Science.gov

Sample records for accelerator physics detector

  1. The Development of Biomedical Applications of Nuclear Physics Detector Technology at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberger, Andrew

    2003-10-01

    The Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA) operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) for the United States Department of Energy. As a user facility for physicists worldwide, its primary mission is to conduct basic nuclear physics research of the atom's nucleus at the quark level. Within the Jefferson Lab Physics Division is the Jefferson Lab Detector Group which was formed to support the design and construction of new detector systems during the construction phase of the major detector systems at Jefferson Lab and to act as technical consultants for the lab scientists and users. The Jefferson Lab Detector Group, headed by Dr. Stan Majewski, has technical capabilities in the development and use of radiation detection systems. These capabilities include expertise in nuclear particle detection through the use of gas detectors, scintillation and light guide techniques, standard and position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs), fast analog readout electronics and data acquisition, and on-line image formation and analysis. In addition to providing nuclear particle detector support to the lab, the group has for several years (starting in 1996) applied these technologies to the development of novel high resolution gamma-ray imaging systems for biomedical applications and x-ray imaging techniques. The Detector Group has developed detector systems for breast cancer detection, brain cancer therapy and small animal imaging to support biomedical research. An overview will be presented of how this small nuclear physics detector research group by teaming with universities, medical facilities, industry and other national laboratories applies technology originating from basic nuclear physics research to biomedical applications.

  2. Physics and Detector Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.

    2004-10-11

    The simulation tools session was divided into three main areas of concentration: physics event simulation and event generators, full detector simulation and event reconstruction frameworks, and fast simulation and physics analysis frameworks. Although the primary purpose of the plenary session talk was to summarize the contents of the parallel session presentations for those unable to attend, the intent of this write-up is to attempt to point out features in common among the ongoing efforts and present a personal view of some goals for the future. The reader is directed to the individual write-ups for details on the specific topics discussed during the workshop. A brief summary and synthesis of topics presented during the tools parallel sessions.

  3. VLHC accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Blaskiewicz et al.

    2001-11-01

    A six-month design study for a future high energy hadron collider was initiated by the Fermilab director in October 2000. The request was to study a staged approach where a large circumference tunnel is built that initially would house a low field ({approx}2 T) collider with center-of-mass energy greater than 30 TeV and a peak (initial) luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The tunnel was to be scoped, however, to support a future upgrade to a center-of-mass energy greater than 150 TeV with a peak luminosity of 2 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} using high field ({approx} 10 T) superconducting magnet technology. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a report of the Design Study was produced by Fermilab in June 2001. 1 The Design Study focused on a Stage 1, 20 x 20 TeV collider using a 2-in-1 transmission line magnet and leads to a Stage 2, 87.5 x 87.5 TeV collider using 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet technology. The article that follows is a compilation of accelerator physics designs and computational results which contributed to the Design Study. Many of the parameters found in this report evolved during the study, and thus slight differences between this text and the Design Study report can be found. The present text, however, presents the major accelerator physics issues of the Very Large Hadron Collider as examined by the Design Study collaboration and provides a basis for discussion and further studies of VLHC accelerator parameters and design philosophies.

  4. The Physics of Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Dan

    2000-08-01

    Here is a comprehensive introduction to the physical principles and design of particle detectors, covering all major detector types in use today. After discussing the size and energy scales involved in different physical processes, the book considers nondestructive methods, including the photoelectric effect, photomultipliers, scintillators, Cerenkov and transition radiation, scattering and ionization, and the use of magnetic fields in drift and wire chambers. A complete chapter is devoted to silicon detectors. In the final part of the book, Green discusses destructive measurement techniques. Throughout, he emphasizes the physical principles underlying detection and shows, through appropriate examples, how those principles are best utilized in real detectors. Exercises and detailed further reading lists are included.

  5. Modern Detectors for Astroparticle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Adriani, Oscar

    2005-10-12

    This paper focus on the necessary requirements for a modern astroparticle physics detector based either on stratospheric balloons, either on satellite. The main technical solutions used to build a reliable detector are described. Finally, the most relevant experiments that have been developed with the INFN contribution and that will be ready in the near future (both for {gamma} and charged cosmic rays detection) are described.

  6. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  7. Accelerator physics and modeling: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Physics of high brightness beams; radio frequency beam conditioner for fast-wave free-electron generators of coherent radiation; wake-field and space-charge effects on high brightness beams. Calculations and measured results for BNL-ATF; non-linear orbit theory and accelerator design; general problems of modeling for accelerators; development and application of dispersive soft ferrite models for time-domain simulation; and bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings.

  8. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  9. Accelerator science in medical physics.

    PubMed

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-12-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future.

  10. Accelerator science in medical physics

    PubMed Central

    Peach, K; Wilson, P; Jones, B

    2011-01-01

    The use of cyclotrons and synchrotrons to accelerate charged particles in hospital settings for the purpose of cancer therapy is increasing. Consequently, there is a growing demand from medical physicists, radiographers, physicians and oncologists for articles that explain the basic physical concepts of these technologies. There are unique advantages and disadvantages to all methods of acceleration. Several promising alternative methods of accelerating particles also have to be considered since they will become increasingly available with time; however, there are still many technical problems with these that require solving. This article serves as an introduction to this complex area of physics, and will be of benefit to those engaged in cancer therapy, or who intend to acquire such technologies in the future. PMID:22374548

  11. ACCELERATION PHYSICS CODE WEB REPOSITORY.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI, J.

    2006-06-26

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  12. Accelerator Physics Code Web Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.; Basset, R.; Bellodi, G.; Benedetto, E.; Dorda, U.; Giovannozzi, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pieloni, T.; Ruggiero, F.; Rumolo, G.; Schmidt, F.; Todesco, E.; Zotter, B.W.; Payet, J.; Bartolini, R.; Farvacque, L.; Sen, T.; Chin, Y.H.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Furman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley /Oak Ridge /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /SLAC /TRIUMF /Tech-X, Boulder /UC, San Diego /Darmstadt, GSI /Rutherford /Brookhaven

    2006-10-24

    In the framework of the CARE HHH European Network, we have developed a web-based dynamic accelerator-physics code repository. We describe the design, structure and contents of this repository, illustrate its usage, and discuss our future plans, with emphasis on code benchmarking.

  13. DETECTORS FOR ACCELERATOR-BASED NUCLEAR SECURITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Stave, Sean C.; Miller, Erin A.

    2015-08-31

    We present of review of detector systems used in accelerator-based national security applications. In gen-eral, the detectors used for these applications are also used in passive measurements. The critical difference is that detector systems for accelerator-based applications in general need to discriminate beam-generated background from the intended signal. Typical techniques to remove background include shielding, timing, selection of sensitive materials, and choice of accelerator.

  14. Non-accelerator particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos: the {nu}IMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments. 21 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. TOPICS IN THE PHYSICS OF PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1984-07-01

    High energy physics, perhaps more than any other branch of science, is driven by technology. It is not the development of theory, or consideration of what measurements to make, which are the driving elements in our science. Rather it is the development of new technology which is the pacing item. Thus it is the development of new techniques, new computers, and new materials which allows one to develop new detectors and new particle-handling devices. It is the latter, the accelerators, which are at the heart of the science. Without particle accelerators there would be, essentially, no high energy physics. In fact. the advances in high energy physics can be directly tied to the advances in particle accelerators. Looking terribly briefly, and restricting one's self to recent history, the Bevatron made possible the discovery of the anti-proton and many of the resonances, on the AGS was found the {mu}-neutrino, the J-particle and time reversal non-invariance, on Spear was found the {psi}-particle, and, within the last year the Z{sub 0} and W{sup {+-}} were seen on the CERN SPS p-{bar p} collider. Of course one could, and should, go on in much more detail with this survey, but I think there is no need. It is clear that as better acceleration techniques were developed more and more powerful machines were built which, as a result, allowed high energy physics to advance. What are these techniques? They are very sophisticated and ever-developing. The science is very extensive and many individuals devote their whole lives to accelerator physics. As high energy experimental physicists your professional lives will be dominated by the performance of 'the machine'; i.e. the accelerator. Primarily you will be frustrated by the fact that it doesn't perform better. Why not? In these lectures, six in all, you should receive some appreciation of accelerator physics. We cannot, nor do we attempt, to make you into accelerator physicists, but we do hope to give you some insight into the

  16. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal

    2011-05-01

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  17. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1992-12-31

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups: Classical semiconductor diode detectors and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported.

  18. Analytical tools in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a sub-set of my lectures presented in the Accelerator Physics course (USPAS, Santa Rosa, California, January 14-25, 2008). It is based on my notes I wrote during period from 1976 to 1979 in Novosibirsk. Only few copies (in Russian) were distributed to my colleagues in Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The goal of these notes is a complete description starting from the arbitrary reference orbit, explicit expressions for 4-potential and accelerator Hamiltonian and finishing with parameterization with action and angle variables. To a large degree follow logic developed in Theory of Cyclic Particle Accelerators by A.A.Kolmensky and A.N.Lebedev [Kolomensky], but going beyond the book in a number of directions. One of unusual feature is these notes use of matrix function and Sylvester formula for calculating matrices of arbitrary elements. Teaching the USPAS course motivated me to translate significant part of my notes into the English. I also included some introductory materials following Classical Theory of Fields by L.D. Landau and E.M. Liftsitz [Landau]. A large number of short notes covering various techniques are placed in the Appendices.

  19. Major detectors in elementary-particle physics. [Portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.; Armstrong, B.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    With the 1983 issue of LBL-91 we introduce a supplement - a folio of descriptions of the world's major elementary particle physics detectors. Modern high energy physics usually involves the use of massive, costly, carefully engineered, large solid angle detectors. These detectors require a long lead time for construction, are often integrated with an accelerator, accumulate data over many years, and are in reality a combination of numerous subsystems. As was the case with bubble chambers, many experiments are performed with the same data, or with data taken after relatively minor changes or additions to the detector configuration. These experiments are often reported in journals whose space limitations make repeated full descriptions of the detector impossible. The detailed properties and performance of the detector are usually described in a fragmented series of papers in more specialized, technologically oriented journals. New additions are often not well documented. Several detectors often make similar measurements and physicists want to make quick comparisons of their respective capabilities. Designers of new large detectors and even of smaller experiments need to know what already exists and what performance has been achieved. To aid the physics community, the Particle Data Group has produced this brief folio of the world's major large detectors. This first edition has some notable omissions: in particular, the bubble chambers and any associated spectrometers, and the still somewhat tentative LEP, SLC, and TRISTAN detectors.

  20. Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Uesugi, T.; Wildnerc, E.

    2010-03-01

    The Accelerator Physics Working Group addressed the worldwide R&D activities performed in support of future neutrino facilities. These studies cover R&D activities for Super Beam, Beta Beam and muon-based Neutrino Factory facilities. Beta Beam activities reported the important progress made, together with the research activity planned for the coming years. Discussion sessions were also organized jointly with other working groups in order to define common ground for the optimization of a future neutrino facility. Lessons learned from already operating neutrino facilities provide key information for the design of any future neutrino facility, and were also discussed in this meeting. Radiation damage, remote handling for equipment maintenance and exchange, and primary proton beam stability and monitoring were among the important subjects presented and discussed. Status reports for each of the facility subsystems were presented: proton drivers, targets, capture systems, and muon cooling and acceleration systems. The preferred scenario for each type of possible future facility was presented, together with the challenges and remaining issues. The baseline specification for the muon-based Neutrino Factory was reviewed and updated where required. This report will emphasize new results and ideas and discuss possible changes in the baseline scenarios of the facilities. A list of possible future steps is proposed that should be followed up at NuFact10.

  1. A Dual-Sided Coded-Aperture Radiation Detection System , Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research Section A-Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We report the development of a large-area, mobile, coded-aperture radiation imaging system for localizing compact radioactive sources in three dimensions while rejecting distributed background. The 3D Stand-Off Radiation Detection System (SORDS-3D) has been tested at speeds up to 95 km/h and has detected and located sources in the millicurie range at distances of over 100 m. Radiation data are imaged to a geospatially mapped world grid with a nominal 1.25- to 2.5-m pixel pitch at distances out to 120 m on either side of the platform. Source elevation is also extracted. Imaged radiation alarms are superimposed on a side-facing video log that can be played back for direct localization of sources in buildings in urban environments. The system utilizes a 37-element array of 5 x 5 x 50 cm{sup 3} cesium-iodide (sodium) detectors. Scintillation light is collected by a pair of photomultiplier tubes placed at either end of each detector, with the detectors achieving an energy resolution of 6.15% FWHM (662 keV) and a position resolution along their length of 5 cm FWHM. The imaging system generates a dual-sided two-dimensional image allowing users to efficiently survey a large area. Imaged radiation data and raw spectra are forwarded to the RadioNuclide Analysis Kit (RNAK), developed by our collaborators, for isotope ID. An intuitive real-time display aids users in performing searches. Detector calibration is dynamically maintained by monitoring the potassium-40 peak and digitally adjusting individual detector gains. We have recently realized improvements, both in isotope identification and in distinguishing compact sources from background, through the installation of optimal-filter reconstruction kernels.

  2. A Components Database Design and Implementation for Accelerators and Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.; Meyer, S.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    Many accelerator and detector systems being fabricated for the PEP-II Accelerator and BABAR Detector needed configuration control and calibration measurements tracked for their components. Instead of building a database for each distinct system, a Components Database was designed and implemented that can encompass any type of component and any type of measurement. In this paper we describe this database design that is especially suited for the engineering and fabrication processes of the accelerator and detector environments where there are thousands of unique component types. We give examples of information stored in the Components Database, which includes accelerator configuration, calibration measurements, fabrication history, design specifications, inventory, etc. The World Wide Web interface is used to access the data, and templates are available for international collaborations to collect data off-line.

  3. [Accelerator physics R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, A.D.

    1994-08-22

    This report discusses the NEPTUN-A experiment that will study spin effects in violent proton-proton collisions; the Siberian snake tests at IUCF cooler ring; polarized gas jets; and polarized proton acceleration to 1 TeV at Fermilab.

  4. Accelerator physics R and D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, A. D.

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the NEPTUN-A experiment that will study spin effects in violent proton-proton collisions; the Siberian snake tests at IUCF cooler ring; polarized gas jets; and polarized proton acceleration to 1 TeV at Fermilab.

  5. Inclined Planes and Motion Detectors: A Study of Acceleration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Dyanne M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students work in cooperative groups and roll balls down inclined planes, collect data with the help of an electronic motion detector, and represent data with a graphing calculator to explore concepts such as mass, gravity, velocity, and acceleration. (Contains 12 references.) (Author/ASK)

  6. Theoretical problems in accelerator physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N.M.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics in accelerator physics: radio frequency pulse compression and power transport; computational methods for the computer analysis of microwave components; persistent wakefields associated with waveguide damping of higher order modes; and photonic band gap cavities.

  7. Physics and Accelerator Applications of RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    H. Padamsee; K. W. Shepard; Ron Sundelin

    1993-12-01

    A key component of any particle accelerator is the device that imparts energy gain to the charged particle. This is usually an electromagnetic cavity resonating at a microwave frequency, chosen between 100 and 3000 MHz. Serious attempts to utilize superconductors for accelerating cavities were initiated more than 25 years ago with the acceleration of electrons in a lead-plated resonator at Stanford University (1). The first full-scale accelerator, the Stanford SCA, was completed in 1978 at the High Energy Physics Laboratory (HEPL) (2). Over the intervening one and a half decades, superconducting cavities have become increasingly important to particle accelerators for nuclear physics and high energy physics. For continuous operation, as is required for many applications, the power dissipation in the walls of a copper structure is quite substantial, for example, 0.1 megawatts per meter of structure operating at an accelerating field of 1 million volts/meter (MV/m). since losses increase as the square of the accelerating field, copper cavities become severely uneconomical as demand for higher fields grows with the higher energies called for by experimenters to probe ever deeper into the structure of matter. Rf superconductivity has become an important technology for particle accelerators. Practical structures with attractive performance levels have been developed for a variety of applications, installed in the targeted accelerators, and operated over significant lengths of time. Substantial progress has been made in understanding field and Q limitations and in inventing cures to advance performance. The technical and economical potential of rf superconductivity makes it an important candidate for future advanced accelerators for free electron lasers, for nuclear physics, and for high energy physics, at the luminosity as well as at the energy frontiers.

  8. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  9. Computational Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.; Bohn, Courtlandt L.

    2004-08-27

    The working group on computational accelerator physics at the 11th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. Verification, i.e., showing that a computational application correctly solves the assumed model, and validation, i.e., showing that the model correctly describes the modeled system, were discussed for a number of systems. In particular, the predictions of the massively parallel codes, OSIRIS and VORPAL, used for modeling advanced accelerator concepts, were compared and shown to agree, thereby establishing some verification of both codes. In addition, a number of talks on the status and frontiers of computational accelerator physics were presented, to include the modeling of ultrahigh-brightness electron photoinjectors and the physics of beam halo production. Finally, talks discussing computational needs were presented.

  10. Computational Accelerator Physics Working Group Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, John R.; Bohn, Courtlandt L.

    2004-12-07

    The working group on computational accelerator physics at the 11th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held a series of meetings during the Workshop. Verification, i.e., showing that a computational application correctly solves the assumed model, and validation, i.e., showing that the model correctly describes the modeled system, were discussed for a number of systems. In particular, the predictions of the massively parallel codes, OSIRIS and VORPAL, used for modeling advanced accelerator concepts, were compared and shown to agree, thereby establishing some verification of both codes. In addition, a number of talks on the status and frontiers of computational accelerator physics were presented, to include the modeling of ultrahigh-brightness electron photoinjectors and the physics of beam halo production. Finally, talks discussing computational needs were presented.

  11. Summary of the very large hadron collider physics and detector workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.; Berger, M.; Brandt, A.; Eno, S.

    1997-10-01

    One of the options for an accelerator beyond the LHC is a hadron collider with higher energy. Work is going on to explore accelerator technologies that would make such a machine feasible. This workshop concentrated on the physics and detector issues associated with a hadron collider with an energy in the center of mass of the order of 100 to 200 TeV.

  12. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H.

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  13. The use of nuclear physics and high energy physics detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina

    2013-06-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late '70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this paper we will try to present how Nuclear Physics/High Energy Physics and Medical Imaging have both benefited by the cross-fertilization of research activities between the two fields and how much they will take advantage in the future.

  14. Fundamental physics of infrared detector materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinch, Michael A.

    2001-06-01

    The fundamental parameters of IR photon detection are discussed relevant to the meaningful comparison of a wide range of proposed IR detecting materials systems. The thermal generation rate of the IR material is seen to be the key parameter that enables this comparison. The simple materials physics of (1) intrinsic direct bandgap semiconductors, (2) extrinsic semiconductors, (3) quantum well devices, including types I, II, and III superlattices, (4) Si Schottky barriers, are examined with regard to the potential performance of these materials as IR detectors, utilizing the thermal generation rate as a differentiator. The possibility of room temperature photon detection over the whole IR spectral range is discussed, and comparison made with uncooled thermal detection.

  15. Fundamental physics of infrared detector materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinch, Michael A.

    2000-06-01

    The fundamental parameters of IR photon detection are discussed relevant to the meaningful comparison of a wide range of proposed IR detecting materials systems. The thermal generation rate of the IR material is seen to be the key parameter that enables this comparison. The simple materials physics of 1) intrinsic direct bandgap semiconductors; 2) extrinsic semiconductors; 3) quantum well devices, including types I, II, and III superlattices; 4) Si Schottky barriers; and 5) high temperature superconductors, will be examined with regard to the potential performance of these materials as IR detectors, utilizing the thermal generation rate as a differentiator. The possibility of room temperature photon detection over the whole IR spectral range is discussed, and comparisons made with uncooled thermal detection.

  16. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Licht, J.de Fine; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-23

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  17. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; de Fine Licht, J.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  18. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Austin, K. N.; Waisman, E. M.; Hickman, R. J.; Davis, J.-P.; Haill, T. A.; Knudson, M. D.; Seagle, C. T.; Brown, J. L.; Goerz, D. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Goldlust, J. A.; Cravey, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM), circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  19. Tevatron accelerator physics and operation highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The performance of the Tevatron collider demonstrated continuous growth over the course of Run II, with the peak luminosity reaching 4 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, and the weekly integration rate exceeding 70 pb{sup -1}. This report presents a review of the most important advances that contributed to this performance improvement, including beam dynamics modeling, precision optics measurements and stability control, implementation of collimation during low-beta squeeze. Algorithms employed for optimization of the luminosity integration are presented and the lessons learned from high-luminosity operation are discussed. Studies of novel accelerator physics concepts at the Tevatron are described, such as the collimation techniques using crystal collimator and hollow electron beam, and compensation of beam-beam effects.

  20. Nuclear physics detector technology applied to plant biology research

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Kross, Brian J.; Lee, Seung Joo; McKisson, John E.; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl J.; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, A.S.; Reid, C.D.; Smith, Mark

    2013-08-01

    The ability to detect the emissions of radioactive isotopes through radioactive decay (e.g. beta particles, x-rays and gamma-rays) has been used for over 80 years as a tracer method for studying natural phenomena. More recently a positron emitting radioisotope of carbon: {sup 11}C has been utilized as a {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer for plant ecophysiology research. Because of its ease of incorporation into the plant via photosynthesis, the {sup 11}CO{sub 2} radiotracer is a powerful tool for use in plant biology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using {sup 11}CO{sub 2}. Presently there are several groups developing and using new PET instrumentation for plant based studies. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in collaboration with the Duke University Phytotron and the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is involved in PET detector development for plant imaging utilizing technologies developed for nuclear physics research. The latest developments of the use of a LYSO scintillator based PET detector system for {sup 11}CO{sub 2} tracer studies in plants will be briefly outlined.

  1. Underground Accelerators for Precise Nuclear Physics: LUNA and DIANA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniela

    2011-05-01

    Current stellar model simulations are at a level of precision that uncertainties in the nuclear-reaction rates are becoming significant for theoretical predictions and for the analysis of observational signatures. To address several open questions in cosmology, astrophysics, and non-Standard-Model neutrino physics, new high precision measurements of direct-capture nuclear fusion cross sections will be essential. At these low energies, fusion cross sections decrease exponentially with energy and are expected to approach femtobarn levels or less. The experimental difficulties in determining the low-energy cross sections are caused by large background rates associated with cosmic ray-induced reactions, background from natural radioactivity in the laboratory environment, and the beam-induced background on target impurities. Natural background can be reduced by careful shielding of the target and detector environment, and beam-induced background can be reduced by active shielding techniques through event identification, but it is difficult to reduce the background component from cosmic ray muons. An underground location has the advantage that the cosmic ray-induced background is reduced by several orders of magnitude, allowing the measurements to be pushed to far lower energies than feasible above ground. This has been clearly demonstrated at LUNA by the successful studies of critical reactions in the pp-chains and first reaction studies in the CNO cycles. The DIANA project (Dakota Ion Accelerators for Nuclear Astrophysics) is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame, Michigan State University, Colorado School of Mines, Regis University, University of North Carolina, Western Michigan University, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to build a nuclear astrophysics accelerator facility deep underground. The DIANA accelerator facility is being designed to achieve large laboratory reaction rates by delivering two orders of magnitude higher ion beams to a

  2. Astroparticle Physics: Detectors for Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Humberto; Villaseñor, Luis

    2006-09-01

    We describe the work that we have done over the last decade to design and construct instruments to measure properties of cosmic rays in Mexico. We describe the measurement of the muon lifetime and the ratio of positive to negative muons in the natural background of cosmic ray muons at 2000 m.a.s.l. Next we describe the detection of decaying and crossing muons in a water Cherenkov detector as well as a technique to separate isolated particles. We also describe the detection of isolated muons and electrons in a liquid scintillator detector and their separation. Next we describe the detection of extensive air showers (EAS) with a hybrid detector array consisting of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator detectors, located at the campus of the University of Puebla. Finally we describe work in progress to detect EAS at 4600 m.a.s.l. with a water Cherenkov detector array and a fluorescence telescope at the Sierra Negra mountain.

  3. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron

  4. Inferential physical measurements using detectors and detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, F.; Burhardt, K. K.; Waltz, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    Some uses of photodiode detector arrays for on-line inferential measurement of process parameters are described in this paper. Optical considerations involving these arrays are discussed. High resolution camera lenses are not necessarily best in these applications since different lens design considerations apply when discrete arrays are used. Serious linearity and repeatability problems that were encountered with some commercially available solid state camera systems are discussed. The requirement of modest system cost, coupled with the need for high speed on-line analysis, place stringent restrictions on the type and amount of computer analysis that can be carried out. A set of recognition algorithms which have worked well in the initial applications are described. Some of the remaining problems, and possible approaches to them, are presented.

  5. Advanced Computing Tools and Models for Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, Robert; Ryne, Robert D.

    2008-06-11

    This paper is based on a transcript of my EPAC'08 presentation on advanced computing tools for accelerator physics. Following an introduction I present several examples, provide a history of the development of beam dynamics capabilities, and conclude with thoughts on the future of large scale computing in accelerator physics.

  6. Guide to accelerator physics program SYNCH: VAX version 1987. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.; Courant, E.

    1987-01-01

    This guide is written to accommodate users of Accelerator Physics Data Base BNLDAG::DUAO:(PARSA1). It describes the contents of the on line Accelerator Physics data base DUAO:(PARSA1.SYNCH). SYNCH is a computer program used for the design and analysis of synchrotrons, storage rings and beamlines.

  7. Physical activities to enhance an understanding of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    On the basis of their everyday experiences, students have developed an understanding of many of the concepts of mechanics by the time they take their first physics course. However, an accurate understanding of acceleration remains elusive. Many students have difficulties distinguishing between velocity and acceleration. In this report, a set of physical activities to highlight the differences between acceleration and velocity are described. These activities involve running and walking on sand (such as an outdoor volleyball court).

  8. State-of-the-Art Particle Physics Detector

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 institutes from 16 countries and organized under United States...

  9. The Influence of Accelerator Science on Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haussecker, Enzo F.; Chao, Alexander W.

    2011-06-01

    We evaluate accelerator science in the context of its contributions to the physics community. We address the problem of quantifying these contributions and present a scheme for a numerical evaluation of them. We show by using a statistical sample of important developments in modern physics that accelerator science has influenced 28% of post-1938 physicists and also 28% of post-1938 physics research. We also examine how the influence of accelerator science has evolved over time, and show that on average it has contributed to a physics Nobel Prize-winning research every 2.9 years.

  10. The Physical Principles of Particle Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Goronwy Tudor

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of a particle detector, an instrument that records the passage of particles through it, to determine the mass of a particle by measuring the particles momentum, speed, and kinetic energy. An appendix discusses the limits on the impact parameter. (MDH)

  11. Fifty years of accelerator based physics at Chalk River

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, John W.

    1999-04-26

    The Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was a major centre for Accelerator based physics for the last fifty years. As early as 1946, nuclear structure studies were started on Cockroft-Walton accelerators. A series of accelerators followed, including the world's first Tandem, and the MP Tandem, Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) facility that was opened in 1986. The nuclear physics program was shut down in 1996. This paper will describe some of the highlights of the accelerators and the research of the laboratory.

  12. Backreaction and the Unruh effect: New insights from exact solutions of uniformly accelerated detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.-Y.; Hu, B. L.

    2007-09-15

    Using nonperturbative results obtained recently for a uniformly accelerated Unruh-DeWitt detector, we discover new features in the dynamical evolution of the detector's internal degree of freedom, and identified the Unruh effect derived originally from time-dependent perturbation theory as operative in the ultraweak coupling and ultrahigh acceleration limits. The mutual interaction between the detector and the field engenders entanglement between them, and tracing out the field leads to a mixed state of the detector even for a detector at rest in Minkowski vacuum. Our findings based on this exact solution show clearly the differences from the ordinary result where the quantum field's backreaction is ignored in that the detector no longer behaves like a perfect thermometer. From a calculation of the evolution of the reduced density matrix of the detector, we find that the transition probability from the initial ground state over an infinitely long duration of interaction derived from time-dependent perturbation theory is existent in the exact solution only in transient under special limiting conditions corresponding to the Markovian regime. Furthermore, the detector at late times never sees an exact Boltzmann distribution over the energy eigenstates of the free detector, thus in the non-Markovian regime covering a wider range of parameters the Unruh temperature cannot be identified inside the detector.

  13. Neutrino physics with accelerator driven subcritical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciuffoli, Emilio; Evslin, Jarah; Zhao, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Accelerator driven system (ADS) subcritical nuclear reactors are under development around the world. They will be intense sources of free, 30-55 MeV μ + decay at rest {overline{ν}}_{μ } . These ADS reactor neutrinos can provide a robust test of the LSND anomaly and a precise measurement of the leptonic CP-violating phase δ, including sign(cos(δ)). The first phase of many ADS programs includes the construction of a low energy, high intensity proton or deuteron accelerator, which can yield competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos.

  14. Fluid Physics Under a Stochastic Acceleration Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinals, Jorge

    2001-01-01

    The research summarized in this report has involved a combined theoretical and computational study of fluid flow that results from the random acceleration environment present onboard space orbiters, also known as g-jitter. We have focused on a statistical description of the observed g-jitter, on the flows that such an acceleration field can induce in a number of experimental configurations of interest, and on extending previously developed methodology to boundary layer flows. Narrow band noise has been shown to describe many of the features of acceleration data collected during space missions. The scale of baroclinically induced flows when the driving acceleration is random is not given by the Rayleigh number. Spatially uniform g-jitter induces additional hydrodynamic forces among suspended particles in incompressible fluids. Stochastic modulation of the control parameter shifts the location of the onset of an oscillatory instability. Random vibration of solid boundaries leads to separation of boundary layers. Steady streaming ahead of a modulated solid-melt interface enhances solute transport, and modifies the stability boundaries of a planar front.

  15. Linear Collider Accelerator Physics Issues Regarding Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; /SLAC

    2005-08-12

    The next generation of linear colliders will require more stringent alignment tolerances than those for the SLC with regard to the accelerating structures, quadrupoles, and beam position monitors. New techniques must be developed to achieve these tolerances. A combination of mechanical-electrical and beam-based methods will likely be needed.

  16. Fluid Physics in a Fluctuating Acceleration Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, J. Ross; Drolet, Francois; Vinals, Jorge

    1996-01-01

    We summarize several aspects of an ongoing investigation of the effects that stochastic residual accelerations (g-jitter) onboard spacecraft can have on experiments conducted in a microgravity environment. The residual acceleration field is modeled as a narrow band noise, characterized by three independent parameters: intensity (g(exp 2)), dominant angular frequency Omega, and characteristic correlation time tau. Realistic values for these parameters are obtained from an analysis of acceleration data corresponding to the SL-J mission, as recorded by the SAMS instruments. We then use the model to address the random motion of a solid particle suspended in an incompressible fluid subjected to such random accelerations. As an extension, the effect of jitter on coarsening of a solid-liquid mixture is briefly discussed, and corrections to diffusion controlled coarsening evaluated. We conclude that jitter will not be significant in the experiment 'Coarsening of solid-liquid mixtures' to be conducted in microgravity. Finally, modifications to the location of onset of instability in systems driven by a random force are discussed by extending the standard reduction to the center manifold to the stochastic case. Results pertaining to time-modulated oscillatory convection are briefly discussed.

