Science.gov

Sample records for accelerator neutrino oscillation

  1. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  2. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  3. Evidence for muon neutrino oscillation in an accelerator-based experiment.

    PubMed

    Aliu, E; Andringa, S; Aoki, S; Argyriades, J; Asakura, K; Ashie, R; Berns, H; Bhang, H; Blondel, A; Borghi, S; Bouchez, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Casper, D; Cavata, C; Cervera, A; Cho, K O; Choi, J H; Dore, U; Espinal, X; Fechner, M; Fernandez, E; Fukuda, Y; Gomez-Cadenas, J; Gran, R; Hara, T; Hasegawa, M; Hasegawa, T; Hayashi, K; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hill, J; Hiraide, K; Hosaka, J; Ichikawa, A K; Iinuma, M; Ikeda, A; Inagaki, T; Ishida, T; Ishihara, K; Ishii, T; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Iwashita, T; Jang, H I; Jeon, E J; Jeong, I S; Joo, K; Jover, G; Jung, C K; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kato, I; Kearns, E; Kerr, D; Kim, C O; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kim, J Y; Kim, S; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, T; Konaka, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubota, J; Kudenko, Yu; Kuno, Y; Kutter, T; Learned, J; Likhoded, S; Lim, I T; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Maesaka, H; Mallet, J; Mariani, C; Maruyama, T; Matsuno, S; Matveev, V; Mauger, C; McConnel, K; McGrew, C; Mikheyev, S; Minamino, A; Mine, S; Mineev, O; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriguchi, Y; Morita, T; Moriyama, S; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Namba, T; Nambu, R; Nawang, S; Nishikawa, K; Nitta, K; Nova, F; Novella, P; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; Oyama, Y; Pac, M Y; Pierre, F; Rodriguez, A; Saji, C; Sakuda, M; Sanchez, F; Sarrat, A; Sasaki, T; Scholberg, K; Schroeter, R; Sekiguchi, M; Sharkey, E; Shiozawa, M; Shiraishi, K; Sitjes, G; Smy, M; Sobel, H; Stone, J; Sulak, L; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, Y; Takahashi, T; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Takubo, Y; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Terri, R; T'Jampens, S; Tornero-Lopez, A; Totsuka, Y; Ueda, S; Vagins, M; Walter, C W; Wang, W; Wilkes, R J; Yamada, S; Yamamoto, S; Yanagisawa, C; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, H; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, M; Zalipska, J

    2005-03-01

    We present results for nu(mu) oscillation in the KEK to Kamioka (K2K) long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. K2K uses an accelerator-produced nu(mu) beam with a mean energy of 1.3 GeV directed at the Super-Kamiokande detector. We observed the energy-dependent disappearance of nu(mu), which we presume have oscillated to nu(tau). The probability that we would observe these results if there is no neutrino oscillation is 0.0050% (4.0 sigma).

  4. Neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mark

    2002-05-15

    The wave theory of light, and in particular the principle of interference, was formulated by Thomas Young in 1801. In the 20th century, the principle of interference was extended to the quantum mechanical wave functions describing matter. The phenomenon of quantum mechanical interference of different neutrino states, neutrino oscillations, has provided one of the most exciting developments in high energy particle physics of the last decade. Observations of the flavour oscillations of neutrinos produced by distant sources, such as from the core of the Sun, provide compelling evidence that neutrinos have mass. This article describes the main features and the most significant experimental observations of this unusual application of the principle of interference.

  5. Neutrino masses, neutrino oscillations, and cosmological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical concepts and motivations for considering neutrinos having finite masses are discussed and the experimental situation on searches for neutrino masses and oscillations is summarized. The solar neutrino problem, reactor, deep mine and accelerator data, tri decay experiments and double beta-decay data are considered and cosmological implications and astrophysical data relating to neutrino masses are reviewed. The neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem, the missing mass problem in galaxy halos and galaxy cluster galaxy formation and clustering, and radiative neutrino decay and the cosmic ultraviolet background radiation are examined.

  6. The neutrino electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P.K.; Stenflo, L.; Bingham, R.; Bethe, H.A.; Dawson, J.M.; Mendonca, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that a wake of electron plasma oscillations can be created by the nonlinear ponderomotive force of an intense neutrino flux. The electrons trapped in the plasma wakefield will be accelerated to high energies. Such processes may be important in supernovas and pulsars. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Neutrino Oscillations With Two Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-10-01

    This work estimates the probability of μ to e neutrino oscillation with two sterile neutrinos using a 5×5 U-matrix, an extension of the previous estimate with one sterile neutrino and a 4×4 U-matrix. The sterile neutrino-active neutrino mass differences and the mixing angles of the two sterile neutrinos with the three active neutrinos are taken from recent publications, and the oscillation probability for one sterile neutrino is compared to the previous estimate.

  8. Neutrino Oscillations With Two Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-06-01

    This work estimates the probability of μ to e neutrino oscillation with two sterile neutrinos using a 5×5 U-matrix, an extension of the previous estimate with one sterile neutrino and a 4×4 U-matrix. The sterile neutrino-active neutrino mass differences and the mixing angles of the two sterile neutrinos with the three active neutrinos are taken from recent publications, and the oscillation probability for one sterile neutrino is compared to the previous estimate.

  9. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  10. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations.

  11. Atmospheric neutrinos and discovery of neutrino oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kajita, Takaaki

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through studies of neutrinos produced by cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. They are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith-angle and energy dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. Neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. Neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have small but non-zero masses. The small neutrino masses have profound implications to our understanding of elementary particle physics and the Universe. This article discusses the experimental discovery of neutrino oscillations. PMID:20431258

  12. Neutrino Oscillation Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Boris

    2012-06-01

    To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures. Neutrinos and photons are by far the most abundant elementary particles in the universe. Thus, if we would like to comprehend the universe, we must understand the neutrinos. Of course, studying the neutrinos is challenging, since the only known forces through which these electrically-neutral leptons interact are the weak force and gravity. Consequently, interactions of neutrinos in a detector are very rare events, so that very large detectors and intense neutrino sources are needed to make experiments feasible. Nevertheless, we have confirmed that the weak interactions of neutrinos are correctly described by the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particle physics. Moreover, in the last 14 years, we have discovered that neutrinos have nonzero masses, and that leptons mix. These discoveries have been based on the observation that neutrinos can change from one 'flavor' to another - the phenomenon known as neutrino oscillation. We shall explain the physics of neutrino oscillation, deriving the probability of oscillation in a new way. We shall also provide a very brief guide to references that can be used to study some major neutrino-physics topics other than neutrino oscillation.

  13. Investigation of neutrino oscillations in the T2k long-baseline accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Izmaylov, A. O. Yershov, N. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Matveev, V. A.; Mineev, O. V.; Musienko, Yu. V.; Khabibulliun, M. M.; Khotjantsev, A. N.; Shaykhiev, A. T.

    2012-02-15

    High-sensitivity searches for transitions of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos are the main task of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) second-generation long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The present article is devoted to describing basic principles of T2K, surveying experimental apparatuses that it includes, and considering in detail the muon-range detector (SMRD) designed and manufactured by a group of physicists from the Institute of Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The results of the first measurements with a neutrino beam are presented, and plans for the near future are discussed.

  14. Neutrino Oscillations and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, David

    2001-04-01

    When the existence of the neutrino was almost apologetically first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli it was intended to explain the mysterious apparent absence of energy and momentum in beta decay. 70 years later the neutrino has indeed solved that mystery, but it has generated still more of its own. Are neutrinos massive? Is it possible to create a neutrino with its spin in the same direction as its momentum? What fraction of the mass of the Universe is made up of neutrinos? Are the flavour labels which we put on neutrinos, like electron and muon, really fixed or can they change? Why does no experiment see the predicted flux of neutrinos from the Sun? Why do there appear to be roughly equal numbers of muon and electron neutrinos created in our atmosphere, rather than the 2:1 ratio we would expect? Many of these questions were coupled when Bruno Pontecorvo first suggested that the shortfall in solar neutrino measurements were caused by neutrino oscillations - neutrinos spontaneously changing flavour as they travel from the Sun. 30 years later we still await definitive proof of that conjecture, and providing that proof is the reason for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The talk will discuss the current state of neutrino oscillations studies, and show how the unique capabilities of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory can provide definitive proof of whether neutrino oscillations are the long-sought answer to the solar neutrino problem.

  15. Neutrino oscillations and the seesaw origin of neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, O. G.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2016-07-01

    The historical discovery of neutrino oscillations using solar and atmospheric neutrinos, and subsequent accelerator and reactor studies, has brought neutrino physics to the precision era. We note that CP effects in oscillation phenomena could be difficult to extract in the presence of unitarity violation. As a result upcoming dedicated leptonic CP violation studies should take into account the non-unitarity of the lepton mixing matrix. Restricting non-unitarity will shed light on the seesaw scale, and thereby guide us towards the new physics responsible for neutrino mass generation.

  16. Nuclear effects in neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2011-10-06

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino(antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei which are relevant for present neutrino oscillation experiments in the few GeV energy region. The study is specially focused on calculating the cross sections and the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The nuclear effects are found to be important for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  17. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  18. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, P; Wen, L J; Zhang, C

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  19. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  20. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-04-27

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

  1. Neutrino oscillation studies with reactors

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, P.; Wen, L.J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavours are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades, reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle θ13. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos. PMID:25913819

  2. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  3. Neutrino Oscillations with Nil Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Edward R.

    2016-09-01

    An alternative neutrino oscillation process is presented as a counterexample for which the neutrino may have nil mass consistent with the standard model. The process is developed in a quantum trajectories representation of quantum mechanics, which has a Hamilton-Jacobi foundation. This process has no need for mass differences between mass eigenstates. Flavor oscillations and ν ,bar{ν } oscillations are examined.

  4. Future short-baseline sterile neutrino searches with accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, J.

    2015-07-15

    A number of experimental anomalies in neutrino oscillation physics point to the existence of at least one light sterile neutrino. This hypothesis can be precisely tested using neutrinos from reactors, radioactive isotopes, and particle accelerators. The focus of these proceedings is on future dedicated short-baseline sterile neutrino searches using accelerators.

  5. A study of neutrino oscillations in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Raufer, Tobias Martin

    2007-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillations experiment located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), USA. It makes use of the NuMI neutrino beamline and two functionally identical detectors located at distances of ~1km and ~735km from the neutrino production target respectively. The Near Detector measures the composition and energy spectrum of the neutrino beam with high precision while the Far Detector looks for evidence of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents work conducted in two distinct areas of the MINOS experiment: analysis of neutral current and charged current interactions. While charged current events are only sensitive to muon neutrino disappearance, neutral current events can be used to distinguish oscillations into sterile neutrinos from those involving only active neutrino species. A complete, preliminary neutral current study is performed on simulated data. This is followed by a more detailed investigation of neutral current neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector. A procedure identifying neutral current interactions and rejecting backgrounds due to reconstruction failures is developed. Two distinct event classification methods are investigated. The selected neutral current events in the Near Detector are used to extract corrections to the neutral current cross-section in the MINOS Monte Carlo simulation as a function of energy. The resulting correction factors are consistent with unity. The main MINOS charged current neutrino disappearance analysis is described. We present the Monte Carlo tuning procedure, event selection, extrapolation from Near to Far Detector and fit for neutrino oscillations. Systematic errors on this measurement are evaluated and discussed in detail. The data are consistent with neutrino oscillations with the following parameters: 2.74 $+0.44\\atop{-0.26}$ x 10-3 eV2 and sin2(2θ23) > 0.87 at 68% confidence level.

  6. Neutrino Oscillations with Three Active and Three Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-07-01

    This is an extension of estimates of the probability of μ to e neutrino oscillation with one sterile neutrino to three sterile neutrinos, using a 6x6 matrix. Since the mixing angle for only one sterile neutrino has been experimentally determined, we estimate the μ to e neutrino oscillation probability with different mixing angles for two of the sterile neutrinos.

  7. Analyzing Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2007-10-26

    We provide a pedagogic derivation of the formula needed to analyze atmospheric data and then derive, for the subset of the data that are fully-contained events, an analysis tool that is quantitative and numerically efficient. Results for the full set of neutrino oscillation data are then presented. We find the following preliminary results: 1.) the sub-dominant approximation provides reasonable values for the best fit parameters for {delta}{sub 32}, {theta}{sub 23}, and {theta}{sub 13} but does not quantitatively provide the errors for these three parameters; 2.) the size of the MSW effect is suppressed in the sub-dominant approximation; 3.) the MSW effect reduces somewhat the extracted error for {delta}{sub 32}, more so for {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13}; 4.) atmospheric data alone constrains the allowed values of {theta}{sub 13} only in the sub-dominant approximation, the full three neutrino calculations requires CHOOZ to get a clean constraint; 5.) the linear in {theta}{sub 13} terms are not negligible; and 6.) the minimum value of {theta}{sub 13} is found to be negative, but at a statistically insignificant level.

  8. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayato, Yoshinari

    2015-07-15

    Accelerator based long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments have been playing important roles in revealing the nature of neutrinos. However, it turned out that the current experiments are not sufficient to study two major remaining problems, the CP violation in the lepton sector and the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. Therefore, several new experiments have been proposed. Among of them, two accelerator based long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, the J-PARC neutrino beam and Hyper-Kamiokande, and MOMENT, have been proposed in Asia. These two projects are reviewed in this article.

  9. Accelerator neutrino program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    The accelerator neutrino programme in the USA consists primarily of the Fermilab neutrino programme. Currently, Fermilab operates two neutrino beamlines, the Booster neutrino beamline and the NuMI neutrino beamline and is the planning stages for a third neutrino beam to send neutrinos to DUSEL. The experiments in the Booster neutrino beamline are miniBooNE, SciBooNE and in the future microBooNE, whereas in the NuMI beamline we have MINOS, ArgoNut, MINERVA and coming soon NOvA. The major experiment in the beamline to DUSEL will be LBNE.

  10. Oscillations of solar atmosphere neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    The Sun is a source of high-energy neutrinos (E(greater-or-similar sign)10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations (in vacuum and in matter) on solar atmosphere neutrinos, and calculate their observable fluxes at Earth, as well as their event rates in a kilometer-scale detector in water or ice. We find that peculiar three-flavor oscillation effects in matter, which can occur in the energy range probed by solar atmosphere neutrinos, are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, we find that the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged vacuum oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23})

  11. Neutrino Masses and Flavor Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang; Xing, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    This essay is intended to provide a brief description of the peculiar properties of neutrinos within and beyond the standard theory of weak interactions. The focus is on the flavor oscillations of massive neutrinos, from which one has achieved some striking knowledge about their mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. The experimental prospects towards probing the absolute neutrino mass scale, possible Majorana nature and CP-violating effects, will also be addressed.

  12. Transport equations for oscillating neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfan; Burrows, Adam

    2013-11-01

    We derive a suite of generalized Boltzmann equations, based on the density-matrix formalism, that incorporates the physics of neutrino oscillations for two- and three-flavor oscillations, matter refraction, and self-refraction. The resulting equations are straightforward extensions of the classical transport equations that nevertheless contain the full physics of quantum oscillation phenomena. In this way, our broadened formalism provides a bridge between the familiar neutrino transport algorithms employed by supernova modelers and the more quantum-heavy approaches frequently employed to illuminate the various neutrino oscillation effects. We also provide the corresponding angular-moment versions of this generalized equation set. Our goal is to make it easier for astrophysicists to address oscillation phenomena in a language with which they are familiar. The equations we derive are simple and practical, and are intended to facilitate progress concerning oscillation phenomena in the context of core-collapse supernova theory.

  13. Magnus approximation in neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-04-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some anomalous experimental observations. In a four-neutrino (three active plus one sterile) mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos with energies of the order of a few GeV, taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  14. Neutrino oscillation results from MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Alexandre; /Oxford U.

    2007-08-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) long-baseline experiment has been actively collecting beam data since 2005, having already accumulated 3 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT). MINOS uses the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) neutrino beam measured in two locations: at Fermilab, close to beam production, and 735 km downstream, in Northern Minnesota. By observing the oscillatory structure in the neutrino energy spectrum, MINOS can precisely measure the neutrino oscillation parameters in the atmospheric sector. These parameters were determined to be |{Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}| = 2.74{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) > 0.87 (68% C.L.) from analysis of the first year of data, corresponding to 1.27 x 10{sup 20} POT.

  15. Analytical approximations for matter effects on CP violation in the accelerator-based neutrino oscillations with E ≲ 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhi-zhong; Zhu, Jing-yu

    2016-07-01

    Given an accelerator-based neutrino experiment with the beam energy E ≲ 1 GeV, we expand the probabilities of ν μ → ν e and {overline{ν}}_{μ}to {overline{ν}}_e oscillations in matter in terms of two small quantities Δ21 /Δ31 and A/Δ31, where Δ 21≡ m 2 2 - m 1 2 and Δ 31≡ m 3 2 - m 1 2 are the neutrino mass-squared differences, and A measures the strength of terrestrial matter effects. Our analytical approximations are numerically more accurate than those made by Freund in this energy region, and thus they are particularly applicable for the study of leptonic CP violation in the low-energy MOMENT, ESS νSM and T2K oscillation experiments. As a by-product, the new analytical approximations help us to easily understand why the matter-corrected Jarlskog parameter tilde{J} peaks at the resonance energy E ∗ ≃ 0 .14GeV (or 0 .12 GeV) for the normal (or inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, and how the three Dirac unitarity triangles are deformed due to the terrestrial matter contamination. We also affirm that a medium-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with the beam energy E lying in the E ∗ ≲ E ≲ 2 E ∗ range is capable of exploring leptonic CP violation with little matter-induced suppression.

  16. Review of neutrino oscillations with sterile and active neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Leonard S.

    2016-08-01

    Recently neutrino oscillation experiments have shown that it is very likely that there are one or two sterile neutrinos. In this review neutrino oscillations with one, two, three sterile and three active neutrinos, and parameters that are consistent with experiments, are reviewed.

  17. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yudong |

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  18. Monte Carlo neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrate that the effects of matter upon neutrino propagation may be recast as the scattering of the initial neutrino wave function. Exchanging the differential, Schrodinger equation for an integral equation for the scattering matrix S permits a Monte Carlo method for the computation of S that removes many of the numerical difficulties associated with direct integration techniques.

  19. Generalized mass ordering degeneracy in neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Pilar; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We consider the impact of neutral-current (NC) nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering. We show that in the presence of NSI there is an exact degeneracy which makes it impossible to determine the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of the solar mixing angle θ12 at oscillation experiments. The degeneracy holds at the probability level and for arbitrary matter density profiles, and hence solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments are affected simultaneously. The degeneracy requires order-1 corrections from NSI to the NC electron neutrino-quark interaction and can be tested in electron neutrino NC scattering experiments.

  20. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 about equals 1-eV2 region

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 ~ 1 eV2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  1. Neutrino oscillations: present status and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Schwetz, Thomas

    2008-02-21

    I summarize the status of three-flavour neutrino oscillations with date of Oct. 2007, and provide an outlook for the developments to be expected in the near future. Furthermore, I discuss the status of sterile neutrino oscillation interpretations of the LSND anomaly in the light of recent MiniBooNE results, and comment on implications for the future neutrino oscillation program.

  2. Global analyses of neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, Michele; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the determination of some neutrino properties from the global analysis of solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino data in the framework of three-neutrino mixing as well as in some extended scenarios such as the mixing with eV-scale sterile neutrinos invoked for the interpretation of the short baseline anomalies, and the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions.

  3. Multipole expansion method for supernova neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu; Shalgar, Shashank E-mail: shashankshalgar@unm.edu

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a multipole expansion method to calculate collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the neutrino bulb model. We show that it is much more efficient to solve multi-angle neutrino oscillations in multipole basis than in angle basis. The multipole expansion method also provides interesting insights into multi-angle calculations that were accomplished previously in angle basis.

  4. Collective neutrino oscillations and spontaneous symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-08-01

    Neutrino oscillations in a hot and dense astrophysical environment such as a core-collapse supernova pose a challenging, seven-dimensional flavor transport problem. To make the problem even more difficult (and interesting), neutrinos can experience collective oscillations through nonlinear refraction in the dense neutrino medium in this environment. Significant progress has been made in the last decade towards the understanding of collective neutrino oscillations in various simplified neutrino gas models with imposed symmetries and reduced dimensions. However, a series of recent studies seem to have "reset" this progress by showing that these models may not be compatible with collective neutrino oscillations because the latter can break the symmetries spontaneously if they are not imposed. We review some of the key concepts of collective neutrino oscillations by using a few simple toy models. We also elucidate the breaking of spatial and directional symmetries in these models because of collective oscillations.

  5. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect

    Backhouse, Christopher James

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0.11

  6. Accelerator systems and instrumentation for the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, Robert Miles

    2005-12-01

    The neutrinos at the main injector (NuMI) neutrino beam facility began operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 2005. NuMI produces an intense, muon-neutrino beam to a number of experiments. Foremost of these experiments is MINOS-the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search-that uses two neutrino detectors in the beam, one at Fermilab and one in northern Minnesota, to investigate the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations.

  7. Current MINOS Neutrino Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, Alec; /Minnesota U., Duluth

    2009-07-01

    The MINOS experiment is now making precise measurements of the {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations seen in atmospheric neutrinos, tests possible disappearance to sterile {nu} by measuring the neutral current flux, and has extended our reach towards the so far unseen {theta}{sub 13} by looking for {nu}{sub e} appearance in the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. It does so by using the intense, well-understood NuMI neutrino beam created at Fermilab and observing it 735km away at the Soudan Mine in Northeast Minnesota. High-statistics studies of the neutrino interactions themselves and the cosmic rays seen by the MINOS detectors have also been made. Results from MINOS first three years of operations will be presented.

  8. Matter Effects On Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael

    An introduction to neutrino oscillations in vacuum is presented, followed by a survey of various techniques for obtaining either exact or approximate expressions for numu → nue oscillations in matter. The method developed by Arafune, Koike, and Sato uses a perturbative analysis to find an approximation for the evolution operator. The method used by Freund yields an approximate oscillation probability by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian, finding the eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and then using those to find modified mixing angles with the matter effect taken into account. The method devised by Mann, Kafka, Schneps, and Altinok produces an exact expression for the oscillation by determining explicitly the evolution operator. These methods are compared to each other using the T2K, MINOS, NOnuA, and LBNE parameters.

  9. Atmospheric neutrinos in ice and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Giordano, Gerardo; Mocioiu, Irina; Mena, Olga

    2010-11-01

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show that the very high statistics atmospheric neutrino data can be used to obtain precise measurements of the main oscillation parameters.

  10. Future Accelerators, Muon Colliders, and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A Carrigan, Jr.

    2001-12-19

    Particle physics is driven by five great topics. Neutrino oscillations and masses are now at the fore. The standard model with extensions to supersymmetry and a Higgs to generate mass explains much of the field. The origins of CP violation are not understood. The possibility of extra dimensions has raised tantalizing new questions. A fifth topic lurking in the background is the possibility of something totally different. Many of the questions raised by these topics require powerful new accelerators. It is not an overstatement to say that for some of the issues, the accelerator is almost the experiment. Indeed some of the questions require machines beyond our present capability. As this volume attests, there are parts of the particle physics program that have been significantly advanced without the use of accelerators such as the subject of neutrino oscillations and many aspects of the particle-cosmology interface. At this stage in the development of physics, both approaches are needed and important. This chapter first reviews the status of the great accelerator facilities now in operation or coming on within the decade. Next, midrange possibilities are discussed including linear colliders with the adjunct possibility of gamma-gamma colliders, muon colliders, with precursor neutrino factories, and very large hadron colliders. Finally visionary possibilities are considered including plasma and laser accelerators.

  11. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The data taken with the ANTARES neutrino telescope from 2007 to 2010, a total live time of 863 days, are used to measure the oscillation parameters of atmospheric neutrinos. Muon tracks are reconstructed with energies as low as 20 GeV. Neutrino oscillations will cause a suppression of vertical upgoing muon neutrinos of such energies crossing the Earth. The parameters determining the oscillation of atmospheric neutrinos are extracted by fitting the event rate as a function of the ratio of the estimated neutrino energy and reconstructed flight path through the Earth. Measurement contours of the oscillation parameters in a two-flavour approximation are derived. Assuming maximal mixing, a mass difference of Δ m322 = (3.1 ± 0.9) ṡ10-3eV2 is obtained, in good agreement with the world average value.

  12. CPT-Odd resonances in neutrino oscillations

    PubMed

    Barger; Pakvasa; Weiler; Whisnant

    2000-12-11

    We consider the consequences for future neutrino factory experiments of small CPT-odd interactions in neutrino oscillations. The nu(&mgr;)-->nu(&mgr;) and nu;(&mgr;)-->nu;(&mgr;) survival probabilities at a baseline L = 732 km can test for CPT-odd contributions at orders of magnitude better sensitivity than present neutrino sector limits. Interference between the CPT-violating interaction and CPT-even mass terms in the Lagrangian can lead to a resonant enhancement of the oscillation amplitude. For oscillations in matter, a simultaneous enhancement of both neutrino and antineutrino oscillation amplitudes is possible.

  13. Another look at synchronized neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Evgeny; Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    In dense neutrino backgrounds present in supernovae and in the early Universe neutrino oscillations may exhibit complex collective phenomena, such as synchronized oscillations, bipolar oscillations and spectral splits and swaps. We consider in detail possible decoherence effects on the simplest of these phenomena - synchronized neutrino oscillations that can occur in a uniform and isotropic neutrino gas. We develop an exact formalism of spectral moments of the flavour spin vectors describing such a system and then apply it to find analytical approaches that allow one to study decoherence effects on its late-time evolution. This turns out to be possible in part due to the existence of the (previously unknown) exact conservation law satisfied by the quantities describing the considered neutrino system. Interpretation of the decoherence effects in terms of neutrino wave packet separation is also given, both in the adiabatic and non-adiabatic regimes of neutrino flavour evolution.

  14. Neutrino Oscillations: Eighty Years in Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Rebecca Lyn

    In order to discuss neutrino oscillations, it is necessary to have knowledge of the developments in the field spanning the last eighty years. The existence of the neutrino was posited by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to account for the mass defect in beta decay, and to this day physicists are still endeavoring to answer fundamental questions about this enigmatic particle. The scope of this thesis includes a historical background of neutrino physics and a discussion of neutrinos and the Standard Model; subsequent to this is a discussion of the Solar Neutrino Problem, which provided the impetus for the proposal of neutrino oscillations. Bolstering the theory of neutrino oscillations (which is developed in the body of this thesis) are neutrino detector experiments and their results; these include the Homestake experiment, SNO, Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande, MINOS, and Double-Chooz. We also include relevant derivations, most particularly of the quantum mechanics of neutrino oscillations as treated in the wave packet formalism. We have amassed here the principle theories and experimental results -- a mere tip of the iceberg -- that have brought us to our current understanding of neutrino oscillations. We have also studied the quantum mechanics of neutrino oscillations and developed for ourselves the wave packet formalism describing the phenomenon.

  15. Future Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  16. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2015-07-15

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  17. FINAL NEUTRINO OSCILLATION RESULTS FROM LSND

    SciTech Connect

    W. LOUIS

    2000-10-01

    The LSND experiment provides evidence for neutrino oscillations from both the primary {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation search and the secondary {nu}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {nu}{sub e} oscillation search. At present, this remains the only evidence for appearance neutrino oscillations and implies that at least one neutrino has a mass greater than 0.4 eV/c{sup 2} and that neutrinos comprise more than 1% of the mass of the universe. The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab, which is presently under construction, will provide a definitive test of the LSND results, and if the neutrino oscillation results are confirmed, will make a precision measurement of the oscillation parameters.

  18. Nonadiabatic three-neutrino oscillations in matter

    SciTech Connect

    DOlivo, J.C.; Oteo, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Oscillations of three neutrinos in matter are analyzed by using the Magnus expansion for the time-evolution operator. We derive a simple expression for the electron-neutrino survival probability which is applied to the examination of the effect of a third neutrino on the nonadiabatic flavor transformations. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Neutrino optics and oscillations in gravitational fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lambiase, G.; Punzi, R.; Papini, G.; Scarpetta, G.

    2005-04-01

    We study the propagation of neutrinos in gravitational fields using wave functions that are exact to first order in the metric deviation. For illustrative purposes, the geometrical background is represented by the Lense-Thirring metric. We derive explicit expressions for neutrino deflection, helicity transitions, flavor oscillations, and oscillation Hamiltonian.

  20. Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Barger, V; Huber, Patrick; Marfatia, Danny

    2005-11-18

    We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data and with reactor antineutrino data at short and long baselines (from CHOOZ and KamLAND). We find that the survival probability of solar MaVaNs is independent of how the suppression of neutrino mass caused by the acceleron-matter couplings varies with density. Measurements of MeV and lower energy solar neutrinos will provide a rigorous test of the idea.

  1. Trapped ionic simulation of neutrino electromagnetic properties in neutrino oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. S.; Cai, Xiaoya; Pan, Hui

    2015-11-01

    We present an approach to study neutrino electromagnetic properties by simulating neutrino oscillation in both dense background matter and external electromagnetic field in terms of trapped coupling ions. We find that the neutrino and anti-neutrino productions can be simulated by using large enough diagonal matter potentials and external magnetic field. We further show that the transition probabilities of flavor neutrino have rich features and time scales corresponding to the neutrino magnetic moments and electric millicharges. Especially, such features and scales can be achieved by tuning the laser parameters. At last, we show that the millicharge and magnetic moments can be detected in terms of flavor neutrino transition probabilities in the trapped ion system. Our approach provides a useful clue to measure the neutrino electromagnetic properties for experimental realization.

  2. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  3. Neutrino oscillations: from an historical perspective to the present status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S.

    2016-05-01

    The history of neutrino mixing and oscillations is briefly presented. Basics of neutrino mixing and oscillations and convenient formalism of neutrino oscillations in vacuum is given. The role of neutrino in the Standard Model and the Weinberg mechanism of the generation of the Majorana neutrino masses are discussed.

  4. Neutrino oscillations: From a historical perspective to the present status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S.

    2016-07-01

    The history of neutrino mixing and oscillations is briefly presented. Basics of neutrino mixing and oscillations and convenient formalism of neutrino oscillations in vacuum are given. The role of neutrino in the Standard Model and the Weinberg mechanism of the generation of the Majorana neutrino masses are discussed.

  5. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for Earth tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  6. Collective Neutrino Oscillations in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalgar, Shashank; Abbar, Sajad; Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-10-01

    The modification of neutrino flavor oscillation probabilities in the presence of ambient neutrino gas is non-linear in nature. This leads to interesting phenomenology that is not well understood. In this paper we study the effect of removing spatial symmetry in a simplified two dimensional toy model. We focus on the linear stability analysis of the problem and note the presence of instability in both hierarchies. We also note significant modification of neutrino oscillation probabilities due to presence of ambient matter. The presence of spurious oscillations makes the study of the problem using numerical simulations very challenging. DE-SC0008142.

  7. Measurements of Neutrino Oscillation Angle θ13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuze, Masahiro

    Neutrinos exhibit an interesting phenomenon called "neutrino oscillation", in which a neutrino changes its flavor after traveling some flight length. Many experiments measured the mixing angles and mass differences, but the angle θ13 had been unmeasured due to its smallness compared to others. During 2011 and 2012, series of new-generation neutrino experiments reported positive results in θ13 search, and its value has been determined to be just below the previous upper limit. The non-zero result of θ13 is a very good news for future of neutrino physics, since it opens a possibility of measuring the CP violation phase in the lepton sector. An introduction to neutrino oscillation and latest experimental results are presented. A detail is put on Double Chooz reactor experiment, in which the author is involved.

  8. Supernova neutrino nucleosynthesis of light elements with neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takashi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Keiichi; Takamura, Akira; Hartmann, Dieter H

    2006-03-10

    Light element synthesis in supernovae through neutrino-nucleus interactions, i.e., the v process, is affected by neutrino oscillations in the supernova environment. There is a resonance of 13-mixing in the O/C layer, which increases the rates of charged-current -process reactions in the outer He-rich layer. The yields of 7Li and 11B increase by about a factor of 1.9 and 1.3, respectively, for a normal mass hierarchy and an adiabatic 13-mixing resonance, compared to those without neutrino oscillations. In the case of an inverted mass hierarchy and a nonadiabatic 13-mixing resonance, the increase in the 7Li and 11B yields is much smaller. Observations of the 7Li/11B ratio in stars showing signs of supernova enrichment could thus provide a unique test of neutrino oscillations and constrain their parameters and the mass hierarchy.

  9. Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillation in NOnuA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, Kanika

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment optimized for electron neutrino (nue) appearance in the NuMI beam, a muon neutrino (numu) source at Fermilab. It consists of two functionally identical, nearly fully-active liquid-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector (ND) at Fermilab is used to study the neutrino beam spectrum and composition before oscillation, and measure background rate to the nu e appearance search. The far detector, 810 km away in Northern Minnesota, observes the oscillated beam and is used to extract oscillation parameters from the data. NOnuA's long baseline, combined with the ability of the NuMI beam to operate in the anti-neutrino mode, makes NOnuA sensitive to the last unmeasured parameters in neutrino oscillations- mass hierarchy, CP violation and the octant of mixing angle theta23. This thesis presents the search for nue appearance in the first data collected by the NOnuA detectors from October 2013 till May 2015. Studies of the NuMI neutrino data collected in the NOnuA near detector are also presented, which show large discrepancies between the ND simulation and data. Muon-removed electron (MRE) events, constructed by replacing the muon in numu charged current interactions by a simulated electron, are used to correct the far detector nue appearance prediction for these discrepancies. In the analysis of the first data, a total of 6 nue candidate events are observed in the far detector on a background of 1, a 3.46 sigma excess, which is interpreted as strong evidence for nue appearance. The results are consistent with our expectation, based on constraints from other neutrino oscillation experiments. The result presented here differs from the officially published nu e appearance result from the NOnuA experiment where the systematic error is assumed to cover the MRE correction.

  10. Tau neutrinos favored over sterile neutrinos in atmospheric muon neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Price, L R; Smy, M; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D

    2000-11-01

    The previously published atmospheric neutrino data did not distinguish whether muon neutrinos were oscillating into tau neutrinos or sterile neutrinos, as both hypotheses fit the data. Using data recorded in 1100 live days of the Super-Kamiokande detector, we use three complementary data samples to study the difference in zenith angle distribution due to neutral currents and matter effects. We find no evidence favoring sterile neutrinos, and reject the hypothesis at the 99% confidence level. On the other hand, we find that oscillation between muon and tau neutrinos suffices to explain all the results in hand.

  11. Probing the GUT Scale with Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddine Ennadifi, Salah

    In the light of the theoretical and experimental developments in neutrino sector and their imprtance, we study its connection with new physics above the electroweak scale MEW ~ 102GeV . In particular, by considering the neutrino oscillations with the possible effective mass, we investigate, according to the experimental data, the underlying GUT scale MGUT ~ 1015GeV .

  12. Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2014-05-02

    A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

  13. Impact of Neutrino Oscillation Measurements on Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-11-30

    Neutrino oscillation data had been a big surprise to theorists, and indeed they have ongoing impact on theory. I review what the impact has been, and what measurements will have critical impact on theory in the future.

  14. Measurement of neutrino oscillations in MACRO experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musser, J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of investigating neutrino oscillations in the proposed MACRO experiment are considered. Its sensitivity taking into account the theoretical uncertainties coming from flux calculations, geomagnetic effects and propagation through matter, and the experimental limitations.

  15. Generalized Boltzmann formalism for oscillating neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Strack, P.; Burrows, A.

    2005-05-01

    In the standard approaches to neutrino transport in the simulation of core-collapse supernovas, one will often start from the classical Boltzmann equation for the neutrino's spatial, temporal, and spectral evolution. For each neutrino species, and its antiparticle, the classical density in phase space, or the associated specific intensity, will be calculated as a function of time. The neutrino radiation is coupled to matter by source and sink terms on the 'right-hand side' of the transport equation and together with the equations of hydrodynamics this set of coupled partial differential equations for classical densities describes, in principle, the evolution of core collapse and explosion. However, with the possibility of neutrino oscillations between species, a purely quantum-physical effect, how to generalize this set of Boltzmann equations for classical quantities to reflect oscillation physics has not been clear. To date, the formalisms developed have retained the character of quantum operator physics involving complex quantities and have not been suitable for easy incorporation into standard supernova codes. In this paper, we derive generalized Boltzmann equations for quasiclassical, real-valued phase-space densities that retain all the standard oscillation phenomenology, including the matter-enhanced resonant flavor conversion (Mikheev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect), neutrino self-interactions, and the interplay between decohering matter coupling and flavor oscillations. With this formalism, any code(s) that can now handle the solution of the classical Boltzmann or transport equation can easily be generalized to include neutrino oscillations in a quantum-physically consistent fashion.

  16. Establishing atmospheric neutrino oscillations with Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, T.; Kearns, E.; Shiozawa, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we review the discovery of atmospheric neutrino oscillation by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. This review outlines the sequence of observations and their associated publications that solved the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and established the existence of neutrino oscillations with nearly maximal mixing of muon neutrinos and tau neutrinos. We also discuss subsequent and ongoing studies that use atmospheric neutrinos to continue to reveal the nature of the neutrino.

  17. Measuring Neutrino Oscillations with Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2007-10-26

    Since the first direct observations of antineutrino events by Reines and Cowan in the 1950's, nuclear reactors have been an important tool in the study of neutrino properties. More recently, the study of neutrino oscillations has been a very active area of research. The pioneering observation of oscillations by the KamLAND experiment has provided crucial information on the neutrino mixing matrix. New experiments to study the remaining unknown mixing angle are currently under development. These recent studies and potential future developments will be discussed.

  18. Testing quantum gravity via cosmogenic neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Joy

    2005-01-15

    Implications of some proposed theories of quantum gravity for neutrino flavor oscillations are explored within the context of modified dispersion relations of special relativity. In particular, approximate expressions for Planck scale-induced deviations from the standard oscillation length are obtained as functions of neutrino mass, energy, and propagation distance. Grounding on these expressions, it is pointed out that, in general, even those deviations that are suppressed by the second power of the Planck energy may be observable for ultra-high-energy neutrinos, provided they originate at cosmological distances. In fact, for neutrinos in the highest energy range of EeV to ZeV, deviations that are suppressed by as much as the seventh power of the Planck energy may become observable. Accordingly, realistic possibilities of experimentally verifying these deviations by means of the next generation neutrino detectors--such as IceCube and ANITA--are investigated.

  19. Spectrometry of the Earth using neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketa, Akimichi; Rott, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Neutrinos have favorable properties for measuring the elemental composition deep inside the earth's interior. First, they propagate a long distance almost undisturbed through the earth due to their weak interactions with matter. Secondly, neutrino oscillations in matter are sensitive to the electron density of the medium traversed by them. Therefore, neutrinos can be used for a probe to determine the average atomic mass ratio Z/A of the earth's core by comparing with the earth's nucleus density distribution that is inferred from seismic observations. There is a little uncertainty in densities of the earth's core, but our knowledge of its main light element is still not fixed. With the advent of the new-generation megaton neutrino detectors, neutrino oscillation mass spectrometry will allow us to constrain directly the light elements in the earth's outer core. We report the detail of this novel technic and the sensitivity study.

  20. Neutrino oscillation above a black hole accretion disk

    SciTech Connect

    Malkus, A.; Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Surman, R.

    2015-05-15

    We examine neutrino oscillations in the context of an accretion disk surrounding a black hole. Because accretion disks produce large quantities of neutrinos, they may be home to interesting neutrino oscillation as well. We model accretion disks associated with stellar collapse for the sake of understanding neutrino oscillations. We find that the neutrino oscillations include phenomena seen in the protoneutron star setting as well as phenomena not seen elsewhere.

  1. Connecting leptonic unitarity triangle to neutrino oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hong-Jian; Xu, Xun-Jie

    2014-04-01

    The leptonic unitarity triangle (LUT) provides a geometric description of CP violations in the lepton-neutrino sector and is directly measurable in principle. In this paper, we reveal that the angles in the LUT have definite physical meaning, and demonstrate the exact connection of the LUT to neutrino oscillations. For the first time, we prove that these leptonic angles act as phase shifts in neutrino oscillations, by shifting Δm2L/2E to Δm2L/2E +α, where (L,E,α) denote the baseline length, neutrino energy and corresponding angle of the LUT. Each LUT has three independent parameters and contains only partial information of the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) matrix. We demonstrate that the partial information in each LUT can describe the corresponding neutrino oscillation. Hence, for the first time, we uncover that any given kind of neutrino oscillations contains at most three (rather than four) independent degrees of freedom from the PMNS matrix, and this may provide a cleaner way for fitting the corresponding oscillation data.

  2. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  3. Relic neutrino decoupling with flavour oscillations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Salas, Pablo F.; Pastor, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    We study the decoupling process of neutrinos in the early universe in the presence of three-flavour oscillations. The evolution of the neutrino spectra is found by solving the corresponding momentum-dependent kinetic equations for the neutrino density matrix, including for the first time the proper collision integrals for both diagonal and off-diagonal elements. This improved calculation modifies the evolution of the off-diagonal elements of the neutrino density matrix and changes the deviation from equilibrium of the frozen neutrino spectra. However, it does not vary the contribution of neutrinos to the cosmological energy density in the form of radiation, usually expressed in terms of the effective number of neutrinos, Neff. We find a value of Neff = 3.045, in agreement with previous theoretical calculations and consistent with the latest analysis of Planck data. This result does not depend on the ordering of neutrino masses. We also consider the effect of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions (NSI), predicted in many theoretical models where neutrinos acquire mass. For two sets of NSI parameters allowed by present data, we find that Neff can be reduced down to 3.040 or enhanced up to 3.059.

  4. Three-Neutrino Oscillation Parameters: Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Montanino, D.; Palazzo, A.

    Neutrino oscillation searches using a variety of sources (solar, atmospheric, accelerator and reactor neutrinos) have established a standard three-neutrino (3ν) mass-mixing framework and five of its parameters: the two squared mass gaps (δm2, Δm2) and the three mixing angles (θ12, θ13, θ23). At present, a single class of experiments dominates each of these parameters, while only combined analyses of various (eventually all) data sets are needed to constrain the still unknown mass hierarchy [sign(Δm2)], θ23 octant and CP-violating phase δ. We review the status of the known and unknown parameters (as emerging from a global analysis of the oscillation data), investigate the correlations and stability of the such parameters within different combinations of data sets, and discuss the near-term prospects in this field.

  5. Analysis Tool for Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.; Latimer, D. C.

    2008-03-13

    Of all the neutrino oscillation data, the atmospheric data is statistically the most important. It is also the most complex to analyze. This is because the source is cosmic rays colliding with the atmosphere or the rock in the Earth and, most importantly, Super-K is the only experiment in which the angle of the neutrino is approximately determined by a measurement of the direction of the created and measured lepton. For pedagogic purposes, we first derive how such an analysis is done. We then derive a new computationally efficient but still quantitative way of doing the analysis and we present some results for a two neutrino model.

  6. The natural parameterization of cosmic neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Andrea; Vissani, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The natural parameterization of vacuum oscillations in three neutrino flavors is studied. Compact and exact relations of its three parameters with the ordinary three mixing angles and CP-violating phase are obtained. Its usefulness is illustrated by considering various applications: the study of the flavor ratio and of its uncertainties, the comparison of expectations and observations in the flavor triangle, and the intensity of the signal due to Glashow resonance. The results in the literature are easily reproduced and in particular the recently obtained agreement of the observations of IceCube with the hypothesis of cosmic neutrino oscillations is confirmed. It is argued that a Gaussian treatment of the errors appropriately describes the effects of the uncertainties on the neutrino oscillation parameters.

  7. OPERA neutrino oscillation search: Status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, Yu.

    2016-07-01

    OPERA is a long-baseline neutrino experiment at the Gran Sasso laboratory (LNGS) designed to search for ν_{{μ}}^{} → ν_{{τ}}^{} oscillations in a direct appearance mode on an event by event basis. OPERA took data in 2008-2012 with the CNGS neutrino beam from CERN. The data analysis is ongoing, with the goal of establishing ν_{{τ}}^{} appearance with a high significance. Complementary studies of the ν_{{μ}}^{} → ν_{{e}}^{} oscillations and atmospheric muons fluxes were performed as well. Current results of the experiment are presented and perspectives discussed.

  8. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  9. Time-Dependent Collective Neutrino Oscillations in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbar, Sajad; Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-10-01

    Neutrinos can experience self-induced flavor conversion in core-collapse supernovae due to neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. Previously a stationary supernova model, the so called ``neutrino bulb model,'' was used exclusively to study collective neutrino oscillations in the core-collapse supernova. We show that even a small time-dependent perturbation in neutrino fluxes on the surface of the proto-neutron star can lead to fast varying collective oscillations at large radii. This result calls for time-dependent supernova models for the study of collective neutrino oscillations. This work was supported by DOE EPSCoR Grant DE-SC0008142 at UNM.

