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Sample records for accelerator network gan

  1. REMOTE OPERATIONS IN A GLOBAL ACCELERATOR NETWORK.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA,T.; AGARWAL,D.; RICE,D.

    2003-05-12

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  2. REMOTE OPERATIONS IN A GLOBAL ACCELERATOR NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.SATOGATA,TAGARWAL,DRICE,D

    2003-05-12

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  3. Remote operations in a global accelerator network

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, Steve; Satogata, Todd; Agarwal, Deborah; Rice, David

    2003-05-08

    The INTRODUCTION to this paper summarizes the history of the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) concept and the recent workshops that discussed the relationship between GAN and Remote Operations. The REMOTE OPERATIONS SCENARIOS section brings out the organizational philosophy embodied in GAN-like and to non-GAN-like scenarios. The set of major TOPICS RAISED AT THE WORKSHOPS are only partially resolved. COLLABORATION TOOLS are described and discussed, followed by examples of REMOTE ACCELERATOR CONTROL PROJECTS around the world.

  4. Collaboration tools for the global accelerator network: Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Olson, Gary; Olson, Judy

    2002-09-15

    The concept of a ''Global Accelerator Network'' (GAN) has been put forward as a means for inter-regional collaboration in the operation of internationally constructed and operated frontier accelerator facilities. A workshop was held to allow representatives of the accelerator community and of the collaboratory development community to meet and discuss collaboration tools for the GAN environment. This workshop, called the Collaboration Tools for the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) Workshop, was held on August 26, 2002 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to provide input about collaboration tools in general and to provide a strawman for the GAN collaborative tools environment. The participants at the workshop represented accelerator physicists, high-energy physicists, operations, technology tool developers, and social scientists that study scientific collaboration.

  5. Network acceleration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Patricia (Inventor); Awrach, James Michael (Inventor); Maccabe, Arthur Barney (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Splintered offloading techniques with receive batch processing are described for network acceleration. Such techniques offload specific functionality to a NIC while maintaining the bulk of the protocol processing in the host operating system ("OS"). The resulting protocol implementation allows the application to bypass the protocol processing of the received data. Such can be accomplished this by moving data from the NIC directly to the application through direct memory access ("DMA") and batch processing the receive headers in the host OS when the host OS is interrupted to perform other work. Batch processing receive headers allows the data path to be separated from the control path. Unlike operating system bypass, however, the operating system still fully manages the network resource and has relevant feedback about traffic and flows. Embodiments of the present disclosure can therefore address the challenges of networks with extreme bandwidth delay products (BWDP).

  6. Growth of GaN nanowall network on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    GaN nanowall network was epitaxially grown on Si (111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. GaN nanowalls overlap and interlace with one another, together with large numbers of holes, forming a continuous porous GaN nanowall network. The width of the GaN nanowall can be controlled, ranging from 30 to 200 nm by adjusting the N/Ga ratio. Characterization results of a transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction show that the GaN nanowall is well oriented along the C axis. Strong band edge emission centered at 363 nm is observed in the spectrum of room temperature photoluminescence, indicating that the GaN nanowall network is of high quality. The sheet resistance of the Si-doped GaN nanowall network along the lateral direction was 58 Ω/. The conductive porous nanowall network can be useful for integrated gas sensors due to the large surface area-to-volume ratio and electrical conductivity along the lateral direction by combining with Si micromachining. PMID:23270331

  7. Broadband accelerator control network

    SciTech Connect

    Skelly, J.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1983-01-01

    A broadband data communications network has been implemented at BNL for control of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AG) proton accelerator, using commercial CATV hardware, dual coaxial cables as the communications medium, and spanning 2.0 km. A 4 MHz bandwidth Digital Control channel using CSMA-CA protocol is provided for digital data transmission, with 8 access nodes available over the length of the RELWAY. Each node consists of an rf modem and a microprocessor-based store-and-forward message handler which interfaces the RELWAY to a branch line implemented in GPIB. A gateway to the RELWAY control channel for the (preexisting) AGS Computerized Accelerator Operating system has been constructed using an LSI-11/23 microprocessor as a device in a GPIB branch line. A multilayer communications protocol has been defined for the Digital Control Channel, based on the ISO Open Systems Interconnect layered model, and a RELWAY Device Language defined as the required universal language for device control on this channel.

  8. Fabrication of GaN structures with embedded network of voids using pillar patterned GaN templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensk, O.; Ali, M.; Riuttanen, L.; Törmä, P. T.; Sintonen, S.; Suihkonen, S.; Sopanen, M.; Lipsanen, H.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we report on the MOCVD growth and characterization of GaN structures and InGaN single quantum wells grown on pillar patterned GaN/sapphire templates. During the regrowth a network of voids was intentionally formed at the interface of sapphire substrate and GaN epitaxial layer. The regrowth process was found to decrease the threading dislocation density of the overgrown layer. The quantum well sample grown on patterned template showed significantly higher optical output in photoluminescence measurements compared to the reference sample with identical internal quantum efficiency characteristics. We attribute the increase to enhanced light extraction efficiency caused by strong scattering and redirection of light from the scattering elements.

  9. Characterization of GaN Nanowall Network and Optical Property of InGaN/GaN Quantum Wells by Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Aihua; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2013-08-01

    A GaN nanowall network and InGaN/GaN quantum wells were grown on AlN/Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The morphology, polarity, structural, and optical properties of the GaN nanowall network were investigated. The lattice constants a0= 3.193 Å and c0 = 5.182 Å of the GaN nanowall network were obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD), indicating that the GaN nanowall network is under low stress. Chemical etching test shows that the GaN nanowall network grown on an Al-polar buffer layer is Ga-polar. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of InGaN/GaN quantum wells both on a GaN nanowall network and a GaN film were also measured. Different from the InGaN/GaN quantum wells on GaN film, the Fabry-Perot effect is not observed in the PL spectrum of the InGaN/GaN quantum wells on the GaN nanowall network owing to its antireflective porous structure. The emission wavelength gradually blue shifts from 408 to 391 nm with the decrease of temperature from 293 to 10 K. The GaN nanowall network grown on a Si substrate is not only compatible with mature Si micromachining technology but also may provide a novel nano-optical device.

  10. Depth Profiles of Mg, Si, and Zn Implants in GaN by Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi Prasad, G.V.; Pelicon, P.; Mitchell, L.J.; McDaniel, F.D.

    2003-08-26

    GaN is one of the most promising electronic materials for applications requiring high-power, high frequencies, or high-temperatures as well as opto-electronics in the blue to ultraviolet spectral region. We have recently measured depth profiles of Mg, Si, and Zn implants in GaN substrates by the TEAMS particle counting method for both matrix and trace elements, using a gas ionization chamber. Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) is a combination of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to measure trace elements at ppb levels. Negative ions from a SIMS like source are injected into a tandem accelerator. Molecular interferences inherent with the SIMS method are eliminated in the TEAMS method. Negative ion currents are extremely low with GaN as neither gallium nor nitrogen readily forms negative ions making the depth profile measurements more difficult. The energies of the measured ions are in the range of 4-8 MeV. A careful selection of mass/charge ratios of the detected ions combined with energy-loss behavior of the ions in the ionization chamber eliminated molecular interferences.

  11. Accelerating Learning By Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad; Barhen, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    Electronic neural networks made to learn faster by use of terminal teacher forcing. Method of supervised learning involves addition of teacher forcing functions to excitations fed as inputs to output neurons. Initially, teacher forcing functions are strong enough to force outputs to desired values; subsequently, these functions decay with time. When learning successfully completed, terminal teacher forcing vanishes, and dynamics or neural network become equivalent to those of conventional neural network. Simulated neural network with terminal teacher forcing learned to produce close approximation of circular trajectory in 400 iterations.

  12. Neural networks and orbit control in accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bozoki, E.; Friedman, A.

    1994-07-01

    An overview of the architecture, workings and training of Neural Networks is given. We stress the aspects which are important for the use of Neural Networks for orbit control in accelerators and storage rings, especially its ability to cope with the nonlinear behavior of the orbit response to `kicks` and the slow drift in the orbit response during long-term operation. Results obtained for the two NSLS storage rings with several network architectures and various training methods for each architecture are given.

  13. Accelerating networks: Effects of preferential connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Y.-P.; McCoy, B. J.

    2007-12-01

    Networks are commonly observed structures in complex systems with interacting and interdependent parts that self-organize. For nonlinearly growing networks, when the total number of connections increases faster than the total number of nodes, the network is said to accelerate. We propose a systematic model for the dynamics of growing networks represented by distribution kinetics equations. We define the nodal-linkage distribution, construct a population dynamics equation based on the association-dissociation process, and perform the moment calculations to describe the dynamics of such networks. For nondirectional networks with finite numbers of nodes and connections, the moments are the total number of nodes, the total number of connections, and the degree (the average number of connections per node), represented by the average moment. Size independent rate coefficients yield an exponential network describing the network without preferential attachment, and size dependent rate coefficients produce a power law network with preferential attachment. The model quantitatively describes accelerating network growth data for a supercomputer (Earth Simulator), for regulatory gene networks, and for the Internet.

  14. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  15. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow.

    PubMed

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006); J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007)]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube. PMID:25353880

  16. Computational acceleration using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadaret, Paul

    2008-04-01

    The author's recent participation in the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program has resulted in the development of a patent pending technology that enables the construction of very large and fast artificial neural networks. Through the use of UNICON's CogniMax pattern recognition technology we believe that systems can be constructed that exploit the power of "exhaustive learning" for the benefit of certain types of complex and slow computational problems. This paper presents a theoretical study that describes one potentially beneficial application of exhaustive learning. It describes how a very large and fast Radial Basis Function (RBF) artificial Neural Network (NN) can be used to implement a useful computational system. Viewed another way, it presents an unusual method of transforming a complex, always-precise, and slow computational problem into a fuzzy pattern recognition problem where other methods are available to effectively improve computational performance. The method described recognizes that the need for computational precision in a problem domain sometimes varies throughout the domain's Feature Space (FS) and high precision may only be needed in limited areas. These observations can then be exploited to the benefit of overall computational performance. Addressing computational reliability, we describe how existing always-precise computational methods can be used to reliably train the NN to perform the computational interpolation function. The author recognizes that the method described is not applicable to every situation, but over the last 8 months we have been surprised at how often this method can be applied to enable interesting and effective solutions.

  17. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, protects against sarcopenia in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Yuki; Kagawa, Syota; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Nakanishi, Miho; Sakashita, Noriko; Otsuka, Shizue; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hagihara, Keisuke

    2015-01-15

    Sarcopenia is characterized by age-associated skeletal muscle atrophy and reduced muscle strength; currently, no pharmaceutical treatment is available. Go-sha-jinki-Gan (GJG) is a traditional Japanese herbal medicine that is used to alleviate various age-related symptoms, especially motor disorders. Here, we investigated the effect of GJG on aging-associated skeletal muscle atrophy by using senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP8). Immunohistochemical and western blotting analyses clearly showed that GJG significantly reduced the loss of skeletal muscle mass and ameliorated the increase in slow skeletal muscle fibers in SAMP8 mice compared to control mice. The expression levels of Akt and GSK-3β, the phosphorylation of FoxO4, and the phosphorylations of AMPK and mitochondrial-related transcription factors such as PGC-1α were suppressed, while the expression of MuRF1 increased in SAMP8 mice, but approximated that in senescence-accelerated aging-resistant (SAMR1) mice after GJG treatment. We demonstrate for the first time that GJG has a therapeutic effect against sarcopenia. PMID:25636865

  18. Accelerating commutation circuits in quantum computer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Huang, Xu; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhang, Zeng-ke

    2012-12-01

    In a high speed and packet-switched quantum computer network, a packet routing delay often leads to traffic jams, becoming a severe bottleneck for speeding up the transmission rate. Based on the delayed commutation circuit proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 110502 (2006), we present an improved scheme for accelerating network transmission. For two more realistic scenarios, we utilize the characteristic of a quantum state to simultaneously implement a data switch and transmission that makes it possible to reduce the packet delay and route a qubit packet even before its address is determined. This circuit is further extended to the quantum network for the transmission of the unknown quantum information. The analysis demonstrates that quantum communication technology can considerably reduce the processing delay time and build faster and more efficient packet-switched networks.

  19. Neural network-based sensor signal accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    2000-10-16

    A strategy has been developed to computationally accelerate the response time of a generic electronic sensor. The strategy can be deployed as an algorithm in a control system or as a physical interface (on an embedded microcontroller) between a slower responding external sensor and a higher-speed control system. Optional code implementations are available to adjust algorithm performance when computational capability is limited. In one option, the actual sensor signal can be sampled at the slower rate with adaptive linear neural networks predicting the sensor's future output and interpolating intermediate synthetic output values. In another option, a synchronized collection of predictors sequentially controls the corresponding synthetic output voltage. Error is adaptively corrected in both options. The core strategy has been demonstrated with automotive oxygen sensor data. A prototype interface device is under construction. The response speed increase afforded by this strategy could greatly offset the cost of developing a replacement sensor with a faster physical response time.

  20. The Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Jackson; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Clare, Loren P.

    2008-01-01

    A document describes the Interplanetary Overlay Networking Protocol Accelerator (IONAC) an electronic apparatus, now under development, for relaying data at high rates in spacecraft and interplanetary radio-communication systems utilizing a delay-tolerant networking protocol. The protocol includes provisions for transmission and reception of data in bundles (essentially, messages), transfer of custody of a bundle to a recipient relay station at each step of a relay, and return receipts. Because of limitations on energy resources available for such relays, data rates attainable in a conventional software implementation of the protocol are lower than those needed, at any given reasonable energy-consumption rate. Therefore, a main goal in developing the IONAC is to reduce the energy consumption by an order of magnitude and the data-throughput capability by two orders of magnitude. The IONAC prototype is a field-programmable gate array that serves as a reconfigurable hybrid (hardware/ firmware) system for implementation of the protocol. The prototype can decode 108,000 bundles per second and encode 100,000 bundles per second. It includes a bundle-cache static randomaccess memory that enables maintenance of a throughput of 2.7Gb/s, and an Ethernet convergence layer that supports a duplex throughput of 1Gb/s.

  1. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  2. Growth of high quality GaN layer on carbon nanotube-graphene network structure as intermediate layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Taeo Hoon; Park, Ah Hyun; Park, Sungchan; Kim, Myung Jong; Suh, Eun-Kyung

    2015-03-01

    In general, high-quality GaN layers are synthesized on low-temperature (LT) GaN buffer layer on a single crystal sapphire substrate. However, large differences in fundamental properties such as lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients between GaN layer and sapphire substrate generate high density of threading dislocation (TD) that leads to deterioration of optical and structural properties. Graphene has been attracting much attention due to its excellent physical properties However, direct epitaxial growth of GaN film onto graphene layer on substrates is not easily accessible due to the lack of chemical reactivity on graphene which consisted of C-C bond of sp2 hexagonally arranged carbon atoms with no dangling bonds. In this work, an intermediate layer for the GaN growth on sapphire substrate was constructed by inserting carbon nanotubes and graphene hybrid structure (CGH) Optical and structural properties of GaN layer grown on CGH were compared with those of GaN layer directly grown on sapphire CNTs act as nucleation sites and play a crucial role in the growth of single crystal high-quality GaN on graphene layer. Also, graphene film acts as a mask for epitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaN layer, which can effectively reduce TD density. A grant from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) institutional program.

  3. Testing pulse forming networks with DARHT accelerator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, E. A.; Dalmas, D. A.; Downing, J. N. , Jr.; Temple, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, generating a 60-nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will generate a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator will be driven by an equal number of pulse forming networks. Each pulse forming network [PFN] generates a nominal 200-kV, 2-microsecond pulse to drive an accelerator cell. Each pulse forming network consists of a set of four equal-capacitance sub-PFN's, stacked in a Marx configuration. The PFN Test Stand was configured to test newly constructed accelerator cells under conditions of full voltage and pulse duration. The PFN Test Stand also explored jitter, prefire and reliability issues for a pulse forming network operated into a purely resistive load. The PFN Test Stand provided experience operating a simple subsystem of the DARHT accelerator. This subsystem involved controls, diagnostics, data acquisition and archival, power supplies, trigger systems, core reset and a gas flow system for the spark gaps. Issues for the DARHT accelerator were investigated in this small-scale facility.

  4. TESTING PULSE FORMING NETWORKS WITH DARHT ACCELERATOR CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. ROSE; D.A. DALMAS; J.N. DOWNING; R.D. TEMPLE

    2001-06-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility [DARHT] at Los Alamos will use two induction linacs to produce high-energy electron beams. The electron beams will be used to generate x-rays from bremsstrahlung targets. The x-rays will be used to produce radiographs. The first accelerator is operational now, generating a 60- nanosecond electron beam. The second accelerator is under construction. It will generate a 2-microsecond electron beam. The 78 induction cells of the second axis accelerator will be driven by an equal number of pulse forming networks. Each pulse forming network [PFN] generates a nominal 200-kV, 2-microsecond pulse to drive an accelerator cell. Each pulse forming network consists of a set of four equal-capacitance sub-PFN's, stacked in a Marx configuration. The PFN Test Stand was configured to test newly constructed accelerator cells under conditions of full voltage and pulse duration. The PFN Test Stand also explored jitter, prefire and reliability issues for a pulse forming network operated into a purely resistive load. The PFN Test Stand provided experience operating a simple subsystem of the DARHT accelerator. This subsystem involved controls, diagnostics, data acquisition and archival, power supplies, trigger systems, core reset and a gas flow system for the spark gaps. Issues for the DARHT accelerator were investigated in this small-scale facility.

  5. Accelerating coordination in temporal networks by engineering the link order

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Social dynamics on a network may be accelerated or decelerated depending on which pairs of individuals in the network communicate early and which pairs do later. The order with which the links in a given network are sequentially used, which we call the link order, may be a strong determinant of dynamical behaviour on networks, potentially adding a new dimension to effects of temporal networks relative to static networks. Here we study the effect of the link order on linear coordination (i.e., synchronisation) dynamics. We show that the coordination speed considerably depends on specific orders of links. In addition, applying each single link for a long time to ensure strong pairwise coordination before moving to a next pair of individuals does not often enhance coordination of the entire network. We also implement a simple greedy algorithm to optimise the link order in favour of fast coordination. PMID:26916093

  6. Accelerating coordination in temporal networks by engineering the link order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    Social dynamics on a network may be accelerated or decelerated depending on which pairs of individuals in the network communicate early and which pairs do later. The order with which the links in a given network are sequentially used, which we call the link order, may be a strong determinant of dynamical behaviour on networks, potentially adding a new dimension to effects of temporal networks relative to static networks. Here we study the effect of the link order on linear coordination (i.e., synchronisation) dynamics. We show that the coordination speed considerably depends on specific orders of links. In addition, applying each single link for a long time to ensure strong pairwise coordination before moving to a next pair of individuals does not often enhance coordination of the entire network. We also implement a simple greedy algorithm to optimise the link order in favour of fast coordination.

  7. An accelerator controls network designed for reliability and flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, W. P.; Sidorowicz, K. V.

    1997-12-02

    The APS accelerator control system is a typical modern system based on the standard control system model, which consists of operator interfaces to a network and computer-controlled interfaces to hardware. The network provides a generalized communication path between the host computers, operator workstations, input/output crates, and other hardware that comprise the control system. The network is an integral part of all modern control systems and network performance will determine many characteristics of a control system. This paper describes the methods used to provide redundancy for various network system components as well as methods used to provide comprehensive monitoring of this network. The effect of archiving tens of thousands of data points on a regular basis and the effect on the controls network will be discussed. Metrics are provided on the performance of the system under various conditions.

  8. Method Accelerates Training Of Some Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    Three-layer networks trained faster provided two conditions are satisfied: numbers of neurons in layers are such that majority of work done in synaptic connections between input and hidden layers, and number of neurons in input layer at least as great as number of training pairs of input and output vectors. Based on modified version of back-propagation method.

  9. Modeling of UH-60A Hub Accelerations with Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2002-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, flight test hub accelerations and the corresponding three N/rev pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) are studied. The present quantitative effort on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations considers the lateral and longitudinal vibrations. An earlier study had considered the vertical vibration. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database is used. A physics based "maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)", derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, is used. Fundamentally, the lateral vibration data show high vibration levels (up to 0.3 g's) at low airspeeds (for example, during landing flares) and at high airspeeds (for example, during turns). The results show that the advance ratio and the gross weight together can predict the vertical and the longitudinal vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together cannot predict the lateral vibration. The hub accelerations and the advance ratio can be used to satisfactorily predict the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal vibration. The present study shows that neural network based representations of all three UH-60A pilot floor vibration components (vertical, lateral, and longitudinal) can be obtained using the hub accelerations along with the gross weight and the advance ratio. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot vibration. The present conclusions potentially allow for the identification of neural network relationships between the experimental hub accelerations obtained from wind tunnel testing and the experimental pilot vibration data obtained from flight testing. A successful establishment of the above neural network based link between the wind tunnel hub accelerations and the flight test vibration data can increase the value of wind tunnel testing.

  10. Accelerating the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Notebaart, Richard A; van Enckevort, Frank HJ; Francke, Christof; Siezen, Roland J; Teusink, Bas

    2006-01-01

    Background The genomic information of a species allows for the genome-scale reconstruction of its metabolic capacity. Such a metabolic reconstruction gives support to metabolic engineering, but also to integrative bioinformatics and visualization. Sequence-based automatic reconstructions require extensive manual curation, which can be very time-consuming. Therefore, we present a method to accelerate the time-consuming process of network reconstruction for a query species. The method exploits the availability of well-curated metabolic networks and uses high-resolution predictions of gene equivalency between species, allowing the transfer of gene-reaction associations from curated networks. Results We have evaluated the method using Lactococcus lactis IL1403, for which a genome-scale metabolic network was published recently. We recovered most of the gene-reaction associations (i.e. 74 – 85%) which are incorporated in the published network. Moreover, we predicted over 200 additional genes to be associated to reactions, including genes with unknown function, genes for transporters and genes with specific metabolic reactions, which are good candidates for an extension to the previously published network. In a comparison of our developed method with the well-established approach Pathologic, we predicted 186 additional genes to be associated to reactions. We also predicted a relatively high number of complete conserved protein complexes, which are derived from curated metabolic networks, illustrating the potential predictive power of our method for protein complexes. Conclusion We show that our methodology can be applied to accelerate the reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks by taking optimal advantage of existing, manually curated networks. As orthology detection is the first step in the method, only the translated open reading frames (ORFs) of a newly sequenced genome are necessary to reconstruct a metabolic network. When more manually curated metabolic

  11. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies thatmore » important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.« less

  12. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  13. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. This orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.

  14. Accelerated Training for Large Feedforward Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepniewski, Slawomir W.; Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new training algorithm, the scaled variable metric (SVM) method. Our approach attempts to increase the convergence rate of the modified variable metric method. It is also combined with the RBackprop algorithm, which computes the product of the matrix of second derivatives (Hessian) with an arbitrary vector. The RBackprop method allows us to avoid computationally expensive, direct line searches. In addition, it can be utilized in the new, 'predictive' updating technique of the inverse Hessian approximation. We have used directional slope testing to adjust the step size and found that this strategy works exceptionally well in conjunction with the Rbackprop algorithm. Some supplementary, but nevertheless important enhancements to the basic training scheme such as improved setting of a scaling factor for the variable metric update and computationally more efficient procedure for updating the inverse Hessian approximation are presented as well. We summarize by comparing the SVM method with four first- and second- order optimization algorithms including a very effective implementation of the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Our tests indicate promising computational speed gains of the new training technique, particularly for large feedforward networks, i.e., for problems where the training process may be the most laborious.

  15. Experimental evidence of homonuclear bonds in amorphous GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuemei; Chu, Wei-Kan; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    Although GaN is an important semiconductor material, its amorphous structures are not well understood. Currently, theoretical atomistic structural models which contradict each other, are proposed for the chemical short-range order of amorphous GaN: one characterizes amorphous GaN networks as highly chemically ordered, consisting of heteronuclear Ga-N atomic bonds; and the other predicts the existence of a large number of homonuclear bonds within the first coordination shell. In the present study, we examine amorphous structures of GaN via radial distribution functions obtained by electron diffraction techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that amorphous GaN networks consist of heterononuclear Ga-N bonds, as well as homonuclear Ga-Ga and N-N bonds.

  16. Linear induction accelerator and pulse forming networks therefor

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, Malcolm T.; Ginn, Jerry W.

    1989-01-01

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities.

  17. The accelerated growth of the worldwide air transportation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Mark; Klingauf, Uwe; Zock, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Mobility by means of air transportation has a critical impact on the global economy. Especially against the backdrop of further growth and an aggravation of the energy crisis, it is crucial to design a sustainable air transportation system. Current approaches focus on air traffic management. Nevertheless, also the historically evolved network offers great potential for an optimized redesign. But the understanding of its complex structure and development is limited, although modern network science supplies a great set of new methods and tools. So far studies analyzing air transportation as a complex network are based on divers and poor data, which are either merely regional or strongly bounded time-wise. As a result, the current state of research is rather inconsistent regarding topological coefficients and incomplete regarding network evolution. Therefore, we use the historical, worldwide OAG flight schedules data between 1979 and 2007 for our study. Through analyzing by far the most comprehensive data base so far, a better understanding of the network, its evolution and further implications is being provided. To our knowledge we present the first study to determine that the degree distribution of the worldwide air transportation network is non-stationary and is subject to densification and accelerated growth, respectively.

  18. Electron mobility of self-assembled and dislocation free InN nanorods grown on GaN nano wall network template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; De, Arpan; Ghatak, Jay; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    A kinetically controlled two-step growth process for the formation of an array of dislocation free high mobility InN nanorods (NRs) on GaN nanowall network (NWN) by Molecular Beam Epitaxy is demonstrated here. The epitaxial GaN NWN is formed on c-sapphire under nitrogen rich conditions, and then changing the source from Ga to In at appropriate substrate temperature yields the nucleation of a self assembled spontaneous m-plane side faceted-InN NR. By HRTEM, the NRs are shown to be dislocation-free and have a low band gap value of 0.65 eV. Hall measurements are carried out on a single InN NR along with J-V measurements that yield mobility values as high as ≈4453 cm2/V s and the carrier concentration of ≈1.1 × 1017 cm-3, which are unprecedented in the literature for comparable InN NR diameters.

  19. An accelerated training method for back propagation networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective is to provide a training procedure for a feed forward, back propagation neural network which greatly accelerates the training process. A set of orthogonal singular vectors are determined from the input matrix such that the standard deviations of the projections of the input vectors along these singular vectors, as a set, are substantially maximized, thus providing an optimal means of presenting the input data. Novelty exists in the method of extracting from the set of input data, a set of features which can serve to represent the input data in a simplified manner, thus greatly reducing the time/expense to training the system.

  20. The ADVANCE network: accelerating data value across a national community health center network

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Gold, Rachel; Cottrell, Erika; Bauer, Vance; Brickman, Andrew; Puro, Jon; Nelson, Christine; Mayer, Kenneth H; Sears, Abigail; Burdick, Tim; Merrell, Jonathan; Matthews, Paul; Fields, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) clinical data research network (CDRN) is led by the OCHIN Community Health Information Network in partnership with Health Choice Network and Fenway Health. The ADVANCE CDRN will ‘horizontally’ integrate outpatient electronic health record data for over one million federally qualified health center patients, and ‘vertically’ integrate hospital, health plan, and community data for these patients, often under-represented in research studies. Patient investigators, community investigators, and academic investigators with diverse expertise will work together to meet project goals related to data integration, patient engagement and recruitment, and the development of streamlined regulatory policies. By enhancing the data and research infrastructure of participating organizations, the ADVANCE CDRN will serve as a ‘community laboratory’ for including disadvantaged and vulnerable patients in patient-centered outcomes research that is aligned with the priorities of patients, clinics, and communities in our network. PMID:24821740

  1. Network effect of knowledge spillover: Scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    We study how knowledge spillover networks affect research and development (R&D) activities and economic growth. For this purpose, we extend a Schumpeterian growth model to the one on networks that depict the knowledge spillover relationships of R&D. We show that scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth.

  2. Transport and optical properties of c-axis oriented wedge shaped GaN nanowall network grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bhasker, H. P.; Dhar, S.; Thakur, Varun; Kesaria, Manoj; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2014-02-21

    The transport and optical properties of wedge-shaped nanowall network of GaN grown spontaneously on cplane sapphire substrate by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (PAMBE) show interesting behavior. The electron mobility at room temperature in these samples is found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of a continuous film. Our study reveals a strong correlation between the mobility and the band gap in these nanowall network samples. However, it is seen that when the thickness of the tips of the walls increases to an extent such that more than 70% of the film area is covered, it behaves close to a flat sample. In the sample with lower surface coverage (≈40% and ≈60%), it was observed that the conductivity, mobility as well as the band gap increase with the decrease in the average tip width of the walls. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments show a strong and broad band edge emission with a large (as high as ≈ 90 meV) blue shift, compared to that of a continuous film, suggesting a confinement of carriers on the top edges of the nanowalls. The PL peak width remains wide at all temperatures suggesting the existence of a high density of tail states at the band edge, which is further supported by the photoconductivity result. The high conductivity and mobility observed in these samples is believed to be due to a “dissipation less” transport of carriers, which are localized at the top edges (edge states) of the nanowalls.

  3. Transport and optical properties of c-axis oriented wedge shaped GaN nanowall network grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhasker, H. P.; Thakur, Varun; Kesaria, Manoj; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Dhar, S.

    2014-02-01

    The transport and optical properties of wedge-shaped nanowall network of GaN grown spontaneously on cplane sapphire substrate by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (PAMBE) show interesting behavior. The electron mobility at room temperature in these samples is found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of a continuous film. Our study reveals a strong correlation between the mobility and the band gap in these nanowall network samples. However, it is seen that when the thickness of the tips of the walls increases to an extent such that more than 70% of the film area is covered, it behaves close to a flat sample. In the sample with lower surface coverage (≈40% and ≈60%), it was observed that the conductivity, mobility as well as the band gap increase with the decrease in the average tip width of the walls. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments show a strong and broad band edge emission with a large (as high as ≈ 90 meV) blue shift, compared to that of a continuous film, suggesting a confinement of carriers on the top edges of the nanowalls. The PL peak width remains wide at all temperatures suggesting the existence of a high density of tail states at the band edge, which is further supported by the photoconductivity result. The high conductivity and mobility observed in these samples is believed to be due to a "dissipation less" transport of carriers, which are localized at the top edges (edge states) of the nanowalls.

  4. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.; Pantazis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially) sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in “sloppy” systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of parameters over

  5. An adaptive cryptographic accelerator for network storage security on dynamically reconfigurable platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li; Liu, Jing-Ning; Feng, Dan; Tong, Wei

    2008-12-01

    Existing security solutions in network storage environment perform poorly because cryptographic operations (encryption and decryption) implemented in software can dramatically reduce system performance. In this paper we propose a cryptographic hardware accelerator on dynamically reconfigurable platform for the security of high performance network storage system. We employ a dynamic reconfigurable platform based on a FPGA to implement a PowerPCbased embedded system, which executes cryptographic algorithms. To reduce the reconfiguration latency, we apply prefetch scheduling. Moreover, the processing elements could be dynamically configured to support different cryptographic algorithms according to the request received by the accelerator. In the experiment, we have implemented AES (Rijndael) and 3DES cryptographic algorithms in the reconfigurable accelerator. Our proposed reconfigurable cryptographic accelerator could dramatically increase the performance comparing with the traditional software-based network storage systems.

  6. G-NetMon: a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; DeMar, Phil; Holmgren, Don; Singh, Amitoj; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    At Fermilab, we have prototyped a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system, called G-NetMon, to support large-scale scientific collaborations. In this work, we explore new opportunities in network traffic monitoring and analysis with GPUs. Our system exploits the data parallelism that exists within network flow data to provide fast analysis of bulk data movement between Fermilab and collaboration sites. Experiments demonstrate that our G-NetMon can rapidly detect sub-optimal bulk data movements.

  7. Neural Network Based Representation of UH-60A Pilot and Hub Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2000-01-01

    Neural network relationships between the full-scale, experimental hub accelerations and the corresponding pilot floor vertical vibration are studied. The present physics-based, quantitative effort represents an initial systematic study on the UH-60A Black Hawk hub accelerations. The NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program flight test database was used. A 'maneuver-effect-factor (MEF)', derived using the roll-angle and the pitch-rate, was used. Three neural network based representation-cases were considered. The pilot floor vertical vibration was considered in the first case and the hub accelerations were separately considered in the second case. The third case considered both the hub accelerations and the pilot floor vertical vibration. Neither the advance ratio nor the gross weight alone could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the advance ratio and the gross weight together could be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration over the entire flight envelope. The hub accelerations data were modeled and found to be of very acceptable quality. The hub accelerations alone could not be used to predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. Thus, the hub accelerations alone do not drive the pilot floor vertical vibration. However, the hub accelerations, along with either the advance ratio or the gross weight or both, could be used to satisfactorily predict the pilot floor vertical vibration. The hub accelerations are clearly a factor in determining the pilot floor vertical vibration.

  8. Evidence for Accelerated Decline of Functional Brain Network Efficiency in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Julia M; Repovs, Grega; Harms, Michael P; Carter, Cameron S; Gold, James M; MacDonald, Angus W; Ragland, J Daniel; Silverstein, Steven M; Godwin, Douglass; Barch, Deanna M

    2016-05-01

    Previous work suggests that individuals with schizophrenia display accelerated aging of white matter integrity, however, it is still unknown whether functional brain networks also decline at an elevated rate in schizophrenia. Given the known degradation of functional connectivity and the normal decline in cognitive functioning throughout healthy aging, we aimed to test the hypothesis that efficiency of large-scale functional brain networks supporting overall cognition, as well as integrity of hub nodes within those networks, show evidence of accelerated aging in schizophrenia. Using pseudo-resting state data in 54 healthy controls and 46 schizophrenia patients, in which task-dependent signal from 3 tasks was regressed out to approximate resting-state data, we observed a significant diagnosis by age interaction in the prediction of both global and local efficiency of the cingulo-opercular network, and of the local efficiency of the fronto-parietal network, but no interaction when predicting both default mode network and whole brain efficiency. We also observed a significant diagnosis by age interaction for the node degree of the right anterior insula, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. All interactions were driven by stronger negative associations between age and network metrics in the schizophrenia group than the healthy controls. These data provide evidence that is consistent with accelerated aging of large-scale functional brain networks in schizophrenia that support higher-order cognitive ability. PMID:26472685

  9. Real-time Optical Network for Accelerator Control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Keun

    2012-06-27

    The timing requirements of a modern accelerator complex call for several features. The first is a system for high precision relative timing among accelerator components. Stabilized fiber links have already been demonstrated to achieve sub-10 femtoseconds relative timing precision. The second is a system for timing distribution of absolute time with sufficient precision to identify a specific RF bucket. The White Rabbit technology is a promising candidate to deliver the absolute time that is linked to the GPS clock. In this study we demonstrated that these two technologies can be combined in a way that the absolute time information can be delivered to the stabilized fiber link system. This was accomplished by researching the design of the stabilized fiber and White Rabbit systems and devising adaptation modules that facilitate co-existence of both systems in the same FPGA environment. We built a prototype system using off-the-shelf products and implemented a proof-of-concept version of the FPGA firmware. The test verified that the White Rabbit features operate correctly under the stabilized fiber system environment. This work demonstrates that turn-key femtosecond timing systems with absolute time information can be built cost effectively and deployed in various accelerator environments. This will lead to many new applications in chemistry, biology and surface dynamics, to name a few.

  10. Accelerating Network Traffic Analytics Using Query-DrivenVisualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Campbell, Scott; Dart, Eli; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu,Kesheng

    2006-07-29

    Realizing operational analytics solutions where large and complex data must be analyzed in a time-critical fashion entails integrating many different types of technology. This paper focuses on an interdisciplinary combination of scientific data management and visualization/analysis technologies targeted at reducing the time required for data filtering, querying, hypothesis testing and knowledge discovery in the domain of network connection data analysis. We show that use of compressed bitmap indexing can quickly answer queries in an interactive visual data analysis application, and compare its performance with two alternatives for serial and parallel filtering/querying on 2.5 billion records worth of network connection data collected over a period of 42 weeks. Our approach to visual network connection data exploration centers on two primary factors: interactive ad-hoc and multiresolution query formulation and execution over n dimensions and visual display of then-dimensional histogram results. This combination is applied in a case study to detect a distributed network scan and to then identify the set of remote hosts participating in the attack. Our approach is sufficiently general to be applied to a diverse set of data understanding problems as well as used in conjunction with a diverse set of analysis and visualization tools.

  11. QuateXelero: an accelerated exact network motif detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Sharafuddin, Iman; Dichter, Norbert; Koch, Ina; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Finding motifs in biological, social, technological, and other types of networks has become a widespread method to gain more knowledge about these networks' structure and function. However, this task is very computationally demanding, because it is highly associated with the graph isomorphism which is an NP problem (not known to belong to P or NP-complete subsets yet). Accordingly, this research is endeavoring to decrease the need to call NAUTY isomorphism detection method, which is the most time-consuming step in many existing algorithms. The work provides an extremely fast motif detection algorithm called QuateXelero, which has a Quaternary Tree data structure in the heart. The proposed algorithm is based on the well-known ESU (FANMOD) motif detection algorithm. The results of experiments on some standard model networks approve the overal superiority of the proposed algorithm, namely QuateXelero, compared with two of the fastest existing algorithms, G-Tries and Kavosh. QuateXelero is especially fastest in constructing the central data structure of the algorithm from scratch based on the input network. PMID:23874498

  12. QuateXelero: An Accelerated Exact Network Motif Detection Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Sharafuddin, Iman; Dichter, Norbert; Koch, Ina; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Finding motifs in biological, social, technological, and other types of networks has become a widespread method to gain more knowledge about these networks’ structure and function. However, this task is very computationally demanding, because it is highly associated with the graph isomorphism which is an NP problem (not known to belong to P or NP-complete subsets yet). Accordingly, this research is endeavoring to decrease the need to call NAUTY isomorphism detection method, which is the most time-consuming step in many existing algorithms. The work provides an extremely fast motif detection algorithm called QuateXelero, which has a Quaternary Tree data structure in the heart. The proposed algorithm is based on the well-known ESU (FANMOD) motif detection algorithm. The results of experiments on some standard model networks approve the overal superiority of the proposed algorithm, namely QuateXelero, compared with two of the fastest existing algorithms, G-Tries and Kavosh. QuateXelero is especially fastest in constructing the central data structure of the algorithm from scratch based on the input network. PMID:23874498

  13. A model for earthquake acceleration monitoring with wireless sensor networks in a structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takahiro; Nakamura, Yugo; Jinno, Kousei; Matsubara, Taku; Uehara, Hideyuki

    2014-03-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) technologies have attracted much attention to collect damage information in a natural disaster. WSNs to monitor temperature or humidity usually collect data once in some seconds or some minutes. Since structural health monitoring (SHM), meanwhile, aims to make a diagnosis for the state of a structure based on detected acceleration, WSNs are a promising technology to collect acceleration data. One concern to employ WSNs in SHM is to detect phenomena at a high sampling rate under energy-aware condition. In this paper, we describe a model for seismic acceleration monitoring, configured with multi-layer networks: WSNs, a wireless distribution system (WDS) and a database server, where the WDS is mainly operating in a wireless local area network (WLAN). Examining the performance in the test bed for the monitoring system, the results showed the system was capable of collecting acceleration at a rate of 100 sampling per second (sps) even in the fashion of intermittent operation, and capable of storing data into a database. We also suggest that the method using intermittent operation with appropriate sampling rate is effective in providing a long time operation for the system by considering in the response motion of a structure.

  14. Wafer-scale epitaxial lift-off of optoelectronic grade GaN from a GaN substrate using a sacrificial ZnO interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Akhil; Rogers, David J.; Ton-That, Cuong; Zhu, Liangchen; Phillips, Matthew R.; Sundaram, Suresh; Gautier, Simon; Moudakir, Tarik; El-Gmili, Youssef; Ougazzaden, Abdallah; Sandana, Vinod E.; Teherani, Ferechteh H.; Bove, Philippe; Prior, Kevin A.; Djebbour, Zakaria; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-08-01

    Full 2 inch GaN epilayers were lifted off GaN and c-sapphire substrates by preferential chemical dissolution of sacrificial ZnO underlayers. Modification of the standard epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process by supporting the wax host with a glass substrate proved key in enabling full wafer scale-up. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction confirmed that intact epitaxial GaN had been transferred to the glass host. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis of the bottom surface of the lifted-off GaN layer revealed strong near-band-edge (3.33 eV) emission indicating a superior optical quality for the GaN which was lifted off the GaN substrate. This modified ELO approach demonstrates that previous theories proposing that wax host curling was necessary to keep the ELO etch channel open do not apply to the GaN/ZnO system. The unprecedented full wafer transfer of epitaxial GaN to an alternative support by ELO offers the perspective of accelerating industrial adoption of the expensive GaN substrate through cost-reducing recycling.

  15. Aitken-based acceleration methods for assessing convergence of multilayer neural networks.

    PubMed

    Pilla, R S; Kamarthi, S V; Lindsay, B G

    2001-01-01

    This paper first develops the ideas of Aitken delta(2) method to accelerate the rate of convergence of an error sequence (value of the objective function at each step) obtained by training a neural network with a sigmoidal activation function via the backpropagation algorithm. The Aitken method is exact when the error sequence is exactly geometric. However, theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that the best possible rate of convergence obtainable for such an error sequence is log-geometric. This paper develops a new invariant extended-Aitken acceleration method for accelerating log-geometric sequences. The resulting accelerated sequence enables one to predict the final value of the error function. These predictions can in turn be used to assess the distance between the current and final solution and thereby provides a stopping criterion for a desired accuracy. Each of the techniques described is applicable to a wide range of problems. The invariant extended-Aitken acceleration approach shows improved acceleration as well as outstanding prediction of the final error in the practical problems considered. PMID:18249928

  16. ICA-based artefact and accelerated fMRI acquisition for improved Resting State Network imaging

    PubMed Central

    Griffanti, Ludovica; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Beckmann, Christian F.; Auerbach, Edward J.; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Sexton, Claire E.; Zsoldos, Enikő; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Filippini, Nicola; Mackay, Clare E.; Moeller, Steen; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ugurbil, Kamil; Miller, Karla L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of resting state networks (RSNs) and the quantification of their functional connectivity in resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) are seriously hindered by the presence of artefacts, many of which overlap spatially or spectrally with RSNs. Moreover, recent developments in fMRI acquisition yield data with higher spatial and temporal resolutions, but may increase artefacts both spatially and/or temporally. Hence the correct identification and removal of non-neural fluctuations is crucial, especially in accelerated acquisitions. In this paper we investigate the effectiveness of three data-driven cleaning procedures, compare standard against higher (spatial and temporal) resolution accelerated fMRI acquisitions, and investigate the combined effect of different acquisitions and different cleanup approaches. We applied single-subject independent component analysis (ICA), followed by automatic component classification with FMRIB’s ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) to identify artefactual components. We then compared two first-level (within-subject) cleaning approaches for removing those artefacts and motion-related fluctuations from the data. The effectiveness of the cleaning procedures were assessed using timeseries (amplitude and spectra), network matrix and spatial map analyses. For timeseries and network analyses we also tested the effect of a second-level cleaning (informed by group-level analysis). Comparing these approaches, the preferable balance between noise removal and signal loss was achieved by regressing out of the data the full space of motion-related fluctuations and only the unique variance of the artefactual ICA components. Using similar analyses, we also investigated the effects of different cleaning approaches on data from different acquisition sequences. With the optimal cleaning procedures, functional connectivity results from accelerated data were statistically comparable or significantly better than the standard (unaccelerated) acquisition

  17. To Break or to Brake Neuronal Network Accelerated by Ammonium Ions?

    PubMed Central

    Dynnik, Vladimir V.; Kononov, Alexey V.; Sergeev, Alexander I.; Teplov, Iliya Y.; Tankanag, Arina V.; Zinchenko, Valery P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of ammonium ions on in vitro neuronal network activity and to search alternative methods of acute ammonia neurotoxicity prevention. Methods Rat hippocampal neuronal and astrocytes co-cultures in vitro, fluorescent microscopy and perforated patch clamp were used to monitor the changes in intracellular Ca2+- and membrane potential produced by ammonium ions and various modulators in the cells implicated in neural networks. Results Low concentrations of NH4Cl (0.1–4 mM) produce short temporal effects on network activity. Application of 5–8 mM NH4Cl: invariably transforms diverse network firing regimen to identical burst patterns, characterized by substantial neuronal membrane depolarization at plateau phase of potential and high-amplitude Ca2+-oscillations; raises frequency and average for period of oscillations Ca2+-level in all cells implicated in network; results in the appearance of group of «run out» cells with high intracellular Ca2+ and steadily diminished amplitudes of oscillations; increases astrocyte Ca2+-signalling, characterized by the appearance of groups of cells with increased intracellular Ca2+-level and/or chaotic Ca2+-oscillations. Accelerated network activity may be suppressed by the blockade of NMDA or AMPA/kainate-receptors or by overactivation of AMPA/kainite-receptors. Ammonia still activate neuronal firing in the presence of GABA(A) receptors antagonist bicuculline, indicating that «disinhibition phenomenon» is not implicated in the mechanisms of networks acceleration. Network activity may also be slowed down by glycine, agonists of metabotropic inhibitory receptors, betaine, L-carnitine, L-arginine, etc. Conclusions Obtained results demonstrate that ammonium ions accelerate neuronal networks firing, implicating ionotropic glutamate receptors, having preserved the activities of group of inhibitory ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. This may mean, that ammonia

  18. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves. PMID:23155997

  19. Feasibility of Using Neural Network Models to Accelerate the Testing of Mechanical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Verification testing is an important aspect of the design process for mechanical mechanisms, and full-scale, full-length life testing is typically used to qualify any new component for use in space. However, as the required life specification is increased, full-length life tests become more costly and lengthen the development time. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, we theorized that neural network systems may be able to model the operation of a mechanical device. If so, the resulting neural network models could simulate long-term mechanical testing with data from a short-term test. This combination of computer modeling and short-term mechanical testing could then be used to verify the reliability of mechanical systems, thereby eliminating the costs associated with long-term testing. Neural network models could also enable designers to predict the performance of mechanisms at the conceptual design stage by entering the critical parameters as input and running the model to predict performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of using neural networks to predict the performance and life of mechanical systems. To do this, we generated a neural network system to model wear obtained from three accelerated testing devices: 1) A pin-on-disk tribometer; 2) A line-contact rub-shoe tribometer; 3) A four-ball tribometer.

  20. Structure investigations of nonpolar GaN layers.

    PubMed

    Neumann, W; Mogilatenko, A; Wernicke, T; Richter, E; Weyers, M; Kneissl, M

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure of nonpolar m-plane (1100) oriented GaN layers deposited on (100)gamma-LiAlO(2) was analysed by transmission electron microscopy. This study shows that the films contain a large number of defects. The most dominant defects in the m-plane GaN are intrinsic I(1) basal plane stacking faults (approximately 10(4) cm(-1)), threading dislocations (approximately 10(9) cm(-2)) as well as a complex defect network consisting of planar defects located on prismatic {1010} GaN and differently inclined pyramidal planes. A large number of the stacking faults nucleate at the GaN/LiAlO(2) interface. Furthermore, the inclined planar defects act as additional nucleation sites for the basal plane stacking faults. A decreasing crystal quality with an increasing layer thickness can be explained by this defect formation mechanism. PMID:20500386

  1. Accelerated intoxication of GABAergic synapses by botulinum neurotoxin A disinhibits stem cell-derived neuron networks prior to network silencing

    PubMed Central

    Beske, Phillip H.; Scheeler, Stephen M.; Adler, Michael; McNutt, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely potent toxins that specifically cleave SNARE proteins in peripheral synapses, preventing neurotransmitter release. Neuronal responses to BoNT intoxication are traditionally studied by quantifying SNARE protein cleavage in vitro or monitoring physiological paralysis in vivo. Consequently, the dynamic effects of intoxication on synaptic behaviors are not well-understood. We have reported that mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs) are highly sensitive to BoNT based on molecular readouts of intoxication. Here we study the time-dependent changes in synapse- and network-level behaviors following addition of BoNT/A to spontaneously active networks of glutamatergic and GABAergic ESNs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings indicated that BoNT/A rapidly blocked synaptic neurotransmission, confirming that ESNs replicate the functional pathophysiology responsible for clinical botulism. Quantitation of spontaneous neurotransmission in pharmacologically isolated synapses revealed accelerated silencing of GABAergic synapses compared to glutamatergic synapses, which was consistent with the selective accumulation of cleaved SNAP-25 at GAD1+ pre-synaptic terminals at early timepoints. Different latencies of intoxication resulted in complex network responses to BoNT/A addition, involving rapid disinhibition of stochastic firing followed by network silencing. Synaptic activity was found to be highly sensitive to SNAP-25 cleavage, reflecting the functional consequences of the localized cleavage of the small subpopulation of SNAP-25 that is engaged in neurotransmitter release in the nerve terminal. Collectively these findings illustrate that use of synaptic function assays in networked neurons cultures offers a novel and highly sensitive approach for mechanistic studies of toxin:neuron interactions and synaptic responses to BoNT. PMID:25954159

  2. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  3. Acceleration of Deep Neural Network Training with Resistive Cross-Point Devices: Design Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Vlasov, Yurii

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deep neural networks (DNN) have demonstrated significant business impact in large scale analysis and classification tasks such as speech recognition, visual object detection, pattern extraction, etc. Training of large DNNs, however, is universally considered as time consuming and computationally intensive task that demands datacenter-scale computational resources recruited for many days. Here we propose a concept of resistive processing unit (RPU) devices that can potentially accelerate DNN training by orders of magnitude while using much less power. The proposed RPU device can store and update the weight values locally thus minimizing data movement during training and allowing to fully exploit the locality and the parallelism of the training algorithm. We evaluate the effect of various RPU device features/non-idealities and system parameters on performance in order to derive the device and system level specifications for implementation of an accelerator chip for DNN training in a realistic CMOS-compatible technology. For large DNNs with about 1 billion weights this massively parallel RPU architecture can achieve acceleration factors of 30, 000 × compared to state-of-the-art microprocessors while providing power efficiency of 84, 000 GigaOps∕s∕W. Problems that currently require days of training on a datacenter-size cluster with thousands of machines can be addressed within hours on a single RPU accelerator. A system consisting of a cluster of RPU accelerators will be able to tackle Big Data problems with trillions of parameters that is impossible to address today like, for example, natural speech recognition and translation between all world languages, real-time analytics on large streams of business and scientific data, integration, and analysis of multimodal sensory data flows from a massive number of IoT (Internet of Things) sensors. PMID:27493624

  4. GPU technology as a platform for accelerating physiological systems modeling based on Laguerre-Volterra networks.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Agathoklis; Kostoglou, Kyriaki; Mitsis, Georgios D; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    The use of a GPGPU programming paradigm (running CUDA-enabled algorithms on GPU cards) in biomedical engineering and biology-related applications have shown promising results. GPU acceleration can be used to speedup computation-intensive models, such as the mathematical modeling of biological systems, which often requires the use of nonlinear modeling approaches with a large number of free parameters. In this context, we developed a CUDA-enabled version of a model which implements a nonlinear identification approach that combines basis expansions and polynomial-type networks, termed Laguerre-Volterra networks and can be used in diverse biological applications. The proposed software implementation uses the GPGPU programming paradigm to take advantage of the inherent parallel characteristics of the aforementioned modeling approach to execute the calculations on the GPU card of the host computer system. The initial results of the GPU-based model presented in this work, show performance improvements over the original MATLAB model. PMID:26736993

  5. Assessment of GaN chips for culturing cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Young, Tai-Horng; Chen, Chi-Ruei

    2006-06-01

    In this work, the behaviors of cerebellar granule neurons prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rats on gallium nitride (GaN) were investigated. We believe that this is the first time that the GaN has been used as a substrate for neuron cultures to examine its effect on cell response in vitro. The GaN surface structure and its relationship with cells were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), metallography microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and Western blot analysis. GaN is a so-called III-V compound semiconductor material with a wide bandgap and a relatively high bandgap voltage. Compared with silicon used for most neural chips, neurons seeded on GaN were able to form an extensive neuritic network and expressed very high levels of GAP-43 coincident with the neurite outgrowth. Therefore, the GaN structure may spatially mediate cellular response that can promote neuronal cell attachment, differentiation and neuritic growth. The favorable biocompatibility characteristics of GaN can be used to measure electric signals from networks of neuronal cells in culture to make it a possible candidate for use in a microelectrode array. PMID:16516287

  6. G-NetMon: A GPU-accelerated Network Performance Monitoring System for Large Scale Scientific Collaborations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; DeMar, Phil; Holmgren, Don; Singh, Amitoj; Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    At Fermilab, we have prototyped a GPU-accelerated network performance monitoring system, called G-NetMon, to support large-scale scientific collaborations. Our system exploits the data parallelism that exists within network flow data to provide fast analysis of bulk data movement between Fermilab and collaboration sites. Experiments demonstrate that our G-NetMon can rapidly detect sub-optimal bulk data movements.

