining GaN at monolayer thickness with AlN barriers inside of a nanowire, deep ultraviolet LEDs are demonstrated. Full three-dimensional strain dependent energy band simulations are carried out within multiple quantum disk (MQD) GaN/AlN nanowire superlattice heterostructures. It is found that, even within the same nanowire MQD, the emission energy of the ultrathin GaN QDs varies from disk to disk due to the changing strain distribution and polarization charge induced energy band bending along the axial nanowire direction. MQD heterostructures are grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form self-assembled catalyst-free nanowires with 1 to 2 monolayer thick GaNmore » insertions within an AlN matrix. Photoluminescence peaks are observed at 295 nm and 283 nm from the 2 ML and 1 ML thick MQD samples, respectively. Polarization-doped nanowire LEDs are grown incorporating 1 ML thick GaN MQD active regions from which we observe deep ultraviolet electroluminescence. As a result, the shortest LED wavelength peak observed is 240 nm and attributed to electron hole recombination within 1 ML thick GaN QDs.« less

  11. Fabrications and application of single crystalline GaN for high-performance deep UV photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, R.; Aldalbahi, A.; Rivera, M.; Feng, P.

    2016-08-01

    High-quality single crystalline Gallium Nitride (GaN) semiconductor has been synthesized using molecule beam epitaxy (MBE) technique for development of high-performance deep ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors. Thickness of the films was estimated by using surface profile meter and scanning electron microscope. Electronic states and elemental composition of the films were obtained using Raman scattering spectroscopy. The orientation, crystal structure and phase purity of the films were examined using a Siemens x-ray diffractometer radiation. The surface microstructure was studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two types of metal pairs: Al-Al, Al-Cu or Cu-Cu were used for interdigital electrodes on GaN film in order to examine the Schottky properties of the GaN based photodetector. The characterizations of the fabricated prototype include the stability, responsivity, response and recovery times. Typical time dependent photoresponsivity by switching different UV light source on and off five times for each 240 seconds at a bias of 2V, respectively, have been obtained. The detector appears to be highly sensitive to various UV wavelengths of light with very stable baseline and repeatability. The obtained photoresponsivity was up to 354 mA/W at the bias 2V. Higher photoresponsivity could be obtained if higher bias was applied but it would unavoidably result in a higher dark current. Thermal effect on the fabricated GaN based prototype was discussed.

  12. Regional density functional theory for crystal growth in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Koichi; Hayashi, Tensei; Tachibana, Akitomo; Matsumoto, Koh

    2000-12-01

    We have applied the regional density functional theory to the study of the electronic characteristics in the Ga and N adsorption process of crystal growth in gallium nitride (GaN) with the surface orientations of (0 0 0 1) and (0 0 0 1¯) . Potential energy curves along the Ga and N adsorption process were obtained for some adsorption sites by the first-principle density functional calculation using the periodic boundary model. The Ga-chemical potentials for the GaN(0 0 0 1) and GaN (0 0 0 1¯) surfaces have been derived, and we have observed the clear dependency of crystal growth in GaN on the surface orientation. Furthermore, we have calculated the regional electronic numbers and energies for the regions partitioned by the interface. The regional electronic energies are stabilized in consequence of the electron transfer as the adatom approaches the surface. It is concluded that an electron accumulation in the vicinity of the stable position of the adatom plays an important role in crystal growth.

  13. GaN Haeckelite Single-Layered Nanostructures: Monolayer and Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Mojica, Dulce C.; López-Urías, Florentino

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, III-V semiconductors are interesting candidate materials for the tailoring of two dimensional (2D) graphene-like structures. These new 2D materials have attracted profound interest opening the possibility to find semiconductor materials with unexplored properties. First-principles density functional theory calculations are performed in order to investigate the electronic properties of GaN planar and nanotube morphologies based on Haeckelite structures (containing octagonal and square membered rings). Optimized geometries, band-structures, phonon dispersion, binding energies, transmission electron microscopy images simulations, x-ray diffraction patterns, charge densities, and electronic band gaps are calculated. We demonstrated that GaN Haeckelite structures are stable exhibiting a semiconducting behavior with an indirect band gap. Furthermore, it was found that GaN Haeckelite nanotubes are semiconductor with a band gap nature (direct or indirect) that depends of the nanotube´s chirality and diameter. In addition, it was demonstrated that surface passivation and the interaction with hydrazine, water, ammonia, and carbon monoxide molecules can change the band-gap nature. Our results are compared with the corresponding GaN hexagonal honeycomb structures. PMID:26658148

  14. GaN nano-pyramid arrays as an efficient photoelectrode for solar water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Yu, X.; Syed, Z. Ahmed; Shen, S.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2016-11-01

    A prototype photoelectrode has been fabricated using a GaN nano-pyramid array structure grown on a cost-effective Si (111) substrate, demonstrating a significant improvement in performance of solar-powered water splitting compared with any planar GaN photoelectrode. Such a nano-pyramid structure leads to enhanced optical absorption as a result of a multi-scattering process which can effectively produce a reduction in reflectance. A simulation based on a finite-difference time-domain approach indicates that the nano-pyramid architecture enables incident light to be concentrated within the nano-pyramids as a result of micro-cavity effects, further enhancing optical absorption. Furthermore, the shape of the nano-pyramid further facilitates the photo-generated carrier transportation by enhancing a hole-transfer efficiency. All these features as a result of the nano-pyramid configuration lead to a large photocurrent of 1 mA cm‑2 under an illumination density of 200 mW cm‑2, with a peak incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 46.5% at ∼365 nm, around the band edge emission wavelength of GaN. The results presented are expected to pave the way for the fabrication of GaN based photoelectrodes with a high energy conversion efficiency of solar powered water splitting.

  15. GaN nanostructure-based light emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Annamraju Kasi

    2014-02-01

    GaN and related materials have received a lot of attention because of their applications in a number of semiconductor devices such as LEDs, laser diodes, field effect transistors, photodetectors etc. An introduction to optical phenomena in semiconductors, light emission in p-n junctions, evolution of LED technology, bandgaps of various semiconductors that are suitable for the development of LEDs are discussed first. The detailed discussion on photoluminescence of GaN nanostructures is made, since this is crucial to develop optical devices. Fabrication technology of many nanostructures of GaN such as nanowires, nanorods, nanodots, nanoparticles, nanofilms and their luminescence properties are given. Then the optical processes including ultrafast phenomena, radiative, non-radiative recombination, quantum efficiency, lifetimes of excitons in InGaN quantum well are described. The LED structures based on InGaN that give various important colors of red, blue, green, and their design considerations to optimize the output were highlighted. The recent efforts in GaN technology are updated. Finally the present challenges and future directions in this field are also pointed out.

  16. Cathodoluminescence of GaN nanorods and nanowires grown by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, G.; Herrera, M.

    2014-02-01

    GaN nanorods and nanowires have been grown by thermal evaporation of GaN on Au/Si (1 0 0) substrates. The nanorods recorded a surface decorated with numerous grains with an average size of about 100 nm. The nanowires grew onto the surface of the nanorods exhibiting multiple bends along them. TEM measurements revealed the formation of irregular porous and a polycrystalline structure in the nanowires with diameter higher than 100 nm, while the nanowires with lower diameter showed a tubular structure with wall thickness of 10 nm. The luminescence of the samples recorded three bands centered at about 2.1, 2.74, and 3.2 eV, attributed to the GaN yellow emission and to the blue and UV emissions of the β-Ga2O3, respectively. Ga-ion irradiation in samples revealed a decrease in the intensity of the β-Ga2O3 blue emission attributed to the elimination of gallium vacancies. A thermal annealing treatment at 800 °C in N2 atmosphere generated a quenching of the GaN yellow emission, due to the elimination of nitrogen vacancies.

  17. Utilisation of GaN and InGaN/GaN with nanoporous structures for water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, J.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-01

    We report a cost-effective approach to the fabrication of GaN based nanoporous structure for applications in renewable hydrogen production. Photoelectrochemical etching in a KOH solution has been employed to fabricate both GaN and InGaN/GaN nanoporous structures with pore sizes ranging from 25 to 60 nm, obtained by controlling both etchant concentration and applied voltage. Compared to as-grown planar devices the nanoporous structures have exhibited a significant increase of photocurrent with a factor of up to four times. An incident photon conversion efficiency of up to 46% around the band edge of GaN has been achieved.

  18. Defect Reduction via Selective Lateral Epitaxy of GaN on an Innovative Masked Structure with Serpentine Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Justin P. C.; Liu, Lei; Li, Ding; Wang, Lei; Wan, Chenghao; Chen, Weihua; Yang, Zhijian; Xie, Yahong; Hu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guoyi

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrated an innovative lateral epitaxy method to grow c-plane GaN film using serpentine masked structures, which simplified the entire fabrication process with only one single epitaxial growth step and could efficiently block the threading dislocations. The microstructural and optical properties of GaN indicated that the crystalline quality was effectively improved. Unlike the conventional epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) or the double ELOG method, the presented serpentine masked structure needs no regrowth process for obtaining low-defect-density GaN materials, and is promising for growing high-performance III-nitride-based devices including laser diodes (LDs), power transistors, and light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

  19. Mg 2+-doped GaN nanoparticles as blue-light emitters: a method to avoid sintering at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Venkataramanan; Sudarsan, Vasanthakumaran; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; van Veggel, Frank C J M; Wang, Rui; Steckl, Andrew J; Raudsepp, Mati

    2008-01-01

    Bright blue-light emission at 410 nm is observed from Mg(2+)-doped GaN nanoparticles prepared by the nitridation of Ga(2)MgO(4) nanoparticles at 950 degrees C. The sintering of these nanoparticles during high-temperature nitridation was prevented by mixing the Ga(2)MgO(4) precursor nanoparticles with La(2)O(3) as an inert matrix before the nitridation process. The Mg(2+)-doped GaN nanoparticles were isolated from the matrix by etching with 10 % nitric acid. The Mg(2+)-doped GaN nanoparticles were characterized by photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and IR analyses.