  17. SEVAN particle-detector network for Solar Physics and Space Weather research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.

    2009-04-01

    A network of detectors called SEVAN (Space Environmental Viewing and Analysis Network) is planned in the framework of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), to improve fundamental research of the Solar accelerators and Space Weather conditions. The network will detect changing fluxes of the most of species secondary cosmic rays at different altitudes, latitudes and altitudes those constituting powerful integrated device in exploration of solar modulation effects. Surface particle detectors measure time series of secondary particles born in cascades originated in the atmosphere by nuclear interactions of the "primary" protons and nuclei accelerated in galaxy. During violent solar explosions sometimes additional particles, accelerated at sun's environments, are added to this "background" flux. If solar particles are energetic enough they also will generate secondary particles reaching earth surface. Therefore, registration of changing time series of secondary particles shed light on the high-energy particle acceleration mechanisms by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection driven shocks. Network of particle detectors located at middle-to-low latitudes is sensitive to the highest energy solar particles. The enigma of particle acceleration in supernovae remnants, super-massive black holes, clusters of galaxies can be researched using particle beams accelerated by sun and detected at earth. The shock acceleration is a universal process responsible for the same physical process (particle acceleration) on the different scales. Time series of intensities of high energy particles can also provide highly cost-effective information on the key characteristics of the disturbances of interplanetary magnetic field. Recent results on of the detection of the extreme solar events (2003, 2005) by the monitors of the Aragats Space-Environmental Center (ASEC) illustrate wide possibilities opening with introduction of new particle detectors measuring neutron, electron and muon

  18. Accelerating Innovation: How Nuclear Physics Benefits Us All

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    2011-01-01

    Innovation has been accelerated by nuclear physics in the areas of improving our health; making the world safer; electricity, environment, archaeology; better computers; contributions to industry; and training the next generation of innovators.

  19. Astroparticle physics with the MINOS Far Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grashorn, Eric William

    Since August 2003, the MINOS Far Detector collected over 67 million underground muons at Soudan MN, USA. As the temperature of the atmosphere changes, the interaction height of incident cosmic rays changes, which affects the production of muons that are seen underground. A four percent peak-to-peak seasonal fluctuation was seen over a period of four years, which was highly correlated to the measured temperature variations of the upper atmosphere over the same period. The coefficient relating changes in the muon rate to changes changes in atmospheric temperature, alphaT , was found to be: alphaT = 0.877 +/- 0.010 (stat.) +/- 0.017 (syst.). A new model was developed to describe the observed effect, and is the first to include the contribution from kaons. This model predicts alphaT = 0.865 +/- 0.015. The first measurements of charge separated seasonal variations were reported: alphaT(mu+) = 0.782 +/- 0.056 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (syst.), alpha T(mu-) = 0.788 +/- 0.066 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (syst.). The measurable inclusion of kaons in the theoretical expression for alphaT allowed a measurement of the atmospheric K/pi ratio = 0.21 +/- 0.08. A high significance observation of two muon signals, the shadow of the sun and moon, have been seen. The shadow of the moon was observed at the 5 sigma level, and the shadow of the sun was observed at the 4.3 sigma level. The angular resolution of the detector was found to be 0.62° using dimuons, and the two dimensional shadowing distribution was used to quantify the absolute pointing of the detector 0.15 +/- 0.10°. A cosmic ray point source search was performed, and no statistically significant source was found. In the absence of a source, 95% flux limits were placed on cosmic ray sources. The minimum flux limit was 2.7 x 10-16 cm-2s-1, which is comparable to the previous best limit set by MACRO [1,2]. Using the 239 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) of the first Swift catalog a search for space-time coincidence between neutrino induced muons and GRBs

  20. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  1. Accelerator physics analysis with an integrated toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, J.A.; Michelotti, L.; Satogata, T.

    1992-08-01

    Work is in progress on an integrated software toolkit for linear and nonlinear accelerator design, analysis, and simulation. As a first application, beamline'' and MXYZPTLK'' (differential algebra) class libraries, were used with an X Windows graphics library to build an user-friendly, interactive phase space tracker which, additionally, finds periodic orbits. This program was used to analyse a theoretical lattice which contains octupoles and decapoles to find the 20th order, stable and unstable periodic orbits and to explore the local phase space structure.

  2. Superconducting Kinetic Inductance Detectors for astronomy and particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M.; Goupy, J.; D`Addabbo, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Catalano, A.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) represent a novel detector technology based on superconducting resonators. Since their first demonstration in 2003, they have been rapidly developed and are today a strong candidate for present and future experiments in the different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. This has been possible thanks to the unique features of such devices: in particular, they couple a very high sensitivity to their intrinsic suitability for frequency domain multiplexed readout, making the fabrication of large arrays of ultrasensitive detectors possible. There are many fields of application that can profit of such detectors. Here, we will briefly review the principle of operation of a KID, and give two sample applications, to mm-wave astronomy and to particle physics.

  3. Physics with the collider detectors at RHIC and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Hallman, T.

    1995-07-15

    On January 8, 1995, over 180 participants gathered to hear the QM95 preconference workshop on `Physics with the Collider Detectors at RHIC and the LHC`. The goal was to bring together the experimentalists from a wide community of hadron and heavy ion collider detector collaborations. The speakers were encouraged to present the current status of their detectors, with all the blemishes, and the audience was encouraged to share their successes and failures in approaching similar detector design issues. The presentations were excellent and the discussions were lively and stimulating. The editors hope that the reader will find these proceedings to be equally stimulating. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database from articles in this report.

  4. Helium cooling systems for large superconducting physics detector magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.

    The large superconducting detector magnets used for high energy physics experiments are virtually all indirectly cooled. In general, these detector magnets are not cryogenically stabilized. Therefore, there are a number of choices for cooling large indirectly cooled detector magnets. These choices include; 1) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by the helium refrigerator J-T circuit, 2) forced two-phase helium cooling driven by a helium pump, and 3) a peculation gravity feed cooling system which uses liquid helium from a large storage dewar. The choices for the cooling of a large detector magnet are illustrated by applying these concepts to a 4.2 meter diameter 0.5 tesla thin superconducting solenoid for an experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  5. Liquid xenon detectors for particle physics and astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Doke, T.

    2010-07-15

    This article reviews the progress made over the last 20 years in the development and applications of liquid xenon detectors in particle physics, astrophysics, and medical imaging experiments. A summary of the fundamental properties of liquid xenon as radiation detection medium, in light of the most current theoretical and experimental information is first provided. After an introduction of the different type of liquid xenon detectors, a review of past, current, and future experiments using liquid xenon to search for rare processes and to image radiation in space and in medicine is given. Each application is introduced with a survey of the underlying scientific motivation and experimental requirements before reviewing the basic characteristics and expected performance of each experiment. Within this decade it appears likely that large volume liquid xenon detectors operated in different modes will contribute to answering some of the most fundamental questions in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, fulfilling the most demanding detection challenges. From detectors based solely on liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation, such as in the MEG experiment for the search of the rare ''{mu}{yields}e{gamma}'' decay, currently the largest liquid xenon detector in operation, and in the XMASS experiment for dark matter detection, to the class of time projection chambers which exploit both scintillation and ionization of LXe, such as in the XENON dark matter search experiment and in the Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay, unrivaled performance and important contributions to physics in the next few years are anticipated.

  6. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  7. Fluid Physics in a Fluctuating Acceleration Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drolet, Francois; Vinals, Jorge

    1999-01-01

    Our program of research aims at developing a stochastic description of the residual acceleration field onboard spacecraft (g-jitter) to describe in quantitative detail its effect on fluid motion. Our main premise is that such a statistical description is necessary in those cases in which the characteristic time scales of the process under investigation are long compared with the correlation time of g-jitter. Although a clear separation between time scales makes this approach feasible, there remain several difficulties of practical nature: (i), g-jitter time series are not statistically stationary but rather show definite dependences on factors such as active or rest crew periods; (ii), it is very difficult to extract reliably the low frequency range of the power spectrum of the acceleration field. This range controls the magnitude of diffusive processes; and (iii), models used to date are Gaussian, but there is evidence that large amplitude disturbances occur much more frequently than a Gaussian distribution would predict. The lack of stationarity does not constitute a severe limitation in practice, since the intensity of the stochastic components changes very slowly during space missions (perhaps over times of the order of hours). A separate analysis of large amplitude disturbances has not been undertaken yet, but it does not seem difficult a priori to devise models that may describe this range better than a Gaussian distribution. The effect of low frequency components, on the other hand, is more difficult to ascertain, partly due to the difficulty associated with measuring them, and partly because they may be indistinguishable from slowly changing averages. This latter effect is further complicated by the lack of statistical stationarity of the time series. Recent work has focused on the effect of stochastic modulation on the onset of oscillatory instabilities as an example of resonant interaction between the driving acceleration and normal modes of the system

  8. Physics and detector simulation facility Type O workstation specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Chartrand, G.; Cormell, L.R.; Hahn, R.; Jacobson, D.; Johnstad, H.; Leibold, P.; Marquez, M.; Ramsey, B.; Roberts, L.; Scipioni, B.; Yost, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    This document specifies the requirements for the front-end network of workstations of a distributed computing facility. This facility will be needed to perform the physics and detector simulations for the design of Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors, and other computations in support of physics and detector needs. A detailed description of the computer simulation facility is given in the overall system specification document. This document provides revised subsystem specifications for the network of monitor-less Type 0 workstations. The requirements specified in this document supersede the requirements given. In Section 2 a brief functional description of the facility and its use are provided. The list of detailed specifications (vendor requirements) is given in Section 3 and the qualifying requirements (benchmarks) are described in Section 4.

  9. Applications of gaseous particle detectors in physics and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    1995-08-01

    The multi-wire proportional chamber, introduced in 1967 by Georges Charpak (recipient of the 1992 Nobel prize for physics) allows to achieve high-rate, fully electronics detection and localization of ionizing radiation. The myriad of devices inspired by this initial work generated a revolution in the conception of detectors for elementary particle physics experiments; examples are the time projection chamber, the drift chamber, the micro-strip gas chamber. After a brief introduction on the basic operating principles of the device, I will describe several examples of application of advanced gas detectors in medicine and biology and analyze the operating characteristics that make the new devices attractive when confronted with classic detectors.

  10. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  11. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak [open quotes]for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.[close quotes] Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given.

  12. HEAVY ION PHYSICS WITH THE ATLAS DETECTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, S.

    2005-02-05

    Soon after the LHC is commissioned with proton beams the ATLAS experiment will begin studies of Pb-Pb collisions with a center of mass energy of {radical}s{sub NN} = 5.5 TeV. The ATLAS program is a natural extension of measurements at RHIC in a direction that exploits the higher LHC energies and the superb ATLAS calorimeter and tracking coverage. At LHC energies, collisions will be produced with even higher energy density than observed at RHIC. The properties of the resulting hot medium can be studied with higher energy probes, which are more directly interpreted through modification of jet properties emerging from these collisions, for example. Other topics which are enabled by the 30-fold increase in center of mass energy include probing the partonic structure of nuclei with hard photoproduction (in UltraPeripheral collisions) and in p-Pb collisions. Here we report on evaluation of ATLAS capabilities for Heavy Ion Physics.

  13. Response of a uniformly accelerated detector to massless Rarita–Schwinger fields in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qinglin; Yu, Hongwei; Zhou, Wenting

    2014-09-15

    We study the response of a uniformly accelerated detector modeled by a two-level atom nonlinearly coupled to vacuum massless Rarita–Schwinger fields. We first generalize the formalism developed by Dalibard, Dupont-Roc, and Cohen-Tannoudji in the linear coupling case, and we then calculate the mean rate of change of the atomic energy of the accelerated atom. Our result shows that a uniformly accelerated atom in its ground state interacting with vacuum Rarita–Schwinger field fluctuations would spontaneously transition to an excited state and the unique feature in contrast to the case of the atom coupled to the scalar, electromagnetic and Dirac fields is the appearance of terms in the excitation rate which are proportional to the sixth and eighth powers of acceleration. - Highlights: • We study the response of an accelerated detector to Rarita–Schwinger fields. • Detector spontaneously transitions to an excited state in vacuum. • Excitation rate contains terms of the sixth and eighth powers of acceleration.

  14. (Advanced accelerator physics featuring the problems of small rings)

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.

    1989-10-16

    The traveler attended the CERN Accelerator School and Uppsala University short course on Advanced Accelerator Physics held on the University campus, Uppsala, Sweden, from September 18-29, 1989. The course, attended by 81 people, was well conceived, well presented, and informative. The course was organized and specialized on the problems of small rings. The traveler also visited the CELSIUS ring facility of Uppsala University and the CRYRING ring facility of the Manne Siegbahn Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

  15. An introduction to the physics of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A.; Syphers, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of a course given by the authors at various universities and particle accelerator schools. It starts from the basic physics principles governing particle motion inside an accelerator, and leads to a full description of the complicated phenomena and analytical tools encountered in the design and operation of a working accelerator. The book covers acceleration and longitudinal beam dynamics, transverse motion and nonlinear perturbations, intensity dependent effects, emittance preservation methods and synchrotron radiation. These subjects encompass the core concerns of a high energy synchrotron. The authors apparently do not assume the reader has much previous knowledge about accelerator physics. Hence, they take great care to introduce the physical phenomena encountered and the concepts used to describe them. The mathematical formulae and derivations are deliberately kept at a level suitable for beginners. After mastering this course, any interested reader will not find it difficult to follow subjects of more current interests. Useful homework problems are provided at the end of each chapter. Many of the problems are based on actual activities associated with the design and operation of existing accelerators.

  16. Proceedings of the workshop on B physics at hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, P.; Mishra, C.S.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Measurement of Angle {alpha}; Measurement of Angle {beta}; Measurement of Angle {gamma}; Other B Physics; Theory of Heavy Flavors; Charged Particle Tracking and Vertexing; e and {gamma} Detection; Muon Detection; Hadron ID; Electronics, DAQ, and Computing; and Machine Detector Interface. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion the in Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Applications of the ARGUS code in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Petillo, J.J.; Mankofsky, A.; Krueger, W.A.; Kostas, C.; Mondelli, A.A.; Drobot, A.T.

    1993-12-31

    ARGUS is a three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code that is being distributed to U.S. accelerator laboratories in collaboration between SAIC and the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group. It uses a modular architecture that allows multiple physics modules to share common utilities for grid and structure input., memory management, disk I/O, and diagnostics, Physics modules are in place for electrostatic and electromagnetic field solutions., frequency-domain (eigenvalue) solutions, time- dependent PIC, and steady-state PIC simulations. All of the modules are implemented with a domain-decomposition architecture that allows large problems to be broken up into pieces that fit in core and that facilitates the adaptation of ARGUS for parallel processing ARGUS operates on either Cray or workstation platforms, and MOTIF-based user interface is available for X-windows terminals. Applications of ARGUS in accelerator physics and design are described in this paper.

  18. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  19. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, M.S.

    2008-05-03

    Historically, progress in high-energy physics has largely been determined by development of more capable particle accelerators. This trend continues today with the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the worldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider. Looking ahead, there are two scientific areas ripe for further exploration--the energy frontier and the precision frontier. To explore the energy frontier, two approaches toward multi-TeV beams are being studied, an electron-positron linear collider based on a novel two-beam powering system (CLIC), and a Muon Collider. Work on the precision frontier involves accelerators with very high intensity, including a Super-BFactory and a muon-based Neutrino Factory. Without question, one of the most promising approaches is the development of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very high scientific potential, and would substantially advance the state-of-the-art in accelerator design. The challenges of the new generation of accelerators, and how these can be accommodated in the accelerator design, are described. To reap their scientific benefits, all of these frontier accelerators will require sophisticated instrumentation to characterize the beam and control it with unprecedented precision.

  20. The upgraded ATLAS and CMS detectors and their physics capabilities.

    PubMed

    Wells, Pippa S

    2015-01-13

    The update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics from 2013 states that Europe's top priority should be the exploitation of the full potential of the LHC, including the high-luminosity upgrade of the machine and detectors with a view to collecting 10 times more data than in the initial design. The plans for upgrading the ATLAS and CMS detectors so as to maintain their performance and meet the challenges of increasing luminosity are presented here. A cornerstone of the physics programme is to measure the properties of the 125GeV Higgs boson with the highest possible precision, to test its consistency with the Standard Model. The high-luminosity data will allow precise measurements of the dominant production and decay modes, and offer the possibility of observing rare modes including Higgs boson pair production. Direct and indirect searches for additional Higgs bosons beyond the Standard Model will also continue.

  1. Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) architecture/utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Scipioni, B.

    1993-05-01

    The current systems architecture for the SSCL`s Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) is presented. Systems analysis data is presented and discussed. In particular, these data disclose the effectiveness of utilization of the facility for meeting the needs of physics computing, especially as concerns parallel architecture and processing. Detailed design plans for the highly networked, symmetric, parallel, UNIX workstation-based facility are given and discussed in light of the design philosophy. Included are network, CPU, disk, router, concentrator, tape, user and job capacities and throughput.

  2. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  3. Better physical activity classification using smartphone acceleration sensor.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad; Bilal, Mohsin; Kattan, Ahmed; Ahamed, S Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is becoming one of the serious problems for the health of worldwide population. Social interactions on mobile phones and computers via internet through social e-networks are one of the major causes of lack of physical activities. For the health specialist, it is important to track the record of physical activities of the obese or overweight patients to supervise weight loss control. In this study, acceleration sensor present in the smartphone is used to monitor the physical activity of the user. Physical activities including Walking, Jogging, Sitting, Standing, Walking upstairs and Walking downstairs are classified. Time domain features are extracted from the acceleration data recorded by smartphone during different physical activities. Time and space complexity of the whole framework is done by optimal feature subset selection and pruning of instances. Classification results of six physical activities are reported in this paper. Using simple time domain features, 99 % classification accuracy is achieved. Furthermore, attributes subset selection is used to remove the redundant features and to minimize the time complexity of the algorithm. A subset of 30 features produced more than 98 % classification accuracy for the six physical activities.

  4. Accelerator Physics Challenges for the NSLS-II Project

    SciTech Connect

    Krinsky,S.

    2009-05-04

    The NSLS-II is an ultra-bright synchrotron light source based upon a 3-GeV storage ring with a 30-cell (15 super-period) double-bend-achromat lattice with damping wigglers used to lower the emittance below 1 nm. In this paper, we discuss the accelerator physics challenges for the design including: optimization of dynamic aperture; estimation of Touschek lifetime; achievement of required orbit stability; and analysis of ring impedance and collective effects.

  5. Accelerator physics highlights in the 1997/98 SLC run

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.; Bane, K.L.F.; Barkow, T.

    1998-03-01

    The authors report various accelerator physics studies and improvements from the 1997/98 run at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). In particular, the authors discuss damping-ring lattice diagnostics, changes to the linac set up, fast control for linac rf phase stability, new emittance tuning strategies, wakefield reduction, modifications of the final-focus optics, longitudinal bunch shaping, and a novel spot-size control at the interaction point (IP).

  6. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  7. A neutron track etch detector for electron linear accelerators in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, Branko; Faj, Dario; Poje, Marina; Varga, Maja; Radolic, Vanja; Miklavcic, Igor; Ivkovic, Ana; Planinic, Josip

    2010-01-01

    Background Electron linear accelerators in medical radiotherapy have replaced cobalt and caesium sources of radiation. However, medical accelerators with photon energies over 10 MeV generate undesired fast neutron contamination in a therapeutic X-ray photon beam. Photons with energies above 10 MeV can interact with the atomic nucleus of a high-Z material, of which the target and the head of an accelerator consist, and lead to the neutron ejection. Results and conclusions. Our neutron dosimeter, composed of the LR-115 track etch detector and boron foil BN-1 converter, was calibrated on thermal neutrons generated in the nuclear reactor of the Josef Stefan Institute (Slovenia), and applied to dosimetry of undesirable neutrons in photon radiotherapy by the linear accelerator 15 MV Siemens Mevatron. Having considered a high dependence of a cross-section between neutron and boron on neutron energy, and broad neutron spectrum in a photon beam, as well as outside the entrance door to maze of the Mevatron, we developed a method for determining the effective neutron detector response. A neutron dose rate in the photon beam was measured to be 1.96 Sv/h. Outside the Mevatron room the neutron dose rate was 0.62 μSv/h. PACS: 87.52. Ga; 87.53.St; 29.40.Wk. PMID:22933893

  8. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a broad computational accelerator physics initiative

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Cary; P. Spentzouris; J. Amundson; L. McInnes; M. Borland; B. Mustapha; B. Norris; P. Ostroumov; Y. Wang; W. Fischer; A. Fedotov; I. Ben-Zvi; R. Ryne; E. Esarey; C. Geddes; J. Qiang; E. Ng; S. Li; C. Ng; R. Lee; L. Merminga; H. Wang; D.L. Bruhwiler; D. Dechow; P. Mullowney; P. Messmer; C. Nieter; S. Ovtchinnikov; K. Paul; P. Stoltz; D. Wade-Stein; W.B. Mori; V. Decyk; C.K. Huang; W. Lu; M. Tzoufras; F. Tsung; M. Zhou; G.R. Werner; T. Antonsen; T. Katsouleas

    2007-06-01

    Accelerators are the largest and most costly scientific instruments of the Department of Energy, with uses across a broad range of science, including colliders for particle physics and nuclear science and light sources and neutron sources for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, is a broad, four-office (HEP, NP, BES, ASCR) effort to develop computational tools for the prediction and performance enhancement of accelerators. The tools being developed can be used to predict the dynamics of beams in the presence of optical elements and space charge forces, the calculation of electromagnetic modes and wake fields of cavities, the cooling induced by comoving beams, and the acceleration of beams by intense fields in plasmas generated by beams or lasers. In SciDAC-1, the computational tools had multiple successes in predicting the dynamics of beams and beam generation. In SciDAC-2 these tools will be petascale enabled to allow the inclusion of an unprecedented level of physics for detailed prediction.

  9. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a board computational accelerator physics initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.R.; Spentzouris, P.; Amundson, J.; McInnes, L.; Borland, M.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.; Wang, Y.; Fischer, W.; Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Ryne, R.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.; Qiang, J.; Ng, E.; Li, S.; Ng, C.; Lee, R.; Merminga, L.; Wang, H.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dechow, D.; Mullowney, P.; Messmer, P.; Nieter, C.; Ovtchinnikov, S.; Paul, K.; Stoltz, P.; Wade-Stein, D.; Mori, W.B.; Decyk, V.; Huang, C.K.; Lu, W.; Tzoufras, M.; Tsung, F.; Zhou, M.; Werner, G.R.; Antonsen, T.; Katsouleas, T.; Morris, B.

    2007-07-16

    Accelerators are the largest and most costly scientific instruments of the Department of Energy, with uses across a broad range of science, including colliders for particle physics and nuclear science and light sources and neutron sources for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, is a broad, four-office (HEP, NP, BES, ASCR) effort to develop computational tools for the prediction and performance enhancement of accelerators. The tools being developed can be used to predict the dynamics of beams in the presence of optical elements and space charge forces, the calculation of electromagnetic modes and wake fields of cavities, the cooling induced by comoving beams, and the acceleration of beams by intense fields in plasmas generated by beams or lasers. In SciDAC-1, the computational tools had multiple successes in predicting the dynamics of beams and beam generation. In SciDAC-2 these tools will be petascale enabled to allow the inclusion of an unprecedented level of physics for detailed prediction.

  10. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation, a Broad Computational Accelerator Physics Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.R.; Spentzouris, P.; Amundson, J.; McInnes, L.; Borland, M.; Mustapha, B.; Norris, B.; Ostroumov, P.; Wang, Y.; Fischer, W.; Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Ryne, R.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.; Qiang, J.; Ng, E.; Li, S.; Ng, C.; Lee, R.; Merminga, L.; /Jefferson Lab /Tech-X, Boulder /UCLA /Colorado U. /Maryland U. /Southern California U.

    2007-11-09

    Accelerators are the largest and most costly scientific instruments of the Department of Energy, with uses across a broad range of science, including colliders for particle physics and nuclear science and light sources and neutron sources for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, is a broad, four-office (HEP, NP, BES, ASCR) effort to develop computational tools for the prediction and performance enhancement of accelerators. The tools being developed can be used to predict the dynamics of beams in the presence of optical elements and space charge forces, the calculation of electromagnetic modes and wake fields of cavities, the cooling induced by comoving beams, and the acceleration of beams by intense fields in plasmas generated by beams or lasers. In SciDAC-1, the computational tools had multiple successes in predicting the dynamics of beams and beam generation. In SciDAC-2 these tools will be petascale enabled to allow the inclusion of an unprecedented level of physics for detailed prediction.

  11. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    SciTech Connect

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  12. Assessment of the setup dependence of detector response functions for mega-voltage linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Christopher; Simon, Tom; Simon, Bill; Dempsey, James F.; Kahler, Darren; Palta, Jatinder R.; Liu Chihray; Yan Guanghua

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of beam profiles is important for precise treatment planning dosimetry. Calculated beam profiles need to precisely replicate profiles measured during machine commissioning. Finite detector size introduces perturbations into the measured profiles, which, in turn, impact the resulting modeled profiles. The authors investigate a method for extracting the unperturbed beam profiles from those measured during linear accelerator commissioning. Methods: In-plane and cross-plane data were collected for an Elekta Synergy linac at 6 MV using ionization chambers of volume 0.01, 0.04, 0.13, and 0.65 cm{sup 3} and a diode of surface area 0.64 mm{sup 2}. The detectors were orientated with the stem perpendicular to the beam and pointing away from the gantry. Profiles were measured for a 10x10 cm{sup 2} field at depths ranging from 0.8 to 25.0 cm and SSDs from 90 to 110 cm. Shaping parameters of a Gaussian response function were obtained relative to the Edge detector. The Gaussian function was deconvolved from the measured ionization chamber data. The Edge detector profile was taken as an approximation to the true profile, to which deconvolved data were compared. Data were also collected with CC13 and Edge detectors for additional fields and energies on an Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy, and Siemens Oncor linear accelerator and response functions obtained. Response functions were compared as a function of depth, SSD, and detector scan direction. Variations in the shaping parameter were introduced and the effect on the resulting deconvolution profiles assessed. Results: Up to 10% setup dependence in the Gaussian shaping parameter occurred, for each detector for a particular plane. This translated to less than a {+-}0.7 mm variation in the 80%-20% penumbral width. For large volume ionization chambers such as the FC65 Farmer type, where the cavity length to diameter ratio is far from 1, the scan direction produced up to a 40% difference in the shaping

  13. International Linear Collider Accelerator Physics R&D

    SciTech Connect

    George D. Gollin; Michael Davidsaver; Michael J. Haney; Michael Kasten; Jason Chang; Perry Chodash; Will Dluger; Alex Lang; Yehan Liu

    2008-09-03

    ILC work at Illinois has concentrated primarily on technical issues relating to the design of the accelerator. Because many of the problems to be resolved require a working knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, most of our research projects lend themselves well to the participation of undergraduate research assistants. The undergraduates in the group are scientists, not technicians, and find solutions to problems that, for example, have stumped PhD-level staff elsewhere. The ILC Reference Design Report calls for 6.7 km circumference damping rings (which prepare the beams for focusing) using “conventional” stripline kickers driven by fast HV pulsers. Our primary goal was to determine the suitability of the 16 MeV electron beam in the AØ region at Fermilab for precision kicker studies.We found that the low beam energy and lack of redundancy in the beam position monitor system complicated the analysis of our data. In spite of these issues we concluded that the precision we could obtain was adequate to measure the performance and stability of a production module of an ILC kicker, namely 0.5%. We concluded that the kicker was stable to an accuracy of ~2.0% and that we could measure this precision to an accuracy of ~0.5%. As a result, a low energy beam like that at AØ could be used as a rapid-turnaround facility for testing ILC production kicker modules. The ILC timing precision for arrival of bunches at the collision point is required to be 0.1 picosecond or better. We studied the bunch-to-bunch timing accuracy of a “phase detector” installed in AØ in order to determine its suitability as an ILC bunch timing device. A phase detector is an RF structure excited by the passage of a bunch. Its signal is fed through a 1240 MHz high-Q resonant circuit and then down-mixed with the AØ 1300 MHz accelerator RF. We used a kind of autocorrelation technique to compare the phase detector signal with a reference signal obtained from the phase detector

  14. SEVAN particle-detector network located at Middle-Low latitudes for Solar Physics and Space Weather research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot

    A network of middle to low latitude particle detectors called SEVAN (Space Environmental Viewing and Analysis Network) is planned in the framework of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY), to improve fundamental research of the Solar accelerators and Space Weather conditions. The network will detect changing fluxes of secondary cosmic rays at different altitudes, latitudes and altitudes those constituting powerful integrated device in exploration of solar modulation effects. Surface particle detectors measure time series of secondary particles born in cascades originated in the atmosphere by nuclear interactions of the "primary" protons and nuclei accelerated in galaxy. During violent solar explosions additional particles, accelerated at sun's environments, can add to this "background" flux. If solar particles are energetic enough they also will generate secondary particles reaching earth surface. Therefore, registration of changing time series of secondary particles shed light on the high-energy particle acceleration mechanisms by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection driven shocks. Network of particle detectors located at middle-to-low latitudes is sensitive to the highest energy solar particles. The enigma of particle acceleration in supernovae remnants, super-massive black holes, clusters of galaxies can be researched using particle beams accelerated by sun and detected at earth. The shock acceleration is a universal process responsible for the same physical process (particle acceleration) on the different scales. Time series of intensities of high energy particles can also provide highly cost-effective information on the key characteristics of the disturbances of interplanetary magnetic field. Recent results on of the detection of the extreme solar events (2003, 2005) by the monitors of the Aragats Space-Environmental Center (ASEC) illustrate wide possibilities opening with introduction of new particle detectors measuring neutron, electron and muon

  15. MICE Step I: first measurement of emittance with particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Vittorio

    2012-03-01

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intending to demonstrate the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam is measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a sci-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in Li-H absorbers and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a second muon identification system measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010-11 run the beam and most detectors have been fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of a beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors has been performed. The analysis of these data should be completed by the time of the Conference. The next steps of more precise measurements, of emittance and emittance reduction (cooling), that will follow in 2012 and later, will also be outlined.