  10. Dark matter, baryogenesis and neutrino oscillations from right-handed neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canetti, Laurent; Drewes, Marco; Frossard, Tibor; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    We show that, leaving aside accelerated cosmic expansion, all experimental data in high energy physics that are commonly agreed to require physics beyond the Standard Model can be explained when completing the model by three right-handed neutrinos that can be searched for using present-day experimental techniques. The model that realizes this scenario is known as the Neutrino Minimal Standard Model (νMSM). In this article we give a comprehensive summary of all known constraints in the νMSM, along with a pedagogical introduction to the model. We present the first complete quantitative study of the parameter space of the model where no physics beyond the νMSM is needed to simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. The key new point of our analysis is leptogenesis after sphaleron freeze-out, which leads to resonant dark matter production, thus evading the constraints on sterile neutrino dark matter from structure formation and x-ray searches. This requires one to track the time evolution of left- and right-handed neutrino abundances from hot big bang initial conditions down to temperatures below the QCD scale. We find that the interplay of resonant amplifications, CP-violating flavor oscillations, scatterings, and decays leads to a number of previously unknown constraints on the sterile neutrino properties. We furthermore reanalyze bounds from past collider experiments and big bang nucleosynthesis in the face of recent evidence for a nonzero neutrino mixing angle θ13. We combine all our results with existing constraints on dark matter properties from astrophysics and cosmology. Our results provide a guideline for future experimental searches for sterile neutrinos. A summary of the constraints on sterile neutrino masses and mixings has appeared in Canetti et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 061801 (2013)PRLTAO0031-9007]. In this article we provide all details of our calculations and give constraints on other model

  11. Evidence for neutrino oscillations in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Alysia Diane

    2004-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a large-volume heavy water Cerenkov detector designed to resolve the solar neutrino problem. SNO observes charged-current interactions with electron neutrinos, neutral-current interactions with all active neutrinos, and elastic-scattering interactions primarily with electron neutrinos with some sensitivity to other flavors. This dissertation presents an analysis of the solar neutrino flux observed in SNO in the second phase of operation, while ~2 tonnes of salt (NaCl) were dissolved in the heavy water. The dataset here represents 391 live days of data. Only the events above a visible energy threshold of 5.5 MeV and inside a fiducial volume within 550 cm of the center of the detector are studied. The neutrino flux observed via the charged-current interaction is [1.71 ± 0.065(stat.)±$0.065\\atop{0.068}$(sys.)±0.02(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, via the elastic-scattering interaction is [2.21±0.22(stat.)±$0.12\\atop{0.11}$(sys.)±0.01(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1, and via the neutral-current interaction is [5.05±0.23(stat.)±$0.31\\atop{0.37}$(sys.)±0.06(theor.)] x 106cm-2s-1. The electron-only flux seen via the charged-current interaction is more than 7σ below the total active flux seen via the neutral-current interaction, providing strong evidence that neutrinos are undergoing flavor transformation as they travel from the core of the Sun to the Earth. The most likely origin of the flavor transformation is matter-induced flavor oscillation.

  12. Neutrino oscillations in noisy media

    SciTech Connect

    Loreti, F.N.; Balantekin, A.B.

    1994-05-27

    The authors develop the Redfield equation for delta-correlated gaussian noise and apply it to the case of two neutrino flavor or spin precession in the presence of a noisy matter density or magnetic field, respectively. The criteria under which physical fluctuations can be well approximated by the delta-correlated gaussian noise for the above cases are examined. Current limits on the possible neutrino magnetic moment and solar magnetic field suggest that a reasonably noisy solar magnetic field would not appreciably affect the solar electron neutrino flux. However, if the solar electron density has fluctuations of a few percent of the local density and a small enough correlation length, the MSW effect is suppressed for a range of parameters.

  13. KamLAND's precision neutrino oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decowski, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    The KamLAND experiment started operation in the Spring of 2002 and is operational to this day. The experiment observes signals from electron antineutrinos from distant nuclear reactors. The program, spanning more than a decade, allowed the determination of LMA-MSW as the solution to the solar neutrino transformation results (under the assumption of CPT invariance) and the measurement of various neutrino oscillation parameters. In particular, the solar mass-splitting Δ m212 was determined to high precision. Besides the study of neutrino oscillation, KamLAND started the investigation of geologically produced antineutrinos (geo-ν‾e). The collaboration also reported on a variety of other topics related to particle and astroparticle physics.

  14. Spectrometry of the Earth using Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Rott, C; Taketa, A; Bose, D

    2015-01-01

    The unknown constituents of the interior of our home planet have provoked the human imagination and driven scientific exploration. We herein demonstrate that large neutrino detectors could be used in the near future to significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's inner chemical composition. Neutrinos, which are naturally produced in the atmosphere, traverse the Earth and undergo oscillations that depend on the Earth's electron density. The Earth's chemical composition can be determined by combining observations from large neutrino detectors with seismic measurements of the Earth's matter density. We present a method that will allow us to perform a measurement that can distinguish between composition models of the outer core. We show that the next-generation large-volume neutrino detectors can provide sufficient sensitivity to reject extreme cases of outer core composition. In the future, dedicated instruments could be capable of distinguishing between specific Earth composition models and thereby reshape our understanding of the inner Earth in previously unimagined ways. PMID:26489447

  15. Collective neutrino oscillations in nonspherical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg

    2008-08-01

    The rich phenomenology of collective neutrino oscillations has been studied only in one-dimensional or spherically symmetric systems. Motivated by the nonspherical example of coalescing neutron stars, presumably the central engines of short gamma-ray bursts, we use the Liouville equation to formulate the problem for general source geometries. Assuming the neutrino ensemble displays self-maintained coherence, the problem once more becomes effectively one-dimensional along the streamlines of the overall neutrino flux. This approach for the first time provides a formal definition of the 'single-angle approximation' frequently used for supernova neutrinos and allows for a natural generalization to nonspherical geometries. We study the explicit example of a disk-shaped source as a proxy for coalescing neutron stars.

  16. Spectrometry of the Earth using Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Rott, C; Taketa, A; Bose, D

    2015-10-22

    The unknown constituents of the interior of our home planet have provoked the human imagination and driven scientific exploration. We herein demonstrate that large neutrino detectors could be used in the near future to significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's inner chemical composition. Neutrinos, which are naturally produced in the atmosphere, traverse the Earth and undergo oscillations that depend on the Earth's electron density. The Earth's chemical composition can be determined by combining observations from large neutrino detectors with seismic measurements of the Earth's matter density. We present a method that will allow us to perform a measurement that can distinguish between composition models of the outer core. We show that the next-generation large-volume neutrino detectors can provide sufficient sensitivity to reject extreme cases of outer core composition. In the future, dedicated instruments could be capable of distinguishing between specific Earth composition models and thereby reshape our understanding of the inner Earth in previously unimagined ways.

  17. Higgs Boson Mass, Neutrino Oscillations and Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Shafi, Qaisar

    2008-11-23

    Finding the Standard Model scalar (Higgs) boson is arguably the single most important mission of the LHC. I review predictions for the Higgs boson mass based on stability and perturbativity arguments, taking into account neutrino oscillations. Primordial inflation based on the Coleman-Weinberg potential is briefly discussed.

  18. High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, T. R.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densam, C.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Wildner, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoni, S.; Hansen, C.; Benedetto, E.; Jensen, E.; Kosmicki, A.; Martini, M.; Osborne, J.; Prior, G.; Stora, T.; Melo Mendonca, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Waaijer, C.; Cupial, P.; Chancé, A.; Longhin, A.; Payet, J.; Zito, M.; Baussan, E.; Bobeth, C.; Bouquerel, E.; Dracos, M.; Gaudiot, G.; Lepers, B.; Osswald, F.; Poussot, P.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Wurtz, J.; Zeter, V.; Bielski, J.; Kozien, M.; Lacny, L.; Skoczen, B.; Szybinski, B.; Ustrycka, A.; Wroblewski, A.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Balint, P.; Fourel, C.; Giraud, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Latrasse, L.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Mitrofanov, S.; Loiselet, M.; Keutgen, Th.; Delbar, Th.; Debray, F.; Trophine, C.; Veys, S.; Daversin, C.; Zorin, V.; Izotov, I.; Skalyga, V.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; De Angelis, G.; Prete, G.; Collazuol, G.; Laveder, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Mezzetto, M.; Signorini, C.; Vardaci, E.; Di Nitto, A.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Moro, R.; Palladino, V.; Gelli, N.; Berkovits, D.; Hass, M.; Hirsh, T. Y.; Schaumann, M.; Stahl, A.; Wehner, J.; Bross, A.; Kopp, J.; Neuffer, D.; Wands, R.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, P.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Donini, A.; Ghosh, T.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Mena, O.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Agostino, L.; Buizza-Avanzini, M.; Marafini, M.; Patzak, T.; Tonazzo, A.; Duchesneau, D.; Mosca, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Akhmedov, E.; Blennow, M.; Lindner, M.; Schwetz, T.; Fernández Martinez, E.; Maltoni, M.; Menéndez, J.; Giunti, C.; González García, M. C.; Salvado, J.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Li, T.; López Pavón, J.; Orme, C.; Pascoli, S.; Meloni, D.; Tang, J.; Winter, W.; Ohlsson, T.; Zhang, H.; Scotto-Lavina, L.; Terranova, F.; Bonesini, M.; Tortora, L.; Alekou, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Kurup, A.; Jenner, L. J.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Pozimski, J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Beard, K.; Bogacz, A.; Berg, J. S.; Stratakis, D.; Witte, H.; Snopok, P.; Bliss, N.; Cordwell, M.; Moss, A.; Pattalwar, S.; Apollonio, M.

    2013-02-01

    The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fréjus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of μ+ and μ- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt magnetized iron neutrino detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular He6 and Ne18, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fréjus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the physics reach of each facility, in particular for the measurement of CP violation in the lepton sector, and estimated the cost of construction. These have demonstrated that the best facility to build is the Neutrino Factory. However, if a powerful proton driver is constructed for another purpose or if the MEMPHYS detector is built for astroparticle physics, the Super Beam also becomes very attractive.

  19. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  20. Some comments on high precision study of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenky, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    I discuss here some problems connected with the high precision study of neutrino oscillations. In the general case of n-neutrino mixing I derive a convenient expression for transition probability in which only independent terms (and mass-squared differences) enter. For three-neutrino mixing I discuss a problem of a definition of a large (atmospheric) neutrino mass-squared difference. I comment also possibilities to reveal the character of neutrino mass spectrum in future reactor neutrino experiments.

  1. Neutral current neutrino oscillation via quantum field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettefaghi, M. M.; Askaripour Ravari, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Neutrino and anti-neutrino states coming from the neutral current or Z0 decay are blind with respect to the flavor. The neutrino oscillation is observed and formulated when its flavor is known. However, it has been shown that we can see neutrino oscillation pattern for Z0 decay neutrinos provided that both neutrino and anti-neutrino are detected. In this paper, we restudy this oscillation via quantum field theory approach. Through this approach, we find that the oscillation pattern ceases if the distance between the detectors is larger than the coherence length, while both neutrino and antineutrino states may be coherent. Also the uncertainty of source (region of Z0 decay) does not have any role in the coherency of neutrino and antineutrino.

  2. Oscillations of very low energy atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    There are several new features in the production, oscillations, and detection of the atmospheric neutrinos of low energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The flavor ratio r of muon to electron neutrino fluxes is substantially smaller than 2 and decreases with energy, a significant part of events is due to the decay of invisible muons at rest, etc. Oscillations in a two-layer medium (atmosphere-Earth) should be taken into account. We derive analytical and semianalytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities of these 'sub-sub-GeV' neutrinos. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed, and the dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle {theta}{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing, and the CP-violation phase are studied. We find that variations of {theta}{sub 23} in the presently allowed region change the number of e-like events by about 15%-20% as well as lead to distortion of the energy spectrum. The 1-3 mixing and CP violation can lead to {approx}10% effects. Detailed study of the sub-sub-GeV neutrinos will be possible in future megaton-scale detectors.

  3. Short distance neutrino oscillations with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminata, A.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; di Noto, L.; Durero, M.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jonquères, N.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Veyssière, C.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Borexino detector has convincingly shown its outstanding performances in the low energy, sub-MeV regime through its unprecedented accomplishments in the solar and geo-neutrinos detection. These performances make it the ideal tool to accomplish a state-of-the-art experiment able to test unambiguously the long-standing issue of the existence of a sterile neutrino, as suggested by the several anomalous results accumulated over the past two decades, i.e. the outputs of the LSND and Miniboone experiments, the results of the source calibration of the two Gallium solar neutrino experiments, and the recently hinted reactor anomaly. The SOX project will exploit two sources, based on Chromium and Cerium, respectively, which deployed under the experiment, in a location foreseen on purpose at the time of the construction of the detector, will emit two intense beams of neutrinos (Cr) and anti-neutrinos (Ce). Interacting in the active volume of the liquid scintillator, each beam would create an unmistakable spatial wave pattern in case of oscillation of the νe (or ν̅e) into the sterile state: such a pattern would be the smoking gun proving the existence of the new sterile member of the neutrino family. Otherwise, its absence will allow setting a very stringent limit on its existence.

  4. Quantum correlations in terms of neutrino oscillation probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alok, Ashutosh Kumar; Banerjee, Subhashish; Uma Sankar, S.

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino oscillations provide evidence for the mode entanglement of neutrino mass eigenstates in a given flavour eigenstate. Given this mode entanglement, it is pertinent to consider the relation between the oscillation probabilities and other quantum correlations. In this work, we show that all the well-known quantum correlations, such as the Bell's inequality, are directly related to the neutrino oscillation probabilities. The results of the neutrino oscillation experiments, which measure the neutrino survival probability to be less than unity, imply Bell's inequality violation.

  5. Resolving Standard and Nonstandard CP Violation Phases in Neutrino Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, A. M.; Minakata, H.; Uchinami, S.; Nunokawa, H.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.

    2010-03-30

    Neutrino oscillations can exhibit extra CP violation effects, beyond those expected from the standard Kobayashi-Maskawa phase delta, if non-standard neutrino interactions are at play. We show that it is possible to disentangle the two CP violating effects by measuring muon neutrino appearance using a near-far two detector setting in a neutrino factory experiment.

  6. Studying neutrino oscillations using quasi-elastic events in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaratunga, Sujeewa Terasita

    2008-02-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search), is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to search for neutrino oscillations using two detectors at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, IL (Near Detector) and Soudan, MN (Far Detector). It will study vμ → vτ oscillations and make a measurement on the oscillation parameters, Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin223, via a vμ beam made at Fermilab. Charge current neutrino interactions in the MINOS detectors are of three types: quasi-elastic scattering (QEL), resonance scattering (RES) and deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Of these, quasi-elastic scattering leaves the cleanest signal with just one μ and one proton in the final state, thus rendering the reconstruction of the neutrino energy more accurate. This thesis will outline a method to separate QEL events from the others in the two detectors and perform a calculation of Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin223 using those events. The period under consideration was May 2005 to February 2006. The number of observed quasi-elastic events with energies below 10 GeV was 29, where the expected number was 60 ± 3. A fit to the energy distribution of these events gives Δm$2\\atop{23}$ = 2.91$+0.49\\atop{-0.53}$(stat)$+0.08\\atop{-0.09}$(sys) x 10-3 eV2 and sin223 = 0.990-0.180(stat)-0.030(sys).

  7. A combined muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino oscillation search at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, Jocelyn Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    MiniBooNE seeks to corroborate or refute the unconfirmed oscillation result from the LSND experiment. If correct, the result implies that a new kind of massive neutrino, with no weak interactions, participates in neutrino oscillations. MiniBooNE searches for vμ → ve oscillations with the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 8 GeV beam line, which produces a vμ beam with an average energy of ~ 0.8 GeV and an intrinsic ve content of 0.4%. The neutrino detector is a 6.1 m radius sphere filled with CH2, viewed by 1540 photo-multiplier tubes, and located 541 m downstream from the source. This work focuses on the estimation of systematic errors associated with the neutrino flux and neutrino interaction cross section predictions, and in particular, on constraining these uncertainties using in-situ MiniBooNE vμ charged current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering data. A data set with ~ 100,000 events is identified, with 91% CCQE purity. This data set is used to measure several parameters of the CCQE cross section: the axial mass, the Fermi momentum, the binding energy, and the functional dependence of the axial form factor on four-momentum transfer squared. Constraints on the vμ and ve fluxes are derived using the vμ CCQE data set. A Monte Carlo study of a combined vμ disappearance and ve appearance oscillation fit is presented, which improves the vμ → ve oscillation sensitivity of MiniBooNE with respect to a ve appearance-only fit by 1.2-1.5σ, depending on the value of Δm2.

  8. Prospects for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.

    1991-01-01

    Several recent development have motivated consideration of neutrino experiments located hundreds or thousand of kilometers from an accelerator. The motivations and experimental challenges for such experiments are examined. Three proposals for using the Fermilab Main Injector are compared. The requirements on mass, distance and resolution for an ideal'' detector for such an experimental are considered.

  9. Prospects for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.

    1991-12-31

    Several recent development have motivated consideration of neutrino experiments located hundreds or thousand of kilometers from an accelerator. The motivations and experimental challenges for such experiments are examined. Three proposals for using the Fermilab Main Injector are compared. The requirements on mass, distance and resolution for an ``ideal`` detector for such an experimental are considered.

  10. A study of muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingjun

    2009-03-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations (neutrino changing from one flavor to another) has provided compelling evidence that the neutrinos have non-zero masses and that leptons mix, which is not part of the original Standard Model of particle physics. The theoretical framework that describes neutrino oscillation involves two mass scales (Δmatm2 and Δmsol2), three mixing angles (θ12, θ23, and θ13) and one CP violating phase (δCP). Both mass scales and two of the mixing angles (θ12 and θ23) have been measured by many neutrino experiments. The mixing angle θ13, which is believed to be very small, remains unknown. The current best limit on θ13 comes from the CHOOZ experiment: θ13 < 11° at 90% C.L. at the atmospheric mass scale. δCP is also unknown today. MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino experiment based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a muon neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far Detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can obtain parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. MINOS has published results on the precise measurement of Δmatm2 and θ23 through the disappearance of muon neutrinos in the Far Detector and on a search for sterile neutrinos by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far Detector. MINOS also has the potential to improve the limit on the neutrino mixing angle θ13 or make the first measurement of its value by searching for an electron neutrino appearance signal in the Far Detector. This is the focus of the study presented in this thesis. We developed a neural network based algorithm to

  11. NEUTRINOS OSCILLATIONS WITH LONG-BASE-LINE BEAMS:. Past, Present and very near Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanco, L.

    2011-03-01

    We overview the status of the studies on neutrino oscillations with accelerators at the present running experiments. Past and present results enlighten the path towards the observation of massive neutrinos and the settling of their oscillations. The very near future may still have addiction from the outcome of the on-going experiments. OPERA is chosen as a relevant example justified by the very recent results released.

  12. Neutrino oscillations with MINOS and MINOS+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, L. H.

    2016-07-01

    The MINOS experiment ran from 2003 until 2012 and collected a data sample including 10.71 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT) of beam neutrinos, 3.36 ×1020 POT of beam antineutrinos and an atmospheric neutrino exposure of 37.88 kt yrs. The final measurement of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters, Δ m322 and θ23, came from a full three flavour oscillation analysis of the combined CC νμ and CC ν‾μ beam and atmospheric samples and the CC νe and CC ν‾e appearance samples. This analysis yielded the most precise measurement of the atmospheric mass splitting Δ m322 performed to date. The results are | Δ m322 | = [ 2.28- 2.46 ] ×10-3 eV2 (68%) and sin2 ⁡θ23 = 0.35- 0.65 (90%) in the normal hierarchy, and | Δ m322 | = [ 2.32- 2.53 ] ×10-3 eV2 (68%) and sin2 ⁡θ23 = 0.34- 0.67 (90%) in the inverted hierarchy. The successor to MINOS in the NOνA era at FNAL, MINOS+, is now collecting data mostly in the 3- 10 GeV region, and an analysis of νμ disappearance using the first 2.99 ×1020 POT of data produced results very consistent with those from MINOS. Future data will further test the standard neutrino oscillation paradigm and allow for improved searches for exotic phenomena including sterile neutrinos, large extra dimensions and non-standard interactions.

  13. Neutrino-oscillation search with cosmic-ray neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D.S.; Gaisser, T.K.; Mann, A.K.; Shrock, R.E.

    1982-10-01

    It is shown that a sensitive search for neutrino oscillations involving more flavors than just nu/sub e/ and nu/sub ..mu../ is provided by measurement of the ratio of the total interaction rates of upward- and downward-going cosmic-ray neutrinos within a massive (approx. 10 kiloton) detector. Assuming mixing between all pairs of nu/sub e/, nu/sub ..mu../ and nu/sub tau/, the experiment is capable of observing time-averaging probabilities < P/sub e tau/>/sub t/ of magnitude set by mixing strengths corresponding to, e.g., the d- to s-quark mixing strength, and of reaching the limit ..delta..m/sub ij//sup 2/ identical with vertical bar m/sub i//sup 2/-m/sub j//sup 2/ vertical bar approx. = 10/sup -4/ eV/sup 2/, where m/sub i/, m/sub j/ are neutrino mass eigenstates, and P/sub e tau/ and p/sub ..mu.. tau/ are the probabilities for nu/sub e/ and nu/sub ..mu../, respectively, to oscillate into nu/sub tau/ after traversing a distance L approx. = diameter of the earth.

  14. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-15

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming x{sub F} scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments – NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) – are reviewed.

  15. Oscillation of Very Low Energy Atmospheric Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Orlando L. G.

    2010-03-30

    We discuss the oscillation effects of sub-sub-GeV atmospheric neutrinos, the sample with energies E < or approx. 100 MeV. The energy spectra of the e-like events in water Cherenkov detectors are computed and dependence of the spectra on the 2-3 mixing angle, theta{sub 23}, the 1-3 mixing and CP-violation phase are studied.

  16. Bayesian global analysis of neutrino oscillation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Johannes; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, Michele; Schwetz, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We perform a Bayesian analysis of current neutrino oscillation data. When estimating the oscillation parameters we find that the results generally agree with those of the χ 2 method, with some differences involving s 23 2 and CP-violating effects. We discuss the additional subtleties caused by the circular nature of the CP-violating phase, and how it is possible to obtain correlation coefficients with s 23 2 . When performing model comparison, we find that there is no significant evidence for any mass ordering, any octant of s 23 2 or a deviation from maximal mixing, nor the presence of CP-violation.

  17. Limits on neutrino oscillations in the Fermilab narrow band beam

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, E.B.; Jacques, P.F.; Kalelkar, M.; Koller, E.L.; Plano, R.J.; Stamer, P.E.; Baker, N.J.; Connolly, P.L.; Kahn, S.A.; Murtagh, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A search for neutrino oscillations was made using the Fermilab narrow-band neutrino beam and the 15 ft. bubble chamber. No positive signal for neutrino oscillations was observed. Limits were obtained for mixing angles and neutrino mass differences for nu/sub ..mu../ ..-->.. nu/sub e/, nu/sub ..mu../ ..-->.. nu/sub tau/, nu/sub e/ ..-->.. nu/sub e/. 5 refs.

  18. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    DOE PAGES

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  19. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  20. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations at Δm2 > 0.1 eV2

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Ryan Benton

    2007-11-01

    The evidence is compelling that neutrinos undergo flavor change as they propagate. In recent years, experiments have observed this phenomenon of neutrino oscillations using disparate neutrino sources: the sun, fission reactors, accelerators, and secondary cosmic rays. The standard model of particle physics needs only simple extensions - neutrino masses and mixing - to accommodate all neutrino oscillation results to date, save one. The 3.8σ-significant $\\bar{v}$e excess reported by the LSND collaboration is consistent with $\\bar{v}$μ →$\\bar{v}$e oscillations with a mass-squared splitting of Δm2 ~ 1 eV2. This signal, which has not been independently verified, is inconsistent with other oscillation evidence unless more daring standard model extensions (e.g. sterile neutrinos) are considered.

  1. Investigation of Beam Loading Effects for the Neutrino Factory Muon Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    J. Pozimski,M. Aslaninejad,C. Bontoiu,S. Berg,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    The International design study (IDS) study showed that a Neutrino Factory [1] seems to be the most promising candidate for the next phase of high precision neutrino oscillation experiments. One part of the increased precision is due to the fact that in a Neutrino Factory the decay of muons produces a neutrino beam with narrow energy distribution and divergence. The effect of beam loading on the energy distribution of the muon beam in the Neutrino Factory decay rings has been investigated numerically. The simulations have been performed using the baseline accelerator design including cavities for different number of bunch trains and bunch train timing. A detailed analysis of the beam energy distribution expected is given together with a discussion of the energy spread produced by the gutter acceleration in the FFAG and the implications for the neutrino oscillation experiments will be presented.

  2. Possible Neutrino-Antineutrino Oscillation Under Gravity and its Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2008-09-01

    We show that under gravity the effective masses for neutrino and antineutrino are different which opens a possible window of neutrino-antineutrino oscillation even if the rest masses of the corresponding eigenstates are same. This is due to CPT violation and possible to demonstrate if the neutrino mass eigenstates are expressed as a combination of neutrino and antineutrino eigenstates, as of the neutral kaon system, with the plausible breaking of lepton number conservation. In early universe, in presence of various lepton number violating processes, this oscillation might lead to neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry which resulted baryogenesis from the B-L symmetry by electro-weak sphaleron processes. On the other hand, for Majorana neutrinos, this oscillation is expected to affect the inner edge of neutrino dominated accretion disks around a compact object by influencing the neutrino sphere which controls the accretion dynamics, and then the related type-II supernova evolution and the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  3. Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

    2008-02-03

    This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

  4. Spectrometry of the Earth using Neutrino Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Rott, C.; Taketa, A.; Bose, D.

    2015-01-01

    The unknown constituents of the interior of our home planet have provoked the human imagination and driven scientific exploration. We herein demonstrate that large neutrino detectors could be used in the near future to significantly improve our understanding of the Earth’s inner chemical composition. Neutrinos, which are naturally produced in the atmosphere, traverse the Earth and undergo oscillations that depend on the Earth’s electron density. The Earth’s chemical composition can be determined by combining observations from large neutrino detectors with seismic measurements of the Earth’s matter density. We present a method that will allow us to perform a measurement that can distinguish between composition models of the outer core. We show that the next-generation large-volume neutrino detectors can provide sufficient sensitivity to reject extreme cases of outer core composition. In the future, dedicated instruments could be capable of distinguishing between specific Earth composition models and thereby reshape our understanding of the inner Earth in previously unimagined ways. PMID:26489447

  5. Spectrometry of the Earth using Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rott, C.; Taketa, A.; Bose, D.

    2015-10-01

    The unknown constituents of the interior of our home planet have provoked the human imagination and driven scientific exploration. We herein demonstrate that large neutrino detectors could be used in the near future to significantly improve our understanding of the Earth’s inner chemical composition. Neutrinos, which are naturally produced in the atmosphere, traverse the Earth and undergo oscillations that depend on the Earth’s electron density. The Earth’s chemical composition can be determined by combining observations from large neutrino detectors with seismic measurements of the Earth’s matter density. We present a method that will allow us to perform a measurement that can distinguish between composition models of the outer core. We show that the next-generation large-volume neutrino detectors can provide sufficient sensitivity to reject extreme cases of outer core composition. In the future, dedicated instruments could be capable of distinguishing between specific Earth composition models and thereby reshape our understanding of the inner Earth in previously unimagined ways.

  6. Velocity-induced neutrino oscillation and its possible implications for long baseline neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Amit Dutta; Majumdar, Debasish

    2015-12-01

    If the three types of active neutrinos possess different maximum attainable velocities and the neutrino eigenstates in the velocity basis are different from those in the flavor (and mass) basis, then this will induce a flavor oscillation in addition to the normal mass-flavor oscillation. Here we study such an oscillation scenario in three neutrino framework including also the matter effect and apply our results to demonstrate its consequences for long baseline (LBL) neutrinos. We also predict the possible signatures in terms of yields in a possible LBL neutrino experiment.

  7. Neutrino oscillations in low density medium.

    PubMed

    Ioannisian, A N; Smirnov, A Y

    2004-12-10

    We have solved the evolution equation for neutrinos in a low density medium, Voscillation probabilities have been derived in the lowest order in epsilon which are valid for an arbitrary density profile. The formulas can be applied for propagation of the solar and supernova neutrinos in matter of the Earth, substantially simplifying numerical calculations. Using these formulas we study sensitivity of the oscillations to structures of the density profile situated at different distances d from a detector. For the mass-to-flavor transitions, e.g., nu(2)-->nu(e), we have found the attenuation effect: a decrease of the sensitivity to remote structures, d>l(nu)E/DeltaE, where l(nu) is the oscillation length and DeltaE/E is the energy resolution of a detector.

  8. Neutrino physics with accelerator driven subcritical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Evslin, Jarah; Zhao, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Accelerator driven system (ADS) subcritical nuclear reactors are under development around the world. They will be intense sources of free, 30-55 MeV μ + decay at rest {overline{ν}}_{μ } . These ADS reactor neutrinos can provide a robust test of the LSND anomaly and a precise measurement of the leptonic CP-violating phase δ, including sign(cos(δ)). The first phase of many ADS programs includes the construction of a low energy, high intensity proton or deuteron accelerator, which can yield competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos.

  9. New Ambiguity in Probing CP Violation in Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Miranda, O G; Tórtola, M; Valle, J W F

    2016-08-01

    If neutrinos get mass via the seesaw mechanism the mixing matrix describing neutrino oscillations can be effectively nonunitary. We show that in this case the neutrino appearance probabilities involve a new CP phase ϕ associated with nonunitarity. This leads to an ambiguity in extracting the "standard" three-neutrino phase δ_{CP}, which can survive even after neutrino and antineutrino channels are combined. Its existence should be taken into account in the planning of any oscillation experiment aiming at a robust measurement of δ_{CP}. PMID:27541461

  10. N-mode coherence in collective neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.

    2011-05-15

    We study two-flavor neutrino oscillations in a homogeneous and isotropic ensemble under the influence of neutrino-neutrino interactions. For any density there exist forms of collective oscillations that show self-maintained coherence. They can be classified by a number N of linearly independent functions that describe all neutrino modes as linear superpositions. What is more, the dynamics is equivalent to another ensemble with the same effective density, consisting of N modes with discrete energies E{sub i} with i=1,...,N. We use this equivalence to derive the analytic solution for two-mode (bimodal) coherence, relevant for spectral-split formation in supernova neutrinos.

  11. New Ambiguity in Probing C P Violation in Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, O. G.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2016-08-01

    If neutrinos get mass via the seesaw mechanism the mixing matrix describing neutrino oscillations can be effectively nonunitary. We show that in this case the neutrino appearance probabilities involve a new C P phase ϕ associated with nonunitarity. This leads to an ambiguity in extracting the "standard" three-neutrino phase δC P, which can survive even after neutrino and antineutrino channels are combined. Its existence should be taken into account in the planning of any oscillation experiment aiming at a robust measurement of δC P.

  12. Evidence for an oscillatory signature in atmospheric neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Ashie, Y; Hosaka, J; Ishihara, K; Itow, Y; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Minamino, A; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Namba, T; Nambu, R; Obayashi, Y; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Yamada, S; Ishitsuka, M; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Ooyabu, T; Saji, C; Takenaga, Y; Desai, S; Kearns, E; Likhoded, S; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Wang, W; Goldhaber, M; Casper, D; Cravens, J P; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Liu, D W; Mine, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Sterner, C W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Guillian, G; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D; Messier, M D; Hayato, Y; Ichikawa, A K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwashita, T; Kobayashi, T; Maruyama, T; Nakamura, K; Nitta, K; Oyama, Y; Sakuda, M; Totsuka, Y; Suzuki, A T; Hasegawa, M; Hayashi, K; Inagaki, T; Kato, I; Maesaka, H; Morita, T; Nakaya, T; Nishikawa, K; Sasaki, T; Ueda, S; Yamamoto, S; Haines, T J; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Svoboda, R; Blaufuss, E; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Turcan, D; Scholberg, K; Habig, A; Fukuda, Y; Jung, C K; Kato, T; Kobayashi, K; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sarrat, A; Sharkey, E; Yanagisawa, C; Toshito, T; Miyano, K; Tamura, N; Ishii, J; Kuno, Y; Nagashima, Y; Takita, M; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Okazawa, H; Ishizuka, T; Choi, Y; Seo, H K; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Koshiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Nishijima, K; Harada, T; Ishino, H; Nishimura, R; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; Zalipska, J; Berns, H G; Gran, R; Shiraishi, K K; Stachyra, A; Washburn, K; Wilkes, R J

    2004-09-01

    Muon neutrino disappearance probability as a function of neutrino flight length L over neutrino energy E was studied. A dip in the L/E distribution was observed in the data, as predicted from the sinusoidal flavor transition probability of neutrino oscillation. The observed L/E distribution constrained nu(micro)<-->nu(tau) neutrino oscillation parameters; 1.9x10(-3)0.90 at 90% confidence level.

  13. New Ambiguity in Probing CP Violation in Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Miranda, O G; Tórtola, M; Valle, J W F

    2016-08-01

    If neutrinos get mass via the seesaw mechanism the mixing matrix describing neutrino oscillations can be effectively nonunitary. We show that in this case the neutrino appearance probabilities involve a new CP phase ϕ associated with nonunitarity. This leads to an ambiguity in extracting the "standard" three-neutrino phase δ_{CP}, which can survive even after neutrino and antineutrino channels are combined. Its existence should be taken into account in the planning of any oscillation experiment aiming at a robust measurement of δ_{CP}.

  14. Atmospheric neutrinos, ν e- ν s oscillations and a novel neutrino evolution equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Evgeny

    2016-08-01

    If a sterile neutrino ν s with an eV-scale mass and a sizeable mixing to the electron neutrino exists, as indicated by the reactor and gallium neutrino anomalies, a strong resonance enhancement of ν e -ν s oscillations of atmospheric neutrinos should occur in the TeV energy range. At these energies neutrino flavour transitions in the 3+1 scheme depend on just one neutrino mass squared difference and are fully described within a 3-flavour oscillation framework. We demonstrate that the flavour transitions of atmospheric ν e can actually be very accurately described in a 2-flavour framework, with neutrino flavour evolution governed by an inhomogeneous Schrödinger-like equation. Evolution equations of this type have not been previously considered in the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  15. Neutrino oscillations: Quantum mechanics vs. quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, Evgeny Kh.; Kopp, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    A consistent description of neutrino oscillations requires either the quantum-mechanical (QM) wave packet approach or a quantum field theoretic (QFT) treatment. We compare these two approaches to neutrino oscillations and discuss the correspondence between them. In particular, we derive expressions for the QM neutrino wave packets from QFT and relate the free parameters of the QM framework, in particular the effective momentum uncertainty of the neutrino state, to the more fundamental parameters of the QFT approach. We include in our discussion the possibilities that some of the neutrino's interaction partners are not detected, that the neutrino is produced in the decay of an unstable parent particle, and that the overlap of the wave packets of the particles involved in the neutrino production (or detection) process is not maximal. Finally, we demonstrate how the properly normalized oscillation probabilities can be obtained in the QFT framework without an ad hoc normalization procedure employed in the QM approach.

  16. Linking neutrino oscillations to the nucleosynthesis of elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Neutrino interactions with matter play an important role in determining the nucleosynthesis outcome in explosive astrophysical environments such as core-collapse supernovae or mergers of compact objects. In this article, we first discuss our recent work on the importance of studying the time evolution of collective neutrino oscillations among active flavors in determining their effects on nucleosynthesis. We then consider the possible active-sterile neutrino mixing and demonstrate the need of a consistent approach to evolve neutrino flavor oscillations, matter composition, and the hydrodynamics when flavor oscillations can happen very deep inside the supernovae.

  17. Effects of neutrino oscillations on nucleosynthesis and neutrino signals for an 18 M⊙ supernova model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Fischer, Tobias; Huther, Lutz

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the effects of neutrino flavor oscillations on supernova nucleosynthesis and on the neutrino signals. Our study is based on detailed information about the neutrino spectra and their time evolution from a spherically symmetric supernova model for an 18 M⊙ progenitor. We find that collective neutrino oscillations are not only sensitive to the detailed neutrino energy and angular distributions at emission, but also to the time evolution of both the neutrino spectra and the electron density profile. We apply the results of neutrino oscillations to study the impact on supernova nucleosynthesis and on the neutrino signals from a Galactic supernova. We show that in our supernova model, collective neutrino oscillations enhance the production of rare isotopes 138La and 180Ta but have little impact on the ν p -process nucleosynthesis. In addition, the adiabatic Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein flavor transformation, which occurs in the C /O and He shells of the supernova, may affect the production of light nuclei such as 7Li and 11B. For the neutrino signals, we calculate the rate of neutrino events in the Super-Kamiokande detector and in a hypothetical liquid argon detector. Our results suggest the possibility of using the time profiles of the events in both detectors, along with the spectral information of the detected neutrinos, to infer the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  18. Earth matter effect on active-sterile neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Mario A.; Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.; D'Olivo, J. C.

    2011-08-01

    Oscillations between active and sterile neutrinos remain as an open possibility to explain some experimental observations. In a four-neutrino mixing scheme, we use the Magnus expansion of the evolution operator to study the evolution of neutrino flavor amplitudes within the Earth. We apply this formalism to calculate the transition probabilities from active to sterile neutrinos taking into account the matter effect for a varying terrestrial density.

  19. Decoherence and oscillations of supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Jörn; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova neutrinos have several exceptional features which can lead to interesting physical consequences. At the production point their wave packets have an extremely small size σ x ˜ 10^{-11} cm; hence the energy uncertainty can be as large as the energy itself, σ E ˜ E, and the coherence length is short. On the way to the Earth the wave packets of mass eigenstates spread to macroscopic sizes and separate. Inside the Earth the mass eigenstates split into eigenstates in matter and oscillate again. The coherence length in the Earth is comparable with the radius of the Earth. We explore these features and their consequences. (1) We present new estimates of the wave packet size. (2) We consider the decoherence condition for the case of wave packets with spatial spread and show that it is not modified by the spread. (3) We study the coherence of neutrinos propagating in a multi-layer medium with density jumps at the borders of layers. In this case coherence can be partially restored due to a "catch-up effect", increasing the coherence length beyond the usual estimate. This catch-up effect can occur for supernova neutrinos as they cross the shock wave fronts in the exploding star or the core of the Earth.

  20. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  1. Study of accelerator neutrino detection at a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Yang

    2016-06-01

    We study the detection of accelerator neutrinos produced at the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Using the code FLUKA, we have simulated the production of neutrinos in a proton beam on a tungsten target and obtained the yield efficiency, numerical flux, and average energy of different flavors of neutrinos. Furthermore, detection of these accelerator neutrinos is investigated in two reaction channels: neutrino-electron reactions and neutrino-carbon reactions. The expected numbers of different flavors of neutrinos have also been calculated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205185, 11175020)

  2. Optical simulation of neutrino oscillations in binary waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Marini, Andrea; Longhi, Stefano; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-10-10

    We theoretically propose and investigate an optical analogue of neutrino oscillations in a pair of vertically displaced binary waveguide arrays with longitudinally modulated effective refractive index. Optical propagation is modeled through coupled-mode equations, which in the continuous limit converge to two coupled Dirac equations for fermionic particles with different mass states, analogously to neutrinos. In addition to simulating neutrino oscillation in the noninteracting regime, our optical setting enables us to explore neutrino interactions in extreme regimes that are expected to play an important role in massive supernova stars. In particular, we predict the quenching of neutrino oscillations and the existence of topological defects, i.e., neutrino solitons, which in our photonic simulator should be observable as excitation of optical gap solitons propagating along the binary arrays at high excitation intensities.

  3. Optical simulation of neutrino oscillations in binary waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Marini, Andrea; Longhi, Stefano; Biancalana, Fabio

    2014-10-10

    We theoretically propose and investigate an optical analogue of neutrino oscillations in a pair of vertically displaced binary waveguide arrays with longitudinally modulated effective refractive index. Optical propagation is modeled through coupled-mode equations, which in the continuous limit converge to two coupled Dirac equations for fermionic particles with different mass states, analogously to neutrinos. In addition to simulating neutrino oscillation in the noninteracting regime, our optical setting enables us to explore neutrino interactions in extreme regimes that are expected to play an important role in massive supernova stars. In particular, we predict the quenching of neutrino oscillations and the existence of topological defects, i.e., neutrino solitons, which in our photonic simulator should be observable as excitation of optical gap solitons propagating along the binary arrays at high excitation intensities. PMID:25375692

  4. Neutrino oscillations as a probe of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David B; Nelson, Ann E; Weiner, Neal

    2004-08-27

    We consider a class of theories in which neutrino masses depend significantly on environment, as a result of interactions with the dark sector. Such theories of mass varying neutrinos were recently introduced to explain the origin of the cosmological dark energy density and why its magnitude is apparently coincidental with that of neutrino mass splittings. In this Letter we argue that in such theories neutrinos can exhibit different masses in matter and in vacuum, dramatically affecting neutrino oscillations. As an example of modifications to the standard picture, we consider simple models that may simultaneously account for the LSND anomaly, KamLAND, K2K, and studies of solar and atmospheric neutrinos, while providing motivation to continue to search for neutrino oscillations in short baseline experiments such as BooNE.

  5. SIMULATION OF A WIDE-BAND LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINO BEAM FOR VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BISHAI, M.; HEIM, J.; LEWIS, C.; MARINO, A.D.; VIREN, B.; YUMICEVA, F.

    2006-08-01

    We present simulations of a wide-band low-energy neutrino beam for a future very long baseline neutrino oscillation (VLBNO) program using the proton beam from the Main Injector (MI) proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The target and horn designs previously developed for Brookhaven Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) VLBNO program are used without modifications. The neutrino flux distributions for various MI proton beam energies and new high-intensity neutrino beam-line designs possible at Fermilab are presented. The beam-line siting and design parameters are chosen to match the requirements of an on-axis beam from Fermilab to one of the two possible sites for the future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). A preliminary estimate of the observable event rates and spectra at a detector located in DUSEL for different beam configurations has been performed. Our preliminary conclusions are that a 40-60 GeV 0.5 to 1 MW beam from the Fermilab Main Injector to a DUSEL site has the potential to reach the desired intensity for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Recent studies indicate that the Fermilab MI can reach a beam power of 0.5 MW at 60 GeV with incremental upgrades to the existing accelerator complex.

  6. Constraints on neutrino oscillations using 1258 days of Super-Kamiokande solar neutrino data.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, S; Fukuda, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kobayashi, K; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, H; Takeuchi, Y; Toshito, T; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Desai, S; Earl, M; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Liu, D W; Price, L R; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Takemori, D; Hayato, Y; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakamura, K; Obayashi, Y; Oyama, Y; Sakai, A; Sakuda, M; Kohama, M; Suzuki, A T; Inagaki, T; Nakaya, T; Nishikawa, K; Haines, T J; Blaufuss, E; Dazeley, S; Lee, K B; Svoboda, R; Goodman, J A; Guillian, G; Sullivan, G W; Turcan, D; Habig, A; Hill, J; Jung, C K; Martens, K; Malek, M; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Viren, B; Yanagisawa, C; Mitsuda, C; Miyano, K; Saji, C; Shibata, T; Kajiyama, Y; Nagashima, Y; Nitta, K; Takita, M; Yoshida, M; Kim, H I; Kim, S B; Yoo, J; Okazawa, H; Ishizuka, T; Etoh, M; Gando, Y; Hasegawa, T; Inoue, K; Ishihara, K; Maruyama, T; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Koshiba, M; Hatakeyama, Y; Ichikawa, Y; Koike, M; Nishijima, K; Fujiyasu, H; Ishino, H; Morii, M; Watanabe, Y; Golebiewska, U; Kielczewska, D; Boyd, S C; Stachyra, A L; Wilkes, R J; Young, K K

    2001-06-18

    We report the result of a search for neutrino oscillations using precise measurements of the recoil electron energy spectrum and zenith angle variations of the solar neutrino flux from 1258 days of neutrino-electron scattering data in Super-Kamiokande. The absence of significant zenith angle variation and spectrum distortion places strong constraints on neutrino mixing and mass difference in a flux-independent way. Using the Super-Kamiokande flux measurement in addition, two allowed regions at large mixing are found.

  7. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Patzak, T.

    2015-07-15

    Since about a decade the european physics community interested in neutrino and neutrino-astrophysics develops a plan to conceive the next generation large underground neutrino observatory. Recently, the LAGUNA-LBNO collaboration made the outcome of the FP7 design study public which shows a clear path for the realization of such experiment. In this paper the LAGUNA and LAGUNA-LBNO Design studies, resulting in a proposal for the LBNO experiment, will be discussed. The author will focus on the long baseline neutrino oscillation search, especially on the potential to discover the neutrino mass ordering and the search for CP violation in the lepton sector.

  8. Are the B decay anomalies related to neutrino oscillations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucenna, Sofiane M.; Valle, José W. F.; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-11-01

    Neutrino oscillations are solidly established, with a hint of CP violation just emerging. Similarly, there are hints of lepton universality violation in b → s transitions at the level of 2.6σ. By assuming that the unitary transformation between weak and mass charged leptons equals the leptonic mixing matrix measured in neutrino oscillation experiments, we predict several lepton flavor violating (LFV) B meson decays. We are led to the tantalizing possibility that some LFV branching ratios for B decays correlate with the leptonic CP phase δ characterizing neutrino oscillations. Moreover, we also consider implications for ℓi →ℓjℓkℓk decays.