  20. High Efficiency m-plane LEDs on Low Defect Density Bulk GaN Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    David, Aurelien

    2012-10-15

    Solid-state lighting is a key technology for reduction of energy consumption in the US and worldwide. In principle, by replacing standard incandescent bulbs and other light sources with sources based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs), ultimate energy efficiency can be achieved. The efficiency of LEDs has improved tremendously over the past two decades, however further progress is required for solid- state lighting to reach its full potential. The ability of an LED at converting electricity to light is quantified by its internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The material of choice for visible LEDs is Gallium Nitride (GaN), which is at the basis of blue-emitting LEDs. A key factor limiting the performance of GaN LEDs is the so-called efficiency droop, whereby the IQE of the LED decreases significantly at high current density. Despite decades of research, efficiency droop remains a major issue. Since high-current operation is necessary for practical lighting applications, reducing droop is a major challenge for the scientific community and the LED industry. Our approach to solving the droop issue is the use of newly available low-defect-density bulk GaN non-polar substrates. In contrast to the standard foreign substrates (sapphire, silicon carbide, silicon) used in the industry, we have employed native bulk GaN substrates with very low defect density, thus ensuring exquisite material quality and high IQE. Whereas all commercial LEDs are grown along the c-plane crystal direction of GaN, we have used m-plane non-polar substrates; these drastically modify the physical properties of the LED and enable a reduction of droop. With this approach, we have demonstrated very high IQE performance and low droop. Our results focused on violet and blue LEDs. For these, we have demonstrated very high peak IQEs and current droops of 6% and 10% respectively (up to a high current density of 200A.cm-2). All these results were obtained under electrical operation. These high IQE and low droop

  1. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  2. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  3. Microwave annealing of Mg-implanted and in situ Be-doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluri, Geetha S.; Gowda, Madhu; Mahadik, Nadeemullah A.; Sundaresan, Siddarth G.; Rao, Mulpuri V.; Schreifels, John A.; Freitas, J. A.; Qadri, S. B.; Tian, Y.-L.

    2010-10-01

    An ultrafast microwave annealing method, different from conventional thermal annealing, is used to activate Mg-implants in GaN layer. The x-ray diffraction measurements indicated complete disappearance of the defect sublattice peak, introduced by the implantation process for single-energy Mg-implantation, when the annealing was performed at ≥1400 °C for 15 s. An increase in the intensity of Mg-acceptor related luminescence peak (at 3.26 eV) in the photoluminescence spectra confirms the Mg-acceptor activation in single-energy Mg-implanted GaN. In case of multiple-energy implantation, the implant generated defects persisted even after 1500 °C/15 s annealing, resulting in no net Mg-acceptor activation of the Mg-implant. The Mg-implant is relatively thermally stable and the sample surface roughness is 6 nm after 1500 °C/15 s annealing, using a 600 nm thick AlN cap. In situ Be-doped GaN films, after 1300 °C/5 s annealing have shown Be out-diffusion into the AlN layer and also in-diffusion toward the GaN/SiC interface. The in-diffusion and out-diffusion of the Be increased with increasing annealing temperature. In fact, after 1500 °C/5 s annealing, only a small fraction of in situ doped Be remained in the GaN layer, revealing the inadequateness of using Be-implantation for forming p-type doped layers in the GaN.

  4. Enhanced functionality in GaN and SiC devices by using novel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, S. J.; Abernathy, C. R.; Gila, B. P.; Ren, F.; Zavada, J. M.; Park, Y. D.

    2004-11-01

    Some examples of recent advances in enhancing or adding functionality to GaN and SiC devices through the use of novel processing techniques are discussed. The first example is the use of ion implantation to incorporate transition metals such as Mn, Cr and Co at atomic percent levels in the wide bandgap semiconductors to produce room temperature ferromagnetism. A discussion is given of the phase space within which single-phase material can be obtained and the requirements for demonstrating the presence of a true dilute magnetic semiconductor. The ability to make GaN and SiC ferromagnetic leads to the possibility of magnetic devices with gain, spin FETs operating at low voltages and spin polarized light emitters. The second example is the use of novel oxides such as Sc 2O 3 and MgO as gate dielectrics or surface passivants on GaN. True inversion behavior has been demonstrated in gated MOS-GaN diodes with implanted n-regions supplying the minority carriers need for inversion. These oxide layers also effectively mitigate current collapse in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs through their passivation of surface states in the gate-drain region. The third example is the use of laser drilling to make through-wafer via holes in SiC, sapphire and GaN. The ablation rate is sufficiently high that this maskless, serial process appears capable of achieving similar throughput to the more conventional approach of plasma etching of vias. The fourth example is the use of either ungated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs or simple GaN and SiC Schottky diodes as sensors for chemicals, biogens, radiation, combustion gases or strain. The sensitivity of either the channel carrier density or the barrier height to changes in surface condition make these materials systems ideal for compact robust sensors capable of operating at elevated temperatures.

  5. A review of gigaxonin mutations in giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kang, James J; Liu, Isabelle Y; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2016-07-01

    Gigaxonin, the product of GAN gene localized to chromosome 16, is associated with the early onset neuronal degeneration disease giant axonal neuropathy (GAN). Gigaxonin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptor protein involved in intermediate filament processing in neural cells, and vimentin filaments in fibroblasts. Mutations of the gene cause pre-neural filaments to accumulate and form giant axons resulting in the inhibition of neural cell signaling. Analysis of the catalog of somatic mutations in cancer, driver DB and IDGC data portal databases containing 21,000 tumor genomic sequences has identified GAN patient mutations in cancer cell lines and primary tumors. The database search has also shown the presence of identical missense and nonsense gigaxonin mutations in GAN and colon cancer. These mutations frequently occur in the domains associated with protein homodimerization and substrate interaction such as Broad-Complex, Tramtrack and Bric a brac (BTB), BTB associated C-terminal KELCH (BACK), and KELCH repeats. Analysis of the International HapMap Project database containing 1200 normal genomic sequences has identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2608555, in exon 8 of the gigaxonin sequence. While this SNP is present in >40 % of Caucasian population, it is present in less than 10 % of Japanese and Chinese populations. Although the role of gigaxonin polymorphism is not yet known, CFTR and MDR1 gene studies have shown that silent mutations play a role in the instability and aberrant splicing and folding of mRNAs. We believe that molecular and functional investigation of gigaxonin mutations including the exon 8 polymorphism could lead to an improved understanding of the relationship between GAN and cancer.

  6. Study of GaP single crystal layers grown on GaN by MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuti; Liu, Chao; Ye, Guoguang; Xiao, Guowei; Zhou, Yugang; Su, Jun; Fan, Guanghan; Zhang, Yong; Liang, Fubo; Zheng, Shuwen

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} We investigated the growth of GaP layers on GaN by MOCVD. {yields} A single crystal GaP layer could be grown on GaN. {yields} The V/III ratio played an important role to improve GaP layer quality. {yields} The GaP:Mg layer with hole concentration of 4.2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} was obtained. -- Abstract: The performance of GaN based devices could possibly be improved by utilizing the good p-type properties of GaP layer and it provides the possibility of the integration of InAlGaN and AlGaInP materials to produce new devices, if high quality GaP compounds can be grown on III-nitride compounds. In this paper, the growth of GaP layers on GaN by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) has been investigated. The results show that the GaP low temperature buffer layer can provide a high density of nucleation sites for high temperature GaP growth. Using a 40 nm thick GaP buffer layer, a single crystal GaP layer, whose full-width at half-maximum of the (1 1 1) plane measured by double crystal X-ray diffraction is 580'', can be grown on GaN. The V/III ratio plays an important role in the GaP layer growth and an appropriate V/III ratio can improve the quality of GaP layer. The GaP:Mg layer with hole carrier concentration of 4.2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} has been obtained.

  7. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  8. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  9. Linear accelerator: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutzberg, J.

    1972-01-01

    Design is proposed for inexpensive accelerometer which would work by applying pressure to fluid during acceleration. Pressure is used to move shuttle, and shuttle movement is sensed and calibrated to give acceleration readings.

  10. Improved plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y.

    1971-01-01

    Converging, coaxial accelerator electrode configuration operates in vacuum as plasma gun. Plasma forms by periodic injections of high pressure gas that is ionized by electrical discharges. Deflagration mode of discharge provides acceleration, and converging contours of plasma gun provide focusing.

  11. MEQALAC rf accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.; Brodowski, J.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype MEQALAC capable of replacing the Cockcroft Walton pre-injector at BNL is being fabricated. Ten milliamperes of H/sup -/ beam supplied from a source sitting at a potential of -40 kilovolt is to be accelerated to 750 keV. This energy gain is provided by a 200 Megahertz accelerating system rather than the normal dc acceleration. Substantial size and cost reduction would be realized by such a system over conventional pre-accelerator systems.

  12. Crystallographic Wet Chemical Etching of Semipolar GaN (11-22) Grown on m-Plane Sapphire Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Kwan; Lee, Sung Nam; Song, Keun-Man; Yoon, Jae-Sik; Lee, Ji-Myon

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the etch rates and etched surface morphology of semipolar GaN using a potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution. Semipolar (11-22) GaN could be etched easily using a KOH solution and the etch rate was higher than that of Ga-polar c-plane GaN (0001). The etch rate was anisotropic and the highest etch rate was measured to be approximately 116 nm/min for the (1011) plane and 62 nm/min for the (11-20) plane GaN using a 4 M KOH solution at 100 °C, resulting in specific surface features, such as inclined trigonal cells. PMID:26373117

  13. Growth behavior of GaN nanowires on c-plane sapphire substrate by applying various catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppulingam, B.; Bhalerao, G. M.; Singh, Shubra; Baskar, K.