  16. MICE Step 1: First measurements of emittance using particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adey, David; MICE Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intended to demonstrate the only practical solution to prepare high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon colliders. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). It comprises a dedicated beam line to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam is measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a fibre tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in LH2 absorbers and RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a second muon identification system measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010 run the beam and most detectors have been fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of a beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors has been performed. The next steps of more precise measurements, of emittance and emittance reduction (cooling), that will follow in 2011 and later, will also be outlined.

  17. Accelerator-driven molten-salt blankets: Physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Durkee, J.W.; Perry, R.T.; Poston, D.I.

    1994-10-01

    A number of nuclear physics issues concerning the Los Alamos molten-salt accelerator-driven plutonium converter are discussed. General descriptions of several concepts using internal and external moderation are presented. Burnup and salt processing requirement calculations are presented for four concepts, indicating that both the high power density externally moderated concept and an internally moderated concept achieve total plutonium burnups approaching 90% at salt processing rates of less than 2 m{sup 3} per year. Beginning-of-life reactivity temperature coefficients and system kinetic response are also discussed. Future research should investigate the effect of changing blanket composition on operational and safety characteristics.

  18. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  19. Using a Tandem Pelletron accelerator to produce a thermal neutron beam for detector testing purposes.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Praena, J; Fernández, B; Macías, M; Bedogni, R; Terrón, J A; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Arias de Saavedra, F; Porras, I; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-01-01

    Active thermal neutron detectors are used in a wide range of measuring devices in medicine, industry and research. For many applications, the long-term stability of these devices is crucial, so that very well controlled neutron fields are needed to perform calibrations and repeatability tests. A way to achieve such reference neutron fields, relying on a 3 MV Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at the CNA (Seville, Spain), is reported here. This paper shows thermal neutron field production and reproducibility characteristics over few days.

  20. Solar neutrino physics with low-threshold dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billard, J.; Strigari, L. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2015-05-01

    Dark matter detectors will soon be sensitive to Solar neutrinos via two distinct channels: coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron elastic scatterings. We establish an analysis method for extracting Solar model properties and neutrino properties from these measurements, including the possible effects of sterile neutrinos which have been hinted at by some reactor experiments and cosmological measurements. Even including sterile neutrinos, through the coherent scattering channel, a 1 ton-year exposure with a low-threshold background free Germanium detector could improve on the current measurement of the normalization of the B 8 Solar neutrino flux down to 3% or less. Combining with the neutrino-electron elastic scattering data will provide constraints on both the high- and low-energy survival probability and will improve on the uncertainty on the active-to-sterile mixing angle by a factor of 2. This sensitivity to active-to-sterile transitions is competitive and complementary to forthcoming dedicated short baseline sterile neutrino searches with nuclear decays. Finally, we show that such solar neutrino physics potentials can be reached as long as the signal-to-noise ratio is better than 0.1.

  1. Innovative Applications of Genetic Algorithms to Problems in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia; Terzic, Balsa; Kramer, Matthew; Zvezdin, Anton; Morozov, Vasiliy; Roblin, Yves; Lin, Fanglei; Jarvis, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is a relatively new technique that implements the principles nature uses in biological evolution in order to optimize a multidimensional nonlinear problem. The GA works especially well for problems with a large number of local extrema, where traditional methods (such as conjugate gradient, steepest descent, and others) fail or, at best, underperform. The field of accelerator physics, among others, abounds with problems which lend themselves to optimization via GAs. In this paper, we report on the successful application of GAs in several problems related to the existing CEBAF facility, the proposed MEIC at Jefferson Lab, and a radio frequency (RF) gun based injector. These encouraging results are a step forward in optimizing accelerator design and provide an impetus for application of GAs to other problems in the field. To that end, we discuss the details of the GAs used, including a newly devised enhancement, which leads to improved convergence to the optimum and make recommendations for future GA developments and accelerator applications.

  2. RICH detector at Jefferson Lab, design, performance and physics results

    SciTech Connect

    E. Cisbani; S. Colilli; F. Cusanno; S. Frullani; R. Frantoni; F. Garibaldi; F. Giuliani; M. Gricia; M. Lucentini; M.L. Magliozzi; L. Pierangeli; F. Santavenere; P. Veneroni; G.M. Urciuoli; M. Iodice; G. De Cataldo; R. De Leo; L. Lagamba; S. Marrone; E. Nappi; V. Paticchio; R. Feuerbach; D. Higinbotham; J. Lerose; B. Kross; R. Michaels; Y. Qiang; B. Reitz; J. Segal; B. Wojtsekhowski; C. Zorn; A. Acha; P. Markowitz; C.C. Chang; H. Breuer

    2006-04-01

    Since 2004 the hadron spectrometer of Hall A at Jefferson Lab is equipped with a proximity focusing RICH. This detector is capable of identify kaon from pion and proton with an angular separation starting from 6 sigma at 2 GeV/c. The RICH design is conceptually similar to the ALICE HMPID RICH; it uses a C6F14 liquid radiator and a 300 nm layer of CsI deposited on the cathode pad plane of an asymmetric MWPC. The RICH has operated for the Hypernuclear Spectroscopy Experiment E94-107, which took data in the last two years. Design details and performance along with first physics results from the hypernuclear experiment are shortly presented.

  3. Position sensitive photon detectors for nuclear physics, particle physics and healthcare applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, B.

    2012-01-01

    Modern experiments in hadronic physics require detector systems capable of identifying and reconstructing all final-state particles and their momentum vectors. Imaging Cherenkov counters (RICH and DIRC) are frequently employed in nuclear and particle physics experiments. These detectors require high-rate, single-photon capable light detection system with sufficient granularity and position resolution. Several candidate systems are available, ranging from multi-anode photomultiplier tubes to micro-channel plate systems to silicon photomultipliers. Each of these detection solutions has particular advantages and disadvantages. Detailed studies of rate dependence, cross-talk, time-resolution and position resolution for a range of available photon detection solutions are presented. These properties make these photon detection systems ideal for radionuclide imaging applications. Cherenkov radiation can also be used for medical imaging applications. Two different applications using the Cherenkov effect for radionuclide imaging will be reviewed.

  4. Detector positioning for the initial subcriticality level determination in accelerator-driven systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uyttenhove, W.; Van Den Eynde, G.; Baeten, P.; Kochetkov, A.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Van Der Hagen, T. J. H. H.; Wols, F.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Thybault, H. E.

    2012-07-01

    Within the GUINEVERE project (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) carried out at SCK-CEN in Mol, the continuous deuteron accelerator GENEPI-3C was coupled to the VENUS-F fast simulated lead-cooled reactor. Today the FREYA project (Fast Reactor Experiments for hYbrid Applications) is ongoing to study the neutronic behavior of this Accelerator Driven System (ADS) during different phases of operation. In particular the set-up of a monitoring system for the subcriticality of an ADS is envisaged to guarantee safe operation of the installation. The methodology for subcriticality monitoring in ADS takes into account the determination of the initial subcriticality level, the monitoring of reactivity variations, and interim cross-checking. At start-up, the Pulsed Neutron Source (PNS) technique is envisaged to determine the initial subcriticality level. Thanks to its reference critical state, the PNS technique can be validated on the VENUS-F core. A detector positioning methodology for the PNS technique is set up in this paper for the subcritical VENUS-F core, based on the reduction of higher harmonics in a static evaluation of the Sjoestrand area method. A first case study is provided on the VENUS-F core. This method can be generalised in order to create general rules for detector positions and types for full-scale ADS. (authors)

  5. Incorporating Ideas from Detector Physics into the Physics Curriculum: from HS to College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Miso; Boston, Bernard; Carmona, Rodney; Leon, Ely; Sabella, Mel; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this project is to improve student understanding of modern physics in the undergraduate curriculum by building stronger content knowledge, reasoning and laboratory skills. This project is centered on the development of lab modules that help students move beyond theory and develop an appreciation of modern experimental physics. These modules allow students to build knowledge of subatomic particles by experimenting with detectors made of scintillator plastic, phototubes and read-out electronics. These instructional modules we are developing will permeate throughout the undergraduate curriculum forming a coherent conceptual thread. As students progress through the materials the content will become more challenging as the level of scaffolding decreases. As students complete the conceptual thread they will become versed in nuclear physics experimental techniques. In this talk we introduce the project, the detectors and the lab modules. Module one relates the kinetic energy we study in introductory mechanics to the kinetic energy of sub-atomic particles. Module two relates the principles of electromagnetism and charge from the interaction of magnets and coils to that of a sub-atomic particle moving through a detector. This project is supported by the National Science Foundation, grant number DUE-0941034.

  6. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra.

    PubMed

    Metzkes, J; Karsch, L; Kraft, S D; Pawelke, J; Richter, C; Schürer, M; Sobiella, M; Stiller, N; Zeil, K; Schramm, U

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate (~10 Hz), high power (~100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of ~1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  7. ASP2012: Fundamental Physics and Accelerator Sciences in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darve, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Much remains to be done to improve education and scientific research in Africa. Supported by the international scientific community, our initiative has been to contribute to fostering science in sub-Saharan Africa by establishing a biennial school on fundamental subatomic physics and its applications. The school is based on a close interplay between theoretical, experimental, and applied physics. The lectures are addressed to students or young researchers with at least a background of 4 years of university formation. The aim of the school is to develop capacity, interpret, and capitalize on the results of current and future physics experiments with particle accelerators; thereby spreading education for innovation in related applications and technologies, such as medicine and information science. Following the worldwide success of the first school edition, which gathered 65 students for 3-week in Stellenbosch (South Africa) in August 2010, the second edition will be hosted in Ghana from July 15 to August 4, 2012. The school is a non-profit organization, which provides partial or full financial support to 50 of the selected students, with priority to Sub-Saharan African students.

  8. The Scanning Electron Microscope As An Accelerator For The Undergraduate Advanced Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Randolph S.; Berggren, Karl K.; Mondol, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Few universities or colleges have an accelerator for use with advanced physics laboratories, but many of these institutions have a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on site, often in the biology department. As an accelerator for the undergraduate, advanced physics laboratory, the SEM is an excellent substitute for an ion accelerator. Although there are no nuclear physics experiments that can be performed with a typical 30 kV SEM, there is an opportunity for experimental work on accelerator physics, atomic physics, electron-solid interactions, and the basics of modern e-beam lithography.

  9. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

  10. Neutrino Physics with the IceCube Detector

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Kiryluk, Joanna; Kiryluk, Joanna

    2008-06-11

    IceCube is a cubic kilometer neutrino telescope under construction at the South Pole.The primary goal is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos.We describe the detector and present results on atmospheric muon neutrinos from2006 data collected with nine detector strings.

  11. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  12. Doing accelerator physics using SDDS, UNIX, and EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.; Emery, L.; Sereno, N.

    1995-12-31

    The use of the SDDS (Self-Describing Data Sets) file protocol, together with the UNIX operating system and EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls System), has proved powerful during the commissioning of the APS (Advanced Photon Source) accelerator complex. The SDDS file protocol has permitted a tool-oriented approach to developing applications, wherein generic programs axe written that function as part of multiple applications. While EPICS-specific tools were written for data collection, automated experiment execution, closed-loop control, and so forth, data processing and display axe done with the SDDS Toolkit. Experiments and data reduction axe implemented as UNIX shell scripts that coordinate the execution of EPICS specific tools and SDDS tools. Because of the power and generic nature of the individual tools and of the UNIX shell environment, automated experiments can be prepared and executed rapidly in response to unanticipated needs or new ideas. Examples are given of application of this methodology to beam motion characterization, beam-position-monitor offset measurements, and klystron characterization.

  13. Review of Basic Physics of Laser-Accelerated Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, H.; Hur, M. S.; Jang, H.; Kim, J.

    2007-07-11

    Laser-plasma wake wave can accelerate charged particles, especially electrons with an enormously large acceleration gradient. The electrons in the plasma wake wave have complicated motions in the longitudinal and transverse directions. In this paper, basic physics of the laser-accelerated electron beam is reviewed.

  14. Physical properties of a new flat panel detector with cesium-iodide technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Andreas; Penchev, Petar; Fiebich, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Flat panel detectors have become the standard technology in projection radiography. Further progress in detector technology will result in an improvement of MTF and DQE. The new detector (DX-D45C; Agfa; Mortsel/Belgium) is based on cesium-iodine crystals and has a change in the detector material and the readout electronics. The detector has a size of 30 cm x 24 cm and a pixel matrix of 2560 x 2048 with a pixel pitch of 124 μm. The system includes an automatic exposure detector, which enables the use of the detector without a connection to the x-ray generator. The physical properties of the detector were determined following IEC 62220-1-1 in a laboratory setting. The MTF showed an improvement compared to the previous version of cesium-iodine based flat-panel detectors. Thereby the DQE is also improved especially for the higher frequencies. The new detector showed an improvement in the physical properties compared to the previous versions. This enables a potential for further dose reductions in clinical imaging.

  15. Brief Introduction to the γ-DETECTOR Array at Institute of Modern Physics in Lanzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, W.; Zhang, N. T.; Liu, M. L.; Zheng, Y.; Fang, Y. D.; Zhou, X. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X.

    2013-11-01

    A new γ-detector array at Institute of modern physics in Lanzhou is now in construction. The spherical frame is designed using Solidworks, and is assembled by 4 kinds of irregular polygons. 32 detectors could be placed on this frame in maximum, which are arranged with 4-4-4-8-4-4-4 configuration.

  16. Relative Humidity in Limited Streamer Tubes for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, M.I.; Convery, M.; Menges, W.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2005-12-15

    The BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center studies the decay of B mesons created in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions. The outermost layer of the detector, used to detect muons and neutral hadrons created during this process, is being upgraded from Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) to Limited Streamer Tubes (LSTs). The standard-size LST tube consists of eight cells, where a silver-plated wire runs down the center of each. A large potential difference is placed between the wires and ground. Gas flows through a series of modules connected with tubing, typically four. LSTs must be carefully tested before installation, as it will be extremely difficult to repair any damage once installed in the detector. In the testing process, the count rate in most modules showed was stable and consistent with cosmic ray rate over an approximately 500 V operating range between 5400 to 5900 V. The count in some modules, however, was shown to unexpectedly spike near the operation point. In general, the modules through which the gas first flows did not show this problem, but those further along the gas chain were much more likely to do so. The suggestion was that this spike was due to higher humidity in the modules furthest from the fresh, dry inflowing gas, and that the water molecules in more humid modules were adversely affecting the modules' performance. This project studied the effect of humidity in the modules, using a small capacitive humidity sensor (Honeywell). The sensor provided a humidity-dependent output voltage, as well as a temperature measurement from a thermistor. A full-size hygrometer (Panametrics) was used for testing and calibrating the Honeywell sensors. First the relative humidity of the air was measured. For the full calibration, a special gas-mixing setup was used, where relative humidity of the LST gas mixture could be varied from almost dry to almost fully saturated. With the sensor calibrated, a set of sensors was used to measure humidity vs. time

  17. Physics models in the MARS15 code for accelerator and space applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.; Mashnik, S. G.; Rakhno, I. L.; Sierk, A. J.; Striganov, S.

    2004-01-01

    The MARS code system, developed over 30 years, is a set of Monte Carlo programs for detailed simulation of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades in an arbitrary geometry of accelerator, detector and spacecraft components with particle energy ranging from a fraction of an electron volt up to 100 TeV. The new MARS15 (2004) version is described with an emphasis on modeling physics processes. This includes an extended list of elementary particles and arbitrary heavy ions, their interaction cross-sections, inclusive and exclusive nuclear event generators, photo - hadron production, correlated ionization energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering, nuclide production and residual activation, and radiation damage (DPA). In particular, the details of a new model for leading baryon production and implementation of advanced versions of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM03), and the Los Alamos version of Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM03) are given. The applications that are motivating these developments, needs for better nuclear data, and future physics improvements are described.

  18. Impact of particles on the Planck HFI detectors: Ground-based measurements and physical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Ade, P.; Atik, Y.; Benoit, A.; Bréele, E.; Bock, J. J.; Camus, P.; Chabot, M.; Charra, M.; Crill, B. P.; Coron, N.; Coulais, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Fauvet, L.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Guillaudin, O.; Holmes, W.; Jones, W. C.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Macías-Pérez, J.; Martinez, M.; Miniussi, A.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pelissier, A.; Piat, M.; Puget, J.-L.; Renault, C.; Rosset, C.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Spencer, L. D.; Sudiwala, R.

    2014-09-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) surveyed the sky continuously from August 2009 to January 2012. Its noise and sensitivity performance were excellent (from 11 to 40 aW Hz-1), but the rate of cosmic-ray impacts on the HFI detectors was unexpectedly higher than in other instruments. Furthermore, collisions of cosmic rays with the focal plane produced transient signals in the data (glitches) with a wide range of characteristics and a rate of about one glitch per second. A study of cosmic-ray impacts on the HFI detector modules has been undertaken to categorize and characterize the glitches, to correct the HFI time-ordered data, and understand the residual effects on Planck maps and data products. This paper evaluates the physical origins of glitches observed by the HFI detectors. To better understand the glitches observed by HFI in flight, several ground-based experiments were conducted with flight-spare HFI bolometer modules. The experiments were conducted between 2010 and 2013 with HFI test bolometers in different configurations using varying particles and impact energies. The bolometer modules were exposed to 23 MeV protons from the Orsay IPN Tandem accelerator, and to 241Am and 244Cm α-particle and 55Fe radioactive X-ray sources. The calibration data from the HFI ground-based preflight tests were used to further characterize the glitches and compare glitch rates with statistical expectations under laboratory conditions. Test results provide strong evidence that the dominant family of glitches observed in flight are due to cosmic-ray absorption by the silicon die substrate on which the HFI detectors reside. Glitch energy is propagated to the thermistor by ballistic phonons, while thermal diffusion also contributes. The average ratio between the energy absorbed, per glitch, in the silicon die and thatabsorbed in the bolometer is equal to 650. We discuss the implications of these results for future satellite missions, especially those in the far

  19. Genetic algorithms and their applications in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hofler, Alicia S.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-objective optimization techniques are widely used in an extremely broad range of fields. Genetic optimization for multi-objective optimization was introduced in the accelerator community in relatively recent times and quickly spread becoming a fundamental tool in multi-dimensional optimization problems. This discussion introduces the basics of the technique and reviews applications in accelerator problems.

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry: from nuclear physics to dating

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.

    1983-01-01

    Several applications of accelerator-based mass spectroscopy are reviewed. Among these are the search for unknown species, determination of comogenic radioisotopes in natural materials and measurements of half-lifes, especially those of significance to dating. Accelerator parameters and techniques of importance for these applications are also considered.

  1. Diamond particle detectors systems in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, A.

    2015-04-01

    With the first three years of the LHC running complete, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond has been used extensively in beam condition monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. The lessons learned in constructing the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM), Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) and the CMS Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) all of which are based on CVD diamond with the goal of elucidating the issues that should be addressed for future diamond based detector systems. The first beam test results of prototype diamond devices with 3D detector geometry should further enhance the radiation tolerance of this material.

  2. Absolute energy calibration of the Telescope Array fluorescence detector with an electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Beitollahi, M.; Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D.; Langely, K.; Matthews, J. N.; Sagawa, H.; Shin, B. K.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.

    2013-06-01

    The Electron Light Source(ELS) is a new light source for the absolute energy calibration of cosmic ray Fluorescence Detector(FD) telescopes. The ELS is a compact electron linear accelerator with a typical output of 109 electrons per pulse at 40 MeV. We fire the electron beam vertically into the air 100 m in front of the telescope. The electron beam excites the gases of the atmosphere in the same way as the charged particles of the cosmic ray induced extensive air shower. The gases give off the same light with the same wavelength dependence. The light passes through a small amount of atmosphere and is collected by the same mirror and camera with their wavelength dependence. In this way we can use the electron beam from ELS to make an end-to-end calibration of the telescope. In September 2010, we began operation of the ELS and the FD telescopes observed the fluorescence photons from the air shower which was generated by the electron beam. In this article, we will reort the status of analysis of the absolute energy calibration with data which was taken in September 2010, and beam monitor study in November 2011.

  3. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H. PMID:18374710

  4. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  5. Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.

    1998-04-01

    We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ``tabletop`` scale is also discussed.

  6. Medical physics--particle accelerators--the beginning.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Jeremy C

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines the early development of particle accelerators with the redesign from linear accelerator to cyclotron by Ernest Lawrence with a view to reducing the size of the machines as the power increased. There are minibiographies of Ernest Lawrence and his brother John. The concept of artificial radiation is outlined and the early attempts at patient treatment are mentioned. The reasons for trying and abandoning neutron therapy are discussed, and the early use of protons is described.

  7. The High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC: Physics and Technology Challenges for the Accelerator and the Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2016-04-01

    In the second phase of the LHC physics program, the accelerator will provide an additional integrated luminosity of about 2500/fb over 10 years of operation to the general purpose detectors ATLAS and CMS. This will substantially enlarge the mass reach in the search for new particles and will also greatly extend the potential to study the properties of the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC in 2012. In order to meet the experimental challenges of unprecedented pp luminosity, the experiments will need to address the aging of the present detectors and to improve the ability to isolate and precisely measure the products of the most interesting collisions. The lectures gave an overview of the physics motivation and described the conceptual designs and the expected performance of the upgrades of the four major experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, along with the plans to develop the appropriate experimental techniques and a brief overview of the accelerator upgrade. Only some key points of the upgrade program of the four major experiments are discussed in this report; more information can be found in the references given at the end.

  8. The Time-Of-Flight Detector for RHIC/STAR and The Related Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Xin

    2006-11-02

    A full barrel Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector based on the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology will be constructed and installed in the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Several TOP prototypes with some MRPC modules were tested in the last RHIC runs and they functioned well, satisfying the requested characteristics for the TOF detector by the STAR physics. Some important physics results have been obtained using these prototypes in STAR and released to publication. With the coming full barrel TOF detector, many measurements on more penetrating probes can be made with high precision and large acceptance. The related physics which may reveal the discovery and property of Quark-Gluon Plasma will be discussed.

  9. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors: physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Chandra M.; Tanner, Michael G.; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2012-06-01

    Single-photon detectors based on superconducting nanowires (SSPDs or SNSPDs) have rapidly emerged as a highly promising photon-counting technology for infrared wavelengths. These devices offer high efficiency, low dark counts and excellent timing resolution. In this review, we consider the basic SNSPD operating principle and models of device behaviour. We give an overview of the evolution of SNSPD device design and the improvements in performance which have been achieved. We also evaluate device limitations and noise mechanisms. We survey practical refrigeration technologies and optical coupling schemes for SNSPDs. Finally we summarize promising application areas, ranging from quantum cryptography to remote sensing. Our goal is to capture a detailed snapshot of an emerging superconducting detector technology on the threshold of maturity.

  10. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  11. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for low-energetic heavy ions and their application in accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V. A.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Kiseleva, A.; Kiselev, O.; Meier, H. J.; Meier, J. P.; Shrivastava, A.; Weber, M.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2009-10-01

    The energy-sensitive detection of heavy ions with calorimetric low temperature detectors was investigated in the energy range of E =0.1-1 MeV/amu, commonly used for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The detectors used consist of sapphire absorbers and superconducting aluminum transition edge thermometers operated at T ˜1.5 K. They were irradiated with various ion beams (C13,A197u,U238) provided by the VERA tandem accelerator in Vienna, Austria. The relative energy resolution obtained was ΔE /E=(5-9)×10-3, even for the heaviest ions such as U238. In addition, no evidence for a pulse height defect was observed. This performance allowed for the first time to apply a calorimetric low temperature detector in an AMS experiment. The aim was to precisely determine the isotope ratio of U236/U238 for several samples of natural uranium, U236 being known as a sensitive monitor for neutron fluxes. Replacing a conventionally used detection system at VERA by the calorimetric detector enabled to substantially reduce background from neighboring isotopes and to increase the detection efficiency. Due to the high sensitivity achieved, a value of U236/U238=6.1×10-12 could be obtained, representing the smallest U236/U238 ratio measured at the time. In addition, we contributed to establishing an improved material standard of U236/U238, which can be used as a reference for future AMS measurements.

  12. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  13. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  14. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Schumann, M. E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 2–30 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ∼ 2 × 10{sup −48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV⋅c{sup −2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ∼ 6 GeV⋅c{sup −2} to cross sections above ∼ 4 × 10{sup −45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 × 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  15. Pixel detectors in 3D technologies for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, G.; Demarteau, M.; Hoff, J.; Lipton, R.; Shenai, A.; Yarema, R.; Zimmerman, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports on the current status of the development of International Linear Collider vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics. Initial testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second embodiment of the prototype data-pushed readout concept developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  16. CEBAF: The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and its Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mougey, Jean

    1992-01-01

    With the 4 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility presently under construction in Newport News, Virginia, a new domain of nuclear and subnuclear phenomena can be investigated, mainly through coincidence experiments. An overview of the characteristic features of the accelerator and associated experimental equipment is given. Some examples of the physics programs are briefly described.

  17. Acceleration of neutrons in a scheme of a tautochronous mathematical pendulum (physical principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Rivlin, Lev A

    2010-12-09

    We consider the physical principles of neutron acceleration through a multiple synchronous interaction with a gradient rf magnetic field in a scheme of a tautochronous mathematical pendulum. (laser applications and other aspects of quantum electronics)

  18. Physics design of an accelerator for an accelerator-driven subcritical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhihui; Cheng, Peng; Geng, Huiping; Guo, Zhen; He, Yuan; Meng, Cai; Ouyang, Huafu; Pei, Shilun; Sun, Biao; Sun, Jilei; Tang, Jingyu; Yan, Fang; Yang, Yao; Zhang, Chuang; Yang, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    An accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS) program was launched in China in 2011, which aims to design and build an ADS demonstration facility with the capability of more than 1000 MW thermal power in multiple phases lasting about 20 years. The driver linac is defined to be 1.5 GeV in energy, 10 mA in current and in cw operation mode. To meet the extremely high reliability and availability, the linac is designed with much installed margin and fault tolerance, including hot-spare injectors and local compensation method for key element failures. The accelerator complex consists of two parallel 10-MeV injectors, a joint medium-energy beam transport line, a main linac, and a high-energy beam transport line. The superconducting acceleration structures are employed except for the radio frequency quadrupole accelerators (RFQs) which are at room temperature. The general design considerations and the beam dynamics design of the driver linac complex are presented here.

  19. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  20. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-15

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  1. Accelerator Preparations for Muon Physics Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments - the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment - is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. Operating scenarios being investigated and anticipated accelerator improvements or reconfigurations will be presented.

  2. Seeing the Nature of the Accelerating Physics: It's a SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-05

    For true insight into the nature of dark energy, measurements of the precision and accuracy of the Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) are required. Precursor or scaled-down experiments are unavoidably limited, even for distinguishing the cosmological constant. They can pave the way for, but should not delay, SNAP by developing calibration, refinement, and systematics control (and they will also provide important, exciting astrophysics).

  3. Synergia: a modern tool for accelerator physics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, P.; Amundson, J.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    High precision modeling of space-charge effects, together with accurate treatment of single-particle dynamics, is essential for designing future accelerators as well as optimizing the performance of existing machines. Synergia is a high-fidelity parallel beam dynamics simulation package with fully three dimensional space-charge capabilities and a higher order optics implementation. We describe the computational techniques, the advanced human interface, and the parallel performance obtained using large numbers of macroparticles.

  4. Physics of beam self-modulation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-10-15

    The self-modulation instability is a key effect that makes possible the usage of nowadays proton beams as drivers for plasma wakefield acceleration. Development of the instability in uniform plasmas and in plasmas with a small density up-step is numerically studied with the focus at nonlinear stages of beam evolution. The step parameters providing the strongest established wakefield are found, and the mechanism of stable bunch train formation is identified.

  5. Inflationary Expansions Generated by a Physically Real Kinematic Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savickas, David

    2010-02-01

    A repulsive cosmological acceleration is shown to exist that exhibits a behavior very similar to that found in both inflationary models at the time of origin of the universe, and also in the repulsive acceleration found in present-day cosmological observations. It is able to describe an inflationary model of a radiation universe in considerable numerical detail. It is based on a method that defines the Hubble parameter H, and consequently inertial systems themselves, directly in terms of the positions and velocities of mass particles in a universe. This makes it possible to describe a mass particle's motion relative to other particles in the universe, rather than relative to inertial systems. Because of this, the repulsive acceleration is a real kinematic effect existing in the present-day universe. This definition of H cannot include the use of photon positions or velocities because H determines the velocities of receding inertial systems of galaxies, and the velocity of a photon in a distant inertial system then depends on the definition of H itself. Therefore, at the time of its origin the magnitude of H in a radiation dominated universe would be solely determined by the behavior of the relatively few mass particles that it contained while allowing for a near balance with the gravitation of the Friedmann-Lemaître model. )

  6. Accelerator physics of the Stanford Linear Collider and SLC accelerator experiments towards the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.

    1992-06-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was built to collide single bunches of electrons and positrons head-on at a single interaction point with single beam energies up to 55 GeV. The small beam sizes and high currents required for high luminosity operation have significantly pushed traditional beam quality limits. The Polarized Electron Source produces about 8 {times} 10{sup 10} electrons in each of two bunches with up to 28% polarization,. The Damping Rings provide coupled invariant emittances of 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m with 4.5 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch. The 57 GeV Linac has successfully accelerated over 3 {times} 10{sup 10} particles with design invariant emittances of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} r-m. Both longitudinal and transverse wakefields affect strongly the trajectory and emittance corrections used for operations. The Arc systems routinely transport decoupled and betatron matched beams. In the Final Focus, the beams are chromatically corrected and demagnified producing spot sizes of 2 to 3 {mu}m at the focal point. Spot sizes below 2 {mu}m have been made during special tests. Instrumentation and feedback systems are well advanced, providing continuous beam monitoring and pulse-by-pulse control. A luminosity of 1.6 {times} 10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1} has been produced. Several experimental tests for a Next Linear Collider (NLC) are being planned or constructed using the SLC accelerator as a test facility. The Final Focus Test Beam will demagnify a flat 50 GeV electron beam to dimensions near 60 nm vertically and 900 nm horizontally. A potential Emittance Dynamics Test Area has the capability to test the acceleration and transport of very low emittance beams, the compression of bunch lengths to 50 {mu}m, the acceleration and control of multiple bunches, and the properties of wakefields in the very short bunch length regime.

  7. Laser-based acceleration for nuclear physics experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesileanu, O.; Asavei, Th.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Negoita, F.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the Extreme Light pan-European research infrastructure, Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Romania will focus on topics in Nuclear Physics, fundamental Physics and applications, based on very intense photon beams. Laser-based acceleration of electrons, protons and heavy ions is a prerequisite for a multitude of laser-driven nuclear physics experiments already proposed by the international research community. A total of six outputs of the dual-amplification chain laser system, two of 100TW, two of 1PW and two of 10PW will be employed in 5 experimental areas, with the possibility to use long and short focal lengths, gas and solid targets, reaching the whole range of laser acceleration processes. We describe the main techniques and expectations regarding the acceleration of electrons, protons and heavy nuclei at ELI-NP, and some physics cases for which these techniques play an important role in the experiments.