  7. Genomic and Network Patterns of Schizophrenia Genetic Variation in Human Evolutionary Accelerated Regions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Schadt, Eric E.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Roussos, Panos; Dudley, Joel T.

    2015-01-01

    The population persistence of schizophrenia despite associated reductions in fitness and fecundity suggests that the genetic basis of schizophrenia has a complex evolutionary history. A recent meta-analysis of schizophrenia genome-wide association studies offers novel opportunities for assessment of the evolutionary trajectories of schizophrenia-associated loci. In this study, we hypothesize that components of the genetic architecture of schizophrenia are attributable to human lineage-specific evolution. Our results suggest that schizophrenia-associated loci enrich in genes near previously identified human accelerated regions (HARs). Specifically, we find that genes near HARs conserved in nonhuman primates (pHARs) are enriched for schizophrenia-associated loci, and that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are under stronger selective pressure than other schizophrenia genes and other pHAR-associated genes. We further evaluate pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes in regulatory network contexts to investigate associated molecular functions and mechanisms. We find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes significantly enrich in a GABA-related coexpression module that was previously found to be differentially regulated in schizophrenia affected individuals versus healthy controls. In another two independent networks constructed from gene expression profiles from prefrontal cortex samples, we find that pHAR-associated schizophrenia genes are located in more central positions and their average path lengths to the other nodes are significantly shorter than those of other schizophrenia genes. Together, our results suggest that HARs are associated with potentially important functional roles in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia. PMID:25681384

  8. Ba4GaN3O

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Yamane, Hisanori

    2014-01-01

    Red transparant platelet-shaped single crystals of tetra­barium gallium trinitride oxide, Ba4GaN3O, were synthesized by the Na flux method. The crystal structure is isotypic with Sr4GaN3O, containing isolated triangular [GaN3]6− anionic groups. O2− atoms are inserted between the slabs of [Ba4GaN3]2+, in which the [GaN3]6− groups are surrounded by Ba2+ atoms. PMID:24940188

  9. A FLUX ROPE NETWORK AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Daniel; Milosavljevic, Milos; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2013-09-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic pair plasmas with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a kinetic-scale current sheet in a periodic geometry. We include a guide field that introduces an inclination between the reconnecting field lines and explore outside-of-the-current sheet magnetizations that are significantly below those considered by other authors carrying out similar calculations. Thus, our simulations probe the transitional regime in which the magnetic and plasma pressures are of the same order of magnitude. The tearing instability is the dominant mode in the current sheet for all guide field strengths, while the linear kink mode is less important even without the guide field, except in the lower magnetization case. Oblique modes seem to be suppressed entirely. In its nonlinear evolution, the reconnection layer develops a network of interconnected and interacting magnetic flux ropes. As smaller flux ropes merge into larger ones, the reconnection layer evolves toward a three-dimensional, disordered state in which the resulting flux rope segments contain magnetic substructure on plasma skin depth scales. Embedded in the flux ropes, we detect spatially and temporally intermittent sites of dissipation reflected in peaks in the parallel electric field. Magnetic dissipation and particle acceleration persist until the end of the simulations, with simulations with higher magnetization and lower guide field strength exhibiting greater and faster energy conversion and particle energization. At the end of our largest simulation, the particle energy spectrum attains a tail extending to high Lorentz factors that is best modeled with a combination of two additional thermal components. We confirm that the primary energization mechanism is acceleration by the electric field in the X-line region. The highest-energy positrons (electrons) are moderately beamed with median angles {approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree

  10. Incipient fault detection and identification in process systems using accelerating neural network learning

    SciTech Connect

    Parlos, A.G.; Muthusami, J.; Atiya, A.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the development and numerical testing of a robust fault detection and identification (FDI) system using artificial neural networks (ANNs), for incipient (slowly developing) faults occurring in process systems. The challenge in using ANNs in FDI systems arises because of one's desire to detect faults of varying severity, faults from noisy sensors, and multiple simultaneous faults. To address these issues, it becomes essential to have a learning algorithm that ensures quick convergence to a high level of accuracy. A recently developed accelerated learning algorithm, namely a form of an adaptive back propagation (ABP) algorithm, is used for this purpose. The ABP algorithm is used for the development of an FDI system for a process composed of a direct current motor, a centrifugal pump, and the associated piping system. Simulation studies indicate that the FDI system has significantly high sensitivity to incipient fault severity, while exhibiting insensitivity to sensor noise. For multiple simultaneous faults, the FDI system detects the fault with the predominant signature. The major limitation of the developed FDI system is encountered when it is subjected to simultaneous faults with similar signatures. During such faults, the inherent limitation of pattern-recognition-based FDI methods becomes apparent. Thus, alternate, more sophisticated FDI methods become necessary to address such problems. Even though the effectiveness of pattern-recognition-based FDI methods using ANNs has been demonstrated, further testing using real-world data is necessary.

  11. Nanopore morphology in porous GaN template and its effect on the LEDs emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, C. B.; Tay, C. B.; Tan, Rayson J. N.; Vajpeyi, A. P.; Seetoh, I. P.; Ansah-Antwi, K. K.; Chua, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    GaN grown on sapphire is electrochemically etched in HF and in KOH. Etching in HF results in a network of nanopillars while that etched in KOH results in a network of pores. The higher density of voids from the network of pores shows the highest strain relaxation for a 1.2 µm thick GaN overgrown on the porous templates. In general, a light-emitting diode (LED) on the porous templates gives about 1.5 times higher intensity and a spectral envelop shift towards the red due to a higher In incorporation. The higher intensity is attributed to enhanced light extraction due to light scattering at the voids formed from the pores and improved material quality with dislocation reduction. The formation of larger overgrowth GaN islands which merges to give a continuous GaN film over the porous template reduced the dislocation density and also accounted for higher strain relaxation for the growth of the quantum dots (QDs) and quantum well layers. This reduced the extent of peak shift of LEDs grown on porous GaN template and improved its performance.

  12. Kinetics of optically excited charge carriers at the GaN surface: Influence of catalytic Pt nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnerl, Andrea; Pereira, Rui N.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we use GaN with different deposited Pt nanostructures as a controllable model system to investigate the kinetics of photo-generated charge carriers in hybrid photocatalysts. We combine conductance and contact potential difference measurements to investigate the influence of Pt on the processes involved in the capture and decay of photo-generated charge carriers at and close to the GaN surface. We found that in the presence of Pt nanostructures the photo-excitation processes are similar to those found in Pt free GaN. However, in GaN with Pt nanostructures, photo-generated holes are preferentially trapped in surface states of the GaN covered with Pt and/or in electronic states of the Pt and lead to an accumulation of positive charge there, whereas negative charge is accumulated in localized states in a shallow defect band of the GaN covered with Pt. This preferential accumulation of photo-generated electrons close to the surface is responsible for a dramatic acceleration of the turn-off charge transfer kinetics and a stronger dependence of the surface photovoltage on light intensity when compared to a Pt free GaN surface. Our study shows that in hybrid photocatalysts, the metal nanostructures induce a spatially inhomogeneous surface band bending of the semiconductor that promotes a lateral drift of photogenerated charges towards the catalytic nanostructures.

  13. Kinetics of optically excited charge carriers at the GaN surface: Influence of catalytic Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Winnerl, Andrea Pereira, Rui N.; Stutzmann, Martin

    2015-10-21

    In this work, we use GaN with different deposited Pt nanostructures as a controllable model system to investigate the kinetics of photo-generated charge carriers in hybrid photocatalysts. We combine conductance and contact potential difference measurements to investigate the influence of Pt on the processes involved in the capture and decay of photo-generated charge carriers at and close to the GaN surface. We found that in the presence of Pt nanostructures the photo-excitation processes are similar to those found in Pt free GaN. However, in GaN with Pt nanostructures, photo-generated holes are preferentially trapped in surface states of the GaN covered with Pt and/or in electronic states of the Pt and lead to an accumulation of positive charge there, whereas negative charge is accumulated in localized states in a shallow defect band of the GaN covered with Pt. This preferential accumulation of photo-generated electrons close to the surface is responsible for a dramatic acceleration of the turn-off charge transfer kinetics and a stronger dependence of the surface photovoltage on light intensity when compared to a Pt free GaN surface. Our study shows that in hybrid photocatalysts, the metal nanostructures induce a spatially inhomogeneous surface band bending of the semiconductor that promotes a lateral drift of photogenerated charges towards the catalytic nanostructures.

  14. Extrinsic and Intrinsic Brain Network Connectivity Maintains Cognition across the Lifespan Despite Accelerated Decay of Regional Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Richard N.A.; Tyler, Lorraine K.; Razi, Adeel; Geerligs, Linda; Ham, Timothy E.; Rowe, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of wellbeing across the lifespan depends on the preservation of cognitive function. We propose that successful cognitive aging is determined by interactions both within and between large-scale functional brain networks. Such connectivity can be estimated from task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), also known as resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI). However, common correlational methods are confounded by age-related changes in the neurovascular signaling. To estimate network interactions at the neuronal rather than vascular level, we used generative models that specified both the neural interactions and a flexible neurovascular forward model. The networks' parameters were optimized to explain the spectral dynamics of rs-fMRI data in 602 healthy human adults from population-based cohorts who were approximately uniformly distributed between 18 and 88 years (www.cam-can.com). We assessed directed connectivity within and between three key large-scale networks: the salience network, dorsal attention network, and default mode network. We found that age influences connectivity both within and between these networks, over and above the effects on neurovascular coupling. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that the relationship between network connectivity and cognitive function was age-dependent: cognitive performance relied on neural dynamics more strongly in older adults. These effects were driven partly by reduced stability of neural activity within all networks, as expressed by an accelerated decay of neural information. Our findings suggest that the balance of excitatory connectivity between networks, and the stability of intrinsic neural representations within networks, changes with age. The cognitive function of older adults becomes increasingly dependent on these factors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Maintaining cognitive function is critical to successful aging. To study the neural basis of cognitive function across the lifespan, we studied a

  15. GaN High Power Devices

    SciTech Connect

    PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHI,G.C.; CHU,S.N.G.

    2000-07-17

    A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers, GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors, GaN heterostructure and metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.

  16. Bandgap engineering of GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Bang-Ming; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Yam, Chi-Yung; Xu, Li-Chun; Lau, Woon-Ming; Yan, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Bandgap engineering has been a powerful technique for manipulating the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors. In this work, a systematic investigation of the electronic properties of [0001] GaN nanowires was carried out using the density functional based tight-binding method (DFTB). We studied the effects of geometric structure and uniaxial strain on the electronic properties of GaN nanowires with diameters ranging from 0.8 to 10 nm. Our results show that the band gap of GaN nanowires depends linearly on both the surface to volume ratio (S/V) and tensile strain. The band gap of GaN nanowires increases linearly with S/V, while it decreases linearly with increasing tensile strain. These linear relationships provide an effect way in designing GaN nanowires for their applications in novel nano-devices.

  17. A Method of Social Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing Acceleration for e-Learning System: The Distance Learning Network Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różewski, Przemysław

    Nowadays, e-learning systems take the form of the Distance Learning Network (DLN) due to widespread use and accessibility of the Internet and networked e-learning services. The focal point of the DLN performance is efficiency of knowledge processing in asynchronous learning mode and facilitating cooperation between students. In addition, the DLN articulates attention to social aspects of the learning process as well. In this paper, a method for the DLN development is proposed. The main research objectives for the proposed method are the processes of acceleration of social collaboration and knowledge sharing in the DLN. The method introduces knowledge-disposed agents (who represent students in educational scenarios) that form a network of individuals aimed to increase their competence. For every agent the competence expansion process is formulated. Based on that outcome the process of dynamic network formation performed on the social and knowledge levels. The method utilizes formal apparatuses of competence set and network game theories combined with an agent system-based approach.

  18. A high efficiency C-band internally-matched harmonic tuning GaN power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Zhao, B. C.; Zheng, J. X.; Zhang, H. S.; Zheng, X. F.; Ma, X. H.; Hao, Y.; Ma, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high efficiency C-band gallium nitride (GaN) internally-matched power amplifier (PA) is presented. This amplifier consists of 2-chips of self-developed GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with 16 mm total gate width on SiC substrate. New harmonic manipulation circuits are induced both in the input and output matching networks for high efficiency matching at fundamental and 2nd-harmonic frequency, respectively. The developed amplifier has achieved 72.1% power added efficiency (PAE) with 107.4 W output power at 5 GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this amplifier exhibits the highest PAE in C-band GaN HEMT amplifiers with over 100 W output power. Additionally, 1000 hours' aging test reveals high reliability for practical applications.

  19. Streaming parallel GPU acceleration of large-scale filter-based spiking neural networks.

    PubMed

    Slażyński, Leszek; Bohte, Sander

    2012-01-01

    The arrival of graphics processing (GPU) cards suitable for massively parallel computing promises affordable large-scale neural network simulation previously only available at supercomputing facilities. While the raw numbers suggest that GPUs may outperform CPUs by at least an order of magnitude, the challenge is to develop fine-grained parallel algorithms to fully exploit the particulars of GPUs. Computation in a neural network is inherently parallel and thus a natural match for GPU architectures: given inputs, the internal state for each neuron can be updated in parallel. We show that for filter-based spiking neurons, like the Spike Response Model, the additive nature of membrane potential dynamics enables additional update parallelism. This also reduces the accumulation of numerical errors when using single precision computation, the native precision of GPUs. We further show that optimizing simulation algorithms and data structures to the GPU's architecture has a large pay-off: for example, matching iterative neural updating to the memory architecture of the GPU speeds up this simulation step by a factor of three to five. With such optimizations, we can simulate in better-than-realtime plausible spiking neural networks of up to 50 000 neurons, processing over 35 million spiking events per second. PMID:23098420

  20. Planning for an Accelerated School. A Two Day Workshop (Stanford, California, November 17-18, 1988). Illinois Network of Accelerated Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of School Improvement Services.

    The thesis of this conference report is that acceleration is a much more effective method than remediation for bringing at-risk children into the educational mainstream at an early age. The papers summarized in the report provide a background on the history, politics, and demography of at-risk students and suggest applications of acceleration to…

  1. Neural Network Models of Simple Mechanical Systems Illustrating the Feasibility of Accelerated Life Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Jones, Steven P.; Jansen, Ralph

    1996-01-01

    A complete evaluation of the tribological characteristics of a given material/mechanical system is a time-consuming operation since the friction and wear process is extremely systems sensitive. As a result, experimental designs (i.e., Latin Square, Taguchi) have been implemented in an attempt to not only reduce the total number of experimental combinations needed to fully characterize a material/mechanical system, but also to acquire life data for a system without having to perform an actual life test. Unfortunately, these experimental designs still require a great deal of experimental testing and the output does not always produce meaningful information. In order to further reduce the amount of experimental testing required, this study employs a computer neural network model to investigate different material/mechanical systems. The work focuses on the modeling of the wear behavior, while showing the feasibility of using neural networks to predict life data. The model is capable of defining which input variables will influence the tribological behavior of the particular material/mechanical system being studied based on the specifications of the overall system.

  2. A GPU-accelerated cortical neural network model for visually guided robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, Michael; Oros, Nicolas; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Humans and other terrestrial animals use vision to traverse novel cluttered environments with apparent ease. On one hand, although much is known about the behavioral dynamics of steering in humans, it remains unclear how relevant perceptual variables might be represented in the brain. On the other hand, although a wealth of data exists about the neural circuitry that is concerned with the perception of self-motion variables such as the current direction of travel, little research has been devoted to investigating how this neural circuitry may relate to active steering control. Here we present a cortical neural network model for visually guided navigation that has been embodied on a physical robot exploring a real-world environment. The model includes a rate based motion energy model for area V1, and a spiking neural network model for cortical area MT. The model generates a cortical representation of optic flow, determines the position of objects based on motion discontinuities, and combines these signals with the representation of a goal location to produce motor commands that successfully steer the robot around obstacles toward the goal. The model produces robot trajectories that closely match human behavioral data. This study demonstrates how neural signals in a model of cortical area MT might provide sufficient motion information to steer a physical robot on human-like paths around obstacles in a real-world environment, and exemplifies the importance of embodiment, as behavior is deeply coupled not only with the underlying model of brain function, but also with the anatomical constraints of the physical body it controls. PMID:26494281

  3. Selective-area growth of GaN on non- and semi-polar bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shunsuke; Miyake, Hideto; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa; Enatsu, Yuuki; Nagao, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We carried out the selective-area growth of GaN and fabricated InGaN/GaN MQWs on non- and semi-polar bulk GaN substrates by MOVPE. The differences in the GaN structures and the In incorporation of InGaN/GaN MQWs grown on non- and semi-polar GaN substrates were investigated. In the case of selective-area growth, different GaN structures were obtained on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN, (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) GaN, and (10\\bar{1}0) GaN substrates. A repeating pattern of \\{ 1\\bar{1}01\\} and \\{ 1\\bar{1}0\\bar{1}\\} facets appeared on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN. Then, we fabricated InGaN/GaN MQWs on the facet structures on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN. The emission properties characterized by cathodoluminescence were different for \\{ 1\\bar{1}01\\} and \\{ 1\\bar{1}0\\bar{1}\\} facets. On the other hand, for InGaN/GaN MQWs on non- and semi-polar GaN substrates, steps along the a-axis were observed by AFM. In particular on (20\\bar{2}1) GaN, undulations and undulation bunching appeared. Photoluminescence characterization indicated that In incorporation increased with the off-angle from the m-plane and also depended on the polarity.

  4. Electron Beam-induced Light Emission and Transport in GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J W; MoberlyChan, W J; Stevens, C G; Davydov, A V; Motayed, A

    2006-05-10

    We report observations of electron beam-induced light from GaN nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition. GaN nanowires were modified in-situ with deposited opaque platinum coatings to estimate the extent to which light is channeled to the ends of nanowires. Some evidence of light channeling was found, but wire microstructure and defects play an important role in light scattering and transport, limiting the extent to which light is confined. Optical interconnects are powerful components presently applied for high bandwidth communications among high-performance processors. Future circuits based on nanometer-scale components could similarly benefit from optical information transfer among processing blocks. Strong light channeling (and even lasing) has been observed in GaN nanowires, suggesting that these structures could be useful building blocks in a future networked electro-optical processor. However, the extent to which defects and microstructure control optical performance in nanowire waveguides has not been measured. In this study, we use electron microscopy and in-situ modification of individual nanowires to begin to correlate wire structure with light transport efficiency through GaN nanowires tens of microns long.

  5. Drug loaded composite oxidized pectin and gelatin networks for accelerated wound healing.

    PubMed

    Tummalapalli, Mythili; Berthet, Morgane; Verrier, Bernard; Deopura, B L; Alam, M S; Gupta, Bhuvanesh

    2016-05-30

    Biocomposite interactive wound dressings have been designed and fabricated using oxidized pectin (OP), gelatin and nonwoven cotton fabric. Due to their inherent virtues of antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility, these composite structures are capable of redirecting the healing cascade and influencing cell attachment and proliferation. A novel in situ reduction process has been followed to synthesize oxidized pectin-gelatin-nanosilver (OP-Gel-NS) flower like nanohydrocolloids. This encapsulation technology controls the diffusion and permeation of nanosilver into the surrounding biological tissues. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride has also been incorporated into the OP-Gel matrix to produce OP-Gel-Cipro dressings. While OP-Gel-NS dressings exhibited 100% antimicrobial activity at extremely low loadings of 3.75μg/cm(2), OP-Gel-Cipro dressings were highly antimicrobial at 1% drug loading. While NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts proliferated remarkably well when cultured with OP-Gel and OP-Gel-Cipro dressings, OP-Gel-NS hindered cell growth and Bactigras(®) induced complete lysis. Full thickness excisional wounds were created on C57BL/6J mice and the wound healing potential of the OP-Gel-NS dressings led to accelerated healing within 12days, while OP-Gel-Cipro dressings healed wounds at a rate similar to that of Bactigras(®). Histological examination revealed that OP-Gel-NS and OP-Gel-Cipro treatment led to organized collagen deposition, neovascularization and nuclei migration, unlike Bactigras(®). Therefore, the OP-Gel-NS and OP-Gel-Cipro biocomposite dressings exhibiting good hydrophilicity, sustained antimicrobial nature, promote cell growth and proliferation, and lead to rapid healing, can be considered viable candidates for effective management. PMID:27063849

  6. Piezotronic Effect in Polarity-Controlled GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenfu; Pu, Xiong; Han, Changbao; Du, Chunhua; Li, Linxuan; Jiang, Chunyan; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-08-25

    Using high-quality and polarity-controlled GaN nanowires (NWs), we studied the piezotronic effect in crystal orientation defined wurtzite structures. By applying a normal compressive force on c-plane GaN NWs with an atomic force microscopy tip, the Schottky barrier between the Pt tip and GaN can be effectively tuned by the piezotronic effect. In contrast, the normal compressive force cannot change the electron transport characteristics in m-plane GaN NWs whose piezoelectric polarization axis is turned in the transverse direction. This observation provided solid evidence for clarifying the difference between the piezotronic effect and the piezoresistive effect. We further demonstrated a high sensitivity of the m-plane GaN piezotronic transistor to collect the transverse force. The integration of c-plane GaN and m-plane GaN indicates an overall response to an external force in any direction. PMID:26256533

  7. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  8. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  9. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  10. Improvement of optical quality of semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN on m-plane sapphire by in-situ epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monavarian, Morteza; Izyumskaya, Natalia; Müller, Marcus; Metzner, Sebastian; Veit, Peter; Can, Nuri; Das, Saikat; Özgür, Ümit; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Morkoç, Hadis; Avrutin, Vitaliy

    2016-04-01

    Among the major obstacles for development of non-polar and semipolar GaN structures on foreign substrates are stacking faults which deteriorate the structural and optical quality of the material. In this work, an in-situ SiNx nano-network has been employed to achieve high quality heteroepitaxial semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN on m-plane sapphire with reduced stacking fault density. This approach involves in-situ deposition of a porous SiNx interlayer on GaN that serves as a nano-mask for the subsequent growth, which starts in the nanometer-sized pores (window regions) and then progresses laterally as well, as in the case of conventional epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO). The inserted SiNx nano-mask effectively prevents the propagation of defects, such as dislocations and stacking faults, in the growth direction and thus reduces their density in the overgrown layers. The resulting semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN layers exhibit relatively smooth surface morphology and improved optical properties (PL intensity enhanced by a factor of 5 and carrier lifetimes by 35% to 85% compared to the reference semipolar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) GaN layer) which approach to those of the c-plane in-situ nano-ELO GaN reference and, therefore, holds promise for light emitting and detecting devices.

  11. Improved Strain-Free GaN Growth with a Nearly Lattice-Matched AlInN Interlayer by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tae Su; Jeong, Hyun; Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Yong Seok; Park, Ah Hyun; Kim, Hun; Jea Lee, Kang; Suh, Eun-Kyung

    2010-11-01

    Using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, a strain-free GaN layer has been successfully grown by employing a 40-nm-thick nearly lattice-matched (NLM) Al1-xInxN as an interlayer. The Al1-xInxN interlayers having an InN molar fraction of x˜0.11 and 0.13 led to crack-networking at the GaN surface due to excessive tensile strain by lattice-mismatching. In the case of the GaN layer with a NLM Al1-xInxN interlayer (x˜0.18), however, strain-free GaN structure with improved structural and optical properties was demonstrated from the results of atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence. By using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the origin on strain-free state and improved properties of the GaN layer with the NLM AlInN interlayer was investigated. Based on TEM observations, we suggest that the faulted zone-like growth mechanism on roughed AlInN surface and partial compensation of tensile thermal stress are major factors on the improved strain-free GaN film.

  12. Performance of the 2-hour Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol Within the American College of Radiology Imaging Network PA 4005 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Simon A.; Miller, Chadwick D.; Litt, Harold I.; Gatsonis, Constantine A.; Snyder, Bradley S.; Hollander, Judd E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The 2-hour accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADAPT) is a decision rule designed to identify emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain for early discharge. Previous studies in the Asia-Pacific region demonstrated high sensitivity (97.9% to 99.7%) for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 30 days. The objective of this study was to determine the validity of ADAPT for risk stratification in a cohort of U.S. ED patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods A secondary analysis of participants enrolled in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) PA 4005 trial was conducted. This trial enrolled 1,369 patients at least 30 years old with symptoms suggestive of ACS. All data elements were collected prospectively at the time of enrollment. Each patient was classified as low risk or at risk by ADAPT. Early discharge rate and sensitivity for MACE, defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), or coronary revascularization at 30 days, were calculated. Results Of 1,140 patients with complete biomarker data, MACE occurred in 31 patients (2.7%). Among 551 of the 1,140 (48.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 45.4% to 51.3%), ADAPT identified for early discharge; five of the 551 (0.9%, 95% CI = 0.3% to 2.1%) had MACE at 30 days. ADAPT was 83.9% (95% CI = 66.3% to 94.5%) sensitive, identifying 26 of 31 patients with MACE. Of the five patients identified for early discharge by ADAPT with MACE, there were no deaths, one patient with MI, and five with revascularizations. Conclusions In this first North American application of the ADAPT strategy, sensitivity for MACE within 30 days was 83.9%. One missed adverse event was a MI, with the remainder representing coronary revascularizations. The effect of missing revascularization events needs further investigation. PMID:25810343

  13. Nanoscale anisotropic plastic deformation in single crystal GaN

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Elasto-plastic mechanical deformation behaviors of c-plane (0001) and nonpolar GaN single crystals are studied using nanoindentation, cathodoluminescence, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanoindentation tests show that c-plane GaN is less susceptible to plastic deformation and has higher hardness and Young's modulus than the nonpolar GaN. Cathodoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy characterizations of indent-induced plastic deformation reveal that there are two primary slip systems for the c-plane GaN, while there is only one most favorable slip system for the nonplane GaN. We suggest that the anisotropic elasto-plastic mechanical properties of GaN are relative to its anisotropic plastic deformation behavior. PACS: 62.20.fq; 81.05.Ea; 61.72.Lk. PMID:22353389

  14. Transfer characteristics in a GaN MFSFET: comparison with a conventional GaN MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Jinzhi; Ying, Wei; Cai, Xueyuan; Yang, Jianhong

    2012-07-01

    Based on the Miller model, we develop an analytical model for the GaN-based metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MFSFETs). In this article, we investigate the effects of ferroelectric film on the maximum drain current, transconductance and memory window of GaN MFSFET at the different hierarchical thickness values of 10, 30, 50, 100, 200 and 300 nm, as well as the polarisation influence. The results indicate that the thickness of ferroelectric film is one of the critical parameters, and certain trade-off should be made for various potential applications. Moreover, the advantages of GaN MFSFET are also investigated in detail, compared with the conventional GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor under the conditions of similar design. Our results of simulation shows that GaN MFSFETs hold the numerous advantages in electrical characteristics, such as the maximal drain current reaching 69 mA, and the threshold voltage and the subthreshold slope as low as 1.5 V and 58 mV/decade, respectively. In general, these theoretical predictions not only indicate that GaN MFSFET devices have wide applicational perspectives, but also they provide some important references to the empirical research and the design of new electron devices in the future.

  15. GaN substrate and GaN homo-epitaxy for LEDs: Progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie-Jun; Wang, Kun; Yu, Tong-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Yi

    2015-06-01

    After a brief review on the progresses in GaN substrates by ammonothermal method and Na-flux method and hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) technology, our research results of growing GaN thick layer by a gas flow-modulated HVPE, removing the GaN layer through an efficient self-separation process from sapphire substrate, and modifying the uniformity of multiple wafer growth are presented. The effects of surface morphology and defect behaviors on the GaN homo-epitaxial growth on free standing substrate are also discussed, and followed by the advances of LEDs on GaN substrates and prospects of their applications in solid state lighting. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA032605), the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB619304 and 2011CB301904), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376012, 61474003, and 61327801).

  16. Self-catalyzed anisotropic growth of GaN spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsha, Avinash; Sahoo, Prasana; Dhara, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    GaN spirals with homogeneous size are grown using chemical-vapor-deposition technique in a self catalytic process. Raman and photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal wurtzite GaN phase. Nucleation of GaN sphere takes place with the agglomeration Ga clusters and simultaneous reaction with NH3. A growth mechanism involving diffusion limited aggregation process initiating supersaturation and subsequent neck formation along with possible role of thermodynamic fluctuation in different crystalline facets of GaN, is described for the anisotropic spiral structures. Temperature dependent PL spectra show strong excitonic emissions along with the presence of free-to-bound transition.

  17. Dislocation core in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Washburn, Jack; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-02-20

    Light emitting diodes and blue laser diodes grown on GaN have been demonstrated despite six orders of magnitude higher dislocation density than that for III-V arsenide and phosphide diodes. Understanding and determination of dislocation cores in GaN is crucial since both theoretical and experimental work are somewhat contradictory. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been applied to study the layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) (under Ga rich conditions) in plan-view and cross-section samples. This study suggests that despite the fact that voids are formed along the dislocation line in HVPE material, the dislocations have closed cores. Similar results of closed core are obtained for the screw dislocation in the MBE material, confirming earlier studies.

  18. Amphoteric arsenic in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Araujo, J. P.; Rita, E.; Soares, J. C.

    2007-04-30

    The authors have determined the lattice location of implanted arsenic in GaN by means of conversion electron emission channeling from radioactive {sup 73}As. They give direct evidence that As is an amphoteric impurity, thus settling the long-standing question as to whether it prefers cation or anion sites in GaN. The amphoteric character of As and the fact that As{sub Ga} 'antisites' are not minority defects provide additional aspects to be taken into account for an explanantion of the so-called miscibility gap in ternary GaAs{sub 1-x}N{sub x} compounds, which cannot be grown with a single phase for values of x in the range of 0.1

  19. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) method for measurements of soil moisture in cropped fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. This study evaluates the applicability of the Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for integral quantification of seasonal soil moisture in the root zone at the scale of a field or small watershed, making use of the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator relative to other landscape materials. GANS measurements were performed at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations and seasonal conditions. Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a lowland Bornim farmland (Brandenburg) cropped with sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. At both sites depth profiles of soil moisture were measured at several locations in parallel by frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) for comparison and calibration. Initially, calibration parameters derived from a previous study with corn cover were tested under sunflower and winter rye periods at the same farmland. GANS soil moisture based on these parameters showed a large discrepancy compared to classical soil moisture measurements. Therefore, two new calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for GANS were evaluated in this study. This included different sets of calibration parameters based on different growing periods of sunflower. New calibration parameters showed a good agreement with FDR network during sunflower period (RMSE = 0.023 m3 m-3), but they underestimated soil moisture in the winter rye period. The GANS approach resulted to be highly affected by temporal changes of biomass and crop types which suggest the need of neutron corrections for long-term observations with crop rotation. Finally

  20. TEM characterization of GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Gao, Y.H.; Bando, Y.

    2002-02-21

    Transmission electron microscopy was applied to study GaN nanowires grown on carbon nanotube surfaces by chemical reaction between Ga{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} gas in a conventional furnace. These wires grew in two crystallographic directions, <2{und 11}0> and <01{und 1}0> (fast growth directions of GaN), in the form of whiskers covered by small elongated GaN platelets. The morphology of these platelets is similar to that observed during the growth of single crystals from a Ga melt at high temperatures under high nitrogen pressure. It is thought that growth of nanowires in two different crystallographic directions and the arrangement of the platelets to the central whisker may be influenced by the presence of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (based on the observation of the energy dispersive x-ray spectra), the interplanar spacings in the wire, and the presence of defects on the interface between the central part of the nanowire and the platelets surrounding it.

  1. P-type doping of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.

    2000-04-10

    After implantation of As, As + Be, and As + Ga into GaN and annealing for short durations at temperatures as high as 1500 C, the GaN films remained highly resistive. It was apparent from c-RBS studies that although implantation damage did not create an amorphous layer in the GaN film, annealing at 1500 C did not provide enough energy to completely recover the radiation damage. Disorder recovered significantly after annealing at temperatures up to 1500 C, but not completely. From SIMS analysis, oxygen contamination in the AIN capping layer causes oxygen diffusion into the GaN film above 1400 C. The sapphire substrate (A1203) also decomposed and oxygen penetrated into the backside of the GaN layer above 1400 C. To prevent donor-like oxygen impurities from the capping layer and the substrate from contaminating the GaN film and compensating acceptors, post-implantation annealing should be done at temperatures below 1500 C. Oxygen in the cap could be reduced by growing the AIN cap on the GaN layer after the GaN growth run or by depositing the AIN layer in a ultra high vacuum (UHV) system post-growth to minimize residual oxygen and water contamination. With longer annealing times at 1400 C or at higher temperatures with a higher quality AIN, the implantation drainage may fully recover.

  2. GaN Electronics For High Power, High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHU,S.N.G.

    2000-06-12

    A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers. GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors and GaN metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.

  3. Implant activation and redistribution of dopants in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Pearton, S.J.; Wilson, R.G.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    GaN and related III-Nitride materials (IN, an) have recently been the focus of extensive research for photonic and electronic device applications. As this material system matures, ion implantation doping and isolation is expected to play an important role in advance device demonstrations. To this end, we report the demonstration of implanted p-type doping with Mg+P and Ca as well as n-type doping with Si in GaN. These implanted dopants require annealing 105 approximately1100 {degrees}C to achieve electrical activity, but demonstrate limited redistribution at this temperature. The redistribution of other potential dopants in GaN (such as Be, Zn, and Cd) will also be reported. Results for a GaN junction field effect transistor (JFET), the first GaN device to use implantation doping, will also be presented.

  4. Atomic force microscopy studies of homoepitaxial GaN layers grown on GaN template by laser MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. S.; Singh, A.; Tanwar, S.; Tyagi, P. K.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Kushvaha, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    We have grown homoepitaxial GaN films on metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown 3.5 µm thick GaN on sapphire (0001) substrate (GaN template) using an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) laser assisted molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) system. The GaN films were grown by laser ablating a polycrystalline solid GaN target in the presence of active r.f. nitrogen plasma. The influence of laser repetition rates (10-30 Hz) on the surface morphology of homoepitaxial GaN layers have been studied using atomic force microscopy. It was found that GaN layer grown at 10 Hz shows a smooth surface with uniform grain size compared to the rough surface with irregular shape grains obtained at 30 Hz. The variation of surface roughness of the homoepitaxial GaN layer with and without wet chemical etching has been also studied and it was observed that the roughness of the film decreased after wet etching due to the curved structure/rough surface.

  5. GaN: Defect and Device Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-09

    The role of extended and point defects, and key impurities such as C, O and H, on the electrical and optical properties of GaN is reviewed. Recent progress in the development of high reliability contacts, thermal processing, dry and wet etching techniques, implantation doping and isolation and gate insulator technology is detailed. Finally, the performance of GaN-based electronic and photonic devices such as field effect transistors, UV detectors, laser diodes and light-emitting diodes is covered, along with the influence of process-induced or grown-in defects and impurities on the device physics.

  6. Inductively coupled plasma etching of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; McClellan, G.B.; Casalnuovo, S.A.; Rieger, D.J.; Pearton, S.J.; Constantine, C.; Barratt, C.; Karlicek, R.F. Jr.; Tran, C.; Schurman, M.

    1996-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etch rates for GaN are reported as a function of plasma pressure, plasma chemistry, rf power, and ICP power. Using a Cl{sub 2}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma chemistry, GaN etch rates as high as 6875 A/min are reported. The GaN surface morphology remains smooth over a wide range of plasma conditions as quantified using atomic force microscopy. Several etch conditions yield highly anisotropic profiles with smooth sidewalls. These results have direct application to the fabrication of group-III nitride etched laser facets. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Screw dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Washburn, Jack; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-02-15

    GaN has received much attention over the past few years because of several new applications, including light emitting diodes, blue laser diodes and high-power microwave transistors. One of the biggest problems is a high density of structural defects, mostly dislocations, due to a lack of a suitable lattice-matched substrate since bulk GaN is difficult to grow in large sizes. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been applied to study defects in plan-view and cross-sections on samples prepared by conventional techniques such as mechanical thinning and precision ion milling. The density of dislocations close to the sample surface of a 1 mm-thick HVPE sample was in the range of 3x109 cm-2. All three types of dislocations were present in these samples, and almost 50 percent were screw dislocations. Our studies suggest that the core structure of screw dislocations in the same material might differ when the material is grown by different methods.

  8. Longitudinal Excitons in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Jogai, B.; Collins, T. C.

    2002-05-01

    Many of the previous investigations of longitudinal excitons have involved reflection and absorption measurements rather than emission. In these measurements it is more difficult to resolve the longitudinal exciton from the Γ5 and Γ6 free excitons in wurtzite material. The longitudinal excitons have energies and oscillator strengths that depend on the direction of propagation and they are not observable along the principal axis of the crystal. In the wurtzite structure, such as GaN, the Γ5 exciton is the pure transverse mode, whereas the longitudinal is a mixed mode going from pure longitudinal, for the propogation direction K perpendicular to C, to pure transverse for K parallel to C. If more than one orientation is present in the sample, it is clear that more than one longitudinal exciton may be seen since it is a mixed mode. In the current experiment we observe more than one mode, which we associate with more than one crystal orientation. This may result from the columnar growth often observed in GaN.

  9. GaN for LED applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    In order to improve the synthesis of GaN the effect of various growth and doping parameters has been studied. Although Be, Li, Mg, and Dy can be used to overcompensate native donors, the most interesting acceptor element is Zn. The emission spectrum and the luminescence efficiency depend on the growth temperature (below 800 C), on the partial pressure of the doping impurity, and on the duration of growth. Blue-green electroluminescence with a power efficiency of 0.1 percent and a brightness of 850 fL (at 0.6 mA and 22.5 V) was obtained. Some diodes allow the color of the emitted light to change by reversing the polarity of the bias. Continuous operation of a diode over a period of 5 months showed no evidence of degradation. The luminescence properties of ion-implanted GaN were studied. Delay effects were found in the electroluminescence of diodes, although, with a dc bias, a 70-MHz modulation was possible.

  10. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  11. Comparative study on cost evaluation and network visualization of particle accelerator components for heavy ion inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, A.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, Nob; Barnard, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    By visualizing accelerator system components in heavy ion inertial fusion, the connection between the components becomes clear. We clarify an influential component on the entire cost by the relation of node connections due to the visualization result. Since a low cost component affects a high cost component, not only the cost estimation but also the relation between the components is considerable and important issue. A cost estimation result changing with an induction core cost indicates no influences in the rate of details.

  12. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  13. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  14. GaN grown on nano-patterned sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Kong; Meixin, Feng; Jin, Cai; Hui, Wang; Huaibing, Wang; Hui, Yang

    2015-04-01

    High-quality gallium nitride (GaN) film was grown on nano-patterned sapphire substrates (NPSS) and investigated using XRD and SEM. It was found that the optimum thickness of the GaN buffer layer on the NPSS is 15 nm, which is thinner than that on micro-patterned sapphire substrates (MPSS). An interesting phenomenon was observed for GaN film grown on NPSS:GaN mainly grows on the trench regions and little grows on the sidewalls of the patterns at the initial growth stage, which is dramatically different from GaN grown on MPSS. In addition, the electrical and optical properties of LEDs grown on NPSS were characterized. Project supported by the Suzhou Nanojoin Photonics Co., Ltd and the High-Tech Achievements Transformation of Jiangsu Province, China (No.BA2012010).

  15. Epitaxy of GaN Nanowires on Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Vishnuvarthan; Largeau, Ludovic; Madouri, Ali; Glas, Frank; Zhang, Hezhi; Oehler, Fabrice; Cavanna, Antonella; Babichev, Andrey; Travers, Laurent; Gogneau, Noelle; Tchernycheva, Maria; Harmand, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-10

    Epitaxial growth of GaN nanowires on graphene is demonstrated using molecular beam epitaxy without any catalyst or intermediate layer. Growth is highly selective with respect to silica on which the graphene flakes, grown by chemical vapor deposition, are transferred. The nanowires grow vertically along their c-axis and we observe a unique epitaxial relationship with the ⟨21̅1̅0⟩ directions of the wurtzite GaN lattice parallel to the directions of the carbon zigzag chains. Remarkably, the nanowire density and height decrease with increasing number of graphene layers underneath. We attribute this effect to strain and we propose a model for the nanowire density variation. The GaN nanowires are defect-free and they present good optical properties. This demonstrates that graphene layers transferred on amorphous carrier substrates is a promising alternative to bulk crystalline substrates for the epitaxial growth of high quality GaN nanostructures. PMID:27414518

  16. Novel high frequency devices with graphene and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei

    This work focuses on exploring new materials and new device structures to develop novel devices that can operate at very high speed. In chapter 2, the high frequency performance limitations of graphene transistor with channel length less than 100 nm are explored. The simulated results predict that intrinsic cutoff frequency fT of graphene transistor can be close to 2 THz at 15 nm channel length. In chapter 3, we explored the possibility of developing a 2D materials based vertical tunneling device. An analytical model to calculate the channel potentials and current-voltage characteristics in a Symmetric tunneling Field-Effect-Transistor (SymFET) is presented. The symmetric resonant peak in SymFET is a good candidate for high-speed analog applications. Rest of the work focuses on Gallium Nitride (GaN), several novel device concepts based on GaN heterostructure have been proposed for high frequency and high power applications. In chapter 4, we compared the performance of GaN Schottky diodes on bulk GaN substrates and GaN-on-sapphire substrates. In addition, we also discussed the lateral GaN Schottky diode between metal/2DEGs. The advantage of lateral GaN Schottky diodes is the intrinsic cutoff frequency is in the THz range. In chapter 5, a GaN Heterostructure barrier diode (HBD) is designed using the polarization charge and band offset at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction. The polarization charge at AlGaN/GaN interface behaves as a delta-doping which induces a barrier without any chemical doping. The IV characteristics can be explained by the barrier controlled thermionic emission current. GaN HBDs can be directly integrated with GaN HEMTs, and serve as frequency multipliers or mixers for RF applications. In chapter 6, a GaN based negative effective mass oscillator (NEMO) is proposed. The current in NEMO is estimated under the ballistic limits. Negative differential resistances (NDRs) can be observed with more than 50% of the injected electrons occupied the negative

  17. Fabrication of bamboo-shaped GaN nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Li, J. Y.; He, M.; Chen, X. L.; Zhang, Z.

    Bamboo-shaped GaN nanorods were formed through a simple sublimation method. They were characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). The TEM image showed that the nanorods were bamboo-like. XRD, HRTEM and SAED patterns indicated that the nanorods were single-crystal wurtzite GaN.

  18. Modeling of temperature sensor built on GaN nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, A.; Taheri, S.

    2011-03-01

    A GaN nanostructure based temperature sensor has been modeled using the minority-carrier exclusion theory. The model takes into account the effects of temperature, carrier concentrations and electric field on carrier mobilities. The model also consists of different carrier scattering mechanisms such as phonon and natural ionized scattering. The calculation results show that the resistance of modeled GaN nanostructure based temperature sensor is strongly dependent on the sensor structural parameters such as doping density and device size.

  19. ARM MJO Investigation Experiment on Gan Island (AMIE-Gan) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Long, CL; Del Genio, A; Deng, M; Fu, X; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Johnson, R; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Webster, P; Xie, S; Zhang, C

    2011-04-11

    The overarching campaign, which includes the ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) deployment in conjunction with the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) and the Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns, is designed to test several current hypotheses regarding the mechanisms responsible for Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation and propagation in the Indian Ocean area. The synergy between the proposed AMF2 deployment with DYNAMO/CINDY2011, and the corresponding funded experiment on Manus, combine for an overarching ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) with two components: AMF2 on Gan Island in the Indian Ocean (AMIE-Gan), where the MJO initiates and starts its eastward propagation; and the ARM Manus site (AMIE-Manus), which is in the general area where the MJO usually starts to weaken in climate models. AMIE-Gan will provide measurements of particular interest to Atmospheric System Research (ASR) researchers relevant to improving the representation of MJO initiation in climate models. The framework of DYNAMO/CINDY2011 includes two proposed island-based sites and two ship-based locations forming a square pattern with sonde profiles and scanning precipitation and cloud radars at both island and ship sites. These data will be used to produce a Variational Analysis data set coinciding with the one produced for AMIE-Manus. The synergy between AMIE-Manus and AMIE-Gan will allow studies of the initiation, propagation, and evolution of the convective cloud population within the framework of the MJO. As with AMIE-Manus, AMIE-Gan/DYNAMO also includes a significant modeling component geared toward improving the representation of MJO initiation and propagation in climate and forecast models. This campaign involves the deployment of the second, marine-capable, AMF; all of the included measurement systems; and especially the scanning and vertically pointing radars. The campaign will include sonde

  20. High nitrogen pressure solution growth of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockowski, Michal

    2014-10-01

    Results of GaN growth from gallium solution under high nitrogen pressure are presented. Basic of the high nitrogen pressure solution (HNPS) growth method is described. A new approach of seeded growth, multi-feed seed (MFS) configuration, is demonstrated. The use of two kinds of seeds: free-standing hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN (HVPE-GaN) obtained from metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-GaN/sapphire templates and free-standing HVPE-GaN obtained from the ammonothermally grown GaN crystals, is shown. Depending on the seeds’ structural quality, the differences in the structural properties of pressure grown material are demonstrated and analyzed. The role and influence of impurities, like oxygen and magnesium, on GaN crystals grown from gallium solution in the MFS configuration is presented. The properties of differently doped GaN crystals are discussed. An application of the pressure grown GaN crystals as substrates for electronic and optoelectronic devices is reported.

  1. Effect of photocatalytic oxidation technology on GaN CMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Pan, Guoshun; Lu, Xinchun

    2016-01-01

    GaN is so hard and so chemically inert that it is difficult to obtain a high material removal rate (MRR) in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process. This paper discusses the application of photocatalytic oxidation technology in GaN planarization. Three N-type semiconductor particles (TiO2, SnO2, and Fe2O3) are used as catalysts and added to the H2O2-SiO2-based slurry. By optical excitation, highly reactive photoinduced holes are produced on the surface of the particles, which can oxidize OH- and H2O absorbed on the surface of the catalysts; therefore, more OH* will be generated. As a result, GaN MRRs in an H2O2-SiO2-based polishing system combined with catalysts are improved significantly, especially when using TiO2, the MRR of which is 122 nm/h. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows the variation trend of chemical composition on the GaN surface after polishing, revealing the planarization process. Besides, the effect of pH on photocatalytic oxidation combined with TiO2 is analyzed deeply. Furthermore, the physical model of GaN CMP combined with photocatalytic oxidation technology is proposed to describe the removal mechanism of GaN.

  2. GaN Technology for Power Electronic Applications: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Tyler J.; Pushpakaran, Bejoy N.; Bayne, Stephen B.

    2016-06-01

    Power semiconductor devices based on silicon (Si) are quickly approaching their limits, set by fundamental material properties. In order to address these limitations, new materials for use in devices must be investigated. Wide bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) have suitable properties for power electronic applications; however, fabrication of practical devices from these materials may be challenging. SiC technology has matured to point of commercialized devices, whereas GaN requires further research to realize full material potential. This review covers fundamental material properties of GaN as they relate to Si and SiC. This is followed by a discussion of the contemporary issues involved with bulk GaN substrates and their fabrication and a brief overview of how devices are fabricated, both on native GaN substrate material and non-native substrate material. An overview of current device structures, which are being analyzed for use in power switching applications, is then provided; both vertical and lateral device structures are considered. Finally, a brief discussion of prototypes currently employing GaN devices is given.

  3. GaN Technology for Power Electronic Applications: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Tyler J.; Pushpakaran, Bejoy N.; Bayne, Stephen B.

    2016-03-01

    Power semiconductor devices based on silicon (Si) are quickly approaching their limits, set by fundamental material properties. In order to address these limitations, new materials for use in devices must be investigated. Wide bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) have suitable properties for power electronic applications; however, fabrication of practical devices from these materials may be challenging. SiC technology has matured to point of commercialized devices, whereas GaN requires further research to realize full material potential. This review covers fundamental material properties of GaN as they relate to Si and SiC. This is followed by a discussion of the contemporary issues involved with bulk GaN substrates and their fabrication and a brief overview of how devices are fabricated, both on native GaN substrate material and non-native substrate material. An overview of current device structures, which are being analyzed for use in power switching applications, is then provided; both vertical and lateral device structures are considered. Finally, a brief discussion of prototypes currently employing GaN devices is given.

  4. Stress dependence of the near-band-gap cathodoluminescence spectrum of GaN determined by spatially resolved indentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porporati, Alessandro Alan; Tanaka, Yoshitomo; Matsutani, Atsuo; Zhu, Wenliang; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2006-10-01

    A microscopic procedure has been proposed for evaluating the stress dependence of the (room-temperature) cathodoluminescence (CL) excitonic band emitted from the (0001) crystallographic plane of GaN in a field-emission-gun scanning electron microscope. The room-temperature near-band-gap emission (generally referred to as the excitonic band) mainly consisted of a band arising from free exciton (FX). However, an asymmetric morphology was found for the band, which thus needed to be deconvoluted into the main FX band and a shoulder. The spectral location at intensity maximum of the overall excitonic band under stress-free conditions was observed at room temperature at around 365nm. Experimentally measured spectral shifts were precisely retrieved nearby the tip of a Vickers indentation microcrack, while CL intensity probe response functions were collected at different acceleration voltages at a sharp interface between a GaN film and its sapphire substrate. Based on these assessments, the magnitude of the piezospectroscopic coefficient (i.e., the spectral shift rate versus the trace of a biaxial stress tensor) Π =1.35±0.01nm/GPa of the excitonic (cumulative) band of GaN could be evaluated. This study not only emphasizes the importance of microscopic piezospectroscopic calibration procedures for precise residual stress assessments in GaN-based devices, but also the need of deconvoluting the electron probe for minimizing the error involved with its finite size.

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  7. Harnessing person-generated health data to accelerate patient-centered outcomes research: the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America PCORnet Patient Powered Research Network (CCFA Partners).