    2016-07-01

    Systematic reaction has been used to control the vapor-liquid-solid growth of gallium nitride nanowires (NWs) using different catalysts. GaN NWs were grown using Cu, Au, Pd/Au alloy catalysts on c-plane sapphire substrate. XRD and Raman analysis revealed the crystalline wurtzite phase of GaN synthesized at 900 °C. High density GaN NWs were studied using SEM and HRTEM. Elemental composition and impurities were analyzed by EDX. Diameter of individual NW, grown using Au catalyst is found to be ~50 nm. The diameter of NWs grown with the help of Cu catalyst was found to be ˜65 nm, whereas with Pd/Au catalyst, the diameter was about 100-200 nm. NBE emission observed from PL spectra for Cu catalyst (377 nm), Au catalyst (372 nm) as well as Pd/Au catalyst (385 nm) growth of GaN NWs respectively has been presented and discussed.

  14. Improved control over spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy using a two-step growth process.

    PubMed

    Zettler, J K; Corfdir, P; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H; Brandt, O; Fernández-Garrido, S

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the influence of modified growth conditions during the spontaneous formation of GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. We find that a two-step growth approach, where the substrate temperature is increased during the nucleation stage, is an efficient method to gain control over the area coverage, average diameter, and coalescence degree of GaN NW ensembles. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the growth conditions employed during the incubation time that precedes nanowire nucleation do not influence the properties of the final nanowire ensemble. Therefore, when growing GaN NWs at elevated temperatures or with low Ga/N ratios, the total growth time can be reduced significantly by using more favorable growth conditions for nanowire nucleation during the incubation time.

  15. GaN High-Electron-Mobility Transistor with WN x /Cu Gate for High-Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ting-En; Lin, Yueh-Chin; Li, Fang-Ming; Shi, Wang-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Xiang; Lan, Wei-Cheng; Chin, Ping-Chieh; Chang, Edward Yi

    2015-12-01

    A GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) with WN x /Cu gate for high-power applications has been investigated. The direct-current (DC) characteristics of the device are comparable to those of conventional Ni/Au-gated GaN HEMTs. The results of high-voltage stress testing indicate that the device is stable after application of 200 V stress for 42 h. The WN x /Cu-gated GaN HEMT exhibited no obvious changes in the DC characteristics or Schottky barrier height before and after annealing at 250°C for 1 h. These results demonstrate that the WN x /Cu gate structure can be used in a GaN HEMT for high-power applications with good thermal stability.

  16. The origin of yellow band emission and cathodoluminescence of Au-catalyzed wurtzite GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. S.; Jiao, J. F.; Wu, X.

    2016-06-01

    GaN nanowires with large yield are directly synthesized by simply ammoniating the gallium oxide powders in the presence of ammonia gas at 1000 °C, under the assistance of Au nanocatalysts. The microstructure and crystallinity of as-synthesized GaN nanowires are well studied by using high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and some structural defects such as stacking faults are found in the GaN nano-crystal. Cathodoluminescence measurement shows that a strong near-band-edge (NBE) emission band centered at 384 nm and a broad yellow band in the range of 500-800 nm are observed. Finally, the growth mechanism and possible optical emission process of GaN nanowires are discussed.

  17. Band alignment between GaN and ZrO{sub 2} formed by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Gang; Wang, Hong Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2014-07-14

    The band alignment between Ga-face GaN and atomic-layer-deposited ZrO{sub 2} was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dependence of Ga 3d and Zr 3d core-level positions on the take-off angles indicated upward band bending at GaN surface and potential gradient in ZrO{sub 2} layer. Based on angle-resolved XPS measurements combined with numerical calculations, valence band discontinuity ΔE{sub V} of 1 ± 0.2 eV and conduction band discontinuity ΔE{sub C} of 1.2 ± 0.2 eV at ZrO{sub 2}/GaN interface were determined by taking GaN surface band bending and potential gradient in ZrO{sub 2} layer into account.

  18. InGaN light emitting diodes with a nanopipe layer formed from the GaN epitaxial layer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Ju; Chen, Kuei-Ting; Huang, Wan-Chun; Wu, Chia-Jung; Dai, Jing-Jie; Chen, Sy-Hann; Lin, Chia-Feng

    2016-05-30

    A Si-heavy doped GaN:Si epitaxial layer is transformed into a directional nanopipe GaN layer through a laser-scribing process and a selectively electrochemical (EC) etching process. InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with an EC-treated nanopipe GaN layer have a high light extraction efficiency. The direction of the nanopipe structure was directed perpendicular to the laser scribing line and was guided by an external bias electric field. An InGaN LED structure with an embedded nanopipe GaN layer can enhance external quantum efficiency through a one-step epitaxial growth process and a selective EC etching process. A birefringence optical property and a low effective refractive index were observed in the directional-nanopipe GaN layer.

  19. InGaN light-emitting diodes with embedded nanoporous GaN distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Bing-Cheng; Jhang, Yuan-Chang; Huang, Kun-Pin; Huang, Wan-Chun; Dai, Jing-Jie; Lai, Chun-Feng; Lin, Chia-Feng

    2015-08-01

    InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with embedded conductive nanoporous GaN/undoped GaN (NP-GaN/u-GaN) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) were demonstrated. Nanoporous GaN DBR structures were fabricated by pulsed 355 nm laser scribing and electrochemical etching processes. Heavily Si-doped n-type GaN:Si layers (n+-GaN) in an eight-period n+-GaN/u-GaN stack structure were transformed into a low-refractive-index, conductive nanoporous GaN structure. The measured center wavelength, peak reflectivity, and bandwidth of the nanoporous GaN DBR structure were 417 nm, 96.7%, and 34 nm, respectively. Resonance cavity modes of the photoluminescence spectra were observed in the treated LED structure with the nanoporous DBR structure.

  20. Design and simulation of a novel GaN based resonant tunneling high electron mobility transistor on a silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Subhra; Chattaraj, Swarnabha; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, we have introduced a novel GaN based resonant tunneling high electron mobility transistor (RTHEMT) on a silicon substrate. A monolithically integrated GaN based inverted high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) and a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) are designed and simulated using the ATLAS simulator and MATLAB in this study. The 10% Al composition in the barrier layer of the GaN based RTD structure provides a peak-to-valley current ratio of 2.66 which controls the GaN based HEMT performance. Thus the results indicate an improvement in the current-voltage characteristics of the RTHEMT by controlling the gate voltage in this structure. The introduction of silicon as a substrate is a unique step taken by us for this type of RTHEMT structure.

  1. In situ GaN decomposition analysis by quadrupole mass spectrometry and reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.; Koblmueller, G.; Speck, J. S.

    2008-08-01

    Thermal decomposition of wurtzite (0001)-oriented GaN was analyzed: in vacuum, under active N exposure, and during growth by rf plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN decomposition rate was determined by measurements of the Ga desorption using in situ quadrupole mass spectrometry, which showed Arrhenius behavior with an apparent activation energy of 3.1 eV. Clear signatures of intensity oscillations during reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements facilitated complementary evaluation of the decomposition rate and highlighted a layer-by-layer decomposition mode in vacuum. Exposure to active nitrogen, either under vacuum or during growth under N-rich growth conditions, strongly reduced the GaN losses due to GaN decomposition.

  2. Synchrotron radiation x-ray topography and defect selective etching analysis of threading dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Sintonen, Sakari Suihkonen, Sami; Jussila, Henri; Tuomi, Turkka O.; Lipsanen, Harri; Rudziński, Mariusz; Knetzger, Michael; Meissner, Elke; Danilewsky, Andreas

    2014-08-28

    The crystal quality of bulk GaN crystals is continuously improving due to advances in GaN growth techniques. Defect characterization of the GaN substrates by conventional methods is impeded by the very low dislocation density and a large scale defect analysis method is needed. White beam synchrotron radiation x-ray topography (SR-XRT) is a rapid and non-destructive technique for dislocation analysis on a large scale. In this study, the defect structure of an ammonothermal c-plane GaN substrate was recorded using SR-XRT and the image contrast caused by the dislocation induced microstrain was simulated. The simulations and experimental observations agree excellently and the SR-XRT image contrasts of mixed and screw dislocations were determined. Apart from a few exceptions, defect selective etching measurements were shown to correspond one to one with the SR-XRT results.

  3. InGaN light emitting diodes with a nanopipe layer formed from the GaN epitaxial layer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Ju; Chen, Kuei-Ting; Huang, Wan-Chun; Wu, Chia-Jung; Dai, Jing-Jie; Chen, Sy-Hann; Lin, Chia-Feng

    2016-05-30

    A Si-heavy doped GaN:Si epitaxial layer is transformed into a directional nanopipe GaN layer through a laser-scribing process and a selectively electrochemical (EC) etching process. InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with an EC-treated nanopipe GaN layer have a high light extraction efficiency. The direction of the nanopipe structure was directed perpendicular to the laser scribing line and was guided by an external bias electric field. An InGaN LED structure with an embedded nanopipe GaN layer can enhance external quantum efficiency through a one-step epitaxial growth process and a selective EC etching process. A birefringence optical property and a low effective refractive index were observed in the directional-nanopipe GaN layer. PMID:27410087

  4. Effect of oxygen incorporation in a-plane GaN on p-type ohmic contact property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ki-Chang; Lee, Inwoo; Park, Jaehyoung; Bae, Hyojung; Kim, Chung Yi; Shin, Hui-Youn; Kim, Hyung-Gu; Jeon, Jina; Jung, S.; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Jung-Soo; Ha, Jun-Seok

    2014-09-01

    We report on the origin of the non-ohmic behavior of Ni/Au-based p-type contacts on a nonpolar a-plane GaN layer. The contact properties of Ga-polar c-plane GaN and nonpolar a-plane GaN are compared. While the Ga-polar c-plane shows ohmic-contact properties in the Ni/Au contact after heat treatment, the nonpolar a-plane shows rectifying characteristics both before and after heat treatment. We determined the reasons why the two planes show substantial differences in contact properties using various tools. We conclude that the differences originated from the oxygen incorporation preference resulting in gallium oxide formation at the interface of nonpolar a-plane GaN.