  8. Physics at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Cardman

    2005-10-22

    The CEBAF accelerator at JLab is fulfilling its scientific mission to understand how hadrons are constructed from the quarks and gluons of QCD, to understand the QCD basis for the nucleon-nucleon force, and to explore the transition from the nucleon-meson to a QCD description. Its success is based on the firm foundation of experimental and theoretical techniques developed world-wide over the past few decades, on complementary data provided by essential lower-energy facilities, such as MAMI, and on the many insights provided by the scientists we are gathered here to honor.

  9. Accelerating Innovation: How Nuclear Physics Benefits Us All

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    From fighting cancer to assuring food is safe to protecting our borders, nuclear physics impacts the lives of people around the globe every day. In learning about the nucleus of the atom and the forces that govern it, scientists develop a depth of knowledge, techniques and remarkable research tools that can be used to develop a variety of often unexpected, practical applications. These applications include devices and technologies for medical diagnostics and therapy, energy production and exploration, safety and national security, and for the analysis of materials and environmental contaminants. This brochure by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the USDOE Office of Science discusses nuclear physics and ways in which its applications fuel our economic vitality, and make the world and our lives safer and healthier.

  10. Hadron physics at the new CW electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, V.D.

    1990-01-01

    Major trends of the physics program related to the study of hadron structure and hadron spectroscopy at the new high current, high duty cycle electron machines are discussed. It is concluded that planned experiments at these machines may have important impact on our understanding of the strong interaction by studying the internal structure and spectroscopy of the nucleon and lower mass hyperon states.

  11. SEVAN CRO Particle Detector for Solar Physics and Space Weather research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roša, D.; Angelov, Ch.; Arakelyan, K.; Arsov, T.; Avakyan, K.; Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Hovhanissyan, A.; Hovhannisyan, T.; Hovsepyan, G.; Sargsyan, D.; Hržina, D.; Kalapov, I.; Karapetyan, T.; Kozliner, L.; Mailyan, B.; Maričić, D.; Nishev, A.; Pokhsraryan, D.; Reymers, A.; Romštajn, I.; Stamenov, J.; Tchorbadjieff, A.; Vanyan, L.

    The installation of the SEVAN CRO particle detector at Zagreb Astronomical Observatory was finished at the end of 2008. The detector is a fully autonomous unit, with the capability to send data via the Internet, and it is a part of the SEVAN (Space Environmental Viewing and Analysis Network), which includes detectors located at middle to low latitudes. Till to now the SEVAN modules are installed at Aragats Space Environmental Centre in Armenia (3 units), Bulgaria (Moussala) and Croatia (Zagreb). SEVAN detectors are use for simultaneous measurements of flux of most species of secondary cosmic rays born in the atmospheric cascade caused by primary ions and solar neutrons. These devices can be used for exploration of solar modulation effects on galactic cosmic rays. The main scientific aim is to the improve research of solar particle acceleration in the vicinity of the Sun by detecting highest energy solar cosmic rays giving additional secondaries detected by surface particle detectors and to improve researches of the space environment conditions.

  12. 'Accelerators and Beams,' multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R. R.; Browman, A. A.; Mead, W. C.; Williams, R. A.

    1999-06-10

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user's rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive 'On-Screen Laboratories,' hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published (Vectors, Forces, and Motion), a fourth (Dipole Magnets) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form (Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport, and Properties of Charged-Particle Beams). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer.

  13. A Comparison of Video-Based and Interaction-Based Affect Detectors in Physics Playground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kai, Shiming; Paquette, Luc; Baker, Ryan S.; Bosch, Nigel; D'Mello, Sidney; Ocumpaugh, Jaclyn; Shute, Valerie; Ventura, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Increased attention to the relationships between affect and learning has led to the development of machine-learned models that are able to identify students' affective states in computerized learning environments. Data for these affect detectors have been collected from multiple modalities including physical sensors, dialogue logs, and logs of…

  14. Monolithic circuits for barium fluoride detectors used in nuclear physics experiments. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, R.L.; Blankenship, J.L.; Beene, J.R.; Todd, R.A.

    1998-02-01

    Custom monolithic electronic circuits have been developed recently for large detector applications in high energy physics where subsystems require tens of thousands of channels of signal processing and data acquisition. In the design and construction of these enormous detectors, it has been found that monolithic circuits offer significant advantages over discrete implementations through increased performance, flexible packaging, lower power and reduced cost per channel. Much of the integrated circuit design for the high energy physics community is directly applicable to intermediate energy heavy-ion and electron physics. This STTR project conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sought to develop a new integrated circuit chip set for barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) detector arrays based upon existing CMOS monolithic circuit designs created for the high energy physics experiments. The work under the STTR Phase 1 demonstrated through the design, simulation, and testing of several prototype chips the feasibility of using custom CMOS integrated circuits for processing signals from BaF{sub 2} detectors. Function blocks including charge-sensitive amplifiers, comparators, one shots, time-to-amplitude converters, analog memory circuits and buffer amplifiers were implemented during Phase 1 effort. Experimental results from bench testing and laboratory testing with sources were documented.

  15. Summary of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector subgroup

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, D.; Keller, S.

    1996-12-31

    We summarize the activity of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector subgroup during Snowmass 96. Members of the group: M. Albrow, R. Diebold, S. Feher, L. Jones, R. Harris, D. Hedin, W. Kilgore, J. Lykken, F. Olness, T. Rizzo, V. Sirotenko, and J. Womersley. 9 refs.

  16. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-01-01

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance. PMID:27074452

  17. Accelerator beam data commissioning equipment and procedures: Report of the TG-106 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the AAPM

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, C.-W.; Watts, Ronald J.; Ahnesjoe, Anders; Gibbons, John; Li, X. Allen; Lowenstein, Jessica; Mitra, Raj K.; Simon, William E.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2008-09-15

    For commissioning a linear accelerator for clinical use, medical physicists are faced with many challenges including the need for precision, a variety of testing methods, data validation, the lack of standards, and time constraints. Since commissioning beam data are treated as a reference and ultimately used by treatment planning systems, it is vitally important that the collected data are of the highest quality to avoid dosimetric and patient treatment errors that may subsequently lead to a poor radiation outcome. Beam data commissioning should be performed with appropriate knowledge and proper tools and should be independent of the person collecting the data. To achieve this goal, Task Group 106 (TG-106) of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine was formed to review the practical aspects as well as the physics of linear accelerator commissioning. The report provides guidelines and recommendations on the proper selection of phantoms and detectors, setting up of a phantom for data acquisition (both scanning and no-scanning data), procedures for acquiring specific photon and electron beam parameters and methods to reduce measurement errors (<1%), beam data processing and detector size convolution for accurate profiles. The TG-106 also provides a brief discussion on the emerging trend in Monte Carlo simulation techniques in photon and electron beam commissioning. The procedures described in this report should assist a qualified medical physicist in either measuring a complete set of beam data, or in verifying a subset of data before initial use or for periodic quality assurance measurements. By combining practical experience with theoretical discussion, this document sets a new standard for beam data commissioning.

  18. From electron maps to acceleration models in the physics of flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massone, Anna Maria

    Electron maps reconstructed from RHESSI visibilities represent a powerful source of information for constraining models of electron acceleration in solar plasma physics during flaring events. In this talk I will describe how and to which extent electron maps can be utilized to estimate local electron spectral indices, the evolution of centroid position at different energies in the electron space and the compatibility of RHESSI observations with different theoretical models for the acceleration mechanisms.

  19. High energy physics advisory panel`s composite subpanel for the assessment of the status of accelerator physics and technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    In November 1994, Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (OER), initiated a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to five OER programs -- High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy, and Health and Environmental Research. Dr. Krebs asked the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to establish a composite subpanel with representation from the five OER advisory committees and with a balance of membership drawn broadly from both the accelerator community and from those scientific disciplines associated with the OER programs. The Subpanel was also charged to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future research and development needs, management issues, and funding requirements. The Subpanel finds that accelerator science and technology is a vital and intellectually exciting field. It has provided essential capabilities for the DOE/OER research programs with an enormous impact on the nation`s scientific research, and it has significantly enhanced the nation`s biomedical and industrial capabilities. Further progress in this field promises to open new possibilities for the scientific goals of the OER programs and to further benefit the nation. Sustained support of forefront accelerator research and development by the DOE`s OER programs and the DOE`s predecessor agencies has been responsible for much of this impact on research. This report documents these contributions to the DOE energy research mission and to the nation.

  20. Physics design and scaling of recirculating induction accelerators: from benchtop prototypes to drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.; Callahan, D.A.

    1996-02-06

    Recirculating induction accelerators (recirculators) have been investigated as possible drivers for inertial fusion energy production because of their potential cost advantage over linear induction accelerators. Point designs were obtained and many of the critical physics and technology issues that would need to be addressed were detailed. A collaboration involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers is now developing a small prototype recirculator in order to demonstrate an understanding of nearly all of the critical beam dynamics issues that have been raised. We review the design equations for recirculators and demonstrate how, by keeping crucial dimensionless quantities constant, a small prototype recirculator was designed which will simulate the essential beam physics of a driver. We further show how important physical quantities such as the sensitivity to errors of optical elements (in both field strength and placement), insertion/extraction, vacuum requirements, and emittance growth, scale from small-prototype to driver-size accelerator.

  1. ACCELERATOR PHYSICS ISSUES FOR FUTURE ELECTRON ION COLLIDERS.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.; BEN-ZVI,I.; KEWISCH,J.; MURPHY,J.

    2001-06-18

    Interest continues to grow in the physics of collisions between electrons and heavy ions, and between polarized electrons and polarized protons [1,2,3]. Table 1 compares the parameters of some machines under discussion. DESY has begun to explore the possibility of upgrading the existing HERA-p ring to store heavy ions, in order to collide them with electrons (or positrons) in the HERA-e ring, or from TESLA [4]. An upgrade to store polarized protons in the HERA-p ring is also under discussion [1]. BNL is considering adding polarized electrons to the RHIC repertoire, which already includes heavy and light ions, and polarized protons. The authors of this paper have made a first pass analysis of this ''eRHIC'' possibility [5]. MIT-BATES is also considering electron ion collider designs [6].

  2. Current status of the SNO+ detector: preparations for first physics data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, A. R.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    SNO+ is a multi-purpose neutrino detector, which will primarily study neutrinoless double beta decay. Preparations are underway for the first phase of physics data-taking, with a water-filled detector. In terms of hardware, recent electronics repairs are described, as well as the programme which has shown to be ~90% effective in repairing failed photomultiplier tubes. Testing of Data Quality has revealed some areas in the software that could be developed further and has provided useful cross-checks of trigger behaviour.

  3. Real-time particle-detection probabilities in accelerated macroscopic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastopoulos, Charis; Savvidou, Ntina

    2015-01-01

    We construct the detection rate for particle detectors moving along non-inertial trajectories and interacting with quantum fields. The detectors described here are characterized by the presence of records of observation throughout their history, so that the detection rate corresponds to directly measurable quantities. This is in contrast to past treatments of detectors, which actually refer to probes, i.e., microscopic systems from which we extract information only after their interaction has been completed. Our treatment incorporates the irreversibility due to the creation of macroscopic records of observation. The key result is a real-time description of particle detection and a rigorously defined time-local probability density function (PDF). The PDF depends on the scale of the temporal coarse-graining that is necessary for the formation of a macroscopic record. The evaluation of the PDF for Unruh-DeWitt detectors along different types of trajectory shows that only paths with at least one characteristic time-scale much smaller than lead to appreciable particle detection. Our approach allows for averaging over fast motions and thus predicts a constant detection rate for all fast periodic motions.

  4. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  5. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  6. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics: The Physics of Magnetic Reconnection and Associated Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, James

    2010-11-01

    Solar and stellar flares, substorms in the Earth's magnetosphere, and disruptions in laboratory fusion experiments are driven by the explosive release of magnetic energy through the process of magnetic reconnection. During reconnection oppositely directed magnetic fields break and cross-connect. The resulting magnetic slingshots convert magnetic energy into high velocity flows, thermal energy and energetic particles. A major scientific challenge has been the multi-scale nature of the problem: a narrow boundary layer, ``the dissipation region,'' breaks field lines and controls the release of energy in a macroscale system. Significant progress has been made on fundamental questions such as how magnetic energy is released so quickly and why the release occurs as an explosion. At the small spatial scales of the dissipation region the motion of electrons and ions decouples, the MHD description breaks down and whistler and kinetic Alfven dynamics drives reconnection. The dispersive property of these waves leads to fast reconnection, insensitive to system size and weakly dependent on dissipation, consistent with observations. The evidence for these waves during reconnection in the magnetosphere and the laboratory is compelling. The role of turbulence within the dissipation region in the form of ``secondary islands'' or as a source of anomalous resistivity continues to be explored. A large fraction of the magnetic energy released during reconnection appears in the form of energetic electrons and protons -- up to 50% or more during solar flares. The mechanism for energetic particle production during magnetic reconnection has remained a mystery. Models based on reconnection at a single large x-line are incapable of producing the large numbers of energetic electrons seen in observations. Scenarios based on particle acceleration in a multi-x-line environment are more promising. In such models a link between the energy gain of electrons and the magnetic energy released, a

  7. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  8. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as 12C and 16O . All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the 12C (α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  9. Status and Physics Opportunities of the STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker and the Muon Telescope Detector Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qiu; Star Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The STAR Collaboration will complete the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) and the Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) upgrades by 2014. HFT utilizes the state-of-art active pixel detector technology, which will greatly enhance the STAR physics capabilities by measuring heavy quark yield, collectivity and correlations via the topological reconstruction of charmed hadrons over a wide momentum range. The MTD is based on the long Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber detector technology designed to measure muons penetrating the bulk of other detectors and the magnet yoke. It will enable STAR to study di-muon and electron-muon correlations and enhance heavy quarkonium studies. With the addition of these upgrades, STAR is well suited to perform precise measurements of production as well as correlations of rare probes (heavy flavors, dileptons) to systematically investigate the quark-gluon plasma properties at RHIC. For Run 13 63% of the MTD has been installed and data have been taken. Prototype PXL sectors (30% coverage) have also been installed and commissioned. Anticipated physics results and current status of these upgrades is reported.

  10. Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator In The Department Of Physics And Nuclear Engineering At West Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Don; Shannon, Mike; Kovanen, Andrew; Anderson, Tom; Bright, Kevin; Edwards, Ronald; Danon, Yaron; Moretti, Brian; Musk, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    The Nuclear Science and Engineering Research Center (NSERC), a Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) office located at the United States Military Academy (USMA), sponsors and manages cadet and faculty research in support of DTRA objectives. The NSERC has created an experimental pyroelectric crystal accelerator program to enhance undergraduate education at USMA in the Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering. This program provides cadets with hands-on experience in designing their own experiments using an inexpensive tabletop accelerator. This device uses pyroelectric crystals to ionize and accelerate gas ions to energies of ˜100 keV. Within the next year, cadets and faculty at USMA will use this device to create neutrons through the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion process, effectively creating a compact, portable neutron generator. The double crystal pyroelectric accelerator will also be used by students to investigate neutron, x-ray, and ion spectroscopy.

  11. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 6, Uniformly Accelerated Motion of Bodies Starting From Rest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the sixth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to the uniformly accelerated motion of bodies starting from rest. The objective is to teach students how a complete set of equations of motion is derived and how to use them. Free falling bodies near the Earth's…

  12. Using a mobile phone acceleration sensor in physics experiments on free and damped harmonic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos Castro-Palacio, Juan; Velázquez-Abad, Luisberis; Giménez, Marcos H.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2013-06-01

    We have used a mobile phone acceleration sensor, and the Accelerometer Monitor application for Android, to collect data in physics experiments on free and damped oscillations. Results for the period, frequency, spring constant, and damping constant agree very well with measurements obtained by other methods. These widely available sensors are likely to find increased use in instructional laboratories.

  13. Physical Interpretation of the Schott Energy of An Accelerating Point Charge and the Question of Whether a Uniformly Accelerating Charge Radiates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A core topic in graduate courses in electrodynamics is the description of radiation from an accelerated charge and the associated radiation reaction. However, contemporary papers still express a diversity of views on the question of whether or not a uniformly accelerating charge radiates suggesting that a complete "physical" understanding of the…

  14. Toward a physics design for NDCX-II, an ion accelerator for warm dense matter and HIF target physics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Briggs, R. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M.; Grote, D. P.; Henestroza, E.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sharp, W. M.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.; Yu, S. S.

    2009-07-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL), a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, has achieved 60-fold pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In NDCX, a ramped voltage pulse from an induction cell imparts a velocity "tilt" to the beam; the beam's tail then catches up with its head in a plasma environment that provides neutralization. The HIFS-VNL's mission is to carry out studies of warm dense matter (WDM) physics using ion beams as the energy source; an emerging thrust is basic target physics for heavy ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE). These goals require an improved platform, labeled NDCX-II. Development of NDCX-II at modest cost was recently enabled by the availability of induction cells and associated hardware from the decommissioned advanced test accelerator (ATA) facility at LLNL. Our initial physics design concept accelerates a ˜30 nC pulse of Li+ ions to ˜3 MeV, then compresses it to ˜1 ns while focusing it onto a mm-scale spot. It uses the ATA cells themselves (with waveforms shaped by passive circuits) to impart the final velocity tilt; smart pulsers provide small corrections. The ATA accelerated electrons; acceleration of non-relativistic ions involves more complex beam dynamics both transversely and longitudinally. We are using an interactive one-dimensional kinetic simulation model and multidimensional Warp-code simulations to develop the NDCX-II accelerator section. Both LSP and Warp codes are being applied to the beam dynamics in the neutralized drift and final focus regions, and the plasma injection process. The status of this effort is described.

  15. {open_quotes}Accelerators and Beams,{close_quotes} multimedia computer-based training in accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R.R.; Browman, A.A.; Mead, W.C.; Williams, R.A.

    1999-06-01

    We are developing a set of computer-based tutorials on accelerators and charged-particle beams under an SBIR grant from the DOE. These self-paced, interactive tutorials, available for Macintosh and Windows platforms, use multimedia techniques to enhance the user{close_quote}s rate of learning and length of retention of the material. They integrate interactive {open_quotes}On-Screen Laboratories,{close_quotes} hypertext, line drawings, photographs, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. They target a broad audience, from undergraduates or technicians to professionals. Presently, three modules have been published ({ital Vectors, Forces}, and {ital Motion}), a fourth ({ital Dipole Magnets}) has been submitted for review, and three more exist in prototype form ({ital Quadrupoles, Matrix Transport}, and {ital Properties of Charged-Particle Beams}). Participants in the poster session will have the opportunity to try out these modules on a laptop computer. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Accelerator-based techniques for the support of senior-level undergraduate physics laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. R.; Clark, J. C.; Isaacs-Smith, T.

    2001-07-01

    Approximately three years ago, Auburn University replaced its aging Dynamitron accelerator with a new 2MV tandem machine (Pelletron) manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). This new machine is maintained and operated for the University by Physics Department personnel, and the accelerator supports a wide variety of materials modification/analysis studies. Computer software is available that allows the NEC Pelletron to be operated from a remote location, and an Internet link has been established between the Accelerator Laboratory and the Upper-Level Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory in the Physics Department. Additional software supplied by Canberra Industries has also been used to create a second Internet link that allows live-time data acquisition in the Teaching Laboratory. Our senior-level undergraduates and first-year graduate students perform a number of experiments related to radiation detection and measurement as well as several standard accelerator-based experiments that have been added recently. These laboratory exercises will be described, and the procedures used to establish the Internet links between our Teaching Laboratory and the Accelerator Laboratory will be discussed.

  17. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-20

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton–proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This article briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  18. Resolution limitations from detector pulse width and jitter in a linear orthogonal-acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Coles, J N; Guilhaus, M

    1994-08-01

    Recent and ongoing advances in timing electronics together with the development of ionization techniques suited to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) have contributed to renewed interest in this method of mass analysis. Whereas low resolving powers (m/†m < 500) were once an almost unavoidable drawback in TOF-MS, recent developments in instrument geometries have produced much higher resolving powers for many ion sources. The temporal width of detector pulses and jitter in timing electronics, however, lead to contributions to peak widths that are essentially independent of the mass-analyzer ion optics. The effective detector pulse width (†t d ≈ 1-10 ns typically) can be a limiting factor in the development of high resolution time-of-flight (TOF) instruments with modest drift lengths (∼1 m), It also reduces the mass resolution more seriously for light ions. This article presents a method for distinguishing the instrumental "ion arrival-time" resolution (R o) of a linear TOF mass analyzer from that which is locally measured at a particular mass, limited by the broadening of the detector pulse width and electronics. The method also provides an estimate of †t d, that is useful in determining the temporal performance of the detection system. The model developed here is tested with data from a recently constructed orthogonal-acceleration TOF mass spectrometer equipped with a commercially available transient recorder (a LeCroy 400-Msamplejs digital oscilloscope) from which we obtained R o = 4240 ± 100 [full width at half maximum (FWHM)) and †t d = 3.0 ± 0.1 ns (FWHM).

  19. Induction-accelerator heavy-ion fusion: Status and beam physics issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    1996-01-26

    Inertial confinement fusion driven by beams of heavy ions is an attractive route to controlled fusion. In the U.S., induction accelerators are being developed as {open_quotes}drivers{close_quotes} for this process. This paper is divided into two main sections. In the first section, the concept of induction-accelerator driven heavy-ion fusion is briefly reviewed, and the U.S. program of experiments and theoretical investigations is described. In the second, a {open_quotes}taxonomy{close_quotes} of space-charge-dominated beam physics issues is presented, accompanied by a brief discussion of each area.

  20. Physical Activities Monitoring Using Wearable Acceleration Sensors Attached to the Body.

    PubMed

    Arif, Muhammad; Kattan, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring physical activities by using wireless sensors is helpful for identifying postural orientation and movements in the real-life environment. A simple and robust method based on time domain features to identify the physical activities is proposed in this paper; it uses sensors placed on the subjects' wrist, chest and ankle. A feature set based on time domain characteristics of the acceleration signal recorded by acceleration sensors is proposed for the classification of twelve physical activities. Nine subjects performed twelve different types of physical activities, including sitting, standing, walking, running, cycling, Nordic walking, ascending stairs, descending stairs, vacuum cleaning, ironing clothes and jumping rope, and lying down (resting state). Their ages were 27.2 ± 3.3 years and their body mass index (BMI) is 25.11 ± 2.6 Kg/m2. Classification results demonstrated a high validity showing precision (a positive predictive value) and recall (sensitivity) of more than 95% for all physical activities. The overall classification accuracy for a combined feature set of three sensors is 98%. The proposed framework can be used to monitor the physical activities of a subject that can be very useful for the health professional to assess the physical activity of healthy individuals as well as patients.

  1. Physical Activities Monitoring Using Wearable Acceleration Sensors Attached to the Body

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring physical activities by using wireless sensors is helpful for identifying postural orientation and movements in the real-life environment. A simple and robust method based on time domain features to identify the physical activities is proposed in this paper; it uses sensors placed on the subjects’ wrist, chest and ankle. A feature set based on time domain characteristics of the acceleration signal recorded by acceleration sensors is proposed for the classification of twelve physical activities. Nine subjects performed twelve different types of physical activities, including sitting, standing, walking, running, cycling, Nordic walking, ascending stairs, descending stairs, vacuum cleaning, ironing clothes and jumping rope, and lying down (resting state). Their ages were 27.2 ± 3.3 years and their body mass index (BMI) is 25.11 ± 2.6 Kg/m2. Classification results demonstrated a high validity showing precision (a positive predictive value) and recall (sensitivity) of more than 95% for all physical activities. The overall classification accuracy for a combined feature set of three sensors is 98%. The proposed framework can be used to monitor the physical activities of a subject that can be very useful for the health professional to assess the physical activity of healthy individuals as well as patients. PMID:26203909

  2. The forward sPHENIX detector design and its physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Cesar L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The PHENIX detector at RHIC is planing a complete new design to respond some of the physics questions which emerged after the recent discoveries at RHIC and LHC, namely how jets lose energy in a hot and dense medium with minimal share viscosity. Studies have been carried out also in designing a set of forward detectors (fsPHENIX) including high momentum resolution tracking, calorimetry and particle identification covering the pseudo-rapidity region of 1 < η < 4. The fsPHENIX can extends the heavy ion program performed by PHOBOS and BRAHMS in p+A and A+A collisions, deeply studying the initial state in such collisions and covering a broad baryon density phase space. Long range correlation can also be measured at RHIC for the first time. The forward region is also crucial for the spin program. Transverse spin asymmetries from Collins and Sivers effects in jets and Drell Yan yields in the unexplored large Feynman momentum xF region, where these effects are larger, would be accessible as well as small momentum fraction gluon contribution to the proton spin (ΔG). Ultimately, fsPHENIX will be the hadron detector of the future ePHENIX in the eIC RHIC era. This presentation will briefly report the physics, the design and the performance in simulations of fsPHENIX.

  3. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  4. Physical design and Monte Carlo simulations of a space radiation detector onboard the SJ-10 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Qing; Wang, Huan-Yu; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Fan, Rui-Rui; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Gao, Ming; Zhang, Yun-Long; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A radiation gene box (RGB) onboard the SJ-10 satellite is a device carrying mice and drosophila cells to determine the biological effects of space radiation environment. The shielded fluxes of different radioactive sources were calculated and the linear energy transfers of γ-rays, electrons, protons and α-particles in the tissue were acquired using A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic. Then, a conceptual model of a space radiation instrument employing three semiconductor sub-detectors for deriving the charged and uncharged radiation environment of the RGB was designed. The energy depositions in the three sub-detectors were classified into 15 channels (bins) in an algorithm derived from the Monte Carlo method. The physical feasibility of the conceptual instrument was also verified by Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  6. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  7. Physical activity recognition based on rotated acceleration data using quaternion in sedentary behavior: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y E; Choi, W H; Shin, T M

    2014-01-01

    This paper suggests a physical activity assessment method based on quaternion. To reduce user inconvenience, we measured the activity using a mobile device which is not put on fixed position. Recognized results were verified with various machine learning algorithms, such as neural network (multilayer perceptron), decision tree (J48), SVM (support vector machine) and naive bayes classifier. All algorithms have shown over 97% accuracy including decision tree (J48), which recognized the activity with 98.35% accuracy. As a result, physical activity assessment method based on rotated acceleration using quaternion can classify sedentary behavior with more accuracy without considering devices' position and orientation. PMID:25571109

  8. The social structure of experimental'' strings at Fermilab; a physics and detector driven model

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1990-12-12

    Physicists in HEP have been forced to organize large scientific projects without a well defined organizational or sociological model to guide them. In the absence of such models, what structures do experimentalists use to develop social structures in HEP In this paper, I claim that physicists organize around what they know best, the physics problems they study and the detectors and devices they study them with. After describing the advent of management'' in HEP, I use a case study of 4 Fermilab experiments as the base upon which to propose a physics and detector driven model of social structure for experiments. In addition, I show how this model can be extended to describe strings'' of experiments, where continuities of physics interests, spectrometer design, and a core group of physicists become a definable sociological unit that can exist for over 15 years. A dominate theme that emerges from my analysis is the conscious attempt on the part of experimenters to remove the uncertainties that are part of the practice of HEP.

  9. Research on acceleration method of reactor physics based on FPGA platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2013-07-01

    The physical designs of the new concept reactors which have complex structure, various materials and neutronic energy spectrum, have greatly improved the requirements to the calculation methods and the corresponding computing hardware. Along with the widely used parallel algorithm, heterogeneous platforms architecture has been introduced into numerical computations in reactor physics. Because of the natural parallel characteristics, the CPU-FPGA architecture is often used to accelerate numerical computation. This paper studies the application and features of this kind of heterogeneous platforms used in numerical calculation of reactor physics through practical examples. After the designed neutron diffusion module based on CPU-FPGA architecture achieves a 11.2 speed up factor, it is proved to be feasible to apply this kind of heterogeneous platform into reactor physics. (authors)

  10. The physics and detectors of the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    In mid-1999 the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will begin accelerating {sup 197}Au nuclei to 100 A GeV. The effective temperature in the dense region of overlap when two nuclei collide nearly head on at this energy will reach 10{sup 12} degrees Kelvin. At this temperature a basic restructuring of matter is expected to occur, in which the quark and gluon constituents normally confined in hadronic matter form a chirally symmetric deconfined plasma. There are many signatures to help isolate evidence of a transition to a deconfined phase of matter. These include, for example: (1) strangeness saturation on a time scale too short to be accounted for by strangeness exchange interactions in a hadron gas, (2) color screening (vector meson suppression) in the plasma phase, (3) in-medium effects on the mass/lifetime of the vector mesons, (4) the observation of thermodynamic/chemical equilibrium, (5) thermal radiation from a hot plasma, (6) excess heavy flavor production, (7) a discontinuity or change in the correlation between energy density and entropy density, (8) the observation of a long hadronization time, (9) disoriented chiral condensate behavior (isospin or low pt correlations). Each of the RHIC detectors is optimized for the measurement of a number of the above signatures. It is therefore possible because of the very high particle densities at RHIC for these detectors to correlate multiple observables in a single event or in a sample of events. It will thus be possible to isolate events which exhibit correlated non-statistical fluctuations in several observables simultaneously. It will be possible at RHIC to make a self-consistent measurement of the initial conditions, and in particular the gluon distribution in the nucleus. This affords optimal use of perturbative QCD in providing guidance as to the evolution of the early stages of the collision. We review the design and capabilities of the four detectors at RHIC: BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and STAR.