    PubMed

    Chung, Arlene E; Sandler, Robert S; Long, Millie D; Ahrens, Sean; Burris, Jessica L; Martin, Christopher F; Anton, Kristen; Robb, Amber; Caruso, Thomas P; Jaeger, Elizabeth L; Chen, Wenli; Clark, Marshall; Myers, Kelly; Dobes, Angela; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners Patient-Powered Research Network (PPRN) seeks to advance and accelerate comparative effectiveness and translational research in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Our IBD-focused PCORnet PPRN has been designed to overcome the major obstacles that have limited patient-centered outcomes research in IBD by providing the technical infrastructure, patient governance, and patient-driven functionality needed to: 1) identify, prioritize, and undertake a patient-centered research agenda through sharing person-generated health data; 2) develop and test patient and provider-focused tools that utilize individual patient data to improve health behaviors and inform health care decisions and, ultimately, outcomes; and 3) rapidly disseminate new knowledge to patients, enabling them to improve their health. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners PPRN has fostered the development of a community of citizen scientists in IBD; created a portal that will recruit, retain, and engage members and encourage partnerships with external scientists; and produced an efficient infrastructure for identifying, screening, and contacting network members for participation in research. PMID:26911821

  8. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  9. Nodes and biological processes identified on the basis of network analysis in the brain of the senescence accelerated mice as an Alzheimer's disease animal model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-rui; Cui, Xiu-liang; Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Gui-rong; Li, Peng; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Yue-ying; Bo, Xiao-chen; Wang, Sheng-qi; Zhou, Wen-xia; Zhang, Yong-xiang

    2013-01-01

    Harboring the behavioral and histopathological signatures of Alzheimer's disease (AD), senescence accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8) mice are currently considered a robust model for studying AD. However, the underlying mechanisms, prioritized pathways and genes in SAMP8 mice linked to AD remain unclear. In this study, we provide a biological interpretation of the molecular underpinnings of SAMP8 mice. Our results were derived from differentially expressed genes in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of SAMP8 mice compared to age-matched SAMR1 mice at 2, 6, and 12 months of age using cDNA microarray analysis. On the basis of PPI, MetaCore and the co-expression network, we constructed a distinct genetic sub-network in the brains of SAMP8 mice. Next, we determined that the regulation of synaptic transmission and apoptosis were disrupted in the brains of SAMP8 mice. We found abnormal gene expression of RAF1, MAPT, PTGS2, CDKN2A, CAMK2A, NTRK2, AGER, ADRBK1, MCM3AP, and STUB1, which may have initiated the dysfunction of biological processes in the brains of SAMP8 mice. Specifically, we found microRNAs, including miR-20a, miR-17, miR-34a, miR-155, miR-18a, miR-22, miR-26a, miR-101, miR-106b, and miR-125b, that might regulate the expression of nodes in the sub-network. Taken together, these results provide new insights into the biological and genetic mechanisms of SAMP8 mice and add an important dimension to our understanding of the neuro-pathogenesis in SAMP8 mice from a systems perspective. PMID:24194717

  10. Regional flood frequency analysis for the Gan-Ming River basin in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingyi, Zhang; Hall, M. J.

    2004-08-01

    A regionalised relationship to estimate flood magnitudes for ungauged and poorly gauged catchments can be established using regional flood frequency analysis. The geographical approach (Residuals method), Ward's cluster method, the Fuzzy c-means method and a Kohonen neural network were applied to 86 sites in the Gan River Basin of Jiangxi Province and the Ming River Basin of Fujian Province in the southeast of China to delineate homogeneous regions based on site characteristics. Similar groupings of sites into sub-regions were obtained from all but the Residuals method. Since the Kohonen neural network can be employed to identify the number of sub-regions as well as the allocation of sites to sub-regions, this method is to be preferred over Ward's method and the Fuzzy c-means approach. For each sub-region, growth curves must be constructed and the value of an index flood must be related to catchment characteristics. The regional L-moment algorithm may be used to advantage both to identify an appropriate underlying frequency distribution and to construct sub-regional growth curves. However, the membership levels produced by the Fuzzy c-means method may also be used as weights to derive a regional at-site growth curve from those of all the sub-regions. The latter method is likely to be most useful where the sub-regional growth curves are of strongly contrasting shape. An index flood may be related to catchment characteristics using Multiple Linear Regression Analysis, but application to the Gan-Ming data demonstrates that estimates with lower standard errors of estimate can be produced using an artificial neural network (ANN). However, in order to apply such ANNs, sufficient sites must be available so that enough processing elements can be employed without impairing the ability of the network to generalise outside the training data set.

  11. Prospect of GaN light-emitting diodes grown on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Hee; Lee, Yun Sung; Baik, Chan Wook; Ahn, Ho Young; Cho, Kyung Sang; Kim, Sun Il; Hwang, Sungwoo

    2013-03-01

    We report the enhanced electroluminescence (EL) of GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on glass substrates. We found that GaN morphology affected the EL and achieved enhanced EL of GaN-LEDs on glass by identifying the optimal GaN morphology having both high crystallinity and compatibility for device fabrication. At proper growth temperature, GaN crystallinity was improved with increasing GaN crystal size irrespective of the GaN crystallographic orientation, as determined by spatially resolved cathodoluminescent spectroscopy. The optimized GaN LEDs on glass composed of the nearly single-crystalline GaN pyramid arrays exhibited excellent microscopic EL uniformity and luminance values of ~ 9100 cd/m2 at the peak wavelength of 495 nm. The EL color could be adjusted mainly by varying the quantum well temperature. In addition, new growth methods for achieving high GaN crystallinity at a low growth temperature (e.g. ~700°C) were briefly reviewed and attempted by adopting selective heating. We expect that performance of the GaN LEDs on glass can be much enhanced by enhancing GaN crystallinity and p-GaN coating, and evolvement of low-temperature growth of high-quality GaN might even customize ordinary glass as a substrate, which enables high-performance, low-cost lighting or display.

  12. Environmental sensitivity of n-i-n and undoped single GaN nanowire photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Posada, F.; Songmuang, R.; Den Hertog, M.; Monroy, E.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we compare the photodetector performance of single nearly defect-free undoped and n-i-n GaN nanowires (NWs). Undoped NWs present a dark current three orders of magnitude lower than n-i-n structures, about ten times lower gain, and a strong dependence of the measurement environment. In vacuum, undoped NWs react with an increase of their responsivity, accompanied by stronger nonlinearities and persistent photoconductivity effects. This behavior is attributed to the unpinned Fermi level at the m-plane NW sidewalls, which enhances the role of surface states in the photodetection dynamics. In the air, adsorbed oxygen accelerates the carrier dynamics at the price of reducing the photoresponse. In contrast, in n-i-n NWs, the Fermi level pinning at the contact regions limits the photoinduced sweep of the surface band bending, hence reducing the environment sensitivity and preventing persistent effects even in vacuum.

  13. Pulsed laser annealing of Be-implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.T.; Tan, L.S.; Chor, E.F.

    2005-11-01

    Postimplantation thermal processing of Be in molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown GaN by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) was investigated. It has been found that the activation of Be dopants and the repair of implantation-induced defects in GaN films cannot be achieved efficiently by conventional RTA alone. On the other hand, good dopant activation and surface morphology and quality were obtained when the Be-implanted GaN film was annealed by PLA with a 248 nm KrF excimer laser. However, observations of off-resonant micro-Raman and high-resolution x-ray-diffraction spectra indicated that crystal defects and strain resulting from Be implantation were still existent after PLA, which probably degraded the carrier mobility and limited the activation efficiency to some extent. This can be attributed to the shallow penetration depth of the 248 nm laser in GaN, which only repaired the crystal defects in a thin near-surface layer, while the deeper defects were not annealed out well. This situation was significantly improved when the Be-implanted GaN was subjected to a combined process of PLA followed by RTA, which produced good activation of the dopants, good surface morphology, and repaired bulk and surface defects well.

  14. Native defects in GaN: a hybrid functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, Ibrahima Castillo; Demchenko, Denis

    Intrinsic defects play an important role in the performance of GaN-based devices. We present hybrid density functional calculations of the electronic and possible optical properties of interstitial N (Ni-Ni) , N antisite (NGa) , interstitial Ga (Gai) , Ga antisite (GaN) , Ga vacancy (VGa) , N vacancy (VN) and Ga-N divacancies (VGaVN) in GaN. Our results show that the vacancies display relatively low formation energies in certain samples, whereas antisites and interstitials are energetically less favorable. However, interstitials can be created by electron irradiation. For instance, in 2.5 MeV electron-irradiated GaN samples, a strong correlation between the frequently observed photoluminescence (PL) band centered around 0.85 eV accompanied with a rich phonon sideband of ~0.88 eV and the theoretical optical behavior of interstitial Ga is discussed. N vacancies are found to likely contribute to the experimentally obtained green luminescence band (GL2) peaking at 2.24 eV in high-resistivity undoped and Mg-doped GaN. National Science Foundation (DMR-1410125) and the Thomas F. and Kate Miller Jeffress Memorial Trust.

  15. Structural defects in bulk GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; dos Reis, R.; Mancuso, M.; Song, C. Y.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Bockowski, M.

    2014-10-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies of undoped and Mg doped GaN layers grown on the HVPE substrates by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution (HNPS) with the multi-feed-seed (MFS) configuration are shown. The propagation of dislocations from the HVPE substrate to the layer is observed. Due to the interaction between these dislocations in the thick layers much lower density of these defects is observed in the upper part of the HNPS layers. Amorphous Ga precipitates with attached voids pointing toward the growth direction are observed in the undoped layer. This is similar to the presence of Ga precipitates in high-pressure platelets, however the shape of these precipitates is different. The Mg doped layers do not show Ga precipitates, but MgO rectangular precipitates are formed, decorating the dislocations. Results of TEM studies of HVPE layers grown on Ammonothermal substrates are also presented. These layers have superior crystal quality in comparison to the HNPS layers, as far as density of dislocation is concern. Occasionally some small inclusions can be found, but their chemical composition was not yet determined. It is expected that growth of the HNPS layers on these substrate will lead to large layer thickness obtained in a short time and with high crystal perfection needed in devices.

  16. High Voltage GaN Schottky Rectifiers

    SciTech Connect

    CAO,X.A.; CHO,H.; CHU,S.N.G.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHYI,J.-I.; DANG,G.T.; HAN,JUNG; LEE,C.-M.; PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; WILSON,R.G.; ZHANG,A.P.

    1999-10-25

    Mesa and planar GaN Schottky diode rectifiers with reverse breakdown voltages (V{sub RB}) up to 550V and >2000V, respectively, have been fabricated. The on-state resistance, R{sub ON}, was 6m{Omega}{center_dot} cm{sup 2} and 0.8{Omega}cm{sup 2}, respectively, producing figure-of-merit values for (V{sub RB}){sup 2}/R{sub ON} in the range 5-48 MW{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. At low biases the reverse leakage current was proportional to the size of the rectifying contact perimeter, while at high biases the current was proportional to the area of this contact. These results suggest that at low reverse biases, the leakage is dominated by the surface component, while at higher biases the bulk component dominates. On-state voltages were 3.5V for the 550V diodes and {ge}15 for the 2kV diodes. Reverse recovery times were <0.2{micro}sec for devices switched from a forward current density of {approx}500A{center_dot}cm{sup -2} to a reverse bias of 100V.

  17. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  18. Mg doping and its effect on the semipolar GaN(1122) growth kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahourcade, L.; Wirthmueller, A.; Monroy, E.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Laufer, A.; Eickhoff, M.

    2009-10-26

    We report the effect of Mg doping on the growth kinetics of semipolar GaN(1122) synthesized by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Mg tends to segregate on the surface, inhibiting the formation of the self-regulated Ga film which is used as a surfactant for the growth of undoped and Si-doped GaN(1122). We observe an enhancement of Mg incorporation in GaN(1122) compared to GaN(0001). Typical structural defects or polarity inversion domains found in Mg-doped GaN(0001) were not observed for the semipolar films investigated in the present study.

  19. Conductivity based on selective etch for GaN devices and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  20. Temperature dependent growth of GaN nanowires using CVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, R.

    2016-05-01

    Growth of GaN nanowires have been carried out on sapphire substrates with Au as a catalyst using chemical vapour deposition technique. GaN nanowires growth have been studied with the experimental parameter as growth temperature. Diameter of grown GaN nanowires are in the range of 50 nm to 100 nm while the nanowire length depends on growth temperature. Morphology of the GaN nanowires have been studied by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline nature has been observed by XRD patterns. Optical properties of grown GaN nanowires have been investigated by photoluminescence spectra.

  1. Desorption Induced Formation of Negative Nanowires in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, E.A.; Kim, B.-J.

    2011-06-01

    We report in-situ transmission electron microscopy studies of the formation of negative nanowires created by thermal decomposition of single crystal GaN. During annealing, vertical negative nanowires are formed in [0 0 0 1] by preferential dissociation of GaN along the 1 0 {bar 1} 0 prism planes, while lateral negative nanowires grow in close-packed 1 0 {bar 1} 0 by the self-catalytic solid-liquid-vapor (SLV) mechanism. Our quantitative measurements show that the growth rates of the laterally grown negative nanowires are independent of the wire diameter, indicating that the rate-limiting step is the decomposition of GaN on the surface of the Ga droplets that catalyze their creation. These nanoscale features offer controllable templates for the creation and integration of a broad range of nanoscale materials systems, with potential applications in nanoscale fluidics.

  2. Gate stack engineering for GaN lateral power transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu; Liu, Shenghou; Liu, Cheng; Hua, Mengyuan; Chen, Kevin J.

    2016-02-01

    Developing optimal gate-stack technology is a key to enhancing the reliability and performance of GaN insulated-gate devices for high-voltage power switching applications. In this paper, we discuss current challenges and review our recent progresses in gate-stack technology development toward high-performance and high-reliability GaN power devices, including (1) interface engineering that creates a high-quality dielectric/III-nitride interface with low trap density; (2) barrier-layer engineering that enables optimal trade-off between performance and stability; (3) bulk quality and reliability enhancement of the gate dielectric. These gate-stack techniques in terms of new process development and device structure design are valuable to realize highly reliable and competitive GaN power devices.

  3. Curvature and bow of bulk GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Romanov, Alexey E.; Young, Erin C.; Roberston, Christian A.; Beltz, Glenn E.; Speck, James S.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the bow of free standing (0001) oriented hydride vapor phase epitaxy grown GaN substrates and demonstrate that their curvature is consistent with a compressive to tensile stress gradient (bottom to top) present in the substrates. The origin of the stress gradient and the curvature is attributed to the correlated inclination of edge threading dislocation (TD) lines away from the [0001] direction. A model is proposed and a relation is derived for bulk GaN substrate curvature dependence on the inclination angle and the density of TDs. The model is used to analyze the curvature for commercially available GaN substrates as determined by high resolution x-ray diffraction. The results show a close correlation between the experimentally determined parameters and those predicted from theoretical model.

  4. Strong atomic ordering in Gd-doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Higashi, Kotaro; Hasegawa, Shigehiko; Asahi, Hajime; Sato, Kazuhisa; Konno, Toyohiko J.

    2012-09-03

    Gd-doped GaN (Ga{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x}N) thin films were grown on a GaN(001) template by radio frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Three samples with a different Gd composition were prepared in this study: x = 0.02, 0.05, and 0.08. XRD and TEM results revealed that the low Gd concentration GaN possesses the wurtzite structure. On the other hand, it was found that an ordered phase with a quadruple-periodicity along the [001] direction in the wurtzite structure is formed throughout the film with x = 0.08. We proposed the atomistic model for the superlattice structure observed here.

  5. Stability of Carbon Incorpoated Semipolar GaN(1101) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Toru; Nakamura, Kohji; Ito, Tomonori

    2011-08-01

    The structural stability of carbon incorporated GaN(1101) surfaces is theoretically investigated by performing first-principles pseudopotential calculations. The calculated surface formation energies taking account of the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy conditions demonstrate that several carbon incorporated surfaces are stabilized depending on the growth conditions. Using surface phase diagrams, which are obtained by comparing the calculated adsorption energy with vapor-phase chemical potentials, we find that the semipolar surface forms NH2 and CH2 below ˜1660 K while the polar GaN(0001) surface with CH3 is stabilized below ˜1550 K. This difference could be one of possible explanations for p-type doping on the semipolar GaN(1101) surface.

  6. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750–800, 900, and 130–180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  7. Surface morphology of GaN: Flat versus vicinal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.H.; Seutter, S.M.; Zheng, L.X.; Cheung, S.H.; Ng, Y.F.; Wu, H.; Tong, S.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The surface morphology of GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A comparison is made between flat and vicinal surfaces. The wurtzite structure of GaN leads to special morphological features such as step pairing and triangularly shaped islands. Spiral mounds due to growth at screw threading dislocations are dominant on flat surfaces, whereas for vicinal GaN, the surfaces show no spiral mound but evenly spaced steps. This observation suggests an effective suppression of screw threading dislocations in the vicinal films. This finding is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Continued growth of the vicinal surface leads to step bunching that is attributed to the effect of electromigration.

  8. High-Sensitivity GaN Microchemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-ah; Yang, Baohua; Liao, Anna; Moon, Jeongsun; Prokopuk, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Systematic studies have been performed on the sensitivity of GaN HEMT (high electron mobility transistor) sensors using various gate electrode designs and operational parameters. The results here show that a higher sensitivity can be achieved with a larger W/L ratio (W = gate width, L = gate length) at a given D (D = source-drain distance), and multi-finger gate electrodes offer a higher sensitivity than a one-finger gate electrode. In terms of operating conditions, sensor sensitivity is strongly dependent on transconductance of the sensor. The highest sensitivity can be achieved at the gate voltage where the slope of the transconductance curve is the largest. This work provides critical information about how the gate electrode of a GaN HEMT, which has been identified as the most sensitive among GaN microsensors, needs to be designed, and what operation parameters should be used for high sensitivity detection.

  9. Plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chen, P.

    1986-03-01

    In this paper we discuss plasma accelerators which might provide high gradient accelerating fields suitable for TeV linear colliders. In particular we discuss two types of plasma accelerators which have been proposed, the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator. We show that the electric fields in the plasma for both schemes are very similar, and thus the dynamics of the driven beams are very similar. The differences appear in the parameters associated with the driving beams. In particular to obtain a given accelerating gradient, the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator has a higher efficiency and a lower total energy for the driving beam. Finally, we show for the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator that one can accelerate high quality low emittance beams and, in principle, obtain efficiencies and energy spreads comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques.

  10. Study of photoemission mechanism for varied doping GaN photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jianliang; Xu, Yuan; Niu, Jun; Gao, Youtang; Chang, Benkang

    2015-10-01

    Negative electron affinity (NEA) GaN photocathode has many virtues, such as high quantum efficiency, low dark current, concentrated electrons energy distribution and angle distribution, adjustive threshold and so on. The quantum efficiency is an important parameter for the preparation and evaluation of NEA GaN photocathode. The varied doping GaN photocathode has the directional inside electric field within the material, so the higher quantum efficiency can be obtained. The varied doping NEA GaN photocathode has better photoemission performance. According to the photoemission theory of NEA GaN photocathode, the quantum efficiency formulas for uniform doping and varied doping NEA GaN photocathodes were given. In the certain condition, the quantum efficiency formula for varied doping GaN photocathode consists with the uniform doping. The activation experiment was finished for varied doping GaN photocathode. The cleaning method and technics for varied doping GaN photocathode were given in detail. To get an atom clean surface, the heat cleaning must be done after the chemical cleaning. Using the activation and evaluation system for NEA photocathode, the varied doping GaN photocathode was activated with Cs and O, and the photocurrent curve for varied doping GaN photocathode was gotten.

  11. GaN nanowire arrays by a patterned metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. C.; Yuan, G. D.; Wu, R. W.; Lu, H. X.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wei, T. B.; Wang, J. X.; Li, J. M.; Zhang, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    We developed an one-step and two-step metal-assisted chemical etching method to produce self-organized GaN nanowire arrays. In one-step approach, GaN nanowire arrays are synthesized uniformly on GaN thin film surface. However, in a two-step etching processes, GaN nanowires are formed only in metal uncovered regions, and GaN regions with metal-covering show nano-porous sidewalls. We propose that nanowires and porous nanostructures are tuned by sufficient and limited etch rate, respectively. PL spectra shows a red-shift of band edge emission in GaN nanostructures. The formation mechanism of nanowires was illustrated by two separated electrochemical reactions occur simultaneously. The function of metals and UV light was illustrated by the scheme of potential relationship between energy bands in Si, GaN and standard hydrogen electrode potential of solution and metals.

  12. First-principles study of d0 ferromagnetism in alkali-metal doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The d0 ferromagnetism in GaN has been studied based on density functional theory. Our results show that GaN with sufficient hole become spin-polarized. Alkali-metal doping can introduce holes in GaN. Among them, both of Li- and Na-doping induce ferromagnetism in GaN and Na-doped GaN behaves as half-metallic ferromagnet. Moreover, at a growth temperature of 2000 K under N-rich condition, both concentrations can exceed 18%, which is sufficient to produce detectable macroscopic magnetism in GaN. The Curie temperature of Li- and Na-doped GaN is estimated to be 304 and 740 K, respectively, which are well above room temperature.

  13. Development of Partial-Charge Potential for GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Devanathan, Ram; Oda, Takuji; Weber, William J.

    2006-09-01

    Partial-charged potentials for GaN are systematically developed that describes a wide range of structural properties, where the reference data for fitting the potential parameters are taken from ab initial calculations or experiments. The present potential model provides a good fit to different structural geometries and high pressure phases of GaN. The high-pressure transition from wurtzite to rock-salt structure is correctly described yielding the phase transition pressure of about 55 GPa, and the calculated volume change at the transition is in good agreement with experimental data. The results are compared with those obtained by ab initio simulations.

  14. Ferromagnetism in undoped One-dimensional GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Jeganathan, K. E-mail: jagan@physics.bdu.ac.in; Purushothaman, V.; Debnath, R.; Arumugam, S.

    2014-05-15

    We report an intrinsic ferromagnetism in vertical aligned GaN nanowires (NW) fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy without any external catalyst. The magnetization saturates at ∼0.75 × emu/gm with the applied field of 3000 Oe for the NWs grown under the low-Gallium flux of 2.4 × 10{sup −8} mbar. Despite a drop in saturation magnetization, narrow hysteresis loop remains intact regardless of Gallium flux. Magnetization in vertical standing GaN NWs is consistent with the spectral analysis of low-temperature photoluminescence pertaining to Ga-vacancies associated structural defects at the nanoscale.

  15. Femtosecond Studies of Carrier Dynamics in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Zeng, Wensheng; Xu, Su; Makinen, Antti J.; Wicks, Gary W.; Gao, Yongli

    1998-03-01

    Ultrafast carrier dynamics were measured in GaN by femtosecond two-color pump-probe technique with 150fs resolution. Undoped wurtzite GaN sample studied in this work was grown by moecular beam epitaxy on a (0001)-oriented sapphire substrate. Third harmonic wave from Ti:sapphire Regen was employed as pump and second harmonic as probe. Transient transmission measurement shows the electron-phonon scattering and longitutal optical phonons relaxation. A simply two temperature model is used to explain the results.

  16. Persistent photoconductivity in neutron irradiated GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minglan, Zhang; Ruixia, Yang; Naixin, Liu; Xiaoliang, Wang

    2013-09-01

    Unintentionally doped GaN films grown by MOCVD were irradiated with neutrons at room temperature. In order to investigate the influence of neutron irradiation on the optical properties of GaN films, persistent photoconductivity (PPC) and low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out. Pronounced PPC was observed in the samples before and after neutron irradiation without the appearance of a yellow luminescence (YL) band in the PL spectrum, suggesting that the origin of PPC and YL are not related. Moreover, PPC phenomenon was enhanced by neutron irradiation and quenched by the followed annealing process at 900 °C. The possible origin of PPC is discussed.

  17. Dislocation luminescence in GaN single crystals under nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Xu, Ke; Fan, Ying Min; Wang, Jian Feng; Zhang, Ji Cai; Ren, Guo Qiang

    2014-12-01

    This work presents an experimental study on the dislocation luminescence in GaN by nanoindentation, cathodoluminescence, and Raman. The dislocation luminescence peaking at 3.12 eV exhibits a series of special properties in the cathodoluminescence measurements, and it completely disappears after annealing at 500°C. Raman spectroscopy shows evidence for existence of vacancies in the indented region. A comprehensive investigation encompassing cathodoluminescence, Raman, and annealing experiments allow the assignment of dislocation luminescence to conduction-band-acceptor transition involving Ga vacancies. The nanoscale plasticity of GaN can be better understood by considering the dislocation luminescence mechanism.

  18. Synthesis of p-type GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Park, Youn Ho; Kim, Ilsoo; Park, Tae-Eon; Kwon, Byoung Wook; Choi, Won Kook; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2013-08-01

    GaN has been utilized in optoelectronics for two decades. However, p-type doping still remains crucial for realization of high performance GaN optoelectronics. Though Mg has been used as a p-dopant, its efficiency is low due to the formation of Mg-H complexes and/or structural defects in the course of doping. As a potential alternative p-type dopant, Cu has been recognized as an acceptor impurity for GaN. Herein, we report the fabrication of Cu-doped GaN nanowires (Cu:GaN NWs) and their p-type characteristics. The NWs were grown vertically via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using a Au/Ni catalyst. Electrical characterization using a nanowire-field effect transistor (NW-FET) showed that the NWs exhibited n-type characteristics. However, with further annealing, the NWs showed p-type characteristics. A homo-junction structure (consisting of annealed Cu:GaN NW/n-type GaN thin film) exhibited p-n junction characteristics. A hybrid organic light emitting diode (OLED) employing the annealed Cu:GaN NWs as a hole injection layer (HIL) also demonstrated current injected luminescence. These results suggest that Cu can be used as a p-type dopant for GaN NWs.GaN has been utilized in optoelectronics for two decades. However, p-type doping still remains crucial for realization of high performance GaN optoelectronics. Though Mg has been used as a p-dopant, its efficiency is low due to the formation of Mg-H complexes and/or structural defects in the course of doping. As a potential alternative p-type dopant, Cu has been recognized as an acceptor impurity for GaN. Herein, we report the fabrication of Cu-doped GaN nanowires (Cu:GaN NWs) and their p-type characteristics. The NWs were grown vertically via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using a Au/Ni catalyst. Electrical characterization using a nanowire-field effect transistor (NW-FET) showed that the NWs exhibited n-type characteristics. However, with further annealing, the NWs showed p-type characteristics. A homo

  19. Properties of amorphous GaN from first-principles simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, B.; Drabold, D. A.

    2011-08-01

    Amorphous GaN (a-GaN) models are obtained from first-principles simulations. We compare four a-GaN models generated by “melt-and-quench” and the computer alchemy method. We find that most atoms tend to be fourfold, and a chemically ordered continuous random network is the ideal structure for a-GaN albeit with some coordination defects. Where the electronic structure is concerned, the gap is predicted to be less than 1.0 eV, underestimated as usual by a density functional calculation. We observe a highly localized valence tail and a remarkably delocalized exponential conduction tail in all models generated. Based upon these results, we speculate on potential differences in n- and p-type doping. The structural origin of tail and defect states is discussed. The vibrational density of states and dielectric function are computed and seem consistent with experiment.

  20. Structural and vibrational properties of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, T.; Ichiryu, D.; Toshikawa, K.; Sekiguchi, K.; Sota, T.; Matsuo, R.; Azuhata, T.; Yamaguchi, M.; Yagi, T.; Chichibu, S.; Nakamura, S.

    1999-08-01

    Structural and vibrational properties of device quality pure GaN substrate grown using a lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) technique were studied using x-ray diffraction, Brillouin, Raman, and infrared spectroscopy. Lattice constants were found to be a=3.1896±0.0002 Å and c=5.1855±0.0002 Å. Comparing the results with those on GaN epilayer directly grown on sapphire substrate, it is shown that the GaN substrate is indeed of high quality, i.e., the lattice is relaxed. However the GaN substrate has a small enough but finite residual strain arising from the pileup of the lateral growth front on SiO2 masks in the course of LEO. It was also found that the elastic stiffness constants C13 and C44, are more sensitive to the residual strain than the optical phonon frequencies. The high frequency and static dielectric constants were found to be 5.14 and 9.04. The Born and Callen effective charges were found to be 2.56 and 0.50.

  1. Growth of ZnO and GaN Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Hong, S.-K.; Matsumoto, K.; Tokunaga, H.; Tachibana, A.; Lee, S. W.; Cho, M.-W.

    . Zinc oxide (ZnO) and gallium nitride (GaN) are wide bandgap semi conductors applicable to light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) with wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to blue light. Now ZnO and GaN are key ma terials for optoelectronic device applications and their applications are being rapidly expanded to lots of other technology including electronics, biotechnology, nanotech-nology, and fusion technology among all these. As a fundamental starting point for the development of this new technique, epitaxy of ZnO and GaN films is one of the most important key technology. Hence, development of the growth technique for high quality epitaxial films is highly necessary. Among the various kinds of epi taxy technique for semiconductor films developed so far, physical vapor deposition (PVD)-based epitaxy technique has been revealed to be the appropriate way for the high quality ZnO film and related alloy growths, while chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-based epitaxy technique has been proved to be the best method for the high quality GaN film and related alloy growths.

  2. Properties of H, O and C in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lee, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    The electrical properties of the light ion impurities H, O and C in GaN have been examined in both as-grown and implanted material. H is found to efficiently passivate acceptors such as Mg, Ca and C. Reactivation occurs at {ge} 450 C and is enhanced by minority carrier injection. The hydrogen does not leave the GaN crystal until > 800 C, and its diffusivity is relatively high ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 2}/s) even at low temperatures (< 200 C) during injection by wet etching, boiling in water or plasma exposure. Oxygen shows a low donor activation efficiency when implanted into GaN, with an ionization level of 30--40 meV. It is essentially immobile up to 1,100 C. Carbon can produce low p-type levels (3 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}3}) in GaN during MOMBE, although there is some evidence it may also create n-type conduction in other nitrides.

  3. NQRS Data for GaN (Subst. No. 2219)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for GaN (Subst. No. 2219)

  4. Photoluminescence of Zn-implanted GaN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, J. I.; Hutchby, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The photoluminescence spectrum of Zn-implanted GaN peaks at 2.87 eV at room temperature. The emission efficiency decreases linearly with the logarithm of the Zn concentration in the range from 1 x 10 to the 18th to 20 x 10 to the 18th Zn/cu cm.

  5. Crystallization of free standing bulk GaN by HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucznik, B.; Pastuszka, B.; Grzegory, I.; Bokowski, M.; Kamler, G.; Domagaa, J.; Nowak, G.; Prystawko, P.; Krukowski, S.; Porowski, S.

    2006-06-01

    Gallium nitride was crystallized on 2 inch MOVPE GaN/sapphire substrates by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy. A stable growth has been achieved in long duration (>10 h) processes at growth rates bigger than 100 m/h. As a result, entirely transparent and colorless bulk crystals with thickness exceeding 2 mm were obtained. The cracks in the thick HVPE GaN layers deposited on the MOVPE GaN/sapphire substrates can appear especially during cooling of the system after crystallization. It is shown that the formation of cracks at cooling is dependent on the gradients in the layer thickness The relaxation of strains in the resulting crystal coupled to the substrate leads to the self separation of GaN from sapphire. (At present 30 x 30 x 2 mm free standing bulk GaN crystals are obtained). The GaN crystals are characterized by defect selective etching (DSE) and X-ray diffraction. The density of threading dislocations (measured by DSE of (0001) surface) decreases with the thickness of the HVPE layer and becomes lower than 107 cm-2 in the layers thicker than app. 1 mm. The X-ray rocking curves for (0002) reflection (slit 0.5 x 0.1 mm) are in the range of 80-95 arcsec. However, larger scans reveal bending of crystallographic {0001} planes. The behavior of these deformed free standing crystals used as substrates for HVPE re-growth is also analyzed.

  6. Refractive index of erbium doped GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Alajlouni, S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zavada, J. M.

    2014-08-25

    GaN is an excellent host for erbium (Er) to provide optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safe 1540 nm wavelength window. Er doped GaN (GaN:Er) epilayers were synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing a pulsed growth scheme, the crystalline quality of GaN:Er epilayers was significantly improved over those obtained by conventional growth method of continuous flow of reaction precursors. X-ray diffraction rocking curve linewidths of less than 300 arc sec were achieved for the GaN (0002) diffraction peak, which is comparable to the typical results of undoped high quality GaN epilayers and represents a major improvement over previously reported results for GaN:Er. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the GaN:Er epilayers in the 1540 nm wavelength window and a linear dependence on Er concentration was found. The observed refractive index increase with Er incorporation and the improved crystalline quality of the GaN:Er epilayers indicate that low loss GaN:Er optical waveguiding structures are feasible.

  7. Luminescence properties of defects in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, Michael A.; Morkoc, Hadis

    2005-03-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN) and its allied binaries InN and AIN as well as their ternary compounds have gained an unprecedented attention due to their wide-ranging applications encompassing green, blue, violet, and ultraviolet (UV) emitters and detectors (in photon ranges inaccessible by other semiconductors) and high-power amplifiers. However, even the best of the three binaries, GaN, contains many structural and point defects caused to a large extent by lattice and stacking mismatch with substrates. These defects notably affect the electrical and optical properties of the host material and can seriously degrade the performance and reliability of devices made based on these nitride semiconductors. Even though GaN broke the long-standing paradigm that high density of dislocations precludes acceptable device performance, point defects have taken the center stage as they exacerbate efforts to increase the efficiency of emitters, increase laser operation lifetime, and lead to anomalies in electronic devices. The point defects include native isolated defects (vacancies, interstitial, and antisites), intentional or unintentional impurities, as well as complexes involving different combinations of the isolated defects. Further improvements in device performance and longevity hinge on an in-depth understanding of point defects and their reduction. In this review a comprehensive and critical analysis of point defects in GaN, particularly their manifestation in luminescence, is presented. In addition to a comprehensive analysis of native point defects, the signatures of intentionally and unintentionally introduced impurities are addressed. The review discusses in detail the characteristics and the origin of the major luminescence bands including the ultraviolet, blue, green, yellow, and red bands in undoped GaN. The effects of important group-II impurities, such as Zn and Mg on the photoluminescence of GaN, are treated in detail. Similarly, but to a lesser extent, the effects of

  8. GaN as a radiation hard particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J.; Bates, R.; Cunningham, W.; Blue, A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Vaitkus, J.; Gaubas, E.; O'Shea, V.

    2007-06-01

    Semiconductor tracking detectors at experiments such as ATLAS and LHCb at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be subjected to intense levels of radiation. The proposed machine upgrade, the Super-LHC (SLHC), to 10 times the initial luminosity of the LHC will require detectors that are ultra-radiation hard. Much of the current research into finding a detector that will meet the requirements of the SLHC has focused on using silicon substrates with enhanced levels of oxygen, for example Czochralski silicon and diffusion oxygenated float zone silicon, and into novel detector structures such as 3D devices. Another avenue currently being investigated is the use of wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN). Both SiC and GaN should be intrinsically more radiation hard than silicon. Pad and guard ring structures were fabricated on three epitaxial GaN wafers. The epitaxial GaN thickness was either 2.5 or 12 μm and the fabricated detectors were irradiated to various fluences with 24 GeV/c protons and 1 MeV neutrons. Detectors were characterised pre- and post-irradiation by performing current-voltage ( I- V) and charge collection efficiency (CCE) measurements. Devices fabricated on 12 μm epitaxial GaN irradiated to fluences of 1016 protons cm-2 and 1016 neutrons cm-2 show maximum CCE values of 26% and 20%, respectively, compared to a maximum CCE of 53% of the unirradiated device.

  9. Network Cosmology

    PubMed Central

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Kitsak, Maksim; Sinkovits, Robert S.; Rideout, David; Meyer, David; Boguñá, Marián

    2012-01-01

    Prediction and control of the dynamics of complex networks is a central problem in network science. Structural and dynamical similarities of different real networks suggest that some universal laws might accurately describe the dynamics of these networks, albeit the nature and common origin of such laws remain elusive. Here we show that the causal network representing the large-scale structure of spacetime in our accelerating universe is a power-law graph with strong clustering, similar to many complex networks such as the Internet, social, or biological networks. We prove that this structural similarity is a consequence of the asymptotic equivalence between the large-scale growth dynamics of complex networks and causal networks. This equivalence suggests that unexpectedly similar laws govern the dynamics of complex networks and spacetime in the universe, with implications to network science and cosmology. PMID:23162688

  10. Structural properties of free-standing 50 mm diameter GaN waferswith (101_0) orientation grown on LiAlO2

    SciTech Connect

    Jasinski, Jacek; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Maruska, Herbert-Paul; Chai, Bruce H.; Hill, David W.; Chou, Mitch M.C.; Gallagher, John J.; Brown, Stephen

    2005-09-27

    (10{und 1}0) GaN wafers grown on (100) face of {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Despite good lattice matching in this heteroepitaxial system, high densities of planar structural defects in the form of stacking faults on the basal plane and networks of boundaries located on prism planes inclined to the layer/substrate interface were present in these GaN layers. In addition, significant numbers of threading dislocations were observed. High-resolution electron microscopy indicates that stacking faults present on the basal plane in these layers are of low-energy intrinsic I1type. This is consistent with diffraction contrast experiments.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of GaN nanowire doubly clamped resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliakkal, Carina B.; Mathew, John P.; Hatui, Nirupam; Rahman, A. Azizur; Deshmukh, Mandar M.; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2015-09-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) have been intensely researched as building blocks for nanoscale electronic and photonic device applications; however, the mechanical properties of GaN nanostructures have not been explored in detail. The rigidity, thermal stability, and piezoelectric properties of GaN make it an interesting candidate for nano-electromechanical systems. We have fabricated doubly clamped GaN NW electromechanical resonators on sapphire using electron beam lithography and estimated the Young's modulus of GaN from resonance frequency measurements. For wires of triangular cross section with side ˜90 nm, we obtained values for the Young's modulus to be about 218 and 691 GPa, which are of the same order of magnitude as the values reported for bulk GaN. We also discuss the role of residual strain in the nanowire on the resonant frequency and the orientation dependence of the Young's modulus in wurtzite crystals.

  12. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry-Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ∼1 μm and a length of ∼15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry-Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm(-2). The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices. PMID:27454350

  13. Photo-induced Doping in GaN Epilayers with Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Lin, T. N.; Inciong, M. R.; Santiago, S. R. M. S.; Yeh, T. W.; Yang, W. Y.; Yuan, C. T.; Shen, J. L.; Kuo, H. C.; Chiu, C. H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new doping scheme where photo-induced carriers from graphene quantum dots (GQDs) can be injected into GaN and greatly enhance photoluminescence (PL) in GaN epilayers. An 8.3-fold enhancement of PL in GaN is observed after the doping. On the basis of time-resolved PL studies, the PL enhancement is attributed to the carrier transfer from GQDs to GaN. Such a carrier transfer process is caused by the work function difference between GQDs and GaN, which is verified by Kelvin probe measurements. We have also observed that photocurrent in GaN can be enhanced by 23-fold due to photo-induced doping with GQDs. The improved optical and transport properties from photo-induced doping are promising for applications in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26987403

  14. Atomic-Level Study of Melting Behavior of GaN Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2006-09-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations with a Stillinger-Weber potential have been used to investigate the melting behavior of wurtzite-type single crystalline GaN nanotubes. The simulations show that the melting temperature of GaN nanotubes is much lower than that of bulk GaN, which may be associated with the large surface-to-volume ratio of the nanotubes. The melting temperature of the GaN nanotubes increases with the thickness of the nanotubes to a saturation value, which is close to the melting temperature of a GaN slab. The results reveal that the nanotubes begin to melt at the surface, and then the melting rapidly extends to the interior of the nanotubes as the temperature increases. The melting temperature of a single-crystalline GaN nanotube with [100]-oriented lateral facets is higher than that with [110]-oriented lateral facets for the same thickness.

  15. Photo-induced Doping in GaN Epilayers with Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Lin, T N; Inciong, M R; Santiago, S R M S; Yeh, T W; Yang, W Y; Yuan, C T; Shen, J L; Kuo, H C; Chiu, C H

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new doping scheme where photo-induced carriers from graphene quantum dots (GQDs) can be injected into GaN and greatly enhance photoluminescence (PL) in GaN epilayers. An 8.3-fold enhancement of PL in GaN is observed after the doping. On the basis of time-resolved PL studies, the PL enhancement is attributed to the carrier transfer from GQDs to GaN. Such a carrier transfer process is caused by the work function difference between GQDs and GaN, which is verified by Kelvin probe measurements. We have also observed that photocurrent in GaN can be enhanced by 23-fold due to photo-induced doping with GQDs. The improved optical and transport properties from photo-induced doping are promising for applications in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:26987403

  16. Photo-induced Doping in GaN Epilayers with Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. N.; Inciong, M. R.; Santiago, S. R. M. S.; Yeh, T. W.; Yang, W. Y.; Yuan, C. T.; Shen, J. L.; Kuo, H. C.; Chiu, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a new doping scheme where photo-induced carriers from graphene quantum dots (GQDs) can be injected into GaN and greatly enhance photoluminescence (PL) in GaN epilayers. An 8.3-fold enhancement of PL in GaN is observed after the doping. On the basis of time-resolved PL studies, the PL enhancement is attributed to the carrier transfer from GQDs to GaN. Such a carrier transfer process is caused by the work function difference between GQDs and GaN, which is verified by Kelvin probe measurements. We have also observed that photocurrent in GaN can be enhanced by 23-fold due to photo-induced doping with GQDs. The improved optical and transport properties from photo-induced doping are promising for applications in GaN-based optoelectronic devices.

  17. Computational synthesis of single-layer GaN on refractory materials

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Arunima K.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2014-08-04

    The synthesis of single-layer materials relies on suitable substrates. In this paper, we identify suitable substrates for the stabilization and growth of single-layer GaN and characterize the effect of the substrate on the electronic structure of single-layer GaN. We identify two classes of epitaxial substrates, refractory metal diborides and transition-metal dichalcogenides. We find that the refractory diborides provide epitaxial stabilization for the growth and functionalization of single layer GaN. We show that chemical interactions of single layer GaN with the diboride substrates result in n-type doping of the single-layer GaN. Transition-metal dichalcogenides, on the other hand, although epitaxially matched, cannot provide sufficient thermodynamic stabilization for the growth of single layer GaN. Nonetheless, energy band alignments of GaN/metal chalcogenides show that they make good candidates for heterostructures.

  18. Growth of GaN micro/nanolaser arrays by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Zhang, Hanlu; Dong, Lin; Zhang, Yingjiu; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-09-01

    Optically pumped ultraviolet lasing at room temperature based on GaN microwire arrays with Fabry–Perot cavities is demonstrated. GaN microwires have been grown perpendicularly on c-GaN/sapphire substrates through simple catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition. The GaN microwires are [0001] oriented single-crystal structures with hexagonal cross sections, each with a diameter of ∼1 μm and a length of ∼15 μm. A possible growth mechanism of the vertical GaN microwire arrays is proposed. Furthermore, we report room-temperature lasing in optically pumped GaN microwire arrays based on the Fabry–Perot cavity. Photoluminescence spectra exhibit lasing typically at 372 nm with an excitation threshold of 410 kW cm‑2. The result indicates that these aligned GaN microwire arrays may offer promising prospects for ultraviolet-emitting micro/nanodevices.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of GaN nanowire doubly clamped resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Maliakkal, Carina B. Mathew, John P.; Hatui, Nirupam; Rahman, A. Azizur; Deshmukh, Mandar M.; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2015-09-21

    Gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires (NWs) have been intensely researched as building blocks for nanoscale electronic and photonic device applications; however, the mechanical properties of GaN nanostructures have not been explored in detail. The rigidity, thermal stability, and piezoelectric properties of GaN make it an interesting candidate for nano-electromechanical systems. We have fabricated doubly clamped GaN NW electromechanical resonators on sapphire using electron beam lithography and estimated the Young's modulus of GaN from resonance frequency measurements. For wires of triangular cross section with side ∼90 nm, we obtained values for the Young's modulus to be about 218 and 691 GPa, which are of the same order of magnitude as the values reported for bulk GaN. We also discuss the role of residual strain in the nanowire on the resonant frequency and the orientation dependence of the Young's modulus in wurtzite crystals.

  20. Enhancing the field emission properties of Se-doped GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enling; Wu, Guishuang; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    Pure and Se-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on Pt-coated Si(111) substrates via chemical vapor deposition. The GaN NWs exhibit a uniform density with an average diameter of 20–120 nm. The structure of the NWs is wurtzite hexagonal, and the growth direction is along [0001]. Field emission measurements show that the Se-doped GaN NWs possess a low turn-on field (2.9 V μm‑1) compared with the pure GaN NWs (7.0 V μm‑1). In addition, density functional theory calculations indicate that the donor states near the Fermi level are mainly formed through the hybridization between Se 4p and N 2p orbitals and that the Fermi level move towards the vacuum level. Consequently, the work functions of Se-doped GaN NWs are lower than those of pure GaN NWs.

  1. Study of radiation detection properties of GaN pn diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Mutsuhito; Kushimoto, Maki; Mitsunari, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kohei; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi; Inoue, Yoku; Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru; Nakano, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    Recently, GaN, which has remarkable properties as a material for optical devices and high-power electron devices, has also attracted attention as a material for radiation detectors. We previously suggested the use of BGaN as a neutron detector material. However, the radiation detection characteristics of GaN itself are not yet adequately understood. For realizing a BGaN neutron detector, the understanding of the radiation detection characteristics of GaN, which is a base material of the neutron detector, is important. In this study, we evaluated the radiation detection characteristics of GaN. We performed I-V and energy spectrum measurements under alpha ray, gamma ray, and thermal neutron irradiations to characterize the radiation detection characteristics of a GaN diode. The obtained results indicate that GaN is an effective material for our proposed new BGaN-based neutron detector.

  2. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of GaN with hydrazine on spinel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishin, S. A.; Temkin, H.; Antipov, V. G.; Guriev, A. I.; Zubrilov, A. S.; Elyukhin, V. A.; Faleev, N. N.; Kyutt, R. N.; Chin, A. K.

    1998-05-01

    Growth of high quality wurtzite-structure GaN layers on (111) MgAl2O4 by gas source molecular beam epitaxy is described. Hydrazine was used as a source of active nitrogen. In situ reflection high energy electron diffraction was used to monitor the growth mode. Two-dimensional growth was obtained at temperatures above 750 °C on multi-step GaN buffer layers. The resulting GaN films show excellent luminescence properties.

  3. Graphene oxide assisted synthesis of GaN nanostructures for reducing cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rong; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chao; Yang, Yanlian; Dong, Hongwei; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-01

    We report a general approach for the synthesis of large-scale gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures by the graphene oxide (GO) assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. A modulation effect of GaN nanostructures on cell adhesion has been observed. The morphology of the GaN surface can be controlled by GO concentrations. This approach, which is based on the predictable choice of the ratio of GO to catalysts, can be readily extended to the synthesis of other materials with controllable nanostructures. Cell studies show that GaN nanostructures reduced cell adhesion significantly compared to GaN flat surfaces. The cell-repelling property is related to the nanostructure and surface wettability. These observations of the modulation effect on cell behaviors suggest new opportunities for novel GaN nanomaterial-based biomedical devices. We believe that potential applications will emerge in the biomedical and biotechnological fields.We report a general approach for the synthesis of large-scale gallium nitride (GaN) nanostructures by the graphene oxide (GO) assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. A modulation effect of GaN nanostructures on cell adhesion has been observed. The morphology of the GaN surface can be controlled by GO concentrations. This approach, which is based on the predictable choice of the ratio of GO to catalysts, can be readily extended to the synthesis of other materials with controllable nanostructures. Cell studies show that GaN nanostructures reduced cell adhesion significantly compared to GaN flat surfaces. The cell-repelling property is related to the nanostructure and surface wettability. These observations of the modulation effect on cell behaviors suggest new opportunities for novel GaN nanomaterial-based biomedical devices. We believe that potential applications will emerge in the biomedical and biotechnological fields. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02770h

  4. On the Helmert-blocking technique: its acceleration by block Choleski decomposition and formulae to insert observations into an adjusted network.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Eduardo; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    The Helmert-blocking technique is a common approach to adjust large geodetic networks like Europeans and Brazilians. The technique is based upon a division of the network into partial networks called blocks. This way, the global network adjustment can be done by manipulating these blocks. Here we show alternatives to solve the block system that arises from the application of the technique. We show an alternative that optimizes its implementation as the elapsed processing time is decreased by about 33%. We also show that to insert observations into an adjusted network it is not necessary to readjust the whole network. We show the formulae to insert new observations into an adjusted network that are more efficient than simply readjusting the whole new network. PMID:26064634

  5. On the Helmert-blocking technique: its acceleration by block Choleski decomposition and formulae to insert observations into an adjusted network

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Eduardo; Oliveira, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    The Helmert-blocking technique is a common approach to adjust large geodetic networks like Europeans and Brazilians. The technique is based upon a division of the network into partial networks called blocks. This way, the global network adjustment can be done by manipulating these blocks. Here we show alternatives to solve the block system that arises from the application of the technique. We show an alternative that optimizes its implementation as the elapsed processing time is decreased by about 33%. We also show that to insert observations into an adjusted network it is not necessary to readjust the whole network. We show the formulae to insert new observations into an adjusted network that are more efficient than simply readjusting the whole new network. PMID:26064634

  6. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  7. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-04-18

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  8. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for Measurement of Integral Soil Water Content at the Small Catchment Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. One largest initiative to cover the measuring gap of soil moisture between point scale and remote sensing observations is the COSMOS network (Zreda et al., 2012). Here, cosmic-ray neutron sensing, which may be more precisely named ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS), is applied. The measuring principle is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. Soil water content contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters is inversely correlated to the neutron flux at the air-ground interface. This approach is now implemented, e.g. in USA (Zreda et al., 2012) and Germany (Rivera Villarreyes et al., 2011), based on its simple installation and integral measurement of soil moisture at the small catchment scale. The present study performed Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing on farmland at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam and Berlin cropped with corn in 2010, sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. In order to test this methodology, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, several calibration approaches, role of vegetation cover and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations were also evaluated. Observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil moisture from GANS compared quantitatively with mean values derived from a network of classical devices under vegetated and non- vegetated conditions. The GANS approach responded well

  9. Understanding of surface pit formation mechanism of GaN grown in MOCVD based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Yuan, Gao; Xiao-Wei, Xue; Jiang-Jiang, Li; Xun, Wang; Yan-Hui, Xing; Bi-Feng, Cui; De-Shu, Zou

    2016-06-01

    Frank’s theory describes that a screw dislocation will produce a pit on the surface, and has been evidenced in many material systems including GaN. However, the size of the pit calculated from the theory deviates significantly from experimental result. Through a careful observation of the variations of surface pits and local surface morphology with growing temperature and V/III ratio for c-plane GaN, we believe that Frank’s model is valid only in a small local surface area where thermodynamic equilibrium state can be assumed to stay the same. If the kinetic process is too vigorous or too slow to reach a balance, the local equilibrium range will be too small for the center and edge of the screw dislocation spiral to be kept in the same equilibrium state. When the curvature at the center of the dislocation core reaches the critical value 1/r 0, at the edge of the spiral, the accelerating rate of the curvature may not fall to zero, so the pit cannot reach a stationary shape and will keep enlarging under the control of minimization of surface energy to result in a large-sized surface pit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204009 and 61204011) and the Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 4142005).

  10. Accelerated Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of Accelerated Reader, a system of computerized testing and record-keeping that supplements the regular classroom reading program. Accelerated Reader's primary goal is to increase literature-based reading practice. The program offers a computer-aided reading comprehension and management program intended to motivate…

  11. Cathodoluminescence of GaN implanted with Sm and Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Lozykowski, H.J.; Jadwisienczak, W.M.; Brown, I.

    1999-04-01

    We report the first observation of visible cathodoluminescence of the rare earth (RE) elements Sm, Ho implanted in GaN. The implanted samples were given isochronal thermal annealing treatments at a temperature of 1100 degrees C in N2, at atmospheric pressure to recover implantation damages and activate the RE ions. The sharp characteristic emission lines corresponding to Sm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} intra-4f{sup n}-shell transitions are resolved in the spectral range from 400 to 1000 nm, and observed over the temperature range of 11-411 K. The cathodoluminescence emission is only weakly temperature dependent. The results indicate that RE doped GaN epilayers are suitable as a material for visible optoelectronic devices.