  5. Deep traps responsible for hysteresis in capacitance-voltage characteristics of AlGaN /GaN heterostructure transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Markov, A. V.; Dabiran, A. M.; Wowchak, A. M.; Osinsky, A. V.; Cui, B.; Chow, P. P.; Pearton, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    The origin of hysteresis in capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics was studied for Schottky diodes prepared on AlGaN /GaN transistor structures with GaN (Fe) buffers. The application of reverse bias leads to a shift of C-V curves toward higher positive voltages. The magnitude of the effect is shown to increase for lower temperatures. The phenomenon is attributed to tunneling of electrons from the Schottky gate to localized states in the structure. A technique labeled "reverse" deep level transient spectroscopy was used to show that the deep traps responsible for the hysteresis have activation energies of 0.25, 0.6, and 0.9eV. Comparison with deep trap spectra of GaN buffers and Si doped n-GaN films prepared on GaN buffers suggests that the traps in question are located in the buffer layer.

  6. Acceleration gradient of a plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.

    2008-02-25

    The phase velocity of the wakefield waves is identical to the electron beam velocity. A theoretical analysis indicates that the acceleration gradient of the wakefield accelerator normalized by the wave breaking amplitude is K{sub 0}({xi})/K{sub 1}({xi}), where K{sub 0}({xi}) and K{sub 1}({xi}) are the modified Bessel functions of the second kind of order zero and one, respectively and {xi} is the beam parameter representing the beam intensity. It is also shown that the beam density must be considerably higher than the diffuse plasma density for the large radial velocity of plasma electrons that are required for a high acceleration gradient.

  7. Acceleration: It's Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    Acceleration is one tool for providing high-ability students the opportunity to learn something new every day. Some people talk about acceleration as taking a student out of step. In actuality, what one is doing is putting a student in step with the right curriculum. Whole-grade acceleration, also called grade-skipping, usually happens between…

  8. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  9. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  10. Photochemical Modification of Single Crystalline GaN Film Using n-Alkene with Different Carbon Chain Lengths as Biolinker.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Zhuang, Hao; Huang, Nan; Heuser, Steffen; Schlemper, Christoph; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Baodan; Staedler, Thorsten; Jiang, Xin

    2016-06-14

    As a potential material for biosensing applications, gallium nitride (GaN) films have attracted remarkable attention. In order to construct GaN biosensors, a corresponding immobilization of biolinkers is of great importance in order to render a surface bioactive. In this work, two kinds of n-alkenes with different carbon chain lengths, namely allylamine protected with trifluoroacetamide (TFAAA) and 10-aminodec-1-ene protected with trifluoroacetamide (TFAAD), were used to photochemically functionalize single crystalline GaN films. The successful linkage of both TFAAA and TFAAD to the GaN films is confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) measurement. With increased UV illumination time, the intensity of the secondary ions corresponding to the linker molecules initially increases and subsequently decreases in both cases. Based on the SIMS measurements, the maximum coverage of TFAAA is achieved after 14 h of UV illumination, while only 2 h is required in the case of TFAAD to reach the situation of a fully covered GaN surface. This finding leads to the conclusion that the reaction rate of TFAAD is significantly higher compared to TFAAA. Measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that the coverage of GaN films by a TFAAA layer leads to an increased surface roughness. The atomic terraces, which are clearly observable for the pristine GaN films, disappear once the surface is fully covered by a TFAAA layer. Such TFAAA layers will feature a homogeneous surface topography even for reaction times of 24 h. In contrast to this, TFAAD shows strong cross-polymerization on the surface, this is confirmed by optical microscopy. These results demonstrate that TFAAA is a more suitable candidate as biolinker in context of the GaN surfaces due to its improved controllability.

  11. Growth and characterizations of GaN micro-rods on graphene films for flexible light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kunook; Beak, Hyeonjun; Tchoe, Youngbin; Oh, Hongseok; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Yoo, Hyobin; Kim, Miyoung

    2014-09-01

    We report the growth of GaN micro-rods and coaxial quantum-well heterostructures on graphene films, together with structural and optical characterization, for applications in flexible optical devices. Graphene films were grown on Cu foil by means of chemical vapor deposition, and used as the substrates for the growth of the GaN micro-rods, which were subsequently transferred onto SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. Highly Si-doped, n-type GaN micro-rods were grown on the graphene films using metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. The growth and vertical alignment of the GaN micro-rods, which is a critical factor for the fabrication of high-performance light-emitting diodes (LEDs), were characterized using electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The GaN micro-rods exhibited promising photoluminescence characteristics for optoelectronic device applications, including room-temperature stimulated emission. To fabricate flexible LEDs, In{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}N/GaN multiple quantum wells and a p-type GaN layer were deposited coaxially on the GaN micro-rods, and transferred onto Ag-coated polymer substrates using lift-off. Ti/Au and Ni/Au metal layers were formed to provide electrical contacts to the n-type and p-type GaN regions, respectively. The micro-rod LEDs exhibited intense emission of visible light, even after transfer onto the flexible polymer substrate, and reliable operation was achieved following numerous cycles of mechanical deformation.

  12. Dislocation confinement in the growth of Na flux GaN on metalorganic chemical vapor deposition-GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, S. Asazu, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakai, A.; Imanishi, M.; Imade, M.; Mori, Y.

    2015-12-28

    We have demonstrated a GaN growth technique in the Na flux method to confine c-, (a+c)-, and a-type dislocations around the interface between a Na flux GaN crystal and a GaN layer grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on a (0001) sapphire substrate. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly revealed detailed interface structures and dislocation behaviors that reduced the density of vertically aligned dislocations threading to the Na flux GaN surface. Submicron-scale voids were formed at the interface above the dislocations with a c component in MOCVD-GaN, while no such voids were formed above the a-type dislocations. The penetration of the dislocations with a c component into Na flux GaN was, in most cases, effectively blocked by the presence of the voids. Although some dislocations with a c component in the MOCVD-GaN penetrated into the Na flux GaN, their propagation direction changed laterally through the voids. On the other hand, the a-type dislocations propagated laterally and collectively near the interface, when these dislocations in the MOCVD-GaN penetrated into the Na flux GaN. These results indicated that the dislocation propagation behavior was highly sensitive to the type of dislocation, but all types of dislocations were confined to within several micrometers region of the Na flux GaN from the interface. The cause of void formation, the role of voids in controlling the dislocation behavior, and the mechanism of lateral and collective dislocation propagation are discussed on the basis of TEM results.

  13. Photochemical Modification of Single Crystalline GaN Film Using n-Alkene with Different Carbon Chain Lengths as Biolinker.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Zhuang, Hao; Huang, Nan; Heuser, Steffen; Schlemper, Christoph; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Baodan; Staedler, Thorsten; Jiang, Xin

    2016-06-14

    As a potential material for biosensing applications, gallium nitride (GaN) films have attracted remarkable attention. In order to construct GaN biosensors, a corresponding immobilization of biolinkers is of great importance in order to render a surface bioactive. In this work, two kinds of n-alkenes with different carbon chain lengths, namely allylamine protected with trifluoroacetamide (TFAAA) and 10-aminodec-1-ene protected with trifluoroacetamide (TFAAD), were used to photochemically functionalize single crystalline GaN films. The successful linkage of both TFAAA and TFAAD to the GaN films is confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) measurement. With increased UV illumination time, the intensity of the secondary ions corresponding to the linker molecules initially increases and subsequently decreases in both cases. Based on the SIMS measurements, the maximum coverage of TFAAA is achieved after 14 h of UV illumination, while only 2 h is required in the case of TFAAD to reach the situation of a fully covered GaN surface. This finding leads to the conclusion that the reaction rate of TFAAD is significantly higher compared to TFAAA. Measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that the coverage of GaN films by a TFAAA layer leads to an increased surface roughness. The atomic terraces, which are clearly observable for the pristine GaN films, disappear once the surface is fully covered by a TFAAA layer. Such TFAAA layers will feature a homogeneous surface topography even for reaction times of 24 h. In contrast to this, TFAAD shows strong cross-polymerization on the surface, this is confirmed by optical microscopy. These results demonstrate that TFAAA is a more suitable candidate as biolinker in context of the GaN surfaces due to its improved controllability. PMID:27217218

  14. Growth of a-plane GaN on lattice-matched ZnO substrates using a room-temperature buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kawano, Satoshi; Ueno, Kohei; Ohta, Jitsuo; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Amanai, Hidetaka; Nagao, Satoru; Horie, Hideyoshi

    2007-11-01

    Nonpolar a-plane GaN films were grown on nearly lattice-matched a-plane ZnO substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Growth of GaN on a-plane ZnO at conventional growth temperatures (around 700°C) resulted in the formation of polycrystalline materials, probably due to the interface reactions between GaN and ZnO. However, single crystalline a-plane GaN with an atomically flat surface can be grown on ZnO at room temperature in the layer-by-layer mode. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements revealed that high-quality a-plane GaN films can also be grown at elevated substrate temperatures (up to 700°C) by using a RT a-plane GaN film as a buffer layer.

  15. Non-destructive assessment of the polarity of GaN nanowire ensembles using low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyuk, O. Jiříček, P.; Bartoš, I.; Fernández-Garrido, S.; Geelhaar, L.; Brandt, O.; Paskova, T.