  9. Solar oscillation frequency and solar neutrino predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, A.N.

    1990-07-05

    The light and velocity variations of the Sun and solar-like stars are unique among intrinsic variable stars. Unlike all other standard classes, such as Cepheids, B stars, and white dwarfs, the pulsation driving is caused by coupling with the acoustic noise in the upper convection zone. Each global pulsation mode is just another degree of freedom for the turbulent convection, and energy is shared equally between these g{sup {minus}}-modes and the solar oscillation modes. This driving and damping, together with the normal stellar pulsation mechanisms produce extremely low amplitude solar oscillations. Actually, the surface layer radiative damping is strong, and the varying oscillation mode amplitudes manifest the stochastic convection driving and the steady damping. Thus stability calculations for solar-like pulsations are difficult and mostly inconclusive, but calculations of pulsation periods are as straightforward as for all the other classes of intrinsic variable stars. The issue that is important for the Sun is its internal structure, because the mass, radius, and luminosity are extremely well known. Conventionally, we need the pulsation constants for each of millions of modes. Unknown parameters for constructing solar models are the composition and its material pressure, energy, and opacity, as well as the convection mixing length. We treat the nuclear energy and neutrino production formulas as sufficiently well known. The presence of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) orbiting the solar center affects the predicted oscillation frequencies so that they do not agree with observations as well as those for models without WIMPs. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Neutrino oscillation studies with IceCube-DeepCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.

    2016-07-01

    IceCube, a gigaton-scale neutrino detector located at the South Pole, was primarily designed to search for astrophysical neutrinos with energies of PeV and higher. This goal has been achieved with the detection of the highest energy neutrinos to date. At the other end of the energy spectrum, the DeepCore extension lowers the energy threshold of the detector to approximately 10 GeV and opens the door for oscillation studies using atmospheric neutrinos. An analysis of the disappearance of these neutrinos has been completed, with the results produced being complementary with dedicated oscillation experiments. Following a review of the detector principle and performance, the method used to make these calculations, as well as the results, is detailed. Finally, the future prospects of IceCube-DeepCore and the next generation of neutrino experiments at the South Pole (IceCube-Gen2, specifically the PINGU sub-detector) are briefly discussed.

  11. The Effects of Collective Neutrino Oscillations on Supernova Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seadrow, Shaquann; Frohlich, C.; Duan, H.; Friedland, A.; McLaughlin, G.; Keohane, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    A core-collapse supernova originates from the implosion of the electron degenerate core inside a massive star. Runaway electron capture produces on the order of 1057 neutrinos containing about 1053 erg of energy in total. While the vast majority of neutrinos are eventually released, during the first few seconds these neutrinos drive both the dynamics, and likewise the nucleosynthesis, inside the supernova. Recently, our understanding of oscillations among the different flavors of neutrinos (electron, muon, and tau) has significantly improved, allowing us to ask if neutrino flavor change has a significant effect on nucleosynthesis in a core-collapse supernova. To investigate the effects of collective neutrino flavor oscillations, we use the hydrodynamic conditions from a spherically-symmetrical model of the implosion, bounce, and explosion of the 1.4 solar mass core that is inside an 8.8 solar mass star (Huedepohl et al. 2009). We select 20 mass tracers in the ejecta, varying in initial radii, and follow these trajectories for the first 9 seconds following bounce. We include these trajectories into a nuclear reaction network in order to calculate the detailed nucleosynthesis. We use three sets of neutrino reaction rates, all of which are calculated consistently with the conditions in the supernova model: (i) no collective flavor oscillations, (ii) collective oscillations for normal neutrino mass hierarchy, and (iii) collective oscillations for inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We calculate the detailed nucleosynthesis for each trajectory for all three sets of neutrino rates. We find that the inclusion of collective oscillations (ii or iii) significantly increases the free neutron abundance; however, we obtain similar results regardless of which hierarchy is used. The increase in free neutrons also increases the subsequent rate of neutron capture, but has only a small effect on the predicted final abundances. This work was performed as part of North Carolina State

  12. An analytical treatment for three neutrino oscillations in the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Supanitsky, A. D.

    2012-08-01

    A simple, and at the same time accurate, description of the Earth matter effects on the oscillations between three neutrino flavors is given in terms of the Magnus expansion for the evolution operator.

  13. Pseudoscalar—sterile neutrino interactions: reconciling the cosmos with neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Gariazzo, Stefano; Giunti, Carlo; Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus; Laveder, Marco; Tram, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The Short BaseLine (SBL) neutrino oscillation anomalies hint at the presence of a sterile neutrino with a mass of around 1 eV. However, such a neutrino is incompatible with cosmological data, in particular observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. However, this conclusion can change by invoking new physics. One possibility is to introduce a secret interaction in the sterile neutrino sector mediated by a light pseudoscalar. In this pseudoscalar model, CMB data prefer a sterile neutrino mass that is fully compatible with the mass ranges suggested by SBL anomalies. In addition, this model predicts a value of the Hubble parameter which is completely consistent with local measurements.

  14. New results for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Justin; Whitehead, Lisa; /Brookhaven

    2010-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment situated along Fermilab's high-intensity NuMI neutrino beam. MINOS has completed an updated search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino transitions, observation of which would indicate a non-zero value for the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}. The present 7 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target data set represents more than double the exposure used in the previous analysis. The new result and its implications are presented.

  15. Neutrino mass in GUT constrained supersymmetry with R-parity violation in light of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Simkovic, Fedor

    2004-11-01

    The neutrino masses are generated in grand unified theory (GUT) constrained supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. The neutrinos acquire masses via tree-level neutrino-neutralino mixing as well as via one-loop radiative corrections. The theoretical mass matrix is compared with the phenomenological one, which is reconstructed by using neutrino oscillation and neutrinoless double beta decay data. This procedure allows to obtain significantly stronger constraints on R-parity breaking parameters than those existing in the literature. The implication of normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy on the sneutrino expectation values, lepton-Higgs bilinear and trilinear R-parity breaking couplings is also discussed.

  16. Particle production with left-right neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Seishi; Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2016-03-01

    When the Higgs field starts oscillation after Higgs inflation, gauge bosons are produced nonperturbatively near the enhanced symmetry point (ESP). Just after the particle production, when the Higgs field is going away from the ESP, these gauge bosons gain mass and decay or annihilate into Standard Model (SM) fermions. Left-handed neutrinos can be generated in that way. If one assumes the seesaw mechanism, the mass matrix of a pair of left- and right-handed neutrinos is nondiagonal. Although their mixing in the mass eigenstates is negligible in the true vacuum, it could be significant near the edge of the Higgs oscillation, where the off-diagonal component is large. Therefore, the left-handed neutrinos generated from the gauge bosons can start neutrino oscillation between the right-handed neutrinos. We study the particle production when such left-right (L-R) neutrino oscillation is significant. For a working example, the nonthermal leptogenesis scenario after Higgs inflation is examined, which cannot be realized without the L-R neutrino oscillation. The same mechanism could be applied to other singlet particles whose abundance has been neglected.

  17. Solar neutrino experiments and a test for neutrino oscillations with radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Rowley, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment are given and compared to the most recent standard solar model calculations. The observations are about a factor of 4 below theoretical expectations. In view of the uncertainties involved in the theoretical models of the sun, the discrepancy is not considered to be evidence for neutrino oscillations. The status of the development of a gallium solar neutrino detector is described. Radiochemical neutrino detectors can be used to search for ..nu../sub e/ oscillations by using megacurie sources of monoenergetic neutrinos like /sup 65/Zn. A quantitative evaluation of possible experiments using the Brookhaven chlorine solar neutrino detector and a gallium detector is given. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Self-induced parametric resonance in collective neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.

    2008-12-15

    We identify a generic new form of collective flavor oscillations in dense neutrino gases that amounts to a self-induced parametric resonance. It occurs in a homogeneous and isotropic ensemble when a range of neutrino modes is prepared in a different flavor than the neighboring modes with lower and higher energies. The flavor content of the intermediate spectral part librates relative to the other parts with a frequency corresponding to a typical {delta}m{sup 2}/2E. This libration persists in the limit of an arbitrarily large neutrino density where one would have expected synchronized flavor oscillations.

  19. Neutrino Oscillation Parameter Sensitivity in Future Long-Baseline Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The study of neutrino interactions and propagation has produced evidence for physics beyond the standard model and promises to continue to shed light on rare phenomena. Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations in the late 1990s there have been rapid advances in establishing the three flavor paradigm of neutrino oscillations. The 2012 discovery of a large value for the last unmeasured missing angle has opened the way for future experiments to search for charge-parity symmetry violation in the lepton sector. This thesis presents an analysis of the future sensitivity to neutrino oscillations in the three flavor paradigm for the T2K, NO A, LBNE, and T2HK experiments. The theory of the three flavor paradigm is explained and the methods to use these theoretical predictions to design long baseline neutrino experiments are described. The sensitivity to the oscillation parameters for each experiment is presented with a particular focus on the search for CP violation and the measurement of the neutrino mass hierarchy. The variations of these sensitivities with statistical considerations and experimental design optimizations taken into account are explored. The effects of systematic uncertainties in the neutrino flux, interaction, and detection predictions are also considered by incorporating more advanced simulations inputs from the LBNE experiment.

  20. Constant matter neutrino oscillations in a parametrization-free formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, L. J.; Miranda, O. G.

    2016-02-01

    Neutrino oscillations are now a well-established and deeply studied phenomena. Their mixing parameters, except for the C P phase, are measured with good accuracy. The three-neutrino oscillation picture in matter is currently of great interest due to the different long-baseline neutrino experiments that are already running or under construction. In this work, we reanalyze the exact expression for the neutrino probabilities (in a constant density medium) and introduce an approximate formula. Our results are shown in a formulation that is independent of the parametrization and could be useful for unitary tests of the leptonic mixing matrix. We illustrate how the approximation, besides being simple, can reproduce the neutrino probabilities with good accuracy.

  1. Basic oscillation measurables in the neutrino pair beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yoshimura, M.

    2016-09-01

    It was recently shown that the neutrino-pair emission may occur with large rates, their energy being extended to GeV region, if appropriate heavy ions are circulated in a quantum state of mixture. In the present work it is further demonstrated that the vector current contribution of neutrino interaction with electrons in ion, not necessarily suppressed in high atomic number ions, gives rise to the oscillating component, even when a single neutrino is detected alone. On the other hand, the single neutrino detection in Z-boson decay does not show the oscillating component, as known for some time. CP violation measurements in the neutrino pair beam may become a possibility, along with determination of mass hierarchical patterns.

  2. Preliminary Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters By NuMI/MINOS and Calibration Studies for Improving this Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Symes, Philip Andrew

    2005-11-01

    This thesis explains the origins of neutrinos and their interactions, and the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. Experiments for measuring neutrino oscillations are mentioned and the experiment investigated in this thesis, the ''Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search'', and its neutrino beam, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's ''Neutrinos At The Main Injector'', are described. MINOS is a long baseline (735 km) neutrino oscillation experiment with a near and a far detector, intended to make precision measurements of the atmospheric sector neutrino oscillation parameters. A measurement is made of the ''atmospheric'' neutrino oscillation parameters, {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin {sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}), using neutrinos from the NuMI beam. The results of this analysis are compared to measurements at MINOS using neutrinos from the atmosphere and with other experiments. A more detailed method of beam neutrino analysis is discussed, and the extra calibrations needed to perform that analysis properly are described, with special attention paid to two aspects of the calibration, which comprise the bulk of work for this thesis. The light injection calibration system uses LEDs to illuminate the detector readout and provides a normalization of the stability of the detector over time. The hardware and different modi operandi of the system are described. There is a description of installation and commissioning of the system at one of the MINOS detectors. The response normalization of each detector with cosmic ray muons is described. Special attention is paid to the explanation of necessary corrections that must be made to the muon sample in order for the sample to be used to calibrate each detector to the specified accuracy. The performance of the calibration is shown.

  3. The analysis of solar models: Neutrinos and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, R. K.; Rhodes, E. J., Jr.; Tomczyk, S.; Dumont, P. J.; Brunish, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    Tests of solar neutrino flux and solar oscillation frequencies were used to assess standard stellar structure theory. Standard and non-standard solar models are enumerated and discussed. The field of solar seismology, wherein the solar interior is studied from the measurement of solar oscillations, is introduced.

  4. Neutrino mass and oscillation in matter and in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liguo

    2004-11-01

    With improved Z-Burst model for the new cosmology and reasonable distribution of the neutrino cosmic ray sources, the signatures of the Z-Burst absorption dip and the contributing parameters are investigated through numerical calculations. From the results of the numerical calculations, it is learned that the source distribution and the neutrino mass spectrum will be the major contributing parameters for the Z-Burst absorption dip. Also, only Z-Burst absorption dip will not be able to offer enough information for to establish the structure of the neutrino mass spectrum. The heavy neutrino mass of a few 10-1 eV supported by the four- neutrino model and the LSND mass gap is essential for the detection of the Z-Burst absorption dip. The evidence against the (2+2) neutrino model, especially the Sum Rule, is investigated. Through numerical calculations, it is shown that the small mixing angles, especially ɛμμ and ɛμe with the assistance of the MSW matter effect can significantly weaken the Sum Rule. This result casts doubts on the conclusions of the global experiment data fitting, in which two of the small mixing angles ɛμe and ɛ ee are set to zero. With the future extremely high-energy neutrino cosmic ray detectors and the improvement in the neutrino oscillation experiments, the full establishment of the neutrino mass spectrum with the absolute neutrino mass could be achieved in the this decade.

  5. Aspects of neutrino oscillation in alternative gravity theories

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sumanta

    2015-10-01

    Neutrino spin and flavour oscillation in curved spacetime have been studied for the most general static spherically symmetric configuration. Having exploited the spherical symmetry we have confined ourselves to the equatorial plane in order to determine the spin and flavour oscillation frequency in this general set-up. Using the symmetry properties we have derived spin oscillation frequency for neutrino moving along a geodesic or in a circular orbit. Starting from the expression of neutrino spin oscillation frequency we have shown that even in this general context, in high energy limit the spin oscillation frequency for neutrino moving along circular orbit vanishes. We have verified previous results along this line by transforming to Schwarzschild coordinates under appropriate limit. This finally lends itself to the probability of neutrino helicity flip which turns out to be non-zero. While for neutrino flavour oscillation we have derived general results for oscillation phase, which subsequently have been applied to three different gravity theories. One, of them appears as low-energy approximation to string theory, where we have an additional field, namely, dilaton field coupled to Maxwell field tensor. This yields a realization of Reissner-Nordström solution in string theory at low-energy. Next one corresponds to generalization of Schwarzschild solution by introduction of quadratic curvature terms of all possible form to the Einstein-Hilbert action. Finally, we have also discussed regular black hole solutions. In all these cases the flavour oscillation probabilities can be determined for solar neutrinos and thus can be used to put bounds on the parameters of these gravity theories. While for spin oscillation probability, we have considered two cases, Gauss-Bonnet term added to the Einstein-Hilbert action and the f(R) gravity theory. In both these cases we could impose bounds on the parameters which are consistent with previous considerations. In a nutshell, in

  6. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Stephen James

    2011-05-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting Δm232 = (2.32-0.08+0.12) x 10-3 eV2/c4 and the mixing angle sin2(2θ32) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2σ and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0σ.

  7. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with IceCube.

    PubMed

    Aartsen, M G; Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; Benzvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H-P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Palazzo, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2013-08-23

    We present the first statistically significant detection of neutrino oscillations in the high-energy regime (>20 GeV) from an analysis of IceCube Neutrino Observatory data collected in 2010 and 2011. This measurement is made possible by the low-energy threshold of the DeepCore detector (~20 GeV) and benefits from the use of the IceCube detector as a veto against cosmic-ray-induced muon background. The oscillation signal was detected within a low-energy muon neutrino sample (20-100 GeV) extracted from data collected by DeepCore. A high-energy muon neutrino sample (100 GeV-10 TeV) was extracted from IceCube data to constrain systematic uncertainties. The disappearance of low-energy upward-going muon neutrinos was observed, and the nonoscillation hypothesis is rejected with more than 5σ significance. In a two-neutrino flavor formalism, our data are best described by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters |Δm(32)(2)|=(2.3(-0.5)(+0.6))×10(-3) eV(2) and sin(2)(2θ(23))>0.93, and maximum mixing is favored. PMID:24010427

  8. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with IceCube.

    PubMed

    Aartsen, M G; Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; Benzvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H-P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Palazzo, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2013-08-23

    We present the first statistically significant detection of neutrino oscillations in the high-energy regime (>20 GeV) from an analysis of IceCube Neutrino Observatory data collected in 2010 and 2011. This measurement is made possible by the low-energy threshold of the DeepCore detector (~20 GeV) and benefits from the use of the IceCube detector as a veto against cosmic-ray-induced muon background. The oscillation signal was detected within a low-energy muon neutrino sample (20-100 GeV) extracted from data collected by DeepCore. A high-energy muon neutrino sample (100 GeV-10 TeV) was extracted from IceCube data to constrain systematic uncertainties. The disappearance of low-energy upward-going muon neutrinos was observed, and the nonoscillation hypothesis is rejected with more than 5σ significance. In a two-neutrino flavor formalism, our data are best described by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters |Δm(32)(2)|=(2.3(-0.5)(+0.6))×10(-3) eV(2) and sin(2)(2θ(23))>0.93, and maximum mixing is favored.

  9. A 3×2 texture for neutrino oscillations and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahmachari, Biswajoy; Okada, Nobuchika

    2008-03-01

    In an economical system with only two heavy right-handed neutrinos, we postulate a new texture for 3×2 Dirac mass matrix m. This model implies one massless light neutrino and thus displays only two patterns of mass spectrum for light neutrinos, namely hierarchical or inverse-hierarchical. Both the cases can correctly reproduce all the current neutrino oscillation data with a unique prediction mν=Δmsolar23 and Δmatm2 for the hierarchical and the inverse-hierarchical cases, respectively, which can be tested in next generation neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Introducing a single physical CP phase in m, we examine baryon asymmetry through leptogenesis. Interestingly, through the CP phase there are correlations between the amount of baryon asymmetry and neutrino oscillation parameters. We find that for a fixed CP phase, the hierarchical case also succeeds in generating the observed baryon asymmetry in our universe, plus a non-vanishing U which is accessible in future baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  10. Supernova nucleosynthesis and the physics of neutrino oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, Toshitaka

    2012-11-20

    We studied the explosive nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae and found that several isotopes of rare elements like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 138}La, {sup 180}Ta and others are predominantly produced by the neutrino interactions with several abundant nuclei. These isotopes are strongly affected by the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the MSW (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein) effect. We here first study how to know the suitable average neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the neutrino oscillation effects on their abundances, and propose a new novel method to determine the neutrino oscillation parameters, {theta}{sub 13} and mass hierarchy, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that some SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced neutrino-process {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on {theta}{sub 13}, we show that although the uncertainties are still large, our method hints at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy for the first time.

  11. Neutrino oscillations in the presence of super-light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divari, Paraskevi; Vergados, John

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of conversion of super-light sterile neutrino (SLSN) to electron neutrino in matter like that of the Earth. In the Sun the resonance conversion between SLSN and electron neutrino via the neutral current is suppressed due to the smallness of neutron number. On the other hand, neutron number density can play an important role in the Earth, making the scenario of SLSN quite interesting. The effect of CP-violating phases on active-SLSN oscillations is also discussed. Reactor neutrino experiments with medium or short baseline may probe the scenario of SLSN.

  12. The effect of short-baseline neutrino oscillations on LBNE

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, William C.

    2015-10-15

    Short-baseline neutrino oscillations can have a relatively big effect on long-baseline oscillations, due to the cross terms that arise from multiple mass scales. The existing short-baseline anomalies suggest that short-baseline oscillations can affect the ν{sub μ} → ν{sub e} appearance probabilities by up to 20-40%, depending on the values of the CP-violating parameters.

  13. The effect of short-baseline neutrino oscillations on LBNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, William C.

    2015-10-01

    Short-baseline neutrino oscillations can have a relatively big effect on long-baseline oscillations, due to the cross terms that arise from multiple mass scales. The existing short-baseline anomalies suggest that short-baseline oscillations can affect the νμ → νe appearance probabilities by up to 20-40%, depending on the values of the CP-violating parameters.

  14. Study of antineutrino oscillations using accelerator and atmospheric data in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Son Van

    2014-05-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline experiment that was built for studying the neutrino oscillation phenomena. The MINOS experiment uses high intensity muon neutrino and antineutrino beams created by Neutrinos at the Main Injector facility (NuMI) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Neutrino interactions are recorded by two sampling steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters: 0.98\\,kton Near Detector at Fermilab, IL and 5.4\\,kton Far Detector at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, MN. These two detectors are functionally identical, which helps to reduce the systematic uncertainties in the muon neutrino and antineutrino disappearance measurements. The Near Detector, located 1.04\\,km from the neutrino production target, is used to measure the initial beam composition and neutrino energy proximal to the neutrino source. The collected data at the Near Detector is then used to predict energy spectrum in the Far Detector. By comparing this prediction to collected data at the Far Detector, which is 735\\,km away from the target, it enables a measurement of a set of parameters that govern the neutrino oscillation phenomenon. \\\\ \\indent The flexibility of the NuMI beam configuration and the magnetization of the MINOS detectors facilitate the identification of $\

  15. Compact perturbative expressions for neutrino oscillations in matter

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, Peter B.; Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2016-06-08

    We further develop and extend a recent perturbative framework for neutrino oscillations in uniform matter density so that the resulting oscillation probabilities are accurate for the complete matter potential versus baseline divided by neutrino energy plane. This extension also gives the exact oscillation probabilities in vacuum for all values of baseline divided by neutrino energy. The expansion parameter used is related to the ratio of the solar to the atmosphericmore » $$\\Delta m^2$$ scales but with a unique choice of the atmospheric $$\\Delta m^2$$ such that certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Using a mixing matrix formulation, this framework has the exceptional feature that the neutrino oscillation probability in matter has the same structure as in vacuum, to all orders in the expansion parameter. It also contains all orders in the matter potential and $$\\sin\\theta_{13}$$. It facilitates immediate physical interpretation of the analytic results, and makes the expressions for the neutrino oscillation probabilities extremely compact and very accurate even at zeroth order in our perturbative expansion. Furthermore, the first and second order results are also given which improve the precision by approximately two or more orders of magnitude per perturbative order.« less

  16. Compact perturbative expressions for neutrino oscillations in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Peter B.; Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2016-06-01

    We further develop and extend a recent perturbative framework for neutrino oscillations in uniform matter density so that the resulting oscillation probabilities are accurate for the complete matter potential versus baseline divided by neutrino energy plane. This extension also gives the exact oscillation probabilities in vacuum for all values of baseline divided by neutrino energy. The expansion parameter used is related to the ratio of the solar to the atmospheric ∆ m 2 scales but with a unique choice of the atmospheric ∆ m 2 such that certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Using a mixing matrix formulation, this framework has the exceptional feature that the neutrino oscillation probability in matter has the same structure as in vacuum, to all orders in the expansion parameter. It also contains all orders in the matter potential and sin θ 13. It facilitates immediate physical interpretation of the analytic results, and makes the expressions for the neutrino oscillation probabilities extremely compact and very accurate even at zeroth order in our perturbative expansion. The first and second order results are also given which improve the precision by approximately two or more orders of magnitude per perturbative order.

  17. Flavor entanglement in neutrino oscillations in the wave packet description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2015-10-01

    The wave packet approach to neutrino oscillations provides an enlightening description of quantum decoherence induced, during propagation, by localization effects. Within this approach, we show that a deeper insight into the dynamical aspects of particle mixing can be obtained if one investigates the behavior of quantum correlations associated to flavor oscillations. By identifying the neutrino three-flavor modes with (suitably defined) three-qubit modes, the exploitation of tools of quantum information theory for mixed states allows a detailed analysis of the dynamical behavior of flavor entanglement during free propagation. This provides further elements leading to a more complete understanding of the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, and a basis for possible applicative implementations. The analysis is carried out by studying the distribution of the flavor entanglement; to this aim, we perform combined investigations of the behaviors of the two-flavor concurrence and of the logarithmic negativities associated with specific bipartitions of the three flavors.

  18. Baseline concept for a precise measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Ambrosio, M.; Aprile, E.; Bologna, G.; Bonesini, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Calvi, M.; Castellina, A.; Curioni, A.; Fulgione, W.; Ghia, P. L.; Gustavino, C.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Negri, P.; Paganoni, M.; Periale, L.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Picchi, P.; Pullia, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Satta, L.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Terranova, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchero, G.; Vallania, P.; Villone, B.

    2000-08-01

    A high-density calorimeter, consisting of magnetized planes interleaved by Resistive Plates Chambers (RPCs, Ref. (1)) , as tracking and timing devices, is a good candidate for a new experiment on atmospheric neutrinos. With 34 kt of mass and in four years of data taking, this experiment will be sensitive to νμ→νx oscillation with Δm2>6×10-5 and large mixing, covering the region suggested by the SuperKamiokande results. Moreover, the experimental method will enable to measure the oscillation parameters from the modulation of the L/E spectrum (νμ disappearance). For >m2>3×10-3eV2, this experiment can also establish whether the oscillation occurs into a tau or a sterile neutrino, by looking for an excess of muon-less events at high energies produced by upward-going tau neutrinos(ντ appearence).

  19. Measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance with an off-axis beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F D M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Curioni, A; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Frank, E; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Golan, T; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kim, S B; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Kogan, G; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Lopez, G D; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Masliah, P; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Otani, M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Taylor, I J; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2013-11-22

    The T2K Collaboration reports a precision measurement of muon neutrino disappearance with an off-axis neutrino beam with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. Near detector measurements are used to constrain the neutrino flux and cross section parameters. The Super-Kamiokande far detector, which is 295 km downstream of the neutrino production target, collected data corresponding to 3.01×10(20) protons on target. In the absence of neutrino oscillations, 205±17 (syst) events are expected to be detected while only 58 muon neutrino event candidates are observed. A fit to the neutrino rate and energy spectrum, assuming three neutrino flavors and normal mass hierarchy yields a best-fit mixing angle sin2(θ23)=0.514±0.082 and mass splitting |Δm(32)(2)|=2.44(-0.15)(+0.17)×10(-3) eV2/c4. Our result corresponds to the maximal oscillation disappearance probability.

  20. Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters from Muon Neutrino Disappearance with an Off-Axis Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Frank, E.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Gaudin, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Jung, C. K.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kim, S. B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Taylor, I. J.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2013-11-01

    The T2K Collaboration reports a precision measurement of muon neutrino disappearance with an off-axis neutrino beam with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. Near detector measurements are used to constrain the neutrino flux and cross section parameters. The Super-Kamiokande far detector, which is 295 km downstream of the neutrino production target, collected data corresponding to 3.01×1020 protons on target. In the absence of neutrino oscillations, 205±17 (syst) events are expected to be detected while only 58 muon neutrino event candidates are observed. A fit to the neutrino rate and energy spectrum, assuming three neutrino flavors and normal mass hierarchy yields a best-fit mixing angle sin⁡2(θ23)=0.514±0.082 and mass splitting |Δm322|=2.44-0.15+0.17×10-3eV2/c4. Our result corresponds to the maximal oscillation disappearance probability.

  1. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Ruth B.

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  2. A high intensity 6He beam for the β-beam neutrino oscillation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stora, Thierry; Noah, Etam; Hodak, Rastislav; Hirsh, Tsviki Y.; Hass, Michael; Kumar, Vivek; Singh, Kuljeet; Vaintraub, Sergey; Delahaye, Pierre; Franberg-Delahaye, Hanna; Saint-Laurent, Marie-Genevieve; Lhersonneau, Gerard

    2012-05-01

    This work presents the production and extraction of the short-lived radionuclide 6He in yet unmatched yields from the ISOLDE facility at CERN. It is the first report of 6He production using spallation neutrons via the 9Be(n, α)6He reaction. These neutrons are produced from the 1.4 GeV proton beam of the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) striking a tungsten converter, and are impinging on a porous BeO material. The central position of 6He in future experiments is due to its role as a necessary radioactive nucleus to realize the β-beam at CERN, a next-generation facility to study neutrino oscillation parameters, and hence neutrino masses. In the β-beam scenario, an intense beam of radioactive 6He nuclei will be produced, accelerated to multi-GeV energies and stored in a dedicated storage ring. The resulting virtually mono-directional anti-neutrino beam from the decay of the stored 6He nuclei will be directed towards a remote underground neutrino detector. A similar beam of, e.g., 18Ne will provide neutrinos, an ideal concept to test CP violation in the neutrino sector. The results of the present experiment demonstrate for the first time that the necessary conditions for the realization of the proposed β-beam scheme with anti-neutrinos can be fulfilled.

  3. Using Quasi-Elastic Events to Measure Neutrino Oscillations with MINOS Detectors in the NuMI Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Watabe, Masaki

    2010-05-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has been designed to search for a change in the avor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as they travel between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Far Detector in the Soudan mine in Minnesota, 735 km from the target. The MINOS oscillation analysis is mainly performed with the charged current (CC) events and sensitive to constrain high- Δm2 values. However, the quasi-elastic (QEL) charged current interaction is dominant in the energy region important to access low- m2 values. For further improvement, the QEL oscillation analysis is performed in this dissertation. A data sample based on a total of 2.50 x 1020 POT is used for this analysis. In summary, 55 QEL-like events are observed at the Far detector while 87.06 ± 13.17 (syst:) events are expected with null oscillation hypothesis. These data are consistent with disappearance via oscillation with m2 = 2:10 0.37 (stat:) ± 0.24 (syst:) eV2 and the maximal mixing angle.

  4. Accelerator systems and instrumentation for the NuMI neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwaska, Robert Miles

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) neutrino beam facility began operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 2005. NuMI produces an intense, muon-neutrino beam to a number of experiments. Fore most of these experiments is MINOS---the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search---that uses two neutrino detectors in the beam, one at Fermilab and one in northern Minnesota, to investigate the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. NuMI is a conventional, horn-focused neutrino beam. It is designed to accept a 400 kW, 120 GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator. The proton beam is steered onto a target, producing a secondary beam of mesons which are focused into a long evacuated volume where they decay to muons and neutrinos. Pulsed toroidal magnets (horns) focus an adjustable meson momentum range. Design of the beamline and its components is challenged by the 400 kW average proton beam power. To achieve such high proton power, the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) must store and accelerate ˜ 4x1013 protons per acceleration cycle. This requires the MI to be loaded with 6 or more batches of protons from the 8 GeV Booster accelerator. Such multiple-batch injection involves a synchronization of the two machines not previously required by the Fermilab accelerators. In this dissertation, we investigate timing errors that can arise between the two accelerators, and a feedback system which enables multiple Booster transfers into the Main Injector without significant loss of beam. Using this method of synchronous transfer, the Main Injector has delivered as many as 3x1013 protons per pulse to the NuMI beam. The instrumentation to assess the quality of the neutrino beam includes arrays of radiation-tolerant ionization chambers downstream of the decay volume. These arrays detect the remnant hadrons and tertiary muons produced with the neutrinos. This thesis discusses measurements using the arrays, including diagnostics of potential beam errors and

  5. First indication of terrestrial matter effects on solar neutrino oscillation.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, A; Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Tomura, T; Ueno, K; Yokozawa, T; Wendell, R A; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; Nishimura, Y; Okumura, K; McLachlan, T; Labarga, L; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhabar, M; Bays, K; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Wilking, M J; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Wilkes, R J

    2014-03-01

    We report an indication that the elastic scattering rate of solar B8 neutrinos with electrons in the Super-Kamiokande detector is larger when the neutrinos pass through Earth during nighttime. We determine the day-night asymmetry, defined as the difference of the average day rate and average night rate divided by the average of those two rates, to be [-3.2 ± 1.1(stat) ± 0.5(syst)]%, which deviates from zero by 2.7 σ. Since the elastic scattering process is mostly sensitive to electron-flavored solar neutrinos, a nonzero day-night asymmetry implies that the flavor oscillations of solar neutrinos are affected by the presence of matter within the neutrinos' flight path. Super-Kamiokande's day-night asymmetry is consistent with neutrino oscillations for 4 × 10(-5)  eV(2) ≤ Δm 2(21) ≤ 7 × 10(-5) eV(2) and large mixing values of θ12, at the 68% C.L. PMID:24655245

  6. Effects of Recent Reactor Anti-neutrino Spectra on Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterbenz, Ciara

    2015-10-01

    The β-decay of nuclear fission fragments produces a very large ve flux from nuclear reactions. The shape of the expected flux has previously been predicted by converting the measured β-electron spectrum to an ve spectrum. Recent reactor neutrino experiments, however, find a large shoulder in the observed ve spectrum relative to this prediction in the energy region 5 - 7 MeV. Accurate knowledge of the expected ve flux from reactors is important for oscillation experiments that only involve one neutrino detector. In this project, I examine the implications of these spectral changes on the ν oscillation result found by the KamLAND experiment. At the time of their finding, the spectral anomaly from 5 - 7 MeV had not be observed. I have re-derived the oscillation parameters Δm2 and sin2 (2 θ) using the anti-neutrino flux from Daya Bay and from nuclear database predictions. With these new expected fluxes, these oscillation parameters shifted and their uncertainties increased. I compare the new oscillation parameters with those derived from solar neutrino oscillation data.

  7. First neutrino oscillation measurements in NOvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messier, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    The NOvA experiment uses the Fermilab NuMI neutrino beam and a newly constructed 14 kt detector to address several open questions in neutrino oscillations including the neutrino mass hierarchy, the precise value of the angle θ23, and the CP-violating phase δCP. The experiment has been running since 2014 and has recently released its first results from an equivalent exposure of 2.74 ×1020 protons-on-target equal to 8% of the eventual data set. Measurements of νμ →νμ oscillations find Δ m322 = (2.52-0.18+0.20) ×10-3 eV2 and 0.38 neutrino mass hierarchy. The experiment has observed νμ →νe oscillations at 3.3 σ C.L. in this early data and disfavors the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy in the range 0.1 π <δCP < 0.5 π at the 90% C.L.

  8. The Unruh effect and oscillating neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vir Ahluwalia, Dharam; Labun, Lance; Torrieri, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    We give an overview of the issues and ambiguities associated with the Unruh effect, and argue that, as well as a very interesting phenomenon, it can also be used as a probe of fundamental physics. In particular, We point out that, because the detectable neutrino is not a mass Eigenstate, the Unruh effect works in a qualitatively different way than for any inertial process. For inertial processes, neutrinoes are produced as charged eigenstates, rather than as mass Eigenstates as in the comoving frame. This makes the Unruh effect detectable in microscopic processes, via, for example, p→ nl^+\\barνl decays. Such an experiment would be invaluable both as a tool to measure neutrino masses and mixing angles, and to investigate the fundamental quantization of fields.

  9. Optimization of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghulam, Mustafa; Faisal, Akram; Bilal, Masud

    2013-03-01

    We show how the traditional grid based method for finding neutrino oscillation parameters Δm2 and tan2 θ can be combined with an optimization technique, Differential Evolution (DE), to get a significant decrease in computer processing time required to obtain minimal chi-square (χ2) in four different regions of the parameter space. We demonstrate efficiency for the two-neutrinos case. For this, the χ2 function for neutrino oscillations is evaluated for grids with different density of points in standard allowed regions of the parameter space of Δm2 and tan2 θ using experimental and theoretical total event rates of chlorine (Homestake), Gallex+GNO, SAGE, Superkamiokande, and SNO detectors. We find that using DE in combination with the grid based method with small density of points can produce the results comparable with the one obtained using high density grid, in much lesser computation time.

  10. Violation of the Leggett-Garg Inequality in Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, J A; Kaiser, D I; Murskyj, M M; Weiss, T E

    2016-07-29

    The Leggett-Garg inequality, an analogue of Bell's inequality involving correlations of measurements on a system at different times, stands as one of the hallmark tests of quantum mechanics against classical predictions. The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations should adhere to quantum-mechanical predictions and provide an observable violation of the Leggett-Garg inequality. We demonstrate how oscillation phenomena can be used to test for violations of the classical bound by performing measurements on an ensemble of neutrinos at distinct energies, as opposed to a single neutrino at distinct times. A study of the MINOS experiment's data shows a greater than 6σ violation over a distance of 735 km, representing the longest distance over which either the Leggett-Garg inequality or Bell's inequality has been tested. PMID:27517759

  11. Violation of the Leggett-Garg Inequality in Neutrino Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, J A; Kaiser, D I; Murskyj, M M; Weiss, T E

    2016-07-29

    The Leggett-Garg inequality, an analogue of Bell's inequality involving correlations of measurements on a system at different times, stands as one of the hallmark tests of quantum mechanics against classical predictions. The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations should adhere to quantum-mechanical predictions and provide an observable violation of the Leggett-Garg inequality. We demonstrate how oscillation phenomena can be used to test for violations of the classical bound by performing measurements on an ensemble of neutrinos at distinct energies, as opposed to a single neutrino at distinct times. A study of the MINOS experiment's data shows a greater than 6σ violation over a distance of 735 km, representing the longest distance over which either the Leggett-Garg inequality or Bell's inequality has been tested.

  12. Violation of the Leggett-Garg Inequality in Neutrino Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, J. A.; Kaiser, D. I.; Murskyj, M. M.; Weiss, T. E.

    2016-07-01

    The Leggett-Garg inequality, an analogue of Bell's inequality involving correlations of measurements on a system at different times, stands as one of the hallmark tests of quantum mechanics against classical predictions. The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations should adhere to quantum-mechanical predictions and provide an observable violation of the Leggett-Garg inequality. We demonstrate how oscillation phenomena can be used to test for violations of the classical bound by performing measurements on an ensemble of neutrinos at distinct energies, as opposed to a single neutrino at distinct times. A study of the MINOS experiment's data shows a greater than 6 σ violation over a distance of 735 km, representing the longest distance over which either the Leggett-Garg inequality or Bell's inequality has been tested.

  13. Pragmatic view of short-baseline neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Long, H. W.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of global analyses of short-baseline neutrino oscillation data in 3+1, 3+2 and 3+1+1 neutrino mixing schemes. We show that the data do not allow us to abandon the simplest 3+1 scheme in favor of the more complex 3+2 and 3+1+1 schemes. We present the allowed region in the 3+1 parameter space, which is located at Δm412 between 0.82 and 2.19eV2 at 3σ. The case of no oscillations is disfavored by about 6σ, which decreases dramatically to about 2σ if the Liquid Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) data are not considered. Hence, new high-precision experiments are needed to check the LSND signal.

  14. Status of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Daya Bay Collaboration; Lin, Cheng-Ju Stephen

    2010-12-15

    The last unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 is one of the fundamental parameters of nature; it is also a crucial parameter for determining the sensitivity of future long-baseline experiments aimed to study CP violation in the neutrino sector. Daya Bay is a reactor neutrino oscillation experiment designed to achieve a sensitivity on the value of sin^2(2*theta_13) to better than 0.01 at 90percent CL. The experiment consists of multiple identical detectors placed underground at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and suppress cosmogenic backgrounds. With the baseline design, the expected anti-neutrino signal at the far site is about 360 events per day and at each of the near sites is about 1500 events per day. An overview and current status of the experiment will be presented.

  15. The hunt for cosmic accelerators: neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resconi, Elisa

    2016-08-01

    The recent discovery of high energy cosmic neutrinos from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory opens new opportunities for particle and astrophysics. We report here the IceCube observation of a diffuse neutrino background and the on-going searches for counterparts.

  16. Nuclear effects in atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Singh, S. K.

    2010-11-24

    We have studied the nuclear medium effects in the neutrino (antineutrino) induced interactions in nuclei at intermediate energy region. We have applied this study to calculate the event rates for atmospheric and accelerator neutrino experiments. The study of the nuclear effects has been done for the quasielastic lepton production and the charged current incoherent and coherent pion production processes.

  17. Experimental constraints on the neutrino oscillations and a simple model of three-flavor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Raczka, P.A.; Szymacha, A. ); Tatur, S. )

    1994-02-01

    A simple model of neutrino mixing is considered which contains only one right-handed neutrino field coupled, via the mass term, to the three usual left-handed fields. This is the simplest model that allows for three-flavor neutrino oscillations. The existing experimental limits on the neutrino oscillations are used to obtain constraints on the two free-mixing parameters of the model. A specific sum rule relating the oscillation probabilities of different flavors is derived.

  18. On the origin of neutrino oscillations through Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Julio

    2015-07-01

    The possibility of generating neutrino masses and oscillations through Lorentz- violating models is investigated. In the first model, an interaction between a fermion doublet and a Lorentz-violating gauge field, which play the role of a regulator field and, eventually, decouples from the fermions, is considered. In this case, by solving the (non-perturbative) Schwinger-Dyson equation, we show how masses and oscillations are generated dynamically. In the second model, fermions with LV kinematics interact via a four-fermion interaction and masses are shown to be generated dynamically when using another non-perturbative method. In both models, the recovery of Lorentz invariance is discussed and it is shown that the only physical observables are the dynamical masses that lead to neutrino oscillations.

  19. Investigation of alternative mechanisms to neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment; Investigacao de Mecanismos Alternativos a Oscilacao de Neutrinos no Experimentos MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    de Abreu Barbosa Coelho, Joao

    2012-01-01

    The neutrino oscillation model is very successful in explaining a large variety of experiments. The model is based on the premise that the neutrinos that interact through the weak force via charged current are not mass eigenstates, but a superposition of them. In general, a quantum superposition is subject to loss of coherence, so that pure states tend toward mixed states. This type of evolution is not possible within the context of isolated quantum systems because the evolution is unitary and, therefore, is invariant under time reversal. By breaking unitarity, an arrow of time is introduced and the characteristic effect for neutrinos is a damping of oscillations. In this thesis, some phenomenological decoherence and decay models are investigated, which could be observed by MINOS, a neutrino oscillation experiment that consists of measuring the neutrino flux produced in a particle accelerator 735 km away. We analyse the disappearance of muon neutrinos in MINOS. Information from other experiments is used to constrain the number of parameters, leaving only one extra parameter in each model. We assume a power law energy dependence of the decoherence parameter. The official MINOS software and simulation are used to obtain the experiment's sensitivities to the effects of unitarity breaking considered.

  20. Wave-packet treatment of reactor neutrino oscillation experiments and its implications on determining the neutrino mass hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yat-Long; Chu, M.-C.; Tsui, Ka Ming; Wong, Chan Fai; Xu, Jianyi

    2016-06-01

    We derive the neutrino flavor transition probabilities with the neutrino treated as a wave packet. The decoherence and dispersion effects from the wave-packet treatment show up as damping and phase-shifting of the plane-wave neutrino oscillation patterns. If the energy uncertainty in the initial neutrino wave packet is larger than around 0.01 of the neutrino energy, the decoherence and dispersion effects would degrade the sensitivity of reactor neutrino experiments to mass hierarchy measurement to lower than 3 σ confidence level.

  1. Bbn Constraints on Neutrino Oscillations Parameters Relaxed or Strengthened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, Daniela

    Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) with nonequilibrium νe ↔ νs oscillations, in the more general case of non-zero population of νs before oscillations δNs ≠ 0, is discussed. 4He primordial production Yp(δNs) in the presence of νe ↔ νs oscillations for different initial populations of the sterile neutrino state 0 ≤ δ Ns ≤ 1 and the full range of oscillation parameters is calculated. Non-zero δNs has a two-fold effect on 4He: (i) it enhances the energy density and hence increases the cosmic expansion rate, leading to Yp overproduction, and (ii) it suppresses the kinetic effects of oscillations on BBN, namely, the effects on pre-BBN nucleon kinetics, caused by the νe energy spectrum distortion and the ν e - bar {ν }e asymmetry generation by oscillations, leading to decreased Yp production. Depending on oscillation parameters one or the other effect may dominate, causing, correspondingly, either a relaxation of the cosmological constraints or their strengthening with the increase of δNs. More general BBN constraints on νe ↔ νs oscillation parameters, corresponding to 3% Yp overproduction, for different initial populations of the sterile state are calculated. Previous BBN constraints were derived assuming empty sterile state before oscillations. It is shown that the cosmological constraints strengthen with the increase of δNs value, the change being more considerable for nonresonant oscillations.

  2. Neutrino factory and beta beam: accelerator options for future neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2012-06-03

    Two accelerator options for producing intense neutrino beams a Neutrino Factory based on stored muon beams and a Beta Beam facility based on stored beams of beta unstable ions are described. Technical challenges for each are described and current R&D efforts aimed at mitigating these challenges are indicated. Progress is being made in the design of both types of facility, each of which would extend the state-of-the-art in accelerator science.