  12. Hydrogen-dependent lattice dilation in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Sun, Dian-Zhao; Kong, Mei-Ying

    2000-06-01

    Using Raman spectroscopy we have analysed the strain status of GaN films grown on sapphire substrates by NH3 source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In addition to the expected compressive biaxial strain, in some cases GaN films grown on c-face sapphire substrates suffer from serious tensile biaxial strain. This anomalous behaviour has been well interpreted in terms of interstitial hydrogen-dependent lattice dilation. The hydrogen concentration in the films is measured by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). With increasing hydrogen incorporation, the residual compressive biaxial strain is first further relaxed, and then turns into tensile strain when the hydrogen contaminant exceeds a critical concentration. The hydrogen incorporation during the growth process is found to be growth-rate dependent, and is supposed to be strain driven. We believe that the strain-induced interstitial incorporation is another way for strain relaxation during heteroepitaxy, besides the two currently well known mechanisms: formation of dislocations and growth front roughening.

  13. Anharmonic phonon decay in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuscó, R.; Domènech-Amador, N.; Novikov, S.; Foxon, C. T.; Artús, L.

    2015-08-01

    We present a Raman-scattering study of optical phonons in zinc-blende (cubic) GaN for temperatures ranging from 80 to 750 K. The experiments were performed on high-quality, cubic GaN films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs (001) substrates. The observed temperature dependence of the optical phonon frequencies and linewidths is analyzed in the framework of anharmonic decay theory, and possible decay channels are discussed in the light of density-functional-theory calculations. The longitudinal-optical (LO) mode relaxation is found to occur via asymmetric decay into acoustic phonons, with an appreciable contribution of higher-order processes. The transverse-optical mode linewidth shows a weak temperature dependence and its frequency downshift is primarily determined by the lattice thermal expansion. The LO phonon lifetime is derived from the observed Raman linewidth and an excellent agreement with previous theoretical predictions is found.

  14. High-Temperature Growth of GaN Single Crystals Using Li-Added Na-Flux Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honjo, Masatomo; Imabayashi, Hiroki; Takazawa, Hideo; Todoroki, Yuma; Matsuo, Daisuke; Murakami, Kosuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Sasaki, Takatomo; Mori, Yusuke

    2012-12-01

    The Na-flux method is a promising for fabricating GaN crystals with high quality. In our previous study, we found that the surface morphology and transparency of these crystals were improved by raising the growth temperature. Increasing the threshold pressure of nitrogen for GaN growth, however, made GaN growth at high temperatures difficult. In this study, we attempted to grow GaN crystals by the Na-flux method with the addition of Li to the flux, which promoted the solubility of nitrogen in the flux. As a result, the threshold pressure of nitrogen for GaN growth decreased, and GaN crystals with high crystallinity were grown at 900 °C. In addition, we found that the crystallinity of the grown GaN crystals was improved and the concentration of impurities in the grown GaN crystals was decreased by raising the growth temperature.

  15. Positron annihilation in AlN and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, N. Yu.; Emtsev, V. V.; Mikhailin, A. V.; Davidov, V. Yu.

    2001-12-01

    The measurements of one-dimensional angular correlation of the annihilation radiation (1D-ACAR) have been carried out for AlN and GaN as well as for some related materials (Al, Ga, GaP, GaAs, GaSb) which have been used as samples of references the analysis of results. The numeral values of characteristic length of radius of spherical volume to be occupied by annihilating electron ( rs‧) have differed significantly from the corresponding values ( rs) calculated by the conventional independent-particle-model (IPM) for ideal Fermi-gas: rs‧ (AlN)≃1.28 rs, where rs (AlN)≃1.61 a.u., and rs‧ (GaN)≃1.66 rs, where rs (GaN)≃1.64 a.u. The electron-positron “ion radii” reconstructed by the high-momentum components (HMC) of 1D-ACAR for Al 3+, Ga 3+ cores as well as numeral rs‧ values provide some reasons to believe that Ga- and Al-vacancies and their impurity complexes are effective centers of the positron localization in AlN and GaN; it is assumed that these complexes include V Ga, V Al, and N atom (V Ga-N Ga in GaN and V Al-N Al in AlN) where the nitrogen atom is likely to be in the configuration of substitution (anti-site), N +Ga and N +Al, respectively.

  16. GaN blue diode lasers: a spectroscopist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinen, H.; Glässner, D.; Metcalf, H.; Wynands, R.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    We have characterized the spectroscopic properties of one of the first samples of blue-emitting diode lasers based on GaN. With such a laser diode operated inside a standard extended cavity arrangement we find a mode-hop free tuning range of more than 20 GHz and a linewidth of 10 MHz. Doppler-free spectroscopy on an indium atomic beam reveals the isotope shift between the two major indium isotopes as well as efficient optical pumping.

  17. Photoluminescence of ion-implanted GaN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, J. I.; Hutchby, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-five elements were implanted in GaN. Their photoluminescence spectra were measured and compared to those of an unimplanted control sample. Most impurities emit a peak at about 2.15 eV. Mg, Zn, Cd, Ca, As, Hg, and Ag have more characteristic emissions. Zn provides the most efficient recombination center. A set of midgap states is generated during the damage-annealing treatment.

  18. Ammonothermal bulk GaN substrates for LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Ehrentraut, D.; Kamber, D. S.; Downey, B. C.; Cook, J.; Grundmann, M.; Pakalapati, R. T.; Yoo, H.; D'Evelyn, M. P.

    2014-02-01

    Soraa has developed a novel ammonothermal approach for growth of high quality, true bulk GaN crystals at a greatly reduced cost. Soraa's patented approach, known as SCoRA (Scalable Compact Rapid Ammonothermal) utilizes internal heating to circumvent the material-property limitations of conventional ammonothermal reactors. The SCoRA reactor has capability for temperatures and pressures greater than 650 °C and 500 MPa, respectively, enabling higher growth rates than conventional ammonothermal techniques, yet is less expensive and more scalable than conventional autoclaves fabricated from nickel-based superalloys. SCoRA GaN growth has been performed on c-plane and m-plane seed crystals with diameters between 5 mm and 2" to thicknesses of 0.5-4 mm. The highest growth rates are greater than 40 μm/h and rates in the 10-30 μm/h range are routinely observed. These values are significantly larger than those achieved by conventional ammonothermal GaN growth and are sufficient for a cost-effective manufacturing process. Two-inch diameter, crack-free, free-standing, n-type bulk GaN crystals have been grown. The crystals have been characterized by a range of techniques, including x-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL), optical spectroscopy, and capacitance-voltage measurements. The crystallinity of the grown crystals is very good, with FWHM values of 15-80 arc-sec and average dislocation densities below 5 x 105 cm-2.

  19. Thermal functionalization of GaN surfaces with 1-alkenes.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan U; Cimalla, Volker; Eichapfel, Georg; Himmerlich, Marcel; Krischok, Stefan; Ambacher, Oliver

    2013-05-28

    A thermally induced functionalization process for gallium nitride surfaces with 1-alkenes is introduced. The resulting functionalization layers are characterized with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared to reference samples without and with a photochemically generated functionalization layer. The resulting layers show very promising characteristics as functionalization for GaN based biosensors. On the basis of the experimental results, important characteristics of the functionalization layers are estimated and a possible chemical reaction scheme is proposed. PMID:23617559

  20. Growth of GaN epilayers on c-, m-, a-, and (20.1)-plane GaN bulk substrates obtained by ammonothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudziński, M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Janicki, L.; Serafinczuk, J.; Kucharski, R.; Zając, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Doradziński, R.; Dwiliński, R.; Strupiński, W.

    2011-08-01

    GaN epilayers were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on c-, m-, a-, and (20.1)-plane GaN substrates obtained by the ammonothermal method. The influence of (i) the surface preparation of substrates, (ii) MOCVD growth parameters, and (iii) the crystallographic orientation of substrates on the structural and optical properties of GaN epilayers was investigated and carefully analyzed. It was observed that the polishing of substrates and their misorientation have strong impact on the quality of GaN epilayers grown on these substrates. The MOCVD growth process was optimized for epilayers grown on m-plane GaN substrates. The best structural and optical properties were achieved for epilayers deposited at 1075 °C and the total reactor pressure of 50 mbar. These conditions were applied to grow GaN epilayers on substrates with other ( c-, a-, and (20.1)-plane) crystallographic orientations in the same MOCVD process. Particularly good optical properties were obtained for GaN epilayers deposited on polar and non-polar ( m- and a-plane) substrates, whereas slightly worse optical properties were observed for epilayers deposited on the semi-polar substrate. It therefore means that MOCVD growth conditions optimized for a given crystallographic direction ( m-plane direction in this case) work rather well also for other crystallographic directions.

  1. Ca and O ion implantation doping of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Wilson, R.G.; Pearton, S.J.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-04-01

    {ital p}- and {ital n}-type doping of GaN have been realized by ion implantation of Ca and O, respectively. Rapid thermal annealing at 1100{degree}C or higher is required to achieve {ital p}-type conduction in Ca or Ca+P implanted samples with an estimated ionization level of 169 meV and a corresponding activation efficiency of {approximately}100{percent}. This is the first experimental report of an acceptor species in GaN, other than Mg, with an ionization energy level less than 180 meV. O-implanted GaN displays an ionization level of {approximately}29 meV but with an activation efficiency of only 3.6{percent} after a 1050{degree}C anneal that may result from insufficient vacancy generation for the lighter O ion or from the existence of a second, deeper O energy level. Neither Ca or O displayed measurable redistribution, based on secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, even after a 1125{degree}C anneal. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. In situ nanomechanics of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian Yu; Zheng, He; Mao, S X; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T

    2011-04-13

    The deformation, fracture mechanisms, and the fracture strength of individual GaN nanowires were measured in real time using a transmission electron microscope-scanning probe microscope (TEM-SPM) platform. Surface mediated plasticity, such as dislocation nucleation from a free surface and plastic deformation between the SPM probe (the punch) and the nanowire contact surface were observed in situ. Although local plasticity was observed frequently, global plasticity was not observed, indicating the overall brittle nature of this material. Dislocation nucleation and propagation is a precursor before the fracture event, but the fracture surface shows brittle characteristic. The fracture surface is not straight but kinked at (10-10) or (10-11) planes. Dislocations are generated at a stress near the fracture strength of the nanowire, which ranges from 0.21 to 1.76 GPa. The results assess the mechanical properties of GaN nanowires and may provide important insight into the design of GaN nanowire devices for electronic and optoelectronic applications. PMID:21417390

  3. UV-Photoassisted Etching of GaN in KOH

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Auh, K.H.; Cho, H.; Donovan, S.M.; Han, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren F.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-12

    The etch rate of GaN under W-assisted photoelectrochemical conditions in KOH solutions is found to be a strong function of illumination intensity, solution molarity, sample bias and material doping level. At low e-h pair generation rates, grain boundaries are selectively etched, while at higher illumination intensities etch rates for unintentionally doped (n - 3x 10^12Gcm-3) GaN are 2 1000 .min-l. The etching is diffusion limited under our conditions with an activation energy of - 0.8kCal.mol-1. The etched surfaces are rough, but retain their stoichiometry. PEC etching is found to selectively reveal grain boundaries in GaN under low light illumination conditions. At high lamp powers the rates increase with sample temperature and the application of bias to the PEC cell, while they go through a maximum with KOH solution molarity. The etching is diffusion-limited, producing rough surface morphologies that are suitable in a limited number of device fabrication steps. The surfaces however appear to remain relatively close to their stoichiometric composition.

  4. Oxidation of GaN: An ab initio thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Adam J.; Walsh, Aron

    2013-10-01

    GaN is a wide-band-gap semiconductor used in high-efficiency light-emitting diodes and solar cells. The solid is produced industrially at high chemical purities by deposition from a vapor phase, and oxygen may be included at this stage. Oxidation represents a potential path for tuning its properties without introducing more exotic elements or extreme processing conditions. In this work, ab initio computational methods are used to examine the energy potentials and electronic properties of different extents of oxidation in GaN. Solid-state vibrational properties of Ga, GaN, Ga2O3, and a single substitutional oxygen defect have been studied using the harmonic approximation with supercells. A thermodynamic model is outlined which combines the results of ab initio calculations with data from experimental literature. This model allows free energies to be predicted for arbitrary reaction conditions within a wide process envelope. It is shown that complete oxidation is favorable for all industrially relevant conditions, while the formation of defects can be opposed by the use of high temperatures and a high N2:O2 ratio.

  5. Theoretical and Experiment Study of Cathodoluminescence of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Nasr, F.; Matoussi, A.; Salh, R.; Boufaden, T.; Guermazi, S.; Fitting, H.-J.; Eljani, B.; Fakhfakh, Z.

    2007-09-01

    In this work, we report the theoretical and experimental results of cathodoluminescence (CL) from GaN layers with thickness (1-3) micron grown at 800 °C by MOVPE on silicon substrate. The CL measurements were performed in a digital scanning electron microscope DSM 960 at room temperature. The CL spectra recorded at room temperature (RT) show the main UV peak at 3.42 eV of the fundamental transition and a broad yellow band at 2.2 eV attributed the intrinsic defects and extrinsic dopants and impurities. The simulation of the CL excitation and intensity is developed using consistent 2-D model based on the electron beam energy dissipation and taking into account the effects of carrier diffusion, internal absorption and the recombination processes in GaN. Then, we have investigated the evolution of the CL intensity from GaN as a function the electron beam energy in the range Eo = (5-20) keV. A comparative study between experimental and simulated CL spectra at room temperature is presented.

  6. Epitaxially-Grown GaN Junction Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Denbaars, S.P.; Lester, L.F.; Mishra, U.K.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-05-19

    Junction field effect transistors (JFET) are fabricated on a GaN epitaxial structure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The DC and microwave characteristics of the device are presented. A junction breakdown voltage of 56 V is obtained corresponding to the theoretical limit of the breakdown field in GaN for the doping levels used. A maximum extrinsic transconductance (gm) of 48 mS/mm and a maximum source-drain current of 270 mA/mm are achieved on a 0.8 µ m gate JFET device at VGS= 1 V and VDS=15 V. The intrinsic transconductance, calculated from the measured gm and the source series resistance, is 81 mS/mm. The fT and fmax for these devices are 6 GHz and 12 GHz, respectively. These JFETs exhibit a significant current reduction after a high drain bias is applied, which is attributed to a partially depleted channel caused by trapped hot-electrons in the semi-insulating GaN buffer layer. A theoretical model describing the current collapse is described, and an estimate for the length of the trapped electron region is given.

  7. Pit assisted oxygen chemisorption on GaN surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Monu; Krishna T C, Shibin; Aggarwal, Neha; Kaur, Mandeep; Singh, Sandeep; Gupta, Govind

    2015-06-21

    A comprehensive analysis of oxygen chemisorption on epitaxial gallium nitride (GaN) films grown at different substrate temperatures via RF-molecular beam epitaxy was carried out. Photoemission (XPS and UPS) measurements were performed to investigate the nature of the surface oxide and corresponding changes in the electronic structure. It was observed that the growth of GaN films at lower temperatures leads to a lower amount of surface oxide and vice versa was observed for a higher temperature growth. The XPS core level (CL) and valence band maximum (VBM) positions shifted towards higher binding energies (BE) with oxide coverage and revealed a downward band bending. XPS valence band spectra were de-convoluted to understand the nature of the hybridization states. UPS analysis divulged higher values of electronic affinity and ionization energy for GaN films grown at a higher substrate temperature. The surface morphology and pit structure were probed via microscopic measurements (FESEM and AFM). FESEM and AFM analysis revealed that the film surface was covered with hexagonal pits, which played a significant role in oxygen chemisorption. The favourable energetics of the pits offered an ideal site for oxygen adsorption. Pit density and pit depth were observed to be important parameters that governed the surface oxide coverage. The contribution of surface oxide was increased with an increase in average pit density as well as pit depth. PMID:25991084

  8. Dislocation core structures in Si-doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Rhode, S. L. Fu, W. Y.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Horton, M. K.; Pennycook, T. J.; Dusane, R. O.; Moram, M. A.

    2015-12-14

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the core structures of threading dislocations in plan-view geometry of GaN films with a range of Si-doping levels and dislocation densities ranging between (5 ± 1) × 10{sup 8} and (10 ± 1) × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. All a-type (edge) dislocation core structures in all samples formed 5/7-atom ring core structures, whereas all (a + c)-type (mixed) dislocations formed either double 5/6-atom, dissociated 7/4/8/4/9-atom, or dissociated 7/4/8/4/8/4/9-atom core structures. This shows that Si-doping does not affect threading dislocation core structures in GaN. However, electron beam damage at 300 keV produces 4-atom ring structures for (a + c)-type cores in Si-doped GaN.

  9. Understanding the pyramidal growth of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, J.L.; Arlery, M.; Bourret, A.

    1996-11-01

    By a combination of conventional, HREM and CBED TEM experiments the authors have studied wurtzite GaN layers grown by Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on (0001)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. They experimentally determine the structure of the macroscopic hexagonal pyramids that are visible at the surface of the layers when no optimized buffer is introduced. These pyramids look like hexagonal volcanoes with one hexagonal microscopic chimney (up to 75 nm wide) at their core. The crystal inside the chimney is a pure GaN crystal with a polarity opposed to the one of the neighboring material: the GaN layers grown on (0001)Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are everywhere Ga-terminated except in the chimneys where they are N-terminated. Some of the N-terminated chimneys grow faster and form macroscopic hexagonal pyramids. Chimneys bounded by Inversion Domains Boundaries (IDBs) originate from steps at the surface of the substrate and may be suppressed by an adapted buffer layer.

  10. Magnesium diffusion profile in GaN grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzarti, Z.; Halidou, I.; Bougrioua, Z.; Boufaden, T.; El Jani, B.

    2008-07-01

    The diffusion of magnesium has been studied in GaN layers grown on sapphire substrate by atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapor-phase-epitaxy (MOVPE) in a "home-made" reactor. Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to visualise the Mg profiles in two kinds of multi-sublayer GaN structures. One structure was grown with a variable flow of Ga precursor (TMG) and the second one with a variable growth temperature. In both cases, the Mg dopant precursor (Cp 2Mg) flow was kept constant. Using the second Fick's law to fit the experimental SIMS data, we have deduced an increasing then a saturating Mg diffusion coefficient versus the Mg concentration. Mg incorporation was found to get higher for lower growth rate, i.e. when TMG flow is reduced. Furthermore, based on the temperature-related behaviour we have found that the activation energy for Mg diffusion coefficient in GaN was 1.9 eV. It is suggested that Mg diffuses via substitutional sites.

  11. Self-assembled GaN nanowires on diamond.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Fabian; Furtmayr, Florian; Zamani, Reza; Magén, Cesar; Morante, Joan R; Arbiol, Jordi; Garrido, Jose A; Stutzmann, Martin

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate the nucleation of self-assembled, epitaxial GaN nanowires (NWs) on (111) single-crystalline diamond without using a catalyst or buffer layer. The NWs show an excellent crystalline quality of the wurtzite crystal structure with m-plane faceting, a low defect density, and axial growth along the c-axis with N-face polarity, as shown by aberration corrected annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction confirms single domain growth with an in-plane epitaxial relationship of (10 ̅10)(GaN) [parallel] (01 ̅1)(Diamond) as well as some biaxial tensile strain induced by thermal expansion mismatch. In photoluminescence, a strong and sharp excitonic emission reveals excellent optical properties superior to state-of-the-art GaN NWs on silicon substrates. In combination with the high-quality diamond/NW interface, confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements, these results underline the potential of p-type diamond/n-type nitride heterojunctions for efficient UV optoelectronic devices. PMID:22506554

  12. Metal contacts on ZnSe and GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Duxstad, K J

    1997-05-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been focused on the development of blue light emitting materials and devices. The focus has been on GaN and ZnSe, direct band gap semiconductors with bands gaps of 3.4 and 2.6 eV, respectively. To have efficient, reliable devices it is necessary to have thermally and electrically stable Ohmic contacts. This requires knowledge of the metal-semiconductor reaction behavior. To date few studies have investigated this behavior. Much information has accumulated over the years on the behavior of metals on Si and GaAs. This thesis provides new knowledge for the more ionic wide band gap semiconductors. The initial reaction temperatures, first phases formed, and phase stability of Pt, Pd, and Ni on both semiconductors were investigated. The reactions of these metals on ZnSe and GaN are discussed in detail and correlated with predicted behavior. In addition, comparisons are made between these highly ionic semiconductors and Si and GaAs. The trends observed here should also be applicable to other II-VI and III-Nitride semiconductor systems, while the information on phase formation and stability should be useful in the development of contacts for ZnSe and GaN devices.

  13. Linear induction accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  14. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  15. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  16. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  17. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  18. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  19. Integral Quantification of Soil Water Content at the Intermediate Catchment Scale by Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water content at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. One new measurement methodology for integral quantifications of mean areal soil water content at the intermediate catchment scale is the aboveground sensing of cosmic-ray neutrons, more precisely ground albedo neutron sensing (GANS). Ground albedo natural neutrons, are generated by collisions of secondary cosmic rays with land surface materials (soil, water, biomass, snow, etc). Neutrons measured at the air/ground interface correlate with soil moisture contained in a footprint of ca. 600 m diameter and a depth ranging down to a few decimeters. This correlation is based on the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator compared to others landscape materials. The present study performed ground albedo neutron sensing in different locations in Germany under different vegetative situations (cropped and bare field) and different seasonal conditions (summer, autumn and winter). Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a farmland close to Potsdam (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with corn in 2010 and sunflowers in 2011, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains, Germany) in 2011. In order to test this method, classical soil moisture devices and meteorological data were used for comparison. Moreover, calibration approach, and transferability of calibration parameters to different times and locations are also evaluated. Our observations suggest that GANS can overcome the lack of data for hydrological processes at the intermediate scale. Soil water content from GANS compared quantitatively with mean water content values derived from a network of classical devices (RMSE = 0.02 m3/m3 and r2 = 0.98) in three calibration periods with cropped-field conditions. Then, same calibration parameters corresponded

  20. Opportunities and challenges in GaN metal organic chemical vapor deposition for electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koh; Yamaoka, Yuya; Ubukata, Akinori; Arimura, Tadanobu; Piao, Guanxi; Yano, Yoshiki; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Tabuchi, Toshiya

    2016-05-01

    The current situation and next challenge in GaN metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) for electron devices of both GaN on Si and GaN on GaN are presented. We have examined the possibility of increasing the growth rate of GaN on 200-mm-diameter Si by using a multiwafer production MOCVD machine, in which the vapor phase parasitic reaction is well controlled. The impact of a high-growth-rate strained-layer-superlattice (SLS) buffer layer is presented in terms of material properties. An SLS growth rate of as high as 3.46 µm/h, which was 73% higher than the current optimum, was demonstrated. As a result, comparable material properties were obtained. Next, a typical result of GaN doped with Si of 1 × 1016 cm‑3 grown at the growth rate of 3.7 µm/h is shown. For high-voltage application, we need a thick high-purity GaN drift layer with a low carbon concentration, of less than 1016 cm‑3. It is shown that achieving a high growth rate by precise control of the vapor phase reaction is still challenge in GaN MOCVD.

  1. Nanoheteroepitaxy of GaN on AlN/Si(111) nanorods fabricated by nanosphere lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Shin, In-Su; Jin, Lu; Kim, Donghyun; Park, Yongjo; Yoon, Euijoon

    2016-06-01

    Nanoheteroepitaxy (NHE) of GaN on an AlN/Si(111) nanorod structure was investigated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Silica nanosphere lithography was employed to fabricate a periodic hexagonal nanorod array with a narrow gap of 30 nm between the nanorods. We were successful in obtaining a fully coalesced GaN film on the AlN/Si(111) nanorod structure. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that threading dislocation (TD) bending and termination by stacking faults occurred near the interface between GaN and the AlN/Si(111) nanorods, resulting in the reduction of TD density for the NHE GaN layer. The full width at half-maximum of the X-ray rocking curve for (102) plane of the NHE GaN was found to decrease down to 728 arcsec from 1005 arcsec for the GaN layer on a planar AlN/Si(111) substrate, indicating that the crystalline quality of the NHE GaN was improved. Also, micro-Raman measurement showed that tensile stress in the NHE GaN layer was reduced significantly as much as 70% by introducing air voids between the nanorods.

  2. Preparation and characterization of one-dimensional GaN nanorods with Tb intermediate layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Feng; Xue, Chengshan

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► GaN nanorods have been prepared on Si substrates by magnetron sputtering. ► GaN nanorods are single crystal with hexagonal wurtzite structure. ► GaN nanorods are high-quality crystalline after ammoniating at 950 °C for 15 min. ► Ammoniating temperatures and times affect the growth of GaN nanorods significantly. -- Abstract: GaN nanorods have been successfully prepared on Si(1 1 1) substrates by magnetron sputtering through ammoniating Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Tb thin films. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), FT-IR spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to characterize the microstructures, morphologies compositions and optical properties of the GaN samples. The results demonstrate that the nanorods are single crystal GaN with hexagonal wurtzite structure and high-quality crystalline after ammoniating at 950 °C for 15 min, which have the size of 100–150 nm in diameter. Ammoniating temperatures and times affect the growth of GaN nanorods significantly. The growth procedure mainly follows the Tb catalyst-assisted VLS mechanism.

  3. Terahertz study of m-plane GaN thin fims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadir, Shaham; Jang, Der-Jun; Lin, Ching-Liang; Lo, Ikai

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the optical properties of m-plane GaN thin films using the terahertz time domain spectroscopy. The m-plane GaN thin films were grown on γ-LiAlO2 substrates with buffer layers of low temperature grown GaN. The thin films were illuminated with terahertz radiation generated by a LT-GaAs antenna and the transmitted signal was detected by a ZnTe crystal. The polarization of the terahertz wave was chosen to be either parallel or perpendicular to the GaN [0001] direction. We compared the transmitted signals of the m-plane GaN thin films to that of the LAO substrate. The samples as well as the LAO substrate exhibited polarization dependence of absorption in terahertz spectrum. The carrier densities and the mobilities were derived from the transmittance of the THz wave using extended Drude model. We found, in all samples, both the carrier densities and mobilities along the GaN [0001] direction were smaller than those along the GaN [1120] direction due to the stripe formation along the GaN [1120].

  4. GaN: From three- to two-dimensional single-layer crystal and its multilayer van der Waals solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onen, A.; Kecik, D.; Durgun, E.; Ciraci, S.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) GaN is a III-V compound semiconductor with potential optoelectronic applications. In this paper, starting from 3D GaN in wurtzite and zinc-blende structures, we investigated the mechanical, electronic, and optical properties of the 2D single-layer honeycomb structure of GaN (g -GaN ) and its bilayer, trilayer, and multilayer van der Waals solids using density-functional theory. Based on high-temperature ab initio molecular-dynamics calculations, we first showed that g -GaN can remain stable at high temperature. Then we performed a comparative study to reveal how the physical properties vary with dimensionality. While 3D GaN is a direct-band-gap semiconductor, g -GaN in two dimensions has a relatively wider indirect band gap. Moreover, 2D g -GaN displays a higher Poisson ratio and slightly less charge transfer from cation to anion. In two dimensions, the optical-absorption spectra of 3D crystalline phases are modified dramatically, and their absorption onset energy is blueshifted. We also showed that the physical properties predicted for freestanding g -GaN are preserved when g -GaN is grown on metallic as well as semiconducting substrates. In particular, 3D layered blue phosphorus, being nearly lattice-matched to g -GaN , is found to be an excellent substrate for growing g -GaN . Bilayer, trilayer, and van der Waals crystals can be constructed by a special stacking sequence of g -GaN , and they can display electronic and optical properties that can be controlled by the number of g -GaN layers. In particular, their fundamental band gap decreases and changes from indirect to direct with an increasing number of g -GaN layers.

  5. The role of AlN encapsulation of GaN during implant activation annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Rieger, D.J.; Baca, A.G.; Pearton, S.J.; Lee, J.W.; Vartulli, C.R.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    With the demonstration of implant doping of GaN and the resulting need to perform the activation anneal at 1100 C, details of thermal stability of the GaN surface needs to be understood. This work reports on the use of a sputtered AlN encapsulant to preserve the surface of GaN during such annealing. The surface was characterized by formation of Pt/Au Schottky contacts and by AES. Schottky contacts deposited an GaN annealed wtih the AlN encapsulant displayed good rectification properties while those formed on GaN annealed uncapped approached ohmic behavior. AES analysis supports the hypothesis that the uncapped sample has lost N from the very near surface which creates N-vacancies that act as donors and thereby form an n{sup +}-surface layer.

  6. GaN microdomes for broadband omnidirectional antireflection for concentrator photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lu; McGoogan, Matthew R.; Piedimonte, Tyler A.; Kidd, Ian V.; French, Roger H.; Zhao, Hongping

    2013-03-01

    GaN microdomes are studied as a broadband omnidirectional anti-reflection structure for high efficiency multi-junction concentrated photovoltaics. Comprehensive studies of the effect of GaN microdome sizes and shapes on the light collection efficiency were studied. The three dimensional finite difference time domain (3-D FDTD) method was used to calculate the surface reflectance of GaN microdomes as compared to that of the flat surface. Studies indicate significant reduction of the surface reflectance is achievable by properly designing the microdome structures. Formation of the GaN microdomes with the flexibility to tune the size and shape has been demonstrated by using reactive ion etching (RIE) of both GaN and the self-assembled silica monolayer microspheres. Characterizations of the angle-dependence light surface reflectance for both micro-domes and flat surface show the similar trend as the simulation.

  7. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of substitutional transition-metal atoms in GaN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Shi, Jun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the transition-metal (TM) atoms (Sc—Zn, Pt and Au) doped zigzag GaN single-walled nanotubes (NTs) are investigated using first-principles spin-polarized density functional calculations. Our results show that the bindings of all TM atoms are stable with the binding energy in the range of 6-16 eV. The Sc- and V-doped GaN NTs exhibit a nonmagnetic behavior. The GaN NTs doped with Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu and Pt are antiferromagnetic. On the contrary, the Cr-, Fe-, Co-, Zn- and Au-doped GaN NTs show the ferromagnetic characteristics. The Mn- and Co-doped GaN NTs induce the largest local moment of 4μB among these TM atoms. The local magnetic moment is dominated by the contribution from the substitutional TM atom and the N atoms bonded with it.

  8. Step-induced misorientation of GaN grown on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Smalc-Koziorowska, J.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Sahonta, S.-L.; Komninou, Ph.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Georgakilas, A.

    2008-07-14

    In the growth of nonpolar (1120) a-plane GaN on r-plane (1102) sapphire by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, misoriented crystallites are observed close to the substrate. They have average diameter {approx}10 nm and are oriented with the (0001){sub GaN} plane approximately parallel to the (2113){sub sapph.} plane and [0110]{sub GaN} parallel [1101]{sub sapph.}. This semipolar orientation is promoted by a low misfit (2.4%) between (1011){sub GaN} and (1210){sub sapph.} planes. Its introduction, after nitridation treatment, is due to GaN nucleation on (2113){sub sapph.} step facets inclined at 26 deg. relative to the r-plane. Two variants are observed, leading to twinning when they abut inside the epilayer.

  9. Hydrogen sensing characteristics of semipolar (112{sup ¯}2) GaN Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeon Baik, Kwang; Kim, Hyonwoong; Jang, Soohwan; Lee, Sung-Nam; Lim, Eunju; Pearton, S. J.; Ren, F.

    2014-02-17

    The hydrogen detection characteristics of semipolar (112{sup ¯}2) plane GaN Schottky diodes were investigated and compared to c-plane Ga- and N-polar and nonpolar a-plane (112{sup ¯}0) GaN diodes. The semipolar GaN diodes showed large current response to 4% hydrogen in nitrogen gas with an accompanying Schottky barrier reduction of 0.53 eV at 25 °C, and the devices exhibited full recovery to the initial current level upon switching to a nitrogen ambient. The current-voltage characteristics of the semipolar devices remained rectifying after hydrogen exposure, in sharp contrast to the case of c-plane N-polar GaN. These results show that the surface atom configuration and polarity play a strong role in hydrogen sensing with GaN.

  10. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of m-plane GaN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ji-Hong; Jang, Der-Jun; Quadir, Shaham; Lo, Ikai

    2014-03-01

    The optical properties and the carrier relaxation of GaN thin films were studied by time-resolved photoluminescence apparatus. The m-plane GaN thin films were grown on GaN buffer layer and γ-LiAlO2 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy with variation of N/Ga ratio. We found that the PL associated with defect is prominent for large N/Ga ratio due to the increasing of stacking faults. The intensity of PL perpendicular to the GaN [0001] direction is more intensive than that of PL parallel to the perpendicular to the GaN [0001] direction. The PL decay times exhibit dependence on the direction of the PL polarizations.

  11. Vertical nonpolar growth templates for light emitting diodes formed with GaN nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Ting-Wei; Lin, Yen-Ting; Ahn, Byungmin; Stewart, Lawrence S.; Daniel Dapkus, P.; Nutt, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that nonpolar m-plane surfaces can be generated on uniform GaN nanosheet arrays grown vertically from the (0001)-GaN bulk material. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown on the facets of these nanosheets are demonstrated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Owing to the high aspect ratio of the GaN nanosheet structure, the MQWs predominantly grow on nonpolar GaN planes. The results suggest that GaN nanosheets provide a conduction path for device fabrication and also a growth template to reduce the piezoelectric field inside the active region of InGaN-based light emitting diodes.

  12. Prospects for the application of GaN power devices in hybrid electric vehicle drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ming; Chen, Chingchi; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-07-01

    GaN, a wide bandgap semiconductor successfully implemented in optical and high-speed electronic devices, has gained momentum in recent years for power electronics applications. Along with rapid progress in material and device processing technologies, high-voltage transistors over 600 V have been reported by a number of teams worldwide. These advances make GaN highly attractive for the growing market of electrified vehicles, which currently employ bipolar silicon devices in the 600-1200 V class for the traction inverter. However, to capture this billion-dollar power market, GaN has to compete with existing IGBT products and deliver higher performance at comparable or lower cost. This paper reviews key achievements made by the GaN semiconductor industry, requirements of the automotive electric drive system and remaining challenges for GaN power devices to fit in the inverter application of hybrid vehicles.

  13. Surface morphology evolution of m-plane (1100) GaN during molecular beam epitaxy growth: Impact of Ga/N ratio, miscut direction, and growth temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Jiayi; Tang Liang; Malis, Oana; Edmunds, Colin; Gardner, Geoff; Manfra, Michael

    2013-07-14

    We present a systematic study of morphology evolution of [1100] m-plane GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on free-standing m-plane substrates with small miscut angles towards the -c [0001] and +c [0001] directions under various gallium to nitrogen (Ga/N) ratios at substrate temperatures T = 720 Degree-Sign C and T = 740 Degree-Sign C. The miscut direction, Ga/N ratio, and growth temperature are all shown to have a dramatic impact on morphology. The observed dependence on miscut direction supports the notion of strong anisotropy in the gallium adatom diffusion barrier and growth kinetics. We demonstrate that precise control of Ga/N ratio and substrate temperature yields atomically smooth morphology on substrates oriented towards +c [0001] as well as the more commonly studied -c [0001] miscut substrates.

  14. Polarity of semipolar wurtzite crystals: X-ray photoelectron diffraction from GaN(101⁻1) and GaN(202⁻1) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyuk, O. Jiříček, P.; Bartoš, I.; Paskova, T.

    2014-09-14

    Polarity of semipolar GaN(101⁻1) (101⁻1⁻) and GaN(202⁻1) (202⁻1⁻) surfaces was determined with X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) using a standard MgKα source. The photoelectron emission from N 1s core level measured in the a-plane of the crystals shows significant differences for the two crystal orientations within the polar angle range of 80–100° from the (0001) normal. It was demonstrated that XPD polar plots recorded in the a-plane are similar for each polarity of the GaN(101⁻1) and GaN(202⁻1) crystals if referred to (0001) crystal axes. For polarity determinations of all important GaN(h0h⁻l) semipolar surfaces, the above given polar angle range is suitable.

  15. Initial growth control of GaN on Si with physical-vapor-deposition-AlN seed layer for high-quality GaN templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbo; Sodabanlu, Hassanet; Daigo, Yoshiaki; Seino, Takuya; Nakagawa, Takashi; Sugiyama, Masakazu

    2016-05-01

    An ex situ AlN seed layer was formed by physical vapor deposition (PVD) on a Si substrate, aiming at the production of high-quality GaN on Si by metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy. A low density of initial GaN islands were obtained by reducing the trimethylgallium (TMGa) flow rate. The dislocation density of GaN was dramatically reduced with 3D growth compared with 2D growth, as indicated by measurements of XRD rocking curves (FWHM of 384 and 461 arcsec for 0002 and 10\\bar{1}0 diffractions, respectively) and cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping (dark-spot density of 3.4 × 108 cm‑2) for 1-µm-thick crack-free GaN on a Si substrate. The values were almost equivalent to those of the layers grown on sapphire substrates.

  16. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  17. Rokumi-jio-gan-Containing Prescriptions Attenuate Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis in the Remnant Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hum; Lee, Sul Lim; Okamoto, Takuya; Tanaka, Takashi; Yokozawa, Takako

    2012-01-01

    Two Rokumi-jio-gan-containing prescriptions (Hachimi-jio-gan and Bakumi-jio-gan) were selected to examine their actions in nephrectomized rats. Each prescription was given orally to rats for 10 weeks after the excision of five-sixths of their kidney volumes, and its effect was compared with non-nephrectomized and normal rats. Rats given Hachimi-jio-gan and Bakumi-jio-gan showed an improvement of renal functional parameters such as serum urea nitrogen, creatinine, creatinine clearance, and urinary protein. The nephrectomized rats exhibited the up-regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphor-JNK, c-Jun, transforming growth factor-β1, nuclear factor-kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, intracellular adhesion molecule-1, Bax, cytochrome c, and caspase-3, and down-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1, and survivin; however, Bakumi-jio-gan administration acts as a regulator in inflammatory reactions caused by oxidative stress in renal failure. Moreover, the JNK pathway and apoptosis-related protein expressions, Bax, caspase-3, and survivin, were ameliorated to the normal levels by Hachimi-jio-gan administration. The development of renal lesions, glomerular sclerosis, tubulointerstitial damage, and arteriolar sclerotic lesions, estimated by histopathological evaluation and scoring, was strong in the groups administered Hachimi-jio-gan rather than Bakumi-jio-gan. This study suggests that Rokumi-jio-gan-containing prescriptions play a protective role in the progression of renal failure. PMID:23243456

  18. Fabrication of low-density GaN/AlN quantum dots via GaN thermal decomposition in MOCVD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With an appropriate high anneal temperature under H2 atmosphere, GaN quantum dots (QDs) have been fabricated via GaN thermal decomposition in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Based on the characterization of atomic force microscopy (AFM), the obtained GaN QDs show good size distribution and have a low density of 2.4 × 108 cm-2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis demonstrates that the GaN QDs were formed without Ga droplets by thermal decomposition of GaN. PMID:25136276

  19. Fabrication of GaN Microporous Structure at a GaN/Sapphire Interface as the Template for Thick-Film GaN Separation Grown by HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianli; Cheng, Hongjuan; Zhang, Song; Lan, Feifei; Qi, Chengjun; Xu, Yongkuan; Wang, Zaien; Li, Jing; Lai, Zhanping

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a microporous structure at the GaN/sapphire interface has been obtained by an electrochemical etching method via a selective etching progress using an as-grown GaN/sapphire wafer grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The as-prepared GaN interfacial microporous structure has been used as a template for the following growth of thick-film GaN crystal by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), facilitating the fabrication of a free-standing GaN substrate detached from a sapphire substrate. The evolution of the interfacial microporous structure has been investigated by varying the etching voltages and time, and the formation mechanism of interfacial microporous structure has been discussed in detail as well. Appropriate interfacial microporous structure is beneficial for separating the thick GaN crystal grown by HVPE from sapphire during the cooling down process. The separation that occurred at the place of interfacial microporous can be attributed to the large thermal strain between GaN and sapphire. This work realized the fabrication of a free-standing GaN substrate with high crystal quality and nearly no residual strain.

  20. The growth and characterization of GaN films on cone-shaped patterned sapphire by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jing; Hongling, Xiao; Xiaoliang, Wang; Cuimei, Wang; Qingwen, Deng; Zhidong, Li; Jieqin, Ding; Zhanguo, Wang; Xun, Hou

    2013-11-01

    GaN films are grown on cone-shaped patterned sapphire substrates (CPSSs) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and the influence of the temperature during the middle stage of GaN growth on the threading dislocation (TD) density of GaN is investigated. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cathode-luminescence (CL) were used to characterize the GaN films. The XRD results showed that the edge-type dislocation density of GaN grown on CPSS is remarkably reduced compared to that of GaN grown on conventional sapphire substrates (CSSs). Furthermore, when the growth temperature in the middle stage of GaN grown on CPSS decreases, the full width at half maximum of the asymmetry (102) plane of GaN is reduced. This reduction is attributed to the enhancement of vertical growth in the middle stage with a more triangular-like shape and the bending of TDs. The CL intensity spatial mapping results also showed the superior optical properties of GaN grown on CPSS to those of GaN on CSS, and that the density of dark spots of GaN grown on CPSS induced by nonradiative recombination is reduced when the growth temperature in the middle stage decreases.

  1. Crack-free GaN substrates grown by the Na-flux method with a sapphire dissolution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takumi; Imanishi, Masayuki; Nakamura, Kosuke; Murakami, Kosuke; Imabayashi, Hiroki; Matsuo, Daisuke; Honjo, Masatomo; Maruyama, Mihoko; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-07-01

    GaN wafers are generally fabricated by separating a foreign substrate from a GaN layer using thermal stress; however, thermal stress also leads to the cracking of the GaN layer. In this study, we first succeeded in dissolving a sapphire substrate just after Na-flux growth by successively changing the flux content for GaN growth (Ga–Na–C) to that for dissolving sapphire (Ga–Na–C–Li) at the considered growth temperature. Hence, no thermal stress was induced in the grown GaN crystals, resulting in a crack-free GaN substrate. We concluded that this process is a good candidate technique for supplying free-standing GaN substrates.

  2. Devices for medical diagnosis with GaN lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasny, Miroslaw; Mierczyk, Zygmunt

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents laser-induced fluroescence method (LIF) employing endogenous ("autofluroescence") and exogenous fluorophores. LIF is applied for clinical diagnosis in dermatology, gynaecology, urology, lung tumors as well as for early dentin caries. We describe the analysers with He-Ne, He-Cd, and SHG Nd:YAG lasers and new generation systems based on blue semiconductor GaN lasers that have been implemented into clinical practice till now. The LIF method, fundamental one for many medical applications, with excitation radiation of wavelength 400 nm could be appl,ied only using tunable dye lasers or titanium lasers adequte for laboratory investigations. Development of GaN laser shows possibility to design portable, compact diagnostic devices as multi-channel analysers of fluorescence spectra and surface imaging devoted to clinical application. The designed systems used for spectra measurement and registration of fluorescence images include lasers of power 5-30 mW and generate wavelengths of 405-407 nm. They are widely used in PDT method for investigation of superficial distribution of accumulation kinetics of all known photosensitizers, their elimination, and degradation as well as for treatment of superficial lesions of mucosa and skin. Excitation of exogenous porphrins in Soret band makes possible to estimate their concentration and a period of healthy skin photosensitivity that occurs after photosensitiser injections. Due to high sensitivity of spectrum analysers, properties of photosensitisers can be investigated in vitro (e.g. their aggregation, purity, chromatographic distributions) when their concentrations are 2-3 times lower in comparison to concentrations investigated with typical spectrofluorescence methods. Dentistry diagnosis is a new field in which GaN laser devices can be applied. After induction with blue light, decreased autofluorescence intensity can be observed when dentin caries occur and strong characteristic bands of endogenous porphyrines

  3. Visible fiber lasers excited by GaN laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nakanishi, Jun; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masaaki

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes and discusses visible fiber lasers that are excited by GaN laser diodes. One of the attractive points of visible light is that the human eye is sensitive to it between 400 and 700 nm, and therefore we can see applications in display technology. Of course, many other applications exist. First, we briefly review previously developed visible lasers in the gas, liquid, and solid-state phases and describe the history of primary solid-state visible laser research by focusing on rare-earth doped fluoride media, including glasses and crystals, to clarify the differences and the merits of primary solid-state visible lasers. We also demonstrate over 1 W operation of a Pr:WPFG fiber laser due to high-power GaN laser diodes and low-loss optical fibers (0.1 dB/m) made by waterproof fluoride glasses. This new optical fiber glass is based on an AlF3 system fluoride glass, and its waterproof property is much better than the well known fluoride glass of ZBLAN. The configuration of primary visible fiber lasers promises highly efficient, cost-effective, and simple laser systems and will realize visible lasers with photon beam quality and quantity, such as high-power CW or tunable laser systems, compact ultraviolet lasers, and low-cost ultra-short pulse laser systems. We believe that primary visible fiber lasers, especially those excited by GaN laser diodes, will be effective tools for creating the next generation of research and light sources.

  4. GaN Nanowire Devices: Fabrication and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Reum

    The development of microelectronics in the last 25 years has been characterized by an exponential increase of the bit density in integrated circuits (ICs) with time. Scaling solid-state devices improves cost, performance, and power; as such, it is of particular interest for companies, who gain a market advantage with the latest technology. As a result, the microelectronics industry has driven transistor feature size scaling from 10 μm to ~30 nm during the past 40 years. This trend has persisted for 40 years due to optimization, new processing techniques, device structures, and materials. But when noting processor speeds from the 1970's to 2009 and then again in 2010, the implication would be that the trend has ceased. To address the challenge of shrinking the integrated circuit (IC), current research is centered on identifying new materials and devices that can supplement and/or potentially supplant it. Bottom-up methods tailor nanoscale building blocks---atoms, molecules, quantum dots, and nanowires (NWs)---to be used to overcome these limitations. The Group IIIA nitrides (InN, AlN, and GaN) possess appealing properties such as a direct band gap spanning the whole solar spectrum, high saturation velocity, and high breakdown electric field. As a result nanostructures and nanodevices made from GaN and related nitrides are suitable candidates for efficient nanoscale UV/ visible light emitters, detectors, and gas sensors. To produce devices with such small structures new fabrication methods must be implemented. Devices composed of GaN nanowires were fabricated using photolithography and electron beam lithography. The IV characteristics of these devices were noted under different illuminations and the current tripled from 4.8*10-7 A to 1.59*10 -6 A under UV light which persisted for at least 5hrs.

  5. Ion implantation processing of GaN epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.H.; Williams, J.S.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D.J.H.; Pearton, S.J.; Yuan, C.

    1996-12-31

    Ion implantation induced-damage build up in epitaxial GaN layers grown on sapphire has been analyzed by ion channeling and electron microscopy techniques. The epitaxial layers are extremely resistant to ion beam damage in that substantial dynamic annealing of implantation disorder occurs even at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Amorphous layers can be formed in some cases if the implantation dose is high enough. However, the damage (amorphous or complex extended defects) that is formed is also extremely difficult to remove during annealing and required temperatures in excess of 1,100 C.

  6. Memristive GaN ultrathin suspended membrane array.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, Mircea; Tiginyanu, Ion; Dragoman, Daniela; Braniste, Tudor; Ciobanu, Vladimir

    2016-07-22

    We show that ultrathin GaN membranes, with a thickness of 15 nm and planar dimensions of 12 × 184 μm(2), act as memristive devices. The memristive behavior is due to the migration of the negatively-charged deep traps, which form in the volume of the membrane during the fabrication process, towards the unoccupied surface states of the suspended membranes. The time constant of the migration process is of the order of tens of seconds and varies with the current or voltage sweep. PMID:27291970

  7. H enhancement of N vacancy migration in GaN.

    SciTech Connect

    Wixom, Ryan R.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2005-06-01

    We have used density functional theory to investigate diffusion of V{sub N}{sup +} in the presence of H{sup +}. Optimal migration pathways were determined using the climbing image nudged elastic band and directed dimer methods. Our calculations indicate that the rate-limiting barrier for VN{sub N}{sup +} migration will be reduced by 0.58 eV by interplay with H{sup +}, which will enhance migration by more than an order of magnitude at typical GaN growth temperatures.

  8. Memristive GaN ultrathin suspended membrane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, Mircea; Tiginyanu, Ion; Dragoman, Daniela; Braniste, Tudor; Ciobanu, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    We show that ultrathin GaN membranes, with a thickness of 15 nm and planar dimensions of 12 × 184 μm2, act as memristive devices. The memristive behavior is due to the migration of the negatively-charged deep traps, which form in the volume of the membrane during the fabrication process, towards the unoccupied surface states of the suspended membranes. The time constant of the migration process is of the order of tens of seconds and varies with the current or voltage sweep.

  9. High field effects of GaN HEMTs.

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Joy; Shul, Randy John

    2004-09-01

    This report represents the completion of a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to develop and fabricate geometric test structures for the measurement of transport properties in bulk GaN and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. A large part of this study was spent examining fabrication issues related to the test structures used in these measurements, due to the fact that GaN processing is still in its infancy. One such issue had to do with surface passivation. Test samples without a surface passivation, often failed at electric fields below 50 kV/cm, due to surface breakdown. A silicon nitride passivation layer of approximately 200 nm was used to reduce the effects of surface states and premature surface breakdown. Another issue was finding quality contacts for the material, especially in the case of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure samples. Poor contact performance in the heterostructures plagued the test structures with lower than expected velocities due to carrier injection from the contacts themselves. Using a titanium-rich ohmic contact reduced the contact resistance and stopped the carrier injection. The final test structures had an etch constriction with varying lengths and widths (8x2, 10x3, 12x3, 12x4, 15x5, and 16x4 {micro}m) and massive contacts. A pulsed voltage input and a four-point measurement in a 50 {Omega} environment was used to determine the current through and the voltage dropped across the constriction. From these measurements, the drift velocity as a function of the applied electric field was calculated and thus, the velocity-field characteristics in n-type bulk GaN and AlGaN/GaN test structures were determined. These measurements show an apparent saturation velocity near to 2.5x10{sup 7} cm/s at 180 kV/cm and 3.1x10{sup 7} cm/s, at a field of 140 kV/cm, for the bulk GaN and AlGaN heterostructure samples, respectively. These experimental drift velocities mark the highest velocities measured in these materials to date and confirm

  10. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  11. Shape dependent electronic properties of wurzite GaN nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Kumar, Avaneesh; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Varun

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, energetic stability and electronic behavior of triangular and square shaped wurzite GaN NW oriented along [1100] and [11 2 0] direction has been investigated by employing ab-initio DFT calculation. Structural analysis suggests that triangular shaped NW undergoes strong surface reconstruction compared to square shaped NW. However, binding energy reveals that square shaped NW is energetically more feasible than triangular NW. Further, from electronic band structure we observe that both structures are metallic with higher metallicity for triangular shaped NW.