    2015-01-12

    We investigate GaN nanowire ensembles spontaneously formed in plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy by non-destructive low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD). We show that GaN nanowire ensembles prepared on AlN-buffered 6H-SiC(0001{sup ¯}) substrates with well-defined N polarity exhibit similar LEED intensity-voltage curves and angular distribution of photo-emitted electrons as N-polar free-standing GaN layers. Therefore, as in the case of GaN layers, LEED and XPD are found to be suitable techniques to assess the polarity of GaN nanowire ensembles on a macroscopic scale. The analysis of GaN nanowire ensembles prepared on bare Si(111) allows us to conclude that, on this non-polar substrate, the majority of nanowires is also N-polar.

  16. Low temperature thin film transistors with hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition based GaN channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bolat, S. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, B.; Ozgit-Akgun, C.; Biyikli, N.; Okyay, A. K. E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2014-06-16

    We report GaN thin film transistors (TFT) with a thermal budget below 250 °C. GaN thin films are grown at 200 °C by hollow cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (HCPA-ALD). HCPA-ALD-based GaN thin films are found to have a polycrystalline wurtzite structure with an average crystallite size of 9.3 nm. TFTs with bottom gate configuration are fabricated with HCPA-ALD grown GaN channel layers. Fabricated TFTs exhibit n-type field effect characteristics. N-channel GaN TFTs demonstrated on-to-off ratios (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF}) of 10{sup 3} and sub-threshold swing of 3.3 V/decade. The entire TFT device fabrication process temperature is below 250 °C, which is the lowest process temperature reported for GaN based transistors, so far.

  17. Semipolar and nonpolar GaN epi-films grown on m-sapphire by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Shruti; Mohan, Lokesh; Chandan, Greeshma; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Roul, Basanta

    2014-11-28

    We hereby report the development of non-polar epi-GaN films of usable quality, on an m-plane sapphire. Generally, it is difficult to obtain high-quality nonpolar material due to the planar anisotropic nature of the growth mode. However, we could achieve good quality epi-GaN films by involving controlled steps of nitridation. GaN epilayers were grown on m-plane (10-10) sapphire substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The films grown on the nitridated surface resulted in a nonpolar (10-10) orientation while without nitridation caused a semipolar (11-22) orientation. Room temperature photoluminescence study showed that nonpolar GaN films have higher value of compressive strain as compared to semipolar GaN films, which was further confirmed by room temperature Raman spectroscopy. The room temperature UV photodetection of both films was investigated by measuring the I-V characteristics under UV light illumination. UV photodetectors fabricated on nonpolar GaN showed better characteristics, including higher external quantum efficiency, compared to photodetectors fabricated on semipolar GaN. X-ray rocking curves confirmed better crystallinity of semipolar as compared to nonpolar GaN which resulted in faster transit response of the device.

  18. Effect of growth temperature on defects in epitaxial GaN film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kushvaha, S. S. Pal, P.; Shukla, A. K.; Joshi, Amish G.; Gupta, Govind; Kumar, M.; Singh, S.; Gupta, Bipin K.; Haranath, D.

    2014-02-15

    We report the effect of growth temperature on defect states of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 3.5 μm thick GaN epi-layer on sapphire (0001) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN samples grown at three different substrate temperatures at 730, 740 and 750 °C were characterized using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy images of these samples show the presence of small surface and large hexagonal pits on the GaN film surfaces. The surface defect density of high temperature grown sample is smaller (4.0 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −2} at 750 °C) than that of the low temperature grown sample (1.1 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2} at 730 °C). A correlation between growth temperature and concentration of deep centre defect states from photoluminescence spectra is also presented. The GaN film grown at 750 °C exhibits the lowest defect concentration which confirms that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and affects the optical properties of the GaN epitaxial films.

  19. Localized tip enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of impurity incorporated single GaN nanowire in the sub-diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Patsha, Avinash E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in; Dhara, Sandip; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-09-21

    The localized effect of impurities in single GaN nanowires in the sub-diffraction limit is reported using the study of lattice vibrational modes in the evanescent field of Au nanoparticle assisted tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). GaN nanowires with the O impurity and the Mg dopants were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique in the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. Symmetry allowed Raman modes of wurtzite GaN are observed for undoped and doped nanowires. Unusually very strong intensity of the non-zone center zone boundary mode is observed for the TERS studies of both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN single nanowires. Surface optical mode of A{sub 1} symmetry is also observed for both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN samples. A strong coupling of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with free electrons, however, is reported only in the O rich single nanowires with the asymmetric A{sub 1}(LO) mode. Study of the local vibration mode shows the presence of Mg as dopant in the single GaN nanowires.

  20. HVPE homoepitaxial growth of high quality bulk GaN using acid wet etching method and its mechanism analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nanliu; Cheng, Yutian; Wu, Jiejun; Li, Xingbin; Yu, Tongjun; Xiong, Huan; Li, Wenhui; Chen, Jiao; Zhang, Guoyi

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, crack-free 2-inch bulk GaN wafer with the thickness up to 3 mm was obtained by HVPE homoepitaxy. A new method of acid wet etching was used to pre-treat GaN substrate before re-growth. The formation of the mesh-like subsurface crack and interface layer were found to be suppressed between the re-growth layer and as-grown GaN substrate. EDS and time varied contact angle measurement proved that chemical etching would decrease the oxygen related surface adsorption and increase atoms diffusion length during HVPE homoepitaxial growth. Moreover, Morphology, Low temperature photoluminescence measurements indicated a reduction in stress of wet etching treated as-grown GaN substrate due to etching effect on its N face. High quality bulk GaN with the dislocation density of 1×106 cm-2 was achieved by using wet etching and HVPE multiple re-growth. It would offer a simple method to obtain bulk GaN with thicker layer and high quality.

  1. On compensation and impurities in state-of-the-art GaN epilayers grown on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Wickenden, A.E.; Gaskill, D.K.; Koleske, D.D.; Doverspike, K.; Simons, D.S.; Chi, P.H.

    1996-11-01

    A comparison between 300 K electron transport data for state-of-the-art wurtzite GaN grown on sapphire substrates and corresponding theoretical calculations shows a large difference, with experimental mobility less than the predicted mobility for a given carrier concentration. The comparison seems to imply that GaN films are greatly compensated, but the discrepancy may also be due to the poorly known values of the materials parameters used in the calculations. In this work, recent analysis of transport and SIMS measurements on silicon-doped GaN films are shown to imply that the compensation, N{sub A}/N{sub D}, is less than 0.3. In addition, the determination of an activation energy of 34 meV in a GaN film doped to a level of 6 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3} suggests either that a second, native donor exists in the doped films at a level of between 6 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3} and 1 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}, or that the activation energy of Si in GaN is dependent on the concentration, being influenced by impurity banding or some other physical effect. GaN films grown without silicon doping are highly resistive.

  2. Effect of GaAs substrate orientation on the growth kinetic of GaN layer grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laifi, J.; Chaaben, N.; Bouazizi, H.; Fourati, N.; Zerrouki, C.; El Gmili, Y.; Bchetnia, A.; Salvestrini, J. P.; El Jani, B.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the kinetic growth of low temperature GaN nucleation layers (LT-GaN) grown on GaAs substrates with different crystalline orientations. GaN nucleation layers were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) in a temperature range of 500-600 °C on oriented (001), (113), (112) and (111) GaAs substrates. The growth was in-situ monitored by laser reflectometry (LR). Using an optical model, including time-dependent surface roughness and growth rate profiles, simulations were performed to best approach the experimental reflectivity curves. Results are discussed and correlated with ex-situ analyses, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-visible reflectance (SR). We show that the GaN nucleation layers growth results the formation of GaN islands whose density and size vary greatly with both growth temperature and substrate orientation. Arrhenius plots of the growth rate for each substrate give values of activation energy varying from 0.20 eV for the (001) orientation to 0.35 eV for the (113) orientation. Using cathodoluminescence (CL), we also show that high temperature (800-900 °C) GaN layers grown on top of the low temperature (550 °C) GaN nucleation layers, grown themselves on the GaAs substrates with different orientations, exhibit cubic or hexagonal phase depending on both growth temperature and substrate orientation.

  3. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  4. Natural Cubic Spline Regression Modeling Followed by Dynamic Network Reconstruction for the Identification of Radiation-Sensitivity Gene Association Networks from Time-Course Transcriptome Data

    PubMed Central

    Michna, Agata; Braselmann, Herbert; Selmansberger, Martin; Dietz, Anne; Hess, Julia; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Blüthgen, Nils; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Unger, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression time-course experiments allow to study the dynamics of transcriptomic changes in cells exposed to different stimuli. However, most approaches for the reconstruction of gene association networks (GANs) do not propose prior-selection approaches tailored to time-course transcriptome data. Here, we present a workflow for the identification of GANs from time-course data using prior selection of genes differentially expressed over time identified by natural cubic spline regression modeling (NCSRM). The workflow comprises three major steps: 1) the identification of differentially expressed genes from time-course expression data by employing NCSRM, 2) the use of regularized dynamic partial correlation as implemented in GeneNet to infer GANs from differentially expressed genes and 3) the identification and functional characterization of the key nodes in the reconstructed networks. The approach was applied on a time-resolved transcriptome data set of radiation-perturbed cell culture models of non-tumor cells with normal and increased radiation sensitivity. NCSRM detected significantly more genes than another commonly used method for time-course transcriptome analysis (BETR). While most genes detected with BETR were also detected with NCSRM the false-detection rate of NCSRM was low (3%). The GANs reconstructed from genes detected with NCSRM showed a better overlap with the interactome network Reactome compared to GANs derived from BETR detected genes. After exposure to 1 Gy the normal sensitive cells showed only sparse response compared to cells with increased sensitivity, which exhibited a strong response mainly of genes related to the senescence pathway. After exposure to 10 Gy the response of the normal sensitive cells was mainly associated with senescence and that of cells with increased sensitivity with apoptosis. We discuss these results in a clinical context and underline the impact of senescence-associated pathways in acute radiation response of normal