  11. Detector response and cosmogenic backgrounds in the exploration of rare event physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, D'Ann

    The next generation of ultra-low background physics experiments will reach energy regions and detector sensitivities beyond those previously used to solve many relevant problems of science. For instance, exploring the nature of dark matter, and answering the question of charge-parity (CP) violation of neutrinos in the lepton sector, require ultra-low background rates in the region of interest of detectors. This thesis studies two aspects related to rare event physics. First, a model of ionization efficiency was developed for low energy nuclear recoils in germanium, a common dark matter target. The fundamental physics processes of stopping power below 100 keV were investigated; it was observed that a component of nuclear stopping power contributes to ionization efficiency. To correctly interpret the experimental threshold, a reliable model for ionization efficiency is necessary. Experimental verification of this model was completed using a neutron source incident on a germanium detector. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out in parallel by another member of the research group. We used shape analysis to compare the experimental data with the proposed Barker-Mei model and an established model for ionization efficiency, Lindhard et al. with k = 0.159. We found agreement between the experimental data and the Monte Carlo simulations to within 4% for both models. Thus, we conclude that the models are valid for the range of 1 keV to 100 keV. The second component was the evaluation of cosmogenic background events from muons and muon-induced neutrons in liquid argon for a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Analytical models were developed to calculate the background event rates of cosmogenically produced nuclei, particularly 40Cl, with rock overburdens of 0.712 km water equivalent (km.w.e.) and 4.3 km.w.e. The predicted rates were compared to a Monte Carlo simulation of a liquid argon target at similar overburden depths performed by another member of the

  12. Testing and Calibration of Novel Detectors for Nuclear and Plasma Physics Diagnostic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zaheer; Haugh, Mike; Tellinghuisen, Jim; Glebov, Vladimir; Roberts, Sam; Stoeckl, Christian; Sangster, Craig

    2008-10-01

    Calibrated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond diodes, X-ray diodes (XRDs), and PIN diodes are used in nuclear and plasma physics diagnostic experiments, such as those conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Calibrations of these diodes are conducted at the OMEGA Laser at the Lab for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, as well as at the Titan Laser in the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. The OMEGA Laser is a 30-kilojoule one-nanosecond system designed for inertial confinement fusion and nuclear physics research. The Titan Laser is a picosecond system designed for plasma and X-ray studies. In addition, National Security Technologies, LLC, (NSTec) has built a new hard X-ray calibration facility (the ``HEX Laboratory''), where X-ray detector systems are also calibrated. In this paper we will present our methods of absolute and relative calibration, results of calibration, and the capabilities of the HEX Laboratory.

  13. FAD: A full-acceptance detector for physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1992-09-01

    For high energy pp collisions, the concepts ``4{pi}`` and ``full acceptance`` are distinct. At the SSC, the appropriate variables for describing phase space are the lego variables: pseudorapidity {eta} and azimuthal angle {phi}. While most of 4{pi} is covered by pseudorapidities less than 3 or 4 in magnitude, at the SSC there is very interesting physics out to {eta}`s of 9 to 12. For over a year I have been attempting to encourage an initiative at the SSC to provide a detector which could cover the missing acceptance of the two big detectors, which in particular have no appreciable charged particle tracking with good momentum resolution beyond rapidities of 2.5 or so. The nonnegotiable criteria for an FAD are for me the following: 1. All charged particles are seen and their momenta measured well, provided pt is not too large. 2. All photons are seen and their momenta are measured well. 3. The physics of rapidity-gaps is not compromised. This means angular coverage from 90{degrees} down to tens of microradians. The above criteria cannot be met on day one of SSC commissioning with the amount of funds available. But I believe a staged approach is feasible, with a lot of interesting physics available along the way. The basic philosophy underlying the FAD idea is that it should first and most be a survey instrument, sensitive to almost everything, but optimized for almost nothing. Its strength is in the perception of complex patterns individual events, used as a signature of new and/or interesting physics. Examples of such patterns will be given later.

  14. FAD: A full-acceptance detector for physics at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1992-09-01

    For high energy pp collisions, the concepts 4{pi}'' and full acceptance'' are distinct. At the SSC, the appropriate variables for describing phase space are the lego variables: pseudorapidity {eta} and azimuthal angle {phi}. While most of 4{pi} is covered by pseudorapidities less than 3 or 4 in magnitude, at the SSC there is very interesting physics out to {eta}'s of 9 to 12. For over a year I have been attempting to encourage an initiative at the SSC to provide a detector which could cover the missing acceptance of the two big detectors, which in particular have no appreciable charged particle tracking with good momentum resolution beyond rapidities of 2.5 or so. The nonnegotiable criteria for an FAD are for me the following: 1. All charged particles are seen and their momenta measured well, provided pt is not too large. 2. All photons are seen and their momenta are measured well. 3. The physics of rapidity-gaps is not compromised. This means angular coverage from 90{degrees} down to tens of microradians. The above criteria cannot be met on day one of SSC commissioning with the amount of funds available. But I believe a staged approach is feasible, with a lot of interesting physics available along the way. The basic philosophy underlying the FAD idea is that it should first and most be a survey instrument, sensitive to almost everything, but optimized for almost nothing. Its strength is in the perception of complex patterns individual events, used as a signature of new and/or interesting physics. Examples of such patterns will be given later.

  15. Applications of FLUKA Monte Carlo Code for Nuclear and Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, Giuseppe; Broggi, Francesco; Brugger, Markus; Campanella, Mauro; Carboni, Massimo; Empl, Anton; Fasso, Alberto; Gadioli, Ettore; Cerutti, Francesco; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ferrari, Anna; Lantz, Matthias; Mairani, Andrea; Margiotta, M.; Morone, Christina; Muraro, Silvia; Parodi, Katerina; Patera, Vincenzo; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Pinsky, Lawrence; Ranft, Johannes; /Siegen U. /CERN /Seibersdorf, Reaktorzentrum /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /SLAC /INFN, Legnaro /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /CERN /HITS, Heidelberg /CERN /CERN /Frascati /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /NASA, Houston

    2012-04-17

    FLUKA is a general purpose Monte Carlo code capable of handling all radiation components from thermal energies (for neutrons) or 1 keV (for all other particles) to cosmic ray energies and can be applied in many different fields. Presently the code is maintained on Linux. The validity of the physical models implemented in FLUKA has been benchmarked against a variety of experimental data over a wide energy range, from accelerator data to cosmic ray showers in the Earth atmosphere. FLUKA is widely used for studies related both to basic research and to applications in particle accelerators, radiation protection and dosimetry, including the specific issue of radiation damage in space missions, radiobiology (including radiotherapy) and cosmic ray calculations. After a short description of the main features that make FLUKA valuable for these topics, the present paper summarizes some of the recent applications of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code in the nuclear as well high energy physics. In particular it addresses such topics as accelerator related applications.

  16. GPU/MIC Acceleration of the LHC High Level Trigger to Extend the Physics Reach at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Halyo, Valerie; Tully, Christopher

    2015-04-14

    The quest for rare new physics phenomena leads the PI [3] to propose evaluation of coprocessors based on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and the Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture for integration into the trigger system at LHC. This will require development of a new massively parallel implementation of the well known Combinatorial Track Finder which uses the Kalman Filter to accelerate processing of data from the silicon pixel and microstrip detectors and reconstruct the trajectory of all charged particles down to momentums of 100 MeV. It is expected to run at least one order of magnitude faster than an equivalent algorithm on a quad core CPU for extreme pileup scenarios of 100 interactions per bunch crossing. The new tracking algorithms will be developed and optimized separately on the GPU and Intel MIC and then evaluated against each other for performance and power efficiency. The results will be used to project the cost of the proposed hardware architectures for the HLT server farm, taking into account the long term projections of the main vendors in the market (AMD, Intel, and NVIDIA) over the next 10 years. Extensive experience and familiarity of the PI with the LHC tracker and trigger requirements led to the development of a complementary tracking algorithm that is described in [arxiv: 1305.4855], [arxiv: 1309.6275] and preliminary results accepted to JINST.

  17. Unobtrusive heart rate estimation during physical exercise using photoplethysmographic and acceleration data.

    PubMed

    Mullan, Patrick; Kanzler, Christoph M; Lorch, Benedikt; Schroeder, Lea; Winkler, Ludwig; Laich, Larissa; Riedel, Frederik; Richer, Robert; Luckner, Christoph; Leutheuser, Heike; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Pasluosta, Cristian

    2015-08-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a non-invasive, inexpensive and unobtrusive method to achieve heart rate monitoring during physical exercises. Motion artifacts during exercise challenge the heart rate estimation from wrist-type PPG signals. This paper presents a methodology to overcome these limitation by incorporating acceleration information. The proposed algorithm consisted of four stages: (1) A wavelet based denoising, (2) an acceleration based denoising, (3) a frequency based approach to estimate the heart rate followed by (4) a postprocessing step. Experiments with different movement types such as running and rehabilitation exercises were used for algorithm design and development. Evaluation of our heart rate estimation showed that a mean absolute error 1.96 bpm (beats per minute) with standard deviation of 2.86 bpm and a correlation of 0.98 was achieved with our method. These findings suggest that the proposed methodology is robust to motion artifacts and is therefore applicable for heart rate monitoring during sports and rehabilitation. PMID:26737687

  18. Towards Extreme Field Physics: Relativistic Optics and Particle Acceleration in the Transparent-Overdense Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel

    2011-10-01

    A steady increase of on-target laser intensity with also increasing pulse contrast is leading to light-matter interactions of extreme laser fields with matter in new physics regimes which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transperent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a0 >10), ultra high contrast laser pulse [1] with a solid density target, turning it transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons. Thus, the interactions becomes volumetric, increasing the energy coupling from laser to plasma, facilitating a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration [3], highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime [4], and the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. Experiments at the LANL 130TW Trident laser facility successfully reached the TOR, and show relativistic pulse shaping beyond the Fourier limit, the acceleration of mono-energetic ~40 MeV electron bunches from solid targets, forward directed coherent relativistic high harmonic generation >1 keV Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) ion acceleration of Carbon to >1 GeV and Protons to >100 MeV. Carbon ions were accelerated with a conversion efficiency of >10% for ions >20 MeV and monoenergetic carbon ions with an energy spread of <20%, have been accelerated at up to ~500 MeV, demonstrating 3 out of 4 for key requirements for ion fast ignition. The shown results now approach or exceed the limits set by many applications from ICF diagnostics over ion fast ignition to medical physics. Furthermore, TOR targets traverse a wide range of HEDP parameter space during the interaction ranging from WDM conditions (e.g. brown dwarfs) to energy densities of ~1011 J/cm3 at peak, then dropping back to the underdense but extremely hot parameter range of gamma-ray bursts. Whereas today this regime can

  19. Development of a wearable motion detector for telemonitoring and real-time identification of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Che-Chang; Hsu, Yeh-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Characteristics of physical activity are indicative of one's mobility level, latent chronic diseases, and aging process. Current research has been oriented to provide quantitative assessment of physical activity with ambulatory monitoring approaches. This study presents the design of a portable microprocessor-based accelerometry measuring device to implement real-time physical activity identification. An algorithm was developed to process real-time tri-axial acceleration signals produced by human movement to identify targeted still postures, postural transitions, and dynamic movements. Fall detection was also featured in this algorithm to meet the increasing needs of elderly care in free-living environments. High identification accuracy was obtained in performance evaluation. This device is technically viable for telemonitoring and real-time identification of physical activity, while providing sufficient information to evaluate a person's activity of daily living and her/his status of physical mobility. Limitations regarding real-time processing and implementation of the system for telemonitoring in the home environment were also observed.

  20. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

  1. Acceleration-assisted entanglement harvesting and rangefinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salton, Grant; Mann, Robert B.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2015-03-01

    We study entanglement harvested from a quantum field through local interaction with Unruh-DeWitt detectors undergoing linear acceleration. The interactions allow entanglement to be swapped locally from the field to the detectors. We find an enhancement in the entanglement harvesting by two detectors with anti-parallel acceleration over those with inertial motion. This enhancement is characterized by the presence of entanglement between two detectors that would otherwise maintain a separable state in the absence of relativistic motion (with the same distance of closest approach in both cases). We also find that entanglement harvesting is degraded for two detectors undergoing parallel acceleration in the same way as for two static, comoving detectors in a de Sitter universe. This degradation is known to be different from that of two inertial detectors in a thermal bath. We comment on the physical origin of the harvested entanglement and present three methods for determining distance between two detectors using properties of the harvested entanglement. Information about the separation is stored nonlocally in the joint state of the accelerated detectors after the interaction; a single detector alone contains none. We also find an example of entanglement sudden death exhibited in parameter space.

  2. Transmutation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Klupák, V.; Sus, F.; Kučera, J.; Kůs, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-03-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  3. The D0 detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1995-02-01

    The Fermilab collider program is undergoing a major upgrade of both the accelerator complex and the two detectors. Operation of the Tevatron at luminosities upwards of ten time that currently provided will occur in early 1999 after the commissioning of the new Fermilab Main Injector. The D0 upgrade program has been established to deliver a detector that will meet the challenges of this environment. A new magnetic tracker consisting of a superconducting solenoid, a silicon vertex detector, a scintillating fiber central tracker, and a central preshower detector will replace the current central tracking and transition radiation chambers. We present the design and performance capabilities of these new systems and describe results from physics simulations that demonstrate the physics reach of the upgraded detector.

  4. Understanding of the relationship between vegetation change and physical geographic factors based on geographical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Jing; Du, Ziqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2015-12-01

    In order to analyze the effect of physical geographic factors on vegetation change in arid and semi-arid ecosystems, assess the relative role of individual physical geographic factors and the interaction between factors on vegetation changes quantitatively, this study takes the Xinjiang area as an example, uses the GIS spatial analysis technology and Geographical Detector model based on the analysis of variance to analysis the influence of physical geographic factors on the vegetation quantitatively. First of all, the spatial-temporal variations of vegetation in Xinjiang area over the last 30 years were analyzed using 1982-2011 GIMMS NDVI3g data as the indicator of vegetation activity. Secondly, the effects of mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, sunshine duration, mean annual wind velocity, DEM, slope and aspect, soil type and vegetation type were selected as potential physical geographic factors. Finally, the influence of physical geographic factors on vegetation change in Xinjiang area was analyzed using the Geographical Detector model. The results show that: (1) the annual coverage of vegetation in Xinjiang area was gradually increasing in 1982-2011 years (linear rate 0.0017/a, P=0.000). (2) the area of vegetation improvement was greater than the area of vegetation degradation. The area of vegetation improvement was mainly distributed in the northern part of the Tianshan Mountains and the Tarim Watershed, the vegetation degradation region was mainly distributed in the southern and Northeast part of Xinjiang. (3) precipitation, soil and vegetation types had the greatest influence on NDVI, followed by temperature, sunshine duration and DEM, and the other factors had little effect. (4) DEM enhanced the effect of soil type on NDVI, and sunshine duration and DEM enhanced all the effect of temperature on NDVI. So, sunshine duration and DEM can be used as the auxiliary indicator in the vegetation growth monitoring. Our results brought new insights on

  5. Free-Space optical interconnects for cable-less readout in particle physics detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Chramowicz, John; Kwan, Simon; Moretti, Tony; Sugg, Alan; Prosser, Alan; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Particle physics detectors utilize readout data links requiring a complicated network of copper wires or optical fibers. These links are both massive and costly. Upgrades to such detectors may require additional bandwidth to be provisioned with limited space available to route new cables or fibers. In contrast, free-space optical interconnects will offer cable-less readout, thereby resulting in significant reductions of material and labor. A collaborative effort between Fermilab and Vega Wave Systems is pursuing the development of a unique free-space optical link design that utilizes the transparency of silicon at wavelengths including 1310 nm and multiple wavelengths used in standard telecommunications applications such as coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM). The first step in the pursuit of that design is a proof that the concept may be viable. To that end, experiments have been performed to characterize the bit error rate performance of a prototype link over a free-space optical path and through doped silicon at multi-gigabit rates. These experiments have demonstrated that operation within acceptable bit error rates is possible using single and multiple wavelength transmission arrangements.

  6. Physics and engineering studies on the MITICA accelerator: comparison among possible design solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Pilan, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.

    2011-09-26

    Consorzio RFX in Padova is currently using a comprehensive set of numerical and analytical codes, for the physics and engineering design of the SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advancement) experiments, planned to be built at Consorzio RFX. This paper presents a set of studies on different possible geometries for the MITICA accelerator, with the objective to compare different design concepts and choose the most suitable one (or ones) to be further developed and possibly adopted in the experiment. Different design solutions have been discussed and compared, taking into account their advantages and drawbacks by both the physics and engineering points of view.

  7. Fabrication and characterisation of high resistivity SOI substrates for monolithic high energy physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddell, F. H.; Suder, S. L.; Bain, M. F.; Montgomery, J. H.; Armstrong, B. M.; Gamble, H. S.; Denvir, D.; Casse, G.; Bowcock, T.; Allport, P. P.; Marczewski, J.; Kucharski, K.; Tomaszewski, D.; Niemiec, H.; Kucewicz, W.

    2008-12-01

    Silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates offer a promising platform for monolithic high energy physics detectors with integrated read-out electronics and pixel diodes. This paper describes the fabrication and characterisation of specially-configured SOI substrates using improved bonded wafer ion split and grind/polish technologies. The crucial interface between the high resistivity handle silicon and the SOI buried oxide has been characterised using both pixel diodes and circular geometry MOS transistors. Pixel diode breakdown voltages were typically greater than 100 V and average leakage current densities at 70 V were only 55 nA/cm 2. MOS transistors subjected to 24 GeV proton irradiation showed an increased SOI buried oxide trapped charge of only 3.45 × 10 11 cm -2 for a dose of 2.7 Mrad.

  8. Physical property comparison of 11 soft denture lining materials as a function of accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Dootz, E R; Koran, A; Craig, R G

    1993-01-01

    Soft denture-lining materials are an important treatment option for patients who have chronic soreness associated with dental prostheses. Three distinctly different types of materials are generally used. These are plasticized polymers or copolymers, silicones, or polyphosphazene fluoroelastomer. The acceptance of these materials by patients and dentists is variable. The objective of this study is to compare the tensile strength, percent elongation, hardness, tear strength, and tear energy of eight plasticized polymers or copolymers, two silicones, and one polyphosphazene fluoroelastomer. Tests were run at 24 hours after specimen preparation and repeated after 900 hours of accelerated aging in a Weather-Ometer device. The data indicated a wide range of physical properties for soft denture-lining materials and showed that accelerated aging dramatically affected the physical and mechanical properties of many of the elastomers. No soft denture liner proved to be superior to all others. The data obtained should provide clinicians with useful information for selecting soft denture lining materials for patients.

  9. Tsallis entropy and complexity theory in the understanding of physics of precursory accelerating seismicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, Filippos; Chatzopoulos, George

    2014-05-01

    Strong observational indications support the hypothesis that many large earthquakes are preceded by accelerating seismic release rates which described by a power law time to failure relation. In the present work, a unified theoretical framework is discussed based on the ideas of non-extensive statistical physics along with fundamental principles of physics such as the energy conservation in a faulted crustal volume undergoing stress loading. We derive the time-to-failure power-law of: a) cumulative number of earthquakes, b) cumulative Benioff strain and c) cumulative energy released in a fault system that obeys a hierarchical distribution law extracted from Tsallis entropy. Considering the analytic conditions near the time of failure, we derive from first principles the time-to-failure power-law and show that a common critical exponent m(q) exists, which is a function of the non-extensive entropic parameter q. We conclude that the cumulative precursory parameters are function of the energy supplied to the system and the size of the precursory volume. In addition the q-exponential distribution which describes the fault system is a crucial factor on the appearance of power-law acceleration in the seismicity. Our results based on Tsallis entropy and the energy conservation gives a new view on the empirical laws derived by other researchers. Examples and applications of this technique to observations of accelerating seismicity will also be presented and discussed. This work was implemented through the project IMPACT-ARC in the framework of action "ARCHIMEDES III-Support of Research Teams at TEI of Crete" (MIS380353) of the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" and is co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national funds

  10. A 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research.

    PubMed

    Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian; Auer, Siegfried; Baust, Günter; Colette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Fiege, Katherina; Grün, Eberhard; Heckmann, Frieder; Helfert, Stefan; Hillier, Jonathan; Kempf, Sascha; Matt, Günter; Mellert, Tobias; Munsat, Tobin; Otto, Katharina; Postberg, Frank; Röser, Hans-Peter; Shu, Anthony; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Srama, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Investigating the dynamical and physical properties of cosmic dust can reveal a great deal of information about both the dust and its many sources. Over recent years, several spacecraft (e.g., Cassini, Stardust, Galileo, and Ulysses) have successfully characterised interstellar, interplanetary, and circumplanetary dust using a variety of techniques, including in situ analyses and sample return. Charge, mass, and velocity measurements of the dust are performed either directly (induced charge signals) or indirectly (mass and velocity from impact ionisation signals or crater morphology) and constrain the dynamical parameters of the dust grains. Dust compositional information may be obtained via either time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the impact plasma or direct sample return. The accurate and reliable interpretation of collected spacecraft data requires a comprehensive programme of terrestrial instrument calibration. This process involves accelerating suitable solar system analogue dust particles to hypervelocity speeds in the laboratory, an activity performed at the Max Planck Institut für Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Here, a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically accelerates charged micron and submicron-sized dust particles to speeds up to 80 km s(-1). Recent advances in dust production and processing have allowed solar system analogue dust particles (silicates and other minerals) to be coated with a thin conductive shell, enabling them to be charged and accelerated. Refinements and upgrades to the beam line instrumentation and electronics now allow for the reliable selection of particles at velocities of 1-80 km s(-1) and with diameters of between 0.05 μm and 5 μm. This ability to select particles for subsequent impact studies based on their charges, masses, or velocities is provided by a particle selection unit (PSU). The PSU contains a field programmable gate array, capable of monitoring in real time the particles' speeds and charges, and

  11. A 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research.

    PubMed

    Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian; Auer, Siegfried; Baust, Günter; Colette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Fiege, Katherina; Grün, Eberhard; Heckmann, Frieder; Helfert, Stefan; Hillier, Jonathan; Kempf, Sascha; Matt, Günter; Mellert, Tobias; Munsat, Tobin; Otto, Katharina; Postberg, Frank; Röser, Hans-Peter; Shu, Anthony; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Srama, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Investigating the dynamical and physical properties of cosmic dust can reveal a great deal of information about both the dust and its many sources. Over recent years, several spacecraft (e.g., Cassini, Stardust, Galileo, and Ulysses) have successfully characterised interstellar, interplanetary, and circumplanetary dust using a variety of techniques, including in situ analyses and sample return. Charge, mass, and velocity measurements of the dust are performed either directly (induced charge signals) or indirectly (mass and velocity from impact ionisation signals or crater morphology) and constrain the dynamical parameters of the dust grains. Dust compositional information may be obtained via either time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the impact plasma or direct sample return. The accurate and reliable interpretation of collected spacecraft data requires a comprehensive programme of terrestrial instrument calibration. This process involves accelerating suitable solar system analogue dust particles to hypervelocity speeds in the laboratory, an activity performed at the Max Planck Institut für Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Here, a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically accelerates charged micron and submicron-sized dust particles to speeds up to 80 km s(-1). Recent advances in dust production and processing have allowed solar system analogue dust particles (silicates and other minerals) to be coated with a thin conductive shell, enabling them to be charged and accelerated. Refinements and upgrades to the beam line instrumentation and electronics now allow for the reliable selection of particles at velocities of 1-80 km s(-1) and with diameters of between 0.05 μm and 5 μm. This ability to select particles for subsequent impact studies based on their charges, masses, or velocities is provided by a particle selection unit (PSU). The PSU contains a field programmable gate array, capable of monitoring in real time the particles' speeds and charges, and

  12. A 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian; Srama, Ralf; Auer, Siegfried; Baust, Guenter; Matt, Guenter; Otto, Katharina; Colette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Shu, Anthony; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Fiege, Katherina; Postberg, Frank; Gruen, Eberhard; Heckmann, Frieder; Helfert, Stefan; Hillier, Jonathan; Mellert, Tobias; and others

    2011-09-15

    Investigating the dynamical and physical properties of cosmic dust can reveal a great deal of information about both the dust and its many sources. Over recent years, several spacecraft (e.g., Cassini, Stardust, Galileo, and Ulysses) have successfully characterised interstellar, interplanetary, and circumplanetary dust using a variety of techniques, including in situ analyses and sample return. Charge, mass, and velocity measurements of the dust are performed either directly (induced charge signals) or indirectly (mass and velocity from impact ionisation signals or crater morphology) and constrain the dynamical parameters of the dust grains. Dust compositional information may be obtained via either time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the impact plasma or direct sample return. The accurate and reliable interpretation of collected spacecraft data requires a comprehensive programme of terrestrial instrument calibration. This process involves accelerating suitable solar system analogue dust particles to hypervelocity speeds in the laboratory, an activity performed at the Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Here, a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically accelerates charged micron and submicron-sized dust particles to speeds up to 80 km s{sup -1}. Recent advances in dust production and processing have allowed solar system analogue dust particles (silicates and other minerals) to be coated with a thin conductive shell, enabling them to be charged and accelerated. Refinements and upgrades to the beam line instrumentation and electronics now allow for the reliable selection of particles at velocities of 1-80 km s{sup -1} and with diameters of between 0.05 {mu}m and 5 {mu}m. This ability to select particles for subsequent impact studies based on their charges, masses, or velocities is provided by a particle selection unit (PSU). The PSU contains a field programmable gate array, capable of monitoring in real time the particles' speeds and

  13. Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon BeamAccelerators for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-09-25

    Historically, progress in particle physics has largely beendetermined by development of more capable particle accelerators. Thistrend continues today with the recent advent of high-luminosityelectron-positron colliders at KEK and SLAC operating as "B factories,"the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and theworldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider.Looking to the future, one of the most promising approaches is thedevelopment of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very highscientific potential, and would substantially advance thestate-of-the-art in accelerator design. A 20-50 GeV muon storage ringcould serve as a copious source of well-characterized electron neutrinosor antineutrinos (a Neutrino Factory), providing beams aimed at detectorslocated 3000-7500 km from the ring. Such long baseline experiments areexpected to be able to observe and characterize the phenomenon ofcharge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector, and thusprovide an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in science,namely, why the matter-dominated universe in which we reside exists atall. By accelerating muons to even higher energies of several TeV, we canenvision a Muon Collider. In contrast with composite particles likeprotons, muons are point particles. This means that the full collisionenergy is available to create new particles. A Muon Collider has roughlyten times the energy reach of a proton collider at the same collisionenergy, and has a much smaller footprint. Indeed, an energy frontier MuonCollider could fit on the site of an existing laboratory, such asFermilab or BNL. The challenges of muon-beam accelerators are related tothe facts that i) muons are produced as a tertiary beam, with very large6D phase space, and ii) muons are unstable, with a lifetime at rest ofonly 2 microseconds. How these challenges are accommodated in theaccelerator design will be described. Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon

  14. The physics of solid-state neutron detector materials and geometries.

    PubMed

    Caruso, A N

    2010-11-10

    Detection of neutrons, at high total efficiency, with greater resolution in kinetic energy, time and/or real-space position, is fundamental to the advance of subfields within nuclear medicine, high-energy physics, non-proliferation of special nuclear materials, astrophysics, structural biology and chemistry, magnetism and nuclear energy. Clever indirect-conversion geometries, interaction/transport calculations and modern processing methods for silicon and gallium arsenide allow for the realization of moderate- to high-efficiency neutron detectors as a result of low defect concentrations, tuned reaction product ranges, enhanced effective omnidirectional cross sections and reduced electron-hole pair recombination from more physically abrupt and electronically engineered interfaces. Conversely, semiconductors with high neutron cross sections and unique transduction mechanisms capable of achieving very high total efficiency are gaining greater recognition despite the relative immaturity of their growth, lithographic processing and electronic structure understanding. This review focuses on advances and challenges in charged-particle-based device geometries, materials and associated mechanisms for direct and indirect transduction of thermal to fast neutrons within the context of application. Calorimetry- and radioluminescence-based intermediate processes in the solid state are not included.

  15. 3D silicon pixel detectors for the ATLAS Forward Physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, J.; Cavallaro, E.; Grinstein, S.; López Paz, I.

    2015-03-01

    The ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project plans to install 3D silicon pixel detectors about 210 m away from the interaction point and very close to the beamline (2-3 mm). This implies the need of slim edges of about 100-200 μm width for the sensor side facing the beam to minimise the dead area. Another challenge is an expected non-uniform irradiation of the pixel sensors. It is studied if these requirements can be met using slightly-modified FE-I4 3D pixel sensors from the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer production. AFP-compatible slim edges are obtained with a simple diamond-saw cut. Electrical characterisations and beam tests are carried out and no detrimental impact on the leakage current and hit efficiency is observed. For devices without a 3D guard ring a remaining insensitive edge of less than 15 μm width is found. Moreover, 3D detectors are non-uniformly irradiated up to fluences of several 1015 neq/cm2 with either a focussed 23 GeV proton beam or a 23 MeV proton beam through holes in Al masks. The efficiency in the irradiated region is found to be similar to the one in the non-irradiated region and exceeds 97% in case of favourable chip-parameter settings. Only in a narrow transition area at the edge of the hole in the Al mask, a significantly lower efficiency is seen. A follow-up study of this effect using arrays of small pad diodes for position-resolved dosimetry via the leakage current is carried out.

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament augmentation for rotational instability following primary reconstruction with an accelerated physical therapy protocol.

    PubMed

    Carey, Timothy; Oliver, David; Pniewski, Josh; Mueller, Terry; Bojescul, John

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to present the results of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) augmentation for patients having rotational instability despite an intact vertical graft in lieu of conventional revision ACL reconstruction. ACL augmentation surgery with a horizontal graft was performed to augment a healed vertical graft on five patients and an accelerated rehabilitation protocol was instituted. Functional outcomes were assessed by the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) and the Modified Cincinnati Rating System (MCRS). All patients completed physical therapy within 5 months and were able to return to full military duty without limitation. LEFS and MCRS were significantly improved. ACL augmentation with a horizontal graft provides an excellent alternative to ACL revision reconstruction for patients with an intact vertical graft, allowing an earlier return to duty for military service members.

  17. GPU-based acceleration of free energy calculations in solid state physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Michał; Ptok, Andrzej; Crivelli, Dawid; Gardas, Bartłomiej

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining a thermodynamically accurate phase diagram through numerical calculations is a computationally expensive problem that is crucially important to understanding the complex phenomena of solid state physics, such as superconductivity. In this work we show how this type of analysis can be significantly accelerated through the use of modern GPUs. We illustrate this with a concrete example of free energy calculation in multi-band iron-based superconductors, known to exhibit a superconducting state with oscillating order parameter (OP). Our approach can also be used for classical BCS-type superconductors. With a customized algorithm and compiler tuning we are able to achieve a 19×speedup compared to the CPU (119×compared to a single CPU core), reducing calculation time from minutes to mere seconds, enabling the analysis of larger systems and the elimination of finite size effects.