  12. Stress related aspects of GaN technology physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, Ephraim

    2015-03-01

    Simple, easy-to-use and physically meaningful analytical models have been developed for the assessment of the combined effect of the lattice and thermal mismatch on the induced stresses in an elongated bi-material assembly, as well as on the thermal mismatch on the thermal stresses in a tri-material assembly, in which the lattice mismatched stresses are eliminated in one way or another. This could be done, e.g., by using a polished or an etched substrate. The analysis is carried out in application to Gallium Nitride (GaN)-Silicon Carbide (SiC) and GaN-diamond (C) filmsubstrate assemblies. The calculated data are obtained, assuming that no annealing or other stress reduction means is applied. The data agree reasonably well with the reported (available) in-situ measurements. The most important conclusion from the computed data is that even if a reasonably good lattice match takes place (as, e.g., in the case of a GaN film fabricated on a SiC substrate, when the mismatch strain is only about 3%) and, in addition, the temperature change (from the fabrication/growth temperature to the operation temperature) is significant (as high as 1000 °C), the thermal stresses are still considerably lower than the lattice-mismatch stresses. Although there are structural and technological means for further reduction of the lattice-mismatch stresses (e.g., by high temperature annealing or by providing one or more buffering layers, or by using patterned or porous substrates), there is still a strong incentive to eliminate completely the lattice mismatch stresses. This seems to be indeed possible, if polished or otherwise flattened (e.g., chemically etched) substrates and sputter deposited GaN film is employed. In such a case only thermal stresses remain, but even these could be reduced, if necessary, by using compliant buffering layers, including layers of variable compliance, or by introducing variable compliance into the properly engineered substrate. In any event, it is expected

  13. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  14. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  15. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  16. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  17. Epitaxial growth of ZnO nanowall networks on GaN/sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Park, Hyun-Kyu; Yi, Min-Su; Park, Nae-Man; Park, Jong-Hyurk; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Maeng, Sung-Lyul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Moon, Seung-Eon

    2007-01-01

    Heteroepitaxy of vertically well-aligned ZnO nanowall networks with a honeycomblike pattern on GaN /c-Al2O3 substrates by the help of a Au catalyst was realized. The ZnO nanowall networks with wall thicknesses of 80-140nm and an average height of about 2μm were grown on a self-formed ZnO thin film during the growth on the GaN /c-Al2O3 substrates. It was found that both single-crystalline ZnO nanowalls and catalytic Au have an epitaxial relation to the GaN thin film in synchrotron x-ray scattering experiments. Hydrogen-sensing properties of the ZnO nanowall networks have also been investigated.

  18. Study on photoemission surface of varied doping GaN photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jianliang; Du, Ruijuan; Ding, Huan; Gao, Youtang; Chang, Benkang

    2014-09-01

    For varied doping GaN photocathode, from bulk to surface the doping concentrations are distributed from high to low. The varied doping GaN photocathode may produce directional inside electric field within the material, so the higher quantum efficiency can be obtained. The photoemission surface of varied doping GaN photocathode is very important to the high quantum efficiency, but the forming process of the surface state after Cs activation or Cs/O activation has been not known completely. Encircling the photoemission mechanism of varied GaN photocathode, considering the experiment phenomena during the activation and the successful activation results, the varied GaN photocathode surface model [GaN(Mg):Cs]:O-Cs after activation with cesium and oxygen was given. According to GaN photocathode activation process and the change of electronic affinity, the comparatively ideal NEA property can be achieved by Cs or Cs/O activation, and higher quantum efficiency can be obtained. The results show: The effective NEA characteristic of GaN can be gotten only by Cs. [GaN(Mg):Cs] dipoles form the first dipole layer, the positive end is toward the vacuum side. In the activation processing with Cs/O, the second dipole layer is formed by O-Cs dipoles, A O-Cs dipole includes one oxygen atom and two Cs atoms, and the positive end is also toward the vacuum side thus the escape of electrons can be promoted.

  19. Fabrication of GaN nanotubular material using MOCVD with aluminum oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Gwang; Jung, Se-Hyuck; Kung, Patrick; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2006-02-01

    GaN nanotubular material is fabricated with aluminum oxide membrane in MOCVD. SEM, XRD, TEM and PL are employed to characterize the fabricated GaN nanotubular material. An aluminum oxide membrane with ordered nano holes is used as template. Gallium nitride is deposited at the inner wall of the nano holes in aluminum oxide template, and the nanotubular material with high aspect ratio is synthesized using the precursors of TMG and ammonia gas. Optimal synthesis condition in MOCVD is obtained successfully for the gallium nitride nanotubular material in this research. The diameter of GaN nanotube fabricated is approximately 200 ~ 250 nm and the wall thickness is about 40 ~ 50 nm. GaN nanotubular material consists of numerous fine GaN particulates with sizes ranging 15 to 30 nm. The composition of gallium nitride is confirmed to be stoichiometrically 1:1 for Ga and N by EDS. XRD and TEM analyses indicate that grains in GaN nanotubular material have nano-crystalline structure. No blue shift is found in the PL spectrum on the GaN nanotubular material fabricated in aluminum oxide template.

  20. Fabrication of GaN nanotubular material using MOCVD with an aluminium oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Gwang; Jung, Se-Hyuck; Kung, Patrick; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2006-01-01

    GaN nanotubular material is fabricated with an aluminium oxide membrane in MOCVD. SEM, XRD, TEM and PL are employed to characterize the fabricated GaN nanotubular material. An aluminium oxide membrane with ordered nanoholes is used as a template. Gallium nitride is deposited at the inner wall of the nanoholes in the aluminium oxide template, and the nanotubular material with high aspect ratio is synthesized using the precursors of TMG and ammonia gas. Optimal synthesis conditions in MOCVD are obtained successfully for the gallium nitride nanotubular material in this research. The diameter of the GaN nanotube fabricated is approximately 200-250 nm and the wall thickness is about 40-50 nm. GaN nanotubular material consists of numerous fine GaN particulates with size range 15-30 nm. The composition of gallium nitride is confirmed to be stoichiometrically 1:1 for Ga and N by EDS. XRD and TEM analyses indicate that the grains in GaN nanotubular material have a nano-crystalline structure. No blue shift is found in the PL spectrum on the GaN nanotubular material fabricated in an aluminium oxide template.

  1. Kinetic-limited etching of magnesium doping nitrogen polar GaN in potassium hydroxide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Junyan; Zhang, Yuantao; Chi, Chen; Yang, Fan; Li, Pengchong; Zhao, Degang; Zhang, Baolin; Du, Guotong

    2016-01-01

    KOH based wet etchings were performed on both undoped and Mg-doped N-polar GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It is found that the etching rate for Mg-doped N-polar GaN gets slow obviously compared with undoped N-polar GaN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis proved that Mg oxide formed on N-polar GaN surface is insoluble in KOH solution so that kinetic-limited etching occurs as the etching process goes on. The etching process model of Mg-doped N-polar GaN in KOH solution is tentatively purposed using a simplified ideal atomic configuration. Raman spectroscopy analysis reveals that Mg doping can induce tensile strain in N-polar GaN films. Meanwhile, p-type N-polar GaN film with a hole concentration of 2.4 × 1017 cm-3 was obtained by optimizing bis-cyclopentadienyl magnesium flow rates.

  2. Influence of surface scattering on the thermal properties of spatially confined GaN nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yang; Zhu, Lin-Li

    2016-08-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN), the notable representative of third generation semiconductors, has been widely applied to optoelectronic and microelectronic devices due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. In this paper, we investigate the surface scattering effect on the thermal properties of GaN nanofilms. The contribution of surface scattering to phonon transport is involved in solving a Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). The confined phonon properties of GaN nanofilms are calculated based on the elastic model. The theoretical results show that the surface scattering effect can modify the cross-plane phonon thermal conductivity of GaN nanostructures completely, resulting in the significant change of size effect on the conductivity in GaN nanofilm. Compared with the quantum confinement effect, the surface scattering leads to the order-of-magnitude reduction of the cross-plane thermal conductivity in GaN nanofilm. This work could be helpful for controlling the thermal properties of GaN nanostructures in nanoelectronic devices through surface engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11302189 and 11321202) and the Doctoral Fund of Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 20130101120175).

  3. Synthesis of GaN nanocrystallites by pulsed laser ablation in pure nitrogen background gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Kakumoto, Soichiro; Sugimura, Akira; Umezu, Ikurou

    2011-09-01

    GaN is a promising material not only for electronic devices but also for photocatalysts. Synthesis of GaN nanocrystal is a key issue to improve performance for these applications. In the present study, GaN nanocrystallites have been synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA), where safe and inactive pure N2 gases were used as reactive background gases. The third harmonics beam of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (355 nm, 10 mJ/pulse, 4 J/(cm2 pulse)) was used to ablate a sintered high purity GaN target. The deposition substrates were not heated. It was clarified that the formed GaN nanoparticles contained a hexagonal system with the wurtzite structure. The diameter of the nanocrystallites was about 10 nm, and showed only little dependence on the background gas pressure, while the porosity of the assembly of nanocrystallites and content of GaN nanocrystallites in the assembly increased with background gas pressure. Highly porous nanometer-sized GaN film obtained at higher gas pressure is considered to be candidate structures for the photocatalysts.

  4. Fabrication of photonic crystal circuits based on GaN ultrathin membranes by maskless lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volciuc, Olesea; Braniste, Tudor; Sergentu, Vladimir; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Tiginyanu, Ion M.; Gutowski, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    We report on maskless fabrication of photonic crystal (PhC) circuits based on ultrathin (d ~ 15 nm) nanoperforated GaN membranes exhibiting a triangular lattice arrangement of holes with diameters of 150 nm. In recent years, we have proposed and developed a cost-effective technology for GaN micro- and nanostructuring, the so-called surface charge lithography (SCL), which opened wide possibilities for a controlled fabrication of GaN ultrathin membranes. SCL is a maskless approach based on direct writing of negative charges on the surface of a semiconductor by a focused ion beam (FIB). These charges shield the material against photo-electrochemical (PEC) etching. Ultrathin GaN membranes suspended on specially designed GaN microstructures have been fabricated using a technological route based on SCL with two selected doses of ion beam treatment. Calculation of the dispersion law in nanoperforated membranes in the approximation of scalar waves is indicative of the occurrence of surface and bulk modes, and there is a range of frequencies where only surface modes can exist. Advantages of the occurrence of two types of modes in ultrathin nanoperforated GaN membranes from the point of view of their incorporation in photonic and optoelectronic integrated circuits are discussed. Along with this, we present the results of a comparative analysis of persistent photoconductivity (PPC) and optical quenching (OQ) effects occurring in continuous and nanoperforated ultrathin GaN suspended membranes, and assess the mechanisms behind these phenomena.

  5. Strain distribution of thin InN epilayers grown on (0001) GaN templates by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delimitis, A.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Kehagias, Th.; Kioseoglou, J.; Karakostas, Th.; Nouet, G.

    2007-02-01

    A structural characterization of thin InN films is performed to determine the post-growth strain distribution, using electron microscopy techniques. A 60° misfit dislocation network at the InN /GaN interface effectively accommodates the lattice mismatch. The InN in-plane lattice parameter, which remained practically constant throughout the epilayer thickness, was precisely determined by electron diffraction analysis, and cross-section and plan-view lattice images. Image analysis using the geometric phase and projection methods revealed a uniform distribution of the residual tensile strain along the growth and lateral directions. The in-plane strain is primarily attributed to InN island coalescence during the initial stages of growth.

  6. W-band GaN MMIC PA with 257 mW output power at 86.5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xu; Xubo, Song; Yuanjie, Lü; Yuangang, Wang; Shaobo, Dun; Jiayun, Yin; Yulong, Fang; Guodong, Gu; Zhihong, Feng; Shujun, Cai

    2015-08-01

    A three-stage W-band GaN monolithic microwave integrated circuit power amplifier (MMIC PA) is reported. In order to manage coupling effects between all the parts of the W-band MMIC, all matching and bias networks have been first optimized using circuit simulating software and then systematically simulated on 3D full-wave electromagnetic simulator. The fabricated MMIC PA achieves a 257 mW output power at 86.5 GHz in continuous-wave mode, with an associated power added efficiency of 5.4% and an associated power gain of 6.1 dB. The power density is 459 mW/mm. Moreover, the MMIC PA offers over 100 mW in the 83-90 GHz bandwidth. Those performances were measured at drain bias of 12 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306113).

  7. Surface chemistry and electronic structure of nonpolar and polar GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Monu; Krishna, T. C. Shibin; Aggarwal, Neha; Gupta, Govind

    2015-08-01

    Photoemission and microscopic analysis of nonpolar (a-GaN/r-Sapphire) and polar (c-GaN/c-Sapphire) epitaxial gallium nitride (GaN) films grown via RF-Molecular Beam Epitaxy is reported. The effect of polarization on surface properties like surface states, electronic structure, chemical bonding and morphology has been investigated and correlated. It was observed that polarization lead to shifts in core level (CL) as well as valence band (VB) spectra. Angle dependent X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic analysis revealed higher surface oxide in polar GaN film compared to nonpolar GaN film. On varying the take off angle (TOA) from 0° to 60°, the Gasbnd O/Gasbnd N ratio varied from 0.11-0.23 for nonpolar and 0.17-0.36 for polar GaN film. The nonpolar film exhibited N-face polarity while Ga-face polarity was perceived in polar GaN film due to the inherent polarization effect. Polarization charge compensated surface states were observed on the polar GaN film and resulted in downward band bending. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic measurements revealed electron affinity and ionization energy of 3.4 ± 0.1 eV and 6.8 ± 0.1 eV for nonpolar GaN film and 3.8 ± 0.1 eV and 7.2 ± 0.1 eV for polar GaN film respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements divulged smooth morphology with pits on polar GaN film. The nonpolar film on the other hand showed pyramidal structures having facets all over the surface.

  8. Annealing effects on polycrystalline GaN using nitrogen and ammonia ambients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariff, A.; Zainal, N.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes effects of using post-annealing treatment in different conditions on the properties of polycrystalline GaN layer grown on m-plane sapphire substrate by electron beam (e-beam) evaporator. Without annealing, GaN surface was found to have a low RMS roughness with agglomeration of GaN grains in a specific direction and the sample consisted of gallium oxide (Ga2O3) material. When the post-annealing treatment was carried out in N2 ambient at 650 °C, initial re-crystallization of the GaN grains was observed while the evidence of Ga2O3 almost disappeared. As the NH3 annealing was conducted at 950 °C, more effect of re-crystallization occurred but with less grains coalescence. Three dominant XRD peaks of GaN in (10 1 bar 0) , (0002) and (10 1 bar 1) orientations were evident. Near band edge (NBE) related emission in GaN was also observed. The significant improvement was attributed to simultaneous recrystallization and effective reduction of N deficiency density. The post-annealing in a mixture of N2 and NH3 ambient at 950 °C was also conducted, but has limited the effectiveness of the N atoms to incorporate on the GaN layer due to 'clouding' effect by the inert N2 gas. Further increase in the annealing temperature at 980 °C and 1100 °C, respectively caused severe deteriorations of the structural and optical properties of the GaN layer. Overall, this work demonstrated initial potential in improving polycrystalline GaN material in simple and inexpensive manner.

  9. Highly c-axis oriented growth of GaN film on sapphire (0001) by laser molecular beam epitaxy using HVPE grown GaN bulk target

    SciTech Connect

    Kushvaha, S. S.; Kumar, M. Senthil; Maurya, K. K.; Dalai, M. K.; Sharma, Nita D.

    2013-09-15

    Growth temperature dependant surface morphology and crystalline properties of the epitaxial GaN layers grown on pre-nitridated sapphire (0001) substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy (LMBE) were investigated in the range of 500–750 °C. The grown GaN films were characterized using high resolution x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The x-ray rocking curve full width at a half maximum (FWHM) value for (0002) reflection dramatically decreased from 1582 arc sec to 153 arc sec when the growth temperature was increased from 500 °C to 600 °C and the value further decreased with increase of growth temperature up to 720 °C. A highly c-axis oriented GaN epitaxial film was obtained at 720 °C with a (0002) plane rocking curve FWHM value as low as 102 arc sec. From AFM studies, it is observed that the GaN grain size also increased with increasing growth temperature and flat, large lateral grains of size 200-300 nm was obtained for the film grown at 720 °C. The micro-Raman spectroscopy studies also exhibited the high-quality wurtzite nature of GaN film grown on sapphire at 720 °C. The SIMS measurements revealed a non-traceable amount of background oxygen impurity in the grown GaN films. The results show that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and crystalline quality of the epitaxial GaN films on sapphire grown by LMBE.

  10. Size dependence of melting of GaN nanowires with triangular cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2007-02-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study the melting of GaN nanowires with triangular cross-sections. The curve of the potential energy, along with the atomic configuration is used to monitor the phase transition. The thermal stability of GaN nanowires is dependent on the size of the nanowires. The melting temperature of the GaN nanowires increases with the increasing of area cross-section of the nanowires to a saturation value. An interesting result is that of the nanowires start to melt from the edges, then the surface, and extends to the inner regions of nanowires as temperature increases.

  11. Stress and Defect Control in GaN Using Low Temperature Interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaki, I.; Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Iwaya, M.; Kashima, T.; Katsuragcawa, M.

    1998-12-04

    In organometallic vapor phase epitaxial growth of Gail on sapphire, the role of the low- temperature-deposited interlayers inserted between high-temperature-grown GaN layers was investigated by in situ stress measurement, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Insertion of a series of low temperature GaN interlayers reduces the density of threading dislocations while simultaneously increasing the tensile stress during growth, ultimately resulting in cracking of the GaN film. Low temperature AIN interlayers were found to be effective in suppressing cracking by reducing tensile stress. The intedayer approach permits tailoring of the film stress to optimize film structure and properties.

  12. Some effects of oxygen impurities on AlN and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Glen A.; Schowalter, Leo J.; Morelli, Donald; Freitas, Jaime A.

    2002-12-01

    Oxygen is a common substitutional impurity in both AlN and GaN crystals. In the wurtzite 2H phase it can be present in AlN up to concentrations of 1×10 21/cm 3 while in GaN it can reach concentrations of 3×10 22/cm 3. These high concentrations of oxygen affect the luminescence, the optical absorption, the thermal conductivity, and the crystal perfection. The effects are somewhat similar in AlN and GaN. Representative experimental data will be presented to demonstrate the similarities, and to show how the oxygen content may be estimated from these property measurements.

  13. Density Functional Theory for Green Chemical Catalyst Supported on S-Terminated GaN(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Mami; Tsukamoto, Shiro; Ishii, Akira

    2011-12-01

    A novel function of nitried-based semiconductor is successfully developed for organic synthesis, in which palladium supported on the surface of S-terminated GaN(0001) serves as a unique green chemical catalyst. In this study we determined the structure of Pd-catalyst supported on S-terminated GaN(0001) surface by means of the density functional theory (DFT) within a Local Density Approximation (LDA). The important role of S on the case of GaN substrate is to make the number of the valence electron to be close to 0, it happened same way for GaAs substrate.

  14. Ion implantation doping and isolation of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Pearton, S.J.; Vartuli, C.B.; Zolper, J.C.; Yuan, C.; Stall, R.A.

    1995-09-04

    {ital N}- and {ital p}-type regions have been produced in GaN using Si{sup +} and Mg{sup +}/P{sup +} implantation, respectively, and subsequent annealing at {similar_to}1100 {degree}C. Carrier activation percentages of 93% for Si and 62% for Mg were obtained for implant doses of 5{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} of each element. Conversely, highly resistive regions ({gt}5{times}10{sup 9} {Omega}/{D`Alembertian}) can be produced in initially {ital n}- or {ital p}- type GaN by N{sup +} implantation and subsequent annealing at {similar_to}750 {degree}C. The activation energy of the deep states controlling the resistivity of these implant-isolated materials is in the range 0.8--0.9 eV. These process modules are applicable to the fabrication of a variety of different GaN-based electronic and photonic devices. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. Dielectrics for GaN based MIS-diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, F.; Abernathy, C.R.; MacKenzie, J.D.

    1998-02-01

    GaN MIS diodes were demonstrated utilizing AlN and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) as insulators. A 345 {angstrom} of AlN was grown on the MOCVD grown n-GaN in a MOMBE system using trimethylamine alane as Al precursor and nitrogen generated from a wavemat ECR N2 plasma. For the Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) growth, a multi MBE chamber was used and a 195 {angstrom} oxide is E-beam evaporated from a single crystal source of Ga{sub 5}Gd{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The forward breakdown voltage of AlN and Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) diodes are 5V and 6V, respectively, which are significantly improved from {approximately} 1.2 V of schottky contact. From the C-V measurements, both kinds of diodes showed good charge modulation from accumulation to depletion at different frequencies. The insulator GaN interface roughness and the thickness of the insulator were measured with x-ray reflectivity.

  16. High Quality, Low Cost Ammonothermal Bulk GaN Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrentraut, D; Pakalapati, RT; Kamber, DS; Jiang, WK; Pocius, DW; Downey, BC; McLaurin, M; D'Evelyn, MP

    2013-12-18

    Ammonothermal GaN growth using a novel apparatus has been performed on c-plane, m-plane, and semipolar seed crystals with diameters between 5 mm and 2 in. to thicknesses of 0.5-3 mm. The highest growth rates are greater than 40 mu m/h and rates in the 10-30 mu m/h range are routinely observed for all orientations. These values are 5-100x larger than those achieved by conventional ammonothermal GaN growth. The crystals have been characterized by X-ray diffraction rocking-curve (XRC) analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), optical spectroscopy, and capacitance-voltage measurements. The crystallinity of the grown crystals is similar to or better than that of the seed crystals, with FWHM values of about 20-100 arcsec and dislocation densities of 1 x 10(5)-5 x 10(6) cm(-2). Dislocation densities below 10(4) cm(-2) are observed in laterally-grown crystals. Epitaxial InGaN quantum well structures have been successfully grown on ammonothermal wafers. (C) 2013 The Japan Society of Applied Physics

  17. Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Weyher, J.L.; Lazar, S.; Macht, L.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar,R.J.; Muller, S.; Nowak, G.; Grzegory, I.

    2006-08-10

    Orthodox etching of HVPE-grown GaN in molten eutectic of KOH + NaOH (E etch) and in hot sulfuric and phosphoric acids (HH etch) is discussed in detail. Three size grades of pits are formed by the preferential E etching at the outcrops of threading dislocations on the Ga-polar surface of GaN. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as the calibration tool it is shown that the largest pits are formed on screw, intermediate on mixed and the smallest on edge dislocations. This sequence of size does not follow the sequence of the Burgers values (and thus the magnitude of the elastic energy) of corresponding dislocations. This discrepancy is explained taking into account the effect of decoration of dislocations, the degree of which is expected to be different depending on the lattice deformation around the dislocations, i.e. on the edge component of the Burgers vector. It is argued that the large scatter of optimal etching temperatures required for revealing all three types of dislocations in HVPE-grown samples from different sources also depends upon the energetic status of dislocations. The role of kinetics for reliability of etching in both etches is discussed and the way of optimization of the etching parameters is shown.

  18. X-ray detectors based on GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duboz, J. Y.; Frayssinet, E.; Chenot, Sebastien; Reverchon, J. L.; Idir, M.

    2013-03-01

    The potential of GaN for X-ray detection in the range from 5 to 40 keV has been assessed. The absorption coefficient has been measured as a fonction of photon energy. Various detectors have been fabricated including MSM and Schottky diodes. They were tested under polychromatic X-ray illumination and under monochromatic irradiation from 6 to 22 keV in the Soleil synchrotron facility. The vertical Schottky diodes perform better as their geometry is better suited to the thick layers required by the low absorption coefficient. The operation mode is discussed in terms of photoconductive and photovoltaic behaviors. Some parasitic effects related to the electrical activation of defects by high energy photons and to the tunnel effect in lightly doped Schottky diodes have been evidenced. These effects disappear in diodes where the doping profile has been optimized. The spectral response is found to be very consistent with the spectral absorption coefficient. The sensitivity of GaN Schottky diodes is evaluated and found to be on the order of 40 photons per second. The response is fast nd linear.

  19. GaN and ZnO Light Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, J.-S.

    In the recent several decades, there are huge concerns in solid-state light emitters based on semiconductor compound materials, which emit light of ultraviolet to red light. Light-emitting diode (LED) fabrication technology for this application is now relatively mature. Currently, the lifetime of blue or green light-emitter are apparently determined mostly by light-induced degradation of a packaging unit encapsulating the LED. New renaissance is taking place in research societies and industries of LEDs because of the straight possibilities and needs for LED-based solid-state lighting in human life instead of the conventional ones employing incandescent, halogen, fluorescent lightings etc. Among various semiconductor compounds applicable to LEDs, GaN and ZnO are regarded as promising materials for solid-state lighting because ultraviolet- or blue-light emitters, which are applicable to white-light LEDs, based on these materials are possible. In this chapter, current technologies and researches on GaN- and ZnO-based LEDs are described. A special emphasis is given to the efficiency of the LEDs in the review of the GaN-based LEDs, while current status technologies in LED applications of ZnO-based materials have been reviewed.

  20. Si Donor Incorporation in GaN Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhihua; Robin, Eric; Rozas-Jiménez, Elena; Cros, Ana; Donatini, Fabrice; Mollard, Nicolas; Pernot, Julien; Daudin, Bruno

    2015-10-14

    With increasing interest in GaN based devices, the control and evaluation of doping are becoming more and more important. We have studied the structural and electrical properties of a series of Si-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with a typical dimension of 2-3 μm in length and 20-200 nm in radius. In particular, high resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) has illustrated a higher Si incorporation in NWs than that in two-dimensional (2D) layers and Si segregation at the edge of the NW with the highest doping. Moreover, direct transport measurements on single NWs have shown a controlled doping with resistivity from 10(2) to 10(-3) Ω·cm, and a carrier concentration from 10(17) to 10(20) cm(-3). Field effect transistor (FET) measurements combined with finite element simulation by NextNano(3) software have put in evidence the high mobility of carriers in the nonintentionally doped (NID) NWs. PMID:26426262

  1. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  2. Microstructural properties and dislocation evolution on a GaN grown on patterned sapphire substrate: A transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Ruh, H.; Noh, Y. K.; Kim, M. D.; Oh, J. E.

    2010-03-01

    The microstructural properties of a GaN layer grown on a patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) were studied in detail using transmission electron microscope techniques to determine dislocation and growth behaviors. Regular and uniform recrystallized GaN islands were observed on the protruding pattern. On a flat sapphire surface, the crystallographic orientation relationship of ⟨1¯21¯0⟩GaN on FS//⟨11¯00⟩sapphire and {11¯01}GaN on FS//{12¯13}sapphire existed between the GaN and the substrate. On the other hand, the orientation relationship of ⟨1¯21¯0⟩GaN layer//⟨1¯21¯0⟩GaN island on IS//⟨11¯00⟩sapphire and {11¯01}GaN layer//{0002}GaN island on IS//{12¯13}sapphire was confirmed among the GaN layer, the recrystallized GaN islands on an inclined sapphire surface and the PSS. The flat surface among the protruding patterns began to fill rapidly with GaN. Then, the GaN gradually overgrew the protruding pattern and coalesced near the summit as the growth time increased. The generation of threading dislocations was observed in the vicinity of the coalescence points near the top of the protruding patterns.

  3. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  4. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  5. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  6. Visions for the future of particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The ambitions of accelerator based science, technology and applications far exceed the present accelerator possibilities. Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. The paper presents a digest of the research results and visions for the future in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator Research and Development. The conference concerns building of the research infrastructure, including advanced photonic and electronic systems for servicing large high energy physics experiments. There are debated a few basic groups of such systems like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution. The main subject is however the vision for the future of particle accelerators and next generation light sources.

  7. Advanced concepts for acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    Selected examples of advanced accelerator concepts are reviewed. Such plasma accelerators as plasma beat wave accelerator, plasma wake field accelerator, and plasma grating accelerator are discussed particularly as examples of concepts for accelerating relativistic electrons or positrons. Also covered are the pulsed electron-beam, pulsed laser accelerator, inverse Cherenkov accelerator, inverse free-electron laser, switched radial-line accelerators, and two-beam accelerator. Advanced concepts for ion acceleration discussed include the electron ring accelerator, excitation of waves on intense electron beams, and two-wave combinations. (LEW)

  8. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    SciTech Connect

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  9. Controlled morphology of regular GaN microrod arrays by selective area growth with HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekhal, Kaddour; Bae, Si-Young; Lee, Ho-Jun; Mitsunari, Tadashi; Tamura, Akira; Deki, Manato; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The selective area growth (SAG) of GaN was implemented on patterned GaN/sapphire templates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) to fabricate regular arrays of Ga-polar GaN microrods. The control of growth parameters such as H2/N2 carrier gas ratio, growth temperature, and absolute NH3/HCl gas flow resulted in changes in the growth morphology. In particular, for an optimized mixed-carrier gas ratio of H2 to N2, we achieved vertically well-aligned microrods. The topmost regions of the GaN microrods were terminated with pyramidal facets, indicating typical Ga polarity. The optical properties of the grown microrods were characterized by cathodoluminescence (CL) at a low temperature. This revealed that the GaN microrods had high crystal quality since they exhibited suppressed yellow luminescence as well as strong band edge emission.

  10. Doping of Si into GaN nanowires and optical properties of resulting composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Congkang; Chung, Sangyong; Kim, Misuk; Kim, Dong Eon; Chon, Bonghwan; Hong, Sangsu; Joo, Taiha

    2005-04-01

    Doping of Si into GaN nanowires has been successfully attained via thermal evaporation in the presence of a suitable gas atmosphere. Analysis indicated that the Si-doped GaN nanowire is a single crystal with a hexagonal wurtzite structure, containing 2.2 atom % of Si. The broadening and the shift of Raman peak to lower frequency are observed, which may be attributed to surface disorder and various strengths of the stress. The band-gap emission (358 nm) of Si-doped GaN nanowires relative to that (370 nm) of GaN nanowires has an apparent blue shift (approximately 12 nm), which can be ascribed to doping impurity Si. PMID:16004115

  11. High-resistance GaN epilayers with low dislocation density via growth mode modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. Y.; Xu, F. J.; Wang, J. M.; Lu, L.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Shen, B.

    2016-09-01

    High-resistance GaN with low dislocation density adopting growth mode modification has been investigated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The sheet resistance of the order of 1016 Ω/sq has been achieved at room temperature by diminishing the oxygen impurity level close to the substrate with an AlN blocking layer. Attributed to this method which offers more freedom to tailor the growth mode, a three-dimensional (3D) growth process is introduced by adjusting the growth pressure and temperature at the initial stage of the GaN epitaxy to improve the crystalline quality. The large 3D GaN grains formed during this period roughen the surface, and the following coalescence of the GaN grains causes threading dislocations bending, which finally remarkably reduces the dislocation density.

  12. A liftoff process of GaN layers and devices through nanoporous transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Leung, Benjamin; Han, Jung

    2012-04-01

    A process to slice and separate GaN device layers for vertical light emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented through a developed electrochemical anodization process to create nanoporous (NP) GaN of designed porosity profiles. The NP GaN serves dual purposes of supporting subsequent overgrowth of LED structures while undergoing, during growth, shape transformation into a largely voided morphology. It is shown that this voided region decreases the lateral fracture resistance and enables large-area separation of the LED structures after appropriate wafer bonding. The separated LED layers are shown to have comparable material quality before and after the liftoff process. Blue emitting GaN LEDs are transferred to silicon substrates with vertical configuration by this unique process.

  13. Swelling or erosion on the surface of patterned GaN damaged by heavy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan; Lan, Chune; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yugang; Xu, Fujun; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-06-08

    Wurtzite undoped GaN epilayers (0 0 0 1) was implanted with 500 keV Au+ ions at room temperature under different doses, respectively. Ion implantation was performed through photoresist masks on GaN to produce alternating strips. The experimental results showed that the step height of swelling and decomposition in implanted GaN depended on ion dose and annealing temperature, i.e., damage level and its evolution. This damage evolution is contributed to implantation-induced defect production, and defect migration/accumulation occurred at different levels of displacement per atom. The results suggest that the swelling is due to the formation of porous structures in the amorphous region of implanted GaN. The decomposition of implanted area can be attributed to the disorder saturation and the diffusion of surface amorphous layer.

  14. GaN growth using gallium hydride generated by hydrogenation of liquid gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayoshi, H.; Nishimura, S.; Takeuchi, T.; Hirai, M.; Terashima, K.

    2005-02-01

    The novel growth method of GaN using hydrogen radicals has been investigated. This paper is the first report of gallium hydrogenation reaction and deposition of GaN using hydrogenated gallium. We found that gallium (Ga) could be volatilized at low temperature by hydrogenation reaction with hydrogen radicals. In this reaction, Ga assumed to be volatilized as GaH 3. The GaN deposition was attempted by using gas phase reaction of NH 3 and GaH 3 generated by the reaction between liquid Ga and hydrogen radicals. Hydrogen radicals were generated by hot tungsten filament, which works as a catalyst during hydrogen cracking, whose temperature was 1600 °C. Surface morphology, deposition rate, and film structure were investigated. It was confirmed that GaN could be deposited by this method. The source materials of this method are safe and of low cost compared to the conventional methods.

  15. Leakage mechanism in GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Tamotsu; Kotani, Junji; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2004-06-01

    Based on detailed temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V-T) measurements the mechanism of leakage currents through GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces is discussed. The experiments were compared to calculations based on thin surface barrier model in which the effects of surface defects were taken into account. Our simulation method reproduced the experimental I-V-T characteristics of the GaN and AlGaN Schottky diodes, and gave excellent fitting results to the reported Schottky I-V curves in GaN for both forward and reverse biases at different temperatures. The present results indicate that the barrier thinning caused by unintentional surface-defect donors enhances the tunneling transport processes, leading to large leakage currents through GaN and AlGaN Schottky interfaces.

  16. Droplet heteroepitaxy of zinc-blende vs. wurtzite GaN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, C.; Jeon, S.; Hill, T.; Jones, C.; Shusterman, S.; Yacoby, Y.; Clarke, R.; Deng, H.; Goldman, Rs

    We have developed a GaN droplet heteroepitaxy process based upon plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Using various surface treatments and Ga deposition parameters, we have demonstrated polycrystalline, zinc-blende (ZB), and wurtzite (WZ) GaN quantum dots (QDs) on Si(001), r-Al2O3, Si(111), and c-GaN substrates. For the polar substrates (i.e. Si(111) and c-GaN), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and coherent Bragg rod analysis reveals the formation of coherent WZ GaN QDs with nitridation-temperature-dependent sizes and densities. For the non-polar substrates (i.e. Si(001) and r-Al2O3) , QDs with strong near-band photoluminescence emission are observed and ZB GaN QD growth on Si(001) is demonstrated for the first time.

  17. Formation of helical dislocations in ammonothermal GaN substrate by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibuchi, Kayo; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kimoto, Yasuji; Nishikawa, Koichi; Kachi, Tetsu

    2016-03-01

    GaN substrate produced by the basic ammonothermal method and an epitaxial layer on the substrate was evaluated using synchrotron radiation x-ray topography and transmission electron microscopy. We revealed that the threading dislocations present in the GaN substrate are deformed into helical dislocations and the generation of the voids by heat treatment in the substrate for the first observation in the GaN crystal. These phenomena are formed by the interactions between the dislocations and vacancies. The helical dislocation was formed in the substrate region, and not in the epitaxial layer region. Furthermore, the evaluation of the influence of the dislocations on the leakage current of Schottky barrier diodes fabricated on the epitaxial layer is discussed. The dislocations did not affect the leakage current characteristics of the epitaxial layer. Our results suggest that the deformation of dislocations in the GaN substrate does not adversely affect the epitaxial layer.

  18. High breakdown single-crystal GaN p-n diodes by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Meng; Zhao, Yuning; Yan, Xiaodong; Li, Guowang; Verma, Jai; Fay, Patrick; Nomoto, Kazuki; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang; Protasenko, Vladimir; Song, Bo; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bader, Samuel

    2015-12-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown GaN p-n vertical diodes are demonstrated on single-crystal GaN substrates. A low leakage current <3 nA/cm{sup 2} is obtained with reverse bias voltage up to −20 V. With a 400 nm thick n-drift region, an on-resistance of 0.23 mΩ cm{sup 2} is achieved, with a breakdown voltage corresponding to a peak electric field of ∼3.1 MV/cm in GaN. Single-crystal GaN substrates with very low dislocation densities enable the low leakage current and the high breakdown field in the diodes, showing significant potential for MBE growth to attain near-intrinsic performance when the density of dislocations is low.

  19. Depth dependence of defect density and stress in GaN grown on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faleev, N.; Temkin, H.; Ahmad, I.; Holtz, M.; Melnik, Yu.

    2005-12-01

    We report high resolution x-ray diffraction studies of the relaxation of elastic strain in GaN grown on SiC(0001). The GaN layers were grown with thickness ranging from 0.29to30μm. High level of residual elastic strain was found in thin (0.29to0.73μm thick) GaN layers. This correlates with low density of threading screw dislocations of 1-2×107cm-2, observed in a surface layer formed over a defective nucleation layer. Stress was found to be very close to what is expected from thermal expansion mismatch between the GaN and SiC. A model based on generation and diffusion of point defects accounts for these observations.

  20. Microstructure of GaN Grown on (111) Si by MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Han, J.; Provencio, P.

    1998-12-17

    Gallium nitride was grown on (111) Si by MOCVD by depositing an AIN buffer at 108O"C and then GaN at 1060 {degrees}C. The 2.2pm layer cracked along {1-100} planes upon cooling to room temperature, but remained adherent. We were able to examine the microstructure of material between cracks with TEM. The character and arrangement of dislocation are much like those of GaN grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: -2/3 pure edge and - 1/3 mixed (edge + screw), arranged in boundaries around domains of GaN that are slightly disoriented with respect to neighboring material. The 30 nm AIN buffer is continuous, indicating that AIN wets the Si, in contrast to GaN on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  1. Rare earth 4f hybridization with the GaN valence band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; McHale, S. R.; McClory, J. W.; Petrosky, J. C.; Wu, J.; Palai, R.; Losovyj, Y. B.; Dowben, P. A.

    2012-11-01

    The placement of the Gd, Er and Yb 4f states within the GaN valence band has been explored by both experiment and theory. The 4d-4f photoemission resonances for various rare-earth(RE)-doped GaN thin films (RE = Gd, Er, Yb) provide an accurate depiction of the occupied 4f state placement within the GaN. The resonant photoemission show that the major Er and Gd RE 4f weight is at about 5-6 eV below the valence band maximum, similar to the 4f weights in the valence band of many other RE-doped semiconductors. For Yb, there is a very little resonant enhancement of the valence band of Yb-doped GaN, consistent with a large 4f14-δ occupancy. The placement of the RE 4f levels is in qualitative agreement with theoretical expectations.

  2. The rare earth 4 f hybridization with the GaN valence band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; McHale, Steve; McClory, John; Petrosky, James; Wu, J.; Palai, Ratnakar; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Dowben, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The placement of the Gd, Er, and Yb 4f states within the GaN valence band has been explored by both experiment and theory. The 4 d - 4 f photoemission resonances for various rare earth doped GaN thin films (RE = Gd, Er, Yb) provide an accurate depiction of the occupied 4 f state placement within the GaN. The resonant photoemission show that the major Er and Gd rare earth 4 f weight is at about 5-6 eV below the valence band maximum, similar to the 4 f weights in the valence band of many other rare earth doped semiconductors. For Yb, there is very little resonant enhancement of the valence band of Yb doped GaN, consistent with a largely 4f 14 - δ occupancy. The placement of the rare earth 4 f levels is in qualitative agreement with theoretical expectations.

  3. Depth dependence of defect density and stress in GaN grown on SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Faleev, N.; Temkin, H.; Ahmad, I.; Holtz, M.; Melnik, Yu.

    2005-12-15

    We report high resolution x-ray diffraction studies of the relaxation of elastic strain in GaN grown on SiC(0001). The GaN layers were grown with thickness ranging from 0.29 to 30 {mu}m. High level of residual elastic strain was found in thin (0.29 to 0.73 {mu}m thick) GaN layers. This correlates with low density of threading screw dislocations of 1-2x10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, observed in a surface layer formed over a defective nucleation layer. Stress was found to be very close to what is expected from thermal expansion mismatch between the GaN and SiC. A model based on generation and diffusion of point defects accounts for these observations.

  4. GaN grown on (1 1 1) single crystal diamond substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaigne, A.; Malinverni, M.; Martin, D.; Castiglia, A.; Grandjean, N.

    2009-10-01

    GaN epilayers are grown on (1 1 1) oriented single crystal diamond substrate by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy. Each step of the growth is monitored in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction. It is found that a two-dimensional epitaxial wurtzite GaN film is obtained. The surface morphology is smooth: the rms roughness is as low as 1.3 nm for 2×2 μm 2 scan. Photoluminescence measurements reveal pretty good optical properties. The GaN band edge is centred at 3.469 eV with a linewidth of 5 meV. These results demonstrate that GaN heteroepitaxially grown on diamond opens new rooms for high power electronic applications.

  5. Surface potential barrier in m-plane GaN studied by contactless electroreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Lukasz; Misiewicz, Jan; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Sawicka, Marta; Skierbiszewski, Czeslaw; Kudrawiec, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Contactless electroreflectance (CER) is used to study the surface potential barrier in m-plane GaN UN+ [GaN (d = 20,30,50,70 nm)/GaN:Si] structures grown by using molecular beam epitaxy. Clear bandgap-related transitions followed by Franz-Keldysh oscillations (FKO) have been observed in the CER spectra of all samples at room temperature. The built-in electric fields in the undoped cap layers have been determined from the FKO period. From the built-in electric field and the undoped GaN layer thickness, the Fermi level location at the air-exposed m-plane GaN surface has been estimated as 0.42 ± 0.05 eV below the conduction band.

  6. Radiative defects in GaN nanocolumns: Correlation with growth conditions and sample morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, P.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Grandal, J.; Ristic, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.-A.; Calleja, E.

    2011-02-21

    Low-temperature photoluminescence is studied in detail in GaN nanocolumns (NCs) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under various conditions (substrate temperature and impinging Ga/N flux ratio). The relative intensities of the different emission lines, in particular those related to structural defects, appear to be correlated with the growth conditions, and clearly linked to the NC sample morphology. We demonstrate, in particular, that all lines comprised between 3.10 and 3.42 eV rapidly lose intensity when the growth conditions are such that the NC coalescence is reduced. The well-known line around 3.45 eV, characteristic of GaN NC samples, shows, however, a behavior that is exactly the opposite of the other lines, namely, for growth conditions leading to reduced NC coalescence, this line tends to become more prominent, thus proving to be intrinsic to individual GaN NCs.

  7. Thermal Conductivity and Large Isotope Effect in GaN from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2012-08-28

    We present atomistic first principles results for the lattice thermal conductivity of GaN and compare them to those for GaP, GaAs, and GaSb. In GaN we find a large increase to the thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment, ~65% at room temperature. We show that both the high thermal conductivity and its enhancement with isotopic enrichment in GaN arise from the weak coupling of heat-carrying acoustic phonons with optic phonons. This weak scattering results from stiff atomic bonds and the large Ga to N mass ratio, which give phonons high frequencies and also a pronounced energy gap between acoustic and optic phonons compared to other materials. Rigorous understanding of these features in GaN gives important insights into the interplay between intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering and isotopic scattering in a range of materials.

  8. In situ studies of the effect of silicon on GaN growth modes.

    SciTech Connect

    Munkholm, A.; Stephenson, G. B.; Eastman, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Murty, M. V. R.; Thompson, C.; Fini, P.; Speck, J. S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Northern Illinois Univ.; Univ. of California at Santa Barbara

    2000-12-01

    We present real-time X-ray scattering studies of the influence of silicon on the homoepitaxial growth mode of GaN grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. Both annealing of Si-doped GaN and surface dosing of GaN with disilane are shown to change the mode of subsequent growth from step-flow to layer-by-layer. By comparing the growth behavior induced by doped layers which have been annealed to that induced by surface dosing, we extract an approximate diffusion coefficient for Si in GaN of 3.5 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}/s at 810{sup o}C.

  9. Above room-temperature ferromagnetism of Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. T.; Wadekar, P. V.; Kao, H. S.; Chen, T. H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Tu, L. W.; Huang, H. C.; Ho, N. J.

    2014-02-10

    One-dimensional nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductors were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Delta-doping technique was adopted to dope GaN nanorods with Mn. The structural and magnetic properties were investigated. The GaMnN nanorods with a single crystalline structure and with Ga sites substituted by Mn atoms were verified by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, respectively. Secondary phases were not observed by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In addition, the magnetic hysteresis curves show that the Mn delta-doped GaN nanorods are ferromagnetic above room temperature. The magnetization with magnetic field perpendicular to GaN c-axis saturates easier than the one with field parallel to GaN c-axis.

  10. The study of in situ scanning tunnelling microscope characterization on GaN thin film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.; Krzyzewski, T.; Jones, T.

    2013-03-18

    The epitaxial growth of GaN by Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy was investigated by Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). The GaN film was grown on initial GaN (0001) and monitored by in situ Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction and STM during the growth. The STM characterization was carried out on different sub-films with increased thickness. The growth of GaN was achieved in 3D mode, and the hexagonal edge of GaN layers and growth gradient were observed. The final GaN was of Ga polarity and kept as (0001) orientation, without excess Ga adlayers or droplets formed on the surface.

  11. P- and N-type implantation doping of GaN with Ca and O

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Wilson, R.G.; Pearton, S.J.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    III-N photonic devices have made great advances in recent years following the demonstration of doping of GaN p-type with Mg and n-type with Si. However, the deep ionization energy level of Mg in GaN ({approximately} 160 meV) limits the ionized of acceptors at room temperature to less than 1.0% of the substitutional Mg. With this in mind, the authors used ion implantation to characterize the ionization level of Ca in GaN since Ca had been suggested by Strite to be a shallow acceptor in GaN. Ca-implanted GaN converted from n-to-p type after a 1,100 C activation anneal. Variable temperature Hall measurements give an ionization level at 169 meV. Although this level is equivalent to that of Mg, Ca-implantation may have advantages (shallower projected range and less straggle for a given energy) than Mg for electronic devices. In particular, the authors report the first GaN device using ion implantation doping. This is a GaN junction field effect transistor (JFET) which employed Ca-implantation. A 1.7 {micro}m JFET had a transconductance of 7 mS/mm, a saturation current at 0 V gate bias of 33 mA/mm, a f{sub t} of 2.7 GHz, and a f{sub max} of 9.4 GHz. O-implantation was also studied and shown to create a shallow donor level ({approximately} 25 meV) that is similar to Si. SIMS profiles of as-implanted and annealed samples showed no measurable redistribution of either Ca or O in GaN at 1,125 C.

  12. High efficiency DC-DC converter using GaN transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tómaş, Cosmin-Andrei; Grecu, Cristian; Pantazicǎ, Mihaela; Marghescu, Ion

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents a new high-efficiency power switching supply using the Gallium Nitride (GaN) technology. There are compared two solutions, the first using standard MOS transistors and the second using the new GaN transistor. The actual green technologies for obtaining the maximum energy and minimum losses have pushed the semiconductor industry into a continuous research regarding high power and high frequency devices, having uses in both digital communications and switching power supplies.

  13. Femtosecond dynamics of exciton bleaching in bulk GaN at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yin-Chieh; Chern, Gia-Wei; Lin, Kung-Hsuan; Liang, Jian-Chin; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Hsu, Chia-Chen; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven P.

    2002-07-01

    Femtosecond transient transmission pump-probe technique was used to investigate exciton dynamics in a nominally undoped GaN thin film at room temperature. An exciton ionization time of 100-250 femtoseconds was observed by the time-resolved pump-probe measurement. A comparison experiment with pre-excited free carriers also confirmed the observation of the exciton ionization process in bulk GaN.

  14. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  15. The dispersion of BED ° in unintentional doped GaN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingcheng, Bao; Fungleng, Zhang; Ke, Shi; Rensong, Dai; Xurong, Xu

    1986-09-01

    The polarization and the wavelength of the photoluminescence of BED ° in not intentionaly doped GaN crystal wafers are observed to be dependent on the excitation intensity (I-exc). When I-exc increases from 1 KW/CM 2 to 1000 KW/CM 2, they vary at first quadratically, and then, appear saturated. This phenomenon is resulted from dispersion effect of BED ° in GaN crystal wafers, which is proposed earlier (1).

  16. Evolution of deep centers in GaN grown by hydride vapor phaseepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Z.-Q.; Look, D.C.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Molnar, R.J.

    2001-04-18

    Deep centers and dislocation densities in undoped n GaN, grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), were characterized as a function of the layer thickness by deep level transient spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. As the layer thickness decreases, the variety and concentration of deep centers increase, in conjunction with the increase of dislocation density. Based on comparison with electron irradiation induced centers, some dominant centers in HVPE GaN are identified as possible point defects.

  17. Mass transport, faceting and behavior of dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, S.; Kashima, T.; Kariya, M.; Yukawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Amano, H.; Akasaki, I.

    2000-07-01

    The behavior of threading dislocations during mass transport of GaN was investigated in detail by transmission electron microscopy. Mass transport occurred at the surface. Therefore, growing species are supplied from the in-plane direction. The behavior of threading dislocations was found to be strongly affected by the mass transport process as well as the high crystallographic anisotropy of the surface energy of the facets particular to GaN.

  18. Atomistic Simulation of Brittle to Ductile Transition in GaN Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2006-12-11

    Molecular dynamics methods with a Stillinger-Weber potential have been used to investigate the mechanical properties of wurtzite-type single crystalline GaN nanotubes under applied tensile stresses. At lower temperatures, the nanotubes show brittle properties; whereas at higher temperatures, they behave as ductile materials. The brittle to ductile transition (BDT) is systemically investigated, and the corresponding transition temperatures have been determined in GaN. The BDT temperature generally increases with increasing thickness of nanotubes and strain rate.

  19. Strain dependent electron spin dynamics in bulk cubic GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, A.; Buß, J. H.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.; Schupp, T.; Zado, A.; As, D. J.

    2015-03-07

    The electron spin dynamics under variable uniaxial strain is investigated in bulk cubic GaN by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. Spin relaxation is found to be approximately independent of the applied strain, in complete agreement with estimates for Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation. Our findings clearly exclude strain-induced relaxation as an effective mechanism for spin relaxation in cubic GaN.

  20. Teleportation with Multiple Accelerated Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagheer, A.; Hamdoun, H.; Metwally, N.

    2015-09-01

    As the current revolution in communication is underway, quantum teleportation can increase the level of security in quantum communication applications. In this paper, we present a quantum teleportation procedure that capable to teleport either accelerated or non-accelerated information through different quantum channels. These quantum channels are based on accelerated multi-qubit states, where each qubit of each of these channels represents a partner. Namely, these states are the W state, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, and the GHZ-like state. Here, we show that the fidelity of teleporting accelerated information is higher than the fidelity of teleporting non-accelerated information, both through a quantum channel that is based on accelerated state. Also, the comparison among the performance of these three channels shows that the degree of fidelity depends on type of the used channel, type of the measurement, and value of the acceleration. The result of comparison concludes that teleporting information through channel that is based on the GHZ state is more robust than teleporting information through channels that are based on the other two states. For future work, the proposed procedure can be generalized later to achieve communication through a wider quantum network.

  1. Influence of initial growth conditions and Mg-surfactant on the quality of GaN film grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junsong, Cao; Xin, Lü; Lubing, Zhao; Shuang, Qu; Wei, Gao

    2015-02-01

    The initial growth conditions of a 100 nm thick GaN layer and Mg-surfactant on the quality of the GaN epilayer grown on a 6H-SiC substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy have been investigated in this research. Experimental results have shown that a high V/III ratio and the initially low growth rate of the GaN layer are favorable for two-dimension growth and surface morphology of GaN and the formation of a smoother growth surface. Mg-surfactant occurring during GaN growth can reduce the dislocations density of the GaN epilayer but increase the surface RMS, which are attributed to the change of growth mode.

  2. An ultra-thin compliant sapphire membrane for the growth of less strained, less defective GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Daeyoung; Jang, Jeonghwan; Choi, Daehan; Shin, In-Su; Lee, Donghyun; Bae, Dukkyu; Park, Yongjo; Yoon, Euijoon

    2016-05-01

    An ultra-thin (26 nm) sapphire (Al2O3) membrane was used as a compliant substrate for the growth of high quality GaN. The density of misfit dislocations per unit length at the interface between the GaN layer and the sapphire membrane was reduced by 28% compared to GaN on the conventional sapphire substrate. Threading dislocation density in GaN on the sapphire membrane was measured to be 2.4×108/cm2, which is lower than that for GaN on the conventional sapphire substrate (3.2×108/cm2). XRD and micro-Raman results verifed that the residual stress in GaN on the sapphire membrane was as low as 0.02 GPa due to stress absorption by the ultra-thin compliant sapphire membrane.