  3. Panofsky Prize Lecture: Evidence for Oscillation of Atmospheric Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuka, Yoji

    2002-04-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are decay products of pions and kaons (and of their decay products muons) produced by nuclear interactions of cosmic rays with air nuclei. Though their flux is not known well, only within 20 %, physics quantities that are independent of the flux uncertainty exist. The ratio of the number of muon neutrinos to the number of electron neutrinos is estimated to be accurate within 5 %. The other quantity is the shape of the zenith-angle distribution. Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande are water Cherenkov detectors with 3,000 ton and 50,000 ton pure water, respectively. Kamiokande was operational in 1983 - 1996, and Super-K in 1996 - 2001 and 2003 - in future. We had already noted in 1988 that the observed μ/e ratio, which represented ν_mu/ν_e, was smaller by about 40 %. Later in 1994 we noted that the zenith angle distribution of muon neutrinos was strongly distorted, namely much fewer muons observed in the upward direction, while downward-going muons were what we expected. Electrons were quite normal. In 1996 Super-Kamiokande was ready. Its fiducial volume is 22.5 kton, much larger than Kamiokande's 1.04 kton. In 1998 based on 25.5 kton years of data we presented convincing results on the small μ/e ratio which was caused by fewer number of muons in the upward direction. The essential feature of the observed anomaly was that the disappearance of muon neutrinos depended strongly on their path length and on their energies. Electrons showed no anomaly within the experimental limit. These results were quantitatively and almost uniquely explained by oscillation of muon neutrinos to tau neutrinos, thus evidence for the finite but tiny mass of neutrinos.

  4. Simple and compact expressions for neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We reformulate perturbation theory for neutrino oscillations in matter with an expansion parameter related to the ratio of the solar to the atmospheric Δ m 2 scales. Unlike previous works, we use a renormalized basis in which certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. We show that the new framework has an exceptional feature that leads to the neutrino oscillation probability in matter with the same structure as in vacuum to first order in the expansion parameter. It facilitates immediate physical interpretation of the formulas, and makes the expressions for the neutrino oscillation probabilities extremely simple and compact. We find, for example, that the ν e disappearance probability at this order is of a simple two-flavor form with an appropriately identified mixing angle and Δ m 2. More generally, all the oscillation probabilities can be written in the universal form with the channel-discrimination coefficient of 0 , ± 1 or simple functions of θ 23. Despite their simple forms they include all order effects of θ 13 and all order effects of the matter potential, to first order in our expansion parameter.

  5. Measurement of neutrino oscillation by the K2K experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, M. H.; Bhang, H.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, B. H.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, H. I.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. B.; Park, H.; Seo, E.; So, H.; Yoo, J.; Aliu, E.; Andringa, S.; Espinal, X.; Fernandez, E.; Jover, G.; Nova, F.; Rodriguez, A.

    2006-10-01

    We present measurements of {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance in K2K, the KEK to Kamioka long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. One-hundred and twelve beam-originated neutrino events are observed in the fiducial volume of Super-Kamiokande with an expectation of 158.1{sub -8.6}{sup +9.2} events without oscillation. A distortion of the energy spectrum is also seen in 58 single-ring muonlike events with reconstructed energies. The probability that the observations are explained by the expectation for no neutrino oscillation is 0.0015% (4.3{sigma}). In a two-flavor oscillation scenario, the allowed {delta}m{sup 2} region at sin{sup 2}2{theta}=1 is between 1.9 and 3.5x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} at the 90% C.L. with a best-fit value of 2.8x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}.

  6. The remarkable history of the discovery of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2014-12-01

    The experimental observation of neutrino flavour oscillations took place some 30 years after they had been first proposed, and even then came about principally as a result of an anomalously low value in the measurement of the electroweak mixing angle, resulting in the possible validity of the minimal SU(5) grand unification scheme and the prediction of proton decay. In turn this led to underground experiments which failed in their original objective, but were to discover - purely as a background - the oscillatory behaviour of neutrino flavour, due to a fortuitous fourfold coincidence in the values of the neutrino mass differences, the Earth's radius and magnetic field and the tiny value of the Fermi constant.

  7. Exploring Neutrino Oscillation Parameter Space with a Monte Carlo Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejel, Hugo; Ernst, David; Cogswell, Bernadette; Latimer, David

    2015-04-01

    The χ2 (or likelihood) function for a global analysis of neutrino oscillation data is first calculated as a function of the neutrino mixing parameters. A computational challenge is to obtain the minima or the allowed regions for the mixing parameters. The conventional approach is to calculate the χ2 (or likelihood) function on a grid for a large number of points, and then marginalize over the likelihood function. As the number of parameters increases with the number of neutrinos, making the calculation numerically efficient becomes necessary. We implement a new Monte Carlo algorithm (D. Foreman-Mackey, D. W. Hogg, D. Lang and J. Goodman, Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 125 306 (2013)) to determine its computational efficiency at finding the minima and allowed regions. We examine a realistic example to compare the historical and the new methods.

  8. SOX: search for short baseline neutrino oscillations with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivier, M.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffliot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, T.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jonquàres, N.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Veyssiére, C.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.; Borexino Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Borexino detector has convincingly shown its outstanding performances in the low energy regime through its accomplishments in the observation and study of the solar and geo neutrinos. It is then an ideal tool to perform a state of the art source-based experiment for testing the longstanding hypothesis of a fourth sterile neutrino with ~ eV2 mass, as suggested by several anomalies accumulated over the past three decades in source, reactor, and accelerator-based experiments. The SOX project aims at successively deploying two intense radioactive sources, made of Cerium (antineutrino) and Chromium (neutrino), respectively, in a dedicated pit located beneath the detector. The existence of such an ~ eV2 sterile neutrino would then show up as an unambiguous spatial and energy distortion in the count rate of neutrinos interacting within the active detector volume. This article reports on the latest developments about the first phase of the SOX experiment, namely CeSOX, and gives a realistic projection of CeSOX sensitivity to light sterile neutrinos in a simple (3+1) model.

  9. Quantum mechanics of neutrino oscillations - hand waving for pedestrians.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.

    1998-12-22

    Why Hand Waving? All calculations in books describe oscillations in time. But real experiments don't measure time. Hand waving is used to convert the results of a ''gedanken time experiment'' to the result of a real experiment measuring oscillations in space. Right hand waving gives the right answer; wrong hand waving gives the wrong answer. Many papers use wrong handwaving to get wrong answers. This talk explains how to do it right and also answers the following questions: (1) A neutrino which is a mixture of two mass eigenstates is emitted with muon in the decay of a pion at rest. This is a ''missing mass experiment'' where the muon energy determines the neutrino mass. Why are the two mass states coherent? (2) A neutrino which is a mixture of two mass eigenstates is emitted at time t=0. The two mass eigenstates move with different velocities and arrive at the detector at different times. Why are the two mass states coherent? (3) A neutrino is a mixture of two overlapping wave packets with different masses moving with different velocities. Will the wave packets eventually separate? If yes, when?

  10. Gravity-induced neutrino antineutrino oscillation: CPT and lepton number non-conservation under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new effect in the neutrino oscillation phase which shows that the neutrino antineutrino oscillation is possible under gravity even if the rest masses of the corresponding eigenstates are the same. This is due to CPT violation, and is possible to demonstrate if the neutrino mass eigenstates are expressed as a combination of neutrino and antineutrino eigenstates, as of the neutral kaon system, with the plausible breaking of lepton number conservation. For Majorana neutrinos, this oscillation is expected to significantly affect the inner edge of neutrino-dominated accretion discs around compact objects by influencing the neutrino sphere which controls the accretion dynamics, and then the related type-II supernova evolution and the r-process nucleosynthesis. On the other hand, in the early universe, in the presence of various lepton number violating processes, this oscillation, we argue, might have led to neutrino asymmetry which resulted in baryogenesis from the B L symmetry by electro-weak sphaleron processes.

  11. Simple and compact expressions for neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter

    DOE PAGES

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Parke, Stephen J.

    2016-01-29

    We reformulate perturbation theory for neutrino oscillations in matter with an expansion parameter related to the ratio of the solar to the atmospheric Δm2 scales. Unlike previous works, use a renormalized basis in which certain first-order effects are taken into account in the zeroth-order Hamiltonian. Using this perturbation theory we derive extremely compact expressions for the neutrino oscillations probabilities in matter. We find, for example, that the νe disappearance probability at this order is of a simple two flavor form with an appropriately identified mixing angle and Δm2. Furthermore, despite exceptional simplicity in their forms they accommodate all order effectsmore » θ13 and the matter potential.« less

  12. Predictive discrete dark matter model and neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucenna, M. S.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.; Shimizu, Yusuke

    2012-10-01

    Dark matter stability can be achieved through a partial breaking of a flavor symmetry. In this framework we propose a type-II seesaw model where left-handed matter transforms nontrivially under the flavor group Δ(54), providing correlations between neutrino oscillation parameters, consistent with the recent Daya-Bay and RENO reactor angle measurements, as well as lower bounds for neutrinoless double beta decay. The dark matter phenomenology is provided by a Higgs-portal.

  13. 11B and constraints on neutrino oscillations and spectra from neutrino nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Sam M; Heger, Alexander; Tur, Clarisse

    2011-04-15

    We study the sensitivity to variations in the triple-alpha and 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rates, of the yield of the neutrino-process isotopes 7Li, 11B, 19F, 138La, and 180Ta in core-collapse supernovae. Compared to solar abundances, less than 15% of 7Li, about 25%-80% of 19F, and about half of 138La is produced in these stars. Over a range of ±2σ for each helium-burning rate, 11B is overproduced and the yield varies by an amount larger than the variation caused by the effects of neutrino oscillations. The total 11B yield, however, may eventually provide constraints on supernova neutrino spectra. PMID:21568548

  14. 11B and constraints on neutrino oscillations and spectra from neutrino nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Sam M; Heger, Alexander; Tur, Clarisse

    2011-04-15

    We study the sensitivity to variations in the triple-alpha and 12C(α,γ)16O reaction rates, of the yield of the neutrino-process isotopes 7Li, 11B, 19F, 138La, and 180Ta in core-collapse supernovae. Compared to solar abundances, less than 15% of 7Li, about 25%-80% of 19F, and about half of 138La is produced in these stars. Over a range of ±2σ for each helium-burning rate, 11B is overproduced and the yield varies by an amount larger than the variation caused by the effects of neutrino oscillations. The total 11B yield, however, may eventually provide constraints on supernova neutrino spectra.

  15. Self-induced suppression of collective neutrino oscillations in a supernova.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huaiyu; Friedland, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    We investigate collective flavor oscillations of supernova neutrinos at late stages of the explosion. We first show that the frequently used single-angle (averaged coupling) approximation predicts oscillations close to, or perhaps even inside, the neutrinosphere, potentially invalidating the basic neutrino transport paradigm. Fortunately, we also find that the single-angle approximation breaks down in this regime; in the full multiangle calculation, the oscillations start safely outside the transport region. The new suppression effect is traced to the interplay between the dispersion in the neutrino-neutrino interactions and the vacuum oscillation term.

  16. A search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa Ricoux, Juan Pedro

    2009-01-01

    We perform a search for vμ → ve oscillations, a process which would manifest a nonzero value of the θ13 mixing angle, in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The analysis consists of searching for an excess of ve charged-current candidate events over the predicted backgrounds, made mostly of neutral-current events with high electromagnetic content. A novel technique to select electron neutrino events is developed, which achieves an improved separation between the signal and the backgrounds, and which consequently yields a better reach in θ13. The backgrounds are predicted in the Far Detector from Near Detector measurements. An excess is observed in the Far Detector data over the predicted backgrounds, which is consistent with the background-only hypothesis at 1.2 standard deviations.

  17. Constraint on neutrino decay with medium-baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahão, Thamys; Minakata, Hisakazu; Nunokawa, Hiroshi; Quiroga, Alexander A.

    2015-11-01

    The experimental bound on lifetime of ν 3, the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest ν e component, is much weaker than those of ν 1 and ν 2 by many orders of magnitude to which the astrophysical constraints apply. We argue that the future reactor neutrino oscillation experiments with medium-baseline (˜50 km), such as JUNO or RENO-50, has the best chance of placing the most stringent constraint on ν3 lifetime among all neutrino experiments which utilize the artificial source neutrinos. Assuming decay into invisible states, we show by a detailed χ 2 analysis that the ν 3 lifetime divided by its mass, τ 3 /m 3, can be constrained to be τ 3 /m 3 > 7 .5 (5 .5) × 10-11 s/eV at 95% (99%) C.L. by 100 kt·years exposure by JUNO. It may be further improved to the level comparable to the atmospheric neutrino bound by its longer run. We also discuss to what extent ν 3 decay affects mass-ordering determination and precision measurements of the mixing parameters.

  18. Search for neutrino oscillations at the palo verde nuclear reactors

    PubMed

    Boehm; Busenitz; Cook; Gratta; Henrikson; Kornis; Lawrence; Lee; McKinny; Miller; Novikov; Piepke; Ritchie; Tracy; Vogel; Wang; Wolf

    2000-04-24

    We report on the initial results from a measurement of the antineutrino flux and spectrum at a distance of about 800 m from the three reactors of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station using a segmented gadolinium-loaded scintillation detector. We find that the antineutrino flux agrees with that predicted in the absence of oscillations excluding at 90% C.L. nu;(e)-nu;(x) oscillations with Deltam(2)>1.12x10(-3) eV(2) for maximal mixing and sin (2)2straight theta>0.21 for large Deltam(2). Our results support the conclusion that the atmospheric neutrino oscillations observed by Super-Kamiokande do not involve nu(e).

  19. Neutrino oscillations: what do we know about θ13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, David

    2008-10-01

    The phenomenon of neutrino oscillations is reviewed. A new analysis tool for the recent, more finely binned Super-K atmospheric data is outlined. This analysis incorporates the full three-neutrino oscillation probabilities, including the mixing angle θ13 to all orders, and a full three- neutrino treatment of the Earth's MSW effect. Combined with the K2K, MINOS, and CHOOZ data, the upper bound on θ13 is found to arise from the Super-K atmospheric data, while the lower bound arises from CHOOZ. This is caused by the linear in θ13 terms which are of particualr importance in the region L/E>10^4 m/MeV where the sub-dominant expansion is not convergent. In addition, the enhancement of θ12 by the Earth MSW effect is found to be important for this result. The best fit value of θ13 is found to be (statistically insignificantly) negative and given by θ13=-0.07^+0.18-0.11. In collaboration with Jesus Escamilla, Vanderbilt University and David Latimer, University of Kentucky.

  20. Reproducing sterile neutrinos and the behavior of flavor oscillations with superconducting-magnetic proximity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Thomas E.

    2016-03-01

    The physics of a superconductor subjected to a magnetic field is known to be equivalent to neutrino oscillations. Examining the properties of singlet-triplet oscillations in the magnetic field, a sterile neutrino is suggested to be represented by singlet Cooper pairs and moderates flavor oscillations between three flavor neutrinos (triplet Cooper pairs). A superconductor-exchange spring system's rotating magnetization profile is used to simulate the mass-flavor oscillations in the neutrino case and the physics of neutrino oscillations are discussed. Connecting the condensed matter system and the particle physics system with this analogy may allow for the properties of the condensed matter system to inform neutrino experiments. Support is graciously acknowledged from the Pat Beckman Memorial Scholarship from the Orange County Chapter of the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation.

  1. Neutrino spin oscillations in matter under the influence of gravitational and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2013-06-01

    We derive the new quasi-classical equation for the description of the spin evolution of a neutrino propagating in a curved space-time and interacting with a background matter and an external electromagnetic field. This equation is used to analyze neutrino spin oscillations in these external backgrounds. We obtain the effective Hamiltonian and the transition probability for oscillations of neutrinos when they move in the vicinity of a rotating black hole, surrounded by an accretion disk, and interact with an external magnetic field. The appearance of new resonances in neutrino spin oscillations in this system is considered. The approximate treatment of spin oscillations of radially propagating ultra high energy neutrinos is developed. We also discuss the applications of our results to the description of neutrino spin oscillations in realistic astrophysical media.

  2. R&D Topics for Neutrino Factory Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, J. Scott

    2008-02-01

    The muons in a neutrino factory must be accelerated from the energy of the capture, phase rotation, and cooling systems (around 120 MeV kinetic energy) to the energy of the storage ring (around 25 GeV). This is done with a sequence of accelerators of different types: a linac, one or more recirculating linear accelerators, and finally one or more fixed field alternating gradient accelerators (FFAGs). I discuss the R&D that is needed to arrive at a complete system which we can have confidence will accelerate the beam and for which we can obtain a cost estimate.

  3. Optimal Staging of Acceleration and Cooling in a Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.

    2005-12-01

    Schemes to produce intense sources of high-energy muons, Neutrino Factories, beta beams, and colliders, require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large initial emittances must be reduced or cooled both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated to multi-GeV energies. The acceleration stage becomes critical in formulating and optimizing muon beams; individual stages are strongly interlinked and not independent as is the case in most conventional acceleration systems. Most importantly, the degree of cooling, or cooling channel, depends on the choice of acceleration. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the optimal strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  4. High intensity neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, A. K.

    2015-07-15

    High-intensity proton accelerator complex enabled long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments with a precisely controlled neutrino beam. The beam power so far achieved is a few hundred kW with enourmorous efforts of accelerator physicists and engineers. However, to fully understand the lepton mixing structure, MW-class accelerators are desired. We describe the current intensity-frontier high-energy proton accelerators, their plans to go beyond and technical challenges in the neutrino beamline facilities.

  5. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters m2 21, θ12 and constraints on θ13 based on a study of reactor antineutrinos at a baseline of ~ 180 km with the KamLAND detector. The data presented here was collected between April 2002 and November 2009, and amounts to a total exposure of 2.64 ± 0.07 × 1032 proton-years. For this exposure we expect 2140 ± 74(syst) antineutrino candidates from reactors, assuming standard model neutrino behavior, and 350±88(syst) candidates from background. The number observed is 1614. The ratio of background-subtracted candidates observed to expected is (NObs - NBkg)/ (NExp) = 0.59 ± 0.02(stat) ± 0.045(syst) which confirms reactor neutrino disappearance at greater than 5σ significance. Interpreting this deficit as being due to neutrino oscillation, the best-fit oscillation parameters from a three-flavor analysis are m2 21= 7.60+0.20 -0.19×10-5eV2, θ12 = 32.5 ± 2.9 degrees and sin2 θ13 = 0.025+0.035 -0.035, the 95% confidence-level upper limit on sin2 θ13 is sin2 θ13 < 0.083. Assuming CPT invariance, a combined analysis of KamLAND and solar neutrino data yields best-fit values: m2 21 = 7.60+0.20 -0.20 × 10-5eV2, θ12 = 33.5+1.0 -1.1 degrees, and sin2 θ13 = 0.013 ± 0.028 or sin2 θ13 < 0.06 at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Probing possible decoherence effects in atmospheric neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lisi, E; Marrone, A; Montanino, D

    2000-08-01

    It is shown that the results of the Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino experiment, interpreted in terms of nu(mu)<-->nu(tau) flavor transitions, can probe possible decoherence effects induced by new physics (e.g., by quantum gravity) with high sensitivity, supplementing current laboratory tests based on kaon oscillations and on neutron interferometry. By varying the (unknown) energy dependence of such effects, one can either obtain strong limits on their amplitude or use them to find an unconventional solution to the atmospheric nu anomaly based solely on decoherence.

  7. Connecting experiment with theory: A model-independent parameterization of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Doris Jeanne

    1997-09-01

    Many experiments are currently looking for evidence of neutrino mass in the form of neutrino oscillations. Oscillation probabilities are non-linear functions of the neutrino mixing matrix elements, so most comparisons of data to theory are based on simplifying models of the mixing matrix. We begin this dissertation with a review of neutrino interactions and a few of the popular models describing neutrino masses and mixing. Next we present our model-independent description of neutrino oscillations and derive the predictions of various models in terms of our new 'box' parameterization. Finally, we use our boxes to find mixing matrices consistent with existing neutrino data. As more definitive data becomes available, these solutions will probably need to be adjusted; when such a need arises, our box notation will provide a convenient method for finding new solutions.

  8. Supernova constraints on neutrino oscillation and EoS for proto-neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-05-02

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We here discuss how to determine the neutrino temperatures and propose a method to determine still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with isotopic ratios of the light elements discovered in presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show that our method suggests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  9. Present and future high-energy accelerators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kourbanis, I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    There is an active neutrino program making use of the high-energy (larger than 50 GeV) accelerators both in USA at Fermilab with NuMI and at CERN in Europe with CNGS. In this paper we will review the prospects for high intensity high energy beams in those two locations during the next decade.

  10. Accelerated and Airy-Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    A quantum particle subjected to a constant force undergoes an accelerated motion following a parabolic path, which differs from the classical motion just because of wave packet spreading (quantum diffusion). However, when a periodic potential is added (such as in a crystal) the particle undergoes Bragg scattering and an oscillatory (rather than accelerated) motion is found, corresponding to the famous Bloch oscillations (BOs). Here, we introduce an exactly-solvable quantum Hamiltonian model, corresponding to a generalized Wannier-Stark Hamiltonian Ĥ, in which a quantum particle shows an intermediate dynamical behavior, namely an oscillatory motion superimposed to an accelerated one. Such a novel dynamical behavior is referred to as accelerated BOs. Analytical expressions of the spectrum, improper eigenfunctions and propagator of the generalized Wannier-Stark Hamiltonian Ĥ are derived. Finally, it is shown that acceleration and quantum diffusion in the generalized Wannier-Stark Hamiltonian are prevented for Airy wave packets, which undergo a periodic breathing dynamics that can be referred to as Airy-Bloch oscillations.

  11. A torsional completion of gravity for Dirac matter fields and its applications to neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Luca; Vignolo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the torsional completion of gravitation for an underlying background filled with Dirac fields, applying it to the problem of neutrino oscillations: we discuss the effects of the induced torsional interactions as corrections to the neutrino oscillations mechanism.

  12. Neutrino oscillations with IceCube DeepCore and PINGU

    SciTech Connect

    DeYoung, T.; Collaboration: IceCube-PINGU Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube neutrino telescope was augmented with the DeepCore infill array, completed in the 2010/11 austral summer, to enhance its response to neutrinos below 100 GeV. At these energies, neutrino oscillation effects are visible in the flux of atmospheric neutrinos traversing path lengths comparable to the Earth's diameter. Initial measurements of muon neutrino disappearance parameters using data from DeepCore are presented, as well as an estimate of potential future precision. In addition, plans for a Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU), which could permit determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy within the coming decade, are discussed.

  13. a Brief Critique of the Search for Neutrino Oscillations with “SINGLE MEASUREMENT” Solar Neutrino Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, David B.; Cheng, Mao-Tung

    We briefly review the recent results on solar neutrino observations pointing out the dependence on the model of the solar neutrino production. We show that current uncertainties make it rather unlikely that unambiguous proof of neutrino oscillations can be obtained from any current (single measurement) techniques. We then show the importance of carrying out solar neutrino experiments where two reactions are measured simultaneously (double experiments). As an example we apply this to the ICARUS liquid Argon detector being constructed for the Gran Sasso Laboratory.

  14. Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This prepares the way for a Neutrino Factory (NF) in which high energy muons decay within the straight sections of a storage ring to produce a beam of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. The NF concept was proposed in 1997 at a time when the discovery that the three known types of neutrino ({nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}) can change their flavor as they propagate through space (neutrino oscillations) was providing a first glimpse of physics beyond the Standard Model. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source: a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  15. Neutrino-driven wakefield plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, L. A.; Serbeto, A.

    2003-08-01

    Processos envolvendo neutrinos são importantes em uma grande variedade de fenômenos astrofísicos, como as explosões de supernovas. Estes objetos, assim como os pulsares e as galáxias starburst, têm sido propostos como aceleradores cósmicos de partículas de altas energias. Neste trabalho, um modelo clássico de fluidos é utilizado para estudar a interação não-linear entre um feixe de neutrinos e um plasma não-colisional relativístico de pósitrons e elétrons na presença de um campo magnético. Durante a interação, uma onda híbrida superior de grande amplitude é excitada. Para parâmetros típicos de supernovas, verificamos que partículas carregadas "capturadas" por essa onda podem ser aceleradas a altas energias. Este resultado pode ser importante no estudo de mecanismos aceleradores de partículas em ambientes astrofísicos.

  16. Limits on muon-neutrino to tau-neutrino oscillations induced by a sterile neutrino state obtained by OPERA at the CNGS beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bender, D.; Bertolin, A.; Bodnarchuk, I.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buonaura, A.; Buontempo, S.; Büttner, B.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chukanov, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; De Serio, M.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Ereditato, A.; Fini, R. A.; Fukuda, T.; Galati, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Goldberg, J.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Guler, A. M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hollnagel, A.; Hosseini, B.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Lauria, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Malgin, A.; Malenica, M.; Mandrioli, G.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meregaglia, A.; Mikado, S.; Monacelli, P.; Montesi, M. C.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Omura, T.; Ozaki, K.; Paoloni, A.; Paparella, L.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pasqualini, L.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pessard, H.; Podgrudkov, D.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Roda, M.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Schembri, A.; Shakirianova, I.; Shchedrina, T.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shiraishi, T.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tioukov, V.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladymyrov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yoon, C. S.; Zemskova, S.

    2015-06-01

    The OPERA experiment, exposed to the CERN to Gran Sasso ν μ beam, collected data from 2008 to 2012. Four oscillated ν τ Charged Current interaction candidates have been detected in appearance mode, which are consistent with ν μ → ν τ oscillations at the atmospheric Δ m 2 within the "standard" three-neutrino framework. In this paper, the OPERA ν τ appearance results are used to derive limits on the mixing parameters of a massive sterile neutrino.

  17. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2016-07-12

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  18. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-12-24

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams (?Beta Beams?), one based on decays of stored muon beams (?Neutrino Factory?), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam (?Superbeam?). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R&D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R&D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  19. Accelerator Challenges and Opportunities for Future Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-10-06

    There are three types of future neutrino facilities currently under study, one based on decays of stored beta-unstable ion beams ('Beta Beams'), one based on decays of stored muon beams ('Neutrino Factory'), and one based on the decays of an intense pion beam ('Superbeam'). In this paper we discuss the challenges each design team must face and the R and D being carried out to turn those challenges into technical opportunities. A new program, the Muon Accelerator Program, has begun in the U.S. to carry out the R and D for muon-based facilities, including both the Neutrino Factory and, as its ultimate goal, a Muon Collider. The goals of this program will be briefly described.

  20. Staging acceleration and cooling in a Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.

    2006-03-01

    All schemes to produce intense sources of high-energy muons—Neutrino factories, beta beams, Colliders—require collection, RF capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large initial emittances must be reduced or "cooled" both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated to multi-GeV energies. The acceleration stage becomes critical in formulating and optimizing muon beams; individual stages are strongly interlinked and not independent as is the case in most conventional acceleration systems. Most importantly, the degree of cooling, or cooling channel, depends on the choice of acceleration. In the current US baseline scenario, the cooling required for acceleration is about a factor of 10 in transverse emittance per plane. Longitudinal cooling is also required. In the proposed Japanese scenario, using an alternative acceleration scheme, no cooling is presumed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the optimal strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  1. Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Brunner, J.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eichmann, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larsen, D. T.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Paul, L.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Rees, I.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandroos, J.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser IceCube instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10 and 100 GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The IceCube detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by Δ m322=2.72-0.20+0.19×10-3 eV2 and sin2θ23=0.53-0.12+0.09 (normal mass ordering assumed). The results are compatible, and comparable in precision, to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

  2. Neutrino-Antineutrino Mass Splitting in the Standard Model: Neutrino Oscillation and Baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Tureanu, Anca

    By adding a neutrino mass term to the Standard Model, which is Lorentz and SU(2) × U(1) invariant but nonlocal to evade CPT theorem, it is shown that nonlocality within a distance scale of the Planck length, that may not be fatal to unitarity in generic effective theory, can generate the neutrino-antineutrino mass splitting of the order of observed neutrino mass differences, which is tested in oscillation experiments, and non-negligible baryon asymmetry depending on the estimate of sphaleron dynamics. The one-loop order induced electron-positron mass splitting in the Standard Model is shown to be finite and estimated at ˜ 10-20 eV, well below the experimental bound < 10-2 eV. The induced CPT violation in the K-meson in the Standard Model is expected to be even smaller and well below the experimental bound |m_{K} - m_{bar{K}}| < 0.44 × 10^{-18} GeV.

  3. Neutrino-antineutrino mass splitting in the Standard Model: Neutrino oscillation and baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Tureanu, Anca

    2015-07-01

    By adding a neutrino mass term to the Standard Model, which is Lorentz and SU(2) × U(1) invariant but nonlocal to evade CPT theorem, it is shown that nonlocality within a distance scale of the Planck length, that may not be fatal to unitarity in generic effective theory, can generate the neutrino-antineutrino mass splitting of the order of observed neutrino mass differences, which is tested in oscillation experiments, and non-negligible baryon asymmetry depending on the estimate of sphaleron dynamics. The one-loop order induced electron-positron mass splitting in the Standard Model is shown to be finite and estimated at ˜ 10-20 eV, well below the experimental bound < 10-2 eV. The induced CPT violation in the K-meson in the Standard Model is expected to be even smaller and well below the experimental bound |mK - mK¯| < 0.44 × 10-18GeV.

  4. Neutrino oscillations at DUNE with improved energy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Romeri, Valentina; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Sorel, Michel

    2016-09-01

    We study the physics reach of the long-baseline oscillation analysis of the DUNE experiment when realistic simulations are used to estimate its neutrino energy reconstruction capabilities. Our studies indicate that significant improvements in energy resolution compared to what is customarily assumed are plausible. This improved energy resolution can increase the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation in two ways. On the one hand, the CP-violating term in the oscillation probability has a characteristic energy dependence that can be better reproduced. On the other hand, the second oscillation maximum, especially sensitive to δ CP, is better reconstructed. These effects lead to a significant improvement in the fraction of values of δ CP for which a 5 σ discovery of leptonic CP-violation would be possible. The precision of the δ CP measurement could also be greatly enhanced, with a reduction of the maximum uncertainties from 26° to 18° for a 300 MW·kt·yr exposure. We therefore believe that this potential gain in physics reach merits further investigations of the detector performance achievable in DUNE.

  5. Calculation of oscillation probabilities of atmospheric neutrinos using nuCraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallraff, Marius; Wiebusch, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    NuCraft (nucraft.hepforge.org) is an open-source Python project that calculates neutrino oscillation probabilities for neutrinos from cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere for their propagation through Earth. The solution is obtained by numerically solving the Schrödinger equation. The code supports arbitrary numbers of neutrino flavors including additional sterile neutrinos, CP violation, arbitrary mass hierarchies, matter effects with a configurable continuous Earth model, and takes into account the production height distribution of neutrinos in the Earth's atmosphere.

  6. Measurement of neutrino oscillations with the MINOS detectors in the NuMI beam.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Cavanaugh, S; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Coleman, S J; Culling, A J; de Jong, J K; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Dytman, S A; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Harris, E Falk; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Godley, A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, J J; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Ma, J; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Metelko, C J; Michael, D G; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahaman, A; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Seun, S-M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Symes, P; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tavera, M A; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Yang, T; Zois, M; Zhang, K; Zwaska, R

    2008-09-26

    This Letter reports new results from the MINOS experiment based on a two-year exposure to muon neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI beam. Our data are consistent with quantum-mechanical oscillations of neutrino flavor with mass splitting |Deltam2| = (2.43+/-0.13) x 10(-3) eV2 (68% C.L.) and mixing angle sin2(2theta) > 0.90 (90% C.L.). Our data disfavor two alternative explanations for the disappearance of neutrinos in flight: namely, neutrino decays into lighter particles and quantum decoherence of neutrinos, at the 3.7 and 5.7 standard-deviation levels, respectively.

  7. Matter Effects on Neutrino Oscillations in Different Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Li-Jun; Li, Rui-Cheng; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of simulations about supernova explosion, we have a better understanding about the density profiles and the shock waves in supernovae than before. There might be a reverse shock wave, another sudden change of density except the forward shock wave, or even no shock wave, emerging in the supernova. Instead of using the expression of the crossing probability at the high resonance, PH, we have studied the matter effects on neutrino oscillations in different supernova models. In detail, we have calculated the survival probability of ve (Ps) and the conversion probability of vx (Pc) in the Schrödinger equation within a simplified two-flavor framework for a certain case, in which the neutrino transfers through the supernova matter from an initial flavor eigenstate located at the core of the supernova. Our calculations was based on the data of density in three different supernova models obtained from simulations. In our work, we do not steepen the density gradient around the border of the shock wave, which differs to what was done in most of the other simulations. It is found that the mass and the density distribution of the supernova do make a difference on the behavior of Ps and Pc. With the results of Ps and Pc, we can estimate the number of ve (and vx) remained in the beam after they go through the matter in the supernova. Supported by National Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11175020 and 11275025

  8. Synchronization versus decoherence of neutrino oscillations at intermediate densities

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, Georg G.; Tamborra, Irene

    2010-12-15

    We study collective oscillations of a two-flavor neutrino system with arbitrary but fixed density. In the vacuum limit, modes with different energies quickly dephase (kinematical decoherence), whereas in the limit of infinite density they lock to each other (synchronization). For intermediate densities, we find different classes of solutions. There is always a phase transition in the sense of partial synchronization occurring only above a density threshold. For small mixing angles, partial or complete decoherence can be induced by a parametric resonance, introducing a new time scale to the problem, the final outcome depending on the spectrum and mixing angle. We derive an analytic relation that allows us to calculate the late-time degree of coherence based on the spectrum alone.

  9. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (˜ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  10. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  11. Neutrino oscillation parameter sampling with MonteCUBES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blennow, Mattias; Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    We present MonteCUBES ("Monte Carlo Utility Based Experiment Simulator"), a software package designed to sample the neutrino oscillation parameter space through Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms. MonteCUBES makes use of the GLoBES software so that the existing experiment definitions for GLoBES, describing long baseline and reactor experiments, can be used with MonteCUBES. MonteCUBES consists of two main parts: The first is a C library, written as a plug-in for GLoBES, implementing the Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to sample the parameter space. The second part is a user-friendly graphical Matlab interface to easily read, analyze, plot and export the results of the parameter space sampling. Program summaryProgram title: MonteCUBES (Monte Carlo Utility Based Experiment Simulator) Catalogue identifier: AEFJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 69 634 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 980 776 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: MonteCUBES builds and installs on 32 bit and 64 bit Linux systems where GLoBES is installed Operating system: 32 bit and 64 bit Linux RAM: Typically a few MBs Classification: 11.1 External routines: GLoBES [1,2] and routines/libraries used by GLoBES Subprograms used:Cat Id ADZI_v1_0, Title GLoBES, Reference CPC 177 (2007) 439 Nature of problem: Since neutrino masses do not appear in the standard model of particle physics, many models of neutrino masses also induce other types of new physics, which could affect the outcome of neutrino oscillation experiments. In general, these new physics imply high-dimensional parameter spaces that are difficult to explore using classical methods such as multi-dimensional projections and minimizations, such as those

  12. Latest results on atmospheric neutrino oscillations from IceCube/DeepCore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de André, J. P. A. M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, located at the South Pole, is the world’s largest neutrino detector. DeepCore, the low energy extension for IceCube, with a threshold of about ten GeV is well suited to study neutrino oscillations using neutrinos produced in the Earth’s atmosphere and traveling distances as large as the Earth’s diameter before being detected. Using these neutrinos DeepCore makes measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters θ23 and |Δm 2 32| with precisions approaching that of dedicated experiments, and based on preliminary studies these results can still be further improved. These new studies as well as the current results obtained in DeepCore are discussed here.

  13. Implications of lepton flavor violation on long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumya, C.; Mohanta, R.

    2016-09-01

    Nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSIs), the subleading effects in the flavor transitions of neutrinos, play a crucial role in the determination of the various unknowns in neutrino oscillations, such as neutrino mass hierarchy, the Dirac C P violating phase, and the octant of the atmospheric mixing angle. In this work, we focus on the possible implications of lepton flavor violating (LFV) NSIs, which generally affect the neutrino propagation, on the determination of these unknown oscillation parameters. We study the effect of these NSIs on the physics potential of the currently running and upcoming long-baseline experiments, i.e., T2K, NO ν A , and DUNE. We also check the allowed oscillation parameter space in the presence of LFV NSIs.

  14. THE PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS: Neutrino Oscillation Induced by Chiral Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Cheng-Fu; Sun, Gao-Feng; Zhuang, Peng-Fei

    2009-03-01

    Electric charge neutrality provides a relationship between chiral dynamics and neutrino propagation in compact stars. Due to the sudden drop of the electron density at thefirst-order chiral phase transition, the oscillation for low energy neutrinos is significant and can be regarded as a signature of chiral symmetry restoration in the core of compact stars.

  15. Diffuse supernova neutrinos: oscillation effects, stellar cooling and progenitor mass dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Tamborra, Irene E-mail: tamborra@mpp.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) using the recent progenitor-dependent, long-term supernova simulations from the Basel group and including neutrino oscillations at several post-bounce times. Assuming multi-angle matter suppression of collective effects during the accretion phase, we find that oscillation effects are dominated by the matter-driven MSW resonances, while neutrino-neutrino collective effects contribute at the 5–10% level. The impact of the neutrino mass hierarchy, of the time-dependent neutrino spectra and of the diverse progenitor star population is 10% or less, small compared to the uncertainty of at least 25% of the normalization of the supernova rate. Therefore, assuming that the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy will be determined within the next decade, the future detection of the DSNB will deliver approximate information on the MSW-oscillated neutrino spectra. With a reliable model for neutrino emission, its detection will be a powerful instrument to provide complementary information on the star formation rate and for learning about stellar physics.

  16. Neutrino oscillations in the early universe: A real-time formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.M.; Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H.J. de

    2005-10-15

    Neutrino oscillations in the early universe prior to the epoch of primordial nucleosynthesis is studied by implementing real-time nonequilibrium field theory methods. We focus on two flavors of Dirac neutrinos, however, the formulation is general. We obtain the equations of motion for neutrino wave packets of either chirality and helicity in the plasma allowing for CP asymmetry. Contributions nonlocal in space-time to the self-energy dominate over the asymmetry for T > or approx. 3-5 MeV if the lepton and neutrino asymmetries are of the same order as the baryon asymmetry. We find a new contribution which cannot be interpreted as the usual effective potential. The mixing angles and dispersion relations in the medium depend on helicity. We find that resonant transitions are possible in the temperature range 10 < or approx. T<<100 MeV. Near a resonance in the mixing angle, the oscillation time scale in the medium as compared to the vacuum is slowed down substantially for small vacuum mixing angle. The time scale of oscillations speeds up for off-resonance high energy neutrinos for which the mixing angle becomes vanishingly small. The equations of motion reduce to the familiar oscillation formulae for negative helicity ultrarelativistic neutrinos, but include consistently both the mixing angle and the oscillation frequencies in the medium. These equations of motion also allow to study the dynamics of right handed as well as positive helicity neutrinos.

  17. Mismatch Oscillations in High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.A.

    2005-05-03

    When planning the design of high-current FODO transport for accelerators, it is useful to have simple, accurate tools for calculating quantities such as the phase advances {sigma}{sub 0} and !given the lattice and beam parameters. Along with the KV beam model, the smooth approximation is often used. It is simple but not very accurate in many cases. Although Struckmeier and Reiser [1] showed that the stable oscillation frequencies of mismatched beams could be obtained accurately, they actually used a hybrid approach where {sigma}{sub 0} and {sigma} were already known precisely. When starting instead with basic quantities such as quadrupole dimensions, field strength, beam line charge density and emittance, the smooth approximation gives substantial errors. Here we derive a simple modification of the smooth approximation formula that improves the accuracy of the predicted frequencies by a factor of five at {sigma}{sub 0} = 83{sup o}.

  18. Quantum-gravity decoherence effects in neutrino oscillations: Expected constraints from CNGS and J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sarkar, Sarben; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Sakharov, Alexander S.

    2008-03-01

    Quantum decoherence, the evolution of pure states into mixed states, may be a feature of quantum-gravity models. In most cases, such models lead to fewer neutrinos of all active flavors being detected in a long-baseline experiment as compared to three-flavor standard neutrino oscillations. We discuss the potential of the CNGS and J-PARC beams in constraining models of quantum-gravity induced decoherence using neutrino oscillations as a probe. We use as much as possible model-independent parametrizations, even though they are motivated by specific microscopic models, for fits to the expected experimental data which yield bounds on quantum-gravity decoherence parameters.

  19. Search for differences in oscillation parameters for atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos at Super-Kamiokande.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Lee, K P; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Martens, K; Vagins, M R; Labarga, L; Magro, L M; Dufour, F; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T M; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Ishizuka, T; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Yokoyama, M; Totsuka, Y; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Wilkes, R J

    2011-12-01

    We present a search for differences in the oscillations of antineutrinos and neutrinos in the Super-Kamiokande-I, -II, and -III atmospheric neutrino sample. Under a two-flavor disappearance model with separate mixing parameters between neutrinos and antineutrinos, we find no evidence for a difference in oscillation parameters. Best-fit antineutrino mixing is found to be at (Δm2,sin2 2θ)=(2.0×10(-3)  eV2, 1.0) and is consistent with the overall Super-K measurement.

  20. Search for differences in oscillation parameters for atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos at Super-Kamiokande.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Lee, K P; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Martens, K; Vagins, M R; Labarga, L; Magro, L M; Dufour, F; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T M; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Ishizuka, T; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Yokoyama, M; Totsuka, Y; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Wilkes, R J

    2011-12-01

    We present a search for differences in the oscillations of antineutrinos and neutrinos in the Super-Kamiokande-I, -II, and -III atmospheric neutrino sample. Under a two-flavor disappearance model with separate mixing parameters between neutrinos and antineutrinos, we find no evidence for a difference in oscillation parameters. Best-fit antineutrino mixing is found to be at (Δm2,sin2 2θ)=(2.0×10(-3)  eV2, 1.0) and is consistent with the overall Super-K measurement. PMID:22242990

  1. Special Issue on "Neutrino Oscillations: Celebrating the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015" in Nuclear Physics B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Tommy

    2016-07-01

    In 2015, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Takaaki Kajita from the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration and Arthur B. McDonald from the SNO Collaboration "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass". Furthermore, the Daya Bay, K2K and T2K, KamLAND, SNO, and Super-Kamiokande Collaborations shared the Fundamental Physics Breakthrough Prize the same year. In order to celebrate this successful and fruitful year for neutrino oscillations, the editors and the publisher of Nuclear Physics B decided to publish a Special Issue on neutrino oscillations. We invited prominent scientists in the area of neutrino physics that relates to neutrino oscillations to write contributions for this Special Issue, which was open to both original research articles as well as review articles. The authors of this Special Issue consist of e.g. the two Nobel Laureates, International Participants of the Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden (August 19-24, 2004), selected active researchers, and members from large experimental collaborations with major results in the last ten years. In total, this Special Issue consists of 28 contributions. Please note that the cover of this Special Issue contains a figure from each of the 26 contributions that have figures included.

  2. Plots and Figures from the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) at Fermilab

    DOE Data Explorer

    MINOS, or Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is an experiment at Fermilab designed to study the phenomena known as neutrino oscillations. It uses a beam of neutrino particles produced by the NuMI beamline facility - Neutrinos at the Main Injector. The beam of neutrinos is sent through the two MINOS detectors, one at Fermilab and one in the Soudan Mine in northern Minnesota. The Minos for Scientists page provides a link to the data plots that are available to the public and also provides explanations for some of the recent results of the experiment. Another links leads to a long listing of MINOS publications in refereed journals. Photo galleries are found by checking the links on the left menu.

  3. Neutrino factory

    DOE PAGES

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; et al

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore » making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  4. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  5. Neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R. J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that θ13>0 . The measured value of θ13 is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti)neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO ν Design Study consortium. EURO ν coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO ν baseline accelerator facility will provide 1 021 muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  6. Solar neutrinos: Near-far asymmetry and just-so oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Faied, B.; Fogli, G.L.; Montanino, D.

    1997-02-01

    We propose to study possible signals of just-so oscillations in new-generation solar neutrino experiments by separating the events detected when the Earth is nearest to the Sun (perihelion {plus_minus} 3 months) from those detected when the Earth is farthest from the Sun (aphelion {plus_minus} 3 months). We introduce a solar-model-independent near-far asymmetry, which is nonzero if just-so oscillations occur. We apply our calculations to the kinetic energy spectra of electrons induced by {sup 8}B solar neutrino interactions in the SuperKamiokande and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiments. We show that the sensitivity to the neutrino oscillation parameters can be increased by probing the near-far asymmetry in selected parts of the electron energy spectra. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Oscillation effects and time variation of the supernova neutrino signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Brockman, Justin

    2008-02-15

    The neutrinos detected from the next galactic core-collapse supernova will contain valuable information on the internal dynamics of the explosion. One mechanism leading to a temporal evolution of the neutrino signal is the variation of the induced neutrino flavor mixing driven by changes in the density profile. With one and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations we identify the behavior and properties of prominent features of the explosion. Using these results we demonstrate the time variation of the neutrino crossing probabilities due to changes in the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) neutrino transformations as the star explodes by using the S-matrix--Monte Carlo--approach to neutrino propagation. After adopting spectra for the neutrinos emitted from the proto-neutron star we calculate for a galactic supernova the evolution of the positron spectra within a water Cerenkov detector and find that this signal allows us to probe of a number of explosion features.