  5. Materials physics and device development for improved efficiency of GaN HEMT high power amplifiers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Steven Ross; Follstaedt, David Martin; Wright, Alan Francis; Baca, Albert G.; Briggs, Ronald D.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Missert, Nancy A.; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Marsh, Phil F.; Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2005-12-01

    GaN-based microwave power amplifiers have been identified as critical components in Sandia's next generation micro-Synthetic-Aperture-Radar (SAR) operating at X-band and Ku-band (10-18 GHz). To miniaturize SAR, GaN-based amplifiers are necessary to replace bulky traveling wave tubes. Specifically, for micro-SAR development, highly reliable GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), which have delivered a factor of 10 times improvement in power performance compared to GaAs, need to be developed. Despite the great promise of GaN HEMTs, problems associated with nitride materials growth currently limit gain, linearity, power-added-efficiency, reproducibility, and reliability. These material quality issues are primarily due to heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on lattice mismatched substrates. Because SiC provides the best lattice match and thermal conductivity, SiC is currently the substrate of choice for GaN-based microwave amplifiers. Obviously for GaN-based HEMTs to fully realize their tremendous promise, several challenges related to GaN heteroepitaxy on SiC must be solved. For this LDRD, we conducted a concerted effort to resolve materials issues through in-depth research on GaN/AlGaN growth on SiC. Repeatable growth processes were developed which enabled basic studies of these device layers as well as full fabrication of microwave amplifiers. Detailed studies of the GaN and AlGaN growth of SiC were conducted and techniques to measure the structural and electrical properties of the layers were developed. Problems that limit device performance were investigated, including electron traps, dislocations, the quality of semi-insulating GaN, the GaN/AlGaN interface roughness, and surface pinning of the AlGaN gate. Surface charge was reduced by developing silicon nitride passivation. Constant feedback between material properties, physical understanding, and device performance enabled rapid progress which eventually led to the successful fabrication of state of the art

  6. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  7. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  8. Coating MCPs with AlN and GaN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhakim; Starikov, David; Boney, Chris

    2006-01-01

    A development effort underway at the time of reporting the information for this article is devoted to increasing the sensitivity of microchannel plates (MCPs) as detectors of photons and ions by coating the MCPs with nitrides of elements in period III of the periodic table. Conventional MCPs are relatively insensitive to slowly moving, large-mass ions for example, ions of biomolecules under analysis in mass spectrometers. The idea underlying this development is to coat an MCP to reduce its work function (decrease its electron affinity) in order to increase both (1) the emission of electrons in response to impingement of low-energy, large-mass ions and (2) the multiplying effect of secondary electron emission. Of particular interest as coating materials having appropriately low or even negative electron affinities are gallium nitride, aluminum nitride, and ternary alloys of general composition Al(x)Ga(1-x)N (where 0GaN both undoped and doped with Si were deposited on commercial MCPs by radio-frequency molecular-beam epitaxy (also known as plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy) at temperatures <200 C. This deposition technique is particularly suitable because (1) MCPs cannot withstand the higher deposition-substrate temperatures used to decompose constituent compounds in some other deposition techniques and (2) in this technique, the constituent Al, Ga, and N

  9. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  10. Accelerating Climate Simulations Through Hybrid Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Shujia; Sinno, Scott; Cruz, Carlos; Purcell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Unconventional multi-core processors (e.g., IBM Cell B/E and NYIDIDA GPU) have emerged as accelerators in climate simulation. However, climate models typically run on parallel computers with conventional processors (e.g., Intel and AMD) using MPI. Connecting accelerators to this architecture efficiently and easily becomes a critical issue. When using MPI for connection, we identified two challenges: (1) identical MPI implementation is required in both systems, and; (2) existing MPI code must be modified to accommodate the accelerators. In response, we have extended and deployed IBM Dynamic Application Virtualization (DAV) in a hybrid computing prototype system (one blade with two Intel quad-core processors, two IBM QS22 Cell blades, connected with Infiniband), allowing for seamlessly offloading compute-intensive functions to remote, heterogeneous accelerators in a scalable, load-balanced manner. Currently, a climate solar radiation model running with multiple MPI processes has been offloaded to multiple Cell blades with approx.10% network overhead.

  11. A new approach to epitaxially grow high-quality GaN films on Si substrates: the combination of MBE and PLD

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Weijia; Zhu, Yunnong; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    High-quality GaN epitaxial films have been grown on Si substrates with Al buffer layer by the combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technologies. MBE is used to grow Al buffer layer at first, and then PLD is deployed to grow GaN epitaxial films on the Al buffer layer. The surface morphology, crystalline quality, and interfacial property of as-grown GaN epitaxial films on Si substrates are studied systematically. The as-grown ~300 nm-thick GaN epitaxial films grown at 850 °C with ~30 nm-thick Al buffer layer on Si substrates show high crystalline quality with the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for GaN(0002) and GaN(102) X-ray rocking curves of 0.45° and 0.61°, respectively; very flat GaN surface with the root-mean-square surface roughness of 2.5 nm; as well as the sharp and abrupt GaN/AlGaN/Al/Si hetero-interfaces. Furthermore, the corresponding growth mechanism of GaN epitaxial films grown on Si substrates with Al buffer layer by the combination of MBE and PLD is hence studied in depth. This work provides a novel and simple approach for the epitaxial growth of high-quality GaN epitaxial films on Si substrates. PMID:27101930

  12. Effect of double superlattice interlayers on growth of thick GaN epilayers on Si(110) substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xu-Qiang; Takahashi, Tokio; Ide, Toshihide; Shimizu, Mitsuaki

    2016-05-01

    The effect of double thin AlN/GaN superlattice interlayers (SL ILs) on the growth of thick GaN epilayers by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si(110) substrates is investigated. It is found that the GaN middle layer (GaN layer between the two SL ILs) can affect the strain state of the GaN epilayer. By comparison with the case of a single SL IL, it is shown that the double SL ILs can have a stronger compressive effect on the GaN epilayer grown on it, which results in lower residual tensile strain in the GaN film after the growth. By optimizing the GaN middle layer thickness, a 4-µm-thick crack-free GaN epilayer is successfully achieved. By this simple technique, it is expected that high-quality crack-free thick GaN can be grown on Si substrates for optical and electronic device applications.

  13. Characterization and density control of GaN nanodots on Si (111) by droplet epitaxy using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this report, self-organized GaN nanodots have been grown on Si (111) by droplet epitaxy method, and their density can be controlled from 1.1 × 1010 to 1.1 × 1011 cm-2 by various growth parameters, such as substrate temperatures for Ga droplet formation, the pre-nitridation treatment of Si substrate, the nitridation duration for GaN crystallization, and in situ annealing after GaN formation. Based on the characterization of in situ RHEED, we can observe the surface condition of Si and the formation of GaN nanodots on Si. The surface nitridaiton treatment at 600°C provides a-SiNx layer which makes higher density of GaN nanodots. Crystal GaN nanodots can be observed by the HRTEM. The surface composition of GaN nanodots can be analyzed by SPEM and μ-XPS with a synchrotron x-ray source. We can find GaN nanodots form by droplet epitaxy and then in situ annealing make higher-degree nitridation of GaN nanodots. PMID:25593560

  14. Nitridation- and Buffer-Layer-Free Growth of [1100]-Oriented GaN Domains on m-Plane Sapphire Substrates by Using Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yeonwoo; Lee, Sanghwa; Jue, Miyeon; Yoon, Hansub; Kim, Chinkyo

    2012-12-01

    Over a wide range of growth conditions, GaN domains were grown on bare m-plane sapphire substrates by using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), and the relation between these growth conditions and three possible preferred crystallographic orientations ([1100], [1103], [1122]) of GaN domains was investigated. In contrast with the previous reports by other groups, our results revealed that preferentially [1100]-oriented GaN domains were grown without low-temperature nitridation or a buffer layer, and that the growth condition of preferentially [1100]-oriented GaN was insensitive to V/III ratio.

  15. A new approach to epitaxially grow high-quality GaN films on Si substrates: the combination of MBE and PLD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Haiyan; Yang, Weijia; Zhu, Yunnong; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-04-22

    High-quality GaN epitaxial films have been grown on Si substrates with Al buffer layer by the combination of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technologies. MBE is used to grow Al buffer layer at first, and then PLD is deployed to grow GaN epitaxial films on the Al buffer layer. The surface morphology, crystalline quality, and interfacial property of as-grown GaN epitaxial films on Si substrates are studied systematically. The as-grown ~300 nm-thick GaN epitaxial films grown at 850 °C with ~30 nm-thick Al buffer layer on Si substrates show high crystalline quality with the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for GaN(0002) and GaN(102) X-ray rocking curves of 0.45° and 0.61°, respectively; very flat GaN surface with the root-mean-square surface roughness of 2.5 nm; as well as the sharp and abrupt GaN/AlGaN/Al/Si hetero-interfaces. Furthermore, the corresponding growth mechanism of GaN epitaxial films grown on Si substrates with Al buffer layer by the combination of MBE and PLD is hence studied in depth. This work provides a novel and simple approach for the epitaxial growth of high-quality GaN epitaxial films on Si substrates.