  3. Probing deep level centers in GaN epilayers with variable-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics of Au /GaN Schottky contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. X.; Xu, S. J.; Shi, S. L.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.; Zhao, D. G.; Yang, H.; Tao, X. M.

    2006-10-01

    Under identical preparation conditions, Au /GaN Schottky contacts were prepared on two kinds of GaN epilayers with significantly different background electron concentrations and mobility as well as yellow emission intensities. Current-voltage (I-V) and variable-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics show that the Schottky contacts on the GaN epilayer with a higher background carrier concentration and strong yellow emission exhibit anomalous reverse-bias I-V and C-V characteristics. This is attributed to the presence of deep level centers. Theoretical simulation of the low-frequency C-V curves leads to a determination of the density and energy level position of the deep centers.

  4. Nanoheteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaN on nanoporous Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, K. Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Chua, S. J.; Wang, L. S.; Tripathy, S.; Thompson, C. V.

    2006-04-01

    Nanoheteroepitaxial (NHE) lateral overgrowth of GaN on nanoporous Si(111) substrates has been demonstrated. Nanopore arrays in Si(111) surfaces were fabricated using anodized aluminum oxide templates as etch masks, resulting in an average pore diameter and depth of about 60 and 160-180nm, respectively. NHE growth of AlN and GaN was found to result in a significant reduction in the threading dislocation density (<108cm-2) compared to that on flat Si(111). Most dislocations that originate at the Si interface bent to lie in the GaN (0001) basal plane during lateral growth over the pore openings. E2 phonon blueshifts in the Raman spectra indicate a significant relaxation of the tensile stress in the coalesced GaN films, due to three-dimensional stress relaxation mechanisms on porous substrates. Our results show that a single step lateral overgrowth of GaN on nanopatterned Si(111) substrates without a dielectric mask is a simple way to improve the crystalline quality of GaN layers for microelectronic applications.

  5. Successive selective growth of semipolar (11-22) GaN on patterned sapphire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendille, Florian; Hugues, Maxime; Vennéguès, Philippe; Teisseire, Monique; De Mierry, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Thanks to the use of two successive selective growths by metal organic chemical vapor deposition reactor, high quality semipolar (11-22) GaN with a homogenous defect repartition over the surface was achieved. The procedure starts with a first selective growth on a patterned sapphire substrate, leading to continuous stripes of three dimensional (3D) GaN crystals of low defect density. Then, a second selective growth step is achieved by depositing a SiNx nano-mask and a low temperature GaN nano-layer on the top of the GaN stripes. Hereby, we demonstrate an original way to obtain a homoepitaxial selective growth on 3D GaN crystals by taking advantage of the different crystallographic planes available. Basal stacking faults (BSFs) are generated during this second selective growth but could be eliminated by using a three-step growth method in which elongated voids are created above the defective area. For a fully coalesced sample grown using the 2 step method, dislocation density of 1.2 × 108 cm-2 and BSFs density of 154 cm-1 with a homogenous distribution have been measured by cathodoluminescence at 80 K. Consequently the material quality of this coalesced semipolar layer is comparable to the one of polar GaN on c-plane sapphire.

  6. Behavior of aluminum adsorption and incorporation at GaN(0001) surface: First-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Zhenzhen; Xiong, Zhihua Wan, Qixin; Qin, Guangzhao

    2013-11-21

    First-principles calculations are performed to study the energetics and atomic structures of aluminum adsorption and incorporation at clean and Ga-bilayer GaN(0001) surfaces. We find the favorable adsorption site changes from T4 to T1 as Al coverage increased to 1 monolayer on the clean GaN(0001) surface, and a two-dimensional hexagonal structure of Al overlayer appears. It is interesting the Al atoms both prefer to concentrate in one deeper Ga layer of clean and Ga-bilayer GaN(0001) surface, respectively, while different structures could be achieved in above surfaces. For the case of clean GaN(0001) surface, corresponding to N-rich and moderately Ga-rich conditions, a highly regular superlattice structure composed of wurtzite GaN and AlN becomes favorable. For the case of Ga-bilayer GaN(0001) surface, corresponding to extremely Ga-rich conditions, the Ga bilayer is found to be sustained stable in Al incorporating process, leading to an incommensurate structure directly. Furthermore, our calculations provide an explanation for the spontaneous formation of ordered structure and incommensurate structure observed in growing AlGaN films. The calculated results are attractive for further development of growth techniques and excellent AlGaN/GaN heterostructure electronic devices.

  7. GaN etching in BCl{sub 3}Cl{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Han, J.; Bridges, M.M.; Pearton, S.J.; Lee, J.W.; Lester, L.F.

    1998-04-01

    GaN etching can be affected by a wide variety of parameters including plasma chemistry and plasma density. Chlorine-based plasmas have been the most widely used plasma chemistries to etch GaN due to the high volatility of the GaCl{sub 3} and NCl etch products. The source of Cl and the addition of secondary gases can dramatically influence the etch characteristics primarily due to their effect on the concentration of reactive Cl generated in the plasma. In addition, high-density plasma etch systems have yielded high quality etching of GaN due to plasma densities which are 2 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than reactive ion etch (RIE) plasma systems. The high plasma densities enhance the bond breaking efficiency of the GaN, the formation of volatile etch products, and the sputter desorption of the etch products from the surface. In this study, the authors report GaN etch results for a high-density inductively coupled plasma (ICP) as a function of BCl{sub 3}:Cl{sub 2} flow ratio, dc-bias, chamber-pressure, and ICP source power. GaN etch rates ranging from {approximately}100 {angstrom}/min to > 8,000 {angstrom}/min were obtained with smooth etch morphology and anisotropic profiles.

  8. Growth and characterization of horizontal GaN wires on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Xinbo; May Lau, Kei; Lu, Xing; Lucas, Ryan; Kuech, Thomas F.; Choi, Jonathan W.; Gopalan, Padma

    2014-06-30

    We report the growth of in-plane GaN wires on silicon by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Triangular-shaped GaN microwires with semi-polar sidewalls are observed to grow on top of a GaN/Si template patterned with nano-porous SiO{sub 2}. With a length-to-thickness ratio ∼200, the GaN wires are well aligned along the three equivalent 〈 112{sup ¯}0 〉 directions. Micro-Raman measurements indicate negligible stress and a low defect density inside the wires. Stacking faults were found to be the only defect type in the GaN wire by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The GaN wires exhibited high conductivity, and the resistivity was 20–30 mΩ cm, regardless of the wire thickness. With proper heterostructure and doping design, these highly aligned GaN wires are promising for photonic and electronic applications monolithically integrated on silicon.

  9. Strain-induced step bunching in orientation-controlled GaN on Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Tetsuo; Iguchi, Hiroko; Horibuchi, Kayo; Otake, Nobuyuki; Hoshi, Shinichi; Tomita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    We report a technique for the fabrication of high-quality GaN-on-silicon (Si) substrates for use in various power applications. GaN epitaxial layers were generated on Si(111) vicinal faces that had been previously covered with a thin coating of Al2O3 to control the orientation of the AlN seed layers. We obtained orientation-controlled GaN layers and found a linear relationship between the GaN c-axis and Si[111] tilt angles. As a result, the threading dislocation density in the AlN seed layer was reduced and high-quality GaN layers were generated. The X-ray rocking curves for these layers exhibited full width at half maximum values of 390‧‧ and 550‧‧ for the (004) and (114) reflections, respectively. Significant step bunching was observed on a GaN(0001) vicinal face produced using this technique, attributed to strain-induced attractive interactions between steps. Thus, by controlling the strain near the surface layer, we achieved the step flow growth of GaN on Si.

  10. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth. PMID:27025461

  11. Enhancing the field emission properties of Se-doped GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Enling; Wu, Guishuang; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-07-01

    Pure and Se-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) are synthesized on Pt-coated Si(111) substrates via chemical vapor deposition. The GaN NWs exhibit a uniform density with an average diameter of 20-120 nm. The structure of the NWs is wurtzite hexagonal, and the growth direction is along [0001]. Field emission measurements show that the Se-doped GaN NWs possess a low turn-on field (2.9 V μm(-1)) compared with the pure GaN NWs (7.0 V μm(-1)). In addition, density functional theory calculations indicate that the donor states near the Fermi level are mainly formed through the hybridization between Se 4p and N 2p orbitals and that the Fermi level move towards the vacuum level. Consequently, the work functions of Se-doped GaN NWs are lower than those of pure GaN NWs. PMID:27197556

  12. Influence of Annealing Conditions on Dopant Antirotation of Si+ and Mg+ Implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Suvkhanov, A.; Parikh, N.; Usov, I.; Hunn, J.D.; Withrow, S.; Thomson, D.; Herke, T.; Davis, R.F.; Krasnobaev, L.

    1999-10-12

    This report reflects the results of heat treatment under various conditions on as-grown and ion implanted GaN. The PL spectrums of as-grown GaN and GaN with 400 A AlN cap were almost identical. This fact allows one to use PL analysis without AlN stripping. As-grown GaN and ion implanted with Mg and Si crystals were annealed at 1300 C for 10 minutes in three different conditions: in flowing argon gas; in flowing ultra high purity nitrogen; and in a quartz capsule sealed with nitrogen gas. The results of PL, RBS, SEM and TEM analysis show an advantage of GaN high temperature annealing in quartz capsules with nitrogen ambient as compared to annealing in argon and nitrogen gas flow. Encapsulation with nitrogen over-pressure prevents the decomposition of the GaN crystal and the AlN capping film, and allows one to achieve optical activation of implanted Mg and Si after 1300 C annealing.

  13. Hybrid device based on GaN nanoneedles and MEH-PPV/PEDOT:PSS polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Min Jeong; Gwon, Dong-Oh; Lee, Chan-Mi; Lee, Gang Seok; Jeon, In-Jun; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Yi, Sam Nyung; Ha, Dong Han

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A hybrid device was demonstrated by using MEH-PPV, PEDOT:PSS, and GaN nanoneedles. • I–V curve of the hybrid device showed its rectification behaviour, similar to a diode. • EL peak originated by the different potential barriers at MEH-PPV and GaN interface. - Abstract: A hybrid device that combines the properties of organic and inorganic semiconductors was fabricated and studied. It incorporated poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)- 1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as organic polymers and GaN nanoneedles as an inorganic semiconductor. Layers of the two polymers were spin coated on to the GaN nanoneedles. The one peak in the electroluminescence spectrum originated from the MEH-PPV layer owing to the different potential barriers of electrons and holes at its interface with the GaN nanoneedles. However, the photoluminescence spectrum showed peaks due to both GaN nanoneedles and MEH-PPV. Such hybrid structures, suitably developed, might be able to improve the efficiency of optoelectronic devices.

  14. A comparative DFT study of the structural and electronic properties of nonpolar GaN surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Hernández, Rafael; González-García, Alvaro; Barragán-Yani, Daniel; López-Pérez, William

    2014-09-01

    A comparative analysis of the geometry and the electronic characteristics of nonpolar GaN surfaces was carried out using density-functional theory (DFT) with different approximations for the exchange-correlation energy (LDA, PBE, PBEsol, RPBE, TPSS, revTPSS, and HSE). The obtained data show that the GaN(1 0 1bar 0) (m-plane) is more energetically stable than the GaN(1 1 2bar 0) (a-plane) surface. However, these surfaces have similar surface relaxation geometry, with a Ga-N surface bond-length contraction of around 6-7% and a Ga-N surface rotational angle in the range of 6-9°. Our results show that the use of different exchange-correlation functionals does not significantly change the surface energy and surface geometry. In addition, we found the presence of surface intra-gap states that reduce the band gap of the nonpolar GaN surface with respect to the bulk value, in agreement with recent photoelectron and surface optical spectroscopy experiments.

  15. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides: promising near-lattice-matched substrates for GaN growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Priti; Rahman, A. A.; Subramanian, Shruti; Gupta, Shalini; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Orlova, Tatyana; Rouvimov, Sergei; Vishwanath, Suresh; Protasenko, Vladimir; Laskar, Masihhur R.; Xing, Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-03-01

    Most III-nitride semiconductors are grown on non-lattice-matched substrates like sapphire or silicon due to the extreme difficulty of obtaining a native GaN substrate. We show that several layered transition-metal dichalcogenides are closely lattice-matched to GaN and report the growth of GaN on a range of such layered materials. We report detailed studies of the growth of GaN on mechanically-exfoliated flakes WS2 and MoS2 by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. Structural and optical characterization show that strain-free, single-crystal islands of GaN are obtained on the underlying chalcogenide flakes. We obtain strong near-band-edge emission from these layers, and analyse their temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties. We also report a proof-of-concept demonstration of large-area growth of GaN on CVD MoS2. Our results show that the transition-metal dichalcogenides can serve as novel near-lattice-matched substrates for nitride growth.

  16. Using the kinetic Wulff plot to design and control nonpolar and semipolar GaN heteroepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Benjamin; Sun, Qian; Yerino, Christopher D.; Han, Jung; Coltrin, Michael E.

    2012-02-01

    For nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN heteroepitaxially grown on sapphire substrates, the development of growth procedures to improve surface morphology and microstructure has been driven in a largely empirical way. This work attempts to comprehensively link the intrinsic properties of GaN faceted growth, across orientations, in order to understand, design and control growth methods for nonpolar (1 1 2 0) GaN and semipolar (1 1 2 2) GaN on foreign substrates. This is done by constructing a comprehensive series of kinetic Wulff plots (or v-plots) by monitoring the advances of convex and concave facets in selective area growth. A methodology is developed to apply the experimentally determined v-plots to the interpretation and design of evolution dynamics in nucleation and island coalescence. This methodology offers a cohesive and rational model for GaN heteroepitaxy along polar, nonpolar and semipolar orientations, and is broadly extensible to the heteroepitaxy of other materials. We demonstrate furthermore that the control of morphological evolution, based on invoking a detailed knowledge of the v-plots, holds a key to the reduction of microstructural defects through effective bending of dislocations and blocking of stacking faults. The status and outlook of semipolar and nonpolar GaN growth on sapphire substrates will be presented.

  17. The hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN on silicon covered by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, U.; Musolino, M.; Lähnemann, J.; Dogan, P.; Fernández Garrido, S.; Wang, J. F.; Xu, K.; Cai, D.; Bian, L. F.; Gong, X. J.; Yang, H.

    2016-06-01

    GaN several tens of μm thick has been deposited on a silicon substrate using a two-step hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) process. The substrates were covered by AlN layers and GaN nanostructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. During the first low-temperature (low-T) HVPE step, stacking faults (SF) form, which show distinct luminescence lines and stripe-like features in the cathodoluminescence images of the cross-section of the layers. These cathodoluminescence features provide an insight into the growth process. During a second high-temperature (high-T) step, the SFs disappear, and the luminescence of this part of the GaN layer is dominated by the donor-bound exciton. For templates consisting of both a thin AlN buffer and GaN nanostructures, the incorporation of silicon into the GaN grown by HVPE is not observed. Moreover, the growth mode of the (high-T) HVPE step depends on the specific structure of the AlN/GaN template, where in the first case, epitaxy is dominated by the formation of slowly growing facets, while in the second case, epitaxy proceeds directly along the c-axis. For templates without GaN nanostructures, cathodoluminescence spectra excited close to the Si/GaN interface show a broadening toward higher energies, indicating the incorporation of silicon at a high dopant level.

  18. Reduction of stress at the initial stages of GaN growth on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadgar, A.; Poschenrieder, M.; Reiher, A.; Bläsing, J.; Christen, J.; Krtschil, A.; Finger, T.; Hempel, T.; Diez, A.; Krost, A.

    2003-01-01

    GaN growth on heterosubstrates usually leads to an initially high dislocation density at the substrate/seed layer interface. Due to the initial growth from small crystallites, tensile stress is generated at the coalescence boundaries during GaN growth. In addition, with tensile thermal stress this leads to cracking of GaN on Si and SiC substrates when cooling to room temperature. By partially masking the typically applied AlN seed layer on Si(111) with an in situ deposited SiN mask a reduction in tensile stress can be achieved for the subsequently grown GaN layer. Additionally, the 6 K GaN band edge photoluminescence is increased by about an order of magnitude and shifts by 21 meV, which can be attributed to a change in tensile stress of ˜0.8 GPa, in good agreement with x-ray diffractometry measurements. This improvement in material properties can be attributed to a reduction of grain boundaries by the growth of larger sized crystallites and lateral overgrowth of less defective GaN.

  19. GaN Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, F.; Pearton, S.J.; Abernathy, C.R.; Baca, A.; Cheng, P.; Shul, R.J.; Chu, S.N.G.; Hong, M.; Lothian, J.R.; Schurman, M.J.

    1999-03-02

    A GaN based depletion mode metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) was demonstrated using Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}(Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) as the gate dielectric. The MOS gate reverse breakdown voltage was > 35V which was significantly improved from 17V of Pt Schottky gate on the same material. A maximum extrinsic transconductance of 15 mS/mm was obtained at V{sub ds} = 30 V and device performance was limited by the contact resistance. A unity current gain cut-off frequency, f{sub {tau}}, and maximum frequency of oscillation, f{sub max} of 3.1 and 10.3 GHz, respectively, were measured at V{sub ds} = 25 V and V{sub gs} = {minus}20 V.

  20. Stacking fault related luminescence in GaN nanorods.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, M; Serban, A; Poenaru, I; Hsiao, C-L; Junaid, M; Birch, J; Pozina, G

    2015-09-01

    Optical and structural properties are presented for GaN nanorods (NRs) grown in the [0001] direction on Si(111) substrates by direct-current reactive magnetron sputter epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals clusters of dense stacking faults (SFs) regularly distributed along the c-axis. A strong emission line at ∼3.42 eV associated with the basal-plane SFs has been observed in luminescence spectra. The optical signature of SFs is stable up to room temperatures with the activation energy of ∼20 meV. Temperature-dependent time-resolved photoluminescence properties suggest that the recombination mechanism of the 3.42 eV emission can be understood in terms of multiple quantum wells self-organized along the growth axis of NRs. PMID:26267041

  1. Inversion domains in GaN grown on sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, L.T.; Northrup, J.E.; OKeefe, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Planar defects observed in GaN films grown on (0001) sapphire have been identified as inversion domain boundaries (IDBs) by a combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy, multiple dark field imaging, and convergent beam electron diffraction techniques. Films grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), metalorganic vapor deposition (MOCVD), and hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) were investigated and all were found to contain IDBs. The IDBs in the MBE and HVPE films extended from the interface to the film surface and formed columnar domains that ranged in width from 3 to 20 nm in the MBE films and up to 100 nm in the HVPE films. For the films investigated, the MBE films had the highest density, and the MOCVD films had the lowest density of IDBs. The nucleation of inversion domains (IDs) may result from step-related inhomogeneities of the GaN/sapphire interface. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. GaN directional couplers for integrated quantum photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanfeng; McKnight, Loyd; Watson, Ian M.; Gu, Erdan; Calvez, Stephane; Dawson, Martin D.; Engin, Erman; Cryan, Martin J.; Thompson, Mark G.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2011-10-17

    Large cross-section GaN waveguides are proposed as a suitable architecture to achieve integrated quantum photonic circuits. Directional couplers with this geometry have been designed with aid of the beam propagation method and fabricated using inductively coupled plasma etching. Scanning electron microscopy inspection shows high quality facets for end coupling and a well defined gap between rib pairs in the coupling region. Optical characterization at 800 nm shows single-mode operation and coupling-length-dependent splitting ratios. Two photon interference of degenerate photon pairs has been observed in the directional coupler by measurement of the Hong-Ou-Mandel dip [C. K. Hong, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2044 (1987)] with 96% visibility.

  3. Spontaneous emission enhancement in micropatterned GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehus, M.; Sanguino, P.; Monteiro, T.; Soares, M. J.; Schwarz, R.

    2004-10-01

    With two interfering pulses from the fourth harmonic of a Nd-YAG laser we burnt a periodic lattice structure into the surface of GaN thin films. The lattice period of this permanent grating could be controlled between less than one and several tens of microns. Above the decomposition threshold, nitrogen evades from the sample surface, and the residual metallic gallium accumulates in the form of tiny droplets at the surfaces. The patterned structure shows structural similarities with microcavities. The question arises if the residual metallic gallium may act as a partially reflecting mirror. To test this hypothesis, we studied the steady-state and transient photoluminescence through the modulation of light emerging from the ubiquitous broad "yellow" photoluminescence band. The microlattice is evidenced by energy-equidistant spontaneous emission enhancement peaks in the steady-state photoluminescence spectra. We suggest that the partial reflection due to the residual metallic gallium leads to the observed enhancement effect.

  4. Influence of dopants on defect formation in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Z.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Grzegory, I.; Porowski, S.; Lampert, D.J.H.; Eiting, C.J.; Dupuis R.D.

    2001-10-15

    Influence of p-dopants (Mg and Be) on the structure of GaN has been studied using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Bulk GaN:Mg and GaN:Be crystals grown by a high pressure and high temperature process and GaN:Mg grown by metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been studied. Structural dependence on growth polarity was observed in the bulk crystals. Spontaneous ordering in bulk GaN:Mg on c-plane (formation of Mg-rich planar defects with characteristics of inversion domains) was observed for growth in the N to Ga polar direction (N polarity). On the opposite site of the crystal (growth in the Ga to N polar direction) Mg-rich pyramidal defects empty inside (pinholes) were observed. Both these defects were also observed in MOCVD grown crystals. Pyramidal defects were also observed in the bulk GaN:Be crystals.

  5. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444kW/cm2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control overmore » the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.« less

  6. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S R J; Wang, George T

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444 kW cm(-2) and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control over the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates. PMID:26899502

  7. Enhanced water splitting with silver decorated GaN photoelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Syed, Z. A.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Gong, Y.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2016-07-01

    By means of a cost-effective approach, we demonstrate a GaN-based photoelectrode decorated with self-organized silver nano-islands employed for solar powered hydrogen generation, demonstrating 4 times increase in photocurrent compared with a reference sample without using any silver. Our photoelectrode exhibits a 60% incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency. The enhanced hydrogen generation is attributed to a significantly increased carrier generation rate as a result of strongly localized electric fields induced by surface plasmon coupling effect. The silver coating also contributes to the good chemical stability of our photoelectrode in a strong alkali electrolyte. This work paves the way for the development of GaN and also InGaN based photoelectrodes with ultra-high solar hydrogen conversion efficiency.

  8. Intrinsic polarization control in rectangular GaN nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting. S.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, S. R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic, linearly polarized lasing from single GaN nanowires using cross-sectional shape control. A two-step top-down fabrication approach was employed to create straight nanowires with controllable rectangular cross-sections. A clear lasing threshold of 444 kW cm-2 and a narrow spectral line width of 0.16 nm were observed under optical pumping at room temperature, indicating the onset of lasing. The polarization was along the short dimension (y-direction) of the nanowire due to the higher transverse confinement factors for y-polarized transverse modes resulting from the rectangular nanowire cross-section. The results show that cross-sectioned shape control can enable inherent control over the polarization of nanowire lasers without additional environment requirements, such as placement onto lossy substrates.

  9. Defect Donor and Acceptor in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Look, D.C.; Reynolds, D.C.; Hemsky, J.W.; Sizelove, J.R.; Jones, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    High-energy (0.7{endash}1MeV) electron irradiation in GaN grown on sapphire produces shallow donors and deep or shallow acceptors at equal rates, 1{plus_minus}0.2 cm{sup {minus}1}. The data, in conjunction with theory, are consistent only with the shallow donor being the N vacancy, and the acceptor the N interstitial. The N-vacancy donor energy is 64{plus_minus}10 meV, much larger than the value of 18meV found for the residual donor (probably Si) in this material. The Hall-effect measurements also reveal a degenerate n -type layer at the GaN/sapphire interface which must be accounted for to get the proper donor activation energy. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Surface photovoltage in undoped n-type GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Foussekis, M.; Baski, A. A.

    2010-06-01

    Steady-state and transient surface photovoltage (SPV) in undoped GaN is studied in vacuum and air ambient at room temperature and 400 K with a Kelvin probe. The results are explained within a phenomenological model accounting for the accumulation of photogenerated holes at the surface, capture of free electrons from the bulk over the near-surface potential barrier, and emission of electrons from surface states into the bulk. Simple analytical expressions are obtained and compared with experimental results. In particular, the proposed model explains the logarithmic decay of the SPV after stopping illumination. Internal and external mechanisms of the SPV are discussed in detail. It is shown that an internal mechanism dominates at low illumination intensity and/or small photon energies, while external mechanisms such as charging of a surface oxide layer and photoinduced processes play a significant role for above-bandgap illumination with sufficient intensity.

  11. Spatial distribution of defect luminescence in GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiming; Wang, George T

    2010-05-12

    The spatial distribution of defect-related and band-edge luminescence from GaN nanowires grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was studied by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy. A surface layer exhibiting strong yellow luminescence (YL) near 566 nm in the nanowires was revealed, compared to weak YL in the bulk. In contrast, other defect-related luminescence near 428 nm (blue luminescence) and 734 nm (red luminescence), in addition to band-edge luminescence (BEL) at 366 nm, were observed in the bulk of the nanowires but were largely absent at the surface. As the nanowire width approaches a critical dimension, the surface YL layer completely quenches the BEL. The surface YL is attributed to the diffusion and piling up of mobile point defects, likely isolated gallium vacancies, at the surface during growth. PMID:20392110

  12. Persistent photoconductivity in n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.T.; Wolk, J.A.; Walukiewicz, W.; Haller, E.E.

    1997-08-01

    We report on the spectral and temperature dependence of persistent photoconductivity (PPC) in metal-organic chemical vapor deposition grown unintentionally doped n-type GaN. The PPC effect is detectable up to temperatures of at least 352 K, the highest temperature used in this study. At 77 K, the conduction persists at a level 80{percent} higher than the equilibrium dark conduction for over 10{sup 4} s after removing the excitation. We have determined the spectral dependence for the optical cross section for PPC and obtain an optical ionization energy of {approximately}2.7 eV. The temperature dependence of the photoconductivity decay and its nonexponential shape are explained by a distribution of capture barriers with a mean capture barrier of 0.2 eV and a width of {approximately}26 meV. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Microstructure of laterally overgrown GaN layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Cherns, David

    2001-04-03

    Transmission electron microscopy study of plan-view and cross-section samples of epitaxial laterally overgrown (ELOG) GaN samples is described. Two types of dislocation with the same type of Burgers vector but different line direction have been observed. It is shown that threading edge dislocations bend to form dislocation segments in the c-plane as a result of shear stresses developed in the wing material along the stripe direction. It is shown that migration of these dislocations involves both glide and climb. Propagation of threading parts over the wing area is an indication of high density of point defects present in the wing areas on the ELOG samples. This finding might shed new light on the optical properties of such samples.

  14. MBE grown high quality GaN films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.; Aktas, O.; Salvador, A.; Botchkarev, A.; Sverdlov, B.; Mohammad, S. N.; Morkoç, H.

    1997-02-01

    GaN films with much improved structural, transport, and optical properties have been prepared by molecular beam epitaxy using NH 3 as a nitrogen source. Films with a wide range of resistivity, including highly resistive ones, were grown with a chosen growth rate of 1.2 μm/h. The electron mobility in modulation doped structures is about 450 and 850 cm 2/Vs at 300 and 77 K, respectively, with an areal carrier concentration of about 10 13 cm -2. Low temperature luminescence shows A- and B-free-excitons as well as the excited state of the A- and B-excitons, the first known observation, attesting to the quality of the samples. These transition energies are consistent with the best MOCVD samples and represent a sizable reduction of the pandemic zincblende phase in MBE grown films. The high quality of films was demonstrated by the realization of high performance MODFETs and Schottky diodes.

  15. GaN Based Electronics And Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fan

    2002-03-01

    The Group III-nitrides were initially researched for their promise to fill the void for a blue solid state light emitter. Electronic devices from III-nitrides have been a more recent phenomenon. The thermal conductivity of GaN is three times that of GaAs. For high power or high temperature applications, good thermal conductivity is imperative for heat removal or sustained operation at elevated temperatures. The development of III-N and other wide bandgap technologies for high temperature applications will likely take place at the expense of competing technologies, such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI), at moderate temperatures. At higher temperatures (>300°C), novel devices and components will become possible. The automotive industry will likely be one of the largest markets for such high temperature electronics. One of the most noteworthy advantages for III-N materials over other wide bandgap semiconductors is the availability of AlGaN/GaN and InGaN/GaN heterostructures. A 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) has been shown to exist at the AlGaN/GaN interface, and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) from these materials can exhibit 2DEG mobilities approaching 2000 cm2 / V?s at 300K. Power handling capabilities of 12 W/mm appear feasible, and extraordinary large signal performance has already been demonstrated, with a current state-of-the-art of >10W/mm at X-band. In this talk, high speed and high temperature AlGaN/GaN HEMTs as well as MOSHEMTs, high breakdown voltage GaN (>6KV) and AlGaN (9.7 KV) Schottky diodes, and their applications will be presented.

  16. Transition between wurtzite and zinc-blende GaN: An effect of deposition condition of molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B. M.; Xie, M. H.; Wu, H. S.; Wang, N.; Tong, S. Y.

    2006-10-09

    GaN exists in both wurtzite and zinc-blende phases and the growths of the two on its (0001) or (111) surfaces are achieved by choosing proper deposition conditions of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE). At low substrate temperatures but high gallium fluxes, metastable zinc-blende GaN films are obtained, whereas at high temperatures and/or using high nitrogen fluxes, equilibrium wurtzite phase GaN epilayers resulted. This dependence of crystal structure on substrate temperature and source flux is not affected by deposition rate. Rather, the initial stage nucleation kinetics plays a primary role in determining the crystallographic structures of epitaxial GaN by MBE.

  17. High electron mobility GaN grown under N-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koblmueller, G.; Wu, F.; Mates, T.; Speck, J. S.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Calleja, E.

    2007-11-26

    An alternative approach is presented for the plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy of high-quality GaN. Under N-rich growth conditions, an unexpected layer-by-layer growth mode was found for a wide range of growth temperatures in the GaN thermal decomposition regime (>750 deg. C). Consequently, superior surface morphologies with roughness of less than 1 nm (rms) have been achieved. For lightly Si-doped GaN films, room-temperature electron mobilities exceeding 1100 cm{sup 2}/V s were measured, surpassing the commonly insulating nature of GaN grown under N-rich conditions at low temperature.

  18. Metal organic vapour phase epitaxy of GaN and lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibart, Pierre

    2004-05-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is an extremely promising wide band gap semiconductor material for optoelectronics and high temperature, high power electronics. Actually, GaN is probably the most important semiconductor since silicon. However, achievement of its full potential has still been limited by a dramatic lack of suitable GaN bulk single crystals. GaN has a high melting temperature and a very high decomposition pressure; therefore it cannot be grown using conventional methods used for GaAs or Si like Czochraslski or Bridgman growths. Since there is no GaN bulk single crystal commercially available, all technological development of GaN-based devices relies on heteroepitaxy. Most of the current device structures are grown on sapphire or 6H-SiC. However, since their lattice parameters and thermal expansion coefficients are not well-matched to GaN, the epitaxial growth generates huge densities of defects, with threading dislocations (TDs) being the most prevalent (109-1011 cm-2). As a comparison, homoepitaxially grown GaAs exhibits ~102-104 dislocation cm-2, and homoepitaxial Si almost 0. Actually this large density of TDs in GaN drastically limits the performance and operating lifetime of nitride-based devices. Therefore, there is currently a tremendous technological effort to reduce these defects. Metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) is currently the most widely used technology. Actually, all optoelectronic commercial device structures are fabricated using MOVPE. In MOVPE, the most appropriate precursor for nitrogen is ammonia (NH3), whereas either trimethyl or triethylgallium may be used as a gallium source. MOVPE of GaN requires a high partial pressure of NH3, high growth temperatures (~1000-1100°C) and a growth chamber specially designed to avoid premature reactions between the ammonia and gallium alkyls. Since sapphire (or 6H-SiC) and GaN are highly mismatched, direct growth of GaN is impossible. Therefore, the growth of GaN on any substrate first requires

  19. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  20. Attention's Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Robert M G; McClenahan, Laura J; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2016-06-01

    How do people get attention to operate at peak efficiency in high-pressure situations? We tested the hypothesis that the general mechanism that allows this is the maintenance of multiple target representations in working and long-term memory. We recorded subjects' event-related potentials (ERPs) indexing the working memory and long-term memory representations used to control attention while performing visual search. We found that subjects used both types of memories to control attention when they performed the visual search task with a large reward at stake, or when they were cued to respond as fast as possible. However, under normal circumstances, one type of target memory was sufficient for slower task performance. The use of multiple types of memory representations appears to provide converging top-down control of attention, allowing people to step on the attentional accelerator in a variety of high-pressure situations. PMID:27056975

  1. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  2. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  3. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures on GaN templates and native GaN substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jr-Tai Hsu, Chih-Wei; Forsberg, Urban; Janzén, Erik

    2015-02-28

    Severe surface decomposition of semi-insulating (SI) GaN templates occurred in high-temperature H{sub 2} atmosphere prior to epitaxial growth in a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition system. A two-step heating process with a surface stabilization technique was developed to preserve the GaN template surface. Utilizing the optimized heating process, a high two-dimensional electron gas mobility ∼2000 cm{sup 2}/V·s was obtained in a thin AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure with an only 100-nm-thick GaN spacer layer homoepitaxially grown on the GaN template. This technique was also demonstrated viable for native GaN substrates to stabilize the surface facilitating two-dimensional growth of GaN layers. Very high residual silicon and oxygen concentrations were found up to ∼1 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} at the interface between the GaN epilayer and the native GaN substrate. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed that the residual carbon doping controlled by growth conditions of the GaN epilayer can be used to successfully compensate the donor-like impurities. State-of-the-art structural properties of a high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure was then realized on a 1 × 1 cm{sup 2} SI native GaN substrate; the full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curves of the GaN (002) and (102) peaks are only 21 and 14 arc sec, respectively. The surface morphology of the heterostructure shows uniform parallel bilayer steps, and no morphological defects were noticeable over the entire epi-wafer.

  4. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition growth of high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructures on GaN templates and native GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Tai, Jr.; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Forsberg, Urban; Janzén, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Severe surface decomposition of semi-insulating (SI) GaN templates occurred in high-temperature H2 atmosphere prior to epitaxial growth in a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition system. A two-step heating process with a surface stabilization technique was developed to preserve the GaN template surface. Utilizing the optimized heating process, a high two-dimensional electron gas mobility ˜2000 cm2/V.s was obtained in a thin AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure with an only 100-nm-thick GaN spacer layer homoepitaxially grown on the GaN template. This technique was also demonstrated viable for native GaN substrates to stabilize the surface facilitating two-dimensional growth of GaN layers. Very high residual silicon and oxygen concentrations were found up to ˜1 × 1020 cm-3 at the interface between the GaN epilayer and the native GaN substrate. Capacitance-voltage measurements confirmed that the residual carbon doping controlled by growth conditions of the GaN epilayer can be used to successfully compensate the donor-like impurities. State-of-the-art structural properties of a high-mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure was then realized on a 1 × 1 cm2 SI native GaN substrate; the full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curves of the GaN (002) and (102) peaks are only 21 and 14 arc sec, respectively. The surface morphology of the heterostructure shows uniform parallel bilayer steps, and no morphological defects were noticeable over the entire epi-wafer.

  5. Piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jamond, N; Chrétien, P; Houzé, F; Lu, L; Largeau, L; Maugain, O; Travers, L; Harmand, J C; Glas, F; Lefeuvre, E; Tchernycheva, M; Gogneau, N

    2016-08-12

    We demonstrate the first piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires (NWs). We perform a systematic multi-scale analysis, going from single wire properties to macroscopic device fabrication and characterization, which allows us to establish for GaN NWs the relationship between the material properties and the piezo-generation, and to propose an efficient piezo-generator design. The piezo-conversion of individual MBE-grown p-doped GaN NWs in a dense array is assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with a Resiscope module yielding an average output voltage of 228 ± 120 mV and a maximum value of 350 mV generated per NW. In the case of p-doped GaN NWs, the piezo-generation is achieved when a positive piezo-potential is created inside the nanostructures, i.e. when the NWs are submitted to compressive deformation. The understanding of the piezo-generation mechanism in our GaN NWs, gained from AFM analyses, is applied to design a piezo-generator operated under compressive strain. The device consists of NW arrays of several square millimeters in size embedded into spin-on glass with a Schottky contact for rectification and collection of piezo-generated carriers. The generator delivers a maximum power density of ∼12.7 mW cm(-3). This value sets the new state of the art for piezo-generators based on GaN NWs and more generally on nitride NWs, and offers promising prospects for the use of GaN NWs as high-efficiency ultra-compact energy harvesters. PMID:27363777

  6. Piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamond, N.; Chrétien, P.; Houzé, F.; Lu, L.; Largeau, L.; Maugain, O.; Travers, L.; Harmand, J. C.; Glas, F.; Lefeuvre, E.; Tchernycheva, M.; Gogneau, N.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the first piezo-generator integrating a vertical array of GaN nanowires (NWs). We perform a systematic multi-scale analysis, going from single wire properties to macroscopic device fabrication and characterization, which allows us to establish for GaN NWs the relationship between the material properties and the piezo-generation, and to propose an efficient piezo-generator design. The piezo-conversion of individual MBE-grown p-doped GaN NWs in a dense array is assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with a Resiscope module yielding an average output voltage of 228 ± 120 mV and a maximum value of 350 mV generated per NW. In the case of p-doped GaN NWs, the piezo-generation is achieved when a positive piezo-potential is created inside the nanostructures, i.e. when the NWs are submitted to compressive deformation. The understanding of the piezo-generation mechanism in our GaN NWs, gained from AFM analyses, is applied to design a piezo-generator operated under compressive strain. The device consists of NW arrays of several square millimeters in size embedded into spin-on glass with a Schottky contact for rectification and collection of piezo-generated carriers. The generator delivers a maximum power density of ∼12.7 mW cm‑3. This value sets the new state of the art for piezo-generators based on GaN NWs and more generally on nitride NWs, and offers promising prospects for the use of GaN NWs as high-efficiency ultra-compact energy harvesters.

  7. Heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on vertical Si{110} sidewalls formed on trench-etched Si(001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jarod C.; Shen, Haoting; Yuwen, Yu; Wang, Ke; Mayer, Theresa S.; Redwing, Joan M.

    2016-07-01

    A maskless Si trench structure was developed to integrate crystallographically non-polar GaN microstructures with semi-polar facets on Si(001). GaN "fins" were preferentially grown by MOCVD on Si{110} trench sidewalls formed by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of Si(001) such that GaN(0001)//Si{110} and GaN(10-10)//Si(001), resulting in a non-polar crystal structure with respect to the Si(001) substrate surface. No masking layer was required to prevent GaN growth on the Si(001) top surface of the trenches, instead, it was found that GaN nucleated preferentially on the Si{110} trench sidewalls. GaN was also observed to nucleate at the top corner of the trenches due to Si etching and exposure of high-index Si facets during the pre-growth H2 anneal. This undesired GaN nucleation was successfully suppressed by reducing the H2 anneal time and/or increasing the growth temperature and decreasing the precursor V/III to enhance Ga-adatom diffusion. Cross-sectional TEM studies confirmed that the GaN fins were crystallographically non-polar with respect to the Si(001) substrate surface and were bounded by semi-polar and non-polar facets. The reported Si fabrication and GaN growth process shows promise for the integration of non-polar and semi-polar GaN microstructures on industry standard Si(001) substrates.

  8. Crystallographically tilted and partially strain relaxed GaN grown on inclined (111) facets etched on Si(100) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Ansah Antwi, K. K.; Soh, C. B.; Wee, Q.; Tan, Rayson J. N.; Tan, H. R.; Yang, P.; Sun, L. F.; Shen, Z. X.; Chua, S. J.

    2013-12-28

    High resolution X-ray diffractometry (HR-XRD), Photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscope measurements are reported for GaN deposited on a conventional Si(111) substrate and on the (111) facets etched on a Si(100) substrate. HR-XRD reciprocal space mappings showed that the GaN(0002) plane is tilted by about 0.63° ± 0.02° away from the exposed Si(111) growth surface for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate, while no observable tilt existed between the GaN(0002) and Si(111) planes for GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The ratio of integrated intensities of the yellow to near band edge (NBE) luminescence (I{sub YL}/I{sub NBE}) was determined to be about one order of magnitude lower in the case of GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) substrate compared with GaN deposited on the conventional Si(111) substrate. The Raman E{sub 2}(high) optical phonon mode at 565.224 ± 0.001 cm{sup −1} with a narrow full width at half maximum of 1.526 ± 0.002 cm{sup −1} was measured, for GaN deposited on the patterned Si(100) indicating high material quality. GaN deposition within the trench etched on the Si(100) substrate occurred via diffusion and mass-transport limited mechanism. This resulted in a differential GaN layer thickness from the top (i.e., 1.8 μm) of the trench to the bottom (i.e., 0.3 μm) of the trench. Mixed-type dislocation constituted about 80% of the total dislocations in the GaN grown on the inclined Si(111) surface etched on Si(100)

  9. Acceleration modules in linear induction accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Heng; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The Linear Induction Accelerator (LIA) is a unique type of accelerator that is capable of accelerating kilo-Ampere charged particle current to tens of MeV energy. The present development of LIA in MHz bursting mode and the successful application into a synchrotron have broadened LIA's usage scope. Although the transformer model is widely used to explain the acceleration mechanism of LIAs, it is not appropriate to consider the induction electric field as the field which accelerates charged particles for many modern LIAs. We have examined the transition of the magnetic cores' functions during the LIA acceleration modules' evolution, distinguished transformer type and transmission line type LIA acceleration modules, and re-considered several related issues based on transmission line type LIA acceleration module. This clarified understanding should help in the further development and design of LIA acceleration modules.

  10. GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, George

    2015-07-03

    For nearly 4 ½ years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) led a very successful, DoE-funded team effort to develop GaN-on-Si materials and devices, targeting high-voltage (>1 kV), high-power, cost-effective electronics for grid applications. This effort, called the GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA) program, was initially made up of MIT/LL, the MIT campus group of Prof. Tomas Palacios (MIT), and the industrial partner M/A Com Technology Solutions (MTS). Later in the program a 4th team member was added (IQE MA) to provide commercial-scale GaN-on-Si epitaxial materials. A basic premise of the GIGA program was that power electronics, for ubiquitous utilization -even for grid applications - should be closer in cost structure to more conventional Si-based power electronics. For a number of reasons, more established GaN-on-SiC or even SiC-based power electronics are not likely to reach theses cost structures, even in higher manufacturing volumes. An additional premise of the GIGA program was that the technical focus would be on materials and devices suitable for operating at voltages > 1 kV, even though there is also significant commercial interest in developing lower voltage (< 1 kV), cost effective GaN-on-Si devices for higher volume applications, like consumer products. Remarkable technical progress was made during the course of this program. Advances in materials included the growth of high-quality, crack-free epitaxial GaN layers on large-diameter Si substrates with thicknesses up to ~5 μm, overcoming significant challenges in lattice mismatch and thermal expansion differences between Si and GaN in the actual epitaxial growth process. Such thick epilayers are crucial for high voltage operation of lateral geometry devices such as Schottky barrier (SB) diodes and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). New “Normally-Off” device architectures were demonstrated – for safe operation of power electronics circuits. The trade-offs between lateral and

  11. Progress on plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-05-01

    Several plasma accelerator concepts are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA) and the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator (PWFA). Various accelerator physics issues regarding these schemes are discussed, and numerical examples on laboratory scale experiments are given. The efficiency of plasma accelerators is then revealed with suggestions on improvements. Sources that cause emittance growth are discussed briefly.

  12. Nanostructural engineering of nitride nucleation layers for GaN substrate dislocation reduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Lemp, Thomas Kerr; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Cross, Karen Charlene; Thaler, Gerald

    2009-07-01

    With no lattice matched substrate available, sapphire continues as the substrate of choice for GaN growth, because of its reasonable cost and the extensive prior experience using it as a substrate for GaN. Surprisingly, the high dislocation density does not appear to limit UV and blue LED light intensity. However, dislocations may limit green LED light intensity and LED lifetime, especially as LEDs are pushed to higher current density for high end solid state lighting sources. To improve the performance for these higher current density LEDs, simple growth-enabled reductions in dislocation density would be highly prized. GaN nucleation layers (NLs) are not commonly thought of as an application of nano-structural engineering; yet, these layers evolve during the growth process to produce self-assembled, nanometer-scale structures. Continued growth on these nuclei ultimately leads to a fully coalesced film, and we show in this research program that their initial density is correlated to the GaN dislocation density. In this 18 month program, we developed MOCVD growth methods to reduce GaN dislocation densities on sapphire from 5 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using our standard delay recovery growth technique to 1 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} using an ultra-low nucleation density technique. For this research, we firmly established a correlation between the GaN nucleation thickness, the resulting nucleation density after annealing, and dislocation density of full GaN films grown on these nucleation layers. We developed methods to reduce the nuclei density while still maintaining the ability to fully coalesce the GaN films. Ways were sought to improve the GaN nuclei orientation by improving the sapphire surface smoothness by annealing prior to the NL growth. Methods to eliminate the formation of additional nuclei once the majority of GaN nuclei were developed using a silicon nitride treatment prior to the deposition of the nucleation layer. Nucleation layer thickness was determined

  13. Influence of stress on optical transitions in GaN nanorods containing a single InGaN/GaN quantum disk

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Y. D.; Shields, P. A.; Allsopp, D. W. E.; Bruckbauer, J.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.

    2014-11-07

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging has been performed on GaN nanorods containing a single InGaN quantum disk (SQD) with controlled variations in excitation conditions. Two different nanorod diameters (200 and 280 nm) have been considered. Systematic changes in the CL spectra from the SQD were observed as the accelerating voltage of the electron beam and its position of incidence are varied. It is shown that the dominant optical transition in the SQD varies across the nanorod as a result of interplay between the contributions of the deformation potential and the quantum-confined Stark effect to the transition energy as consequence of radial variation in the pseudomorphic strain.

  14. Stress reduction in epitaxial GaN films on Si using cubic SiC as intermediate layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Jun; Abe, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakanishi, Hideo

    2006-08-01

    Stress in the epitaxial films of GaN on Si is reduced by using SiC as intermediate layers. The crystalline films of cubic SiC (0-1μm), thin AlN (50nm), and GaN (1-3μm) were prepared on 3in. (1 1 1) Si substrates—stacked in the order of GaN /AlN/SiC/Si—by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. It is revealed by Raman spectroscopy that the tensile stress in GaN is reduced to half (reduction of about 300MPa) for GaN on Si with SiC intermediate layers compared with GaN on Si without SiC intermediate layers. Because of stress reduction, crack-free GaN on Si with a thickness of 2μm was obtained by using SiC intermediate layers. Cracking was minimized even on thicker GaN on Si (3μm thick) with SiC intermediate layers. The SiC intermediate layers are promising for the realization of nitride based electronic devices on Si.

  15. Demonstration of crystal-vapor equilibrium leading to growth blockade of GaN during selective area growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Y.; Trassoudaine, A.; Gil, E.; Lekhal, K.; Chelda-Gourmala, O.; Castelluci, D.; Cadoret, R.

    2012-09-01

    The synthesis of GaN by selective area growth using Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (SAG-HVPE) is reported for stripes patterned along <11bar00 > and <112bar0>GaN on c-plane sapphire substrates. A systematic control of the GaN morphologies was carried out by both cross-sectional and surface Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). A complete HVPE cartography of GaN-SAG revealed domains of zero growth rates at high concentration of hydrogen in the carrier gas. The determination of the mechanisms that govern the growth of GaN morphologies was particularly emphasized. A theoretical model based on thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the grown (0001) GaN layers was discussed, in combination with experiments on unmasked (0001) GaN and patterned GaN/c-plane sapphire substrates. Long HVPE runs were performed to demonstrate that the prevailing growth mechanism, for high hydrogen concentration in the carrier gas, is a mechanism based on a dechlorination by GaCl2 gas species. This mechanism leads to growth blockade of GaN growth and constitutes a very interesting issue for shaping GaN material as an alternative to top-down micro- and nano-technologies.

  16. Comparison of the microstructural characterizations of GaN layers grown on Si (111) and on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Huiyoun; Jeon, Kisung; Jang, Youngil; Gang, Mingu; Choi, Myungshin; Park, Wonhwa; Park, Kyuho

    2013-10-01

    Due to the large differences in the lattice constants and the thermal expansion coefficients between GaN and Si, GaN growth on a Si substrate usually leads initially to high defect densities and cracks. If high-quality GaN films on Si substrate are to be obtained, it is essential to understand the different growth characteristics of GaN layers grown on Si and on sapphire. In this study, the GaN specimens were grown on sapphire and Si (111) substrates with AlGaN and AlN buffer layers, respectively, by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and micro-Raman spectroscope, we carried out a comparative investigation of GaN growth by characterizing lattice coherency, defect density, and residual strain. These analyses revealed that the GaN layers grown on Si have much residual tensile strain and that strain has an effect on the formation of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) above the GaN layers.

  17. Influence of growth temperature and temperature ramps on deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, A. M.; Kelchner, K.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The dependence of deep level defect incorporation in m-plane GaN films grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on bulk m-plane GaN substrates as a function of growth temperature (Tg) and Tg ramping method was investigated using deep level optical spectroscopy. Understanding the influence of Tg on GaN deep level incorporation is important for InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) because GaN quantum barrier (QB) layers are grown much colder than thin film GaN to accommodate InGaN QW growth. Deep level spectra of low Tg (800 °C) GaN films grown under QB conditions were compared to deep level spectra of high Tg (1150 °C) GaN. Reducing Tg, increased the defect density significantly (>50×) through introduction of emergent deep level defects at 2.09 eV and 2.9 eV below the conduction band minimum. However, optimizing growth conditions during the temperature ramp when transitioning from high to low Tg substantially reduced the density of these emergent deep levels by approximately 40%. The results suggest that it is important to consider the potential for non-radiative recombination in QBs of LED or LD active regions, and tailoring the transition from high Tg GaN growth to active layer growth can mitigate such non-radiative channels.

  18. Photoluminescence of GaN Film Exposed to Chlorine-Containing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Banno, Yoshitsugu; Nakano, Yoshitaka; Nakamura, Keiji

    2015-09-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) has been an attractive semiconductor material for the application to not only light emitting diodes, but also high power devices. The advantage of the material is that it can be fabricated to maximize the number density of devices a single wafer. In our current technology, we mainly utilize low-temperature plasma for dry etching. In fact, GaN generally requires chlorine-containing plasma for chemical etching. However, the use of plasma has a drawback that can induce unwanted changes on the fabricating devices in some conditions. This is called as plasma-induced damage (PID). We have so far monitored the development of PIDs with photoluminescence (PL) emitted from the GaN surface during argon plasma process. In this time, we exposed a GaN film to chlorine-containing plasma and monitored the PID development. Our PL measurements show that the chlorine-containing plasma almost gave no change in PL property of GaN, while argon plasma gave drastic changes. This is because the speed of etching by chlorine species was faster than the speed of damage creations by plasma. In this presentation, we will show further results of this experiment along with some analyses for the purpose of industrial application.