  8. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, V.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e + e - linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  9. Accelerator R&D toward Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. Such a collider can offer superb energy resolution, smaller size, and potentially cost and power consumption compared to multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. This article briefly reviews the motivation, design and status of accelerator R&D for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory.

  10. Compatibility of high-{delta}m{sup 2} {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub e} neutrino oscillation searches

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Karagiorgi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Nguyen, V. T.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Anderson, C. E.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Soderberg, M.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.

    2008-07-01

    This article presents the compatibility of experimental data from neutrino oscillation experiments with a high-{delta}m{sup 2} two-neutrino oscillation hypothesis. Data is provided by the Bugey, Karlsruhe Rutherford Medium Energy Neutrino Experiment 2 (KARMEN2), Los Alamos Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND), and MiniBooNE experiments. The LSND, KARMEN2, and MiniBooNE results are 25.36% compatible within a two-neutrino oscillation hypothesis. However, the point of maximal compatibility is found in a region that is excluded by the Bugey data. A joint analysis of all four experiments, performed in the sin{sup 2}2{theta} vs {delta}m{sup 2} region common to all data, finds a maximal compatibility of 3.94%. This result does not account for additions to the neutrino oscillation model from sources such as CP violation or sterile neutrinos.

  11. Transition magnetic moments of Majorana neutrinos in supersymmetry without R-parity in light of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand

    2006-09-01

    The transition magnetic moments of Majorana neutrinos {mu}{sub {nu}{sub ij}} (ij=e{mu}, e{tau}, {mu}{tau}) are calculated in grand unified theory (GUT) constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit R-parity violation. It is assumed that neutrinos acquire masses via one-loop (quark-squark and lepton-slepton) radiative corrections. The mixing of squarks, sleptons, and quarks is considered explicitly. The connection between {mu}{sub {nu}{sub ij}} and the entries of neutrino mass matrix is studied. The current upper limits on {mu}{sub {nu}{sub ij}} are deduced from the elements of phenomenological neutrino mass matrix, which is reconstructed using the neutrino oscillation data and the lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life. Further, the results for {mu}{sub {nu}{sub e}{sub {mu}}}, {mu}{sub {nu}{sub e}{sub {tau}}} and {mu}{sub {nu}{sub {mu}}{sub {tau}}} are presented for the cases of inverted and normal hierarchy of neutrino masses and different SUSY scenarios. The largest values are of the order of 10{sup -17} in units of Bohr magneton.

  12. Three-generation neutrino oscillations in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Hao; Li, Xue-Qian

    2016-10-01

    Three-generation MSW effect in curved spacetime is studied and a brief discussion on the gravitational correction to the neutrino self-energy is given. The modified mixing parameters and corresponding conversion probabilities of neutrinos after traveling through celestial objects of constant densities are obtained. The method to distinguish between the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy is discussed in this framework. Due to the gravitational redshift of energy, in some extreme situations, the resonance energy of neutrinos might be shifted noticeably and the gravitational effect on the self-energy of neutrino becomes significant at the vicinities of spacetime singularities.

  13. Neutrino Oscillations, the Higgs Boson, and the Private Higgs Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenTov, Jonathan

    "CESR, PEP, PETRA, ISABELLE, p-bar p colliders, LEP, the tevatron, and ep machines are at various levels of design or construction. They will study the properties of b-matter, see weak intermediaries, and perhaps find the t-quark and the Higgs boson. Never before was there such a bestiary waiting to be discovered; and what surprises will be found!" - S. L. Glashow ("The Future of Elementary Particle Physics," Quarks and Leptons, NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series Volume 61, 1980, pp 687-713) The situation in 1980 was clearly different from the present situation in 2013, in which we face the very real possibilty that no new degrees of freedom will ever again be within reach of a collider. In an intriguing twist of fate, this very fact results in a sharp paradox for fundamental physics: the Higgs mass should be MP/m h ˜ 1017 times larger than it actually is, and the vacuum energy density of the universe should be (M P/A)4 ˜ (1031)4 times larger than it actually is, and apparently nature refuses to give us any more clues as to why. These together are what I would call the main problem of 21st century physics: despite all of the predictive success of particle physics so far, we must find a way to suitably modify the rules of quantum field theory, lest we accept the unproductive defeatist attitude that our universe is simply fine-tuned. In the meantime, there is much interesting work to be done in more "traditional" particle physics: we have learned that neutrinos actually have tiny but nonzero masses, which is clear and unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will allocate the first third of this document to phenomena related to neutrino oscillations. In particular, I would like to argue that some of the apparent differences between neutrino mixing and quark mixing are to an extent illusory, and actually many aspects of the two sectors can be understood in a coherent framework for extending the Standard Model. The remaining two-thirds of this

  14. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2014-11-01

    We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters. Long baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as KamLAND [10,11]. The aim of these experiments is to observe the slow oscillation with Δ21 and measure the corresponding oscillation parameters Δm212 and θ12. Short baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as Daya Bay [1-3], Double CHOOZ [4], RENO [5]. They are designed to observe the fast oscillation with Δ31 and Δ32 (or equivalently, Δee[3]) and measure the corresponding oscillation parameters Δmee2, θ13. Medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiments. They stand for the next generation experiments of reactor antineutrinos, with typical representatives of Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) [12] and RENO-50 [13]. They can determine the neutrino mass ordering (m1oscillations and become a bridge between short baseline and long baseline reactor antineutrino experiments. High-dimensional operators originating from new physics can contribute to the neutrino oscillation in the form of non-standard interactions (NSIs) [14

  15. Preliminary consideration of a double, 480 GeV, fast cycling proton accelerator for production of neutrino beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Hays, Steven; /Fermilab

    2007-03-01

    We propose to build the DSF-MR (Double Super-Ferric Main Ring), 480 GeV, fast-cycling (2 second repetition rate) two-beam proton accelerator in the Main Ring tunnel of Fermilab. This accelerator design is based on the super-ferric magnet technology developed for the VLHC, and extended recently to the proposed LER injector for the LHC and fast cycling SF-SPS at CERN. The DSF-MR accelerator system will constitute the final stage of the proton source enabling production of two neutrino beams separated by 2 second time period. These beams will be sent alternately to two detectors located at {approx} 3000 km and {approx} 7500 km away from Fermilab. It is expected that combination of the results from these experiments will offer more than 3 order of magnitudes increased sensitivity for detection and measurement of neutrino oscillations with respect to expectations in any current experiment, and thus may truly enable opening the window into the physics beyond the Standard Model. We examine potential sites for the long baseline neutrino detectors accepting beams from Fermilab. The current injection system consisting of 400 MeV Linac, 8 GeV Booster and the Main Injector can be used to accelerate protons to 45 GeV before transferring them to the DSF-MR. The implementation of the DSF-MR will allow for an 8-fold increase in beam power on the neutrino production target. In this note we outline the proposed new arrangement of the Fermilab accelerator complex. We also briefly describe the DSF-MR magnet design and its power supply, and discuss necessary upgrade of the Tevatron RF system for the use with the DSF-MR accelerator. Finally, we outline the required R&D, cost estimate and possible timeline for the implementation of the DSF-MR accelerator.

  16. Neutrino mass hierarchy and electron neutrino oscillation parameters with one hundred thousand reactor events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, F.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proposed medium-baseline reactor neutrino experiments offer unprecedented opportunities to probe, at the same time, the mass-mixing parameters which govern νe oscillations both at long wavelength (δm2 and θ12) and at short wavelength (Δm2 and θ13), as well as their tiny interference effects related to the mass hierarchy (i.e., the relative sign of Δm2 and δm2). In order to take full advantage of these opportunities, precision calculations and refined statistical analyses of event spectra are required. In such a context, we revisit several input ingredients, including nucleon recoil in inverse beta decay and its impact on energy reconstruction and resolution, hierarchy and matter effects in the oscillation probability, spread of reactor distances, irreducible backgrounds from geoneutrinos and from far reactors, and degeneracies between energy scale and spectrum shape uncertainties. We also introduce a continuous parameter α, which interpolates smoothly between normal hierarchy (α =+1) and inverted hierarchy (α =-1). The determination of the hierarchy is then transformed from a test of hypothesis to a parameter estimation, with a sensitivity given by the distance of the true case (either α=+1 or α =-1) from the "undecidable" case (α=0). Numerical experiments are performed for the specific setup envisaged for the JUNO project, assuming a realistic sample of O(105) reactor events. We find a typical sensitivity of ˜2σ to the hierarchy in JUNO, which, however, can be challenged by energy scale and spectrum shape systematics, whose possible conspiracy effects are investigated. The prospective accuracy reachable for the other mass-mixing parameters is also discussed.

  17. Measurement of neutrino oscillation with KamLAND: evidence of spectral distortion.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Eguchi, K; Enomoto, S; Furuno, K; Ichimura, K; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Ishihara, K; Iwamoto, T; Kawashima, T; Kishimoto, Y; Koga, M; Koseki, Y; Maeda, T; Mitsui, T; Motoki, M; Nakajima, K; Ogawa, H; Owada, K; Ricol, J-S; Shimizu, I; Shirai, J; Suekane, F; Suzuki, A; Tada, K; Tajima, O; Tamae, K; Tsuda, Y; Watanabe, H; Busenitz, J; Classen, T; Djurcic, Z; Keefer, G; McKinny, K; Mei, D-M; Piepke, A; Yakushev, E; Berger, B E; Chan, Y D; Decowski, M P; Dwyer, D A; Freedman, S J; Fu, Y; Fujikawa, B K; Goldman, J; Gray, F; Heeger, K M; Lesko, K T; Luk, K-B; Murayama, H; Poon, A W P; Steiner, H M; Winslow, L A; Horton-Smith, G A; Mauger, C; McKeown, R D; Vogel, P; Lane, C E; Miletic, T; Gorham, P W; Guillian, G; Learned, J G; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S; Dazeley, S; Hatakeyama, S; Rojas, A; Svoboda, R; Dieterle, B D; Detwiler, J; Gratta, G; Ishii, K; Tolich, N; Uchida, Y; Batygov, M; Bugg, W; Efremenko, Y; Kamyshkov, Y; Kozlov, A; Nakamura, Y; Gould, C R; Karwowski, H J; Markoff, D M; Messimore, J A; Nakamura, K; Rohm, R M; Tornow, W; Wendell, R; Young, A R; Chen, M-J; Wang, Y-F; Piquemal, F

    2005-03-01

    We present results of a study of neutrino oscillation based on a 766 ton/year exposure of KamLAND to reactor antineutrinos. We observe 258 nu (e) candidate events with energies above 3.4 MeV compared to 365.2+/-23.7 events expected in the absence of neutrino oscillation. Accounting for 17.8+/-7.3 expected background events, the statistical significance for reactor nu (e) disappearance is 99.998%. The observed energy spectrum disagrees with the expected spectral shape in the absence of neutrino oscillation at 99.6% significance and prefers the distortion expected from nu (e) oscillation effects. A two-neutrino oscillation analysis of the KamLAND data gives Deltam(2)=7.9(+0.6)(-0.5)x10(-5) eV(2). A global analysis of data from KamLAND and solar-neutrino experiments yields Deltam(2)=7.9(+0.6)(-0.5)x10(-5) eV(2) and tan((2)theta=0.40(+0.10)(-0.07), the most precise determination to date. PMID:15783875

  18. Detecting CP violation in a single neutrino oscillation channel at very long baselines

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, D. C.; Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.

    2007-11-15

    We propose a way of detecting CP violation in a single neutrino oscillation channel at very long baselines (on the order of several thousands of kilometers), given precise knowledge of the smallest mass-squared difference. It is shown that CP violation can be characterized by a shift in L/E of the peak oscillation in the {nu}{sub e}-{nu}{sub {mu}} appearance channel, both in vacuum and in matter. In fact, matter effects enhance the shift at a fixed energy. We consider the case in which sub-GeV neutrinos are measured with varying baseline and also the case of a fixed baseline. For the varied baseline, accurate knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux would not be necessary; however, neutrinos must be distinguishable from antineutrinos. For the fixed baseline, it is shown that CP violation can be distinguished if the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} were known.

  19. Indication of electron neutrino appearance from an accelerator-produced off-axis muon neutrino beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Abgrall, N; Ajima, Y; Aihara, H; Albert, J B; Andreopoulos, C; Andrieu, B; Aoki, S; Araoka, O; Argyriades, J; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Badertscher, A; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Bertram, I; Besnier, M; Beucher, J; Beznosko, D; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Brook-Roberge, D G; Buchanan, N; Budd, H; Calvet, D; Cartwright, S L; Carver, A; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cazes, A; Cervera, A; Chavez, C; Choi, S; Christodoulou, G; Coleman, J; Coleman, W; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Curioni, A; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davies, G S; Davis, S; Day, M; De Rosa, G; de André, J P A M; de Perio, P; Delbart, A; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dinh Tran, P; Dobson, J; Dore, U; Drapier, O; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Dziomba, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Esposito, L S; Fechner, M; Ferrero, A; Finch, A J; Frank, E; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Galymov, V; Gannaway, F C; Gaudin, A; Gendotti, A; George, M A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Golan, T; Goldhaber, M; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Grant, A; Gumplinger, P; Guzowski, P; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamano, K; Hansen, C; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Harrison, P F; Hartfiel, B; Hartz, M; Haruyama, T; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hastings, S; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayashi, K; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Henderson, R; Higashi, N; Hignight, J; Hirose, E; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hyndman, A; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Iida, M; Ikeda, M; Ilic, J; Imber, J; Ishida, T; Ishihara, C; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwasaki, M; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Joo, K K; Jover-Manas, G V; Jung, C K; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Karlen, D; Kasami, K; Kato, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khanam, F; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, J; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kimura, N; Kirby, B; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Kogan, G; Koike, S; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Kowalik, K; Kravtsov, V; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kulkarni, N; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Laveder, M; Lee, K P; Le, P T; Levy, J M; Licciardi, C; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Litchfield, R P; Litos, M; Longhin, A; Lopez, G D; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Lux, T; Macaire, M; Mahn, K; Makida, Y; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marchionni, A; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Maryon, T; Marzec, J; Masliah, P; Mathie, E L; Matsumura, C; Matsuoka, K; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; McLachlan, T; Messina, M; Metcalf, W; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A D; Mituka, G; Miura, M; Mizouchi, K; Monfregola, L; Moreau, F; Morgan, B; Moriyama, S; Muir, A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakajima, K; Nakamoto, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Naples, D; Navin, M L; Nelson, B; Nicholls, T C; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Nowak, J A; Noy, M; Obayashi, Y; Ogitsu, T; Ohhata, H; Okamura, T; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oser, S M; Otani, M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Ozaki, T; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Paul, P; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perkin, J D; Pettinacci, V; Pierre, F; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Qian, W; Raaf, J L; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Raufer, T M; Ravonel, M; Raymond, M; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rondio, E; Roney, J M; Rossi, B; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sabouri, S; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sarrat, A; Sasaki, K; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Scully, D I; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Shibata, M; Shimizu, Y; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Siyad, M; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Stahl, A; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Stone, J; Strabel, C; Sulak, L R; Sulej, R; Sutcliffe, P; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Szeptycka, M; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, M M; Tanimoto, N; Tashiro, K; Taylor, I; Terashima, A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Toki, W; Tomaru, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Walding, J J; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wanderer, P J; Wang, J; Ward, M A; Ward, G P; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; West, N; Whitehead, L H; Wikström, G; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, S; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamanoi, Y; Yamaoka, H; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2011-07-22

    The T2K experiment observes indications of ν(μ) → ν(e) appearance in data accumulated with 1.43×10(20) protons on target. Six events pass all selection criteria at the far detector. In a three-flavor neutrino oscillation scenario with |Δm(23)(2)| = 2.4×10(-3)  eV(2), sin(2)2θ(23) = 1 and sin(2)2θ(13) = 0, the expected number of such events is 1.5±0.3(syst). Under this hypothesis, the probability to observe six or more candidate events is 7×10(-3), equivalent to 2.5σ significance. At 90% C.L., the data are consistent with 0.03(0.04) < sin(2)2θ(13) < 0.28(0.34) for δ(CP) = 0 and a normal (inverted) hierarchy.

  20. Indication of Electron Neutrino Appearance from an Accelerator-Produced Off-Axis Muon Neutrino Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abgrall, N.; Ajima, Y.; Aihara, H.; Albert, J. B.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrieu, B.; Aoki, S.; Araoka, O.; Argyriades, J.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Bertram, I.; Besnier, M.; Beucher, J.; Beznosko, D.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. D. M. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S. B.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Brook-Roberge, D. G.; Buchanan, N.; Budd, H.; Calvet, D.; Cartwright, S. L.; Carver, A.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cazes, A.; Cervera, A.; Chavez, C.; Choi, S.; Christodoulou, G.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, W.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Curioni, A.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, S.; Day, M.; de Rosa, G.; de André, J. P. A. M.; de Perio, P.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; di Lodovico, F.; di Luise, S.; Dinh Tran, P.; Dobson, J.; Dore, U.; Drapier, O.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziomba, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Esposito, L. S.; Fechner, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finch, A. J.; Frank, E.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Galymov, V.; Gannaway, F. C.; Gaudin, A.; Gendotti, A.; George, M. A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Golan, T.; Goldhaber, M.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Grant, A.; Gumplinger, P.; Guzowski, P.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamano, K.; Hansen, C.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartfiel, B.; Hartz, M.; Haruyama, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hastings, S.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hayashi, K.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Henderson, R.; Higashi, N.; Hignight, J.; Hirose, E.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hyndman, A.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Iida, M.; Ikeda, M.; Ilic, J.; Imber, J.; Ishida, T.; Ishihara, C.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwasaki, M.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joo, K. K.; Jover-Manas, G. V.; Jung, C. K.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kaneyuki, K.; Karlen, D.; Kasami, K.; Kato, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khanam, F.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, B.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Kogan, G.; Koike, S.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kouzuma, Y.; Kowalik, K.; Kravtsov, V.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kulkarni, N.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Laveder, M.; Lee, K. P.; Le, P. T.; Levy, J. M.; Licciardi, C.; Lim, I. T.; Lindner, T.; Litchfield, R. P.; Litos, M.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, G. D.; Loverre, P. F.; Ludovici, L.; Lux, T.; Macaire, M.; Mahn, K.; Makida, Y.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Maryon, T.; Marzec, J.; Masliah, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Matsumura, C.; Matsuoka, K.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; McLachlan, T.; Messina, M.; Metcalf, W.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A. D.; Mituka, G.; Miura, M.; Mizouchi, K.; Monfregola, L.; Moreau, F.; Morgan, B.; Moriyama, S.; Muir, A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Naples, D.; Navin, M. L.; Nelson, B.; Nicholls, T. C.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishino, H.; Nowak, J. A.; Noy, M.; Obayashi, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Ohhata, H.; Okamura, T.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oser, S. M.; Otani, M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Ozaki, T.; Pac, M. Y.; Palladino, V.; Paolone, V.; Paul, P.; Payne, D.; Pearce, G. F.; Perkin, J. D.; Pettinacci, V.; Pierre, F.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Qian, W.; Raaf, J. L.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Raufer, T. M.; Ravonel, M.; Raymond, M.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rondio, E.; Roney, J. M.; Rossi, B.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sabouri, S.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sarrat, A.; Sasaki, K.; Scholberg, K.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Scully, D. I.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Shibata, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Siyad, M.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Stahl, A.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Stone, J.; Strabel, C.; Sulak, L. R.; Sulej, R.; Sutcliffe, P.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Szeptycka, M.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, M. M.; Tanimoto, N.; Tashiro, K.; Taylor, I.; Terashima, A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Toki, W.; Tomaru, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Walding, J. J.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wanderer, P. J.; Wang, J.; Ward, M. A.; Ward, G. P.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; West, N.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wikström, G.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, S.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamanoi, Y.; Yamaoka, H.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.

    2011-07-01

    The T2K experiment observes indications of νμ→νe appearance in data accumulated with 1.43×1020 protons on target. Six events pass all selection criteria at the far detector. In a three-flavor neutrino oscillation scenario with |Δm232|=2.4×10-3eV2, sin⁡22θ23=1 and sin⁡22θ13=0, the expected number of such events is 1.5±0.3(syst). Under this hypothesis, the probability to observe six or more candidate events is 7×10-3, equivalent to 2.5σ significance. At 90% C.L., the data are consistent with 0.03(0.04)

  1. A study of atmospheric neutrino oscillation using the icecube deepcore detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, Laura

    The IceCube detector at the South Pole is a cubic-kilometer-scale neutrino detector designed to observe TeV-range charged particle secondaries from neutrino interactions, and thus do neutrino astronomy. As a main background to the search for astrophysical point sources of neutrinos, IceCube also observes muons and neutrinos from the atmospheric interactions of cosmic rays. By observing a spectrum of atmospheric neutrinos and comparing it to independent predictions of atmospheric fluxes with and without oscillations, IceCube can test various values of oscillation parameters. Neutrino oscillations have been observed experimentally for several decades; IceCube is the first experiment to extend this measurement to the 10-20 GeV energy range. An initial analysis has established that IceCube can see oscillations using the 79-string detector configuration ("IC79"), which was the first year of data that included the DeepCore detector. As a follow-up, this analysis uses a less restrictive event selection and thus a higher total event count, around 3,000 for one year of data. The fit is a Poisson likelihood fit of a two-dimensional rate histogram, using both oscillated length and observed energy. The arrival zenith angle of the muon is used as a proxy for oscillation length. The error contours are dominated by systematic effects more than by statistical limitations of the data. Major systematics include uncertainties in the atmospheric neutrino flux at high energies and uncertainties in the distribution of the cosmic ray muon background. This analysis was designed to produce limits on the mixing angle θ 23 that are competitive with other current experiments, although this is still uncertain as error analysis work is ongoing. Future work will further refine the event selection and systematic error analysis; the statistical methods and software used here are expected to become the IceCube oscillations standard. This thesis also includes background information about the

  2. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: rshansen@phys.au.dk E-mail: yvonne.y.wong@unsw.edu.au

    2015-08-01

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  3. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y.

    2015-08-11

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  4. Sterile Neutrino Search with MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Devan, Alena V.

    2015-08-01

    MINOS, Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in the NuMI muon neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. It consists of two detectors, a near detector positioned 1 km from the source of the beam and a far detector 734 km away in Minnesota. MINOS is primarily designed to observe muon neutrino disappearance resulting from three flavor oscillations. The Standard Model of Particle Physics predicts that neutrinos oscillate between three active flavors as they propagate through space. This means that a muon-type neutrino has a certain probability to later interact as a different type of neutrino. In the standard picture, the neutrino oscillation probabilities depend only on three neutrino flavors and two mass splittings, Δm2. An anomaly was observed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments that suggests the existence of a fourth, sterile neutrino flavor that does not interact through any of the known Standard Model interactions. Oscillations into a theoretical sterile flavor may be observed by a deficit in neutral current interactions in the MINOS detectors. A distortion in the charged current energy spectrum might also be visible if oscillations into the sterile flavor are driven by a large mass-squared difference, ms2 ~ 1 eV2. The results of the 2013 sterile neutrino search are presented here.

  5. Parametric resonance in neutrino oscillation: A guide to control the effects of inhomogeneous matter density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Masafumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Saito, Masako; Sato, Joe

    2016-08-01

    Effects of the inhomogeneous matter density on the three-generation neutrino oscillation probability are analyzed. Realistic profile of the matter density is expanded into a Fourier series. Taking in the Fourier modes one by one, we demonstrate that each mode has its corresponding target energy. The high Fourier mode selectively modifies the oscillation probability of the low-energy region. This rule is well described by the parametric resonance between the neutrino oscillation and the matter effect. The Fourier analysis gives a simple guideline to systematically control the uncertainty of the oscillation probability caused by the uncertain density of matter. Precise analysis of the oscillation probability down to the low-energy region requires accurate evaluation of the Fourier coefficients of the matter density up to the corresponding high modes.

  6. Revising the solution of the neutrino oscillation parameter degeneracies at neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, A. M.; Jones Perez, J.

    2007-02-01

    In the context of neutrino factories, we review the solution of the degeneracies in the neutrino oscillation parameters. In particular, we have set limits to sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} in order to accomplish the unambiguous determination of {theta}{sub 23} and {delta}. We have performed two different analysis. In the first, at a baseline of 3000 km, we simulate a measurement of the channels {nu}{sub e}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub e}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}}, combined with their respective conjugate ones, with a muon energy of 50 GeV and a running time of five years. In the second, we merge the simulated data obtained at L=3000 km with the measurement of {nu}{sub e}{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}} channel at 7250 km, the so-called 'magic baseline.' In both cases, we have studied the impact of varying the {nu}{sub {tau}} detector efficiency-mass product ({epsilon}{sub {nu}{tau}xM{tau}}), at 3000 km, keeping unchanged the {nu}{sub {mu}} detector mass and its efficiency. At L=3000 km, we found the existence of degenerate zones, that correspond to values of {theta}{sub 13}, which are equal or almost equal to the true ones. These zones are extremely difficult to discard, even when we increase the number of events. However, in the second scenario, this difficulty is overcome, demonstrating the relevance of the 'magic baseline'. From this scenario, the best limits of sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}, reached at 3{sigma}, for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 23}=0.95, 0.975, and 0.99 are: 0.008, 0.015, and 0.045, respectively, obtained at {delta}=0, and considering ({epsilon}{sub {nu}{tau}xM{tau}}){approx_equal}125, which is 5 times the initial efficiency-mass combination.

  7. Oscillation dynamics of active-unsterile neutrino mixing in a 2+1-tilde mixing scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Holman, R.; Hutasoit, Jimmy A.

    2010-02-01

    We consider the possibility that sterile neutrinos exist and admit a description as unparticles; we call these unsterile neutrinos. We then examine the nature of neutrino oscillations in a model where an unsterile can mix with two active flavors with a very simple mass matrix of the seesaw type. Despite these simplifications, we find a number of remarkable features, all of which will occur generically when more realistic cases are considered. These include momentum dependent mixing angles, invisible decay widths for the unsterile-like mode, as well as the inheritance of a nonvanishing spectral density for the massive activelike modes. We also obtain the disappearance and appearance probabilities for the activelike neutrinos and find remarkable interference effects between the active and unsterile neutrinos as a consequence of threshold effects, yielding new oscillatory contributions with different oscillation lengths. These effects are only measurable on short baseline experiments because there both probabilities are suppressed as compared to mixing with a canonical sterile neutrino, thereby providing a diagnostics tool to discriminate unsterile from canonical sterile neutrinos. We conclude with a discussion of whether these new phenomena could aid in the reconciliation of the LSND and MiniBooNE results.

  8. Future possibilities with Fermilab neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2008-01-01

    We will start with a brief overview of neutrino oscillation physics with emphasis on the remaining unanswered questions. Next, after mentioning near future reactor and accelerator experiments searching for a non zero {theta}{sub 13}, we will introduce the plans for the next generation of long-baseline accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments. We will focus on experiments utilizing powerful (0.7-2.1 MW) Fermilab neutrino beams, either existing or in the design phase.

  9. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Federspiel, F.; Garvey, G.; Louis, W.C.; Mills, G.B.; Tayloe, R.; Sandberg, V.; Sapp, B.; White, D.H.

    1999-07-09

    The Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND), located at the LANSCE (formerly LAMPF) linear accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory, has seen evidence for the oscillation of neutrinos, and hence neutrino mass. That discovery was the impetus for this LDRD project, begun in 1996. The goal of this project was to define the appropriate technologies to use in a follow up experiment and to set in place the requirements for such an experiment.

  10. BBN with electron-sterile neutrino oscillations — the finest leptometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    A relic lepton asymmetry orders of magnitude bigger than the baryon one may hide in the relic neutrino background. No direct theoretical or experimental limitations on its magnitude and sign are known. Only indirect cosmological constraints exist ranging from |L| < 0.01 to L < 10. Here we discuss a Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) model with late electron-sterile neutrino oscillations. The influence of L on neutrino oscillations and on nucleons freezing in the pre-BBN epoch is numerically analyzed in the full range of the oscillation parameters of the model and for |L| ≥ 10{sup −10}. The asymmetry-oscillations interplay is studied in detail and the behavior of L for different oscillation parameters is found. L effect on the primordially produced {sup 4}He is precisely studied. It is shown that this BBN model is a fine leptometer, capable of feeling extremely small relic lepton asymmetry — |L| > 10{sup −8}. The case of oscillations generated asymmetry by late electron-sterile oscillations and its effect on the primordial {sup 4}He is also briefly discussed. The instability region of the asymmetry growth is obtained.

  11. The Acceleration Scale, Modified Newtonian Dynamics and Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaferio, Antonaldo; Angus, Garry W.

    General relativity is able to describe the dynamics of galaxies and larger cosmic structures only if most of the matter in the universe is dark, namely, it does not emit any electromagnetic radiation. Intriguingly, on the scale of galaxies, there is strong observational evidence that the presence of dark matter appears to be necessary only when the gravitational field inferred from the distribution of the luminous matter falls below an acceleration of the order of 10^{-10} m s^{-2}. In the standard model, which combines Newtonian gravity with dark matter, the origin of this acceleration scale is challenging and remains unsolved. On the contrary, the full set of observations can be neatly described, and were partly predicted, by a modification of Newtonian dynamics, dubbed MOND, that does not resort to the existence of dark matter. On the scale of galaxy clusters and beyond, however, MOND is not as successful as on the scale of galaxies, and the existence of some dark matter appears unavoidable. A model combining MOND with hot dark matter made of sterile neutrinos seems to be able to describe most of the astrophysical phenomenology, from the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies to the dynamics of dwarf galaxies. Whether there exists a yet unknown covariant theory that contains general relativity and Newtonian gravity in the weak field limit and MOND as the ultra-weak field limit is still an open question.

  12. Status and neutrino oscillation physics potential of the Hyper-Kamiokande Project in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Gianfranca; Hyper-Kamiokande ProtoCollaboration

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K), a proposed one-megaton water Cherenkov detector to be built in Japan, is the logical continuation of the highly successful program of neutrino (astro) physics and proton decay using the water Cherenkov technique. In its baseline design, the Hyper-K detector consists of two cylindrical tanks lying side-by-side, the outer dimensions of each tank being 48m × 54m × 250m. The inner detector region will be instrumented with 99,000 20-inch photo-sensors. An international proto-collaboration has been intensively working on the R&D of key components such as optimization of cavern, tank construction, development of high performance photo-sensors, design of new near detectors and improvements to the J-PARC neutrino beam. Hyper-K will study the CP asymmetry in neutrino oscillations using the neutrino and anti-neutrino beams produced at J-PARC. With an exposure of 7.5 MW × 107 seconds, CP violating parameter delta can be measured to better than 19 degrees at all values of delta, and CP violation can be detected with more than 3 sigma significance for 76% of the values. An overview of the status of project and the studies of the sensitivity of this detector to physics quantities governing neutrino oscillation is presented.

  13. First Detection of the Acoustic Oscillation Phase Shift Expected from the Cosmic Neutrino Background.

    PubMed

    Follin, Brent; Knox, Lloyd; Millea, Marius; Pan, Zhen

    2015-08-28

    The unimpeded relativistic propagation of cosmological neutrinos prior to recombination of the baryon-photon plasma alters gravitational potentials and therefore the details of the time-dependent gravitational driving of acoustic oscillations. We report here a first detection of the resulting shifts in the temporal phase of the oscillations, which we infer from their signature in the cosmic microwave background temperature power spectrum. PMID:26371637

  14. Short-baseline electron neutrino oscillation length after the Troitsk experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Long, H. W.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the implications for short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the 3+1 mixing scheme of the recent Troitsk bounds on the mixing of a neutrino with mass between 2 and 100 eV. Considering the Troitsk data in combination with the results of short-baseline νe and ν¯e disappearance experiments, which include the reactor and Gallium anomalies, we derive a 2σ allowed range for the effective neutrino squared-mass difference between 0.85 and 43eV2. The upper bound implies that it is likely that oscillations in distance and/or energy can be observed in radioactive source experiments. It is also favorable for the ICARUS@CERN experiment, in which it is likely that oscillations are not washed out in the near detector. We discuss also the implications for neutrinoless double-β decay.

  15. Quantum theory of neutrino oscillations for pedestrians: simple answers to confusing questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkin, Harry J.

    2006-11-01

    A simple rigorous calculation confirms the standard formula and clarifies some confusing difficulties arising in the standard textbook recipe converting the unobserved frequency of time oscillations between neutrino states with different energies to the observed oscillation wave length in space. Including the quantum fluctuations in the position of the detector and in the transit time between source and detector enables the treatment of: (1) The difference in velocity and transit time between neutrinos with different energies. (2) The destruction of all phases between states with different masses by an ideal detector which measures the energy and momentum of the neutrino. (3) The destruction of all phases between states with different energies by a realistic detector in thermal equilibrium with its macroscopic environment. (4) The difficulty for relativistic treatments and relativistic field theory to treat the crucial quantum mechanics of a macroscopic detector at rest in the laboratory.

  16. Noncommutative spectral geometry, Bogoliubov transformations and neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria Gargiulo, Maria; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2015-07-01

    In this report we show that neutrino mixing is intrinsically contained in Connes’ noncommutatives pectral geometry construction, thanks to the introduction of the doubling of algebra, which is connected to the Bogoliubov transformation. It is known indeed that these transformations are responsible for the mixing, turning the mass vacuum state into the flavor vacuum state, in such a way that mass and flavor vacuum states are not unitary equivalent. There is thus a red thread that binds the doubling of algebra of Connes’ model to the neutrino mixing.

  17. Consequences of an Abelian Z' for neutrino oscillations and dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plestid, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    The Standard Model's accidental and anomaly-free currents, B -L , Le-Lμ, Le-Lτ, and Lμ-Lτ, could be indicative of a hidden gauge structure beyond the Standard Model. Additionally, neutrino masses can be generated by a dimension-5 operator that generically breaks all of these symmetries. It is therefore important to investigate the compatibility of a gauged U'(1 ) and neutrino phenomenology. We consider gauging each of the symmetries above with a minimal extended matter content. This includes the Z', an order parameter to break the U'(1 ), and three right-handed neutrinos. We find all but B -L require additional matter content to explain the measured neutrino oscillation parameters. We also discuss the compatibility of the measured neutrino textures with a nonthermal dark matter production mechanism involving the decay of the Z'. Finally, we present a parametric relation that implies that any sterile neutrino dark matter candidate should not be expected to contribute to neutrino masses beyond ten parts per million.

  18. The discovery reach of CP violation in neutrino oscillation with non-standard interaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Zini; Dasgupta, Arnab; Adhikari, Rathin

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the CP violation discovery reach in a neutrino oscillation experiment with superbeam, neutrino factory and monoenergetic neutrino beam from the electron capture process. For NSI satisfying model-dependent bound for shorter baselines (like CERN-Fréjus set-up) there is insignificant effect of NSI on the the discovery reach of CP violation due to δ. Particularly, for the superbeam and neutrino factory we have also considered relatively longer baselines for which there could be significant NSI effects on CP violation discovery reach for higher allowed values of NSI. For the monoenergetic beam only shorter baselines are considered to study CP violation with different nuclei as neutrino sources. Interestingly for non-standard interactions—{{\\varepsilon }eμ } and {{\\varepsilon }eτ } of neutrinos with matter during propagation in longer baselines in the superbeam, there is the possibility of better discovery reach of CP violation than that with only Standard Model interactions of neutrinos with matter. For complex NSI we have shown the CP violation discovery reach in the plane of Dirac phase δ and NSI phase {{φ }ij}. The CP violation due to some values of δ remain unobservable with present and near future experimental facilities in the superbeam and neutrino factory. However, in the presence of some ranges of off-diagonal NSI phase values there are some possibilities of discovering total CP violation for any {{δ }CP} value even at 5σ confidence level for neutrino factory. Our analysis indicates that for some values of NSI phases total CP violation may not be at all observable for any values of δ. Combination of shorter and longer baselines could indicate in some cases the presence of NSI. However, in general for NSIs ≲ 1 the CP violation discovery reach is better in neutrino factory set-ups. Using a neutrino beam from the electron capture process for nuclei 50110Sn and 152Yb, we have shown the discovery reach of CP violation in a neutrino

  19. Status and Plans for the Accelerator Working Group of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. Scott

    2010-03-30

    The purpose of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) is to produce a design report for a neutrino factory in 2013. I report the status of the accelerator design and plans for future studies.

  20. A quantum-information theoretic analysis of three-flavor neutrino oscillations. Quantum entanglement, nonlocal and nonclassical features of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subhashish; Alok, Ashutosh Kumar; Srikanth, R.; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2015-10-01

    Correlations exhibited by neutrino oscillations are studied via quantum-information theoretic quantities. We show that the strongest type of entanglement, genuine multipartite entanglement, is persistent in the flavor changing states. We prove the existence of Bell-type nonlocal features, in both its absolute and genuine avatars. Finally, we show that a measure of nonclassicality, dissension, which is a generalization of quantum discord to the tripartite case, is nonzero for almost the entire range of time in the evolution of an initial electron-neutrino. Via these quantum-information theoretic quantities, capturing different aspects of quantum correlations, we elucidate the differences between the flavor types, shedding light on the quantum-information theoretic aspects of the weak force.

  1. Sterile neutrino oscillations in MINOS and hadron production in pC collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tinti, Gemma Maria

    2010-01-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, starting with a muon-neutrino beam, for the precise measurement of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters |Δm2| and θ23. The Near Detector measures the neutrino flux and spectra before oscillations. The beam propagates for 735 km to the Far Detector, which measures the depleted spectrum after oscillations. The depletion can be interpreted as vμ → vτ oscillations. Subdominant vμ → ve oscillations may be allowed if the mixing angle θ13 ≠ 0. The two detectors are functionally identical in order to cancel systematic errors when using the Near Detector data to constrain the Far Detector prediction. A crucial part of the analysis is the relative calibration between the two detectors, which is known at the 2% level. A calibration procedure to remove the time and temperature dependence of the detector response using through-going cosmic muons is presented here. Although the two-detector approach reduces the systematic uncertainties related to the neutrino flux, a cross check on the neutrino parent meson ratios is performed in this thesis. The cross sections of mesons produced in proton-carbon interactions from the NA49 experiment have been measured and the results have been compared to the MINOS expectations. A neutrino oscillation analysis allowing mixing to a sterile neutrino is performed, under the assumption that the additional mass splitting is Ο(1 eV2). The analysis uses the energy spectrum of the neutral current interaction products, as neutral current interactions are sensitive to sterile neutrino mixing but not to the active flavour neutrino mixing. The neutrino oscillation parameters have been found to be: |Δm2| = 2.43-0.18+0.21 x 10-3 eV2, θ23 = 40.27°-5.17+14.64, θ24 = 0.00°+5.99 and

  2. Search for neutrino oscillations in the MINOS experiment by using quasi-elastic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Piteira, Rodolphe

    2005-09-29

    The enthusiasm of the scientific community for studying oscillations of neutrinos is equaled only by the mass of their detectors. The MINOS experiment determines and compares the near spectrum of muonic neutrinos from the NUMI beam to the far one, in order to measure two oscillation parameters: Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin2 (2θ23). The spectra are obtained by analyzing the charged current interactions which difficulty lies in identifying the interactions products (e.g. muons). An alternative method identifying the traces of muons, bent by the magnetic field of the detectors, and determining their energies is presented in this manuscript. The sensitivity of the detectors is optimal for the quasi-elastic interactions, for which a selection method is proposed, to study their oscillation. Even though it reduces the statistics, such a study introduces fewer systematic errors, constituting the ideal method on the long range.

  3. Why is the neutrino oscillation formula expanded in Δ m {21/2}/Δ m {31/2} still accurate near the solar resonance in matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    The conventional approximate formula for neutrino oscillation in matter which is obtained from the expansion in terms of the ratio of mass square differences α = Δ m 21 2 /Δ m 31 2 ≈ 0.03, first proposed by Cervera, et al. and Freund, turns out to be an accurate formula for accelerator neutrino experiments. Originally it required the neutrino energy to be well above the solar resonance to validate the expansion but it is found to be still very accurate when the formula is extrapolated to the resonance, which is practically important for the T2K experiment. This paper shows that the accuracy is guaranteed by cancellations of branch cut singularities and also, for the first time, analytically computes the actual error of the formula. The actual error implies that the original requirement can be safely removed in current experiments.

  4. Implications of Neutrino Oscillations on the Dark-Matter World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, W.-Y. Pauchy

    2014-01-01

    According to my own belief that "The God wouldn't create a world that is so boring that a particle knows only the very feeble weak interaction.", maybe we underestimate the roles of neutrinos. We note that right-handed neutrinos play no roles, or don't exist, in the minimal Standard Model. We discuss the language to write down an extended Standard Model - using renormalizable quantum field theory as the language; to start with a certain set of basic units under a certain gauge group; in fact, to use the three right-handed neutrinos to initiate the family gauge group SUf (3). Specifically we use the left-handed and right-handed spinors to form the basic units together with SUc (3) × SUL (2) × U (1) × SUf (3) as the gauge group. The dark-matter SUf (3) world couples with the lepton world, but not with the quark world. Amazingly enough, the space of the Standard-Model Higgs Φ (1 , 2), the family Higgs triplet Φ(3, 1), and the neutral part of the mixed family Higgs Φ0 (3 , 2) undergoes the spontaneous symmetry breaking, i.e. the Standard-Model Higgs mechanism and the "project-out" family Higgs mechanism, to give rise to the weak bosons W± and Z0, one Standard-Model Higgs, the eight massive family gauge bosons, and the remaining four massive neutral family Higgs particles, and nothing more. Thus, the roles of neutrinos in this extended Standard Model are extremely interesting in connection with the dark-matter world.

  5. Slow control systems of the Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Jang, H. I.; Choi, W. Q.; Choi, Y.; Jang, J. S.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, W.; Kim, Y. D.; Ko, Y. J.; Lee, J. K.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Park, I. G.; Park, J. S.; Park, R. G.; Seo, H. K.; Seo, S. H.; Shin, C. D.; Siyeon, K.; Yeo, I. S.; Yu, I.

    2016-02-01

    The RENO experiment has been in operation since August 2011 to measure reactor antineutrino disappearance using identical near and far detectors. For accurate measurements of neutrino mixing parameters and efficient data taking, it is crucial to monitor and control the detector in real time. Environmental conditions also need to be monitored for stable operation of detectors as well as for safety reasons. In this paper, we report the design, hardware, operation, and performance of the slow control system.

  6. Effects of a nonfactorizable metric on neutrino oscillation inside a supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Uma; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2000-10-01

    In this paper we construct the interaction potential between the dense supernova core and neutrinos due to the exchange of light radions in the Randall-Sundrum scenario. We then show that the radion exchange potential affects the neutrino oscillation phenomenology inside the supernova significantly if the radion mass is less than around 1 GeV. In order for the Bethe-Wilson mechanism for heating the envelope and r-process neucleosynthesis to be operative, the radion mass must be greater than 1 GeV. Bounds on the radion mass of the same order of magnitude can also be derived from TASSO and CLEO data on B decays.

  7. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, David Jason

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  8. Search for muon neutrion disappearance in a short-baseline accelerator neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yashuhiro; /Kyoto U.

    2010-11-01

    Neutrino oscillations have been observed and confirmed at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3} and 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2} with various experiments. While oscillations at other mass splittings are prohibited by the current standard model, the LSND experiment observed an excess of electron antineutrinos in a muon antineutrino beam, indicating a possible oscillation at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2}. To test the oscillation at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2}, we search for muon neutrino disappearance using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino beamline and two experiments, SciBooNE and MiniBooNE. The neutrino fluxes are measured in the SciBooNE and MiniBooNE detectors, located at 100 m and 540 m downstream from the neutrino production target, respectively. We collected beam data from June 2007 through August 2008 with SciBooNE, and over a five year period with MiniBooNE. A preliminary sensitivity for a joint v{sub {mu}} disappearance search is presented.

  9. Searching for Physics beyond the Standard Model with Accelerator Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, William C

    2008-01-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to test the LSND evidence for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations . The first MiniBooNE oscillation result in neutrino mode shows no significant excess of events at higher energies (E{sub {nu}} > 475 MeV), although a sizeable excess is observed at lower energies (E{sub {nu}}< 475 MeV). The lack of a significant excess at higher energies allows MiniBooNE to rule out simple 2 - {nu} oscillations as an explanation of the LSND signal. However, the low-energy excess is presently unexplained. Additional antineutrino data and NuMI data may allow the collaboration to determine whether the excess is due, for example, to a neutrino neutral-current radiative interaction or to neutrino oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. If the excess is consistent with being due to sterile neutrinos, then future experiments at FNAL (BooNE) or ORNL (OscSNS) could prove their existence.

  10. Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, L.; Hulth, P. O.; Botner, O.; Carlson, P.; Ohlsson, T.