  18. Beam Polarization at the ILC: the Physics Impact and the Accelerator Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aurand, B.; Bailey, I.; Bartels, C.; Brachmann, A.; Clarke, J.; Hartin, A.; Hauptman, J.; Helebrant, C.; Hesselbach, S.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchesini, I.; Monig, Klaus; Moffeit, K.C.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Riemann, S.; Schalicke, A.; Schuler, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Ushakov, A.; /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Bonn U. /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    In this contribution accelerator solutions for polarized beams and their impact on physics measurements are discussed. Focus are physics requirements for precision polarimetry near the interaction point and their realization with polarized sources. Based on the ILC baseline programme as described in the Reference Design Report (RDR), recent developments are discussed and evaluated taking into account physics runs at beam energies between 100 GeV and 250 GeV, as well as calibration runs on the Z-pole and options as the 1TeV upgrade and GigaZ. The studies, talks and discussions presented at this conference demonstrated that beam polarization and its measurement are crucial for the physics success of any future linear collider. To achieve the required precision it is absolutely decisive to employ multiple devices for testing and controlling the systematic uncertainties of each polarimeter. The polarimetry methods for the ILC are complementary: with the upstream polarimeter the measurements are performed in a clean environment, they are fast and allow to monitor time-dependent variations of polarization. The polarimeter downstream the IP will measure the disrupted beam resulting in high background and much lower statistics, but it allows access to the depolarization at the IP. Cross checks between the polarimeter results give redundancy and inter-calibration which is essential for high precision measurements. Current plans and issues for polarimeters and also energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC are summarized in reference [28]. The ILC baseline design allows already from the beginning the operation with polarized electrons and polarized positrons provided the spin rotation and the fast helicity reversal for positrons will be implemented. A reversal of the positron helicity significantly slower than that of electrons is not recommended to not compromise the precision and hence the success of the ILC. Recently to use calibration data at the Z

  19. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physics Experiments, Photonics Applications and Web Engineering, Wilga, May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the XXXth Jubilee SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonicselectronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-275].

  20. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Lifschitz, A.; Shadwick, B. A.; Malka, V.; Specka, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm-3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  1. Overview on Measured Properties of VTT's Edgeless Detectors and their use in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliopuska, Juha; Jakubek, Jan; Tlustos, Lukas

    During the past five years VTT has actively developed fabrication processes for the state-of-the-art edgeless strip and pixel detectors with a negligible dead region at the edges. The article summarizes the measured properties of VTT's edgeless detectors and gives references to the relevant journal papers. The measured properties include leakage current, breakdown voltage and capacitance dependences on the detector thickness and polarity. Earlier X-ray tube and radiation source characterization results are revised and new ones are introduced to reveal a pixel response as a function of bias voltage and pixel location in the detector's pixel matrix. Part of the article concentrates on alpha particle characterization of the detectors, especially to the pixel response properties at the edge regions of the detector. The article shows that the edgeless detectors are not losing charge collections efficiency at the edge and the spectroscopic response is comparable to the inner regions of the detector. In addition, the distortion of the electric field at the edge of the detector is almost independent on the applied reverse bias voltage.

  2. The physics of proton antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, M. )

    1991-12-03

    This paper contains information information on: accelerator and detector; QCD studies; studies of the electroweak force; The search for the top quark; {beta} physics at hadron colliders; and the search for exotic objects and prospects for the future.

  3. On the physics of waves in the solar atmosphere: Wave heating and wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1992-01-01

    In the area of solar physics, new calculations of the acoustic wave energy fluxes generated in the solar convective zone was performed. The original theory developed was corrected by including a new frequency factor describing temporal variations of the turbulent energy spectrum. We have modified the original Stein code by including this new frequency factor, and tested the code extensively. Another possible source of the mechanical energy generated in the solar convective zone is the excitation of magnetic flux tube waves which can carry energy along the tubes far away from the region. The problem as to how efficiently those waves are generated in the Sun was recently solved. The propagation of nonlinear magnetic tube waves in the solar atmosphere was calculated, and mode coupling, shock formation, and heating of the local medium was studied. The wave trapping problems and evaluation of critical frequencies for wave reflection in the solar atmosphere was studied. It was shown that the role played by Alfven waves in the wind accelerations and the coronal hole heating is dominant. Presently, we are performing calculations of wave energy fluxes generated in late-type dwarf stars and studying physical processes responsible for the heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae. In the area of physics of waves, a new analytical approach for studying linear Alfven waves in smoothly nonuniform media was recently developed. This approach is presently being extended to study the propagation of linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in stratified, nonisothermal and solar atmosphere. The Lighthill theory of sound generation to nonisothermal media (with a special temperature distribution) was extended. Energy cascade by nonlinear MHD waves and possible chaos driven by these waves are presently considered.

  4. Beam test studies of 3D pixel sensors irradiated non-uniformly for the ATLAS forward physics detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, S.; Baselga, M.; Boscardin, M.; Christophersen, M.; Da Via, C.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Darbo, G.; Fadeyev, V.; Fleta, C.; Gemme, C.; Grenier, P.; Jimenez, A.; Lopez, I.; Micelli, A.; Nelist, C.; Parker, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Phlips, B.; Pohl, D.-L.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sicho, P.; Tsiskaridze, S.

    2013-12-01

    Pixel detectors with cylindrical electrodes that penetrate the silicon substrate (so called 3D detectors) offer advantages over standard planar sensors in terms of radiation hardness, since the electrode distance is decoupled from the bulk thickness. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of 3D sensors, which culminated in the sensor production for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade carried out at CNM (Barcelona, Spain) and FBK (Trento, Italy). Based on this success, the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) experiment has selected the 3D pixel sensor technology for the tracking detector. The AFP project presents a new challenge due to the need for a reduced dead area with respect to IBL, and the in-homogeneous nature of the radiation dose distribution in the sensor. Electrical characterization of the first AFP prototypes and beam test studies of 3D pixel devices irradiated non-uniformly are presented in this paper.

  5. A nuclear physics program at the Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang-Bum

    2014-04-15

    This paper outlines the new physics possibilities that fall within the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics based on experiments with radioactive ion beams at the future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility in Korea. This ambitious multi-beam facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) and fragmentation capability to produce rare isotopes beams (RIBs) and will be capable of producing and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. The large dynamic range of reaccelerated RIBs will allow the optimization in each nuclear reaction case with respect to cross section and channel opening. The low energy RIBs around Coulomb barrier offer nuclear reactions such as elastic resonance scatterings, one or two particle transfers, Coulomb multiple-excitations, fusion-evaporations, and direct capture reactions for the study of the very neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclides. In contrast, the high energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the study of neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The proposed studies aim at investigating the exotic nuclei near and beyond the nucleon drip lines, and to explore how nuclear many-body systems change in such extreme regions by addressing the following topics: the evolution of shell structure in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; the study of the weak interaction in exotic decay schemes such as beta-delayed two-neutron or two-proton emission; the change of isospin symmetry in isobaric mirror nuclei at the drip lines; two protons or two neutrons radioactivity beyond the drip lines; the role of the continuum states including resonant states above the particle-decay threshold in exotic nuclei; and the effects of nuclear reaction rates triggered by the unbound proton-rich nuclei on nuclear astrophysical processes.

  6. Summary Report of Working Group 3: High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Gennady; Schoessow, Paul

    2006-11-27

    This report summarizes presented results and discussions in the Working Group 3 at the Twelfth Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop in 2006. Presentations on varied topics, such as laser proton acceleration, novel radiation sources, active medium accelerators, and many others, are reviewed, and the status and future directions of research in these areas are summarized.

  7. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators: Implementation of ALARA in Design and Operation of Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fasso, A.; Rokni, S.; /SLAC

    2011-06-30

    It used to happen often, to us accelerator radiation protection staff, to be asked by a new radiation worker: ?How much dose am I still allowed?? And we smiled looking at the shocked reaction to our answer: ?You are not allowed any dose?. Nowadays, also thanks to improved training programs, this kind of question has become less frequent, but it is still not always easy to convince workers that staying below the exposure limits is not sufficient. After all, radiation is still the only harmful agent for which this is true: for all other risks in everyday life, from road speed limits to concentration of hazardous chemicals in air and water, compliance to regulations is ensured by keeping below a certain value. It appears that a tendency is starting to develop to extend the radiation approach to other pollutants (1), but it will take some time before the new attitude makes it way into national legislations.

  8. PEGASYS/Mark II: A program of internal target physics using the Mark II detector at the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This document is a proposal to SLAC on behalf of the PEGASYS Collaboration for a program of internal target physics at PEP utilizing the Mark A detector. Having completed its tour of duty at SLC in November 1990, we propose that the Mark A detector be returned to the PEP storage ring, where it will be used in conjunction with a long gas target for studies of QCD with nucleon and nuclear targets, as well as tests of QED in lepton pair production, and a search for new neutral bosons. We expect that the detector in its new configuration could be commissioned by late 1991 and begin taking data by 1992. This document presents the physics to be accomplished with the Mark A, and describes the minimal changes to the detector that we will need to make it function for internal target experiments. We also show a possible timeline for the project, and indicate the makeup of the collaboration that will carry out the work.

  9. On the physics of waves in the solar atmosphere: Wave heating and wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents work performed on the generation and physics of acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. The investigators have incorporated spatial and temporal turbulent energy spectra in a newly corrected version of the Lighthill-Stein theory of acoustic wave generation in order to calculate the acoustic wave energy fluxes generated in the solar convective zone. The investigators have also revised and improved the treatment of the generation of magnetic flux tube waves, which can carry energy along the tubes far away from the region of their origin, and have calculated the tube wave energy fluxes for the sun. They also examine the transfer of the wave energy originated in the solar convective zone to the outer atmospheric layers through computation of wave propagation and dissipation in highly nonhomogeneous solar atmosphere. These waves may efficiently heat the solar atmosphere and the heating will be especially significant in the chromospheric network. It is also shown that the role played by Alfven waves in solar wind acceleration and coronal hole heating is dominant. The second part of the project concerned investigation of wave propagation in highly inhomogeneous stellar atmospheres using an approach based on an analytic tool developed by Musielak, Fontenla, and Moore. In addition, a new technique based on Dirac equations has been developed to investigate coupling between different MHD waves propagating in stratified stellar atmospheres.

  10. On the physics of waves in the solar atmosphere: Wave heating and wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents work performed on the generation and physics of acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. The investigators have incorporated spatial and temporal turbulent energy spectra in a newly corrected version of the Lighthill-Stein theory of acoustic wave generation in order to calculate the acoustic wave energy fluxes generated in the solar convective zone. The investigators have also revised and improved the treatment of the generation of magnetic flux tube waves, which can carry energy along the tubes far away from the region of their origin, and have calculated the tube energy fluxes for the sun. They also examine the transfer of the wave energy originated in the solar convective zone to the outer atmospheric layers through computation of wave propagation and dissipation in highly nonhomogeneous solar atmosphere. These waves may efficiently heat the solar atmosphere and the heating will be especially significant in the chromospheric network. It is also shown that the role played by Alfven waves in solar wind acceleration and coronal hole heating is dominant. The second part of the project concerned investigation of wave propagation in highly inhomogeneous stellar atmospheres using an approach based on an analytic tool developed by Musielak, Fontenla, and Moore. In addition, a new technique based on Dirac equations has been developed to investigate coupling between different MHD waves propagating in stratified stellar atmospheres.

  11. Detector Noise Susceptibility Issues for the Future Generation of High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arteche, F.; Esteban, C.; Iglesias, M.; Rivetta, C.; Arcega, F.J.; /Zaragoza U.

    2011-11-22

    The front-end electronics (FEE) noise characterization to electromagnetic interference and the compatibility of the different subsystems are important topics to consider for the LHC calorimeter upgrades. A new power distribution scheme based on switching power converters is under study and will define a noticeable noise source very close to the detector's FEE. Knowledge and experience with both FFE noise and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) issues from previous detectors are important conditions to guarantee the design goals and the good functionality of the upgraded LHC detectors. This paper shows an overview of the noise susceptibility studies performed in different CMS subdetectors. The impact of different FEE topologies in the final sensitivity to electromagnetic interference of the subsystem is analyzed and design recommendations are presented to increase the EMC of the detectors to the future challenging power distribution topologies.

  12. Evaluation of ‘OpenCL for FPGA’ for Data Acquisition and Acceleration in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Srikanth

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the data acquisition and processing needs of High Energy Physics experiments has made it more essential to use FPGAs to meet those needs. However harnessing the capabilities of the FPGAs has been hard for anyone but expert FPGA developers. The arrival of OpenCL with the two major FPGA vendors supporting it, offers an easy software-based approach to taking advantage of FPGAs in applications such as High Energy Physics. OpenCL is a language for using heterogeneous architectures in order to accelerate applications. However, FPGAs are capable of far more than acceleration, hence it is interesting to explore if OpenCL can be used to take advantage of FPGAs for more generic applications. To answer these questions, especially in the context of High Energy Physics, two applications, a DAQ module and an acceleration workload, were tested for implementation with OpenCL on FPGAs2. The challenges on using OpenCL for a DAQ application and their solutions, together with the performance of the OpenCL based acceleration are discussed. Many of the design elements needed to realize a DAQ system in OpenCL already exists, mostly as FPGA vendor extensions, but a small number of elements were found to be missing. For acceleration of OpenCL applications, using FPGAs has become as easy as using GPUs. OpenCL has the potential for a massive gain in productivity and ease of use enabling non FPGA experts to design, debug and maintain the code. Also, FPGA power consumption is much lower than other implementations. This paper describes one of the first attempts to explore the use of OpenCL for applications outside the acceleration workloads.

  13. Low-cost bump-bonding processes for high energy physics pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Blank, T.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Husemann, U.; Kudella, S.; Weber, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the next generation of collider experiments detectors will be challenged by unprecedented particle fluxes. Thus large detector arrays of highly pixelated detectors with minimal dead area will be required at reasonable costs. Bump-bonding of pixel detectors has been shown to be a major cost-driver. KIT is one of five production centers of the CMS barrel pixel detector for the Phase I Upgrade. In this contribution the SnPb bump-bonding process and the production yield is reported. In parallel to the production of the new CMS pixel detector, several alternatives to the expensive photolithography electroplating/electroless metal deposition technologies are developing. Recent progress and challenges faced in the development of bump-bonding technology based on gold-stud bonding by thin (15 μm) gold wire is presented. This technique allows producing metal bumps with diameters down to 30 μm without using photolithography processes, which are typically required to provide suitable under bump metallization. The short setup time for the bumping process makes gold-stud bump-bonding highly attractive (and affordable) for the flip-chipping of single prototype ICs, which is the main limitation of the current photolithography processes.

  14. Avalanche Effect in Si Heavily Irradiated Detectors: Physical Model and Perspectives for Application

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin V.; Li Z.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Harkonen, J.

    2011-05-07

    The model explaining an enhanced collected charge in detectors irradiated to 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} is developed. This effect was first revealed in heavily irradiated n-on-p detectors operated at high bias voltage ranging from 900 to 1700 V. The model is based on the fundamental effect of carrier avalanche multiplication in the space charge region and in our case is extended with a consideration of p-n junctions with a high concentration of the deep levels. It is shown that the efficient trapping of free carriers from the bulk generation current to the deep levels of radiation induced defects leads to the stabilization of the irradiated detector operation in avalanche multiplication mode due to the reduction of the electric field at the junction. The charge collection efficiency and the detector reverse current dependences on the applied bias have been numerically simulated in this study and they well correlate to the recent experimental results of CERN RD50 collaboration. The developed model of enhanced collected charge predicts a controllable operation of heavily irradiated detectors that is promising for the detector application in the upcoming experiments in a high luminosity collider.

  15. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction-acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2016-04-01

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction-acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  16. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Margarone, D.; Prokupek, J.; Rus, B.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Picciotto, A.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Mocek, T.; Ullschmied, J.

    2011-05-15

    Multi-MeV beams of light ions have been produced using the 300 picosecond, kJ-class iodine laser, operating at the Prague Asterix Laser System facility in Prague. Real-time ion diagnostics have been performed by the use of various time-of-flight (TOF) detectors: ion collectors (ICs) with and without absorber thin films, new prototypes of single-crystal diamond and silicon carbide detectors, and an electrostatic ion mass spectrometer (IEA). In order to suppress the long photopeak induced by soft X-rays and to avoid the overlap with the signal from ultrafast particles, the ICs have been shielded with Al foil filters. The application of large-bandgap semiconductor detectors (>3 eV) ensured cutting of the plasma-emitted visible and soft-UV radiation and enhancing the sensitivity to the very fast proton/ion beams. Employing the IEA spectrometer, various ion species and charge states in the expanding laser-plasma have been determined. Processing of the experimental data based on the TOF technique, including estimation of the plasma fast proton maximum and peak energy, ion beam currents and total charge, total number of fast protons, as well as deconvolution processes, ion stopping power, and ion/photon transmission calculations for the different metallic filters used, are reported.

  17. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato a.; Benitez, Narciso; Moles, Mariano; Sodre, Laerte; J-PAS Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Astrophysical Observatory in Spain with a dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7deg^2 camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in 2016, J-PAS will observe 8600 deg^2 of the Northern Sky and measure 0.003(1+z) precision photometric redshifts for nearly 1E08 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ~14 Gpc^3 up to z = 1.3. J-PAS will also detect and measure the mass of more than a hundred thousand galaxy clusters, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements.The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach the combination of 54 145°A filters, placed 100°A apart, and a multi-degree field of view (FOV) which makes it a powerful “redshift machine”, with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. Moreover, since the J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7deg^2 “IFU”, it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations. J-PAS will have a lasting legacy value in many areas of Astrophysics, serving as a fundamental dataset for future Cosmological projects.Here, we present the overall description, status and scientific potential of the survey.

  18. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato A.; Benitez, Narciso; Moles, Mariano; Sodre, Laerte; Irwin, Jimmy; J-PAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Astrophysical Observatory in Spain with a dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7deg^2 camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in 2016, J-PAS will observe 8600 deg^2 of the Northern Sky and measure 0.003(1+z) precision photometric redshifts for nearly 1E08 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ~14 Gpc^3 up to z = 1.3. J-PAS will also detect and measure the mass of more than a hundred thousand galaxy clusters, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements.The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach the combination of 54 145°A filters, placed 100°A apart, and a multi-degree field of view (FOV) which makes it a powerful "redshift machine", with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. Moreover, since the J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7deg^2 "IFU", it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations. J-PAS will have a lasting legacy value in many areas of Astrophysics, serving as a fundamental dataset for future Cosmological projects.Here, we present the overall description, status and scientific potential of the survey.

  19. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  20. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  1. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  2. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Alexander; Tabbert, Bernd

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities - from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  3. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  4. Optical Wireless Communication system for particle detectors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, W.; Corsini, R.; Ciaramella, E.; Dell`Orso, R.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.

    2016-07-01

    Optical Wireless Communication (OWC) system for particles detector can be a viable solution for reducing the complexity of the optical fibre network used to extract the data from the detector. In this work we present the initial study of the tolerance to misalignment for the OWC system under investigation. We observed that using collimators of beam waist from 0.35 mm to 3.5 mm we can obtain tolerance in range from ± 0.25 mm to ± 0.8 mm. We also observed using ray trace simulation that both transmitting power and tolerance can be improved by using optimized lens at the receiver having VCSEL as transmitting source.

  5. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the {open_quotes}construction{close_quotes} of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc.

  6. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  7. The future of tau physics and tau-charm detector and factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1991-02-01

    Future research on the tau lepton requires large statistics, thorough investigation of systematic errors, and direct experimental knowledge of backgrounds. Only a tau-charm factory with a specially designed detector can provide all the experimental conditions to meet these requirements. This paper is a summary of three lectures delivered at the 1991 Lake Louise Winter Institute.

  8. Externally-Modulated Electro-Optically Coupled Detector Architecture for Nuclear Physics Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Wenze; McKisson, John E.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zhang, Shukui; Zorn, Carl J.

    2014-06-01

    A new laser-based externally-modulated electro-optically coupled detector (EOCD) architecture is being developed to enable high-density readout for radiation detectors with accurate analog radiation pulse shape and timing preservation. Unlike digital conversion before electro-optical modulation, the EOCD implements complete analog optical signal modulation and multiplexing in its detector front-end. The result is a compact, high performance detector readout that can be both radiation tolerant and immune to magnetic fields. In this work, the feasibility of EOCD was explored by constructing a two-wavelength laser-based externally-modulated EOCD, and testing analog pulse shape preservation and wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) crosstalk. Comparisons were first made between the corresponding initial pulses and the electro-optically coupled analog pulses. This confirmed an excellent analog pulse preservation over $ sim {hbox {29}}% $ of the modulator’s switching voltage range. Optical spectrum analysis revealed less than $-{hbox {14}}~hbox{dB}$ crosstalk with 1.2 nm WDM wavelength bandgap, and provided insight on experimental conditions that could lead to increased inter-wavelength crosstalk. Further discussions and previous research on the radiation tolerance and magnetic field immunity of the candidate materials were also given, and quantitative device testing is proposed in the future.

  9. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  10. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  11. J-PAS: The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepa, J.; Benítez, N.; Dupke, R.; Moles, M.; Sodré, L.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín-Franch, A.; Taylor, K.; Cristóbal, D.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Abramo, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Overzier, R.; Hernández-Monteagudo, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Kanaan, A.; Carvano, M.; Reis, R. R. R.; J-PAS Team

    2016-10-01

    The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Observatory in Spain with a purpose-built, dedicated 2.5 m telescope and a 4.7 sq.deg. camera with 1.2 Gpix. Starting in late 2016, J-PAS will observe 8500 sq.deg. of Northern Sky and measure Δz˜0.003(1+z) photo-z for 9× 107 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ˜ 14 Gpc3 up to z=1.3 and becoming the first radial BAO experiment to reach Stage IV. J-PAS will detect 7× 105 galaxy clusters and groups, setting constraints on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from its BAO measurements. Thanks to the superb characteristics of the site (seeing ˜ 0.7 arcsec), J-PAS is expected to obtain a deep, sub-arcsec image of the Northern sky, which combined with its unique photo-z precision will produce one of the most powerful cosmological lensing surveys before the arrival of Euclid. J-PAS's unprecedented spectral time domain information will enable a self-contained SN survey that, without the need for external spectroscopic follow-up, will detect, classify and measure σz˜ 0.5 redshifts for ˜ 4000 SNeIa and ˜ 900 core-collapse SNe. The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach: a contiguous system of 54 filters with 145 Å width, placed 100 Å apart over a multi-degree FoV is a powerful redshift machine, with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. The J-PAS camera is equivalent to a 4.7 sq.deg. IFU and it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations.

  12. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Bennett, N. L.; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Rovang, D. C.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated by the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator's water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator's physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations

  13. The precise energy spectra measurement of laser-accelerated MeV/n-class high-Z ions and protons using CR-39 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasaki, M.; Jinno, S.; Sakaki, H.; Kondo, K.; Oda, K.; Yamauchi, T.; Fukuda, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis method, using a combination of a permanent magnet and CR-39 track detectors, has been developed to separately measure the energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated MeV/n-class high-Z ions and that of MeV protons. The main role of magnet is separating between high-Z ions and protons, not for the usual energy spectrometer, while ion energy was precisely determined from careful analysis of the etch pit shapes and the etch pit growth behaviors in the CR-39. The method was applied to laser-driven ion acceleration experiments using CO2 clusters embedded in a background H2 gas. Ion energy spectra with uncertainty ΔE  =  0.1 MeV n-1 for protons and carbon/oxygen ions were simultaneously obtained separately. The maximum energies of carbon/oxygen ions and protons were determined as 1.1  ±  0.1 MeV and 1.6  ±  0.1 MeV n-1, respectively. The sharp decrease around 1 MeV n-1 observed in the energy spectrum of carbon/oxygen ions could be due to a trace of the ambipolar hydrodynamic expansion of CO2 clusters. Thanks to the combination of the magnet and the CR-39, the method is robust against electromagnetic pulse (EMP).

  14. Web-based, GPU-accelerated, Monte Carlo simulation and visualization of indirect radiation imaging detector performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Han; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo simulations play a vital role in the understanding of the fundamental limitations, design, and optimization of existing and emerging medical imaging systems. Efforts in this area have resulted in the development of a wide variety of open-source software packages. One such package, hybridMANTIS, uses a novel hybrid concept to model indirect scintillator detectors by balancing the computational load using dual CPU and graphics processing unit (GPU) processors, obtaining computational efficiency with reasonable accuracy. In this work, the authors describe two open-source visualization interfaces, webMANTIS and visualMANTIS to facilitate the setup of computational experiments via hybridMANTIS. Methods: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS enable the user to control simulation properties through a user interface. In the case of webMANTIS, control via a web browser allows access through mobile devices such as smartphones or tablets. webMANTIS acts as a server back-end and communicates with an NVIDIA GPU computing cluster that can support multiuser environments where users can execute different experiments in parallel. Results: The output consists of point response and pulse-height spectrum, and optical transport statistics generated by hybridMANTIS. The users can download the output images and statistics through a zip file for future reference. In addition, webMANTIS provides a visualization window that displays a few selected optical photon path as they get transported through the detector columns and allows the user to trace the history of the optical photons. Conclusions: The visualization tools visualMANTIS and webMANTIS provide features such as on the fly generation of pulse-height spectra and response functions for microcolumnar x-ray imagers while allowing users to save simulation parameters and results from prior experiments. The graphical interfaces simplify the simulation setup and allow the user to go directly from specifying

  15. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division, semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory in the following areas: Experimental High Energy Physics; Theoretical High Energy Physics; Experimental Facilities Research; Accelerator Research and Development; and SSC Detector Research and Development.

  16. Physical Property Changes in Plutonium from Accelerated Aging using Pu-238 Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, B W; Choi, B W; Saw, C K; Thompson, S R; Woods, C H; Hopkins, D J; Ebbinghaus, B B

    2006-12-20

    We present changes in volume, immersion density, and tensile properties observed from accelerated aged plutonium alloys. Accelerated alloys (or spiked alloys) are plutonium alloys enriched with approximately 7.5 weight percent of the faster-decaying {sup 238}Pu to accelerate the aging process by approximately 17 times the rate of unaged weapons-grade plutonium. After sixty equivalent years of aging on spiked alloys, the dilatometry shows the samples at 35 C have swelled in volume by 0.15 to 0.17 % and now exhibit a near linear volume increase due to helium in-growth. The immersion density of spiked alloys shows a decrease in density, similar normalized volumetric changes (expansion) for spiked alloys. Tensile tests show increasing yield and engineering ultimate strength as spiked alloys are aged.

  17. A Treasure Trove of Physics from a Common Source-Automobile Acceleration Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graney, Christopher M.

    2005-11-01

    What is better than interesting, challenging physics with good data free for the taking to which everyone can relate? That's what is available to anyone who digs into the reams of automobile performance tests that have been available in popular magazines since the 1950s. Opportunities to do and teach interesting physics abound, as evidenced by the frequent appearance of "physics of cars" articles in The Physics Teacher.1-6

  18. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. L.; Hua, J. F.; Wu, Y. P.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wan, Y.; Pai, C.-H.; Lu, W.; An, W.; Yu, P.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-03-01

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  19. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  20. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles. PMID:27058082

  1. Conceptual design of a 1013 -W pulsed-power accelerator for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Ao, T.; Benage, J. F.; Breden, E. W.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Davis, J.-P.; Ennis, J. B.; Gard, P. D.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Haill, T. A.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jones, P. A.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Lucero, D. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moore, J. K.; Mulville, T. D.; Muron, D. J.; Root, S.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Spielman, R. B.; Waisman, E. M.; Wisher, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a conceptual design of a next-generation pulsed-power accelerator that is optimized for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments. Sufficient electrical energy is delivered by the accelerator to a physics load to achieve—within centimeter-scale samples—material pressures as high as 1 TPa. The accelerator design is based on an architecture that is founded on three concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression, impedance matching, and transit-time-isolated drive circuits. The prime power source of the accelerator consists of 600 independent impedance-matched Marx generators. Each Marx comprises eight 5.8-GW bricks connected electrically in series, and generates a 100-ns 46-GW electrical-power pulse. A 450-ns-long water-insulated coaxial-transmission-line impedance transformer transports the power generated by each Marx to a system of twelve 2.5-m-radius water-insulated conical transmission lines. The conical lines are connected electrically in parallel at a 66-cm radius by a water-insulated 45-post sextuple-post-hole convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the conical lines, and delivers the combined current to a single solid-dielectric-insulated radial transmission line. The radial line in turn transmits the combined current to the load. Since much of the accelerator is water insulated, we refer to it as Neptune. Neptune is 40 m in diameter, stores 4.8 MJ of electrical energy in its Marx capacitors, and generates 28 TW of peak electrical power. Since the Marxes are transit-time isolated from each other for 900 ns, they can be triggered at different times to construct-over an interval as long as 1 μ s -the specific load-current time history required for a given experiment. Neptune delivers 1 MJ and 20 MA in a 380-ns current pulse to an 18 -m Ω load; hence Neptune is a megajoule-class 20-MA arbitrary waveform generator. Neptune will allow the international scientific community to conduct dynamic

  2. Shlaer-Mellor object-oriented analysis and recursive design, an effective modern software development method for development of computing systems for a large physics detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, T.; Carey, T.A.; Maguire, C.F.

    1995-10-01

    After evaluation of several modern object-oriented methods for development of the computing systems for the PHENIX detector at RHIC, we selected the Shlaer-Mellor Object-Oriented Analysis and Recursive Design method as the most appropriate for the needs and development environment of a large nuclear or high energy physics detector. This paper discusses our specific needs and environment, our method selection criteria, and major features and components of the Shlaer-Mellor method.

  3. Effect of physical training in cool and hot environments on +Gz acceleration tolerance in women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Acceleration tolerance, plasma volume, and maximal oxygen uptake were measured in 15 healthy women before and after submaximal isotonic exercise training periods in cool and hot environments. The women were divided on the basis of age, maximal oxygen uptake, and +Gz tolerance into three groups: a group that exercised in heat (40.6 C), a group that exercised at a lower temperature (18.7 C), and a sedentary control group that functioned in the cool environment. There was no significant change in the +Gz tolerance in any group after training, and terminal heart rates were similar within each group. It is concluded that induction of moderate acclimation responses without increases in sweat rate or resting plasma volume has no influence on +Gz acceleration tolerance in women.

  4. Plasma physics. Stochastic electron acceleration during spontaneous turbulent reconnection in a strong shock wave.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Amano, T; Kato, T N; Hoshino, M

    2015-02-27

    Explosive phenomena such as supernova remnant shocks and solar flares have demonstrated evidence for the production of relativistic particles. Interest has therefore been renewed in collisionless shock waves and magnetic reconnection as a means to achieve such energies. Although ions can be energized during such phenomena, the relativistic energy of the electrons remains a puzzle for theory. We present supercomputer simulations showing that efficient electron energization can occur during turbulent magnetic reconnection arising from a strong collisionless shock. Upstream electrons undergo first-order Fermi acceleration by colliding with reconnection jets and magnetic islands, giving rise to a nonthermal relativistic population downstream. These results shed new light on magnetic reconnection as an agent of energy dissipation and particle acceleration in strong shock waves. PMID:25722406

  5. Particle Detectors Subatomic Bomb Squad

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-29

    The manner in which particle physicists investigate collisions in particle accelerators is a puzzling process. Using vaguely-defined “detectors,” scientists are able to somehow reconstruct the collisions and convert that information into physics measurements. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln sheds light on this mysterious technique. In a surprising analogy, he draws a parallel between experimental particle physics and bomb squad investigators and uses an explosive example to illustrate his points. Be sure to watch this video… it’s totally the bomb.