  19. Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Tongqing; Pan, Guoshun; Lu, Xinchun

    2016-08-01

    Effects of catalyst concentration and ultraviolet intensity on chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of GaN were deeply investigated in this paper. Working as an ideal homogeneous substrate material in LED industry, GaN ought to be equipped with a smooth and flat surface. Taking the strong chemical stability of GaN into account, photocatalytic oxidation technology was adopted in GaN CMP process to realize efficient removal. It was found that, because of the improved reaction rate of photocatalytic oxidation, GaN material removal rate (MRR) increases by a certain extent with catalyst concentration increasing. Cross single line analysis on the surface after polishing by Phase Shift MicroXAM-3D was carried out to prove the better removal effect with higher catalyst concentration. Ultraviolet intensity field in H2O2-SiO2-based polishing system was established and simulated, revealing the variation trend of ultraviolet intensity around the outlet of the slurry. It could be concluded that, owing to the higher planarization efficiency and lower energy damage, the UV lamp of 125 W is the most appropriate lamp in this system. Based on the analysis, defects removal model of this work was proposed to describe the effects of higher catalyst concentration and higher power of UV lamp.

  20. Ultrathin GaN quantum disk nanowire LEDs with sub-250 nm electroluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, A. T. M. Golam; May, Brelon J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Duscher, Gerd J.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2016-04-01

    By quantum confining GaN at monolayer thickness with AlN barriers inside of a nanowire, deep ultraviolet LEDs are demonstrated. Full three-dimensional strain dependent energy band simulations are carried out within multiple quantum disk (MQD) GaN/AlN nanowire superlattice heterostructures. It is found that, even within the same nanowire MQD, the emission energy of the ultrathin GaN QDs varies from disk to disk due to the changing strain distribution and polarization charge induced energy band bending along the axial nanowire direction. MQD heterostructures are grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form self-assembled catalyst-free nanowires with 1 to 2 monolayer thick GaN insertions within an AlN matrix. Photoluminescence peaks are observed at 295 nm and 283 nm from the 2 ML and 1 ML thick MQD samples, respectively. Polarization-doped nanowire LEDs are grown incorporating 1 ML thick GaN MQD active regions from which we observe deep ultraviolet electroluminescence. The shortest LED wavelength peak observed is 240 nm and attributed to electron hole recombination within 1 ML thick GaN QDs.

  1. Nanoscale lateral epitaxial overgrowth of GaN on Si (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Zang, K.Y.; Wang, Y.D.; Chua, S.J.; Wang, L.S.

    2005-11-07

    We demonstrate that GaN can selectively grow by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition into the pores and laterally over the nanoscale patterned SiO{sub 2} mask on a template of GaN/AlN/Si. The nanoporous SiO{sub 2} on GaN surface with pore diameter of approximately 65 nm and pore spacing of 110 nm was created by inductively coupled plasma etching using anodic aluminum oxide template as a mask. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy shows that the threading-dislocation density was largely reduced in this nanoepitaxial lateral overgrowth region. Dislocations parallel to the interface are the dominant type of dislocations in the overgrown layer of GaN. A large number of the threading dislocations were filtered by the nanoscale mask, which leads to the dramatic reduction of the threading dislocations during the growth within the nano-openings. More importantly, due to the nanoscale size of the mask area, the very fast coalescence and subsequent lateral overgrowth of GaN force the threading dislocations to bend to the basal plane within the first 50 nm of the film thickness. The structure of overgrown GaN is a truncated hexagonal pyramid which is covered with six {l_brace}1101{r_brace} side facets and (0001) top surface depending on the growth conditions.

  2. Synthesis and field emission studies of tower-like GaN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tower-like GaN nanowires were successfully fabricated on Au-coated Si substrates by chemical vapor deposition. The tower-like nanowire consisted of a nanowire at the center and microcrystal layers stacked one by one around the nanowire. The tower-like nanowires grew along the [0001] direction, and the exposed surfaces of the microcrystal layers are 101¯1 and 101¯1¯ facets. The growth mechanism of the tower-like GaN nanowires was proposed. The field emission property of tower-like GaN nanowires was tested. Due to the sharp tips, nearly vertical alignment and rough surfaces caused by the microcrystal layers, the tower-like GaN nanowires show excellent performance in field emission with a turn-on field of 2.44 V/μm which is lower than those of other GaN one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. PACS 81.15.Gh; 68.37.Lp; 68.37.Vj PMID:25404876

  3. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi Gan locus, involved in galactan catabolism.

    PubMed

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-10-01

    beta-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK(2). Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-beta-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-beta-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  4. Characterization of the Erwinia chrysanthemi gan Locus, Involved in Galactan Catabolism▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Delangle, Aurélie; Prouvost, Anne-France; Cogez, Virginie; Bohin, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Jean-Marie; Cotte-Pattat, Nicole Hugouvieux

    2007-01-01

    β-1,4-Galactan is a major component of the ramified regions of pectin. Analysis of the genome of the plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia chrysanthemi revealed the presence of a cluster of eight genes encoding proteins potentially involved in galactan utilization. The predicted transport system would comprise a specific porin GanL and an ABC transporter made of four proteins, GanFGK2. Degradation of galactans would be catalyzed by the periplasmic 1,4-β-endogalactanase GanA, which released oligogalactans from trimer to hexamer. After their transport through the inner membrane, oligogalactans would be degraded into galactose by the cytoplasmic 1,4-β-exogalactanase GanB. Mutants affected for the porin or endogalactanase were unable to grow on galactans, but they grew on galactose and on a mixture of galactotriose, galactotetraose, galactopentaose, and galactohexaose. Mutants affected for the periplasmic galactan binding protein, the transporter ATPase, or the exogalactanase were only able to grow on galactose. Thus, the phenotypes of these mutants confirmed the functionality of the gan locus in transport and catabolism of galactans. These mutations did not affect the virulence of E. chrysanthemi on chicory leaves, potato tubers, or Saintpaulia ionantha, suggesting an accessory role of galactan utilization in the bacterial pathogeny. PMID:17644603

  5. Ferromagnetism and Photoluminescence in Rare-Earth doped GaN via Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luen, M. Oliver; Nepal, N.; Bedair, S. M.; Zavada, J. M.; Brown, Ei Ei; Hommerich, U.; Frajtag, P.; El-Masry, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    Rare-earth doped GaN is attracting attention both as a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) material and for optical devices useful in communications and multi-color semiconductor display technology. GaN's large band gap (3.4 eV) gives rise to optical transparency over a wide spectral range, from the infrared (IR) to the ultraviolet. These properties make it an optimum host for the various emissions that are possible from rare-earth (RE) ions. Recently, rare-earth doped GaN also has demonstrated above room temperature ferromagnetism. In this study, we report the diffusion of RE (Nd, Sm, Gd and Er) into undoped, Mg-doped and Si-doped GaN templates. Room temperature optical and ferromagnetic properties were studied using photoluminescence (PL) and alternating gradient magnetometer, respectively. Ferromagnetic properties show a preference for undoped and n-type GaN. PL spectra exhibit RE ion inner shell transitions in the visible and infrared regions. The mechanisms for above room temperature ferromagnetism and emission intensity related to the RE concentration, is discussed.

  6. Low temperature inorganic chemical vapor deposition of heteroepitaxial GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurran, Jeffrey; Todd, M.; Kouvetakis, J.; Smith, David J.

    1996-07-01

    We have developed a highly efficient method of growing thin oriented films of GaN on basal plane sapphire and (100) Si substrates using an exclusively inorganic single-source precursor free of carbon and hydrogen. Cross sectional transmission electron microscopy of the highly conformal films revealed columnar material growth on Si and heteroepitaxial columnar growth of crystalline GaN on sapphire. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) of layers grown at 700 °C confirmed stoichiometric GaN. Auger and RBS oxygen and carbon resonance profiles indicated that the films were pure and highly homogeneous. With respect to current chemical vapor deposition processes for GaN growth, our approach offers a number of potentially important improvements. These include high growth rates of 5-350 nm/min, low deposition temperature of 650-700 °C, nearly ideal Ga-N stoichiometry, elimination of the highly inefficient use of toxic ammonia, and a carbon-hydrogen free growth environment that could prove to be beneficial to p-doping processes.

  7. Synthesis, microstructure, and cathodoluminescence of [0001]-oriented GaN nanorods grown on conductive graphite substrate.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Liu, Baodan; Wang, Zaien; Yang, Bing; Yin, Yao; Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Zhang, Guifeng; Jiang, Xin

    2013-11-27

    One-dimensional GaN nanorods with corrugated morphology have been synthesized on graphite substrate without the assistance of any metal catalyst through a feasible thermal evaporation process. The morphologies and microstructures of GaN nanorods were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results from HRTEM analysis indicate that the GaN nanorods are well-crystallized and exhibit a preferential orientation along the [0001] direction with Ga(3+)-terminated (101̅1) and N(3-)-terminated (101̅1̅) as side facets, finally leading to the corrugated morphology surface. The stabilization of the electrostatic surface energy of {101̅1} polar surface in a wurtzite-type hexagonal structure plays a key role in the formation of GaN nanorods with corrugated morphology. Room-temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements show a near-band-edge emission (NBE) in the ultraviolet range and a broad deep level emission (DLE) in the visible range. The crystallography and the optical emissions of GaN nanorods are discussed. PMID:24164686

  8. Properties of Gallium Disorder and Gold Implants in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Weber, William J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Shutthanandan, V; DB Poker, SC Moss, K-H Heinig

    2001-04-25

    Epitaxial single-crystal GaN films on sapphire were implanted 60? off the <0001> surface normal with 1 MeV Auor 3 MeV Au over a fluence range from 0.88 to 86.2 ions/nm2 at 180 and 300 K. The implantation damage was studied in-situ using 2 MeV He Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS/C). The disordering rate in the near-surface region is faster than at the damage peak. In all cases, results show an intermediate stage of Ga disorder saturation at the damage peak. Migration of Au implants in GaN is observed during ion implantation at 300 K. As a result of thermal annealing at 870 K for 20 min, some Au implants in GaN diffuse into the amorphized surface region, while the remaining Au atoms distribute around the mean ion-projected-range. These results suggest a high mobility of both Ga defects and Au implants in GaN. Deeper damage implantation by 3 MeV Au indicates that GaN cannot be completely amorphized up to the highest ion fluence (86.2 ions/nm) applied at 300 K.

  9. Transport properties, specific heat and thermal conductivity of GaN nanocrystalline ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkowski, Czeslaw; ChuchmaLa, Andrzej; Zaleski, Andrzej J.; Matusiak, Marcin; Mucha, Jan; GLuchowski, PaweL; Strek, WiesLaw

    2010-10-15

    The structural and transport properties (resistivity, thermopower and Hall effect), specific heat and thermal conductivity have been measured for GaN nanocrystalline ceramic prepared by hot pressing. It was found that the temperature dependence of resistivity in temperature range 10-300 K shows the very low activation energy, which is ascribed to the shallow donor doping originating in amorphous phase of sample. The major charge carriers are electrons, what is indicated by negative sign of Hall constant and Seebeck coefficient. The thermopower attains large values (-58 {mu}V/K at 300 K) and was characterized by linear temperature dependence which suggests the diffusion as a major contribution to Seebeck effect. The high electron concentration of 1.3x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and high electronic specific heat coefficient determined to be 2.4 mJ/molK{sup 2} allow to conclude that GaN ceramic demonstrates the semimetallic-like behavior accompanied by very small mobility of electrons ({approx}0.1 cm{sup 2}/V s) which is responsible for its high resistivity. A low heat conductivity of GaN ceramics is associated with partial amorphous phase of GaN grains due to high pressure sintering. - Graphical Abstract: Thermal resistivity and thermopower measurements indicates the high phonon scattering and lack of phonon-drag contribution to thermopower in GaN nanoceramics pressed under 4 GPa at 800 {sup o}C.

  10. Deep levels and persistent photoconductivity in GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, C.H.; Pankove, J.I.

    1997-04-01

    Photocurrent decay in GaN thin films was studied in the time span from a few seconds to several days. The persistent photoconductivity (PPC) behavior was observed not only in Mg-doped {ital p}-type GaN films but also in undoped {ital n}-type GaN films. The photoconductivity spectra and the photocurrent response time were measured using a weak probe light at several times after the samples had been kept in the dark. During the relaxation, the photocurrent due to the subband-gap probe light decreased more than the photocurrent due to the UV probe light. It is suggested that metastable centers at 1.1, 1.40, and 2.04 eV above the valence band edge are responsible for the PPC behavior in Mg-doped GaN, and that Ga vacancy is the candidate for PPC effect in {ital n}-type GaN. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. UV Photodetectors using Vertically-aligned GaN n-core/p-shell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jong-Yoon; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Paramanik, Dipak; Debnath, Ratan; Davydov, Albert; King, Matthew; Motayed, Abhishek

    2013-03-01

    The fabrication methods of GaN nanostructures, such as vertically aligned core-shell nano- and micro- pillar arrays, are critical for device applications. We have demonstrated dense arrays of vertically-oriented, individual GaN core-shell structures realized by a combination of top-down etching of the n-type pillars and subsequent p-shell epitaxial growth using selective CVD. The patterned samples were then etched in an inductively coupled plasma system to form GaN pillars. Mg-doped p-type GaN shells were then epitaxially grown over the n-GaN pillars in a custom-built horizontal hot-wall halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. Room-temperature photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy measurements indicate strain-relaxation in the etched pillars compared to the as-grown GaN film. Complete devices have been fabricated using dielectric planarization Detailed device characterization was correlated with TEM microstructural analysis. IREAP, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742

  12. Thermal evolution of microstructure in ion-irradiated GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, In-Tae; Jiang, Weilin; Wang, Chong M.; Weber, William J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2009-04-20

    The thermal evolution of the microstructure created by irradiation of a GaN single crystal with 2 MeV Au2+ ions at 150 K is characterized following annealing at 973 K using transmission electron microscopy. In the as-irradiated sample characterized at 300 K, Ga nanocrystals with the diamond structure, which is an unstable configuration for Ga, are directly observed together with nitrogen bubbles in the irradiation-induced amorphous layer. Upon thermal annealing, the thickness of the amorphous layer decreases by ~13.1 %, and nano-beam electron diffraction analysis indicates no evidence for residual Ga nanocrystals, but instead reveals a mixture of hexagonal and cubic GaN phases in the annealed sample. Nitrogen molecules, captured in the as-irradiated bubbles, appear to debond and react with the Ga nanocrystals during the thermal annealing to form crystalline GaN. In addition, electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements reveal an atomic volume change of 18.9 % for the as-irradiated amorphous layer relative to the virgin single crystal GaN. This relative swelling of the damaged layer reduces to 7.7 % after thermal annealing. Partial recrystallization and structural relaxation of the GaN amorphous state are believed responsible for the volume change.

  13. Distribution of the lateral correlation length in GaN epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, J.; Paszkiewicz, R.; Korbutowicz, R.; Tlaczala, M.

    2001-12-01

    GaN structures belong to the most popular wide-bandgap semiconductors. Large lattice mismatch existing between the layer and substrates (3.5% for SiC and even 16% in the case of sapphire substrate) results in structures with a large number of defects. The typical GaN epitaxial layer consists of dislocation-free regions with lateral dimensions equal to a few hundred nanometers. The dislocation density changes from 10 8 cm -2 inside the grains to 10 10 cm -2 in the grain boundaries. The average value of the lateral correlation lengths (coherence wavelength) seems to be not quite satisfactory. Particularly, it is connected with lateral direction, because the vertical length is approximately equal to the thickness of the epitaxial layer. This paper presents the new approach for the determination of GaN crystallites dislocation-free block size distributions. This method is based on the X-ray peak profile analysis and solution of the Fredholm integral equation. The necessary peaks are obtained from the high-resolution X-ray diffractometry measurements. The obtained results have been shown for the various samples: GaN layers grown on low temperature buffer layer (GaN or AlN). Very interesting results were obtained in the first case, where two different sizes of the blocks appear.

  14. Electron spin relaxation in two polymorphic structures of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation process of electron spin in systems of electrons interacting with piezoelectric deformation phonons that are mediated through spin-orbit interactions was interpreted from a microscopic point of view using the formula for the electron spin relaxation times derived by a projection-reduction method. The electron spin relaxation times in two polymorphic structures of GaN were calculated. The piezoelectric material constant for the wurtzite structure obtained by a comparison with a previously reported experimental result was {{P}pe}=1.5 × {{10}29} eV {{m}-1}. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times for both wurtzite and zinc-blende structures were similar, but the relaxation times in zinc-blende GaN were smaller and decreased more rapidly with increasing temperature and magnetic field than that in wurtzite GaN. This study also showed that the electron spin relaxation for wurtzite GaN at low density could be explained by the Elliot-Yafet process but not for zinc-blende GaN in the metallic regime.

  15. Fabrication of high-quality \\{11\\bar{2}2\\} GaN substrates using the Na flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Mihoko; Nakamura, Koshi; Che, Songbek; Murakami, Kosuke; Takazawa, Hideo; Imanishi, Masayuki; Imade, Mamoru; Morita, Yukihiro; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) substrates fabricated along the nonpolar and semipolar directions are the most promising materials for realizing optical and electronic devices with low power consumption. In this study, we carry out the Na flux growth on \\{ 11\\bar{2}2\\} -plane GaN templates grown heteroepitaxially on sapphires. The GaN crystals are grown at low supersaturation using the Na flux method with the dipping technique. The crystallinity of the grown GaN crystals is improved compared to that of the seed substrates. Then it improves further by lowering the supersaturation. Finally, we succeed in fabricating a 2-in. \\{ 11\\bar{2}2\\} -plane GaN single crystal with high transparency and crystallinity.

  16. A New Method to Modify Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Density by GaN Cap Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongda; Chow, T. Paul

    2013-08-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a new method for modifying the two-dimensional electron density (2DEG) at the AlGaN/GaN interface by etching of the GaN cap layer on top of the AlGaN. GaN MOS capacitors have been fabricated on samples with partially or fully etched GaN cap, and the 2DEG density has been extracted. The results show a linear relation between the 2DEG density and the thickness of the GaN cap being etched. We have also fabricated van der Pauw structures and obtained the 2DEG density using Hall measurements, and the results are consistent with that from the GaN MOS capacitors.

  17. Ion-implanted GaN junction field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.; Baca, A.G.; Wilson, R.G.; Pearton, S.J.; Stall, R.A.

    1996-04-01

    Selective area ion implantation doping has been used to fabricate GaN junction field effect transistors (JFETs). {ital p}-type and {ital n}-type doping was achieved with Ca and Si implantation, respectively, followed by a 1150{degree}C rapid thermal anneal. A refractory W gate contact was employed that allows the {ital p}-gate region to be self-aligned to the gate contact. A gate turn-on voltage of 1.84 V at 1 mA/mm of gate current was achieved. For a {approximately}1.7 {mu}m{times}50 {mu}m JFET with a {minus}6 V threshold voltage, a maximum transconductance of 7 mS/mm at {ital V}{sub GS}={minus} 2V and saturation current of 33 mA/mm at {ital V}{sub GS}=0 V were measured. These results were limited by excess access resistance and can be expected to be improved with optimized {ital n}{sup +} implants in the source and drain regions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Dopant distribution in high fluence Fe implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Jensen, J.; Hallen, A.; Aggerstam, T.

    2008-09-01

    Undoped wurtzite GaN epilayers implanted at room temperature with 50-325 keV Fe{sup +} ions in the fluence range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} are studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis. The results show an enhanced Fe concentration close to the surface for high ion fluences (>1x10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}), which increases with the ion fluence. Annealing at 800 deg. C for 30 min has a negligible effect on the Fe distribution in the material bulk, but further increases the Fe concentration near the surface. Our findings can be understood by radiation enhanced diffusion during ion implantation and an increased Fe diffusivity in the near surface region with distorted stoichiometry, or formation of secondary phases and precipitates for the highest doses. The simulation shows that, if enhanced diffusion is the reason for Fe buildup at the surface, both radiation enhanced diffusion and the thermal diffusion of Fe atoms near the surface, need to be at least five times larger than ordinary bulk diffusion to explain the increased Fe surface concentration.

  19. Photoionization Spectroscopy of Trapping Centers in GaN FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein Freitas, P. B., Jr.; Binari, S. C.; Wickenden, A. E.

    2000-03-01

    Measurements of the spectral and intensity dependences of the optically-induced reversal of current collapse in a GaN metal semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET) have been compared to the results of modeling the phenomenon assuming a net transfer of charge from the conducting channel to the high-resistivity (HR) region of the device. The reversal was assumed to result from the photoionization of trapped carriers that return to the channel under the influence of a large built-in field at the channel/HR-substrate interface. For a MESFET in which two distinct trapping centers have been spectrally resolved, the experimentally measured dependence upon light intensity was fitted using this model. The two traps were found to have very different photoionization cross-sections (6x10-17 cm^2 and 2.4x10-15cm^2) but comparable concentrations (3x10^11cm-2 and 7x10^11cm-2), suggesting that both traps contribute comparably to the observed current collapse.

  20. Effects of Hydrogen Implantation into GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Han, J.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.; Song, C.Y.; Stavola, M.; Weinstein, M.G.; Wilson, R.G.; Zavada, J.M.

    1998-12-24

    Proton implantation in GaN is found to reduce the free carrier density through two mechanisms - first, by creating electron and hole traps at around Ec-0.8eV and Ev+0.9eV that lead to compensation in both n- and p-type material, and second, by leading to formation of (AH)O complexes, where A is any acceptor (Mg, Ca, Zn, Be, Cd). The former mechanism is usefid in creating high resistivity regions for device isolation, whereas the latter produces unintentional acceptor passivation that is detrimental to device performance. The strong affinity of hydrogen for acceptors leads to markedly different redistribution behavior for implanted in n- and p-GaN due to the chemical reaction to form neutral complexes in the latter. The acceptors may be reactivated by simple annealing at 2600{degrees}C, or by electron injection at 25-150{degrees}C that produces debonding of the (AH) centers. Implanted hydrogen is also strongly attracted to regions of strain in heterostructure samples during annealing, leading to pile-up at epi-epi and epi-substrate interfaces. II? spectroscopy shows that implanted hydrogen also decorates VG, defects in undoped and n-GaN.

  1. Temperature Dependence of the Free Excitons in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Collins, T. C.

    2002-03-01

    We are presenting the temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) of the free excitons and donor bound exciton ( D^circ ,X) in GaN. The excitons involved are the longitudinal, the Γ5 and the Γ6 excitons as well as D^circ ,X. The temperature dependence of the energy positions of Γ_5, Γ_6, and D^circ ,X are well mapped out using the Varshni equation in a temperature range of 0 -- 60 K. In this temperature range, the energy positions of the longitudinal excitons depart from the predictions of the Varshni equation used for the other excitons. If more than one columnar structural direction is present, then in PL, more than one longitudinal mode might be observed. The sample being investigated shows two longitudinal modes. The energy separation between the longitudinal and transverse modes has been reported by Hopfield and Thomas. One component in the separation is the polarizability, which has some temperature dependence. The longitudinal exciton then has a band gap temperature dependence, which is predicted by the Varshni equation and an additional temperature dependence due to the polarizability. We have used the Varshni equation plus a linear and quadratic temperature dependence term to map the energy positions of the longitudinal excitons.

  2. Thick (>20 µm) and high-resistivity carbon-doped GaN-buffer layers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on n-type GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Tomonobu; Terano, Akihisa; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    To improve the performance of GaN power devices, we have investigated the crystalline quality of thick (>20 µm) carbon-doped GaN layers on n-type GaN substrates and templates. The surface morphologies and X-ray rocking curves of carbon-doped GaN layers were improved by using GaN substrates. However, the crystalline quality degraded when the carbon concentration was too high (1 × 1020 cm‑3), even in the case of GaN substrates. High breakdown voltages (approximately 7 kV under a lateral configuration) were obtained for the carbon-doped GaN layers on n-type GaN substrates when the carbon concentration was 5 × 1019 cm‑3. These results indicate that lateral power devices with high breakdown voltage can be fabricated by using thick carbon-doped GaN buffer layers, even on n-type GaN substrates.

  3. Valence band offset of β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A sample of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure has been grown by dry thermal oxidation of GaN on a sapphire substrate. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the β-Ga2O3 layer was formed epitaxially on GaN. The valence band offset of the β-Ga2O3/wurtzite GaN heterostructure is measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the valence band of the β-Ga2O3/GaN structure is 1.40 ± 0.08 eV. PMID:23046910

  4. Lattice-matched HfN buffer layers for epitaxy of GaN on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, Robert; Yang, Qing; Feick, Henning; Gebauer, Joerg; Weber, Eicke R.; Shinkai, Satoko; Sasaki, Katsutaka

    2002-05-08

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using sputter-deposited hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 (mu)m. Initial results for GaN grown on the (111) surface show a photoluminescence peak width of 17 meV at 11 K, and an asymmetric x-ray rocking curve width of 20 arcmin. Wurtzite GaN on HfN/Si(001) shows reduced structural quality and peculiar low-temperature luminescence features. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  5. Microstructure of GaN epitaxy on SiC using AlN buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, F.A.; Krusor, B.S.; Major, J.S. Jr.; Plano, W.E.; Welch, D.F.

    1995-07-17

    The crystalline structure of GaN epilayers on (0001) SiC substrates has been studied using x-ray diffraction and transmission microscopy. The films were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, using AlN buffer layers. X-ray diffraction measurements show negligible strain in the epilayer, and a long-range variation in orientation. Transmission electron lattice images show that the AlN buffer layer consists of small crystallites. The nature of the buffer layer and its interfaces with the substrate and the GaN film is discussed. The defect structure of the GaN film away from the substrate consists mostly of threading dislocations with a density of {similar_to}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. OMVPE growth of P-type GaN using solution Cp2Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yundong; Musante, Charles; Lau, Kei May; Smith, Lesley; Odedra, Rajesh; Kanjolia, Ravi

    2001-11-01

    Bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium (Cp2Mg) is a common source for p-type doping in GaN and AlInGaP materials. It is a white crystalline solid with very low vapor pressure, leading to transport problems similar to solid trimethyindium (TMI). Some of these problems can be alleviated by a newly developed source-solution magnesocene, Cp2Mg, dissolved in a solvent that is essentially nonvolatile. In this paper, we report the growth and comparative results of Mg-doped GaN grown by OMVPE using solid and solution Cp2Mg. Using both sources, we optimized parameters to obtain high-quality GaN growth with hole concentrations up to 1 1018/cm3.

  7. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  8. Simulation analysis of GaN microdomes with broadband omnidirectional antireflection for concentrator photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lu; Zhao, Hongping

    2014-04-01

    Microdome structures are analyzed as surface topology to reduce surface reflection over a broad spectral range and wide light incidence angle for concentrator photovoltaics application. Three dimensional finite difference time domain method was used to accurately calculate the surface reflection and transmission for surface topologies with different feature sizes and aspect ratios. Studies show that the use of GaN microdomes will lead to a significant reduction of the surface reflection over a broad wavelength range and wide incidence angle range. The surface reflection significantly depends on the surface structure feature size and geometrical shape. The design of the GaN microdomes provides flexibility to tune the structure in order to obtain the minimum surface reflection for different designs of concentrator optical systems. The surface reflections of the GaN microdomes are compared with that of the conventional flat surface as well as the one with antireflection coating.

  9. Effect of diffusion from a lateral surface on the rate of GaN nanowire growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirev, N. V. Tchernycheva, M.; Cirlin, G. E.; Patriarche, G.; Harmand, J. C.; Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2012-06-15

    The kinetics of the growth of GaN crystalline nanowires on a Si (111) surface with no catalyst is studied experimentally and theoretically. Noncatalytic GaN nanowires were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with AlN inserts, which makes it possible to determine the rate of the vertical growth of nanowires. A model for the formation of GaN nanowires is developed, and an expression for their rate of growth is derived. It is shown that, in the general case, the dependence of the rate of growth on the nanowire diameter has a minimum. The diameter corresponding to the experimentally observed minimum of the rate of growth steadily increases with increasing diffusion flux from the lateral surface.

  10. Structural and magnetic impact of Cr+-implantation into GaN thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husnain, G.; Shu-De, Yao; Ahmad, Ishaq; Rafique, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    Thin films of GaN with thickness of 2 μm were synthesized on sapphire. Cr+ ions were implanted into GaN with150 keV energy at a fluence of 3 × 1015 cm-2. The annealing of the samples was carried out for a short time using rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Structural properties of the implanted samples were undertaken by XRD and Rutherford backscattering. The annealed samples demonstrated lattice recovery and damages caused by implantation. The structural properties were also studied by High-resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD). Magnetic measurements of the samples were performed by Alternating Gradient Magnetometer (AGM) at room temperature and by SQUID in the range of 5-380 K. The SQUID results showed ferromagnetic behavior at T = 5 K and above 380 K for Cr+-implanted GaN.

  11. Effect of light Si doping on the properties of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Lin; Zhai, Guangmei; Jia, Zhigang; Mei, Fuhong; Lu, Taiping; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-03-01

    An obvious increase in electron mobility and yellow luminescence (YL) band intensity was found in light Si doping GaN. For a series of GaN samples with different doping concentration, the dislocation density is almost the same. It is inferred that the abrupt increase in mobility and YL intensity does not originate from the change of dislocation density. The mobility behavior is attributed to the screening of scattering by dislocation and increase of ionized impurity scattering with the increase of Si doping concentration. At lower doping level, the screening of dislocation scattering is dominant, which results in the increase in carrier mobility. At higher doping level, the increase in ionized impurity scattering leads to the decrease in carrier mobility. Higher mobility causes longer diffusion length of nonequilibrium carrier. More dislocations will participate in the recombination process which induces stronger YL intensity in light Si doping GaN.

  12. Synthesis, morphology and optical properties of GaN and AlGaN semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppulingam, B. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    Hexagonal Gallium Nitride (GaN) and Aluminum Gallium Nitride (AlGaN) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method using Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) complex route. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis confirms the hexagonal wurtzite structure of GaN and Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N nanoparticles. Surface morphology and elemental analysis were carried out by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The room temperature Photoluminescence (PL) study shows the near band edge emission for GaN at 3.35 eV and at 3.59 eV for AlGaN nanoparticles. The Aluminum (Al) composition of 20% has been obtained from PL emission around 345 nm.

  13. Measurement of the electrostatic edge effect in wurtzite GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Alex; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Klein, Benjamin; Bertness, Kris A.; Blanchard, Paul T.; Sanford, Norman A.

    2014-11-24

    The electrostatic effect of the hexagonal corner on the electronic structure in wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) was directly measured using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating electrostatic simulations with the measured potential difference between the nanowire face and the hexagonal vertices, the surface state concentration and band bending of GaN NWs were estimated. The surface band bending is important for an efficient design of high electron mobility transistors and for opto-electronic devices based on GaN NWs. This methodology provides a way to extract NW parameters without making assumptions concerning the electron affinity. We are taking advantage of electrostatic modeling and the high precision that KPFM offers to circumvent a major source of uncertainty in determining the surface band bending.

  14. Coaxial metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) Au/Ga2O3/GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chin-Hua; Chang, Mu-Tung; Chien, Yu-Jen; Chou, Li-Jen; Chen, Lih-Juann; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2008-10-01

    Coaxial metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) Au-Ga2O3-GaN heterostructure nanowires were successfully fabricated by an in situ two-step process. The Au-Ga2O3 core-shell nanowires were first synthesized by the reaction of Ga powder, a mediated Au thin layer, and a SiO2 substrate at 800 degrees C. Subsequently, these core-shell nanowires were nitridized in ambient ammonia to form a GaN coating layer at 600 degrees C. The GaN shell is a single crystal, an atomic flat interface between the oxide and semiconductor that ensures that the high quality of the MOS device is achieved. These novel 1D nitride-based MOS nanowires may have promise as building blocks to the future nitride-based vertical nanodevices. PMID:18778107

  15. Analysis and modelling of GaN Schottky-based circuits at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, D.; Grajal, J.

    2015-11-01

    This work presents an analysis of the capabilities of GaN Schottky diodes for frequency multipliers and mixers at millimeter wavelengths. By using a Monte Carlo (MC) model of the diode coupled to a harmonic balance technique, the electrical and noise performances of these circuits are investigated. Despite the lower electron mobility of GaN compared to GaAs, multipliers based on GaN Schottky diodes can be competitive in the first stages of multiplier chains, due to the excellent power handling capabilities of this material. The performance of these circuits can be improved by taking advantage of the lateral Schottky diode structures based on AlGaN/GaN HEMT technology.

  16. Dislocation structures and mobilities in GaN from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, N.

    2013-03-01

    The deleterious electronic effects associated with the presence of misfit and threading dislocations have been a major problem hindering application of wide bandgap wurtzite semiconductors such as GaN. Due to the many possible mechanisms that contribute to dislocation formation, systematic approaches for their elimination have remained elusive. Phenomena related to dislocation glide and entanglement can be investigated using discrete dislocation dynamics simulations, however accurate mobility laws must first be determined. In this work, results are presented from molecular dynamics simulations performed to calculate dislocation velocities in GaN as a function of applied stress and temperature. The structure of dislocation cores for a number of slip systems is presented, and comparisons are made between dislocations in the basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes. The mechanisms driving dislocation motion are presented for various slip systems, as well as for both edge and screw dislocations. Finally, we discuss the development of mobility laws for GaN based on our atomistic results.

  17. Schottky barrier formation at the Au to rare earth doped GaN thin film interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, S. R.; McClory, J. W.; Petrosky, J. C.; Wu, J.; Rivera, A.; Palai, R.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Dowben, P. A.

    2011-09-01

    The Schottky barriers formed at the interface between gold and various rare earth doped GaN thin films (RE = Yb, Er, Gd) were investigated in situ using synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy. The resultant Schottky barrier heights were measured as 1.68 ± 0.1 eV (Yb:GaN), 1.64 ± 0.1 eV (Er:GaN), and 1.33 ± 0.1 eV (Gd:GaN). We find compelling evidence that thin layers of gold do not wet and uniformly cover the GaN surface, even with rare earth doping of the GaN. Furthermore, the trend of the Schottky barrier heights follows the trend of the rare earth metal work function.

  18. Lithographically defined carbon growth templates for ELOG of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, D. B.; Fan, Hongyou; Thaler, G.; Koleske, D. D.

    2008-06-01

    We report the initial use of lithographically defined carbon growth templates for use as an epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) mask for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) heteroepitaxial GaN on sapphire. Interferometric lithography is used to define high aspect ratio structures in SU-8, which are then pyrolyzed in a reducing atmosphere up to 1200 °C. The resist structures convert to amorphous carbon, shrinking 80% in the vertical direction and 53% in the horizontal direction, but maintain their pattern geometry and adhesion to the substrate. These templates are capable of surviving GaN nucleation layer growth temperatures (˜530 °C), GaN crystal growth and high-temperature annealing up to 1050 °C. This new approach to ELOG offers several advantages, requiring fewer processing steps, and favorable selectivity tendencies as well as the capability to create growth masks which are difficult or impossible to fabricate using a top-down etching approach.

  19. Global analysis of GaN growth using a solution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, D.; Gejo, R.; Kangawa, Y.; Liu, L.; Kawamura, F.; Mori, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Kakimoto, K.

    2008-04-01

    The solution growth technique is one of the key methods for fabricating gallium nitride (GaN) wafers with small dislocation density. Since the growth rate of GaN using the solution technique is small, the key issue of the technique is to enhance the growth rate of the crystal. We studied how nitrogen is transferred from the surface of the flux to the interface between the top of the flux and the crystal in a muffle furnace using a global model that includes radiative, convective and conductive heat and mass transfer, including nitrogen transfer. The average growth rate of GaN increased when the temperature difference between the furnace wall and a crucible wall became large. This phenomenon is based on mixing of the flux due to natural convection.

  20. Effect of Capping on Electrical and Optical Properties of GaN Layers Grown by HVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.; Puzyk, M. V.; Papchenko, B. P.

    2016-04-01

    Gallium nitride, grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and capped with a thin AlGaN layer, was studied by photoluminescence (PL) methods. The concentration of free electrons in GaN was found from the time-resolved PL data, and the concentrations of point defects were estimated from the steady-state PL measurements. The intensity of PL from GaN decreases moderately after capping it with Si-doped AlGaN, and it decreases dramatically after capping with Mg-doped AlGaN. At the same time, the concentration of free electrons and the concentrations of main radiative defects in GaN are not affected by the AlGaN capping. We demonstrate that PL is a powerful tool for nondestructive characterization of semiconductor layers buried under overlying device structures.

  1. Cubic and hexagonal GaN nanoparticles synthesized at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaeed, M. A.; Ibrahim, K.; Saron, K. M. A.; Salhin, A.

    2013-12-01

    This study involves a simple and low cost chemical method for the synthesis of Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanoparticles at low temperature. Structural and optical characterizations were carried out using various techniques in order to investigate the properties of the nanoparticles. The Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) images showed that the nanoparticles consist of cubic and hexagonal shapes, indicating crystallized structural quality of the GaN nanoparticles. The average size of the nanoparticles was found to be 51 nm. The X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Raman analysis further confirmed the hexagonal and cubic phases of GaN nanoparticles. The room temperature photoluminescence deduced h-GaN energy gaps of 2.95, 3.12 and 3.13 eV.

  2. Large photocurrents in GaN porous structures with a redshift of the photoabsorption edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taketomo; Kumazaki, Yusuke; Kida, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Akio; Yatabe, Zenji; Matsuda, Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Photoresponse and photoabsorption properties of GaN porous structures were investigated by measuring photocurrent and spectroscopic photoabsorption under monochromatic light with various wavelengths. The measured photocurrents on the porous GaN electrodes were larger than those on the planar electrodes due to the unique features of the former electrode, such as large surface area and low photoreflectance properties. Moreover, the photocurrents were observed even under illumination with wavelength of 380 nm, corresponding to photon energy of 3.26 eV, which is 130 meV lower than the bandgap energy of bulk GaN. A potential simulation revealed that a high-electric field was induced at the pore tips due to modification of the potential in the porous structures. The observed redshift of the photoabsorption edge can be qualitatively explained by the Franz-Keldysh effect.

  3. Formation of GaN porous structures with improved structural controllability by photoassisted electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazaki, Yusuke; Yatabe, Zenji; Sato, Taketomo

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to develop a photoassisted electrochemical etching process for the formation of GaN porous structures. Pore linearity and depth controllability were strongly affected by the anode voltage. In addition, the use of light with an energy below the band gap played an important role in controlling the pore diameter. Spectro-electrochemical measurements revealed that the high electric field induced at the GaN/electrolyte interface caused a redshift of the photoabsorption edge. This specific phenomenon can be explained by a theoretical calculation based on the Franz-Keldysh effect. On the basis of the results of our experimental and theoretical analyze, we propose a formation model for GaN porous structures. We also note that the application of the Franz-Keldysh effect is useful in controlling the structural properties of GaN porous structures.

  4. Optical properties of wurtzite/zinc-blende heterostructures in GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacopin, G.; Rigutti, L.; Largeau, L.; Fortuna, F.; Furtmayr, F.; Julien, F. H.; Eickhoff, M.; Tchernycheva, M.

    2011-09-01

    The optical and structural properties of wurtzite GaN nanowires containing zinc-blende GaN inclusions of different thicknesses are investigated. Micro-photoluminescence spectra of single nanowires exhibit a series of narrow emission peaks with linewidth as low as 0.8 meV in the interval 3.1-3.42 eV. The peak energy blue-shifts with increasing excitation power following a ˜I1/3 law due to the progressive band filling and to the screening of the internal field. The quantum confinement in these type-II crystal phase heterostructures was simulated in the framework of a one-dimensional effective mass model, accounting for the internal electrical polarization of the wurtzite GaN. The predicted transition energies are in good agreement with the energy statistics realized on more than 30 single nanowire emission spectra.

  5. Preparation and properties of inverse perovskite Mn3GaN thin films and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, H.; Suzuki, R.; Miyawaki, T.; Ueda, K.; Asano, H.

    2013-08-01

    Thin films and heterostructures of Mn3GaN with an inverse perovskite structure were grown epitaxially on SrTiO3 (001) and (La0.18Sr0.82)(Al0.59Ta0.41)O3 (001) (LSAT) substrates by ion beam sputtering, and their structural and electrical properties have been investigated. Mn3GaN epitaxial thin films showed metallic behavior of temperature-dependent resistivity with a small maximum at 290-340 K. The maximum resistivity could be attributed to the magnetic transition from antiferromagnetism to paramagnetism. It has been found that epitaxial heterostructures formed by ferroelectric Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 and Mn3GaN layers exhibit a large magnetocapacitance effect of more than 2000% in an applied magnetic filed of 1.5 T.

  6. A low cost, green method to synthesize GaN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Li, Yong-He; Su, Chao-hua; Song, Xue-Mei; Yan, Hui; Wang, Ru-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of gallium nitride nanowires (GaN NWs) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are successfully demonstrated in this work. The simple and green synthesis route is to introduce gallium oxide (Ga2O3) and nitrogen (N2) for the growth of nanowires. The prepared GaN nanowires have a single crystalline wurtzite structure, which the length of some nanowires is up to 20 μm, with a maximum diameter about 140 nm. The morphology and quantity of the nanowires can be modulated by the growth substrate and process parameters. In addition, the photoluminescence and field emission properties of the prepared GaN nanowires have been investigated, which were found to be largely affected by their structures. This work renders an environmentally benign strategy and a facile approach for controllable structures on nanodevice. PMID:26643613

  7. Room-Temperature Transport of Indirect Excitons in (Al ,Ga )N /GaN Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedichkin, F.; Guillet, T.; Valvin, P.; Jouault, B.; Brimont, C.; Bretagnon, T.; Lahourcade, L.; Grandjean, N.; Lefebvre, P.; Vladimirova, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the exciton propagation in polar (Al ,Ga )N /GaN quantum wells over several micrometers and up to room temperature. The key ingredient to achieve this result is the crystalline quality of GaN quantum wells grown on GaN substrate that limits nonradiative recombination. From the comparison of the spatial and temporal dynamics of photoluminescence, we conclude that the propagation of excitons under continuous-wave excitation is assisted by efficient screening of the in-plane disorder. Modeling within drift-diffusion formalism corroborates this conclusion and suggests that exciton propagation is still limited by the exciton scattering on defects rather than by exciton-exciton scattering so that improving interface quality can boost exciton transport further. Our results pave the way towards room-temperature excitonic devices based on gate-controlled exciton transport in wide-band-gap polar heterostructures.

  8. Photoinduced conversion of methane into benzene over GaN nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Fan, Shizhao; Mu, Xiaoyue; Mi, Zetian; Li, Chao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    As a class of key building blocks in the chemical industry, aromatic compounds are mainly derived from the catalytic reforming of petroleum-based long chain hydrocarbons. The dehydroaromatization of methane can also be achieved by using zeolitic catalysts under relatively high temperature. Herein we demonstrate that Si-doped GaN nanowires (NWs) with a 97% rationally constructed m-plane can directly convert methane into benzene and molecular hydrogen under ultraviolet (UV) illumination at rt. Mechanistic studies suggest that the exposed m-plane of GaN exhibited particularly high activity toward methane C-H bond activation and the quantum efficiency increased linearly as a function of light intensity. The incorporation of a Si-donor or Mg-acceptor dopants into GaN also has a large influence on the photocatalytic performance. PMID:24826797

  9. Long-Lived, Coherent Acoustic Phonon Oscillations in GaN Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Geiser, P.; Jun, J.; Karpinski, J.; Park, J.-R.; Sobolewski, R.

    2006-01-31

    We report on coherent acoustic phonon (CAP) oscillations studied in high-quality bulk GaN single crystals with a two-color femtosecond optical pump-probe technique. Using a far-above-the-band gap ultraviolet excitation (~270 nm wavelength) and a near-infrared probe beam (~810 nm wavelength), the long-lived, CAP transients were observed within a 10 ns time-delay window between the pump and probe pulses, with a dispersionless (proportional to the probe-beam wave vector) frequency of ~45 GHz. The measured CAP attenuation corresponded directly to the absorption of the probe light in bulk GaN, indicating that the actual (intrinsic) phonon-wave attenuation in our crystals was significantly smaller than the measured 65.8 cm^-1 value. The velocity of the phonon propagation was equal to the velocity of sound in GaN.

  10. Migration mechanisms and diffusion barriers of carbon and native point defects in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrtsos, Alexandros; Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    Carbon related defects are readily incorporated in GaN due to its abundance during growth both with MBE and MOCVD techniques. Employing first-principles calculations, we compute the migration barriers of carbon interstitials and we discuss possible relevant mechanisms of diffusion in the wurtzite GaN crystal. In addition, we calculate the migration barriers for the diffusion of the native defects of the crystal, i.e., gallium and nitrogen interstitials and vacancies. The minimum energy path and the migration barriers of these defects are obtained using the nudged elastic band method with the climbing image modification. In addition, the dimer method is used to independently determine the results. The results yield a quantitative description of carbon diffusion in GaN allowing for the determination of the most preferable migration paths.

  11. Room temperature epitaxy of Pd films on GaN under conventional vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. Z.; Lau, S. S.; Perkins, N. R.; Kuech, T. F.

    1996-09-01

    Pd films deposited at room temperature have been found to grow epitaxially on GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The Pd films were deposited on GaN substrates cleaned by chemicals only, and in a conventional e-beam evaporation system with a vacuum of ˜1×10-7 Torr. MeV 4He backscattering spectrometry and the Read x-ray camera were used to evaluate the Pd films. The effects of various chemical etchants—such as aqua regia, HCl:H2O, and HF:H2O—on the epitaxial quality of the Pd films have also been investigated. Ni and Pt films deposited on GaN in a similar manner were also found to be epitaxial.

  12. Self-induced growth of vertical GaN nanowires on silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaresan, V.; Largeau, L.; Oehler, F.; Zhang, H.; Mauguin, O.; Glas, F.; Gogneau, N.; Tchernycheva, M.; Harmand, J.-C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the self-induced growth of GaN nanowires on silica. Although the amorphous structure of this substrate offers no possibility of an epitaxial relationship, the nanowires are remarkably aligned with the substrate normal whereas, as expected, their in-plane orientation is random. Their structural and optical characteristics are compared to those of GaN nanowires grown on standard crystalline Si (111) substrates. The polarity inversion domains are much less frequent, if not totally absent, in the nanowires grown on silica, which we find to be N-polar. This work demonstrates that high-quality vertical GaN nanowires can be elaborated without resorting to bulk crystalline substrates.

  13. Self-induced growth of vertical GaN nanowires on silica.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, V; Largeau, L; Oehler, F; Zhang, H; Mauguin, O; Glas, F; Gogneau, N; Tchernycheva, M; Harmand, J-C

    2016-04-01

    We study the self-induced growth of GaN nanowires on silica. Although the amorphous structure of this substrate offers no possibility of an epitaxial relationship, the nanowires are remarkably aligned with the substrate normal whereas, as expected, their in-plane orientation is random. Their structural and optical characteristics are compared to those of GaN nanowires grown on standard crystalline Si (111) substrates. The polarity inversion domains are much less frequent, if not totally absent, in the nanowires grown on silica, which we find to be N-polar. This work demonstrates that high-quality vertical GaN nanowires can be elaborated without resorting to bulk crystalline substrates. PMID:26895252

  14. Characterization of vertical GaN p-n diodes and junction field-effect transistors on bulk GaN down to cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilyalli, I. C.; Aktas, O.

    2015-12-01

    There is great interest in wide-bandgap semiconductor devices and most recently in vertical GaN structures for power electronic applications such as power supplies, solar inverters and motor drives. In this paper the temperature-dependent electrical behavior of vertical GaN p-n diodes and vertical junction field-effect transistors fabricated on bulk GaN substrates of low defect density (104 to 106 cm-2) is described. Homoepitaxial MOCVD growth of GaN on its native substrate and the ability to control the doping in the drift layers in GaN have allowed the realization of vertical device architectures with drift layer thicknesses of 6 to 40 μm and net carrier electron concentrations as low as 1 × 1015 cm-3. This parameter range is suitable for applications requiring breakdown voltages of 1.2 kV to 5 kV. Mg, which is used as a p-type dopant in GaN, is a relatively deep acceptor (E A ≈ 0.18 eV) and susceptible to freeze-out at temperatures below 200 K. The loss of holes in p-GaN has a deleterious effect on p-n junction behavior, p-GaN contacts and channel control in junction field-effect transistors at temperatures below 200 K. Impact ionization-based avalanche breakdown (BV > 1200 V) in GaN p-n junctions is characterized between 77 K and 423 K for the first time. At higher temperatures the p-n junction breakdown voltage improves due to increased phonon scattering. A positive temperature coefficient in the breakdown voltage is demonstrated down to 77 K; however, the device breakdown characteristics are not as abrupt at temperatures below 200 K. On the other hand, contact resistance to p-GaN is reduced dramatically above room temperature, improving the overall device performance in GaN p-n diodes in all cases except where the n-type drift region resistance dominates the total forward resistance. In this case, the electron mobility can be deconvolved and is found to decrease with T -3/2, consistent with a phonon scattering model. Also, normally-on vertical junction

  15. Doping of GaN by ion implantation: Does It Work?

    SciTech Connect

    Suvkhanov, A.; Wu, W.; Price, K.; Parikh, N.; Irene, E.; Hunn, J.; Thomson, D.; Davis, R.F.; Krasnobaev, L.

    1998-04-01

    Epitaxially grown GaN by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on SiC were implanted with 100 keV Si{sup +} (for n-type) and 80 keV Mg{sup +} (for p-type) with various fluences from 1 {times} 10{sup 12} to 7 {times} 10 {sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at liquid nitrogen temperature (LT), room temperature (RT), and 700 C (HT). High temperature (1,200 C and 1,500 C) annealing was carried out after capping the GaN with epitaxial AlN by MOCVD to study damage recovery. Samples were capped by a layer of AlN in order to protect the GaN surface during annealing. Effects of implant temperature, damage and dopant activation are critically studied to evaluate a role of ion implantation in doping of GaN. The damage was studied by Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling, spectroscopic ellipsometry and photoluminescence. Results show dependence of radiation damage level on temperature of the substrate during implantation: implantations at elevated temperatures up to 550 C decrease the lattice disorder; hot implants above 550 C can not be useful in doping of GaN due to nitrogen loss from the surface. SE measurements have indicated very high sensitivity to the implantation damage. PL measurements at LT of 80 keV Mg{sup +} (5 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2}) implanted and annealed GaN showed two peaks: one {approximately} 100 meV and another {approximately} 140 meV away from the band edge.

  16. Hybrid density functional theory studies of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lixia; Duan, Yifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Shi, Liwei; Tang, Gang

    2013-01-30

    The structural stability, spontaneous polarization, piezoelectric response, and electronic structure of AlN and GaN under uniaxial strain along the [0001] direction are systematically investigated using HSE06 range-separated hybrid functionals. Our results exhibit interesting behavior. (i) AlN and GaN share the same structural transition from wurtzite to a graphite-like phase at very large compressive strains, similarly to other wurtzite semiconductors. Our calculations further reveal that this well-known phase transition is driven by the transverse-acoustic soft phonon mode associated with elastic instabilities. (ii) The applied tensile strain can either drastically suppress or strongly enhance the polarization and piezoelectricity, based on the value of the strain. Furthermore, large enhancements of polarization and piezoelectricity close to the phase-transition regions at large compressive strains are predicted, similar to those previously predicted in ferroelectric fields. Our calculations indicate that such colossal enhancements are strongly correlated to phase transitions when large atomic displacements are generated by external strains. (iii) Under the same strain, AlN and GaN have significantly different electronic properties: both wurtzite and graphite-like AlN always display direct band structures, while the the bandgap of wurtzite GaN is always direct and that of graphite-like GaN always indirect. Furthermore, the bandgap of graphite-like AlN is greatly enhanced by large compressive strain, but that of wurtzite GaN is not sensitive to compressive strain. Our results are drastically different from those for equibiaxial strain (Duan et al 2012 Appl. Phys. Lett. 100 022104). PMID:23248170

  17. Physical Properties of GaN Nanotubes as Revealed by Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao; Weber, William J.