    2006-03-01

    J. N. Bahcall (1934-2005) -- Preface -- List of participants -- Committees -- Nobel symposium on neutrino physics - program -- The history of neutrino oscillations / S. M. Bilenky -- Super-Kamiokande results on neutrino oscillations / Y. Suzuki -- Sudbury neutrino observatory results / A. B. McDonald -- Results from KamLAND reactor neutrino detection / A. Suzuki -- New opportunities for surprise / J. Conrad -- Solar models and solar neutrinos / J. N. Bahcall -- Atmospheric neutrino fluxes / T. K. Gaisser -- The MSW effect and matter effects in neutrino oscillations / A. Yu. Smirnov -- Three-flavour effects and CP- and T-violation in neutrino oscillations / E. Kh. Akhmedov -- Global analysis of neutrino data / M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia -- Future precision neutrino oscillation experiments and theoretical implications / M. Lindner -- Experimental prospects of neutrinoless double beta decay / E. Fiorini -- Theoretical prospects of neutrinoless double beta decay / S. T. Petcov -- Supernova neutrino oscillations / G. G. Raffelt -- High-energy neutrino astronomy / F. Halzen -- Neutrino astrophysics in the cold: Amanda, Baikal and IceCube / C. Spiering -- Status of radio and acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos and a proposal on reporting results / D. Saltzberg -- Detection of neutrino-induced air showers / A. A. Watson -- Prospect for relic neutrino searches / G. B. Gelmini -- Leptogenesis in the early universe / T. Yanagida -- Neutrinos and big bang nucleosynthesis / G. Steigman -- Extra galactic sources of high energy neutrinos / E. Waxman -- Cosmological neutrino bounds for non-cosmologists / M. Tegmark -- Neutrino intrinsic properties: the neutrino-antineutrino relation / B. Kayser -- NuTeV and neutrino properties / M. H. Shaevitz -- Absolute masses of neutrinos - experimental results and future possibilities / C. Weinheimer -- Flavor theories and neutrino masses / P. Ramond -- Neutrino mass models and leptogenesis / S. F. King -- Neutrino mass and

  11. Analytical approximation of the neutrino oscillation matter effects at large θ 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Kao, Yee; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2014-04-01

    We argue that the neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter are best understood by allowing the mixing angles and mass-squared differences in the standard parametrization to `run' with the matter effect parameter a = , where N e is the electron density in matter and E is the neutrino energy. We present simple analytical approximations to these `running' parameters. We show that for the moderately large value of θ 13, as discovered by the reactor experiments, the running of the mixing angle θ 23 and the CP violating phase δ can be neglected. It simplifies the analysis of the resulting expressions for the oscillation probabilities considerably. Approaches which attempt to directly provide approximate analytical expressions for the oscillation probabilities in matter suffer in accuracy due to their reliance on expansion in θ 13, or in simplicity when higher order terms in θ 13 are included. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method by comparing it to the exact numerical result, as well as the direct approximations of Cervera et al., Akhmedov et al., Asano and Minakata, and Freund. We also discuss the utility of our approach in figuring out the required baseline lengths and neutrino energies for the oscillation probabilities to exhibit certain desirable features.

  12. Neutrino-Electron Scattering in MINERvA for Constraining the NuMI Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaewon

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is used as a reference process to constrain the neutrino flux at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam observed by the MINERvA experiment. Prediction of the neutrino flux at accelerator experiments from other methods has a large uncertainty, and this uncertainty degrades measurements of neutrino oscillations and neutrino cross-sections. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is a rare process, but its cross-section is precisely known. With a sample corresponding to $3.5\\times10^{20}$ protons on target in the NuMI low-energy neutrino beam, a sample of $120$ $\

  13. Progress in the Physics of Massive Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BARGER, V.; MARFATIA, D.; WHISNANT, K.

    The current status of the physics of massive neutrinos is reviewed with a forward-looking emphasis. The article begins with the general phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and matter and documents the experimental evidence for oscillations of solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos. Both active and sterile oscillation possibilities are considered. The impact of cosmology (BBN, CMB, leptogenesis) and astrophysics (supernovae, highest energy cosmic rays) on neutrino observables and vice versa, is evaluated. The predictions of grand unified, radiative and other models of neutrino mass are discussed. Ways of determining the unknown parameters of three-neutrino oscillations are assessed, taking into account eight-fold degeneracies in parameters that yield the same oscillation probabilities, as well as ways to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale (from beta-decay, neutrinoless double-beta decay, large scale structure and Z-bursts). Critical unknowns at present are the amplitude of νμ→νe oscillations and the hierarchy of the neutrino mass spectrum; the detection of CP violation in the neutrino sector depends on these and on an unknown phase. The estimated neutrino parameter sensitivities at future facilities (reactors, superbeams, neutrino factories) are given. The overall agenda of a future neutrino physics program to construct a bottom-up understanding of the lepton sector is presented.

  14. Study of muon neutrino and muon antineutrino disappearance with the NOvA neutrino oscillation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pawloski, Gregory

    2014-06-30

    The primary goal of this working group is to study the disappearance rate of νμ charged current events in order to measure the mixing angle θ23 and the magnitude of the neutrino mass square splitting Δm 232.

  15. Analyzing Elevator Oscillation with the Smartphone Acceleration Sensors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Müller, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    It has often been reported in this column that smartphones are very suitable tools for exploring the physical properties of everyday phenomena. A very good example of this is an elevator ride. In addition to the acceleration processes, oscillations of the cabin are interesting. The present work responds to the second aspect.

  16. Analyzing elevator oscillation with the smartphone acceleration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Müller, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    It has often been reported in this column that smartphones are very suitable tools for exploring the physical properties of everyday phenomena. A very good example of this is an elevator ride. In addition to the acceleration processes, oscillations of the cabin are interesting. The present work responds to the second aspect.

  17. Limits on Active to Sterile Neutrino Oscillations from Disappearance Searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; An, F. P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Blyth, S.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cao, S. V.; Carroll, T. J.; Castromonte, C. M.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, R.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, J.-H.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Childress, S.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; De Rijck, S.; Deng, Z. Y.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Flanagan, W.; Frohne, M. V.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Gill, R.; Gomes, R. A.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grassi, M.; Grzelak, K.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Habig, A.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Holin, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, J.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; James, C.; Jen, K. L.; Jensen, D.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; de Jong, J. K.; Joshi, J.; Kafka, T.; Kang, L.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kramer, M.; Kreymer, A.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lang, K.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Litchfield, P. J.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Lucas, P.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Mayer, N.; McDonald, K. T.; McGivern, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Ngai, H. Y.; Nichol, R. J.; Ning, Z.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Patton, S.; Pawloski, G.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Perch, A.; Pfützner, M. M.; Phan, D. D.; Phan-Budd, S.; Pinsky, L.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poonthottathil, N.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Raper, N.; Rebel, B.; Ren, J.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sail, P.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Moed Sher, S.; Sousa, A.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tian, X.; Timmons, A.; Todd, J.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webb, R. C.; Weber, A.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wise, T.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C.-H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been performed independently by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Stringent limits on sin22 θμ e are set over 6 orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting Δ m412. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for Δ m412<0.8 eV2 at 95 % CLs .

  18. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Mariani, Camillo; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δCP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δCP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizable bias in the extracted δCP value.

  19. Missing energy and the measurement of the CP-violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    DOE PAGES

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Mariani, Camillo; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-11-30

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δCP in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this study, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δCP sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizable bias inmore » the extracted δCP value.« less

  20. Missing energy and the measurement of the C P -violating phase in neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankowski, A. M.; Coloma, P.; Huber, P.; Mariani, C.; Vagnoni, E.

    2015-11-01

    In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments aiming to determine the charge-parity-violating phase δC P in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this paper, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the δC P sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy carried out by undetected particles is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20%, to avoid a sizable bias in the extracted δC P value.

  1. From DeepCore to PINGU. Measuring atmospheric neutrino oscillations at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yáñez, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Very large volume neutrino telescopes (VLVNTs) observe atmospheric neutrinos over a wide energy range (GeV to TeV), after they travel distances as large as the Earth's diameter. DeepCore, the low energy extension of IceCube, has started making meaningful measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters θ23 and | Δm232| by analyzing the atmospheric flux at energies above 10 GeV. PINGU, a proposed project to lower DeepCore's energy threshold, aims to use the same flux to further increase the precision with which these parameters are known, and eventually determine the sign of Δm232. The latest results from DeepCore, and the planned transition to PINGU, are discussed here.

  2. An absence of neutrinos associated with cosmic-ray acceleration in γ-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    2012-04-19

    Very energetic astrophysical events are required to accelerate cosmic rays to above 10(18) electronvolts. GRBs (γ-ray bursts) have been proposed as possible candidate sources. In the GRB 'fireball' model, cosmic-ray acceleration should be accompanied by neutrinos produced in the decay of charged pions created in interactions between the high-energy cosmic-ray protons and γ-rays. Previous searches for such neutrinos found none, but the constraints were weak because the sensitivity was at best approximately equal to the predicted flux. Here we report an upper limit on the flux of energetic neutrinos associated with GRBs that is at least a factor of 3.7 below the predictions. This implies either that GRBs are not the only sources of cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10(18) electronvolts or that the efficiency of neutrino production is much lower than has been predicted. PMID:22517161

  3. An absence of neutrinos associated with cosmic-ray acceleration in γ-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    2012-04-18

    Very energetic astrophysical events are required to accelerate cosmic rays to above 10(18) electronvolts. GRBs (γ-ray bursts) have been proposed as possible candidate sources. In the GRB 'fireball' model, cosmic-ray acceleration should be accompanied by neutrinos produced in the decay of charged pions created in interactions between the high-energy cosmic-ray protons and γ-rays. Previous searches for such neutrinos found none, but the constraints were weak because the sensitivity was at best approximately equal to the predicted flux. Here we report an upper limit on the flux of energetic neutrinos associated with GRBs that is at least a factor of 3.7 below the predictions. This implies either that GRBs are not the only sources of cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10(18) electronvolts or that the efficiency of neutrino production is much lower than has been predicted.

  4. NOνA Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jediny, Filip

    2015-06-01

    The NOνA experiment is a long-baseline accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment. It uses the upgraded NuMI beam from Fermilab and measures electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance at its far detector in Ash River, Minnesota. Goals of the experiment include measurements of θ13, mass hierarchy and the CP violating phase. NOνA has begun to take neutrino data and first neutrino candidates are observed in its detectors. This document provides an overview of the scientific reach of the experiment, the status of detector operation and physics analysis, as well as the first data.

  5. Non-Hermitian neutrino oscillations in matter with PT symmetric Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Tommy

    2016-03-01

    We introduce and develop a novel approach to extend the ordinary two-flavor neutrino oscillation formalism in matter using a non-Hermitian PT symmetric effective Hamiltonian. The condition of PT symmetry is weaker and less mathematical than that of hermicity, but more physical, and such an extension of the formalism can give rise to sub-leading effects in neutrino flavor transitions similar to the effects by so-called non-standard neutrino interactions. We derive the necessary conditions for the spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian to be real as well as the mappings between the fundamental and effective parameters. We find that the real spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian will depend on all new fundamental parameters introduced in the non-Hermitian PT symmetric extension of the usual neutrino oscillation formalism and that either i) the spectrum is exact and the effective leptonic mixing must always be maximal or ii) the spectrum is approximate and all new fundamental parameters must be small.

  6. Covariant asymmetric wave packet for a field-theoretical description of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Vadim A.; Shkirmanov, Dmitry S.

    2015-06-01

    We consider a class of models for the relativistic covariant wave packets (WPs) which can be used as asymptotically free in and out states in the quantum field theoretical formalisms for description of the neutrino flavor oscillation phenomenon. We demonstrate that the new “asymmetric” wave packet (AWP) is an appropriate alternative to the more conventional “symmetric” WPs, like the so-called relativistic Gaussian packet (RGP) widely used in the quantum field theory (QFT)-based approaches to neutrino oscillations. We show that RGP is not a particular case of AWP, although many properties of these models are almost identical in the quasistable regime. We discuss some features of AWP distinguishing it from RGP.

  7. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  8. Improved search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in MINOS

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.

    2011-10-27

    The authors report the results of a search for νe appearance in νμ beam in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino experiment. With an improved analysis and an increased exposure of 8.2 x 1020 protons on the NuMI target at Fermilab, they find that 2 sin2 (θ23 sin2 (θ13) < 0.12 (0.20) at 90% confidence level for δ = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, with a best fit of 2 sin2θ23) sin 2 (2θ13) = 0.041-0.031 +0.047 (0.079-0.053 +0.071). The θ13= 0 hypothesis is disfavored by the MINOS data at the 89% confidence level.

  9. Improved search for Muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Cavanaugh, S; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Ratchford, J; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Walding, J J; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Yang, T; Zwaska, R

    2011-10-28

    We report the results of a search for ν(e) appearance in a ν(μ) beam in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino experiment. With an improved analysis and an increased exposure of 8.2 × 10(20) protons on the NuMI target at Fermilab, we find that 2 sin(2) (θ(23))sin(2)(2θ(13))<0.12(0.20) at 90% confidence level for δ = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, with a best-fit of 2sin(2) (θ(23))sin(2)(2θ(13)) = 0.041(-0.031)(+0.047) (0.079(-0.053) (+0.071)). The θ(13) = 0 hypothesis is disfavored by the MINOS data at the 89% confidence level.

  10. Neutrino oscillations with a proton driver upgrade and an off-axis detector: A Case study

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; De Gouvea, Andre; Szleper, Michal; Velasco, Mayda

    2002-04-01

    We study the physics capabilities of the NuMI beamline with an off-axis highly-segmented iron scintillator detector and with the inclusion of the currently under study proton driver upgrade. We focus on the prospects for the experimental determination of the remaining neutrino oscillation parameters, assuming different outcomes for experiments under way or in preparation. An optimization of the beam conditions and detector location for the detection of the nu_mu to nu_e transitions is discussed. Different physics scenarios were considered, depending on the actual solution of the solar neutrino puzzle. If KamLAND measures Delta m^2_solar, we find it possible to measure both |U_{e3}|^2 and the CP violating phase delta within a viable exposure time, assuming a realistic detector and a complete data analysis. Exposure to both neutrino and antineutrino beams is necessary. We can, in addition, shed light on Delta m^2_solar if its value is at the upper limit of KamLAND sensitivity (i.e. the precise value of Delta m^2_solar remains unknown even after KamLAND). If the solar neutrino solution is not in the LMA region, we can measure |U_{e3}|^2 and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The existence of the proton driver is vital for the feasibility of most of these measurements.

  11. Neutrino oscillations with the MINOS, MINOS+, T2K, and NOvA experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Tsuyoshi; Plunkett, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses recent results and near-term prospects of the long-baseline neutrino experiments MINOS, MINOS+, T2K and NOvA. The non-zero value of the third neutrino mixing angle θ 13 allows experimental analysis in a manner which explicitly exhibits appearance and disappearance dependencies on additional parameters associated with mass-hierarchy, CP violation, and any non-maximal θ 23. These current and near-future experiments begin the era of precision accelerator long-baseline measurements and lay the framework within which future experimental results will be interpreted.

  12. Adiabatic and nonadiabatic perturbation theory for coherence vector description of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenberg, Sebastian; Päs, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    The standard wave function approach for the treatment of neutrino oscillations fails in situations where quantum ensembles at a finite temperature with or without an interacting background plasma are encountered. As a first step to treat such phenomena in a novel way, we propose a unified approach to both adiabatic and nonadiabatic two-flavor oscillations in neutrino ensembles with finite temperature and generic (e.g., matter) potentials. Neglecting effects of ensemble decoherence for now, we study the evolution of a neutrino ensemble governed by the associated quantum kinetic equations, which apply to systems with finite temperature. The quantum kinetic equations are solved formally using the Magnus expansion and it is shown that a convenient choice of the quantum mechanical picture (e.g., the interaction picture) reveals suitable parameters to characterize the physics of the underlying system (e.g., an effective oscillation length). It is understood that this method also provides a promising starting point for the treatment of the more general case in which decoherence is taken into account.

  13. Closed-loop control of ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Barral, S.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Kurzyna, J.; Dudeck, M.

    2011-08-15

    Feedback control of ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated with a proportional-integral-derivative controller acting on the discharge voltage. The stability of the current is found to systematically improve with proportional control, whereas integral and derivative control have in most cases a detrimental or insignificant impact. At low discharge voltages, proportional control eliminates at the same time ionization breathing oscillations as well as a coexisting low frequency mode. A progressive deterioration of the stability is observed at higher voltage, presumably attributable to the limited output voltage range of the controller. The time-averaged characteristics of the discharge such as average current, thrust and efficiency, remain unchanged within measurement uncertainties.

  14. Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters Using Anti-fiducial Charged Current Events in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, Matthew Levy

    2010-09-01

    Abstract The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) obse rves the disappearance of muon neutrinos as they propagate in the long baseline Neutri nos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam. MINOS consists of two detectors. The near detector sam ples the initial composition of the beam. The far detector, 735 km away, looks for an energy-d ependent deficit in the neutrino spectrum. This energy-dependent deficit is interpreted as q uantum mechanical oscillations be- tween neutrino flavors. A measurement is made of the effective two-neutrino mixing parameters ∆ m 2 ≈ ∆ m 2 23 and sin 2 2 θ ≈ sin 2 2 θ 23 . The primary MINOS analysis uses charged current events in the fiducial volume of the far detector. This analysis uses the roughly equal-sized sample of events that fails the fiducial cut, consisting of interact ions outside the fiducial region of the detector and in the surrounding rock. These events provide a n independent and complementary measurement, albeit weaker due to incomplete reconstructi on of the events. This analysis reports on an exposure of 7 . 25 × 10 20 protons-on-target. Due to poor energy resolution, the meas urement of sin 2 2 θ is much weaker than established results, but the measuremen t of sin 2 2 θ > 0 . 56 at 90% confidence is consistent with the accepted value. The measur ement of ∆ m 2 is much stronger. Assuming sin 2 2 θ = 1 , ∆ m 2 = (2 . 20 ± 0 . 18[stat] ± 0 . 14[syst]) × 10 − 3 eV 2 .

  15. Improved search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2011-10-27

    The authors report the results of a search for νe appearance in νμ beam in the MINOS long-baseline neutrino experiment. With an improved analysis and an increased exposure of 8.2 x 1020 protons on the NuMI target at Fermilab, they find that 2 sin223 sin213) < 0.12 (0.20) at 90% confidence level for δ = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy, with a best fit of 2 sin2θ23) sin 2 (2θ13) = 0.041-0.031 +0.047 (0.079-0.053 +0.071). The θ13= 0 hypothesis is disfavored by the MINOS data at the 89% confidence level.

  16. Parameter degeneracy in neutrino oscillation — Solution network and structural overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Uchinami, Shoichi

    2010-04-01

    It is known that there is a phenomenon called “parameter degeneracy” in neutrino oscillation measurement of lepton mixing parameters; A set of the oscillation probabilities, e.g., P( ν μ → ν e ) and its CP-conjugate Pleft( {{{bar ν }_μ } to {{bar ν }_e}} right) at a particular neutrino energy does not determine uniquely the values of θ 13 and δ. With use of the approximate form of the oscillation probability á la Cervera et al., a complete analysis of the eightfold parameter degeneracy is presented. We propose a unified view of the various types of the degeneracy as invariance of the oscillation probabilities under discrete mappings of the mixing parameters. Explicit form of the mapping is obtained either by symmetry argument, or by deriving exact analytic expressions of all the degeneracy solutions for a given true solution. Due to the one-to-one mapping structure the degeneracy solutions are shown to form a network. We extend our analysis into the parameter degeneracy in T- and CPT-conjugate measurement as well as to the setup with the golden and the silver channels, P( ν e → ν μ ) and P( ν e → ν τ ). Some characteristic features of the degeneracy solutions in CP-conjugate measurement, in particular their energy dependences, are illuminated by utilizing the explicit analytic solutions.

  17. Addendum to: Gen. Rel. Grav. 28 (1996) 1161, First Prize Essay for 1996: Neutrino Oscillations and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia-Khalilova, D. V.

    2004-09-01

    In a 1996 JRO Fellowship Research Proposal (Los Alamos), the author suggested that neutrino oscillations may provide a powerful indirect energy transport mechanism to supernovae explosions. The principal aim of this addendum is to present the relevant unedited text of Section 1 of that proposal. We then briefly remind, (a) of an early suggestion of Mazurek on vacuum neutrino oscillations and their relevance to supernovae explosion, and (b) Wolfenstein's result on suppression of the effect by matter effects. We conclude that whether or not neutrino oscillations play a significant role in supernovae explosions shall depend if there are shells/regions of space in stellar collapse where matter effects play no essential role. Should such regions exist in actual astrophysical situations, the final outcome of neutrino oscillations on supernovae explosions shall depend, in part, on whether or not the LNSD signal is confirmed. Importantly, the reader is reminded that neutrino oscillations form a set of flavor-oscillation clocks and these clock suffer gravitational redshift which can be as large as 20 percent. This effect must be incorporated fully into any calculation of supernova explosion.

  18. Experimental evidence of electron neutrino oscillations and validation of MSW-LMA model with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, M. Buizza

    2011-04-01

    We report the real time measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrino fluxes performed with the Borexino experiment at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The achievement of these measurements was possible thanks to the excellent levels of the radiopurity reached. The measurement of the 7Be in real time is the first direct measurements of the survival probability for solar electron neutrinos in the vacuum region. For 8B we reached a threshold energy of 3MeV which is the lowest achieved so far in real time. For the first time, the same apparatus can measure two different oscillation regions (vacuum-driven and matter-enhanced) predicted by the MSW-LMA model. Borexino also quotes the ratio between the survival probabilities, corresponding to 1.93 ± 0.75, and validates the presence of the transition region between the two oscillation regimes, according to the MSW-LMA solution.In addition, a preliminary result on the Day-Night Asymmetry (ADN) for the 7Be neutrino flux is presented and corresponds to 0.007 ± 0.073. This measurement makes Borexino able to give once more an independent confirmation of the MSW-LMA solution.

  19. Coupled Dirac fermions and neutrino-like oscillations in twisted bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Xian, Lede; Wang, Z F; Chou, M Y

    2013-11-13

    The low-energy quasiparticles in graphene can be described by a Dirac-Weyl Hamiltonian for massless fermions, hence graphene has been proposed to be an effective medium to study exotic phenomena originally predicted for relativistic particle physics, such as Klein tunneling and Zitterbewegung. In this work, we show that another important particle-physics phenomenon, the neutrino oscillation, can be studied and observed in a particular graphene system, namely, twisted bilayer graphene. It has been found that graphene layers grown epitaxially on SiC or by the chemical vapor deposition method on metal substrates display a stacking pattern with adjacent layers rotated by an angle with respect to each other. The quasiparticle states in two distinct graphene layers act as neutrinos with two flavors, and the interlayer interaction between them induces an appreciable coupling between these two "flavors" of massless fermions, leading to neutrino-like oscillations. In addition, our calculation shows that anisotropic transport properties manifest in a specific energy window, which is accessible experimentally in twisted bilayer graphene. Combining two graphene layers enables us to probe the rich physics involving multiple interacting Dirac fermions. PMID:24079848

  20. Nonstandard interactions in neutrino oscillations and the recent Daya Bay and T2K experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Rathin; Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Dasgupta, Arnab; Roy, Sourov

    2012-10-01

    We study the possible constraints on nonstandard interaction (NSIs) in a model-independent way by considering the recent results from the T2K and Daya Bay neutrino oscillations experiments. Using the perturbation method we present generic formulas (suitable for T2K baseline and for large θ13 as evident from Daya Bay) for the probability of oscillation for νμ→νe, taking into account NSIs at the source (ɛs), the detector (ɛd), and during propagation (ɛm) of neutrinos through matter. Two separate cases of perturbation with small (slightly large) NSI [ɛαβm˜0.03(0.18)] are discussed in detail. Using various possible presently allowed NSI values we reanalyze numerically the θ13-δ allowed region given by recent T2K experimental data. We obtain model-independent constraints on NSIs in the δ-ɛαβm plane using the θ13 value as measured by Daya Bay, where δ is the CP violating phase. Depending on δ values, significant constraints on ɛeτ and ɛττ, in particular, are possible for both hierarchies of neutrino masses. Corresponding to T2K’s 66% confidence level result, the constraints on ɛττ are shown to be independent of any δ value.

  1. BNL Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment - Technical Challenges in Getting There

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Nicholas; Ludewig, Hans; Weng, Wu-Tsung; Kirk, Harold; Diwan, Milind; Kahn, Steve; Evangelakis, Yiorgos; McDonald, Kirk

    2003-04-01

    A neutrino oscillation experiment of exceptional intensity, driven by a 1 MW proton driver, is currently under study at BNL. To achieve the high neutrino intensity an energetic proton beam with intensity approaching 1014 protons will be intercepted by a low-Z target at 2.5 Hz pulse rate placed within a magnetic horn. Such intensities are expected to push the envelope of the target material integrity and the state of knowledge of how materials respond to both long-term irradiation and thermo-mechanical shock. Furthermore, the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz will strain even further both the target and the horn in that large thermal loads generated from energy deposition and currents will need to be removed between pulses. To accomplish the physics requirements of the proposed neutrino oscillation experiment, technical challenges that relate to (a) material selection for the production target and its long-term survivability, (b) horn design and choice material integrity, and (c) the integration of the two systems, need to be met. This paper discusses the feasibility of different target/horn integration options both in terms of performance and longevity and examines the enhancing potential of innovative techniques. The paper also presents a discussion on the weak links in the various options, which result from the intensity levels and the selected cooling environments, and the strategy to extrapolate the current knowledge on material degradation through R and advanced computational techniques.

  2. Residual Symmetries Applied to Neutrino Oscillations at NO ν A and T2K

    DOE PAGES

    Hanlon, Andrew D.; Repko, Wayne W.; Dicus, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Tmore » he results previously obtained from the model-independent application of a generalized hidden horizontal Z 2 symmetry to the neutrino mass matrix are updated using the latest global fits for the neutrino oscillation parameters.he resulting prediction for the Dirac CP phase δ D is in agreement with recent results from2K.he distribution for the Jarlskog invariant J ν has become sharper and appears to be approaching a particular region.he approximate effects of matter on long-baseline neutrino experiments are explored, and it is shown how the weak interactions between the neutrinos and the particles that make up the Earth can help to determine the mass hierarchy. A similar strategy is employed to show how NO ν A and2K could determine the octant of θ a ( ≡ θ 23 ) . Finally, the exact effects of matter are obtained numerically in order to make comparisons with the form of the approximate solutions. From this analysis there emerge some interesting features of the effective mass eigenvalues.« less

  3. Prospects for reconstruction of leptonic unitarity quadrangle and neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surender; Bhardwaj, Shankita

    2016-06-01

    After the observation of non-zero θ13 the goal has shifted to observe CP violation in the leptonic sector. Neutrino oscillation experiments can, directly, probe the Dirac CP phases. Alternatively, one can measure CP violation in the leptonic sector using Leptonic Unitarity Quadrangle (LUQ). The existence of Standard Model (SM) gauge singlets - sterile neutrinos - will provide additional sources of CP violation. We investigate the connection between neutrino survival probability and rephasing invariants of the 4 × 4 neutrino mixing matrix. In general, LUQ contain eight geometrical parameters out of which five are independent. We obtain CP asymmetry (Pνf→νf‧ -Pνbarf→νbarf‧) in terms of these independent parameters of the LUQ and search for the possibilities of extracting information on these independent geometrical parameters in short baseline (SBL) and long baseline (LBL) experiments, thus, looking for constructing LUQ and possible measurement of CP violation. We find that it is not possible to construct LUQ using data from LBL experiments because CP asymmetry is sensitive to only three of the five independent parameters of LUQ. However, for SBL experiments, CP asymmetry is found to be sensitive to all five independent parameters making it possible to construct LUQ and measure CP violation.

  4. Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance in a Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; /Kyoto U.

    2010-04-25

    We report a search for muon neutrino disappearance in the {Delta}m{sup 2} region of 0.5--40 eV{sup 2} using data from both Sci-BooNE and MiniBooNE experiments. SciBooNE data provides a constraint on the neutrino flux, so that the sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance with both detectors is better than with just MiniBooNE alone. The preliminary sensitivity for a joint {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance search is presented.

  5. Cosmic Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2008-02-01

    I recall the place of neutrinos in the electroweak theory and summarize what we know about neutrino mass and flavor change. I next review the essential characteristics expected for relic neutrinos and survey what we can say about the neutrino contribution to the dark matter of the Universe. Then I discuss the standard-model interactions of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos, paying attention to the consequences of neutrino oscillations, and illustrate a few topics of interest to neutrino observatories. I conclude with short comments on the remote possibility of detecting relic neutrinos through annihilations of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos at the Z resonance.

  6. Are collapse models testable with quantum oscillating systems? The case of neutrinos, kaons, chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, M; Donadi, S; Ferialdi, L; Bassi, A; Curceanu, C; Di Domenico, A; Hiesmayr, B C

    2013-01-01

    Collapse models provide a theoretical framework for understanding how classical world emerges from quantum mechanics. Their dynamics preserves (practically) quantum linearity for microscopic systems, while it becomes strongly nonlinear when moving towards macroscopic scale. The conventional approach to test collapse models is to create spatial superpositions of mesoscopic systems and then examine the loss of interference, while environmental noises are engineered carefully. Here we investigate a different approach: We study systems that naturally oscillate-creating quantum superpositions-and thus represent a natural case-study for testing quantum linearity: neutrinos, neutral mesons, and chiral molecules. We will show how spontaneous collapses affect their oscillatory behavior, and will compare them with environmental decoherence effects. We will show that, contrary to what previously predicted, collapse models cannot be tested with neutrinos. The effect is stronger for neutral mesons, but still beyond experimental reach. Instead, chiral molecules can offer promising candidates for testing collapse models.

  7. Exploring flavor-dependent long-range forces in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sabya Sachi; Dasgupta, Arnab; Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The Standard Model gauge group can be extended with minimal matter content by introducing anomaly free U(1) symmetry, such as L e - L μ or L e - L τ . If the neutral gauge boson corresponding to this abelian symmetry is ultra-light, then it will give rise to flavor-dependent long-range leptonic force, which can have significant impact on neutrino oscillations. For an instance, the electrons inside the Sun can generate a flavor-dependent long-range potential at the Earth surface, which can suppress the ν μ → ν e appearance probability in terrestrial experiments. The sign of this potential is opposite for anti-neutrinos, and affects the oscillations of (anti-)neutrinos in different fashion. This feature invokes fake CP-asymmetry like the SM matter effect and can severely affect the leptonic CP-violation searches in long-baseline experiments. In this paper, we study in detail the possible impacts of these long-range flavor-diagonal neutral current interactions due to L e - L μ symmetry, when (anti-)neutrinos travel from Fermilab to Homestake (1300 km) and CERN to Pyhäsalmi (2290 km) in the context of future high-precision superbeam facilities, DUNE and LBNO respectively. If there is no signal of long-range force, DUNE (LBNO) can place stringent constraint on the effective gauge coupling α eμ < 1.9 × 10-53 (7.8 × 10-54) at 90% C.L., which is almost 30 (70) times better than the existing bound from the Super-Kamiokande experiment. We also observe that if α eμ ≥ 2 × 10-52, the CP-violation discovery reach of these future facilities vanishes completely. The mass hierarchy measurement remains robust in DUNE (LBNO) if α eμ < 5 × 10-52 (10-52).

  8. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations using beam and atmospheric data in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Anghel, I; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moed Sher, S; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2013-06-21

    We report measurements of oscillation parameters from ν(μ) and ν(μ) disappearance using beam and atmospheric data from MINOS. The data comprise exposures of 10.71×10(20) protons on target in the ν(μ)-dominated beam, 3.36×10(20) protons on target in the ν(μ)-enhanced beam, and 37.88 kton yr of atmospheric neutrinos. Assuming identical ν and ν oscillation parameters, we measure |Δm2| = (2.41(-0.10)(+0.09))×10(-3)  eV2 and sin2(2θ) = 0.950(-0.036)(+0.035). Allowing independent ν and ν oscillations, we measure antineutrino parameters of |Δm2| = (2.50(-0.25)(+0.23))×10(-3)  eV2 and sin2(2θ) = 0.97(-0.08)(+0.03), with minimal change to the neutrino parameters. PMID:23829728

  9. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Oscillations Using Beam and Atmospheric Data in MINOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Anghel, I.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G. J.; Bogert, D.; Cao, S. V.; Castromonte, C. M.; Childress, S.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; de Jong, J. K.; Devan, A. V.; Devenish, N. E.; Diwan, M. V.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Falk, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Graf, N.; Gran, R.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Hahn, S. R.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Himmel, A.; Holin, A.; Hylen, J.; Irwin, G. M.; Isvan, Z.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kordosky, M.; Kreymer, A.; Lang, K.; Ling, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Lucas, P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Mathis, M.; Mayer, N.; McGowan, A. M.; Medeiros, M. M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J. R.; Messier, M. D.; Michael, D. G.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Moed Sher, S.; Moore, C. D.; Mualem, L.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nowak, J. A.; O'Connor, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Orchanian, M.; Pahlka, R. B.; Paley, J.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Qiu, X.; Radovic, A.; Rebel, B.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schneps, J.; Schreckenberger, A.; Schreiner, P.; Sharma, R.; Sousa, A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Tinti, G.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Torretta, D.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Viren, B.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; White, C.; Whitehead, L.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Zwaska, R.

    2013-06-01

    We report measurements of oscillation parameters from νμ and ν¯μ disappearance using beam and atmospheric data from MINOS. The data comprise exposures of 10.71×1020 protons on target in the νμ-dominated beam, 3.36×1020 protons on target in the ν¯μ-enhanced beam, and 37.88 kton yr of atmospheric neutrinos. Assuming identical ν and ν¯ oscillation parameters, we measure |Δm2|=(2.41-0.10+0.09)×10-3eV2 and sin⁡2(2θ)=0.950-0.036+0.035. Allowing independent ν and ν¯ oscillations, we measure antineutrino parameters of |Δm¯2|=(2.50-0.25+0.23)×10-3eV2 and sin⁡2(2θ¯)=0.97-0.08+0.03, with minimal change to the neutrino parameters.

  10. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations using beam and atmospheric data in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Anghel, I; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moed Sher, S; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2013-06-21

    We report measurements of oscillation parameters from ν(μ) and ν(μ) disappearance using beam and atmospheric data from MINOS. The data comprise exposures of 10.71×10(20) protons on target in the ν(μ)-dominated beam, 3.36×10(20) protons on target in the ν(μ)-enhanced beam, and 37.88 kton yr of atmospheric neutrinos. Assuming identical ν and ν oscillation parameters, we measure |Δm2| = (2.41(-0.10)(+0.09))×10(-3)  eV2 and sin2(2θ) = 0.950(-0.036)(+0.035). Allowing independent ν and ν oscillations, we measure antineutrino parameters of |Δm2| = (2.50(-0.25)(+0.23))×10(-3)  eV2 and sin2(2θ) = 0.97(-0.08)(+0.03), with minimal change to the neutrino parameters.

  11. Neutrino mass, proton decay, and neutron oscillations as crucial tests of unification models (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Marshak, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Several crucial tests of three popular unification models (of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions) are described. The models are SU(5) and SO(10) at the grand unification theory (GUT) level and SU(4)C × SU(2)L × SU(2)R at the partial unification theory (PUT) level. The tests selected for discussion are the finiteness of the neutrino mass in the electron volt region, the decay of protons into antileptons in the range of 1031± yr, and the detectability of neutron oscillations at all. The PUT group can also be tested by establishing the existence of four generations of quarks and leptons.

  12. Neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Dave; Cowen, Doug; Selen, Mats; Wiebusch, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Neutrinos represent a new “window” to the Universe, spanning a large range of energy. We discuss the science of neutrino astrophysics and focus on two energy regimes. At “lower” energies (≈1 MeV), studies of neutrinos born inside the sun, or produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere, have allowed the first incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos have mass. At energies typically one thousand to one million times higher, sources further than the sun (both within the Milky Way and beyond) are expected to produce a flux of particles that can be detected only through neutrinos. PMID:10588680

  13. A Search for Lorentz and CPT Violation in the Neutrino Sector of the Standard Model Extension Using the Near Detectors of the Tokai to Kamioka Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Gary Alexander

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment is designed to search for electron neutrino appearance oscillations and muon neutrino disappearance oscillations. While the main physics goals of T2K fall into conventional physics, T2K may be used to search for more exotic physics. One exotic physics analysis that can be performed is a search for Lorentz and CPT symmetry violation (LV and CPTV) through short baseline neutrino oscillations. The theoretical framework which describes these phenomena is the Standard Model Extension (SME). Due to its off-axis nature, T2K has two near detectors. A search for LV and CPTV is performed in each detector. The search utilizes charged-current inclusive (CC inclusive) neutrino events to search for sidereal variations in the neutrino event rate at each detector. Two methods are developed; the first being a Fast Fourier Transform method to perform a hypothesis test of the data with a set of 10,000 toy Monte-Carlo simulations that do not have any LV signal in them. The second is a binned likelihood fit. Using three data sets, both analysis methods are consistent with no sidereal variations. One set of data is used to calculate upper limits on combinations of the SME coefficients while the other two are used to constrain the SME coefficients directly. Despite not seeing any indication of LV in the T2K near detectors, the upper limits provided are useful for the theoretical field to continue improving theories which include LV and CPTV.

  14. From Superbeams to Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan

    2010-03-30

    The Neutrino Factory, which produces an extremely intense source of flavor-tagged neutrinos from muon decays in a storage ring, arguably gives the best physics reach for CP violation, as well as virtually all parameters in the neutrino oscillation parameter space. I will briefly describe the physics capabilities of the baseline Neutrino Factory as compared to other possible future facilities (beta-beam and super-beam facilities), give an overview of the accelerator complex and describe in detail the current international R and D program.

  15. Neutrino clouds and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Stephenson, G.J. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    We have examined the consequences of assuming the existence of a light scalar boson, weakly coupled to neutrinos, and not coupled to any other light fermions. For a range of parameters, we find that this hypothesis leads to the development of neutrino clusters which form in the early Universe and which provide gravitational fluctuations on scales small compared to a parsec (i.e., the scale of solar systems). Under some conditions, this can produce anomalous gravitational acceleration within solar systems and lead to a vanishing of neutrino mass-squared differences, giving rise to strong neutrino oscillation effects.

  16. Effect of the 2 p 2 h cross-section uncertainties on an analysis of neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Mariani, Camillo; Vagnoni, Erica

    2016-06-01

    We report the results of a study aimed at quantifying the impact on the oscillation analysis of the uncertainties associated with the description of the neutrino-nucleus cross section in the two-particle-two-hole sector. The results of our calculations, based on the kinematic method of energy reconstruction and carried out comparing two data-driven approaches, show that the existing discrepancies in the neutrino cross sections have a sizable effect on the extracted oscillation parameters, particularly in the antineutrino channel.

  17. Analysis Techniques to Measure Charged Current Inclusive Water Cross Section and to Constrain Neutrino Oscillation Parameters using the Near Detector (ND280) of the T2K Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rajarshi

    2014-03-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) Experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment located in Japan with the primary goal to precisely measure multiple neutrino flavor oscillation parameters. An off-axis muon neutrino beam with an energy that peaks at 600 MeV is generated at the JPARC facility and directed towards the kiloton Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector located 295 km away. The rates of electron neutrino and muon neutrino interactions are measured at SK and compared with expected model values. This yields a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters sinq and sinq. Measurements from a Near Detector that is 280 m downstream of the neutrino beam target are used to constrain uncertainties in the beam flux prediction and neutrino interaction rates. We present a measurement of inclusive charged current neutrino interactions on water. We used several sub-detectors in the ND280 complex, including a Pi-Zero detector (P0D) that has alternating planes of plastic scintillator and water bag layers, a time projection chamber (TPC) and fine-grained detector (FGD) to detect and reconstruct muons from neutrino charged current events. Finally, we describe a ``forward-fitting'' technique that is used to constrain the beam flux and cross section as an input for the neutrino oscillation analysis and also to extract a flux-averaged inclusive charged current cross section on water.

  18. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-19

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10^{-7}  GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (pγ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ-ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments.

  19. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-19

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10^{-7}  GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (pγ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ-ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments. PMID:26943524

  20. FFAGs: Front-end for neutrino factories and medical accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yoshiharu

    The idea of Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator was originated by different people and groups in the early 1950s. It was independently introduced by Ohkawa [Ohkawa (1953)], Symon et al. [Symon et al. (1956)], and Kolomensky [Kolomensky and Lebedev (1966)] when the strong Alternate Gradient (AG) focusing and the phase stability schemes were applied to particle acceleration. The first FFAG electron model was developed in the MURA accelerator project led by Kerst and Cole in the late 1950s. Since then, they have fabricated several electron models in the early 1960s [Symon et al. (1956)]. However, the studies did not lead to a single practical FFAG accelerator for the following 50 years. Because of the difficulties of treating non-linear magnetic field and RF acceleration for non-relativistic particles, the proton FFAG, especially, was not accomplished until recently. In 2000, the FFAG concept was revived with the world's first proton FFAG (POP) which was developed at KEK [Aiba (2000); Mori (1999)]. Since then, in many places [Berg (2004); Johnstone et al. (2004); Mori (2011); Ruggiero (2004); Trbojevic (2004)], FFAGs have been developed and constructed...

  1. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  2. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments. >>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  3. Initial Configuration of Acceleration for the IDS-NF Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.S.

    2011-10-01

    The IDS-NF neutrino factory acceleration system must accelerate the muon beam coming out of cooling to a total energy of 25 GeV. The parameters of the beam being accelerated are given in Table 1. While a certain fraction of the beam will be lost early in acceleration, losses of the beam that falls within the acceptance (see Table 1) should be dominated by decay losses (as opposed to dynamic losses or losses on apertures). Decay losses will be kept small, and the cost of the machine will be reduced to the extent possible, consistent with the above requirements. There is a tradeoff between machine cost and the amount of decay losses, and a reasonable compromise will be made between them. Both muon signs will be accelerated simultaneously.

  4. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2008-02-21

    The International Design Study for a future Neutrino Factory and super-beam facility (the ISS) established the physics case for a high-precision programme of long-baseline neutrino-oscillation measurements. The ISS also identified baseline specifications for the Neutrino Factory accelerator complex and the neutrino detector systems. This paper summarises the objectives of the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF). The IDS-NF will build on the work of the ISS to deliver a Reference Design Report for the Neutrino Factory by 2012/13 and an Interim Design Report by 2010/11.

  5. MUON ACCELERATION WITH A VERY FAST RAMPING SYNCHROTRON FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUMMERS,D.J.BERG,J.S.GARREN,A.A.PALMER,R.B.

    2002-07-01

    A 4600 Hz fast ramping synchrotron is explored as an economical way of accelerating muons from 4 to 20 GeV/c for a neutrino factory. Eddy current losses are minimized by the low machine duty cycle plus thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations and thin copper wires. Combined function magnets with high gradients alternating within single magnets form the lattice we describe. Muon survival is 83%.

  6. Limits on active to sterile neutrino oscillations from disappearance searches in the MINOS, Daya Bay, and Bugey-3 experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.; An, F. P.; Anghel, I.; Aurisano, A.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Blyth, S.; et al

    2016-10-07

    Searches for a light sterile neutrino have been performed independently by the MINOS and the Daya Bay experiments using the muon (anti)neutrino and electron antineutrino disappearance channels, respectively. In this Letter, results from both experiments are combined with those from the Bugey-3 reactor neutrino experiment to constrain oscillations into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND) and MiniBooNE experiments in a minimally extended four-neutrino flavor framework. Here, stringent limits on sin22θμe are set over 6 orders of magnitudemore » in the sterile mass-squared splitting Δm241. The sterile-neutrino mixing phase space allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments is excluded for Δm241 < 0.8 eV2 at 95% CLs.« less

  7. Propagation and neutrino oscillations in the base of a highly magnetized gamma-ray burst fireball flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fraija, N.

    2014-06-01

    Neutrons play an important role in the dynamics of gamma-ray bursts. The presence of neutrons in the baryon-loaded fireball is expected. If the neutron abundance is comparable to that of protons, important features may be observed, such as quasi-thermal multi-GeV neutrinos in coincidence with a subphotospheric γ-ray emission, nucleosynthesis at later times, and rebrightening of the afterglow emission. Additionally, thermal MeV neutrinos are created by electron-positron annihilation, electron (positron) capture on protons (neutrons), and nucleonic bremsstrahlung. Although MeV neutrinos are difficult to detect, quasi-thermal GeV neutrinos are expected in cubic kilometer detectors and/or DeepCore and IceCube. In this paper, we show that neutrino oscillations have outstanding implications for the dynamics of the fireball evolution and also that they can be detected through their flavor ratio on Earth. For that, we derive the resonance and charged-neutrality conditions as well as the neutrino self-energy and effective potential up to the order of m{sub W}{sup −4} at strong, moderate, and weak magnetic field approximations to constrain the dynamics of the fireball. We found important implications: (1) resonant oscillations are suppressed for high baryon densities as well as neutron abundance larger than that of protons, and (2) the effect of magnetic field is to decrease the proton-to-neutron ratio aside from the number of multi-GeV neutrinos expected in the DeepCore detector. Also, we estimate the GeV neutrino flavor ratios along the jet and on Earth.