  6. Particle Detectors Subatomic Bomb Squad

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The manner in which particle physicists investigate collisions in particle accelerators is a puzzling process. Using vaguely-defined “detectors,” scientists are able to somehow reconstruct the collisions and convert that information into physics measurements. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln sheds light on this mysterious technique. In a surprising analogy, he draws a parallel between experimental particle physics and bomb squad investigators and uses an explosive example to illustrate his points. Be sure to watch this video… it’s totally the bomb.

  7. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Rovang, D. C.

    2015-11-30

    Here, we have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated by the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator’s water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator’s physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD

  8. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; et al

    2015-11-30

    Here, we have developed conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators: Z 300 and Z 800. The designs are based on an accelerator architecture that is founded on two concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression and impedance matching [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)]. The prime power source of each machine consists of 90 linear-transformer-driver (LTD) modules. Each module comprises LTD cavities connected electrically in series, each of which is powered by 5-GW LTD bricks connected electrically in parallel. (A brick comprises a single switch and two capacitors in series.) Six water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers transport the power generated bymore » the modules to a six-level vacuum-insulator stack. The stack serves as the accelerator’s water-vacuum interface. The stack is connected to six conical outer magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs), which are joined in parallel at a 10-cm radius by a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the six outer MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a single short inner MITL. The inner MITL transmits the combined current to the accelerator’s physics-package load. Z 300 is 35 m in diameter and stores 48 MJ of electrical energy in its LTD capacitors. The accelerator generates 320 TW of electrical power at the output of the LTD system, and delivers 48 MA in 154 ns to a magnetized-liner inertial-fusion (MagLIF) target [Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF target is 870 TW, which is the highest power throughout the accelerator. Power amplification is accomplished by the centrally located vacuum section, which serves as an intermediate inductive-energy-storage device. The principal goal of Z 300 is to achieve thermonuclear ignition; i.e., a fusion yield that exceeds the energy transmitted by the accelerator to the liner. 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD

  9. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with CUORE-0: Physics Results and Detector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, L.

    2016-08-01

    The CUORE-0 experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in ^{130}Te. It consists of an array of 52 tellurium dioxide crystals, operated as bolometers at a temperature of 10 mK, with a total mass of about 39 kg of TeO_2. CUORE-0 has been built to test the performance of the upcoming CUORE experiment and represents the largest ^{130}Te bolometric setup currently in operation. This experiment has been running in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy, since March 2013. We report the results of a search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 9.8 kg years ^{130}Te exposure, which allowed us to set the most stringent limit to date on this half-life. The performance of the detector in terms of background rate and energy resolution are also reported.

  10. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  11. Worldwide Activities towards a Future Circular Collider: Physics and Detector Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Michelangelo

    2015-04-01

    Collider rings with circumference in the range of 50-100 km could host electron-positron colliders with center-of-mass energies up to 350 GeV, and proton-proton colliders up to 100 TeV. Two-stage projects, along the lines of the LEP-LHC complex, are under study by the high-energy physics community worldwide. The physics potential of such a future facility spans from improving by orders of magnitude the precision study of the Higgs boson, to extending by a factor of 10 the mass reach for the search of new particles. The talk will review the physics opportunities and the challenges that are emerging from the current studies.

  12. Evaluation of polyphenol contents in differently processed apricots using accelerated solvent extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Selım; Erdemoğlu, Sema

    2011-11-01

    Concentrations of 17 polyphenols in ripe-fresh, sun-dried and sulfited-dried apricots either harvested from organic or pesticide-treated trees before harvest were determined using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-Vis diode array detector, and the change of polyphenol profile with origin of the apricot product was established. Extraction of polyphenols was achieved using the accelerated solvent extraction technique (ASE). A mixture of methanol, water (70:30 v/v) including 0.1 g of tert-butylhydroquinone as solvent, 60 min extraction time, 60°C temperature and 1,500 psi pressure were found the most productive operating conditions for ASE. Concentrations of polyphenols in organic apricots were higher than pesticide-treated samples, and roughly the same in ripe-fresh and sun-dried apricots. Polyphenol concentrations of either organic or pesticide-treated sulfited-dried apricots were lower than the ripe-fresh apricots. Considering the organic ripe-fresh apricots, there was a decrease in some polyphenol concentration in the sulfited-dried apricots compared with the ripe-fresh apricot, and the range of decrease is between 1.4 and 53%.

  13. Determination of acetanilide herbicides in cereal crops using accelerated solvent extraction, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; Yang, Jun; Shi, Ronghua; Su, Qingde; Yao, Li; Li, Panpan

    2011-07-01

    A method was developed to determine eight acetanilide herbicides from cereal crops based on accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD) analysis. During the ASE process, the effect of four parameters (temperature, static time, static cycles and solvent) on the extraction efficiency was considered and compared with shake-flask extraction method. After extraction with ASE, four SPE tubes (graphitic carbon black/primary secondary amine (GCB/PSA), GCB, Florisil and alumina-N) were assayed for comparison to obtain the best clean-up efficiency. The results show that GCB/PSA cartridge gave the best recoveries and cleanest chromatograms. The analytical process was validated by the analysis of spiked blank samples. Performance characteristics such as linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantitation (LOQ), precision and recovery were studied. At 0.05 mg/kg spiked level, recoveries and precision values for rice, wheat and maize were 82.3-115.8 and 1.1-13.6%, respectively. For all the herbicides, LOD and LOQ ranged from 0.8 to 1.7 μg/kg and from 2.4 to 5.3 μg/kg, respectively. The proposed analytical methodology was applied for the analysis of the targets in samples; only three herbicides, propyzamid, metolachlor and diflufenican, were detected in two samples. PMID:21656677

  14. Hadron Physics at the Charm and Bottom Thresholds and Other Novel QCD Physics Topics at the NICA Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-20

    The NICA collider project at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna will have the capability of colliding protons, polarized deuterons, and nuclei at an effective nucleon-nucleon center-of mass energy in the range {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 to 11 GeV. I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics processes which can be investigated at the NICA collider. The topics include the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances near the charm and bottom thresholds, intrinsic strangeness, charm, and bottom phenomena, hidden-color degrees of freedom in nuclei, color transparency, single-spin asymmetries, the RHIC baryon anomaly, and non-universal antishadowing.

  15. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended. PMID:27221838

  16. Prospects of heavy quark physics in run II with the D-Zero detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gounder, K.

    1998-09-01

    After a successful Run I, D0 is poised for an encore performance in Run II. This article summarizes the essential features of the D0 upgrade that involve a central magnetic field, a new tracking system, upgraded muon detection, and enhancements to muon, calorimeter and the data acquisition electronics. The goals for top quark physics for Run II are outlined along with issues affecting the precision measurement of top quark mass and single top quark production. The prospects and issues determining the B physics capabilities of D0 in Run II are addressed briefly and a study of the CP sensitivity in the mode B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} is also presented.

  17. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  18. Black hole physics. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, J; Ansoldi, S; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; Becerra González, J; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Delgado Mendez, C; Dominis Prester, D; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; García López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido Terrats, D; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; González Muñoz, A; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Prada Moroni, P G; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rodriguez Garcia, J; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Kadler, M; Schulz, R; Ros, E; Bach, U; Krauß, F; Wilms, J

    2014-11-28

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes, revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet.

  19. Black hole physics. Black hole lightning due to particle acceleration at subhorizon scales.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, J; Ansoldi, S; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; Becerra González, J; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Delgado Mendez, C; Dominis Prester, D; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; García López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Garrido Terrats, D; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; González Muñoz, A; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Prada Moroni, P G; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rodriguez Garcia, J; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Uellenbeck, M; Vogler, P; Zanin, R; Kadler, M; Schulz, R; Ros, E; Bach, U; Krauß, F; Wilms, J

    2014-11-28

    Supermassive black holes with masses of millions to billions of solar masses are commonly found in the centers of galaxies. Astronomers seek to image jet formation using radio interferometry but still suffer from insufficient angular resolution. An alternative method to resolve small structures is to measure the time variability of their emission. Here we report on gamma-ray observations of the radio galaxy IC 310 obtained with the MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescopes, revealing variability with doubling time scales faster than 4.8 min. Causality constrains the size of the emission region to be smaller than 20% of the gravitational radius of its central black hole. We suggest that the emission is associated with pulsar-like particle acceleration by the electric field across a magnetospheric gap at the base of the radio jet. PMID:25378461

  20. Accelerated Integrated Science Sequence (AISS): An Introductory Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Edwalds-Gilbert, Gretchen; Landsberg, Adam S.; Copp, Newton; Ulsh, Lisa; Drew, David E.

    2009-01-01

    A new interdisciplinary, introductory science course was offered for the first time during the 2007-2008 school year. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the idea of working at the intersections of biology, chemistry, and physics and to recognize interconnections between the disciplines. Interdisciplinary laboratories are a key…

  1. Similarities and differences of recent hybrid pixel detectors for X-ray and high energy physics developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, G.; Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Horisberger, R.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.

    2015-04-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are being developed for both photon science and high energy physics. The article will cover similarities and differences in pixel detectors for both applications using two of the pixel detectors developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland) as examples: the EIGER photon counting detector and the psi46dig chip, which has been developed for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) tracking pixel detector upgrade. EIGER is a single photon counting hybrid pixel detector for applications at synchrotron light sources in the energy range from a few to 25 keV. It is characterized by a small pixel size (75 × 75 μm2), high count rate capability (106 counts/pixel/s) and very high data rate, which reaches 6 Gb/s for a 256 × 256 pixel chip. The CMS pixel detector is designed to provide charge information from the pixels in the harsh radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider. The short time between bunches of 25 ns and the high event rate at luminosity up to 2 × 1034cm-2s-1 require a detector with high hit efficiency, with good timing resolution and the ability to retain timestamp information for the hits. The readout architecture is based on the transfer of hits from the pixels to the periphery, where the trigger validation is performed before data transfer. The data rates of the digitized output reach 160 Mb/s for a 52×80 pixel chip.The specific timing and rate requirements for the detectors, the analog performances (minimum threshold and noise), the power consumption and the radiation hardness will be compared. An overview on future developments based on mutual learning and common solutions will be discussed.

  2. Accelerating Translation of Physical Activity and Cancer Survivorship Research into Practice: Recommendations for a More Integrated and Collaborative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Siobhan M.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Perna, Frank M.; Glasgow, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has been deemed safe and effective in reducing many negative side effects of treatment for cancer survivors and promoting better overall health. However, most of this research has focused on highly controlled randomized trials and little of this research has been translated into care or policy for survivors. The purpose of the present paper is to present a research agenda for the field to accelerate the dissemination and implementation of empirically-supported physical activity interventions into care. We provide rationale for the role of basic, behavioral, clinical implementation and population scientists in moving this science forward and call for a more coordinated effort across different phases of research. In addition, we provide key strategies and examples for ongoing and future studies using the RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy/Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) framework and pose recommendations for collaborations between researchers and stakeholders to enhance the integration of this research into policy and practice. Overall, we recommend that physical activity and cancer survivorship research employ additional study designs, include relevant stakeholders and be more collaborative, integrated, contextual, and representative in terms of both setting and participants. PMID:24599577

  3. Physical basis for the ofloxacin-induced acceleration of lysozyme aggregation and polymorphism in amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Shivani A; Mothi, Nivin; Shiriskar, Sonali M; Pissurlenkar, Raghuvir R S; Kumar, Anil; Ahmad, Basir

    2016-02-15

    Aggregation of globular proteins is an intractable problem which generally originates from partially folded structures. The partially folded structures first collapse non-specifically and then reorganize into amyloid-like fibrils via one or more oligomeric intermediates. The fibrils and their on/off pathway intermediates may be toxic to cells and form toxic deposits in different human organs. To understand the basis of origins of the aggregation diseases, it is vital to study in details the conformational properties of the amyloidogenic partially folded structures of the protein. In this work, we examined the effects of ofloxacin, a synthetic fluoroquinolone compound on the fibrillar aggregation of hen egg-white lysozyme. Using two aggregation conditions (4M GuHCl at pH 7.0 and 37 °C; and pH 1.7 at 65 °C) and a number of biophysical techniques, we illustrate that ofloxacin accelerates fibril formation of lysozyme by binding to partially folded structures and modulating their secondary, tertiary structures and surface hydrophobicity. We also demonstrate that Ofloxacin-induced fibrils show polymorphism of morphology, tinctorial properties and hydrophobic surface exposure. This study will assist in understanding the determinant of fibril formation and it also indicates that caution should be exercised in the use of ofloxacin in patients susceptible to various aggregation diseases.

  4. Recent developments in PET detector technology

    PubMed Central

    Lewellen, Tom K

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a tool for metabolic imaging that has been utilized since the earliest days of nuclear medicine. A key component of such imaging systems is the detector modules—an area of research and development with a long, rich history. Development of detectors for PET has often seen the migration of technologies, originally developed for high energy physics experiments, into prototype PET detectors. Of the many areas explored, some detector designs go on to be incorporated into prototype scanner systems and a few of these may go on to be seen in commercial scanners. There has been a steady, often very diverse development of prototype detectors, and the pace has accelerated with the increased use of PET in clinical studies (currently driven by PET/CT scanners) and the rapid proliferation of pre-clinical PET scanners for academic and commercial research applications. Most of these efforts are focused on scintillator-based detectors, although various alternatives continue to be considered. For example, wire chambers have been investigated many times over the years and more recently various solid-state devices have appeared in PET detector designs for very high spatial resolution applications. But even with scintillators, there have been a wide variety of designs and solutions investigated as developers search for solutions that offer very high spatial resolution, fast timing, high sensitivity and are yet cost effective. In this review, we will explore some of the recent developments in the quest for better PET detector technology. PMID:18695301

  5. High energy physics division semiannual report of research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. )

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  6. Physical and mechanical metallurgy of high purity Nb for accelerator cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, T. R.; Wright, N. T.; Pourboghrat, F.; Compton, C.; Hartwig, K. T.; Baars, D.; Zamiri, A.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Darbandi, P.; Jiang, H.; Skoug, E.; Balachandran, S.; Ice, G. E.; Liu, W.

    2010-03-01

    In the past decade, high Q values have been achieved in high purity Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Fundamental understanding of the physical metallurgy of Nb that enables these achievements is beginning to reveal what challenges remain to establish reproducible and cost-effective production of high performance SRF cavities. Recent studies of dislocation substructure development and effects of recrystallization arising from welding and heat treatments and their correlations with cavity performance are considered. With better fundamental understanding of the effects of dislocation substructure evolution and recrystallization on electron and phonon conduction, as well as the interior and surface states, it will be possible to design optimal processing paths for cost-effective performance using approaches such as hydroforming, which minimizes or eliminates welds in a cavity.

  7. On the physics of waves in the solar atmosphere: Wave heating and wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1994-01-01

    New calculations of the acoustic wave energy fluxes generated in the solar convective zone have been performed. The treatment of convective turbulence in the sun and solar-like stars, in particular, the precise nature of the turbulent power spectrum has been recognized as one of the most important issues in the wave generation problem. Several different functional forms for spatial and temporal spectra have been considered in the literature and differences between the energy fluxes obtained for different forms often exceed two orders of magnitude. The basic criterion for choosing the appropriate spectrum was the maximal efficiency of the wave generation. We have used a different approach based on physical and empirical arguments as well as on some results from numerical simulation of turbulent convection.

  8. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  9. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  10. Invited Review Article: Physics and Monte Carlo techniques as relevant to cryogenic, phonon, and ionization readout of Cryogenic Dark Matter Search radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Leman, Steven W.

    2012-09-15

    This review discusses detector physics and Monte Carlo techniques for cryogenic, radiation detectors that utilize combined phonon and ionization readout. A general review of cryogenic phonon and charge transport is provided along with specific details of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search detector instrumentation. In particular, this review covers quasidiffusive phonon transport, which includes phonon focusing, anharmonic decay, and isotope scattering. The interaction of phonons in the detector surface is discussed along with the downconversion of phonons in superconducting films. The charge transport physics include a mass tensor which results from the crystal band structure and is modeled with a Herring-Vogt transformation. Charge scattering processes involve the creation of Neganov-Luke phonons. Transition-edge-sensor (TES) simulations include a full electric circuit description and all thermal processes including Joule heating, cooling to the substrate, and thermal diffusion within the TES, the latter of which is necessary to model normal-superconducting phase separation. Relevant numerical constants are provided for these physical processes in germanium, silicon, aluminum, and tungsten. Random number sampling methods including inverse cumulative distribution function (CDF) and rejection techniques are reviewed. To improve the efficiency of charge transport modeling, an additional second order inverse CDF method is developed here along with an efficient barycentric coordinate sampling method of electric fields. Results are provided in a manner that is convenient for use in Monte Carlo and references are provided for validation of these models.

  11. A fast, ultra-low and frequency-scalable power consumption, 10-bit SAR ADC for particle physics detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kulis, S.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.

    2015-11-01

    The design and measurements results of a fast 10-bit SAR ADC with ultra-low and scalable with frequency power consumption, developed for readout systems for detectors at future particle physics colliders (ILC, CLIC, LHC Upgrade), are described. A prototype ASIC was designed and fabricated in 130 nm CMOS technology and a wide spectrum of static (INLlesssim0.5 LSB, DNLlesssim0.5 LSB) and dynamic (SINAD ~58 dB, ENOB~9.3) measurements was performed to study and quantify the ADC performance. The ADC works in wide 10 kS/s - 40 MS/s sampling frequency range, covering more than three orders of magnitude. In most of the range the power consumption scales linearly with sampling rate with a factor of about 22 μW/MS/s. A dynamic and asynchronous internal logic makes the ADC very well suited not only for commonly used synchronous sampling but also for applications with asynchronous sampling and/or the ones requiring power cycling, like the experiments at future linear collider (ILC/CLIC). The ADC layout is drawn with a small pitch of 146 μm to facilitate multi-channel integration. The obtained figure of Merit is in range 32-37 fJ/conversion for sampling frequencies 10-40 MS/s, placing the ADC among the best State of the Art designs with similar technology and specifications.

  12. Hybrid parallel code acceleration methods in full-core reactor physics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courau, T.; Plagne, L.; Ponicot, A.; Sjoden, G.

    2012-07-01

    When dealing with nuclear reactor calculation schemes, the need for three dimensional (3D) transport-based reference solutions is essential for both validation and optimization purposes. Considering a benchmark problem, this work investigates the potential of discrete ordinates (Sn) transport methods applied to 3D pressurized water reactor (PWR) full-core calculations. First, the benchmark problem is described. It involves a pin-by-pin description of a 3D PWR first core, and uses a 8-group cross-section library prepared with the DRAGON cell code. Then, a convergence analysis is performed using the PENTRAN parallel Sn Cartesian code. It discusses the spatial refinement and the associated angular quadrature required to properly describe the problem physics. It also shows that initializing the Sn solution with the EDF SPN solver COCAGNE reduces the number of iterations required to converge by nearly a factor of 6. Using a best estimate model, PENTRAN results are then compared to multigroup Monte Carlo results obtained with the MCNP5 code. Good consistency is observed between the two methods (Sn and Monte Carlo), with discrepancies that are less than 25 pcm for the k{sub eff}, and less than 2.1% and 1.6% for the flux at the pin-cell level and for the pin-power distribution, respectively. (authors)

  13. Accelerating efforts to prevent childhood obesity: spreading, scaling, and sustaining healthy eating and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Debbie I; Gertel-Rosenberg, Allison; Snyder, Kim

    2014-12-01

    During the past decade, progress has been made in addressing childhood obesity through policy and practice changes that encourage increased physical activity and access to healthy food. With the implementation of these strategies, an understanding of what works to prevent childhood obesity is beginning to emerge. The task now is to consider how best to spread, scale, and sustain promising childhood obesity prevention strategies. In this article we examine a project led by Nemours, a children's health system, to address childhood obesity. We describe Nemours's conceptual approach to spreading, scaling, and sustaining a childhood obesity prevention intervention. We review a component of a Nemours initiative in Delaware that focused on early care and education settings and its expansion to other states through the National Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative to prevent childhood obesity. We also discuss lessons learned. Focusing on the spreading, scaling, and sustaining of promising strategies has the potential to increase the reach and impact of efforts in obesity prevention and help ensure their impact on population health.

  14. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, N.; Dupke, R.; Moles, M.; Sodré, L.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín Franch, A.; Taylor, K.; Cristóbal, D.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Cepa-Nogué, J.; Abramo, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Overzier, R.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Alfaro, E. J.; Kanaan, A.; Carvano, M.; Reis, R. R. R.; J-PAS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    J-PAS is a Spanish-Brazilian 8500 deg^2 Cosmological Survey which will be carried out from the Javalambre Observatory with a purpose-built, dedicated 2.5 m telescope and a 4.7 deg^2 camera with 1.2 Gpix. Starting in 2015, J-PAS will use 59 filters to measure high precision 0.003(1+z) photometric redshifts for 90M galaxies plus several million QSOs, about 50 times more than the largest current spectroscopic survey, sampling an effective volume of ˜ 14 Gpc^3 up to z=1.3. J-PAS will not only be first radial BAO experiment to reach Stage IV; it will also detect and measure the mass of 7× 10^5 galaxy clusters and groups, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements. The combination of a set of 145 Å NB filters, placed 100 Å apart, and a multi-degree field of view is a powerful ``redshift machine'', equivalent to a 4000 multiplexing spectrograph, but many times cheaper to build. The J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7 deg^2 ``IFU'', which will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of scientific applications in Galaxy Evolution, Stellar Physics and the Solar System.

  15. Multi-processor developments in the United States for future high energy physics experiments and accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, I.

    1988-03-01

    The use of multi-processors for analysis and high-level triggering in High Energy Physics experiments, pioneered by the early emulator systems, has reached maturity, in particular with the multiple microprocessor systems in use at Fermilab. It is widely acknowledged that such systems will fulfill the major portion of the computing needs of future large experiments. Recent developments at Fermilab's Advanced Computer Program will make such systems even more powerful, cost-effective, and easier to use than they are at present. The next generation of microprocessors, already available, will provide CPU power of about one VAX 780 equivalent/$300, while supporting most VMS FORTRAN extensions and large (>8MB) amounts of memory. Low cost high density mass storage devices (based on video tape cartridge technology) will allow parallel I/O to remove potential I/O bottlenecks in systems of over 1000 VAX equipment processors. New interconnection schemes and system software will allow more flexible topologies and extremely high data bandwidth, especially for on-line systems. This talk will summarize the work at the Advanced Computer Program and the rest of the US in this field. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Tevatron Detector Upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Ronald

    2005-03-22

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. We discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  17. Tevatron detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. They discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  18. Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development.

  19. Core-shell diodes for particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guobin; Plentz, Jonathan; Höger, Ingmar; Dellith, Jan; Dellith, Andrea; Falk, Fritz

    2016-02-01

    High performance particle detectors are needed for fundamental research in high energy physics in the exploration of the Higgs boson, dark matter, anti-matter, gravitational waves and proof of the standard model, which will extend the understanding of our Universe. Future particle detectors should have ultrahigh radiation hardness, low power consumption, high spatial resolution and fast signal response. Unfortunately, some of these properties are counter-influencing for the conventional silicon drift detectors (SDDs), so that they cannot be optimized simultaneously. In this paper, the main issues of conventional SDDs have been analyzed, and a novel core-shell detector design based on micro- and nano-structures etched into Si-wafers is proposed. It is expected to simultaneously reach ultrahigh radiation hardness, low power consumption, fast signal response and high spatial resolution down to the sub-micrometer range, which will probably meet the requirements for the most powerful particle accelerators in the near future. A prototype core-shell detector was fabricated using modern silicon nanotechnology and the functionality was tested using electron-beam-induced current measurements. Such a high performance detector will open many new applications in extreme radiation environments such as high energy physics, astrophysics, high resolution (bio-) imaging and crystallography, which will push these fields beyond their current boundaries.

  20. The upgraded DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J. T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Angstadt, R.; Anosov, V.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bardon, O.; Barg, W.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beauceron, S.; Begalli, M.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Bishoff, A.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Bockenthien, E.; Bodyagin, V.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Bonamy, P.; Bonifas, D.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Boswell, C.; Bowden, M.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, D.; Butler, J. M.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Bystricky, J.; Canal, L.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Casey, D.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chi, E.; Chiche, R.; Cho, D. K.; Choate, R.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Churin, I.; Cisko, G.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Colling, D. J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, W.; De, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Del Signore, K.; DeMaat, R.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doets, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dvornikov, O.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fagan, J.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Fein, D.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Ferreira, M. J.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Flores, R.; Foglesong, J.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, C.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Gao, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Geurkov, G.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Goldmann, K.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Golovtsov, V.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Gomez, R.; Goodwin, R.; Gornushkin, Y.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graham, D.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Gray, K.; Greder, S.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gu, W.; Guglielmo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggard, E.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hance, R.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hazen, E.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Hou, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Hynek, V.; Huffman, D.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jayanti, R.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, Y.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, P.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Jouravlev, N.; Juarez, M.; Juste, A.; Kaan, A. P.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Kalmani, S. D.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Ke, Z.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, H.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirsch, N.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Komissarov, E. V.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kostritski, A.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kotwal, A. V.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krane, J.; Kravchuk, N.; Krempetz, K.; Krider, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubinski, R.; Kuchinsky, N.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Kwarciany, R.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Larwill, M.; Laurens, P.; Lavigne, B.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Le Meur, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leitner, R.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, X.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Litmaath, M.; Lizarazo, J.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lu, J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Luo, C.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Machado, E.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Maity, M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manakov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Markley, D.; Markus, M.; Marshall, T.; Martens, M.; Martin, M.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; Matulik, M.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; McKenna, M.; McMahon, T.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, D.; Mendoza, L.; Meng, X.; Merekov, Y. P.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mikhailov, V.; Miller, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mostafa, M.; Moua, S.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagaraj, P.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimhan, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neuenschwander, R. T.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nozdrin, A.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurczyk, A.; Nurse, E.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Olis, D.; Oliveira, N.; Olivier, B.; Olsen, J.; Oshima, N.; Oshinowo, B. O.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Phaf, L.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Pompoš, A.; Polosov, P.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Porokhovoy, S.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Pritchard, W.; Prokhorov, I.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ramberg, E.; Ramirez-Gomez, R.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rapisarda, S.; Raskowski, J.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ray, R. E.; Reay, N. W.; Rechenmacher, R.; Reddy, L. V.; Regan, T.; Renardy, J.-F.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Roco, M.; Rotolo, C.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rucinski, R.; Rud, V. I.; Russakovich, N.; Russo, P.; Sabirov, B.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Satyanarayana, B.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schukin, A. A.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shankar, H. C.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Sheahan, P.; Shephard, W. D.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shishkin, A. A.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skow, D.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, D. E.; Smith, R. P.; Smolek, K.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Song, Y.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spartana, N.; Spurlock, B.; Stanton, N. R.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stefanik, A.; Steinberg, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Terentyev, N.; Teterin, V.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, J.; Thooris, B.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tolian, C.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Toole, T.; Torborg, J.; Touze, F.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Utes, M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Vaz, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vigneault, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Vlimant, J.-R.; Von Toerne, E.; Vorobyov, A.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vysotsky, V.; Wahl, H. D.; Walker, R.; Wallace, N.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Warsinsky, M.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wegner, M.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; White, V.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wijnen, T.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Wilcer, N.; Willutzki, H.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wittlin, J.; Wlodek, T.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wu, Z.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Q.; Xuan, N.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yarema, R.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yen, Y.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yoffe, F.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabi, A.; Zanabria, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zitoun, R.; Zmuda, T.; Zutshi, V.; Zviagintsev, S.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2006-09-01

    The DØ experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to DØ.

  1. Alignment of the ATLAS inner detector tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Daniel; ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the world's largest particle accelerator. ATLAS is one of the two general purpose experiments. The inner tracking system of ATLAS, the Inner Detector, is built on two technologies: silicon detectors and drift tube based detectors. The required precision for the alignment of the most sensitive coordinates of the Silicon sensors is just a few microns. Therefore the alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector is performed using complex algorithms requiring extensive CPU and memory usage. The proposed alignment algorithms were exercised on several applications. This proceedings present the outline of the alignment approach and results from Cosmic Ray runs and large scale computing simulation of physics samples mimicking the ATLAS operation during real data-taking. The full alignment chain was tested using these samples and alignment constants were produced and validated within 24 hours. Early alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector is provided even before the LHC start up by analysing Cosmic Ray data.

  2. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  3. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P. ); Gatti, E. )

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and x-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; classical semiconductor diode detectors; and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  4. X-ray detector physics and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1993-02-01

    Recent developments in X-ray and hard X-ray imaging detector, high-intensity sources, hard X-ray imaging optics, calibration, and detection technologies are discussed. Particular attention is given to a high-MTF X-ray image intensifier, application of monolithic CdZnTe linear solid state ionization detectors for X-ray imaging, magnetic response of high-Tc superconductors to X-ray radiation and detection of X-rays, laboratory soft X-ray source with foil target, detection of explosive materials using nuclear radiation, energy response of astronomical CCD X-ray detectors, calibration techniques for high-flux X-ray detectors, fabrication of grazing-incidence optics using flow-polishing techniques, and numerical simulations for capillary-based X-ray optics. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  5. X-ray detector physics and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, July 23, 24, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in X-ray and hard X-ray imaging detector, high-intensity sources, hard X-ray imaging optics, calibration, and detection technologies are discussed. Particular attention is given to a high-MTF X-ray image intensifier, application of monolithic CdZnTe linear solid state ionization detectors for X-ray imaging, magnetic response of high-Tc superconductors to X-ray radiation and detection of X-rays, laboratory soft X-ray source with foil target, detection of explosive materials using nuclear radiation, energy response of astronomical CCD X-ray detectors, calibration techniques for high-flux X-ray detectors, fabrication of grazing-incidence optics using flow-polishing techniques, and numerical simulations for capillary-based X-ray optics. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  6. Studies of the response of CR-39 track detectors to protons from a 3 MeV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, L.; Cecchi, A.; Gori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Renzi, R.

    1991-01-01

    A Van de Graaff proton accelerator was tested for its application to the study of CR-39 SSNTD response to accelerated protons. The energies of the proton beams ranged from 0.2 to 2.3 MeV. Two different beam angles of incidence were taken into consideration for each proton energy (i.e. normal incidence and 45°). The complete procedure for the irradiation of a CR-39 sample required relatively little time and the results obtained — in agreement with others as reported in the literature — demonstrated that the Van de Graaff proton accelerator can find a useful application to the problem of neutron dosimetry using SSNTDs.