  16. Characterization and density control of GaN nanodots on Si (111) by droplet epitaxy using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ing-Song; Chang, Chun-Pu; Yang, Chung-Pei; Lin, Chun-Ting; Ma, Yuan-Ron; Chen, Chun-Chi

    2014-01-01

    In this report, self-organized GaN nanodots have been grown on Si (111) by droplet epitaxy method, and their density can be controlled from 1.1 × 10(10) to 1.1 × 10(11) cm(-2) by various growth parameters, such as substrate temperatures for Ga droplet formation, the pre-nitridation treatment of Si substrate, the nitridation duration for GaN crystallization, and in situ annealing after GaN formation. Based on the characterization of in situ RHEED, we can observe the surface condition of Si and the formation of GaN nanodots on Si. The surface nitridaiton treatment at 600°C provides a-SiNx layer which makes higher density of GaN nanodots. Crystal GaN nanodots can be observed by the HRTEM. The surface composition of GaN nanodots can be analyzed by SPEM and μ-XPS with a synchrotron x-ray source. We can find GaN nanodots form by droplet epitaxy and then in situ annealing make higher-degree nitridation of GaN nanodots.

  17. Influence of vicinal sapphire substrate on the properties of N-polar GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhiyu; Zhang, Jincheng Xu, Shengrui; Chen, Zhibin; Yang, Shuangyong; Tian, Kun; Hao, Yue; Su, Xujun; Shi, Xuefang

    2014-08-25

    The influence of vicinal sapphire substrates on the growth of N-polar GaN films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition is investigated. Smooth GaN films without hexagonal surface feature are obtained on vicinal substrate. Transmission electron microscope results reveal that basal-plane stacking faults are formed in GaN on vicinal substrate, leading to a reduction in threading dislocation density. Furthermore, it has been found that there is a weaker yellow luminescence in GaN on vicinal substrate than that on (0001) substrate, which might be explained by the different trends of the carbon impurity incorporation.

  18. Probing temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with Raman thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, C. Pomeroy, J.; Kuball, M.

    2014-02-14

    We demonstrate the ability of confocal Raman thermography using a spatial filter and azimuthal polarization to probe vertical temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of operating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Temperature gradients in the GaN layer are measured by using offset focal planes to minimize the contribution from different regions of the GaN buffer. The measured temperature gradient is in good agreement with a thermal simulation treating the GaN thermal conductivity as homogeneous throughout the layer and including a low thermal conductivity nucleation layer to model the heat flow between the buffer and substrate.

  19. Radar Waveform Pulse Analysis Measurement System for High-Power GaN Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrivikraman, Tushar; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana; Jenabi, Masud; Hoffman, James

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a measurement system to characterize the pulsed response of high-power GaN amplifiers for use in space-based SAR platforms that require very strict amplitude and phase stability. The measurement system is able to record and analyze data on three different time scales: fast, slow, and long, which allows for greater detail of the mechanisms that impact amplitude and phase stability. The system is fully automated through MATLAB, which offers both instrument control capability and in-situ data processing. To validate this system, a high-power GaN HEMT amplifier operated in saturation was characterized. The fast time results show that variations to the amplitude and phase are correlated to DC supply transients, while long time characteristics are correlated to temperature changes.

  20. Direct experimental determination of the spontaneous polarization of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähnemann, Jonas; Brandt, Oliver; Jahn, Uwe; Pfüller, Carsten; Roder, Claudia; Dogan, Pinar; Grosse, Frank; Belabbes, Abderrezak; Bechstedt, Friedhelm; Trampert, Achim; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2012-08-01

    We present a universal approach for determining the spontaneous polarization Psp of a wurtzite semiconductor from the emission energies of excitons bound to the different types of stacking faults in these crystals. Employing microphotoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, we observe emission lines from the intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults in strain-free GaN microcrystals. By treating the polarization sheet charges associated with these stacking faults as a plate capacitor, Psp can be obtained from the observed transition energies with no additional assumptions. Self-consistent Poisson-Schrödinger calculations, aided by the microscopic electrostatic potential computed using density-functional theory, lead to nearly identical values for Psp. Our recommended value for Psp of GaN is -0.022±0.007 C/m2.

  1. Fabrication of high reflectivity nanoporous distributed Bragg reflectors by controlled electrochemical etching of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Min; Kang, Jin-Ho; Lee, June Key; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2016-07-01

    The nanoporous medium is a valuable feature of optical devices because of its variable optical refractive index with porosity. One important application is in a GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser having a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) composed of alternating nanoporous and bulk GaNs. However, optimization of the fabrication process for high reflectivity DBRs having wellcontrolled high reflection bands has not been studied yet. We used electrochemical etching to study the fabrication process of a nanoporous GaN DBR and analyzed the relationship between the morphology and optical reflectivity. Several electrolytes were examined for the formation of the optimized nanoporous structure. A highly reflective DBRs having reflectivity of ~100% were obtained over a wide wavelength range of 450-750 nm. Porosification of semiconductors into nanoporous layers could provide a high reflectivity DBR due to controlled index-contrast, which would be advantages for the construction of a high-Q optical cavity.

  2. Surfactant assisted growth of MgO films on GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, E. A.; Shelton, T. C.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.; Maria, J.-P.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D.; Mita, S.

    2012-08-27

    Thin epitaxial films of <111> oriented MgO on [0001]-oriented GaN were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and pulsed laser deposition using the assistance of a vapor phase surfactant. In both cases, surfactant incorporation enabled layer-by-layer growth and a smooth terminal surface by stabilizing the {l_brace}111{r_brace} rocksalt facet. Metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor structures were fabricated on n-type GaN. A comparison of leakage current density for conventional and surfactant-assisted growth reveals a nearly 100 Multiplication-Sign reduction in leakage current density for the surfactant-assisted samples. These data verify numerous predictions regarding the role of H-termination in regulating the habit of rocksalt crystals.

  3. Fabrication of high reflectivity nanoporous distributed Bragg reflectors by controlled electrochemical etching of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Min; Kang, Jin-Ho; Lee, June Key; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2016-09-01

    The nanoporous medium is a valuable feature of optical devices because of its variable optical refractive index with porosity. One important application is in a GaN-based vertical cavity surface emitting laser having a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) composed of alternating nanoporous and bulk GaNs. However, optimization of the fabrication process for high reflectivity DBRs having wellcontrolled high reflection bands has not been studied yet. We used electrochemical etching to study the fabrication process of a nanoporous GaN DBR and analyzed the relationship between the morphology and optical reflectivity. Several electrolytes were examined for the formation of the optimized nanoporous structure. A highly reflective DBRs having reflectivity of ~100% were obtained over a wide wavelength range of 450-750 nm. Porosification of semiconductors into nanoporous layers could provide a high reflectivity DBR due to controlled index-contrast, which would be advantages for the construction of a high-Q optical cavity.

  4. Low temperature cathodoluminecence and electron beam induced current studies of single GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eunsoon; Woo Lee, Byoung; Shim, So-Jeong; Choi, Heon-Jin; Hee Son, Byoung; Hwan Ahn, Yeong; Dang, Le Si

    2012-04-01

    Single crystalline GaN nanowires, with 100 nm typical diameters, were grown by chemical vapor deposition method, using Pt catalyst, and characterized by cathodoluminescence and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements at 5 K. The near band edge emission was found to be asymmetric and broad, with full width half maximum of around 150 meV, peaking at 3.55 eV, well above the GaN bulk band gap. This blueshift was ascribed to band filling effect resulting from unintentional n-type doping in the range 1019-1020 cm-3. Despite of this heavy doping, EBIC experiments showed that minority carriers can diffuse over 0.2 μm.

  5. Migration mechanism of a GaN bicrystalline grain boundary as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Bo; Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Han, Heung Nam

    2016-05-01

    Using in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we have explored migration mechanism of a grain boundary in a GaN bicrystal as a model system. During annealing at 500 °C, the grain-boundary region underwent a decrease in thickness, which occurred by decomposition or sublimation of GaN during annealing at 500 °C coupled with electron-beam sputtering. The decrease in thickness corresponds to an increase in the driving force for migration, because the migration of the grain boundary was driven by the surface energy difference. As the driving force increased with annealing time, the grain-boundary morphology turned from atomically smooth to rough, which is characterized by kinetic roughening. The observations indicate that a grain boundary exhibits a nonlinear relationship between driving force for migration and migration velocity, in discord with the general presumption that a grain boundary follows a linear relationship.

  6. Spectroscopic study of semipolar ( 11 2 ¯ 2 ) -HVPE GaN exhibiting high oxygen incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schustek, Philipp; Hocker, Matthias; Klein, Martin; Simon, Ulrich; Scholz, Ferdinand; Thonke, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Spatially resolved luminescence and Raman spectroscopy investigations are applied to a series of ( 11 2 ¯ 2 ) -GaN samples grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) grown over an initial layer deposited by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy on patterned sapphire substrates. Whereas these two differently grown GaN layers are crystallographically homogeneous, they differ largely in their doping level due to high unintentional oxygen uptake in the HVPE layer. This high doping shows up in luminescence spectra, which can be explained by a free-electron recombination band for which an analytical model considering the Burstein-Moss shift, conduction band tailing, and the bandgap renormalization is included. Secondary ion mass spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, and Hall measurements concordantly determine the electron density to be above 1019 cm-3. In addition, the strain state is assessed by Raman spectroscopy and compared to a finite element analysis.

  7. An improved temperature-dependent large signal model of microwave GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changsi, Wang; Yuehang, Xu; Zhang, Wen; Zhikai, Chen; Ruimin, Xu

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the electrothermal effects of GaN electronic devices is critical for reliability design and assessment. In this paper, an improved temperature-dependent model for large signal equivalent circuit modeling of GaN HEMTs is proposed. To accurately describe the thermal effects, a modified nonlinear thermal sub-circuit which is related not only to power dissipation, but also ambient temperature is used to calculate the variations of channel temperature of the device; the temperature-dependent parasitic and intrinsic elements are also taken into account in this model. The parameters of the thermal sub-circuit are extracted by using the numerical finite element method. The results show that better performance can be achieved by using the proposed large signal model in the range of ‑55 to 125 °C compared with the conventional model with a linear thermal sub-circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61106115).