  8. Nonlinear growing neutrino cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaita, Youness; Baldi, Marco; Führer, Florian; Puchwein, Ewald; Wetterich, Christof

    2016-03-01

    The energy scale of dark energy, ˜2 ×10-3 eV , is a long way off compared to all known fundamental scales—except for the neutrino masses. If dark energy is dynamical and couples to neutrinos, this is no longer a coincidence. The time at which dark energy starts to behave as an effective cosmological constant can be linked to the time at which the cosmic neutrinos become nonrelativistic. This naturally places the onset of the Universe's accelerated expansion in recent cosmic history, addressing the why-now problem of dark energy. We show that these mechanisms indeed work in the growing neutrino quintessence model—even if the fully nonlinear structure formation and backreaction are taken into account, which were previously suspected of spoiling the cosmological evolution. The attractive force between neutrinos arising from their coupling to dark energy grows as large as 106 times the gravitational strength. This induces very rapid dynamics of neutrino fluctuations which are nonlinear at redshift z ≈2 . Nevertheless, a nonlinear stabilization phenomenon ensures only mildly nonlinear oscillating neutrino overdensities with a large-scale gravitational potential substantially smaller than that of cold dark matter perturbations. Depending on model parameters, the signals of large-scale neutrino lumps may render the cosmic neutrino background observable.

  9. Cosmology based on f(R) gravity admits 1 eV sterile neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2013-03-22

    It is shown that the tension between recent neutrino oscillation experiments, favoring sterile neutrinos with masses of the order of 1 eV, and cosmological data which impose stringent constraints on neutrino masses from the free streaming suppression of density fluctuations, can be resolved in models of the present accelerated expansion of the Universe based on f(R) gravity.

  10. Gain fractions of future neutrino oscillation facilities over T2K and NOvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blennow, M.; Coloma, P.; Donini, A.; Fernández-Martínez, E.

    2013-07-01

    We evaluate the probability of future neutrino oscillation facilities to discover leptonic CP violation and/or measure the neutrino mass hierarchy. We study how this probability is affected by positive or negative hints for these observables to be found at T2K and NO νA. We consider the following facilities: LBNE; T2HK; and the 10 GeV Neutrino Factory (NF10), and show how their discovery probabilities change with the running time of T2K and NO νA conditioned to their results. We find that, if after 15 years T2K and NO νA have not observed a 90% CL hint of CP violation, then LBNE and T2HK have less than a 10% chance of achieving a 5 σ discovery, whereas NF10 still has a ~ 40% chance to do so. Conversely, if T2K and NO νA have an early 90% CL hint in 5 years from now, T2HK has a rather large chance to achieve a 5 σ CP violation discovery (75% or 55%, depending on whether the mass hierarchy is known or not). This is to be compared with the 90% (30%) probability that NF10 (LBNE) would have to observe the same signal at 5 σ. A hierarchy measurement at 5 σ is achievable at both LBNE and NF10 with more than 90% probability, irrespectively of the outcome of T2K and NO νA. We also find that if LBNE or a similar very long baseline super-beam is the only next generation facility to be built, then it is very useful to continue running T2K and NO νA (or at least T2K) beyond their original schedule in order to increase the CP violation discovery chances, given their complementarity.

  11. Neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter with direct and indirect unitarity violation in the lepton mixing matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Luo, Shu

    2016-02-01

    In the presence of both direct and indirect unitarity violation in the lepton mixing matrix, we derive a complete set of series expansion formulas for neutrino oscillation probabilities in matter of constant density. Expansions in the mass hierarchy parameter α ≡Δ m212/Δ m312 and those unitarity violation parameters sij 2 (for i =1 , 2, 3 and j =4 , 5, 6) up to the first order are studied in this paper. We analyze the accuracy of the analytical series expansion formulas in different regions of L /E . A detailed numerical analysis is also performed, of which the different effects of the direct and the indirect unitarity violation are particularly emphasized. We also study in this paper the summed να→νe ,ν ,τ probabilities, whose deviation from the unity provides a definite signal of the unitarity violation.

  12. Search for sub-eV sterile neutrinos in the precision multiple baselines reactor antineutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shu

    2015-10-01

    According to different effects on neutrino oscillations, the unitarity violation in the MNSP matrix can be classified into the direct unitarity violation and the indirect unitarity violation which are induced by the existence of the light and the heavy sterile neutrinos respectively. Of which sub-eV sterile neutrinos are of most interesting. We study in this paper the possibility of searching for sub-eV sterile neutrinos in the precision reactor antineutrino oscillation experiments with three different baselines at around 500 m, 2 km and 60 km. We find that the antineutrino survival probabilities obtained in the reactor experiments are sensitive only to the direct unitarity violation and offer very concentrated sensitivity to the two parameters θ14 and Δ m412. If such light sterile neutrinos do exist, the active-sterile mixing angle θ14 could be acquired by the combined rate analysis at all the three baselines and the mass-squared difference Δ m412 could be obtained by taking the Fourier transformation to the L / E spectrum. Of course, for such measurements to succeed, both high energy resolution and large statistics are essentially important.

  13. A Non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Accelerator for the Final Acceleration Stage of the International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.S.; Aslaninejad, M.; Pasternak, J.; Witte, H.; Bliss, N. Cordwell M.; Jones, T.; Muir, A., Kelliher, D.; Machida, S.

    2011-09-04

    The International Design Study of the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) has recently completed its Interim Design Report (IDR), which presents our current baseline design of the neutrino factory. To increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of acceleration, the IDR design uses a linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG) for its final acceleration stage. We present the current lattice design of that FFAG, including the main ring plus its injection and extraction systems. We describe parameters for the main ring magnets, kickers, and septa, as well as the power supplies for the kickers. We present a first pass at an engineering layout for the ring and its subsystems.

  14. The study of two-dimensional oscillations using a smartphone acceleration sensor: example of Lissajous curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuset-Sanchis, Luis; Castro-Palacio, Juan C.; Gómez-Tejedor, José A.; Manjón, Francisco J.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2015-08-01

    A smartphone acceleration sensor is used to study two-dimensional harmonic oscillations. The data recorded by the free android application, Accelerometer Toy, is used to determine the periods of oscillation by graphical analysis. Different patterns of the Lissajous curves resulting from the superposition of harmonic motions are illustrated for three experiments. This work introduces an example of how two-dimensional oscillations can be easily studied with a smartphone acceleration sensor.

  15. Optimization and beam control in large-emittance accelerators: Neutrino factories;

    SciTech Connect

    Carol Johnstone

    2004-08-23

    Schemes for intense sources of high-energy muons require collection, rf capture, and transport of particle beams with unprecedented emittances, both longitudinally and transversely. These large emittances must be reduced or ''cooled'' both in size and in energy spread before the muons can be efficiently accelerated. Therefore, formation of muon beams sufficiently intense to drive a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider requires multi-stage preparation. Further, because of the large beam phase space which must be successfully controlled, accelerated, and transported, the major stages that comprise such a facility: proton driver, production, capture, phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and storage are complex and strongly interlinked. Each of the stages must be consecutively matched and simultaneously optimized with upstream and downstream systems, meeting challenges not only technically in the optics and component design, but also in the modeling of both new and extended components. One design for transverse cooling, for example, employs meter-diameter solenoids to maintain strong focusing--300-500 mr beam divergences--across ultra-large momentum ranges, {ge} {+-}20% {delta}p/p, defying conventional approximations to the dynamics and field representation. To now, the interplay of the different systems and staging strategies has not been formally addressed. This work discusses two basic, but different approaches to a Neutrino Factory and how the staging strategy depends on beam parameters and method of acceleration.

  16. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  17. A search for sterile neutrinos in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Osiecki, Thomas Henry

    2007-01-01

    MINOS, the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search, is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment uses a neutrino beam, which is measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near detector at Fermilab and then 735 km later in the Far detector at the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can attain a very high precision for parameters in the atmospheric sector of neutrino oscillations. In addition to precisely determining Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and θ23 through the disappearance of vμ, MINOS is able to measure vμ → vsterile by looking for a deficit in the number of neutral current interactions seen in the Far detector. In this thesis, we present the results of a search for sterile neutrinos in MINOS.

  18. Large-θ 13 perturbation theory of neutrino oscillation for long-baseline experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuhiro; Minakata, Hisakazu

    2011-06-01

    The Cervera et al. formula, the best known approximate formula of neutrino oscillation probability for long-baseline experiments, can be regarded as a second-order perturbative formula with small expansion parameter ɛ ≡ ∆ m {21/2} ∆ m {31/2} ≃ 0 .03 under the 21assumption s 13 ≃ ɛ. If θ 13 is large, as suggested by a candidate ν e event at T2K as well as the recent global analyses, higher order corrections of s 13 to the formula would be needed for better accuracy. We compute the corrections systematically by formulating a perturbative framework by taking θ 13 as {s_{13}} ˜ sqrt { in } ˜eq 0.18 , which guarantees its validity in a wide range of θ 13 below the Chooz limit. We show on general ground that the correction terms must be of order ɛ2. Yet, they nicely fill the mismatch between the approximate and the exact formulas at low energies and relatively long baselines. General theorems are derived which serve for better understanding of δ-dependence of the oscillation probability. Some interesting implications of the large θ 13 hypothesis are discussed.

  19. Leptonic CP violation studies at MiniBooNE in the (3+2) sterile neutrino oscillation hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgi, G.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Conrad, J. M.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Whisnant, K.; Sorel, M.; Barger, V.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which leptonic CP-violation in (3+2) sterile neutrino models leads to different oscillation probabilities for {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} oscillations at MiniBooNE. We are using a combined analysis of short-baseline (SBL) oscillation results, including the LSND and null SBL results, to which we impose additional constraints from atmospheric oscillation data. We obtain the favored regions in MiniBooNE oscillation probability space for both (3+2) CP-conserving and (3+2) CP-violating models. We further investigate the allowed CP-violation phase values and the MiniBooNE reach for such a CP violation measurement. The analysis shows that the oscillation probabilities in MiniBooNE neutrino and antineutrino running modes can differ significantly, with the latter possibly being as much as 3 times larger than the first. In addition, we also show that all possible values of the single CP-violation phase measurable at short baselines in (3+2) models are allowed within 99% CL by existing data.

  20. Results and Status of the T2K and NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muether, Mathew

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations and the resulting implication that neutrinos have mass, recently awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, has bolstered a world-wide effort to exploit this effect as a handle on the properties of neutrinos. In the decades since the initial discovery of neutrino oscillations, great strides have been made in understanding the nature of these elusive particles, yet important and fundamental questions remain open, such as: How are the neutrino masses ordered? And Do neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate differently? The current generation of accelerator based long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K in Japan and NOvA in the United States, are actively pursuing the answers to these questions. In this talk, I will review the recent results and current status of the T2K and NOvA long-baseline neutrino experiments.

  1. A data summary file structure and analysis tools for neutrino oscillation analysis at the NOvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhouse, C.; Rocco, D.

    2015-12-01

    The NuMI Off-axis Neutrino Experiment (NOvA) is designed to study neutrino oscillations in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) is currently being upgraded to provide 700 kW for NOvA. A 14 kt Far Detector in Ash River, MN and a functionally identical 0.3 kt Near Detector at Fermilab are positioned 810 km apart in the NuMI beam line. The fine granularity of the NOvA detectors provides a detailed representation of particle trajectories. The data volume associated with such granularity, however, poses problems for analyzing data with ease and speed. NOvA has developed a data summary file structure which discards the full event record in favor of higher-level reconstructed information. A general- purpose framework for neutrino oscillation measurements has been developed for analysis of these data summary files. We present the design methodology for this new file format as well as the analysis framework and the role it plays in producing NOvA physics results.

  2. Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Neutrinos are electrically neutral ELEMENTARY PARTICLES which experience only the weak nuclear force and gravity. Their existence was introduced as a hypothesis by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to explain the apparent violation of energy conservation in radioactive beta decay. Chadwick had discovered in 1914 that the energy spectrum of electrons emitted in beta decay was not monoenergetic but continuous...

  3. From super beams to neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The Neutrino Factory, which produces an extremely intense source of flavor-tagged neutrinos from muon decays in a storage ring, arguably gives the best physics reach for CP violation, as well as virtually all parameters in the neutrino oscillation parameter space. I will briefly describe the physics capabilities of the baseline Neutrino Factory as compared to other possible future facilities ({beta}-beam and super-beam facilities), give an overview of the accelerator complex and describe in detail the current international R&D program.

  4. Some uncertainties of neutrino oscillation effect in the NOνA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolupaeva, Lyudmila D.; Kuzmin, Konstantin S.; Petrova, Olga N.; Shandrov, Igor M.

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainties related to the effect of neutrino coherent forward scattering in Earth’s matter (MSW mechanism) and with the cross-sections of quasi-elastic (QE) neutrino scattering on nuclear targets of the NOνA detectors are studied. The NOνA sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the CP violating phase is discussed.

  5. Sterile Neutrinos in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Benjamin J.P.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of neutrino oscillations at short baselines contain an intriguing set of experimental anomalies that may be suggestive of new physics such as the existence of sterile neutrinos. This three-part thesis presents research directed towards understanding these anomalies and searching for sterile neutrino oscillations. Part I contains a theoretical discussion of neutrino coherence properties. The open-quantum-system picture of neutrino beams, which allows a rigorous prediction of coherence distances for accelerator neutrinos, is presented. Validity of the standard treatment of active and sterile neutrino oscillations at short baselines is verified, and non-standard coherence loss effects at longer baselines are predicted. Part II concerns liquid argon detector development for the MicroBooNE experiment, which will search for short-baseline oscillations in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. Topics include characterization and installation of the MicroBooNE optical system; test-stand measurements of liquid argon optical properties with dissolved impurities; optimization of wavelength-shifting coatings for liquid argon scintillation light detection; testing and deployment of high-voltage surge arrestors to protect TPC field cages; and software development for optical and TPC simulation and reconstruction. Part III presents a search for sterile neutrinos using the IceCube neutrino telescope, which has collected a large sample of atmospheric-neutrino-induced events in the 1-10 TeV energy range. Sterile neutrinos would modify the detected neutrino flux shape via MSW-resonant oscillations. Following a careful treatment of systematic uncertainties in the sample, no evidence for MSW-resonant oscillations is observed, and exclusion limits on 3+1 model parameter space are derived. Under the mixing assumptions made, the 90% confidence level exclusion limit extends to sin224 ≤ 0.02 at m2 ~ 0.3 eV2, and the LSND and Mini

  6. Lepton mixing under the lepton charge nonconservation, neutrino masses and oscillations and the 'forbidden' decay Micro-Sign {sup -} {yields} e{sup -} + {gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Lyuboshitz, V. L.; Lyuboshitz, V. V.

    2013-08-15

    The lepton-charge (L{sub e}, L{sub {mu}}, L{sub {tau}}) nonconserving interaction leads to the mixing of the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos, which manifests itself in spatial oscillations of a neutrino beam, and also to the mixing of the electron, negative muon, and tau lepton, which, in particular, may be the cause of the 'forbidden' radiative decay of the negative muon into the electron and {gamma} quantum. Under the assumption that the nondiagonal elements of the mass matrices for neutrinos and ordinary leptons, connected with the lepton charge nonconservation, are the same, and by performing the joint analysis of the experimental data on neutrino oscillations and experimental restriction for the probability of the decay Micro-Sign {sup -} {yields} e{sup -} + {gamma} per unit time, the following estimate for the lower bound of neutrino mass has been obtained: m{sup ({nu})} > 1.5 eV/c{sup 2}.

  7. An improved Neutrino Oscillations Analysis of the MiniBooNE Data

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis Armando

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the exclusion region in the parameter space of vμ → v oscillations of the LSND type using a combined fit to the reconstructed energy distributions of neutrino candidate samples from the MiniBooNE data obtained with two different particle identification methods. The two ve candidate samples are included together with a high statistics sample of vμ events in the definition of a X2 statistic which includes the correlations between the energy intervals of all three samples and handles the event overlap between the ve samples. The vμ sample is introduced to constrain the effect of systematic uncertainties. This analysis increases the exclusion limit in the region Δm2≲ 1eV2 when compared with the result previously published by the collaboration, which used a different technique.

  8. Solar oscillations, gravitational multipole field of the sun and the solar neutrino paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, H.A.; Rosenwald, R.D.

    1986-11-04

    The visual solar oblateness work and the solar seismological work on the internal rotation of the sun are reviewed and their implications concerning the static gravitational multipole moments of the sun are discussed. The results of this work are quite deviant which is indicative of the complexity encountered and of the necessity for continued studies based on a diverse set of observing techniques. The evidence for phase-locked internal gravity modes of the sun is reviewed and the implications for the solar neutrino paradox are discussed. The rather unique possibility for testing the relevance which the phase-locked gravity modes have to this paradox is also noted. The oscillating perturbations in the sun's gravitational field produced by the classified internal gravity modes and the phase-locked modes are inferred from the observed temperature eigenfunctions. Strains of the order of 10/sup -18/ in gravitational radiation detectors based on free masses are inferred for frequencies near 100 ..mu..Hz. The relevance of these findings is discussed in terms of a new technique for use in solar seismological studies and of producing background signals in studies of low-frequency gravitational radiation. 64 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth control by an oscillating acceleration in heavy ion inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kodera, T.; Hisatomi, Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.; Koseki, S.; Barada, D.

    2010-08-01

    Uniformity of heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination is one of key issues in HIB inertial confinement fusion (HIF) in order to compress a fuel sufficiently and release fusion energy effectively. In this paper a new mitigation method of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability growth is presented to make a HIF target robust against a non-uniform implosion. In this study a new mitigation method of the R-T instability growth is proposed based on an oscillating perturbed acceleration, which can be realized by a rotation or oscillation of the HIB illumination axis onto a fuel pellet. The R-T instability analyses and fluid simulations demonstrate that the oscillating acceleration reduces the R-T instability growth significantly. In this paper a baseline steady acceleration g0 is perturbed by a perturbed oscillating acceleration δg, which is spatially non-uniform and oscillates in time (g0 >> δg). An example result shows an 84% reduction of the R-T instability growth. In the analytical work two stratified inviscid fluids are treated under the perturbed oscillating acceleration. The linear analysis shows that the R-T instability growth rate does not change from the standard expression of γ. However, the R-T instability growth is strongly affected and mitigated by the oscillating acceleration; The transverse velocity of w is derived at the interface of the two stratified fluids. The R-T instability is induced by δg. The result presents that the perturbed oscillating acceleration reduces the R-T instability growth significantly depending on the magnitude of the HIB oscillation frequency.

  10. Atmospheric Neutrinos: Background and Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Mocioiu, Irina

    2010-11-24

    We discuss a brief history of atmospheric neutrinos, from background to proton decay searches to proving neutrino oscillations. We then discuss how high statistics atmospheric neutrino measurements in the IceCube Deep Core Array can provide useful information about neutrino oscillation parameters and other neutrino properties.

  11. The Study of Two-Dimensional Oscillations Using a Smartphone Acceleration Sensor: Example of Lissajous Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuset-Sanchis, Luis; Castro-Palacio, Juan C.; Gómez-Tejedor, José A.; Manjón, Francisco J.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    A smartphone acceleration sensor is used to study two-dimensional harmonic oscillations. The data recorded by the free android application, Accelerometer Toy, is used to determine the periods of oscillation by graphical analysis. Different patterns of the Lissajous curves resulting from the superposition of harmonic motions are illustrated for…

  12. Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, Steve

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate O(1021) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source : a Neutrino Factory. This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for a Neutrino Factory.

  13. Nonlinear matter spectra in growing neutrino quintessence

    SciTech Connect

    Brouzakis, N.; Tetradis, N.; Pettorino, V.; Wetterich, C. E-mail: pettorin@sissa.it E-mail: c.wetterich@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the nonlinear power spectra of density perturbations and acoustic oscillations in growing neutrino quintessence. In this scenario, the neutrino mass has a strong dependence on the quintessence field. The induced coupling stops the evolution of the field when the neutrinos become nonrelativistic, and triggers the transition to the accelerating phase of the cosmological expansion. For the calculation of the nonlinear spectra we employ the time renormalization group, which resums subsets of diagrams of arbitrarily high order in cosmological perturbation theory. At redshifts around five, the neutrino fluctuations are still linear and acoustic oscillations are present in the neutrino power spectrum, induced by the acoustic oscillations in the baryonic and dark-matter sectors. The neutrino perturbations become nonlinear at redshifts around three. The mode coupling generated by the nonlinearities erases the oscillations in the neutrino spectrum at some redshift above two. There is a potential danger that at later times the influence of the gravitational potentials induced by the neutrino inhomogeneities could erase the oscillations from the baryonic and dark-matter spectra, making the scenario incompatible with observations. For the scenario to be viable, the neutrino-induced gravitational potentials in the range of baryon acoustic oscillations should not grow to average values much larger than 10{sup −4}. The magnitude of the expected potentials is still not known reliably, as the process of structure formation is poorly understood in growing neutrino quintessence. The time renormalization group cannot describe the effects of nonlinear clustering. Alternative methods, such as hydrodynamic simulations, must be empoloyed for the calculation of the spectra at low redshifts.

  14. Observation of deficit in NuMI neutrino-induced rock and non-fiducial muons in MINOS Far Detector and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Aaron Michael

    2007-08-01

    The MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has observed muon neutrino disappearance consistent with the oscillation hypothesis tested by Super-Kamiokande and K2K. The survival probability for vμ is given approximately by 1 - sin22θ23sin2(1.27Δm$2\\atop{32}$L/E), whereθ23 and Δm$2\\atop{32}$ are the mixing angle and difference in mass squared in eV2/c4 between the mass eigenstates v3 and v2, L is the distance traveled in km, and E is the neutrino energy in GeV. In the Near Detector at Fermilab, a measurement of the energy spectrum of the NuMI neutrino beam is made 1 km from the beam target. The neutrinos travel to the Far Detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, where another measurement of the energy spectrum is made 735 km from the target. MINOS measures |Δm$2\\atop{32}$| and sin223 by comparing the ND and FD neutrino energy spectra. In this dissertation, a n alternate method is presented that utilizes rock muons, a class of events that occur when a vμ interaction takes place in the rock surrounding the FD. Many muons that result from these interactions penetrate the rock and reach the detector. Muon events from vμ interactions in the non-fiducial volume of the FD are also used in this analysis. The distribution of reconstructed muon momentum and direction relative to the beam is predicted by Monte Carlo simulation, normalized by the measured vμ energy spectrum at the ND. In the first year of NuMI running (an exposure of 1.27x1020 protons on target) 117 selected events are observed below 3.0 GeV/c, where 150.2±16.1 events are expected. When a fit is performed to events below 10.0 GeV/c, the null (no disappearance) hypothesis is ruled out at significance level α = 4.2 x 10-3. The data are consistent with the oscillation hypothesis given parameter

  15. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  16. Controlling the betatron oscillations of a wakefield-accelerated electron beam by temporally asymmetric laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Inhyuk; Hur, Min Sup; Uhm, Han Sup; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Suk, Hyyong

    2011-04-15

    Based on two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigated the electron beam's transverse oscillations by temporally asymmetric laser pulses in laser wakefield acceleration. Of particular interest in this article are the effects of ultrashort laser pulses having sharp rising and slow falling time scales. In this situation, the accelerated electron beam interacts directly with the laser field and undergoes transverse oscillations due to a phase-slip with the laser field. This oscillation can be matched with the betatron oscillation due to the focusing force of the ions, which can lead to a large transverse oscillation amplitude due to the resonance between them. Furthermore, in this case, the electron beam can be microbunched at the laser wavelength, which may provide the possibility for generation of a coherent synchrotron radiation.

  17. Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Several anomalies recorded in short-baseline neutrino experiments suggest the possibility that the standard 3-flavor framework may be incomplete and point towards a manifestation of new physics. Light sterile neutrinos provide a credible solution to these puzzling results. Here, we present a concise review of the status of the neutrino oscillations within the 3+1 scheme, the minimal extension of the standard 3-flavor framework endowed with one sterile neutrino species. We emphasize the potential role of LBL experiments in the searches of CP violation related to sterile neutrinos and their complementarity with the SBL experiments.

  18. Combined analysis of νμ disappearance and νμ→νe appearance in MINOS using accelerator and atmospheric neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Anghel, I; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moed Sher, S; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2014-05-16

    We report on a new analysis of neutrino oscillations in MINOS using the complete set of accelerator and atmospheric data. The analysis combines the ν(μ) disappearance and ν(e) appearance data using the three-flavor formalism. We measure |Δm(32)(2)| = [2.28-2.46] × 10(-3) eV(2) (68% C.L.) and sin(2)θ(23) = 0.35-0.65 (90% C.L.) in the normal hierarchy, and |Δm(32)(2)| = [2.32-2.53] × 10(-3) eV(2) (68% C.L.) and sin(2)θ(23) = 0.34-0.67 (90% C.L.) in the inverted hierarchy. The data also constrain δ(CP), the θ(23} octant degeneracy and the mass hierarchy; we disfavor 36% (11%) of this three-parameter space at 68% (90%) C.L. PMID:24877929

  19. Combined analysis of νμ disappearance and νμ→νe appearance in MINOS using accelerator and atmospheric neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Anghel, I; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moed Sher, S; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2014-05-16

    We report on a new analysis of neutrino oscillations in MINOS using the complete set of accelerator and atmospheric data. The analysis combines the ν(μ) disappearance and ν(e) appearance data using the three-flavor formalism. We measure |Δm(32)(2)| = [2.28-2.46] × 10(-3) eV(2) (68% C.L.) and sin(2)θ(23) = 0.35-0.65 (90% C.L.) in the normal hierarchy, and |Δm(32)(2)| = [2.32-2.53] × 10(-3) eV(2) (68% C.L.) and sin(2)θ(23) = 0.34-0.67 (90% C.L.) in the inverted hierarchy. The data also constrain δ(CP), the θ(23} octant degeneracy and the mass hierarchy; we disfavor 36% (11%) of this three-parameter space at 68% (90%) C.L.

  20. Neutrino mixing and oscillation in a grand unified field theory SO(10)

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.

    1980-01-01

    The investigation shows that it is very difficult to achieve neutrino mixing of other than the V/sub ..mu../-..nu../sub tau/ type in any minimal SO(10) model in which neutrino masses are generated by the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism, because of the severe constraints placed on the mass matrix by quark phenomenology.

  1. Overview and Status of Experimental Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, Ion

    2002-10-01

    Seventy years after the existence of the neutrino has been postulated by Wolfgang Pauli, these elusive particles remain surrounded by mystery. One of the most fundamental questions about neutrinos is whether they have an identically vanishing mass, as assumed by the Standard Model, or not. Direct measurements have proven to be extremely difficult to perform, and have yielded so far only upper limits. However, if neutrino flavour oscillations do happen, this would automatically imply that at least one of the three neutrinos (the electron, muon or tau neutrino) must have a non-zero mass. The present experimental data indicate that both the solar and atmospheric neutrino deficits can be explained by the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations, while the positive signal reported by the accelerator-based LSND experiment remains to be verified by an independent measurement (MiniBooNE). This talk reviews the current status of the neutrino oscillations experiments, experiments which are quite likely to produce results with significant consequences for both the Standard Model and Cosmology.

  2. Experimental Anomalies in Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Ornella

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, experimental anomalies ranging in significance (2.8-3.8 σ) have been reported from a variety of experiments studying neutrinos over baselines less than 1 km. Results from the LSND and MiniBooNE short-baseline νe /νe appearance experiments show anomalies which cannot be described by oscillations between the three standard model neutrinos (the ``LSND anomaly''). In addition, a re-analysis of the anti-neutrino flux produced by nuclear power reactors has led to an apparent deficit in νe event rates in a number of reactor experiments (the ``reactor anomaly''). Similarly, calibration runs using 51Cr and 37Ar radioactive sources in the Gallium solar neutrino experiments GALLEX and SAGE have shown an unexplained deficit in the electron neutrino event rate over very short distances (the ``Gallium anomaly''). The puzzling results from these experiments, which together may suggest the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model and hint at exciting new physics, including the possibility of additional low-mass sterile neutrino states, have raised the interest in the community for new experimental efforts that could eventually solve this puzzle. Definitive evidence for sterile neutrinos would be a revolutionary discovery, with implications for particle physics as well as cosmology. Proposals to address these signals by employing accelerator, reactor and radioactive source experiments are in the planning stages or underway worldwide. In this talk some of these will be reviewed, with emphasis on the accelerator programs.

  3. Image oscillation reduction and convergence acceleration for OSEM reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.C.

    1999-06-01

    The authors have investigated the use of two approaches to reduce the image oscillation of OSEM reconstruction that is due to the inconsistencies among different partial subsets of the projection measurements (sinogram) when considering as a group. One approach pre-processes the sinogram to make it satisfy a sinogram consistency condition. The second approach takes the average of the intermediary images (i.e., smoothes image values over sub-iterations). Both approaches were found to be capable of reducing the image oscillation, and combination of both was most effective. With these approaches, the convergence of OSEM reconstruction is further improved. For computer simulated data and real PET data, a single iteration of these new OSEM reconstruction was shown to yield images comparable to those with 80 EM iterations.

  4. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Bob

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  5. Chaos, determinacy and fractals in active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early universe

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Agrawal, Prateek E-mail: apr@umd.edu

    2008-10-15

    The possibility of light sterile neutrinos allows for the resonant production of lepton number in the early universe through matter-affected neutrino mixing. For a given mixing of the active and sterile neutrino states it has been found that the lepton number generation process is chaotic and strongly oscillatory. We undertake a new study of the sensitivity of this process to initial conditions through the quantum rate equations. We confirm the chaoticity of the process in this solution, and moreover find that the resultant lepton number and the sign of the asymmetry produce a fractal in the parameter space of mass, mixing angle and initial baryon number. This has implications for future searches for sterile neutrinos, where arbitrarily high sensitivity may not be determinate in forecasting the lepton number of the universe.

  6. Recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Elewyck, Véronique

    2014-04-01

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope is currently the largest operating water Cherenkov detector and the largest neutrino detector in the Northern Hemisphere. Its main scientific target is the detection of high-energy (TeV and beyond) neutrinos from cosmic accelerators, as predicted by hadronic interaction models, and the measurement of the diffuse neutrino flux. Its location allows for surveying a large part of the Galactic Plane, including the Galactic Centre. In addition to the standalone searches for point-like and diffuse high-energy neutrino signals, ANTARES has developed a range of multi-messenger strategies to exploit the close connection between neutrinos and other cosmic messengers such as gamma-rays, charged cosmic rays and gravitational waves. This contribution provides an overview of the recently conducted analyses, including a search for neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles region, searches for optical counterparts with the TAToO program, and searches for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts, blazars, and microquasars. Further topics of investigation, covering e.g. the search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation, searches for exotic particles and the measurement of neutrino oscillations, are also reviewed.

  7. Frequency multiplying oscillator with an electron beam accelerated in a drift space

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Kyu-Ha; Lee, Kitae; Hee Park, Seong; Uk Jeong, Young; Miginsky, S.

    2012-07-02

    In a uniform acceleration region, the behavior of a velocity-modulated electron beam has been analyzed using a particle-in-cell code. By making use of one of the accelerated harmonic components of the velocity-modulated electron beam, we demonstrate a frequency multiplying oscillator for a compact THz emitter, which employs multiple electron beams and a higher order mode resonator to modulate the electron beam without an additional driving source.

  8. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  9. Three flavor neutrino oscillations in matter: Flavor diagonal potentials, the adiabatic basis, and the CP phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss the three neutrino flavor evolution problem with general, flavor-diagonal, matter potentials and a fully parametrized mixing matrix that includes CP violation, and derive expressions for the eigenvalues, mixing angles, and phases. We demonstrate that, in the limit that the mu and tau potentials are equal, the eigenvalues and matter mixing angles {theta}-tilde{sub 12} and {theta}-tilde{sub 13} are independent of the CP phase, although {theta}-tilde{sub 23} does have CP dependence. Since we are interested in developing a framework that can be used for S matrix calculations of neutrino flavor transformation, it is useful to work in a basis that contains only off-diagonal entries in the Hamiltonian. We derive the 'nonadiabaticity' parameters that appear in the Hamiltonian in this basis. We then introduce the neutrino S matrix, derive its evolution equation and the integral solution. We find that this new Hamiltonian, and therefore the S matrix, in the limit that the {mu} and {tau} neutrino potentials are the same, is independent of both {theta}-tilde{sub 23} and the CP violating phase. In this limit, any CP violation in the flavor basis can only be introduced via the rotation matrices, and so effects which derive from the CP phase are then straightforward to determine. We then show explicitly that the electron neutrino and electron antineutrino survival probability is independent of the CP phase in this limit. Conversely, if the CP phase is nonzero and mu and tau matter potentials are not equal, then the electron neutrino survival probability cannot be independent of the CP phase.

  10. Using a mobile phone acceleration sensor in physics experiments on free and damped harmonic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos Castro-Palacio, Juan; Velázquez-Abad, Luisberis; Giménez, Marcos H.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2013-06-01

    We have used a mobile phone acceleration sensor, and the Accelerometer Monitor application for Android, to collect data in physics experiments on free and damped oscillations. Results for the period, frequency, spring constant, and damping constant agree very well with measurements obtained by other methods. These widely available sensors are likely to find increased use in instructional laboratories.

  11. Breathing oscillations in enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, S. F.; Wang, C. X.; Tang, D. L.; Qiu, X. M.; Fu, R. K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-05-28

    Breathing oscillations in the discharge of an enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator are investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. Different from the traditional breathing mode in a circular Hall plasma accelerator, the bulk plasma oscillation here is trigged by the potential barrier generated by the concentrated ion beam and substantial enough to compete with the anode voltage. The electric field near the anode is suppressed by the potential barrier thereby decreasing the electron density by {approx}36%. The discharge is restored to the normal level after the concentrated beam explodes and then it completes one cycle of electro-driven breathing oscillation. The breathing mode identified by the PIC simulation has a frequency range of {approx}156 kHz-{approx}250 kHz and does not vary monotonically with the discharge voltage.

  12. Breathing oscillations in enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, S. F.; Tang, D. L.; Wang, C. X.; Fu, R. K. Y.; Qiu, X. M.; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-05-01

    Breathing oscillations in the discharge of an enlarged cylindrical-anode-layer Hall plasma accelerator are investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. Different from the traditional breathing mode in a circular Hall plasma accelerator, the bulk plasma oscillation here is trigged by the potential barrier generated by the concentrated ion beam and substantial enough to compete with the anode voltage. The electric field near the anode is suppressed by the potential barrier thereby decreasing the electron density by ˜36%. The discharge is restored to the normal level after the concentrated beam explodes and then it completes one cycle of electro-driven breathing oscillation. The breathing mode identified by the PIC simulation has a frequency range of ˜156 kHz-˜250 kHz and does not vary monotonically with the discharge voltage.

  13. Issues in Acceleration of A Muon Beam for a Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    J. Delayen; D. Douglas; L. Harwood; V. Lebedev; C. Leemann; L. Merminga

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a concept for acceleration of a large phase-space, pulsed muon beam from 190 MeV to 50 GeV as part of a collaborative study of the feasibility of a neutrino factory based on in-flight decay of muons. The muon beam's initial energy spread was {approximately}20% and each bunch has the physical size of a soccer ball. Production of the muons will be quite expensive, so prevention of loss due to scraping or decay is critical. The former drives the system to large apertures and the latter calls for high real-estate-average gradients. The solution to be presented utilizes a 3 GeV linac to capture the beam, a 4-pass recirculating linac to get the beam to 10 GeV, and then a 5-pass linac to get the beam to 50 GeV. Throughout the system, longitudinal dynamics issues far outweighed transverse dynamics issues. This paper focuses on the issues surrounding the choice of superconducting rf structures over copper structures.

  14. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-05-30

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8{degree} angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3{degree} angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design.

  15. Probing Neutrino Properties with Long-Baseline Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Alysia

    2015-06-29

    This is nal report on an Early Career Award grant began in April 15, 2010 and concluded on April 14, 2015. Alysia Marino's research is fo- cussed on making precise measurements of neutrino properties using in- tense accelerator-generated neutrino beams. As a part of this grant, she is collaborating on the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino exper- iment [6], currently taking data in Japan, and on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) design e ort for a future Long-Baseline Neu- trino Facility (LBNF) in the US.1 She is also a member of the NA61/SHINE particle production experiment at CERN, but as that e ort is supported by other funds, it will not be discussed further here. T2K was designed to search for the disappearance of muon neutrinos ( ) and the appearance of electron neutrinos ( e), using a beam of muon neu- trino beam that travels 295 km across Japan towards the Super-Kamiokande detector. In 2011 T2K rst reported indications of e appearance [2], a pre- viously unobserved mode of neutrino oscillations. In the past year, T2K has published a combined analysis of disappearance and e appearance [1], and began collecting taking data with a beam of anti-neutrinos, instead of neutrinos, to search for hints of violation of the CP symmetry of the uni- verse. The proposed DUNE experiment has similar physics goals to T2K, but will be much more sensitive due to its more massive detectors and new higher-intensity neutrino beam. This e ort will be very high-priority particle physics project in the US over the next decade.

  16. The Case for Muon-based Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Patrick; Bross, Alan; Palmer, Mark

    2014-11-03

    For the foreseeable future, high energy physics accelerator capabilities in the US will be deployed to study the physics of the neutrino sector. In this context, it is useful to explore the sensitivities and limiting systematic effects of the planned neutrino oscillation program, so that we can evaluate the issues that must be addressed in order to ensure the success of these efforts. It is only in this way that we will ultimately be able to elucidate the fundamental physics processes involved. We conclude that success can only be guaranteed by, at some point in the future, being able to deploy muon accelerator capabilities. Such capabilities provide the only route to precision neutrino beams with which to study and mitigate, at the sub-percent level, the limiting systematic issues of future oscillation measurements. Thus this analysis argues strongly for maintaining a viable accelerator research program towards future muon accelerator capabilities.

  17. Novel Ideas for Neutrino Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peach, Ken

    2007-04-23

    Recent developments in neutrino physics, primarily the demonstration of neutrino oscillations in both atmospheric neutrinos and solar neutrinos, provide the first conclusive evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The simplest phenomenology of neutrino oscillations, for three generations of neutrino, requires six parameters - two squared mass differences, 3 mixing angles and a complex phase that could, if not 0 or {pi}, contribute to the otherwise unexplained baryon asymmetry observed in the universe. Exploring the neutrino sector will require very intense beams of neutrinos, and will need novel solutions.

  18. A large liquid argon time projection chamber for long-baseline, off-axis neutrino oscillation physics with the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, D.; Jensen, D.; Jostlein, H.; Marchionni, A.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Bromberg, C.; Lu, C.; McDonald, T.; Gallagher, H.; Mann, A.; Schneps, J.; Cline, D.; Sergiampietri, F.; Wang, H.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B.T.; Menary, S.; /York U., Canada

    2005-09-01

    Results from neutrino oscillation experiments in the last ten years have revolutionized the field of neutrino physics. While the overall oscillation picture for three neutrinos is now well established and precision measurements of the oscillation parameters are underway, crucial issues remain. In particular, the hierarchy of the neutrino masses, the structure of the neutrino mixing matrix, and, above all, CP violation in the neutrino sector are the primary experimental challenges in upcoming years. A program that utilizes the newly commissioned NuMI neutrino beamline, and its planned upgrades, together with a high-performance, large-mass detector will be in an excellent position to provide decisive answers to these key neutrino physics questions. A Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) [2], which combines fine-grained tracking, total absorption calorimetry, and scalability, is well matched for this physics program. The few-millimeter-scale spatial granularity of a LArTPC combined with dE/dx measurements make it a powerful detector for neutrino oscillation physics. Scans of simulated event samples, both directed and blind, have shown that electron identification in {nu}{sub e} charged current interactions can be maintained at an efficiency of 80%. Backgrounds for {nu}{sub e} appearance searches from neutral current events with a {pi}{sup 0} are reduced well below the {approx} 0.5-1.0% {nu}{sub e} contamination of the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam [3]. While the ICARUS collaboration has pioneered this technology and shown its feasibility with successful operation of the T600 (600-ton) LArTPC [4], a detector for off-axis, long-baseline neutrino physics must be many times more massive to compensate for the low event rates. We have a baseline concept [5] based on the ICARUS wire plane structure and commercial methods of argon purification and housed in an industrial liquefied-natural-gas tank. Fifteen to fifty kton liquid argon capacity tanks have been considered. A very

  19. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Loiacono, Laura Jean

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  20. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.

    2008-01-25

    The observation of neutrino oscillations is clear evidence for physics beyond the standard model. To make precise measurements of this phenomenon, neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require an accurate description of neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) cross sections to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of {nu}{sub {mu}} CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A}{sup eff}=1.23{+-}0.20 GeV, that describes the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon, and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa}=1.019{+-}0.011. Such a modified Fermi gas model may also be used by future accelerator-based experiments measuring neutrino oscillations on nuclear targets.

  1. Search for neutrino oscillations at BNL preliminary results from E 816 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, G.

    1987-03-01

    Neutrino interactions in a fine-grain calorimeter have been analyzed with emphasis on events with associated electromagnetic showers. The good granularity of the detector allows to separate photon from electron showers. The number of events with an electron, according to the present status of our analysis, is found to be about three times larger than expected on the basis of the beam composition. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  2. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  3. Neutrino decay and solar neutrino seasonal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoreti, R.; Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.; Peres, O. L. G.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the possibility of solar neutrino decay as a sub-leading effect on their propagation between production and detection. Using current oscillation data, we set a new lower bound to the ν2 neutrino lifetime at τ2 /m2 ≥ 7.2 ×10-4s .eV-1 at 99% C.L. Also, we show how seasonal variations in the solar neutrino data can give interesting additional information about neutrino lifetime.

  4. Neutrino induced events in the MINOS detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, Reuben Phillip

    2008-01-01

    The MINOS experiment is designed to study neutrino oscillations. It uses an accelerator generated beam of neutrinos and two detectors, the smaller at a distance of 1km and the larger at 735 km. By comparing the spectrum and flavour composition of the beam at the two detectors precise determinations of the oscillation parameters are possible. This thesis concentrates on the analysis of data from the larger Far Detector. By studying the spectrum of neutral current events it is possible to look for evidence of non-interacting 'sterile' neutrinos. The thesis describes how events are selected for this analysis, and a method for discriminating between charged current and neutral current events. The systematic uncertainties resulting from these cuts are evaluated. Several techniques for using Near Detector data to eliminate systematic uncertainties in the predicted Far Detector spectrum are compared. An oscillation analysis, based on the first year of MINOS data, uses the selected events to make a measurement of f{sub s}, the fraction of unseen neutrinos that are sterile. The measured value is fs = 0.07+0.32 at 68%C.L., and is consistent with the standard three-neutrino picture, which has no sterile neutrino.

  5. Feasibility of an XUV FEL Oscillator Driven by a SCRF Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Freund, H. P.; Reinsch, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility is currently under construction at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Using a1-ms-long macropulse composed of up to 3000 micropulses, and with beam energies projected from 45 to 800 MeV, the possibility for an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free-electron laser oscillator (FELO) with the higher energy is evaluated. We have used both GINGER with an oscillator module and the MEDUSA/OPC code to assess FELO saturation prospects at 120 nm, 40 nm, and 13.4 nm. The results support saturation at all of these wavelengths which are also shorter than the demonstrated shortest wavelength record of 176 nm from a storage-ring-based FELO. This indicates linac-driven FELOs can be extended into this XUV wavelength regime previously only reached with single-pass FEL configurations.

  6. Neutrino refraction by the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J. S.; Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2016-03-01

    We have determined the dispersion relation of a neutrino test particle propagating in the cosmic neutrino background. Describing the relic neutrinos and antineutrinos from the hot big bang as a dense medium, a matter potential or refractive index is obtained. The vacuum neutrino mixing angles are unchanged, but the energy of each mass state is modified. Using a matrix in the space of neutrino species, the induced potential is decomposed into a part which produces signatures in beta-decay experiments and another part which modifies neutrino oscillations. The low temperature of the relic neutrinos makes a direct detection extremely challenging. From a different point of view, the identified refractive effects of the cosmic neutrino background constitute an ultralow background for future experimental studies of nonvanishing Lorentz violation in the neutrino sector.

  7. Mass production test of Hamamatsu MPPC for T2K neutrino oscillation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, M.; Nakaya, T.; Gomi, S.; Minamino, A.; Nagai, N.; Nitta, K.; Orme, D.; Otani, M.; Murakami, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Tanaka, M.

    2009-10-01

    In the T2K near neutrino detectors, about 60 000 Hamamatsu Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) will be used. The mass production of MPPC has started in February 2008. In order to perform quality assurance and to characterize each device, we have developed an MPPC test system. For each MPPC, gain, breakdown voltage, noise rate, photo detection efficiency, and cross-talk and after-pulse rate are measured as functions of the bias voltage and temperature. The design of the test system and the measurement procedure are described.

  8. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-15

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π{sup 0} vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of ν{sub µ} charged current interactions.

  9. Results from non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The diversity of non-accelerator experiments is at first look both dazzling and even daunting. However, nearly all of these experiments strive to attain the same goal, to search for new physics, beyond the current Standard Model. These measurements are also unified in the fact that their results are often dominated by systematic uncertainties. This review necessarily covers only a limited subset of non-accelerator experiments, and will concentrate on the experimental areas where there has been significant recent progress. The topics reviewed include neutrino mazes, double beta decay, solar neutrino, and long-baseline neutrino oscillation measurements.