    2008-07-25

    Single-crystalline wurtzite GaN nanotubes have been synthesized recently with proposed applications in nanoscale electronics, optoelectronics and the biochemical-sensing field. Molecular dynamics methods with a Stillinger-Weber potential are used to investigate the melting behavior, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of these wurtzite-type single crystalline GaN nanotubes. Four major topical areas are summarized in this chapter. (1) The melting temperature of the GaN nanotubes increases with the thickness of the nanotubes to a saturation value, which is close to the melting temperature of bulk GaN. The simulations result reveal that the nanotubes begin to melt at the surface, and then the melting rapidly extends to the interior of the nanotubes as the temperature increases. (2) The thermal conductivity of nanotubes is smaller than that of the bulk GaN single crystal. The thermal conductivity is also found to decrease with temperature and increase with increasing wall thickness of the nanotubes. The change of phonon spectrum and surface inelastic scattering may account for the reduction of thermal conductivity in the nanotubes, while thermal softening and high frequency phonon interactions at high temperatures may provide an explanation for its decrease with increasing temperature. (3) At low temperatures, the simulation results show that the nanotubes exhibit brittle properties; whereas at high temperatures, they behave as ductile materials. The brittle to ductile transition temperature generally increases with increasing wall thickness of the nanotubes and increasing strain rate. (4) The simulation temperature, tube length and strain rate affect the buckling behavior of GaN nanotubes. The critical stress decreases with the increase of simulation temperature and tube length. The dependence of buckling on tube length is consistent with the analysis of equivalent continuum structures using Euler buckling theory.

  18. Realization of compressively strained GaN films grown on Si(110) substrates by inserting a thin AlN/GaN superlattice interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. Q.; Takahashi, T.; Kawashima, H.; Ide, T.; Shimizu, M.

    2012-07-16

    We investigate the strain properties of GaN films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on Si(110) substrates. It is found that the strain of the GaN film can be converted from a tensile to a compressive state simply by inserting a thin AlN/GaN superlattice structure (SLs) within the GaN film. The GaN layers seperated by the SLs can have different strain states, which indicates that the SLs plays a key role in the strain modulation during the growth and the cooling down processes. Using this simple technique, we grow a crack-free GaN film exceeding 2-{mu}m-thick. The realization of the compressively strained GaN film makes it possible to grow thick GaN films without crack generation on Si substrates for optic and electronic device applications.

  19. Aligned ZnO nanorod arrays growth on GaN QDs for excellent optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Dandan; Li, Hongdong; Wang, Qinglin

    2016-02-01

    Uniformly aligned ZnO nanorod (NR) arrays grown on GaN quantum dots (QDs) as preferred nucleation sites are imperative for designing field emission emitters, ultraviolet photodetectors and light-emitting diodes for a wide range of new optoelectronic applications. In a recent study (2015 Nanotechnology 26 415601), Qi et al reported a novel method of fabricating ZnO NRs arrays with uniform shape, the density of which is easily tunable by adjusting the density of GaN QDs. This approach opens a door to obtaining a combination of 0D and 1D structures for optoelectronic applications.

  20. Free-Standing GaN Substrates by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung S.; Park, Il-W.; Choh, Sung H.

    2000-11-01

    Thick gallium nitride films 250-350 μm in thickness were grown on 2-inch-diameter (0001) sapphire wafers by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The size of the free-standing GaN substrates without cracks separated from the sapphire substrates by laser processing was equal to that of the initial sapphire substrates. The origin of bowing and the broad photoluminescence (PL) spectra of GaN films was considered the difference in the residual strain between the front and bottom surfaces caused by threading dislocations.

  1. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of excitons in hexagonal GaN layers grown on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, S.; Liu, Z. X.; Kuhl, J.; Ringling, J.; Grahn, H. T.; Khan, M. A.; Sun, C. J.; Ambacher, O.; Stutzmann, M.

    1998-03-01

    We performed time-resolved and continuous wave photoluminescence on two samples of hexagonal GaN, one with free exciton emission and the other without. For the sample with free exciton emission, very different decay dynamics are observed between the front and backside emission. We find that the strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the sapphire substrate and the GaN film has a large influence on the population decay of the sample with free exciton emission and a minor influence on the decay properties of the sample dominated by bound exciton emission. A polariton picture is used to describe the observed behavior.

  2. Investigation of structural and optical properties of GaN on flat and porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, Saleh H.; Selman, Abbas M.; Hassan, Z.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, gallium nitride (GaN) layers were successfully grown on Flat-Si and porous silicon (PSi) using a radio frequency-magnetron sputtering system. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images showed that the grown film on Flat-Si had smoother surface, even though there were some cracks on it. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the peak intensity of all the grown layers on PSi was higher than that of the grown layer on Flat-Si. Our detailed observation showed that PSi is a promising substrate to obtain GaN films.

  3. Characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Ikai; Pang, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Ho; Shih, Cheng-Hung; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Chen, Wen-Yen; Hsu, Tzu-Min; Hsu, Gary Z. L.

    2013-06-15

    The characterization of GaN microstructures grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on LiAlO{sub 2} substrate was studied by cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence measurements. We demonstrated that the cathodoluminescence from oblique semi-polar surfaces of mushroom-shaped GaN was much brighter than that from top polar surface due to the reduction of polarization field on the oblique semi-polar surfaces. It implies that the oblique semi-polar surface is superior for the light-emitting surface of wurtzite nano-devices.

  4. Thermal Conductivity of GaN Nanotubes Simulated by Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Crocombette, J.-P.; Zu, Xiaotao; Yang, Li; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-15

    Thermal conductivity of GaN nanotubes along the tube axis is investigated over the temperature range of 600K-2300K using homogeneous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. In general, the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is smaller than that for the bulk GaN single crystal. The thermal conductivity is also found to decrease with temperature and increase with increasing wall thickness of the nanotubes. The change of phonon spectrum and surface inelastic scattering may account for the reduction of thermal conductivity in the nanotubes, while thermal softening and high frequency phonon interactions at high temperatures may provide an explanation for its decrease with increasing temperature.

  5. Microstructural evolution in H ion induced splitting of freestanding GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Senz, S.; Goesele, U.; Chicoine, M.; Schiettekatte, F.; Suesskraut, F.; Krause-Rehberg, R.

    2008-07-21

    We investigated the microstructural transformations during hydrogen ion-induced splitting of GaN thin layers. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and positron annihilation spectroscopy data show that the implanted region is decorated with a high density of 1-2 nm bubbles resulting from vacancy clustering during implantation. These nanobubbles persist up to 450 deg. C. Ion channeling data show a strong dechanneling enhancement in this temperature range tentatively attributed to strain-induced lattice distortion. The dechanneling level decreases following the formation of plateletlike structures at 475 deg. C. Extended internal surfaces develop around 550 deg. C leading to the exfoliation of GaN thin layer.

  6. Growth of GaN with warm ammonia by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaharazuka, A.; Yoshizaki, T.; Ploog, K. H.; Horikoshi, Y.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy with warm ammonia as a nitrogen source. Ammonia gas is heated by the tungsten filament located at the open end of the gas-tube installed in the growth chamber. By using this simple structure, the multiple collisions of molecules within the heater, thus the generation of nitrogen molecule, can be suppressed. The crystalline quality of the grown GaN layer is significantly improved by introducing the warm ammonia. This effect can be explained by the enhancement of the two-dimensional growth due to the active nitrogen species such as radical NH2* generated by cracking ammonia molecule.

  7. Germanium-catalyzed growth of single-crystal GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Umar; Wang, Hong; Peyrot, David; Olivier, Aurélien; Zhang, Jun; Coquet, Philippe; Ng, Serene Lay Geok

    2016-04-01

    We report the use of Germanium (Ge) as catalyst for Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanowires growth. High-yield growth has been achieved with Ge nanoparticles obtained by dewetting a thin layer of Ge on a Si (100) substrate. The nanowires are long and grow straight with very little curvature. The GaN nanowires are single-crystalline and show a Wurtzite structure growing along the [0001] axis. The growth follows a metal-free Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism, further allowing a CMOS technology compatibility. The synthesis of nanowires has been done using an industrial Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD) system.

  8. Eliminating stacking faults in semi-polar GaN by AlN interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Dadgar, A.; Ravash, R.; Veit, P.; Schmidt, G.; Mueller, M.; Dempewolf, A.; Bertram, F.; Wieneke, M.; Christen, J.; Krost, A.

    2011-07-11

    We report on the elimination of stacking faults by the insertion of low-temperature AlN interlayers in nearly (1016) and (1104) oriented semi-polar GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on Si(112) and Si(113), respectively. The elimination of these defects is visualized by cathodoluminescence (CL) as well as scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and STEM-CL. A possible annihilation mechanism is discussed which leads to the conclusion that the elimination mechanism is most likely valid for all layers with (1101) surfaces, enabling heteroepitaxial semi- and non-polar GaN free from stacking faults.

  9. Lattice location of deuterium in plasma and gas charged Mg doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Barbour, J.C.; Seager, C.H.; Myers, S.M. Jr.; Wright, A.F.; Han, J.

    1999-12-02

    The authors have used ion channeling to examine the lattice configuration of deuterium in Mg doped GaN grown by MOCVD. The deuterium is introduced both by exposure to deuterium gas and to ECR plasmas. A density functional approach including lattice relaxation, was used to calculate total energies for various locations and charge states of hydrogen in the wurtzite Mg doped GaN lattice. Computer simulations of channeling yields were used to compare results of channeling measurements with calculated yields for various predicted deuterium lattice configurations.

  10. Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for plasmonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Ronny; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Sachet, Edward; Bobea, Milena; Bryan, Zachary; Bryan, Isaac; Maria, Jon-Paul; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Nenstiel, Christian; Hoffmann, Axel

    2013-12-09

    Controllable Ge doping in GaN is demonstrated for carrier concentrations of up to 2.4 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. Low temperature luminescence spectra from the highly doped samples reveal band gap renormalization and band filling (Burstein-Moss shift) in addition to a sharp transition. Infrared ellipsometry spectra demonstrate the existence of electron plasma with an energy around 3500 cm{sup −1} and a surface plasma with an energy around 2000 cm{sup −1}. These findings open possibilities for the application of highly doped GaN for plasmonic devices.

  11. X-ray detectors based on GaN Schottky diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Duboz, Jean-Yves; Frayssinet, Eric; Chenot, Sebastien; Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Idir, Mourad

    2010-10-18

    GaN Schottky diodes have been fabricated and tested as x-ray detectors in the range from 6 to 21 keV. The spectral response has been measured and is compared to its theoretical value. The study of the response and its temporal dynamics as a function of the bias allows to identify a photovoltaic behavior at low bias and a photoconductive one at larger reverse biases. The GaN diode turned out to be linear as a function of the incident power. The noise and detectivity are given and discussed.

  12. Resonant photoemission of rare earth doped GaN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, S. R.; McClory, J. W.; Petrosky, J. C.; Wu, J.; Palai, R.; Losovyj, Ya. B.; Dowben, P. A.

    2011-10-01

    The 4d → 4f Fano resonances for various rare earth doped GaN thin films (RE = Gd, Er, Yb) were investigated using synchrotron photoemission spectroscopy. The resonant photoemission Fano profiles show that the major Gd and Er rare earth 4f weight is at about 5-6 eV below the valence band maximum, similar to the 4f weights in the valence band of many other rare earth doped semiconductors. For Yb, there is very little resonant enhancement of the valence band of Yb doped GaN, consistent with a largely 4f14 occupancy.

  13. Temperature dependence of the electron Landé g-factor in cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Schupp, T.; As, D. J.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron Landé g-factor in bulk cubic GaN is investigated over an extremely broad temperature range from 15 K up to 500 K by time-resolved Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. The g-factor is found to be approximately constant over the full investigated temperature range. Calculations by k .p -theory predict a negligible temperature dependence g(T) in complete agreement with the experiment as a consequence of the large band-gap and small spin orbit splitting in cubic GaN.

  14. Simulations of Operation Dynamics of Different Type GaN Particle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gaubas, Eugenijus; Ceponis, Tomas; Kalesinskas, Vidas; Pavlov, Jevgenij; Vysniauskas, Juozas

    2015-01-01

    The operation dynamics of the capacitor-type and PIN diode type detectors based on GaN have been simulated using the dynamic and drift-diffusion models. The drift-diffusion current simulations have been implemented by employing the software package Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus. The monopolar and bipolar drift regimes have been analyzed by using dynamic models based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem. The carrier multiplication processes determined by impact ionization have been considered in order to compensate carrier lifetime reduction due to introduction of radiation defects into GaN detector material. PMID:25751080

  15. Charge Separation of Wurtzite/Zinc-blende Heterojunction GaN Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2010-08-27

    The electronic properties of wurtzite/zinc-blende (WZ/ZB) heterostructure GaN are investigated using first-principles methods. A small component of ZB stacking formed along the growth direction in the WZ GaN nanowires does not show a significant effect on the electronic property, whereas a charge separation of electrons and holes occurs along the directions perpendicular to the growth direction in the ZB stacking. The later case provides an efficient way to separate the charge through controlling crystal structure. These results should have significant implications for most state of the art excitonic solar cells and the tuning region in tunable laser diodes.

  16. Simulation of optimum parameters for GaN MSM UV photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhelfi, Mohanad A.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Hashim, M. R.; Al-Rawi, Ali Amer; Hassan, Z.

    2016-07-01

    In this study the optimum parameters of GaN M-S-M photodetector are discussed. The evaluation of the photodetector depends on many parameters, the most of the important parameters the quality of the GaN film and others depend on the geometry of the interdigited electrode. In this simulation work using MATLAB software with consideration of the reflection and absorption on the metal contacts, a detailed study involving various electrode spacings (S) and widths (W) reveals conclusive results in device design. The optimum interelectrode design for interdigitated MSM-PD has been specified and evaluated by effect on quantum efficiency and responsivity.

  17. Surface-Effect-Induced Optical Bandgap Shrinkage in GaN Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Young S; Lee, Geunsik; Holmes, Mark J; Chan, Christopher C S; Reid, Benjamin P L; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Nicholas, Robin J; Taylor, Robert A; Kim, Kwang S; Han, Sang W; Yang, Woochul; Jo, Y; Kim, J; Im, Hyunsik

    2015-07-01

    We investigate nontrivial surface effects on the optical properties of self-assembled crystalline GaN nanotubes grown on Si substrates. The excitonic emission is observed to redshift by ∼100 meV with respect to that of bulk GaN. We find that the conduction band edge is mainly dominated by surface atoms, and that a larger number of surface atoms for the tube is likely to increase the bandwidth, thus reducing the optical bandgap. The experimental findings can have important impacts in the understanding of the role of surfaces in nanostructured semiconductors with an enhanced surface/volume ratio. PMID:26046390

  18. Wurtzite-type faceted single-crystalline GaN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baodan; Bando, Yoshio; Tang, Chengchun; Shen, Guozhen; Golberg, Dmitri; Xu, Fangfang

    2006-02-01

    We report on the direct fabrication of single-crystalline wurtzite-type hexagonal GaN nanotubes via a newly designed, controllable, and reproducible chemical thermal-evaporation process. The nanotubes are single crystalline, have one end closed, an average outer diameter of ˜300nm, an inner diameter of ˜100nm, and a wall thickness of ˜100nm. The structure and morphology of the tubes are characterized using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The cathodoluminescence of individual nanotubes is also investigated. The growth mechanism, formation kinetics, and crystallography of GaN nanotubes are finally discussed.

  19. First-principles Study of Hydrogen depassivation of Mg acceptor by Be in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiming; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Chihsiang

    2010-03-01

    The process of hydrogen depassivation of the acceptor by can convert the as-grown high-resistivity -doped into a - conducting material. A first-principles study on the process will be presented. The formation energies of various complex of impurities and point defects have been calculated and compared. The diffusion barriers of the hydrogen atom in the doped GaN have been obtained by the Nudge-Elastic-Band method. The results explain successfully the experimental observation that the hole concentration has been significantly enhanced in a Be-implanted Mg-doped GaN.

  20. Clustered quantum dots in single GaN islands formed at threading dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gordon; Veit, Peter; Berger, Christoph; Bertram, Frank; Dadgar, Armin; Strittmatter, André; Christen, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    We give direct evidence of distinct quantum dot states clustered but also spatially separated in single GaN islands. Resulting from GaN layer growth on top of AlN, the islands are predominantly formed in close vicinity to threading dislocation bundles. Detailed analysis of the inner optical and structural properties, performed by nanoscale cathodoluminescence, reveals various sharp quantum dot emission lines from different regions in an otherwise continuous island. Thickness fluctuations found within these islands are made responsible for the clustering of quantum dot states.

  1. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  2. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  3. Electrical and optical properties of carbon-doped GaN grown by MBE on MOCVD GaN templates using a CCl4 dopant source

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, Rob; Yang, Qing; Feick, Henning; Park, Yeonjoon; Weber, Eicke R.

    2002-04-15

    Carbon-doped GaN was grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy using carbon tetrachloride vapor as the dopant source. For moderate doping mainly acceptors were formed, yielding semi-insulating GaN. However at higher concentrations p-type conductivity was not observed, and heavily doped films (>5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) were actually n-type rather than semi-insulating. Photoluminescence measurements showed two broad luminescence bands centered at 2.2 and 2.9 eV. The intensity of both bands increased with carbon content, but the 2.2 eV band dominated in n-type samples. Intense, narrow ({approx}6 meV) donor-bound exciton peaks were observed in the semi-insulating samples.

  4. Growth Mode and Threading Dislocation Behavior of GaN Films Grown on Patterned Sapphire Substrate with Radial Stripe Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Koji; Oshio, Takahide; Shibata, Naoki; Honda, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masahito; Amano, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    A sapphire substrate with a grooved stripe pattern along different radial directions was prepared to investigate the effects of stripe direction on the growth mode and threading dislocation (TD) behavior of GaN films. When the stripe direction is oriented parallel to [10bar 10]sapphire, the GaN films have a triangular structure that is formed by the GaN{10bar 11} facets. As the stripe direction rotates from [10bar 10]sapphire, nanosteps with a step height of around 80 nm are formed on the GaN{10bar 11} facets and then the coalescence of GaN on the ridges and grooves advances. GaN films with a smooth surface and a TD density as low as 2.0×108 cm-2 were achieved when the stripe direction was rotated 3° from [10bar 10]sapphire. Our result indicates that the surface roughness and TD density of GaN films can be controlled by precisely adjusting the angle of the stripe direction from [10bar 10]sapphire.

  5. Synthesis of GaN crystal by the reaction of Ga with Li 3N in NH 3 atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Takayoshi; Mabuchi, Akira; Sugiura, Takashi; Minoura, Hideki

    2009-05-01

    A novel method to synthesize GaN crystals was studied by the reaction of Ga with Li 3N under NH 3 atmosphere. We have already reported the synthesis technique of GaN by the reaction of Ga 2O 3 with Li 3N. However, the size of GaN crystals obtained by this method was limited to be smaller than several micrometers because of the solid phase reaction. In order to increase the size of GaN crystals, the method using liquid Ga as gallium source was studied for solid-liquid phase reaction. We found that the GaN crystals with the size of more than 100 μm were synthesized at 750 °C for 24 h under NH 3 atmosphere. We propose the possible reaction mechanism as follows. Lithium amide (LiNH 2) is synthesized by the reaction of Li 3N with NH 3 gas and then the crystal growth of GaN occurs by the reaction of Ga with LiNH 2. We found that LiNH 2 is a useful nitrogen source for the GaN synthesis method.

  6. Growth optimization and characterization of GaN epilayers on multifaceted (111) surfaces etched on Si(100) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ansah-Antwi, KwaDwo Konadu Chua, Soo Jin; Soh, Chew Beng; Liu, Hongfei

    2015-11-15

    The four nearest Si(111) multifaceted sidewalls were exposed inside an array of 3 μm-wide square holes patterned on an Si(100) substrate, and this patterned Si(100) substrate was used as a substrate for the deposition of a gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer. Subsequently the effect that the growth pressure, the etched-hole profiles, and the etched-hole arrangement had upon the quality of the as-grown GaN was investigated. The coalescence of the as-grown GaN epilayer on the exposed Si(111) facets was observed to be enhanced with reduced growth pressure from 120 to 90 Torr. A larger Si(001) plane area at the bottom of the etched holes resulted in bidirectional GaN domains, which resulted in poor material quality. The bidirectional GaN domains were observed as two sets of six peaks via a high-resolution x-ray diffraction phi scan of the GaN(10-11) reflection. It was also shown that a triangular array of etched holes was more desirable than square arrays of etched holes for the growth high-quality and continuous GaN films.

  7. Growth of GaN on Sapphire via Low-Temperature Deposited Buffer Layer and Realization of p-Type GaN by Mg Doping Followed by Low-Energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    This is a personal history of one of the Japanese researchers engaged in developing a method for growing GaN on a sapphire substrate, paving the way for the realization of smart television and display systems using blue LEDs. The most important work was done in the mid- to late 80s. The background to the author's work and the process by which the technology enabling the growth of GaN and the realization of p-type GaN was established are reviewed.

  8. Nobel Lecture: Growth of GaN on sapphire via low-temperature deposited buffer layer and realization of p -type GaN by Mg doping followed by low-energy electron beam irradiation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    This is a personal history of one of the Japanese researchers engaged in developing a method for growing GaN on a sapphire substrate, paving the way for the realization of smart television and display systems using blue LEDs. The most important work was done in the mid to late 1980s. The background to the author's work and the process by which the technology enabling the growth of GaN and the realization of p -type GaN was established are reviewed.

  9. Growth of GaN Layers on Sapphire by Low-Temperature-Deposited Buffer Layers and Realization of p-type GaN by Magesium Doping and Electron Beam Irradiation (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Amano, Hiroshi

    2015-06-26

    This Review is a personal reflection on the research that led to the development of a method for growing gallium nitride (GaN) on a sapphire substrate. The results paved the way for the development of smart display systems using blue LEDs. The most important work was done in the mid to late 80s. The background to the author's work and the process by which the technology that enables the growth of GaN and the realization of p-type GaN was established are reviewed. PMID:26032024

  10. Wetting of GaN islands by excess Ga: Origin of different appearances of GaN islands in scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Hao; Xie, M. H.; Wu, H. S.; Xue, Q. K.

    2007-05-15

    We observe three different kinds of islands, namely the 'bare', 'ghost', and 'normal' islands, by scanning tunneling microscopy of GaN(0001) prepared under Ga-rich conditions with different excess Ga coverage. They correlate to three different growth regimes. The various morphologies of the islands are suggested to be due to different states of wetting of the surface by excess Ga. The dynamical behavior of the wetting process is followed, and an island size dependence of Ga wetting is noted.

  11. Effect of residual stress on the microstructure of GaN epitaxial films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Weijia; Zhu, Yunnong; Lin, Zhiting; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-04-01

    The stress-free GaN epitaxial films have been directly grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 850 °C, and the effect of different stress on the microstructure of as-grown GaN epitaxial films has been explored in detail. The as-grown stress-free GaN epitaxial films exhibit very smooth surface without any particles and grains, which is confirmed by the smallest surface root-mean-square roughness of 2.3 nm measured by atomic force microscopy. In addition, they also have relatively high crystalline quality, which is proved by the small full-width at half maximum values of GaN(0002) and GaN (10 1 bar 2) X-ray rocking curves as 0.27° and 0.68°, respectively. However, when the growth temperature is lower or higher than 850 °C, internal or thermal stress would be increased in as-grown GaN epitaxial films. To release the larger stress, a great number of dislocations are generated. Many irregular particulates, hexagonal GaN gains and pits are therefore produced on the films surface, and the crystalline quality is greatly reduced consequently. This work has demonstrated the direct growth of stress-free GaN epitaxial films with excellent surface morphology and high crystalline quality by PLD, and presented a comprehensive study on the origins and the effect of stress in GaN layer. It is instructional to achieve high-quality nitride films by PLD, and shows great potential and broad prospect for the further development of high-performance GaN-based devices.

  12. High-electron-mobility GaN grown on free-standing GaN templates by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, Erin C. H. Kaun, Stephen W.; Burke, Peter G.; Wu, Feng; Speck, James S.; Wu, Yuh-Renn

    2014-05-21

    The dependence of electron mobility on growth conditions and threading dislocation density (TDD) was studied for n{sup −}-GaN layers grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. Electron mobility was found to strongly depend on TDD, growth temperature, and Si-doping concentration. Temperature-dependent Hall data were fit to established transport and charge-balance equations. Dislocation scattering was analyzed over a wide range of TDDs (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2} to ∼2 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}) on GaN films grown under similar conditions. A correlation between TDD and fitted acceptor states was observed, corresponding to an acceptor state for almost every c lattice translation along each threading dislocation. Optimized GaN growth on free-standing GaN templates with a low TDD (∼2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}) resulted in electron mobilities of 1265 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 296 K and 3327 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 113 K.

  13. Electrical and structural analysis of high-dose Si implantation in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Tan, H.H.; Williams, J.S.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D.J.; Pearton, S.J.; Crawford, M.H.; Karlicek, R.F. , Jr.

    1997-05-01

    For the development of ion implantation processes for GaN to advanced devices, it is important to understand the dose dependence of impurity activation along with implantation-induced damage generation and removal. We find that Si implantation in GaN can achieve 50{percent} activation at a dose of 1{times}10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}2}, despite significant residual damage after the 1100{degree}C activation anneal. The possibility that the generated free carriers are due to implantation damage alone and not Si-donor activation is ruled out by comparing the Si results to those for implantation of the neutral species Ar. Ion channeling and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the implantation-induced damage both as implanted and after a 1100{degree}C anneal. Both techniques confirm that significant damage remains after the anneal, which suggests that activation of implanted Si donors in GaN doses not require complete damage removal. However, an improved annealing process may be needed to further optimize the transport properties of implanted regions in GaN. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Ion implantation doping and high temperature annealing of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zolper, J.C.; Crawford, M.H.; Howard, A.J. |

    1995-12-31

    The III-V nitride-containing semiconductors InN, GaN, and AIN and their ternary alloys are the focus of extensive research for application to visible light emitters and as the basis for high temperature electronics. Recent advances in ion implantation doping of GaN and studies of the effect of rapid thermal annealing up to 1100{degrees}C are making new device structures possible. Both p- and n-type implantation doping of GaN has been achieved using Mg co-implanted with P for p-type and Si-implantation for n-type. Electrical activation was achieved by rapid thermal anneals in excess of 1000{degrees}C. Atomic force microscopy studies of the surface of GaN after a series of anneals from 750 to 1100{degrees}C shows that the surface morphology gets smoother following anneals in Ar or N{sub 2}. The photoluminescence of the annealed samples also shows enhanced bandedge emission for both annealing ambients. For the deep level emission near 2.2 eV, the sample annealed in N{sub 2} shows slightly reduced emission while the sample annealed in Ar shows increased emission. These annealing results suggest a combination of defect interactions occur during the high temperature processing.

  15. Energy dependence of electron inelastic mean free paths in bulk GaN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M.; Zommer, L.; Jablonski, A.; Grzegory, I.; Bockowski, M.

    2004-09-01

    Recent advances in fabrication and commercialization of high-brightness blue and green light-emitting devices based on gallium nitride have renewed intense research of its basic properties. Since information on electron transport processes in GaN is scarce, their systematic studies are highly desirable. The electron inelastic mean free path (IMFP) is a crucial parameter for quantitative interpretation of surface electron spectra. The energy dependence of IMFP for bulk GaN crystals with different surface concentrations of their constituents was obtained from elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) with use of the Ni standard in the energy range 200-2000 eV. The measured IMFPs were compared with the values predicted by the TPP-2M and G-1 formulae. A reasonable agreement was found between the measured IMFPs in bulk GaN with an ideal stoichiometric surface composition and the corresponding calculated IMFPs. Compared with the bulk IMFPs, experimental IMFPs valid for the GaN sample with a thin surface layer enriched in ˜70 at.% Ga are only slightly smaller by 5-10%, depending on the electron energy.

  16. Instability and Spontaneous Reconstruction of Few-Monolayer Thick GaN Graphitic Structures.

    PubMed

    Kolobov, A V; Fons, P; Tominaga, J; Hyot, B; André, B

    2016-08-10

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors are a very hot topic in solid state science and technology. In addition to van der Waals solids that can be easily formed into 2D layers, it was argued that single layers of nominally 3D tetrahedrally bonded semiconductors, such as GaN or ZnO, also become flat in the monolayer limit; the planar structure was also proposed for few-layers of such materials. In this work, using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that contrary to the existing consensus the graphitic structure of few-layer GaN is unstable and spontaneously reconstructs into a structure that remains hexagonal in plane but with covalent interlayer bonds that form alternating octagonal and square (8|4 Haeckelite) rings with pronounced in-plane anisotropy. Of special interest is the transformation of the band gap from indirect in planar GaN toward direct in the Haeckelite phase, making Haeckelite few-layer GaN an appealing material for flexible nano-optoelectronics. PMID:27387659

  17. Incorporation of Mg in Free-Standing HVPE GaN Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvanut, M. E.; Dashdorj, J.; Freitas, J. A.; Glaser, E. R.; Willoughby, W. R.; Leach, J. H.; Udwary, K.

    2016-06-01

    Mg, the only effective p-type dopant for nitrides, is well studied in thin films due to the important role of the impurity in light-emitting diodes and high-power electronics. However, there are few reports of Mg in thick free-standing GaN substrates. Here, we demonstrate successful incorporation of Mg into GaN grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE) using metallic Mg as the doping source. The concentration of Mg obtained from four separate growth runs ranged between 1016 cm-3 and 1019 cm-3. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction revealed that Mg did not induce stress or perturb the crystalline quality of the HVPE GaN substrates. Photoluminescence (PL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies were performed to investigate the types of point defects in the crystals. The near-band-edge excitonic and shallow donor-shallow acceptor radiative recombination processes involving shallow Mg acceptors were prominent in the PL spectrum of a sample doped to 3 × 1018 cm-3, while the EPR signal was also thought to represent a shallow Mg acceptor. Detection of this signal reflects minimization of nonuniform strain obtained in the thick free-standing HVPE GaN compared with heteroepitaxial thin films.

  18. Hierarchical growth of GaN nanowires for light emitting diode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Rishabh; Ra, Yong-Ho; Lee, Cheul-Ro; Obheroi, Sonika; Navamathavan, R.

    2016-02-01

    Gallium nitride nanostructures have been receiving considerable attention as building blocks for nanophotonic technologies due to their unique high aspect ratios, promising the realization of photonic and biological nanodevices such as blue light emitting diodes (LEDs), short-wavelength ultraviolet nanolasers and nanofluidic biochemical sensors. In this study, we report on the hierarchical growth of GaN nanowires (NWs) by dynamically adjusting the growth parameters using pulsed flow metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. We carried out two step growth processes to grow hierarchical GaN NWs. At the first step the GaN NWs were grown at 950°C and in the second stage, we suitably decreased the growth temperature to 710°C to grow the hierarchical structures. The surface morphology, structural and optical characterization of the grown hierarchical GaN NWs were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, respectively. These kind of hierarchical NWs are promising to allow flat band quantum structures that are shown to improve the efficiency of light-emitting diodes.

  19. GaN Haeckelite Single-Layered Nanostructures: Monolayer and Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Mojica, Dulce C.; López-Urías, Florentino

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, III-V semiconductors are interesting candidate materials for the tailoring of two dimensional (2D) graphene-like structures. These new 2D materials have attracted profound interest opening the possibility to find semiconductor materials with unexplored properties. First-principles density functional theory calculations are performed in order to investigate the electronic properties of GaN planar and nanotube morphologies based on Haeckelite structures (containing octagonal and square membered rings). Optimized geometries, band-structures, phonon dispersion, binding energies, transmission electron microscopy images simulations, x-ray diffraction patterns, charge densities, and electronic band gaps are calculated. We demonstrated that GaN Haeckelite structures are stable exhibiting a semiconducting behavior with an indirect band gap. Furthermore, it was found that GaN Haeckelite nanotubes are semiconductor with a band gap nature (direct or indirect) that depends of the nanotube´s chirality and diameter. In addition, it was demonstrated that surface passivation and the interaction with hydrazine, water, ammonia, and carbon monoxide molecules can change the band-gap nature. Our results are compared with the corresponding GaN hexagonal honeycomb structures.

  20. GaN Haeckelite Single-Layered Nanostructures: Monolayer and Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Mojica, Dulce C.; López-Urías, Florentino

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, III-V semiconductors are interesting candidate materials for the tailoring of two dimensional (2D) graphene-like structures. These new 2D materials have attracted profound interest opening the possibility to find semiconductor materials with unexplored properties. First-principles density functional theory calculations are performed in order to investigate the electronic properties of GaN planar and nanotube morphologies based on Haeckelite structures (containing octagonal and square membered rings). Optimized geometries, band-structures, phonon dispersion, binding energies, transmission electron microscopy images simulations, x-ray diffraction patterns, charge densities, and electronic band gaps are calculated. We demonstrated that GaN Haeckelite structures are stable exhibiting a semiconducting behavior with an indirect band gap. Furthermore, it was found that GaN Haeckelite nanotubes are semiconductor with a band gap nature (direct or indirect) that depends of the nanotube´s chirality and diameter. In addition, it was demonstrated that surface passivation and the interaction with hydrazine, water, ammonia, and carbon monoxide molecules can change the band-gap nature. Our results are compared with the corresponding GaN hexagonal honeycomb structures. PMID:26658148

  1. Stability, diffusivity, and vibrational properties of monatomic and molecular hydrogen in wurtzite GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limpijumnong, Sukit; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2003-12-01

    The stability and diffusivity of monatomic (H+ and H-) and molecular (H2) hydrogen in wurtzite GaN are studied via first-principles calculations. Stable configurations are identified and the formation energies are studied as a function of the Fermi level. Diffusion barriers in the direction parallel to [0001] (||c) and perpendicular to [0001] (⊥c) are calculated. For H+ the diffusion barriers are slightly higher than in the zinc-blende phase and modestly anisotropic (0.85 eV ⊥c, 0.94 eV ||c). For H- the diffusion barriers are lower than in zinc-blende GaN, with values of 1.99 eV and 2.17 eV for ||c and ⊥c, respectively. The diffusion barriers for H2 are relatively high (2.0 eV for ||c and 2.2 eV for ⊥c), and we propose that diffusion of H2 is more likely to proceed by dissociation followed by diffusion of monatomic H+. The vibrational frequency of the molecule in wurtzite GaN is redshifted from the free molecule; for wurtzite GaN the frequency is 129 cm-1 lower than in free H2. Finally, we find that the H*2 complex is only slightly higher in energy than interstitial H2, and we calculate its vibrational frequencies.

  2. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  3. Diffusion of oxygen in bulk GaN crystals at high temperature and at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovyi, B.; Nikolenko, A.; Weyher, J. L.; Grzegory, I.; Dziecielewski, I.; Sarzynski, M.; Strelchuk, V.; Tsykaniuk, B.; Belyaev, O.; Petrusha, I.; Turkevich, V.; Kapustianyk, V.; Albrecht, M.; Porowski, S.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies of diffusion of oxygen in bulk wurtzite-type GaN crystals grown by Halide Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) are reported. Oxygen concentration profiles were studied in as-grown GaN crystals and also after annealing of crystals at temperatures up to 3400 K and pressures up to 9 GPa. Investigated crystals contained large conical defects i.e. pinholes of significantly higher oxygen concentration (NO=(2-4)×1019 cm-3) than that in the bulk matrix (NO<1×1017 cm-3). The pinholes were revealed by a photo-etching method in as-grown and annealed GaN samples. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy was applied to measure the profiles of free electron concentration, which directly corresponds to the concentration of oxygen impurity. Lateral scanning across the interfaces between pinholes and matrix in the as-grown HVPE GaN crystals showed sharp step-like carrier concentration profiles. Annealing at high temperature and high pressure resulted in the diffusion blurring of the profiles. Analysis of obtained data allowed for the first time for estimation of oxygen diffusion coefficients DO(T, P). The obtained values of DO(T, P) are anomalously small similarly to the values obtained by Harafuji et al. by molecular dynamic calculations for self-diffusion of nitrogen. Whereas oxygen and nitrogen are on the same sublattice it could explain the similarity of their diffusion coefficients.

  4. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  5. Photoluminescence Observation of GaN Thin Films Treated by Inductively-Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Keiji; Itoh, Noriyoshi; Nakano, Yoshitaka; Sugai, Hideo

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports observations of photoluminescence from plasma-treated GaN thin films. A 10 mTorr Ar ICP was used, and irradiation of 313 nm ultraviolet (UV) light from Hg-Xe light source induced the photoluminescence of the GaN film. In both in-situ and ex-situ observations, significant yellow luminescence was observed visually, and the ex-situ observed luminescence ranges in a wavelength of 500-800 nm corresponding to defect-states-related transition. The measurements also revealed that the luminescence also contains UV emission at a wavelength of ~365 nm attributed to transition related to near band edges. In order to examine effects of the plasma on the luminescence, the ex-situ observation was made as a function of the plasma treatment time. As the treatment time increased, both the UV and the luminescence intensity decreased, and the decrease in the emission became significant when the 313 nm UV light was irradiated onto the plasma-exposed GaN surface. These results suggested that plasma-induced defect formation leads to the luminescence degradation, and that the photoluminescence observation will be useful for damage monitoring of the GaN surface. This work is partly supported by the 2nd stage Knowledge Cluster Initiative and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  6. Regional density functional theory for crystal growth in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Koichi; Hayashi, Tensei; Tachibana, Akitomo; Matsumoto, Koh

    2000-12-01

    We have applied the regional density functional theory to the study of the electronic characteristics in the Ga and N adsorption process of crystal growth in gallium nitride (GaN) with the surface orientations of (0 0 0 1) and (0 0 0 1¯) . Potential energy curves along the Ga and N adsorption process were obtained for some adsorption sites by the first-principle density functional calculation using the periodic boundary model. The Ga-chemical potentials for the GaN(0 0 0 1) and GaN (0 0 0 1¯) surfaces have been derived, and we have observed the clear dependency of crystal growth in GaN on the surface orientation. Furthermore, we have calculated the regional electronic numbers and energies for the regions partitioned by the interface. The regional electronic energies are stabilized in consequence of the electron transfer as the adatom approaches the surface. It is concluded that an electron accumulation in the vicinity of the stable position of the adatom plays an important role in crystal growth.

  7. Increased thermal conductivity of free-standing low-dislocation-density GaN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weili; Balandin, Alexander A.; Lee, Changho; Lee, Hae-Yong

    2005-09-01

    Proposed high-power electronic and optoelectronic applications of GaN materials rely heavily on the effectiveness of heat removal from the devices. Here we report the results of our measurements of thermal conductivity in the thick free-standing GaN films prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The fabrication method allows one to grow the low-dislocation density films without the use of non-native substrates. Our experimental data show that the room tempera- ture thermal conductivity in free-standing GaN films can be as high at 225 W/mK, which is a factor of 1.8 increase compared to a reference GaN film grown on sapphire substrate. The modeling, performed for the given sample parameters, indicates that the low-temperature thermal conductivity can reach a record value of 7460 W/mK. The presented results are important for the thermal management optimization of GaN-based devices.

  8. Uniaxial strain effects on the optoelectronic properties of GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Sihao; Liu, Lei; Kong, Yike; Wang, Meishan

    2016-09-01

    Considering the importance of strain engineering on semiconductors, GaN nanowires under uniaxial compression deformation and stretch deformation are researched using first principle calculations with density functional theory. It is found that the deformation will destroy the stability of the nanowires except a weak stretch. The compression deformation is more difficult than the stretch deformation. Besides, the work function of the nanowires is reduced under increasing compression while that under increasing stretch is reversed. With increasing diameter, the band gaps of the nanowires gradually exhibit a linear decreasing relation as the elongation of uniaxial length of GaN nanowires. With increasing compression, the band gaps change from direct to indirect. The optical calculations exhibit a redshift for the imaginary part of dielectric function. This study demonstrates strain engineering can effectively adjust the optoelectronic characteristics of GaN nanowire. Moderate compression, which induces a lower work function with a direct band gap, can improve the photoemission performance of GaN nanowires.

  9. Comparative Study of Defect Properties in GaN: Ab initio and Empirical Potential Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Bylaska, Eric J.; El-Azab, Anter; Weber, William J.; LM Wang, R Fromknecht, LL Snead, DF Downey and H Takahashi

    2004-04-05

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to study the formation, properties and atomic configurations of monovacancies, antisite defects and possible interstitials in GaN. The relaxation around a vacancy is generally small, but the relaxation around antisite defects is large, particularly for a Ga antisite defect, which is not stable and converts to an N-N<0001> split interstitial. All N interstitials, starting from any possible sites, eventually transfer into the N-N split interstitials, forming N molecules. In the case of Ga interstitials, the most favorable configuration is the Ga octahedral interstitial. However, it is found that the Ga-Ga<> split interstitial can bridge the gap between non-bonded Ga atoms along the <11-2> direction, which leads to the formation of Ga atomic wires in GaN, with bond distance close to those noted in bulk Ga. In addition, two representative potentials, namely Stillinger-Weber and Tersoff-Brenner potentials, have been employed to deter mine the formation of defects using molecular dynamics (MD) method in GaN. The MD results are discussed and compared to DFT calculations. The present DFT and MD results provide guidelines for evaluating the quality and fit of empirical potentials for large-scale simulations of ion-solid interaction and thermal annealing of defects in GaN.

  10. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  11. Coaxial InGaN epitaxy around GaN micro-tubes: Tracing the signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikry, M.; Ren, Z.; Madel, M.; Tischer, I.; Thonke, K.; Scholz, F.

    2013-05-01

    This work focuses on investigations of the luminescence properties of coaxial InGaN layers grown around single GaN micro and sub-micron tubes on top of GaN micro-pyramids. The tube structure was formed after the controlled desorption of ZnO nano-pillar templates during the coaxial GaN epitaxy. A thin layer near the area around the inner diameter of the micro-tube is believed to be heavily doped with Zn impurities leading to an intense and broad photoluminescence (PL) peak centered around 2.85 eV that quenches the luminescence from coaxial InGaN quantum wells (QWs). When the thickness of the GaN tube wall before the QW growth was doubled, a clear indication of In incorporation in low temperature PL was observed via an intense peak around 3.1 eV. Moreover, as the temperature of the QW growth was changed from 830 °C to 780 °C, a shift of the peak corresponding to an increase in In incorporation from 3.5% to 7.5% was noticed.

  12. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  13. Mechanical Deformation Behavior of Nonpolar GaN Thick Films by Berkovich Nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the deformation mechanisms of nonpolar GaN thick films grown on m-sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) are investigated using nanoindentation with a Berkovich indenter, cathodoluminescence (CL), and Raman microscopy. Results show that nonpolar GaN is more susceptible to plastic deformation and has lower hardness thanc-plane GaN. After indentation, lateral cracks emerge on the nonpolar GaN surface and preferentially propagate parallel to the orientation due to anisotropic defect-related stresses. Moreover, the quenching of CL luminescence can be observed to extend exclusively out from the center of the indentations along the orientation, a trend which is consistent with the evolution of cracks. The recrystallization process happens in the indented regions for the load of 500 mN. Raman area mapping indicates that the distribution of strain field coincides well with the profile of defect-expanded dark regions, while the enhanced compressive stress mainly concentrates in the facets of the indentation. PMID:20596453

  14. A new system for synthesis of high quality nonpolar GaN thin films.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Shih, Shao-Ju; Fu, Zhengyi

    2010-02-28

    High quality nonpolar m-plane GaN films were successfully grown on LiGaO(2) (100) substrates for the first time. This m-plane GaN/LiGaO(2) (100) system opens a new approach for realizing highly-efficient nitride devices. PMID:20449251

  15. Ultrathin GaN quantum disk nanowire LEDs with sub-250 nm electroluminescence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chisholm, Matthew F.; Golam Sarwar, A. T. M.; Myers, Roberto C.; Mays, Brelon J.; Duscher, Gerd J.

    2016-03-18

    By quantum confining GaN at monolayer thickness with AlN barriers inside of a nanowire, deep ultraviolet LEDs are demonstrated. Full three-dimensional strain dependent energy band simulations are carried out within multiple quantum disk (MQD) GaN/AlN nanowire superlattice heterostructures. It is found that, even within the same nanowire MQD, the emission energy of the ultrathin GaN QDs varies from disk to disk due to the changing strain distribution and polarization charge induced energy band bending along the axial nanowire direction. MQD heterostructures are grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form self-assembled catalyst-free nanowires with 1 to 2 monolayer thick GaNmore » insertions within an AlN matrix. Photoluminescence peaks are observed at 295 nm and 283 nm from the 2 ML and 1 ML thick MQD samples, respectively. Polarization-doped nanowire LEDs are grown incorporating 1 ML thick GaN MQD active regions from which we observe deep ultraviolet electroluminescence. As a result, the shortest LED wavelength peak observed is 240 nm and attributed to electron hole recombination within 1 ML thick GaN QDs.« less

  16. Diffusion mechanism and the thermal stability of fluorine ions in GaN after ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. J.; Yuan, L.; Chen, K. J.; Xu, F. J.; Shen, B.

    2009-04-15

    The diffusion mechanisms of fluorine ions in GaN are investigated by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Instead of incorporating fluorine ions close to the sample surface by fluorine plasma treatment, fluorine ion implantation with an energy of 180 keV is utilized to implant fluorine ions deep into the GaN bulk, preventing the surface effects from affecting the data analysis. It is found that the diffusion of fluorine ions in GaN is a dynamic process featuring an initial out-diffusion followed by in- diffusion and the final stabilization. A vacancy-assisted diffusion model is proposed to account for the experimental observations, which is also consistent with results on molecular dynamic simulation. Fluorine ions tend to occupy Ga vacancies induced by ion implantation and diffuse to vacancy rich regions. The number of continuous vacancy chains can be significantly reduced by a dynamic thermal annealing process. As a result, strong local confinement and stabilization of fluorine ions can be obtained in GaN crystal, suggesting excellent thermal stability of fluorine ions for device applications.

  17. Cathodoluminescence of GaN nanorods and nanowires grown by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, G.; Herrera, M.

    2014-02-01

    GaN nanorods and nanowires have been grown by thermal evaporation of GaN on Au/Si (1 0 0) substrates. The nanorods recorded a surface decorated with numerous grains with an average size of about 100 nm. The nanowires grew onto the surface of the nanorods exhibiting multiple bends along them. TEM measurements revealed the formation of irregular porous and a polycrystalline structure in the nanowires with diameter higher than 100 nm, while the nanowires with lower diameter showed a tubular structure with wall thickness of 10 nm. The luminescence of the samples recorded three bands centered at about 2.1, 2.74, and 3.2 eV, attributed to the GaN yellow emission and to the blue and UV emissions of the β-Ga2O3, respectively. Ga-ion irradiation in samples revealed a decrease in the intensity of the β-Ga2O3 blue emission attributed to the elimination of gallium vacancies. A thermal annealing treatment at 800 °C in N2 atmosphere generated a quenching of the GaN yellow emission, due to the elimination of nitrogen vacancies.

  18. Natural Cubic Spline Regression Modeling Followed by Dynamic Network Reconstruction for the Identification of Radiation-Sensitivity Gene Association Networks from Time-Course Transcriptome Data.

    PubMed

    Michna, Agata; Braselmann, Herbert; Selmansberger, Martin; Dietz, Anne; Hess, Julia; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Blüthgen, Nils; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Unger, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression time-course experiments allow to study the dynamics of transcriptomic changes in cells exposed to different stimuli. However, most approaches for the reconstruction of gene association networks (GANs) do not propose prior-selection approaches tailored to time-course transcriptome data. Here, we present a workflow for the identification of GANs from time-course data using prior selection of genes differentially expressed over time identified by natural cubic spline regression modeling (NCSRM). The workflow comprises three major steps: 1) the identification of differentially expressed genes from time-course expression data by employing NCSRM, 2) the use of regularized dynamic partial correlation as implemented in GeneNet to infer GANs from differentially expressed genes and 3) the identification and functional characterization of the key nodes in the reconstructed networks. The approach was applied on a time-resolved transcriptome data set of radiation-perturbed cell culture models of non-tumor cells with normal and increased radiation sensitivity. NCSRM detected significantly more genes than another commonly used method for time-course transcriptome analysis (BETR). While most genes detected with BETR were also detected with NCSRM the false-detection rate of NCSRM was low (3%). The GANs reconstructed from genes detected with NCSRM showed a better overlap with the interactome network Reactome compared to GANs derived from BETR detected genes. After exposure to 1 Gy the normal sensitive cells showed only sparse response compared to cells with increased sensitivity, which exhibited a strong response mainly of genes related to the senescence pathway. After exposure to 10 Gy the response of the normal sensitive cells was mainly associated with senescence and that of cells with increased sensitivity with apoptosis. We discuss these results in a clinical context and underline the impact of senescence-associated pathways in acute radiation response of normal

  19. Natural Cubic Spline Regression Modeling Followed by Dynamic Network Reconstruction for the Identification of Radiation-Sensitivity Gene Association Networks from Time-Course Transcriptome Data

    PubMed Central

    Michna, Agata; Braselmann, Herbert; Selmansberger, Martin; Dietz, Anne; Hess, Julia; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Blüthgen, Nils; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Unger, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression time-course experiments allow to study the dynamics of transcriptomic changes in cells exposed to different stimuli. However, most approaches for the reconstruction of gene association networks (GANs) do not propose prior-selection approaches tailored to time-course transcriptome data. Here, we present a workflow for the identification of GANs from time-course data using prior selection of genes differentially expressed over time identified by natural cubic spline regression modeling (NCSRM). The workflow comprises three major steps: 1) the identification of differentially expressed genes from time-course expression data by employing NCSRM, 2) the use of regularized dynamic partial correlation as implemented in GeneNet to infer GANs from differentially expressed genes and 3) the identification and functional characterization of the key nodes in the reconstructed networks. The approach was applied on a time-resolved transcriptome data set of radiation-perturbed cell culture models of non-tumor cells with normal and increased radiation sensitivity. NCSRM detected significantly more genes than another commonly used method for time-course transcriptome analysis (BETR). While most genes detected with BETR were also detected with NCSRM the false-detection rate of NCSRM was low (3%). The GANs reconstructed from genes detected with NCSRM showed a better overlap with the interactome network Reactome compared to GANs derived from BETR detected genes. After exposure to 1 Gy the normal sensitive cells showed only sparse response compared to cells with increased sensitivity, which exhibited a strong response mainly of genes related to the senescence pathway. After exposure to 10 Gy the response of the normal sensitive cells was mainly associated with senescence and that of cells with increased sensitivity with apoptosis. We discuss these results in a clinical context and underline the impact of senescence-associated pathways in acute radiation response of normal

  20. Ultra High p-doping Material Research for GaN Based Light Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Dmitriev

    2007-06-30

    The main goal of the Project is to investigate doping mechanisms in p-type GaN and AlGaN and controllably fabricate ultra high doped p-GaN materials and epitaxial structures. Highly doped p-type GaN-based materials with low electrical resistivity and abrupt doping profiles are of great importance for efficient light emitters for solid state lighting (SSL) applications. Cost-effective hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) technology was proposed to investigate and develop p-GaN materials for SSL. High p-type doping is required to improve (i) carrier injection efficiency in light emitting p-n junctions that will result in increasing of light emitting efficiency, (ii) current spreading in light emitting structures that will improve external quantum efficiency, and (iii) parameters of Ohmic contacts to reduce operating voltage and tolerate higher forward currents needed for the high output power operation of light emitters. Highly doped p-type GaN layers and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with low electrical resistivity will lead to novel device and contact metallization designs for high-power high efficiency GaN-based light emitters. Overall, highly doped p-GaN is a key element to develop light emitting devices for the DOE SSL program. The project was focused on material research for highly doped p-type GaN materials and device structures for applications in high performance light emitters for general illumination P-GaN and p-AlGaN layers and multi-layer structures were grown by HVPE and investigated in terms of surface morphology and structure, doping concentrations and profiles, optical, electrical, and structural properties. Tasks of the project were successfully accomplished. Highly doped GaN materials with p-type conductivity were fabricated. As-grown GaN layers had concentration N{sub a}-N{sub d} as high as 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Mechanisms of doping were investigated and results of material studies were reported at several International conferences providing