  8. Response of GaN to energetic ion irradiation: conditions for ion track formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlušić, M.; Kozubek, R.; Lebius, H.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Wilhelm, R. A.; Buljan, M.; Siketić, Z.; Scholz, F.; Meisch, T.; Jakšić, M.; Bernstorff, S.; Schleberger, M.; Šantić, B.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the response of wurzite GaN thin films to energetic ion irradiation. Both swift heavy ions (92 MeV Xe23+, 23 MeV I6+) and highly charged ions (100 keV Xe40+) were used. After irradiation, the samples were investigated using atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in channelling orientation and time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis. Only grazing incidence swift heavy ion irradiation induced changes on the surface of the GaN, when the appearance of nanoholes is accompanied by a notable loss of nitrogen. The results are discussed in the framework of the thermal spike model.

  9. Anisotropy of two-photon absorption and free-carrier effect in nonpolar GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yu; Zhou, Feng; Yang, Junyi; Wu, Xingzhi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Li, Zhongguo; Song, Yinglin

    2015-03-30

    We reported a systematic study about the anisotropic optical nonlinearities in bulk m-plane and a-plane GaN crystals by Z-scan and pump-probe with phase object methods under picosecond at 532 nm. The two-photon absorption coefficient, which was measured as a function of polarization angle, exhibited oscillation curves with a period of π/2, indicating a highly polarized optical third-order nonlinearity in both nonpolar GaN samples. Furthermore, free-carrier absorption revealed stronger hole-related absorption for E⊥c than for E//c probe polarization. In contrast, free-carrier refraction was found almost isotropic due to electron-related refraction in the isotropic conduction bands.

  10. Strain modulating half-metallicity of semifluorinated GaN nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meixia; Ao, Zhimin; Xu, Tianhan; He, Cheng; Song, Haiyang; Wang, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Strain-dependent half-metallicity of two-bilayer GaN nanosheets (NSs) with fluorinated Ga atoms is studied using density-functional theory. Our results demonstrate that the band gaps in spin-up states and half-metallic gaps vary with biaxial strain and uniaxial compressive strain along the zigzag direction, while the metallic behaviors in spin-down states remain regardless of strain. However, biaxial strain has a better effect on the half-metallicity. Semifluorinated GaN NSs may undergo a structural phase transition from wurtzite to graphite-like phase at high biaxial tension. Therefore, biaxial strain tuning half-metallicity efficiently could provide a viable route to GaN-based spintronic nanodevices.

  11. An improved temperature-dependent large signal model of microwave GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changsi, Wang; Yuehang, Xu; Zhang, Wen; Zhikai, Chen; Ruimin, Xu

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the electrothermal effects of GaN electronic devices is critical for reliability design and assessment. In this paper, an improved temperature-dependent model for large signal equivalent circuit modeling of GaN HEMTs is proposed. To accurately describe the thermal effects, a modified nonlinear thermal sub-circuit which is related not only to power dissipation, but also ambient temperature is used to calculate the variations of channel temperature of the device; the temperature-dependent parasitic and intrinsic elements are also taken into account in this model. The parameters of the thermal sub-circuit are extracted by using the numerical finite element method. The results show that better performance can be achieved by using the proposed large signal model in the range of -55 to 125 °C compared with the conventional model with a linear thermal sub-circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61106115).

  12. Growth regimes during homoepitaxial growth of GaN by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Corrion, A. L.; Wu, F.; Speck, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    c-plane GaN films were grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metal-organic chemical vapor deposition templates for a wide range of NH{sub 3}:Ga flux ratios and growth temperatures, and the resulting films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three distinct nitrogen-rich growth regimes - unstable layer-by-layer, quasi-stable step flow, and dislocation-mediated pitting - were identified based on the growth mode and film properties. In addition, step flow growth was observed under conditions of gallium droplet accumulation. The results indicate the existence of two regimes for step-flow growth of GaN by ammonia MBE - both gallium-rich and nitrogen-rich. Growth mode instabilities and mound formation were observed and are discussed in the context of a step-edge energy barrier to adatom diffusion over a terrace.

  13. n{sup +}-GaN grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy: Application to regrown contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Lugani, L.; Malinverni, M.; Giraud, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Tirelli, S.; Marti, D.; Bolognesi, C. R.

    2014-11-17

    We report on the low-temperature growth of heavily Si-doped (>10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}) n{sup +}-type GaN by N-rich ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with very low bulk resistivity (<4 × 10{sup −4} Ω·cm). This is applied to the realization of regrown ohmic contacts on InAlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. A low n{sup +}-GaN/2 dimensional electron gas contact resistivity of 0.11 Ω·mm is measured, provided an optimized surface preparation procedure, which is shown to be critical. This proves the great potentials of ammonia MBE for the realization of high performance electronic devices.

  14. Elastic constants of GaN between 10 and 305 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Ogi, H.; Nagakubo, A.; Nakamura, N.; Hirao, M.; Imade, M.; Yoshimura, M.; Mori, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Using the antenna-transmission resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, we measured the elastic constants of GaN between 10 and 305 K using 72 resonance frequencies. The mode Grüneisen parameter is determined from temperature dependence of each elastic constant, which is larger along the c axis than along the a axis, showing anisotropy in lattice anharmonicity. The zero-temperature elastic constants, determined using the Einstein-oscillator model, yield the Debye characteristic temperature of 636 K. The ab-initio calculation is carried out for deducing the elastic constants, and comparison between calculations and measurements at 0 K reveals that the local-density-approximation potential is preferable for theoretically evaluating characteristics of GaN. The theoretical calculation also supports the anisotropy in lattice anharmonicity.

  15. Migration mechanism of a GaN bicrystalline grain boundary as a model system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Bo; Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Han, Heung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Using in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we have explored migration mechanism of a grain boundary in a GaN bicrystal as a model system. During annealing at 500 °C, the grain-boundary region underwent a decrease in thickness, which occurred by decomposition or sublimation of GaN during annealing at 500 °C coupled with electron-beam sputtering. The decrease in thickness corresponds to an increase in the driving force for migration, because the migration of the grain boundary was driven by the surface energy difference. As the driving force increased with annealing time, the grain-boundary morphology turned from atomically smooth to rough, which is characterized by kinetic roughening. The observations indicate that a grain boundary exhibits a nonlinear relationship between driving force for migration and migration velocity, in discord with the general presumption that a grain boundary follows a linear relationship. PMID:27210538

  16. Electrochemical fabrication and optoelectronic properties of hybrid heterostructure of CuPc/porous GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fei; Qin, Shuang-Jiao; Hu, Li-Feng; Wang, Juan-Ye; Yang, Jia-Mei; Chen, Xue-Qing; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2016-05-01

    A new hybrid heterostructure of p-type copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and n-type porous GaN (PGaN) has been fabricated by electrophoretic deposition. The influence of CuPc concentration, electric field intensity, and deposition time on the growth of CuPc film has been explored. The as-prepared CuPc films are made of numerous nanorods. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra revealed that the CuPc films are the β phase and amorphous type on pristine and porous GaN, respectively. Moreover, the prototype devices were fabricated on the basis of the CuPc/PGaN heterostructures. The devices exhibited excellent photodetector performance under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination.

  17. High voltage and high current density vertical GaN power diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Fischer, A. J.; Dickerson, J. R.; Armstrong, A. M.; Moseley, M. W.; Crawford, M. H.; King, M. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Kaplar, R. J.; van Heukelom, M. S.; Wierer, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of a GaN high voltage vertical p-n diode operating at > 3.9 kV breakdown with a specific on-resistance < 0.9 mΩ.cm2. Diodes achieved a forward current of 1 A for on-wafer, DC measurements, corresponding to a current density > 1.4 kA/cm2. An effective critical electric field of 3.9 MV/cm was estimated for the devices from analysis of the forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics. Furthermore this suggests that the fundamental limit to the GaN critical electric field is significantly greater than previously believed.

  18. High voltage and high current density vertical GaN power diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A. J.; Dickerson, J. R.; Armstrong, A. M.; Moseley, M. W.; Crawford, M. H.; King, M. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Kaplar, R. J.; van Heukelom, M. S.; Wierer, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of a GaN high voltage vertical p-n diode operating at > 3.9 kV breakdown with a specific on-resistance < 0.9 mΩ.cm2. Diodes achieved a forward current of 1 A for on-wafer, DC measurements, corresponding to a current density > 1.4 kA/cm2. An effective critical electric field of 3.9 MV/cm was estimated for the devices from analysis of the forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics. Furthermore this suggests that the fundamental limit to the GaN critical electric field is significantly greater than previously believed.

  19. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN P-i-N diodes

    DOE PAGES

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; et al

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN P-i-N diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN P-i-Ns remainmore » superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.« less

  20. Migration mechanism of a GaN bicrystalline grain boundary as a model system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Bo; Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Han, Heung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Using in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we have explored migration mechanism of a grain boundary in a GaN bicrystal as a model system. During annealing at 500 °C, the grain-boundary region underwent a decrease in thickness, which occurred by decomposition or sublimation of GaN during annealing at 500 °C coupled with electron-beam sputtering. The decrease in thickness corresponds to an increase in the driving force for migration, because the migration of the grain boundary was driven by the surface energy difference. As the driving force increased with annealing time, the grain-boundary morphology turned from atomically smooth to rough, which is characterized by kinetic roughening. The observations indicate that a grain boundary exhibits a nonlinear relationship between driving force for migration and migration velocity, in discord with the general presumption that a grain boundary follows a linear relationship. PMID:27210538