  10. Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Oscillations with an Accelerator-Produced Off-Axis Beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buizza Avanzini, M; Calland, R G; Cao, S; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S G; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-05-01

    T2K reports its first measurements of the parameters governing the disappearance of ν[over ¯]_{μ} in an off-axis beam due to flavor change induced by neutrino oscillations. The quasimonochromatic ν[over ¯]_{μ} beam, produced with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV at J-PARC, is observed at the far detector Super-Kamiokande, 295 km away, where the ν[over ¯]_{μ} survival probability is expected to be minimal. Using a data set corresponding to 4.01×10^{20} protons on target, 34 fully contained μ-like events were observed. The best-fit oscillation parameters are sin^{2}(θ[over ¯]_{23})=0.45 and |Δm[over ¯]_{32}^{2}|=2.51×10^{-3}  eV^{2} with 68% confidence intervals of 0.38-0.64 and 2.26-2.80×10^{-3}  eV^{2}, respectively. These results are in agreement with existing antineutrino parameter measurements and also with the ν_{μ} disappearance parameters measured by T2K. PMID:27203315

  11. Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Oscillations with an Accelerator-Produced Off-Axis Beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buizza Avanzini, M; Calland, R G; Cao, S; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S G; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-05-01

    T2K reports its first measurements of the parameters governing the disappearance of ν[over ¯]_{μ} in an off-axis beam due to flavor change induced by neutrino oscillations. The quasimonochromatic ν[over ¯]_{μ} beam, produced with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV at J-PARC, is observed at the far detector Super-Kamiokande, 295 km away, where the ν[over ¯]_{μ} survival probability is expected to be minimal. Using a data set corresponding to 4.01×10^{20} protons on target, 34 fully contained μ-like events were observed. The best-fit oscillation parameters are sin^{2}(θ[over ¯]_{23})=0.45 and |Δm[over ¯]_{32}^{2}|=2.51×10^{-3}  eV^{2} with 68% confidence intervals of 0.38-0.64 and 2.26-2.80×10^{-3}  eV^{2}, respectively. These results are in agreement with existing antineutrino parameter measurements and also with the ν_{μ} disappearance parameters measured by T2K.

  12. Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Oscillations with an Accelerator-Produced Off-Axis Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Cao, S.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    T2K reports its first measurements of the parameters governing the disappearance of ν¯ μ in an off-axis beam due to flavor change induced by neutrino oscillations. The quasimonochromatic ν¯μ beam, produced with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV at J-PARC, is observed at the far detector Super-Kamiokande, 295 km away, where the ν¯μ survival probability is expected to be minimal. Using a data set corresponding to 4.01 ×1020 protons on target, 34 fully contained μ -like events were observed. The best-fit oscillation parameters are sin2(θ¯ 23)=0.45 and |Δ m¯32 2|=2.51 ×10-3 eV2 with 68% confidence intervals of 0.38 - 0.64 and 2.26 - 2.80 ×10-3 eV2 , respectively. These results are in agreement with existing antineutrino parameter measurements and also with the νμ disappearance parameters measured by T2K.

  13. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  14. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    NAKAHATA, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the “solar neutrino problem”. Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consistent with the prediction from the standard solar model. In this article, results of solar neutrino experiments are reviewed with detailed descriptions of what Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have contributed to the history of astroparticle physics with solar neutrino measurements. PMID:21558758

  15. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the "solar neutrino problem". Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consistent with the prediction from the standard solar model. In this article, results of solar neutrino experiments are reviewed with detailed descriptions of what Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have contributed to the history of astroparticle physics with solar neutrino measurements. (Communicated by Toshimitsu Yamazaki, M.J.A.).

  16. Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2004-10-22

    The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very

  17. Nucleosynthesis and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, Toshitaka

    2011-05-06

    Neutrinos play the critical roles in nucleosynthesis of light-to-heavy mass nuclei in core-collapse supernovae. We study the nucleosynthesis induced by neutrino interactions and find suitable average neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta. These isotopes are predominantly synthesized by the supernova {nu}-process. We also study the neutrino oscillation effects on their abundances and propose a method to determine the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, i.e. {theta}{sub 13} and mass hierarchy.

  18. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical

  19. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock

  20. Neutrino Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshio; Chiba, Satoshi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Keiichi; Takamura, Akira; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    2009-05-04

    Neutrino nucleosynthesis is an important synthesis process for light elements in supernovae. One important physics input of neutrino nucleosynthesis is cross sections of neutrino-nucleus reactions. The cross sections of neutrino-{sup 12}C and {sup 4}He reactions are derived using new shell model Hamiltonians. With the new cross sections, light element synthesis of a supernova is investigated. The appropriate range of the neutrino temperature for supernovae is constrained to be between 4.3 MeV and 6.5 MeV from the {sup 11}B abundance in Galactic chemical evolution. Effects by neutrino oscillations are also discussed.

  1. Neutrino-neutrino interactions in a supernova and their effect on neutrino flavor conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Dighe, Amol

    2011-11-23

    The neutrino-neutrino interactions inside a supernova core give rise to nonlinear collective effects that significantly influence the neutrino flavor conversions inside the star. I shall describe these interactions, the new oscillation phenomena they generate, and their effect on the neutrino fluxes arriving at the earth.

  2. "Hammer" events, neutrino energies, and nucleon-nucleon correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, L. B.; Hen, O.; Piasetzky, Eli

    2016-10-01

    Background: Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation measurements depend on observing a difference between the expected and measured rate of neutrino-nucleus interactions at different neutrino energies or different distances from the neutrino source. Neutrino-nucleus scattering cross sections are complicated and depend on the neutrino beam energy, the neutrino-nucleus interaction, and the structure of the nucleus. Knowledge of the incident neutrino energy spectrum and neutrino-detector interactions are crucial for analyzing neutrino oscillation experiments. The ArgoNeut liquid argon time projection chamber (lArTPC) observed charged-current neutrino-argon scattering events with two protons back-to-back in the final state ("hammer" events) which they associated with short-range correlated (SRC) nucleon-nucleon pairs. The large volume MicroBooNE lArTPC will measure far more of these unique events. Purpose: Determine what we can learn about the incident neutrino energy spectrum and/or the structure of SRC from hammer events that will be measured in MicroBooNE. Methods: We simulate hammer events using two models and the well-known electron-nucleon scattering cross section. In the first model the neutrino (or electron) scatters from a moving proton, ejecting a π+, and the π+ is then absorbed on a moving deuteron-like n p pair. In the second model the neutrino (or electron) scatters from a moving nucleon, exciting it to a Δ or N*, which then de-excites by interacting with a second nucleon: Δ N →p p . Results: The pion production and reabsorption process results in two back-to-back protons each with momentum of about 500 MeV/c , very similar to that of the observed ArgoNeut events. These distributions are insensitive to either the relative or center-of-mass momentum of the n p pair that absorbed the π . In this model, the incident neutrino energy can be reconstructed relatively accurately using the outgoing lepton. The Δ p →p p process results in two protons that

  3. Light sterile neutrinos: Status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunti, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The indications in favor of the existence of light sterile neutrinos at the eV scale found in short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments is reviewed. The future perspectives of short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and the connections with β-decay measurements of the neutrino masses and with neutrinoless double-β decay experiments are discussed.

  4. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  5. Sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, J.; Machado, P. A. N.; Maltoni, M.; Schwetz, T.

    2016-06-01

    We characterize statistically the indications of a presence of one or more light sterile neutrinos from MiniBooNE and LSND data, together with the reactor and gallium anomalies, in the global context. The compatibility of the aforementioned signals with null results from solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator experiments is evaluated. We conclude that a severe tension is present in the global fit, and therefore the addition of eV-scale sterile neutrinos does not satisfactorily explain the anomalies.

  6. Observation of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the NuMI Beam with the NOvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Niner, Evan David

    2015-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment that uses two functionally identical detectors separated by 810 kilometers at locations 14 milliradians off-axis from the NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab. At these locations the beam energy peaks at 2 GeV. This baseline is the longest in the world for an accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment, which enhances the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering. The experiment studies oscillations of the muon neutrino and anti-neutrino beam that is produced. Both detectors completed commissioning in the summer of 2014 and continue to collect data. One of the primary physics goals of the experiment is the measurement of electron neutrino appearance in the muon neutrino beam which yields measurements of the oscillation parameters sin213, δ , and the neutrino mass ordering within the standard model of neutrino oscillations. This thesis presents the analysis of data collected between February 2014 and May 2015, corresponding to 3.52 X 1020 protons-on-target. In this first analysis NOvA recorded 6 electron neutrino candidates, which is a 3.3σ observation of electron neutrino appearance. The T2K experiment performs the same measurement on a baseline of 295 kilometers and has a 1 σ preference for the normal mass ordering over the inverted ordering over the phase space of the CP violating parameter δ, which is also weakly seen in the NOvA result. By the summer of 2016 NOvA will triple its statistics due to increased beam power and a completed detector. If electron neutrinos continue to be observed at the current rate NOvA will be able to establish a mass ordering preference at a similar confidence level to T2K.

  7. Review of Current and Future Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    There has been a surge of progress and published results in neutrino cross-section physics in recent years. In many cases, absolute differential cross-sections are being measured for the first time and can be compared to interaction models first developed decades ago. These measurements are important input for the next generation of accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments where precise understanding of both signal and background channels will be critical to the observation of sub-dominant oscillation effects. This paper discusses recent results from several experiments and describes new experiments currently under construction dedicated to making these measurements with unprecedented precision.

  8. Review of Current and Future Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.

    2010-03-30

    There has been a surge of progress and published results in neutrino cross-section physics in recent years. In many cases, absolute differential cross-sections are being measured for the first time and can be compared to interaction models first developed decades ago. These measurements are important input for the next generation of accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments where precise understanding of both signal and background channels will be critical to the observation of sub-dominant oscillation effects. This paper discusses recent results from several experiments and describes new experiments currently under construction dedicated to making these measurements with unprecedented precision.

  9. W. K. H. Panofsky Prize: The Road to Neutrino Mixing Angle θ13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Kam-Biu

    2014-03-01

    A series of solar, atmospheric, accelerator and reactor neutrino experiments have observed transformations of one type of neutrino to another type. This intriguing phenomenon called neutrino oscillation was predicted by Pontecorvo, Maki, Nakagawa and Sakata. It is due to the fact that the three flavors of neutrinos observed in laboratories are mixtures of three neutrino mass eigenstates. Neutrino mixing is described by a set of three mixing angles and a CP-violating phase. The smallest angle, θ13, was unknown until 2012. Knowing the value of θ13 is essential. Besides being a fundamental parameter of nature, knowing its value will improve our understanding of neutrino mixing, provide guidance for building theoretical models and define the future program of neutrino oscillation experiments. In this talk, the experimental development that led to the recent discovery of a new θ13-driven neutrino oscillation will be presented. Work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of High Energy Physics, contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  10. Long-baseline neutrino physics in the U.S

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2006-12-01

    Long baseline neutrino oscillation physics in the U.S. is centered at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), in particular at the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline commissioned in 2004-2005. Already, the MINOS experiment has published its first results confirming the disappearance of {nu}{sub {mu}}'s across a 735 km baseline. The forthcoming NOvA experiment will search for the transition {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} and use this transition to understand the mass heirarchy of neutrinos. These, as well as other conceptual ideas for future experiments using the NuMI beam, will be discussed. The turn-on of the NuMI facility has been positive, with over 310 kW beam power achieved. Plans for increasing the beam intensity once the Main Injector accelerator is fully-dedicated to the neutrino program will be presented.

  11. Neutrino experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  12. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, Jiajie

    2010-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |Δm232|, sin2 θ23. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  13. Constraining GRB as Source for UHE Cosmic Rays through Neutrino Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.

    2013-07-01

    The origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) has been widely regarded as one of the major questions in the frontiers of particle astrophysics. Gamma ray bursts (GRB), the most violent explosions in the universe second only to the Big Bang, have been a popular candidate site for UHECR productions. The recent IceCube report on the non-observation of GRB induced neutrinos therefore attracts wide attention. This dilemma requires a resolution: either the assumption of GRB as UHECR accelerator is to be abandoned or the expected GRB induced neutrino yield was wrong. It has been pointed out that IceCube has overestimated the neutrino flux at GRB site by a factor of ~5. In this paper we point out that, in addition to the issue of neutrino production at source, the neutrino oscillation and the possible neutrino decay during their flight from GRB to Earth should further reduce the detectability of IceCube, which is most sensitive to the muon-neutrino flavor as far as point-source identification is concerned. Specifically, neutrino oscillation will reduce the muon-neutrino flavor ratio from 2/3 per neutrino at GRB source to 1/3 on Earth, while neutrino decay, if exists and under the assumption of normal hierarchy of mass eigenstates, would result in a further reduction of muon-neutrino ratio to 1/8. With these in mind, we note that there have been efforts in recent years in pursuing other type of neutrino telescopes based on Askaryan effect, which can in principle observe and distinguish all three flavors with comparable sensitivities. Such new approach may therefore be complementary to IceCube in shedding more lights on this cosmic accelerator question.

  14. Neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-15

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ{sub 13}. The accelerator facility will deliver 10{sup 21} muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δ{sub CP} that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δ{sub CP} coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  15. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  16. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: weighing the neutrino mass using the galaxy power spectrum of the CMASS sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Saito, Shun; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Montesano, Francesco; Viel, Matteo; Schneider, Donald P.; Manera, Marc; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Ross, Nicholas P.; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G.

    2013-12-01

    We measure the sum of the neutrino particle masses using the three-dimensional galaxy power spectrum of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 9 the constant MASS (CMASS) galaxy sample. Combined with the cosmic microwave background, supernova and additional baryonic acoustic oscillation data, we find upper 95 per cent confidence limits (CL) of the neutrino mass Σmν < 0.340 eV within a flat Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) background, and Σmν < 0.821 eV, assuming a more general background cosmological model. The number of neutrino species is measured to be Neff = 4.308 ± 0.794 and 4.032^{+0.870}_{-0.894} for these two cases, respectively. We study and quantify the effect of several factors on the neutrino measurements, including the galaxy power spectrum bias model, the effect of redshift-space distortion, the cut-off scale of the power spectrum and the choice of additional data. The impact of neutrinos with unknown masses on other cosmological parameter measurements is investigated. The fractional matter density and the Hubble parameter are measured to be Ω _M=0.2796± 0.0097, H_0=69.72^{+0.90}_{-0.91} km s-1 Mpc-1 (flat ΛCDM) and Ω _M=0.2798^{+0.0132}_{-0.0136}, H_0=73.78^{+3.16}_{-3.17} km s-1 Mpc-1 (more general background model). Based on a Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization of the equation-of-state w of dark energy, we find that w = -1 is consistent with observations, even allowing for neutrinos. Similarly, the curvature ΩK and the running of the spectral index αs are both consistent with zero. The tensor-to-scalar ratio is constrained down to r < 0.198 (95 per cent CL, flat ΛCDM) and r < 0.440 (95 per cent CL, more general background model).

  17. Recent Advances and Open Questions in Neutrino-induced Quasi-elastic Scattering and Single Photon Production

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G. T.; Harris, D. A.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Zeller, G. P.

    2015-06-15

    The study of neutrino–nucleus interactions has recently seen rapid development with a new generation of accelerator-based neutrino experiments employing medium and heavy nuclear targets for the study of neutrino oscillations. A few unexpected results in the study of quasi-elastic scattering and single photon production have spurred a revisiting of the underlying nuclear physics and connections to electron–nucleus scattering. A thorough understanding and resolution of these issues is essential for future progress in the study of neutrino oscillations.

  18. Atmospheric electron neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Speakman, Benjamin Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Neutrinos produced as a result of cosmic-ray interactions in the earth's atmosphere offer a powerful probe into the nature of this three-membered family of low-mass, weakly-interacting particles. Ten years ago, the Super-Kamiokande Experiment has confirmed earlier indications that neutrinos undergo lepton-flavor oscillations during propagation, proving that they are massive contrary to the previous Standard Model assumptions. The Soudan Underground Laboratory, located in northern Minnesota, was host to the Soudan2 Experiment, which has made important contributions to atmospheric neutrino research. This same lab has more recently been host to the MINOS far detector, a neutrino detector which serves as the downstream element of an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino-oscillation experiment. This thesis has examined 418.5 live days of atmospheric neutrino data (fiducial exposure of 4.18 kton-years) collected in the MINOS far detector prior to the activation of the NuMI neutrino beam, with a specific emphasis on the investigation of electron-type neutrino interactions. Atmospheric neutrino interaction candidates have been selected and separated into showering or track-like events. The showering sample consists of 89 observed events, while the track-like sample consists of 112 observed events. Based on the Bartol atmospheric neutrino flux model of Barr et al. plus a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of interactions in the MINOS detector, the expected yields of showering and track-like events in the absence of neutrino oscillations are 88.0 ± 1.0 and 149.1 ± 1.0 respectively (where the uncertainties reflect only the limited MC statistics). Major systematic uncertainties, especially those associated with the flux model, are cancelled by forming a double ratio of these observed and expected yields: R$data\\atop{trk/shw}$/R$MC\\atop{trk/shw}$ = 0.74$+0.12\\atop{-1.0}$(stat.) ± 0.04 (syst.) This double ratio should be equal to unity in the absence of oscillations, and the

  19. Quantum mechanics in space-time: The Feynman path amplitude description of physical optics, de Broglie matter waves and quark and neutrino flavour oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.H. . E-mail: john.field@cern.ch

    2006-03-15

    Feynman's laws of quantum dynamics are concisely stated, discussed in comparison with other formulations of quantum mechanics and applied to selected problems in the physical optics of photons and massive particles as well as flavour oscillations. The classical wave theory of light is derived from these laws for the case in which temporal variation of path amplitudes may be neglected, whereas specific experiments, sensitive to the temporal properties of path amplitudes, are suggested. The reflection coefficient of light from the surface of a transparent medium is found to be markedly different to that predicted by the classical Fresnel formula. Except for neutrino oscillations, good agreement is otherwise found with previous calculations of spatially dependent quantum interference effects.

  20. Massive Cherenkov neutrino facilities…their evolution, their future: Twenty-five years at these International Neutrino Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulak, Lawrence R.

    2005-06-01

    This review traces the evolution of massive water Cherenkov tracking calorimeters. Pioneering concepts, first presented in this conference a quarter of a century ago, have led to 1) IMB, the first large detector (10kT), which was designed primarily to search for proton decay, and secondarily to be sensitive to supernova neutrinos and atmospheric oscillations, and 2) Dumand, an attempt to initiate the search for TeV astrophysical neutrinos with a prototype for a 1 km3 telescope. The concepts and initial work on IMB influenced subsequent detectors: Kamiokande, Super-K, SNO, and, in part, Kamland. These detectors have to their credit the elucidation of the physics of atmospheric, solar, reactor and supernova neutrinos. With the advent of the K2K beam, controlled accelerator neutrinos confirm the atmospheric studies. The path breaking developments of Dumand now are incorporated in the high-volume Amanda and Antares detectors, as well as their sequels, IceCube and the proposed Cubic Kilometer detector. The future (ultimate?) facilities have new physics challenges: A high-resolution megaton detector, eventually coupled with an intense accelerator neutrino source, is critical for precision studies of neutrino oscillation parameters and for the potential discovery of CP violation in the lepton sector. The Gigaton TeV neutrino telescopes (IceCube and Cubic Kilometer) seek to open high-energy neutrino astronomy, still an elusive goal. (Amanda, IceCube, and UNO, as well as Minos, Icarus and other large neutrino facilities using non-Cherenkov technologies, are treated in other contributions to this volume.)

  1. New look at the degeneracies in the neutrino oscillation parameters, and their resolution by T2K, NO ν A and ICAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Monojit; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Nath, Newton; Raut, Sushant K.

    2016-01-01

    The three major unknown neutrino oscillation parameters at the present juncture are the mass hierarchy, the octant of the mixing angle θ23 and the C P phase δC P . It is well known that the presence of hierarchy-δC P and octant degeneracies affects the unambiguous determination of these parameters. In this paper, we show that a comprehensive way to study the remaining parameter degeneracies is in the form of a generalized hierarchy-θ23-δC P degeneracy. This is best depicted as contours in the test (θ23-δC P ) plane for different representative true values of parameters. We show that the wrong-hierarchy and/or wrong-octant solutions can be further classified into eight different solutions depending on whether they occur with the wrong or right value of δC P. These eight solutions are different from the original eightfold degenerate solutions and can exist, in principle, even if θ13 is known. These multiple solutions, apart from affecting the determination of the true hierarchy and octant, also affect the accurate estimation of δC P. We identify which of these eight different degenerate solutions can occur in the test (θ23-δC P) parameter space, taking the long-baseline experiment NO ν A running in the neutrino mode as an example. The inclusion of the NO ν A antineutrino run removes the wrong-octant solutions appearing with both right and wrong hierarchy. Adding T2K data to this resolves the wrong hierarchy-right octant solutions to a large extent. The remaining wrong-hierarchy solutions can be removed by combining NO ν A +T 2 K with atmospheric neutrino data. We demonstrate this using ICAL@INO as the prototype atmospheric neutrino detector. We find that the degeneracies can be resolved at the 2 σ level by the combined data set, for the true parameter space considered in the study.

  2. Theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2015-07-15

    The theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos is reviewed, with focus on the most recent advancements on the neutrino flux predicted by supernova numerical models, on neutrino oscillations inside the star and in the Earth, and on the physics of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. Future directions of research are briefly summarized.

  3. What masses do the neutrinos have? Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Efrosinin, V. P.

    2010-06-15

    Possible mechanisms for the production of low-mass neutrinos and sterile neutrinos are considered. The quark mixing angles are calculated under the assumption that the traces of left-right symmetry are stable with respect to the masses of constituent quarks. Order-of-magnitude estimates of the neutrino masses are obtained with the aid of experimental data on neutrino oscillations.

  4. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh

    2015-10-15

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  5. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Q. R. Ahmad, R. C. Allen, T. C. Andersen, J. D. Anglin, G. Bühler, J. C. Barton, E. W. Beier, M. Bercovitch, J. Bigu, S. Biller, R. A. Black, I. Blevis, R. J. Boardman, J. Boger, E. Bonvin, M. G. Boulay, M. G. Bowler, T. J. Bowles, S. J. Brice, M. C. Browne, T. V. Bullard, T. H. Burritt, K. Cameron, J. Cameron, Y. D. Chan, M. Chen, H. H. Chen, X. Chen, M. C. Chon, B. T. Cleveland, E. T. H. Clifford, J. H. M. Cowan, D. F. Cowen, G. A. Cox, Y. Dai, X. Dai, F. Dalnoki-Veress, W. F. Davidson, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, M. R. Dragowsky, C. A. Duba, F. A. Duncan, J. Dunmore, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, A. P. Ferraris, R. J. Ford, M. M. Fowler, K. Frame, E. D. Frank, W. Frati, J. V. Germani, S. Gil, A. Goldschmidt, D. R. Grant, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, A. Hamer, A. A. Hamian, R. U. Haq, C. K. Hargrove, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, R. Heaton, K. M. Heeger, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, J. D. Hepburn, H. Heron, J. Hewett, A. Hime, M. Howe, J. G. Hykawy, M. C. P. Isaac, P. Jagam, N. A. Jelley, C. Jillings, G. Jonkmans, J. Karn, P. T. Keener, K. Kirch, J. R. Klein, A. B. Knox, R. J. Komar, R. Kouzes, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, M. Lay, H. W. Lee, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, W. Locke, M. M. Lowry, S. Luoma, J. Lyon, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, A. D. Marino, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, D. S. McDonald, K. McFarlane, G. McGregor, W. McLatchie, R. Meijer Drees, H. Mes, C. Mifflin, G. G. Miller, G. Milton, B. A. Moffat, M. Moorhead, C. W. Nally, M. S. Neubauer, F. M. Newcomer, H. S. Ng, A. J. Noble, E. B. Norman, V. M. Novikov, M. O'Neill, C. E. Okada, R. W. Ollerhead, M. Omori, J. L. Orrell, S. M. Oser, A. W. P. Poon, T. J. Radcliffe, A. Roberge, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, J. K. Rowley, V. L. Rusu, E. Saettler, K. K. Schaffer, A. Schuelke, M. H. Schwendener, H. Seifert, M. Shatkay, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, A. R. Smith, M. W. E. Smith, N. Starinsky, T. D. Steiger, R. G. Stokstad, R. S. Storey, B. Sur, R. Tafirout, N. Tagg, N. W. Tanner, R. K. Taplin, M. Thorman, P. Thornewell, P. T. Trent, Y. I. Tserkovnyak, R. Van Berg, R. G. Van de Water, C. J. Virtue, C. E. Waltham, J.-X. Wang, D. L. Wark, N. West, J. B. Wilhelmy, J. F. Wilkerson, J. Wilson, P. Wittich, J. M. Wouters, and M. Yeh

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  6. Neutrinos beyond the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, J.W.F.

    1989-08-01

    I review some basic aspects of neutrino physics beyond the Standard Model such as neutrino mixing and neutrino non-orthogonality, universality and CP violation in the lepton sector, total lepton number and lepton flavor violation, etc.. These may lead to neutrino decays and oscillations, exotic weak decay processes, neutrinoless double /beta/ decay, etc.. Particle physics models are discussed where some of these processes can be sizable even in the absence of measurable neutrino masses. These may also substantially affect the propagation properties of solar and astrophysical neutrinos. 39 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Accelerator Test Facility for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2010-06-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following LHC discoveries. This article briefly reviews the needs and possibilities for a Muon Collider beam test facility to carry out the R&D program on the collider front-end and 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  8. Study of neutrino interactions at the T2K near detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, A.; T2K Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Tokai-To-Kamioka (T2K) experiment was designed to measure the oscillation of muon neutrinos produced at the J-PARC accelerator in Japan. The Super-Kamiokande detector acts as the far detector and a near detector is installed in the path of the neutrino beam to reduce uncertainties on the flux and cross sections. This near detector, called ND280, is located 280 m from the production target of the T2K neutrino beamline in order to measure the characteristics of the beam prior to any oscillation. The first ND280 analysis of the momentum-angle distribution of the muon produced by muon neutrino charged current interactions has been performed. These results have also been used to determine a flux-averaged cross section.

  9. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Don Lincoln

    2016-07-12

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  10. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Don Lincoln

    2013-07-11

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  11. Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

  12. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  13. Bolometric detection of neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Krauss, L. M.; Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic neutrino scattering off electrons in crystalline silicon at 1-10 mK results in measurable temperature changes in macroscopic amounts of material, even for low-energy (less than 0.41-MeV) pp neutrinos from the sun. New detectors for bolometric measurement of low-energy neutrino interactions, including coherent nuclear elastic scattering, are proposed. A new and more sensitive search for oscillations of reactor antineutrinos is practical (about 100 kg of Si), and would lay the groundwork for a more ambitious measurement of the spectrum of pp, Be-7, and B-8 solar neutrinos, and of supernovae anywhere in the Galaxy (about 10 tons of Si).

  14. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  15. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) as a primary physics goal. The excellent energy resolution and the large fiducial volume anticipated for the JUNO detector offer exciting opportunities for addressing many important topics in neutrino and astro-particle physics. In this document, we present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. Following an introduction summarizing the current status and open issues in neutrino physics, we discuss how the detection of antineutrinos generated by a cluster of nuclear power plants allows the determination of the neutrino MH at a 3-4σ significance with six years of running of JUNO. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum with excellent energy resolution will also lead to the precise determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters {{sin}}2{θ }12, {{Δ }}{m}212, and | {{Δ }}{m}{ee}2| to an accuracy of better than 1%, which will play a crucial role in the future unitarity test of the MNSP matrix. The JUNO detector is capable of observing not only antineutrinos from the power plants, but also neutrinos/antineutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and solar neutrinos. As a result of JUNO's large size, excellent energy resolution, and vertex reconstruction capability, interesting new data on these topics can be collected. For example, a neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at a distance of 10 kpc would lead to ˜5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ˜2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton ES events in JUNO, which are of crucial importance for understanding the mechanism of supernova explosion and for exploring novel phenomena such as collective neutrino oscillations

  16. Ionization injection effects in x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, K. T.; Zhao, T. Z.; Cole, J. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nees, J.; Wood, J. C.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-05-01

    Single photon counting techniques were used with an x-ray CCD camera to measure features of synchrotron-like x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with different injection techniques. Measurements were made using the Hercules laser system at the University of Michigan. With a single stage gas cell, we demonstrate that pure helium gas in our wakefield accelerator will produce spectra with higher critical energies than when helium mixed with nitrogen is used. This result was not evident when a two stage gas cell was used.

  17. Recent results from operation of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallewell, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The ANTARES neutrino telescope is currently the largest operating water Cherenkov detector and the largest neutrino detector in the Northern hemisphere. It comprises 885 optical modules distributed on 12 detection lines anchored at a depth of 2.5 km in the Mediterranean Sea near Toulon, France; at a latitude that accesses a large part of the Galactic Plane, including the Galactic Centre. Its main scientific target is the detection of multi-TeV neutrinos predicted in charged cosmic particle acceleration mechanisms. In addition, ANTARES has developed a range of multi-messenger search strategies to look for correlations with optical counterparts and other cosmic messengers including γ-rays and charged cosmic rays. Other topics of investigation include the search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation, searches for exotic particles and the measurement of neutrino oscillations. Details of the telescope are discussed together with examples of recently-conducted searches.

  18. A letter of intent for a neutrino scattering experiment on the booster neutrino meanline: FINeSSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.T.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Yale U.

    2005-03-01

    The experiment described in this Letter of Intent provides a decisive measurement of {Delta}s, the spin of the nucleon carried by strange quarks. This is crucial as, after more than thirty years of study, the spin contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon is still not understood. The interpretation of {Delta}s measurements from inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments using charged leptons suffers from two questionable techniques; an assumption of SU(3)-flavor symmetry, and an extrapolation into unmeasured kinematic regions, both of which provide ample room for uncertain theoretical errors in the results. The results of recent semi-inclusive DIS data from HERMES paint a somewhat different picture of the contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon spin than do the inclusive results, but since HERMES does not make use of either of the above-mentioned techniques, then the results are somewhat incomparable. What is required is a measurement directly probing the spin contribution of the strange quarks in the nucleon. Neutrino experiments provide a theoretically clean and robust method of determining {Delta}s by comparing the neutral current interaction, which is isoscalar plus isovector, to the charged current interaction, which is strictly isovector. A past experiment, E734, performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, has pioneered this effort. Building on what they have learned, we present an experiment which achieves a measurement to {+-} 0.025 using neutrino scattering, and {+-} 0.04 using anti-neutrino scattering, significantly better than past measurements. The combination of the neutrino and anti-neutrino data, when combined with the results of the parity-violating electron-nucleon scattering data, will produce the most significant result for {Delta}s. This experiment can also measure neutrino cross sections in the energy range required for accelerator-based precision oscillation measurements. Accurate measurements of cross sections have been

  19. Solar neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Miramonti, Lino

    2009-04-30

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  20. Hadron production measurements for neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panman, Jaap

    2008-02-21

    One of the limiting factors for the precision of neutrino oscillation experiments is the uncertainty in the composition and spectrum of the neutrino flux. Recently, dedicated hadron production experiments have been taking data and are being planned to supply measurements which can significantly reduce these uncertainties. The HARP experiment has presented results on the measurements of the double-differential production cross-section of charged pions in proton interactions with beryllium, carbon, aluminium, copper, tin, tantalum and lead targets. These results are relevant for a detailed understanding of neutrino flux in accelerator neutrino experiments K2K (p-Al data) and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE (p-Be data), for a better prediction of atmospheric neutrino fluxes (p-C, {pi}{sup +}-C and {pi}{sup -}-C data) as well as for a systematic improvement of hadron production models. The E910 experiment at BNL has recently published their p-Be data. NA49 has measured pion production spectra in p-C interactions and a new experiment, NA61, is starting to take data using essentially the same detector. NA61 plans to measure production spectra for the T2K experiment and for the calculation of extended air showers. MIPP has taken data with a copy of the NuMI target and is progressing in the analysis of these data. An upgrade of the readout of this experiment can greatly increase its potential.

  1. Atmospheric Neutrinos in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Howcroft, Caius Leo Frederick

    2004-12-01

    The phenomenon of flavour oscillations of neutrinos created in the atmosphere was first reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration in 1998 and since then has been confirmed by Soudan 2 and MACRO. The MINOS Far Detector is the first magnetized neutrino detector able to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Although it was designed to detect neutrinos from the NuMI beam, it provides a unique opportunity to measure the oscillation parameters for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos independently. The MINOS Far Detector was completed in August 2003 and since then has collected 2.52 kton-years of atmospheric data. Atmospheric neutrino interactions contained within the volume of the detector are separated from the dominant background from cosmic ray muons. Thirty seven events are selected with an estimated background contamination of less than 10%. Using the detector's magnetic field, 17 neutrino events and 6 anti-neutrino events are identified, 14 events have ambiguous charge. The neutrino oscillation parameters for vμ and $\\bar{v}$μ are studied using a maximum likelihood analysis. The measurement does not place constraining limits on the neutrino oscillation parameters due to the limited statistics of the data set analysed. However, this thesis represents the first observation of charge separated atmospheric neutrino interactions. It also details the techniques developed to perform atmospheric neutrino analyses in the MINOS Far Detector.

  2. Role of hierarchy, of δ |--> π - δ symmetry, and of the octant of θ23 in the analysis of neutrino oscillation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, Bernadette; Latimer, David; Ernst, David

    2016-03-01

    The role that symmetries play in the phenomenological determination of the six three-neutrino mixing parameters is investigated. From formulae for the oscillation probabilities, we derive the symmetries for two special cases, the CP conserved case (δ = 0 and π) and maximal CP violation case (δ = +/- π / 2). For these two cases, we show that for both cases there are only two independent solutions in vacuum, and due to the interaction with matter, four independent solutions in general. Guided by a broken symmetry, we perform a global analysis for the CP conserved case. We compare in detail our results to three recent global analyses that include CP violation. The comparison is to their results with the CP phase marginalized away. We find that the results for θ13 and Δm232 , which result from the leading order terms of the oscillation formulae, are consistent across the analyses, that negative δ is preferred at a not totally insignificant level, and that there is some indication that the second octant is preferred for θ23.

  3. MINOS atmospheric neutrino contained events

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, A.; /Minnesota U.

    2007-10-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment has continued to collect atmospheric neutrino events while doing a precision measurement of NuMI beam {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations. The 5.4 kton iron calorimeter is magnetized to provide the unique capability of discriminating between {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} interactions on an event-by-event basis and has been collecting atmospheric neutrino data since July 2003. An analysis of the neutrino events with interaction vertices contained inside the detector will be presented.

  4. Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering in MINER$\

    SciTech Connect

    Chvojka, Jesse John

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrino oscillation is becoming increasingly understood with results from accelerator-based and reactor-based experiments, but unanswered questions remain. The proper ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates that compose the neutrino avor eigenstates is not completely known. We have yet to detect CP violation in neutrino mixing, which if present could help explain the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter in the universe. We also have not resolved whether sterile neutrinos, which do not interact in any Standard Model interaction, exist. Accelerator-based experiments appear to be the most promising candidates for resolving these questions; however, the ability of present and future experiments to provide answers is likely to be limited by systematic errors. A significant source of this systematic error comes from limitations in our knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Errors on cross-sections for such interactions are large, existing data is sometimes contradictory, and knowledge of nuclear effects is incomplete. One type of neutrino interaction of particular interest is charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) scattering, which yields a final state consisting of a charged lepton and nucleon. This process, which is the dominant interaction near energies of 1 GeV, is of great utility to neutrino oscillation experiments since the incoming neutrino energy and the square of the momentum transferred to the final state nucleon, Q2, can be reconstructed using the final state lepton kinematics. To address the uncertainty in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, many experiments have begun making dedicated measurements. In particular, the MINER A experiment is studying neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few GeV region. MINERvA is a fine-grained, high precision, high statistics neutrino scattering experiment that will greatly improve our understanding of neutrino cross-sections and nuclear effects that affect the final state particles

  5. Secondary atmospheric tau neutrino production

    SciTech Connect

    Bulmahn, Alexander; Hall Reno, Mary

    2010-09-01

    We evaluate the flux of tau neutrinos produced from the decay of pair produced taus from incident muons using a cascade equation analysis. To solve the cascade equations, our numerical result for the tau production Z moment is given. Our results for the flux of tau neutrinos produced from incident muons are compared to the flux of tau neutrinos produced via oscillations and the direct prompt atmospheric tau neutrino flux. Results are given for both downward and upward going neutrinos fluxes and higher zenith angles are discussed. We conclude that the direct prompt atmospheric tau neutrino flux dominates these other atmospheric sources of tau neutrinos for neutrino energies larger than a few TeV for upward fluxes, and over a wider range of energy for downward fluxes.

  6. Atmospheric neutrinos: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Sandhya

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the current status of neutrino oscillation studies at atmospheric neutrino experiments. While the current data gives some tantalising hints regarding the neutrino mass hierarchy, octant of θ23 and δCP, the hints are not statistically significant. We summarise the sensitivity to these sub-dominant three-generation effects from the next-generation proposed atmospheric neutrino experiments. We next present the prospects of new physics searches such as non-standard interactions, sterile neutrinos and CPT violation studies at these experiments.

  7. On the description of nonunitary neutrino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escrihuela, F. J.; Forero, D. V.; Miranda, O. G.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-09-01

    Neutrino oscillations are well established and the relevant parameters determined with good precision, except for the C P phase, in terms of a unitary lepton mixing matrix. Seesaw extensions of the Standard Model predict unitarity deviations due to the admixture of heavy isosinglet neutrinos. We provide a complete description of the unitarity and universality deviations in the light-neutrino sector. Neutrino oscillation experiments involving electron or muon neutrinos and antineutrinos are fully described in terms of just three new real parameters and a new C P phase, in addition to the ones describing oscillations with unitary mixing. Using this formalism we describe the implications of nonunitarity for neutrino oscillations and summarize the model-independent constraints on heavy-neutrino couplings that arise from current experiments.

  8. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  9. Light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, S.; Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    The theory and phenomenology of light sterile neutrinos at the eV mass scale is reviewed. The reactor, gallium and Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector anomalies are briefly described and interpreted as indications of the existence of short-baseline oscillations which require the existence of light sterile neutrinos. The global fits of short-baseline oscillation data in 3 + 1 and 3 + 2 schemes are discussed, together with the implications for β-decay and neutrinoless double-β decay. The cosmological effects of light sterile neutrinos are briefly reviewed and the implications of existing cosmological data are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of future perspectives. This review is dedicated to the memory of Hai-Wei Long, our dear friend and collaborator, who passed away on 29 May 2015. He was an exceptionally kind person and an enthusiastic physicist. We deeply miss him.

  10. Light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, S.; Giunti, C.; Laveder, M.; Li, Y. F.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2016-03-01

    The theory and phenomenology of light sterile neutrinos at the eV mass scale is reviewed. The reactor, gallium and Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector anomalies are briefly described and interpreted as indications of the existence of short-baseline oscillations which require the existence of light sterile neutrinos. The global fits of short-baseline oscillation data in 3 + 1 and 3 + 2 schemes are discussed, together with the implications for β-decay and neutrinoless double-β decay. The cosmological effects of light sterile neutrinos are briefly reviewed and the implications of existing cosmological data are discussed. The review concludes with a summary of future perspectives. This review is dedicated to the memory of Hai-Wei Long, our dear friend and collaborator, who passed away on 29 May 2015. He was an exceptionally kind person and an enthusiastic physicist. We deeply miss him.

  11. Solar Neutrino Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Esch, E.-I.; Fowler, M.M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; McGirt, F.; Miller, G.G.; Thornewell, P.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wouters, J.M.

    1999-07-15

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) offers the unique opportunity to measure both the 8B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and, independently, the flux of all active neutrino species reaching the Earth. A model-independent test of the hypothesis that neutrino oscillations are responsible for the observed solar neutrino deficit can be made by comparing the charged-current (CC) and neutral-current (NC) rates. This LDRD proposal supported the research and development necessary for an assessment of backgrounds and performance of the SNO detector and the ability to extract the NC/CC-Ratio. Particular emphasis is put upon the criteria for deployment and signal extraction from a discrete NC detector array based upon ultra-low background 3He proportional counters.

  12. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, E.W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in January 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  13. A long baseline RICH with a 27-kiloton water target and radiator for detection of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Ypsilantis, T.; Seguinot, J.; Zichichi, A.

    1997-01-01

    A 27 kt water volume is investigated as a target for a long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso. Charged secondaries from the neutrino interactions produce Cherenkov photons in water which are imaged as rings by a spherical mirror. The photon detector elements are 14 400 photomultipliers (PM`s) of 127 mm diameter or 3600 HPD`s of 250 mm diameter with single photon sensitivity. A coincidence signal of about 300 pixel elements in time with the SPS beam starts readout in bins of 1 ns over a period of 128 ns. Momentum, direction, and velocity of hadrons and mucons are determined from the width, center, and radius of the rings, respectively. Momentum is measured if multiple scattering dominates the ring width, as is the case for most of the particles of interest. Momentum, direction, and velocity of hadrons and muons are determined from the width, center, and radius of the rings, respectively. Momentum is measured if multiple scattering dominates the ring width, as is the case for most of the particles of interest. Momentum resolutions of 1-10%, mass resolutions of 5-50 MeV, and direction resolutions of < 1 mrad are achievable. Thresholds in water for muons, pions, kaons, and protons are 0.12, 0.16, 0.55, and 1.05 GeV/c, respectively. Electrons and gammas can be measured with energy resolution {sigma}{sub E}/E{approx}8.5%/{radical}E(GeV) and with direction resolution {approx} 1 mrad. The detector can be sited either inside a Gran Sasso tunnel or above ground because it is directional and the SPS beam is pulsed; thus the rejection of cosmic ray background is excellent.

  14. Nuclear ( μ- , e+ ) conversion mediated by Majorana neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domin, P.; Kovalenko, S.; Faessler, Amand; Šimkovic, F.

    2004-12-01

    We study the lepton number violating (LNV) process of ( μ- , e+ ) conversion in nuclei mediated by the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos. Nuclear structure calculations have been carried out for the case of an experimentally interesting nucleus 48Ti in the framework of a renormalized proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation. We demonstrate that the imaginary part of the amplitude of a light Majorana neutrino exchange mechanism gives an appreciable contribution to the ( μ- , e+ ) conversion rate. This specific feature is absent in the allied case of 0νββ decay. Using the present neutrino oscillations, tritium beta decay, accelerator, and cosmological data, we derived the limits on the effective masses of light μe and heavy < M-1 N >μe neutrinos. The expected rates of nuclear ( μ- , e+ ) conversion, corresponding to these limits, were found to be so small that even within a distant future the ( μ- , e+ ) conversion experiments will hardly be able to detect the neutrino signal. Therefore, searches for this LNV process can only rely on the presence of certain physics beyond the trivial extension of the standard model by inclusion of massive Majorana neutrinos.

  15. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  16. Non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.

    1986-01-01

    This report discusses several topics which can be investigated without the use of accelerators. Topics covered are: (1) proton decay, (2) atmospheric neutrinos, (3) neutrino detection, (4) muons from Cygnus X-3, and (5) the double-beta decay.

  17. Neutrino Oscillograms of the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2008-04-16

    Oscillograms are 'neutrino portraits' of the Earth. They encode unique information about the Earth interior and provide a comprehensive description of neutrino oscillation phenomena. I will explain the physical effects involved and the structure of the oscillograms. Dependence of the oscillograms on neutrino parameters, in particular, on the currently unknown q1-3, mixing and CP-violation phase will be considered. A program of measurements of the oscillograms will be outlined.

  18. Indirect dark matter detection in the light of sterile neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, Arman; Peres, O.L.G. E-mail: orlando@ifi.unicamp.br

    2012-05-01

    The recent global fit of short baseline neutrino oscillation data favors the presence of one (or more) sterile neutrino state which leads to new mass splitting Δm{sup 2} ∼ 1 eV{sup 2}. We consider the effect of this new states on the evolution of neutrinos from the dark matter annihilation inside the Sun. We show that neutrinos with energy E{sub ν}∼>100 GeV undergo resonant active-sterile oscillation which depletes the flux of neutrinos arriving at the Earth. As an example of this effect, we present the oscillation probabilities for the case of monochromatic neutrinos from the direct annihilation of dark matter particles to neutrinos and the depletion due to the presence of sterile neutrinos. We discuss the seasonal variation of oscillation probabilities which is expected for the case of monochromatic neutrinos.

  19. The Renaissance of Neutrino Interaction Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Hugh R.

    2009-12-17

    The advent of high intensity neutrino beams for neutrino oscillation experiments has produced a resurgence of interest in neutrino interaction physics. Recent experiments have been revisiting topics not studied since the bubble chamber era, and are exploring many interesting questions at the boundaries of particle and nuclear physics.

  20. Predictive models of radiative neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julio, J.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss two models of radiative neutrino mass generation. The first model features one-loop Zee model with Z4 symmetry. The second model is the two-loop neutrino mass model with singly- and doubly-charged scalars. These two models fit neutrino oscillation data well and predict some interesting rates for lepton flavor violation processes.