  7. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-30

    This document presents our proposal to continue the activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics research. We have a broad program of participation in both non-accelerator and accelerator-based efforts. High energy research at Boston University has a special focus on the physics program of the Superconducting Supercollider. We are active in research and development for detector subsystems, in the design of experiments, and in study of the phenomenology of the very high energy interactions to be observed at the SSC. The particular areas discussed in this paper are: colliding beams physics; accelerator design physics; MACRO project; proton decay project; theoretical particle physics; muon G-2 project; fast liquid scintillators; SSCINTCAL project; TRD project; massively parallel processing for the SSC; and physics analysis and vertex detector upgrade at L3.

  8. The fine grained detector readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retière, F.; T2K/FGD Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The Fine Grained Detector (FGD) readout electronics was designed to record a snapshot of the detector activity before, during and after the neutrino beam spill produced by the J-PARC accelerator complex in Tokai, Japan. The FGD is a key element of T2K near detector currently being constructed. It will act as an active target detecting charged particles produced within its scintillator bars. The original feature of the FGD electronics is to readout Multi-Pixel Photon Counters by recording waveforms using Switch Capacitor Array chips (AFTER ASIC) designed for T2K Time Projection Chamber. In these proceedings, we describe the architecture of the FGD electronics. Beam results show that the physics requirements are met or exceeded. The relatively slow sampling frequency of the AFTER ASIC does not impair the timing resolution significantly. In addition, the very good efficiency of the system for detecting Michel electrons produced by pions or muons decay has been demonstrated.

  9. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the QCD Group's Research into Properties of the Strong Interaction

    DOE Data Explorer

    ,

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The QCD group studies the properties of the strong interaction. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  10. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons Research of the Higgs Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Higgs group searches for Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs bosons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  11. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers.

  12. Organ dose measurements from multiple-detector computed tomography using a commercial dosimetry system and tomographic, physical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Lindsey K.

    The technology of computed tomography (CT) imaging has soared over the last decade with the use of multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners that are capable of performing studies in a matter of seconds. While the diagnostic information obtained from MDCT imaging is extremely valuable, it is important to ensure that the radiation doses resulting from these studies are at acceptably safe levels. This research project focused on the measurement of organ doses resulting from modern MDCT scanners. A commercially-available dosimetry system was used to measure organ doses. Small dosimeters made of optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) material were analyzed with a portable OSL reader. Detailed verification of this system was performed. Characteristics studied include energy, scatter, and angular responses; dose linearity, ability to erase the exposed dose and ability to reuse dosimeters multiple times. The results of this verification process were positive. While small correction factors needed to be applied to the dose reported by the OSL reader, these factors were small and expected. Physical, tomographic pediatric and adult phantoms were used to measure organ doses. These phantoms were developed from CT images and are composed of tissue-equivalent materials. Because the adult phantom is comprised of numerous segments, dosimeters were placed in the phantom at several organ locations, and doses to select organs were measured using three clinical protocols: pediatric craniosynostosis, adult brain perfusion and adult cardiac CT angiography (CTA). A wide-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner and a 64-slice, MDCT scanner were used for organ dose measurements. Doses ranged from 1 to 26 mGy for the pediatric protocol, 1 to 1241 mGy for the brain perfusion protocol, and 2-100 mGy for the cardiac protocol. In most cases, the doses measured on the 64-slice scanner were higher than those on the 320-slice scanner. A methodology to measure organ doses with OSL dosimeters received from CT

  13. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  14. Cardiac acceleration at the onset of exercise: a potential parameter for monitoring progress during physical training in sports and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Monden, Paul G; van Meeteren, Nico L U; Daanen, Hein A M

    2014-05-01

    There is a need for easy-to-use methods to assess training progress in sports and rehabilitation research. The present review investigated whether cardiac acceleration at the onset of physical exercise (HRonset) can be used as a monitoring variable. The digital databases of Scopus and PubMed were searched to retrieve studies investigating HRonset. In total 652 studies were retrieved. These articles were then classified as having emphasis on HRonset in a sports or rehabilitation setting, which resulted in 8 of 112 studies with a sports application and 6 of 68 studies with a rehabilitation application that met inclusion criteria. Two co-existing mechanisms underlie HRonset: feedforward (central command) and feedback (mechanoreflex, metaboreflex, baroreflex) control. A number of studies investigated HRonset during the first few seconds of exercise (HRonsetshort), in which central command and the mechanoreflex determine vagal withdrawal, the major mechanism by which heart rate (HR) increases. In subsequent sports and rehabilitation studies, interest focused on HRonset during dynamic exercise over a longer period of time (HRonsetlong). Central command, mechanoreflexes, baroreflexes, and possibly metaboreflexes contribute to HRonset during the first seconds and minutes of exercise, which in turn leads to further vagal withdrawal and an increase in sympathetic activity. HRonset has been described as the increase in HR compared with resting state (delta HR) or by exponential modeling, with measurement intervals ranging from 0-4 s up to 2 min. Delta HR was used to evaluate HRonsetshort over the first 4 s of exercise, as well as for analyzing HRonsetlong. In exponential modeling, the HR response to dynamic exercise is biphasic, consisting of fast (parasympathetic, 0-10 s) and slow (sympathetic, 1-4 min) components. Although available studies differed largely in measurement protocols, cross-sectional and longitudinal training studies showed that studies analyzing HRonset

  15. Intelligent Detector Design

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  16. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  17. The relation between tilt table and acceleration-tolerance and their dependence on stature and physical fitness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K. E.; Backhausen, F.; Bruner, H.; Eichhorn, J.; Jovy, D.; Schotte, J.; Vogt, L.; Wegman, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A group of 12 highly trained athletes and a group of 12untrained students were subjected to passive changes of position on a tilt table and positive accelerations in a centrifuge. During a 20 min tilt, including two additional respiratory maneuvers, the number of faints and average cardiovascular responses did not differ significantly between the groups. During linear increase of acceleration, the average blackout level was almost identical in both groups. Statistically significant coefficients of product-moment correlation for various relations were obtained. The coefficient of multiple determination computed for the dependence of acceleration tolerance on heart-eye distance and systolic blood pressure at rest allows the explanation of almost 50% of the variation of acceleration tolerance. The maximum oxygen uptake showed the expected significant correlation to the heart rate at rest, but not the acceleration tolerance, or to the cardiovascular responses to tilting.

  18. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities July 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Schuur, C.; Wagner, R.

    1998-08-11

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1997--December 31, 1997. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  19. High Energy Physics division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1998--June 30, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D. S.; Berger, E. L.; Blair, R.; Bodwin, G. T.; Drake, G.; Goodman, M. C.; Guarino, V.; Klasen, M.; Lagae, J.-F.; Magill, S.; May, E. N.; Nodulman, L.; Norem, J.; Petrelli, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P. V.; Sinclair, D. K.; Spinka, H. M.; Stanek, R.; Underwood, D.; Wagner, R.; White, A. R.; Yokosawa, A.; Zachos, C.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1998 through June 30, 1998. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  1. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1 - June 30, 1996. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. List of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  2. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  3. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  4. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  5. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  6. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1994-June 30, 1994. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  7. W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics: The design, construction and performance of the B Factory accelerator facilities, PEP-II and KEKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfan, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    The discovery and elucidation of CP violation in the B-meson system presented daunting challenges for the accelerator and detector facilities. This talk discusses how these challenges were met and overcome in the electron-positron colliding-beam accelerator facilities PEP-II (at SLAC) and KEKB (at KEK). The key challenge was to produce unprecedentedly large numbers of B-mesons in a geometry that provided high-statistics, low-background samples of decays to CP eigenstates. This was realized with asymmetric collisions at the Γ(4S) at peak luminosities in excess of 3 ×1033 /sq. cm/sec. Specialized optics were developed to generate efficient, low background, multi-bunch collisions in an energy-asymmetric collision geometry. Novel technologies for the RF, vacuum and feedback systems permitted the storage of multi-amp, multi-bunch beams of electrons and positrons, thereby generating high peak luminosities. Accelerator uptimes greater than 95 percent, combined with high-intensity injection systems, ensured large integrated luminosity. Both facilities rapidly attained their design specifications and ultimately far exceeded the projected performance expectations for both peak and integrated luminosity.

  8. Small fields output factors measurements and correction factors determination for several detectors for a CyberKnife{sup Registered-Sign} and linear accelerators equipped with microMLC and circular cones

    SciTech Connect

    Bassinet, C.; Huet, C.; Derreumaux, S.; Baumann, M.; Trompier, F.; Roch, P.; Clairand, I.; Brunet, G.; Gaudaire-Josset, S.; Chea, M.; Boisserie, G.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The use of small photon fields is now an established practice in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. However, due to a lack of lateral electron equilibrium and high dose gradients, it is difficult to accurately measure the dosimetric quantities required for the commissioning of such systems. Moreover, there is still no metrological dosimetric reference for this kind of beam today. In this context, the first objective of this work was to determine and to compare small fields output factors (OF) measured with different types of active detectors and passive dosimeters for three types of facilities: a CyberKnife{sup Registered-Sign} system, a dedicated medical linear accelerator (Novalis) equipped with m3 microMLC and circular cones, and an adaptive medical linear accelerator (Clinac 2100) equipped with an additional m3 microMLC. The second one was to determine the k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub m}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}} correction factors introduced in a recently proposed small field dosimetry formalism for different active detectors.Methods: Small field sizes were defined either by microMLC down to 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 mm{sup 2} or by circular cones down to 4 mm in diameter. OF measurements were performed with several commercially available active detectors dedicated to measurements in small fields (high resolution diodes: IBA SFD, Sun Nuclear EDGE, PTW 60016, PTW 60017; ionizing chambers: PTW 31014 PinPoint chamber, PTW 31018 microLion liquid chamber, and PTW 60003 natural diamond). Two types of passive dosimeters were used: LiF microcubes and EBT2 radiochromic films.Results: Significant differences between the results obtained by several dosimetric systems were observed, particularly for the smallest field size for which the difference in the measured OF reaches more than 20%. For passive dosimeters, an excellent agreement was observed (better than 2%) between EBT2 and LiF microcubes

  9. Future particle detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Allan G.

    2000-09-01

    Starting with a short summary of the major new experimental physics programs, we attempt to motivate the reasons why existing general-purpose detectors at Hadron Colliders are what they are, why they are being upgraded, and why new facilities are being constructed. The CDF and ATLAS detectors are used to illustrate these motivations. Selected physics results from the CDF experiment provide evidence for limitations on the detector performance, and new physics opportunities motivate both machine and detector upgrades. This is discussed with emphasis on the improved physics reach of the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron (√s =2 TeV). From 2005, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will become operational at a collision energy of √s =14 TeV, seven times larger than at the Tevatron Collider. To exploit the physics capability of the LHC, several large detectors are being constructed. The detectors are significantly more complex than those at the Tevatron Collider because of physics and operational constraints. The detector design and technology of the aspects of the large general-purpose detector ATLAS is described.

  10. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Zimmermann, F; Schlegel, J; Schwager, C; Debus, J; Jäkel, O; Abdollahi, A; Greilich, S

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  11. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Schlegel, J.; Schwager, C.; Debus, J.; Jäkel, O.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  12. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Zimmermann, F; Schlegel, J; Schwager, C; Debus, J; Jäkel, O; Abdollahi, A; Greilich, S

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis. PMID:27499388

  13. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  14. Neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Andrew C; Jardret, Vincent D

    2009-04-07

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  15. Hall B superconducting magnets for the CLAS12 detector at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    L. Quettier, V. Burkert, L. Elouadrhiri, D. Kashy, E. Leung, W. Schneider

    2011-02-01

    Hadron physics has been an essential part of the physics program with the CLAS detector in experimental hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). With the 12 GeV upgrade of the CEBAF machine, hadron physics in Hall B will be extended to a new domain of higher mass resonances and the range of higher transferred momentum using up to 11 GeV electron beams and the upgraded CLAS12 detector. In this paper, status of the hall B superconducting magnets for the 12 GeV upgrade is presented.

  16. Gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E.

    1988-01-01

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  17. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  18. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics. (WRF)

  19. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle. (LSP)

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of primary electron production inside an a-selenium detector for x-ray mammography: physics.

    PubMed

    Sakellaris, T; Spyrou, G; Tzanakos, G; Panayiotakis, G

    2005-08-21

    Selenium is among the materials under investigation that may form effective detectors and provide a major contribution to digital mammography. Till the final image formation, there is an intervention of the x-ray photons transformation to primary electrons and their subsequent ionizing drift towards the electrodes that collect them. The characteristics of the generated primary electrons inside a-Se material such as their angular, spatial and energy distribution affect the characteristics of the final image. A Monte Carlo based model has been developed that simulates the x-ray irradiation of an a-Se detector plate, including primary photon interactions (photoelectric absorption, coherent and incoherent scattering), as well as secondary ones, such as fluorescence (Kalpha, Kbeta) and emission of Auger electrons. The angular, spatial and energy distributions for the generated primary electrons inside a-Se have been produced for various mammographic x-ray spectra and their usefulness in designing and optimizing a detector made of a-Se for digital mammography is discussed.

  1. Liquid Hydrogen: Target, Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Harigel, G.G.

    2004-06-23

    In 1952 D. Glaser demonstrated that a radioactive source's radiation could boil 135 deg. C superheated-diethyl ether in a 3-mm O glass vessel and recorded bubble track growth on high-speed film in a 2-cm3 chamber. This Bubble Chamber (BC) promised improved particle track time and spatial resolution and cycling rate. Hildebrand and Nagle, U of Chicago, reported Liquid Hydrogen minimum ionizing particle boiling in August 1953. John Wood created the 3.7-cm O Liquid Hydrogen BC at LBL in January 1954. By 1959 the Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (LBL) Alvarez group's '72-inch' BC had tracks in liquid hydrogen. Within 10 years bubble chamber volumes increased by a factor of a million and spread to every laboratory with a substantial high-energy physics program. The BC, particle accelerators and special separated particle beams created a new era of High Energy Physics (HEP) experimentation. The BC became the largest most complex cryogenic installation at the world's HEP laboratories for decades. The invention and worldwide development, deployment and characteristics of these cryogenic dynamic target/detectors and related hydrogen targets are described.

  2. The direction of acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Thomas; Burde, Jan-Philipp; Lück, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration is a physical quantity that is difficult to understand and hence its complexity is often erroneously simplified. Many students think of acceleration as equivalent to velocity, a ˜ v. For others, acceleration is a scalar quantity, which describes the change in speed Δ|v| or Δ|v|/Δt (as opposed to the change in velocity). The main difficulty with the concept of acceleration therefore lies in developing a correct understanding of its direction. The free iOS app AccelVisu supports students in acquiring a correct conception of acceleration by showing acceleration arrows directly at moving objects.

  3. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities. Semi-annual progress report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bajt, D.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  4. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-03-30

    Large open volume (not segmented) liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long-baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat's principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we are calling the 'Fermat surface', and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long-baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long-baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long-baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long-baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  5. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs research of the CDF Electroweak Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Electroweak group studies production and properties of W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  6. Rare Kaon Decays, KEK experiment E391 and E14 at the Japan Physics and Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC)

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Yau Wai

    2012-12-06

    The goal of the J-PARC neutral kaon experiment (E14/KOTO) is to discover and measure the rate of the kaon rare decay to pi-zero and two neutrinos. This flavor changing neutral current decay proceeds through second-order weak interactions. Other, as yet undiscovered particles, which can mediate the decay could provide an enhancement (or depletion) to the branching ratio which in the Standard Model is accurately predicted within a few percent to be 2.8x10-11. The experiment is designed to observe more than 100 events at the Standard Model branching. It is a follow-up of the KEK E391a experiment and has stage-2 approval by J-PARC PAC in 2007. E14/KOTO has collaborators from Japan (Kyoto, Osaka, Yamagata, Saga), US (Arizona State, Chicago, Michigan Ann Arbor), Taiwan (National Taiwan), Korea, and Russia (Dubna). The experiment exploits the 300kW 30-50 GeV proton delivery of the J-PARC accelerator with a hermetic high acceptance detector with a fine grained Cesium Iodide (CsI) crystal calorimeter, and state of the art electronic front end and data acquisition system. With the recovery of the tsunami disaster on March 11th 2011, E14 is scheduled to start collecting data in December 2012. During the detector construction phase, Chicago focuses on the front end electronics readout of the entire detector system, particularly the CsI calorimeter. The CsI crystals together with its photomultipliers were previously used at the Fermilab KTeV experiment (E832/E799), and were loaned to E14 via this Chicago DOE support. The new readout electronics includes an innovative 10-pole pulse-shaping technique coupled with high speed digitization (14-bit 125MHz and 12-bit 500MHz). This new instrument enables us to measure both energy and timing, particularly with timing resolution better than 100 psec. Besides the cost saving by elimination of the standard time to digital converters, it is now possible to measure the momenta of the final state photons for additional background suppression

  7. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  8. B physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    J. Cranshaw

    2002-09-30

    A vibrant B physics program is being pursued at the Tevatron for Run II using the upgraded accelerator complex and the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors with the goal of collecting 2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This will provide measurements of various CP parameters which both complement and extend the programs at the B factories. There are also a variety of spectroscopy measurements currently available only at the Tevatron. The detectors are now largely commissioned and data acquisition is underway.

  9. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  10. The design and construction of a double-sided Silicon Microvertex Detector for the L3 experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, A.; Ahlen, S.; Marin, A.; Zhou, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Babucci, E.; Bertucci, B.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G.M.; Caria, M.; Checcucci, B.; Easo, S.; Fiandrini, E.; Krastev, V.R.; Massetti, R.; Pauluzzi, M.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L. |; Bencze, G.Y.L.; Kornis, J.; Toth, J.; Brooks, M.L.; Coan, T.E.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Kinnison, W.W.; Lee, D.M.; Mills, G.B.; Thompson, T.C.; Busenitz, J.; DiBitonto, D.; Camps, C.; Commichau, V.; Hangartner, K.; Schmitz, P.; Castellini, G.; Hauviller, C.; Herve, A.; Josa, I.; Landi, G.; Lecomte, P.; Viertel, G.M.; Waldmeier, S.; Leiste, R. |; Lejeune, E.; Weill, R.; Lohmann, W.; Nowak, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Schoeniech, B.; Tonisch, F.; Trowitzsch, G.; Vogt, H.; Passaleva, G.

    1993-12-01

    A Silicon Microvertex Detector (SMD) has been commissioned for the L3 experiment at the Large Electron-Positron colliding-beam accelerator (LEP) at the European Center for Nuclear Physics, (CERN). The SMD is a 72,672 channel, two layer barrel tracker that is comprised of 96 ac-coupled, double-sided silicon detectors. Details of the design and construction are presented.

  11. Smartphones as Experimental Tools: Different Methods to Determine the Gravitational Acceleration in Classroom Physics by Using Everyday Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    New media technology becomes more and more important for our daily life as well as for teaching physics. Within the scope of our N.E.T. research project we develop experiments using New Media Experimental Tools (N.E.T.) in physics education and study their influence on students learning abilities. We want to present the possibilities e.g. of…

  12. The GA PEAcH: A Portable Electrostatic Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, Patrick; Burch, Ashlyn; Bivins, Quintorious; Garrett, Megan; Jordan, Zachary; Roberts, Rhett; Thomas, Benjamin; Careccia, Sharon; Johnson, Rommie; France, Ralph, III; McGill, K. C., Jr.; Spraker, Mark

    2014-03-01

    In collaboration with the University of North Georgia, we are constructing a portable electrostatic ion accelerator at Georgia College. It will use a model 2JA066280 R.F. ion source from National Electrostatics Corporation to produce ions from gaseous elements and a model AU-100N1 100 kV power supply to produce the accelerating voltage. The linear accelerator will be less than 2 meters in length. The beam energy will be roughly determined by the acceleration voltage. Low energy proton-induced fusion reactions are envisioned for both pure and applied physics research. One potential application is to use the 17 MeV γ-ray from the 7 Li (p , γ)8 Be reaction to help calibrate γ-ray detectors at the Hi γs facility. Supported by the Georgia College Faculty Research Grant Program.

  13. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  14. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  15. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  16. Physics design of a 100 keV acceleration grid system for the diagnostic neutral beam for international tokamak experimental reactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, M J; De Esch, H P L

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the physics design of a 100 keV, 60 A H(-) accelerator for the diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER). The accelerator is a three grid system comprising of 1280 apertures, grouped in 16 groups with 80 apertures per beam group. Several computer codes have been used to optimize the design which follows the same philosophy as the ITER Design Description Document (DDD) 5.3 and the 1 MeV heating and current drive beam line [R. Hemsworth, H. Decamps, J. Graceffa, B. Schunke, M. Tanaka, M. Dremel, A. Tanga, H. P. L. De Esch, F. Geli, J. Milnes, T. Inoue, D. Marcuzzi, P. Sonato, and P. Zaccaria, Nucl. Fusion 49, 045006 (2009)]. The aperture shapes, intergrid distances, and the extractor voltage have been optimized to minimize the beamlet divergence. To suppress the acceleration of coextracted electrons, permanent magnets have been incorporated in the extraction grid, downstream of the cooling water channels. The electron power loads on the extractor and the grounded grids have been calculated assuming 1 coextracted electron per ion. The beamlet divergence is calculated to be 4 mrad. At present the design for the filter field of the RF based ion sources for ITER is not fixed, therefore a few configurations of the same have been considered. Their effect on the transmission of the electrons and beams through the accelerator has been studied. The OPERA-3D code has been used to estimate the aperture offset steering constant of the grounded grid and the extraction grid, the space charge interaction between the beamlets and the kerb design required to compensate for this interaction. All beamlets in the DNB must be focused to a single point in the duct, 20.665 m from the grounded grid, and the required geometrical aimings and aperture offsets have been calculated.

  17. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  18. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: physics of flat-panel fluoroscopy systems: Survey of modern fluoroscopy imaging: flat-panel detectors versus image intensifiers and more.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Edward Lee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the design and operation of both flat-panel detector (FPD) and image intensifier fluoroscopy systems. The different components of each imaging chain and their functions are explained and compared. FPD systems have multiple advantages such as a smaller size, extended dynamic range, no spatial distortion, and greater stability. However, FPD systems typically have the same spatial resolution for all fields of view (FOVs) and are prone to ghosting. Image intensifier systems have better spatial resolution with the use of smaller FOVs (magnification modes) and tend to be less expensive. However, the spatial resolution of image intensifier systems is limited by the television system to which they are coupled. Moreover, image intensifier systems are degraded by glare, vignetting, spatial distortions, and defocusing effects. FPD systems do not have these problems. Some recent innovations to fluoroscopy systems include automated filtration, pulsed fluoroscopy, automatic positioning, dose-area product meters, and improved automatic dose rate control programs. Operator-selectable features may affect both the patient radiation dose and image quality; these selectable features include dose level setting, the FOV employed, fluoroscopic pulse rates, geometric factors, display software settings, and methods to reduce the imaging time.

  19. Electroweak, top and bottom physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ukegawa, Fumihiko; /Tsukuba U.

    2004-10-01

    The Tevatron Run-II program has been in progress since 2001, and the CDF and D0 experiments have been operational with upgraded detectors. Coupled with recent improvements in the Tevatron accelerator performance, the experiments have started producing important physics results and measurements. They report these measurements as well as prospects in the near future.

  20. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; M. Salvatores; M. Paul; R. Pardo; G. Palmiotti; F. Kondev; G. Imel

    2010-04-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  1. Electro-magnetic physics studies at RHIC: Neutral pion production, direct photon HBT, photon elliptic flow in gold-gold collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV and the Muon Telescope Detector simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoji

    Electro-magnetic (E&M) probes such as direct photons and muons (mu) are important tools to study the properties of the extremely hot and dense matter created in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this thesis, several topics of E&M physics will be addressed, including neutral pion (pi0) production, direct photon HBT, and photon elliptic flow (v2) in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. A discussion on the simulation study of the new Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) will also be presented. The pi0 production is a fundamental measurement of hadron production and prerequisite for the background study of direct photons. Neutral pions are reconstructed using the photons detected by the STAR Barrel Electro-magnetic Calorimeter (BEMC) and the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Spectra of pi 0 are measured at transverse momentum 1 < pT < 12 GeV/c near mid-rapidity (0 < eta < 0.8) in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions. The spectra and nuclear modification factors RCP and RAA are compared to earlier pi+/- and pi0 results. Direct photon Hanbury-Brown and Twiss (HBT) correlations can reveal information of the system size throughout the whole collision. A first attempt of direct photon HBT study at RHIC in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions is done using photons detected by the STAR BEMC and TPC. All unknown correlation at small Qinv is observed, whose magnitude is much larger than the expected HBT signal, and possible causes of the correlation will be discussed. Direct photon elliptic flow (v2) at intermediate to high pT is sensitive to the source of direct photon production. Results of inclusive photon v2 in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions are presented. The v2 of pi0 decay photons is calculated from the previously published pi results. The comparison between inclusive and decay photon v 2 indicates that direct photon v2 is small. A new large-area Muon Telescope Detector at mid-rapidity at RHIC is proposed and under investigation, using the Long-strip Multi-Gap Resistive Plate

  2. Physics design for the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) tapered wiggler 10. 6. mu. FEL (Free-Electron Laser) amplifier experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1985-05-09

    The design and construction of a high-gain, tapered wiggler 10.6 ..mu.. Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier to operate with the 50 MeV e-beam is underway. This report discussed the FEL simulation and the physics motivations behind the tapered wiggler design and initial experimental diagnostics.

  3. Particle Physics and Instrumentation - Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipton, Ronald

    2013-04-01

    The impact of experimental science is defined by the capabilities of its instruments. Particle Physics, reaching to increasingly small scales, depends on advances both in accelerator and detector technology to explore high energies and rare processes. The importance of Instrumentation to the Particle Physics program has been recognized by the creation of an ``Instrumentation Frontier'' within the 2013 DPF ``Snowmass'' planning process. We give examples of how physics needs have guided development of technologies for the Energy and Intensity Frontiers. We describe how current technology has limited our reach and what new technologies may be on the horizon. We will also discuss the status of the Instrumentation Frontier work in preparation for the Community Summer Study this summer in Minneapolis.

  4. Research in particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. We are active in seven principal areas which will be discussed in this report: Colliding Beams - physics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {bar p}p collisions; MACRO Experiment - search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; Proton Decay - search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; Particle Theory - theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; Muon G-2 - measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; SSCintcal - calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; and Muon detectors for the GEM Experiment.

  5. Design Concepts for Muon-Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Berg, J. S.; Kirk, H. G.; Palmer, R. B.; Stratkis, D.; Alexahin, Y.; Bross, A.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Neuffer, D.; Palmer, M. A.; Yonehara, K.; Snopok, P.; Bogacz, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Delahaye, J. -P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced, thus enabling high-quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design & simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider. This paper summarizes the current status of design concepts for muon-based accelerators for neutrino factories and a muon collider.

  6. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995.

  7. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector for CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Rachel A.

    2013-12-01

    The energy increase of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12 GeV promises to greatly extend the physics reach of its experiments. This will include an upgrade of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to CLAS12, offering unique possibilities to study internal nucleon dynamics. For this excellent hadron identification over the full kinematical range of 3–8 GeV/c is essential. This will be achieved by the installation of a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector. A novel hybrid imaging design incorporating mirrors, aerogel radiators and Hamamatsu H8500 multianode photomultiplier tubes is proposed. Depending on the incident particle track angle, Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly or after two reflections and passes through the aerogel. The detector design is described, along with preliminary results on individual detector components tests and from recent testbeam studies.

  8. An Infrared Laser Testing Facility for the Characterization of the CLAS12 Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    During the 12 GeV upgrade to the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, a new spectrometer, CLAS12, will be built in Hall B. The Nuclear Physics Group at the University of New Hampshire is part of the collaboration working to design and build this new detector system. Among the new detector systems being developed for CLAS12 is a silicon vertex tracker that will be placed close to the target, providing excellent position resolution for vertex determination. It is essential to have the ability to perform quality assurance tests and to evaluate the performance of the individual silicon strip detectors before their installation in the full detector system. The UNH Nuclear Physics Group is designing and building a laser testing facility at UNH to perform this task. The design for the testing facility consists of a 1064 nm infrared laser system and a precision positioning mechanism to scan the laser light on the detector by a computer controlled system designed to efficiently test the large number of detectors prior to installation. The detector signals are read out by a computer data acquisition system for analysis. The facility also includes a cleanroom area to house the test stand, and a dry storage containment system for the storage of the detectors.

  9. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  10. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  11. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  12. GPU Acceleration of the Locally Selfconsistent Multiple Scattering Code for First Principles Calculation of the Ground State and Statistical Physics of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbach, Markus; Larkin, Jeff; Lutjens, Justin; Rennich, Steven; Rogers, James H

    2016-01-01

    The Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) code solves the first principles Density Functional theory Kohn-Sham equation for a wide range of materials with a special focus on metals, alloys and metallic nano-structures. It has traditionally exhibited near perfect scalability on massively parallel high performance computer architectures. We present our efforts to exploit GPUs to accelerate the LSMS code to enable first principles calculations of O(100,000) atoms and statistical physics sampling of finite temperature properties. Using the Cray XK7 system Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility we achieve a sustained performance of 14.5PFlop/s and a speedup of 8.6 compared to the CPU only code.

  13. Measurement Of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detector Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seongtae; Baldelomar, Edwin; Sosebee, Mark; White, Andy; Yu, Jaehoon; Park, Kwangjune

    2011-06-01

    The High Energy Physics group of the University of Texas at Arlington has been developing gas electron multiplier detectors to use them as sensitive gap detectors in digital hadron calorimeters for the International Linear Collider, a future high energy particle accelerator. For this purpose, we constructed numerous GEM detectors that employ double GEM layers. In this study, two kinds of prototype GEM detectors were tested; one with 28x28 cm{sup 2} active area double GEM structure with a 3 mm drift gap, a 1 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap and the other with two 3x3 cm{sup 2} GEM foils in the amplifier stage with a 5 mm drift gap, a 2 mm transfer gap and a 1 mm induction gap. The detectors' characteristics from exposure to high-energy charged particles and other radiations were measured using cosmic rays and {sup 55}Fe radioactive source. From the {sup 55}Fe tests, we observed two well separated characteristic X-ray emission peaks and confirmed the detectors' functionality. We also measured chamber gains to be over 6000 at a high voltage of 395 V across each GEM electrode. The responses to cosmic rays show the spectra that fit well to Landau distributions as expected from minimum ionizing particles.

  14. Vertex Detector Cable Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, William E.; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    Vertex detector cable requirements are considered within the context of the SiD concept. Cable material should be limited so that the number of radiation lengths represented is consistent with the material budget. In order to take advantage of the proposed accelerator beam structure and allow cooling by flow of dry gas, 'pulsed power' is assumed. Potential approaches to power distribution, cable paths, and cable design for operation in a 5 T magnetic field are described.

  15. Current and future uses of accelerators in particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Beams of artificially accelerated heavy ions, protons, antiprotons, electrons, and positrons currently available at (and planned for) numerous facilities around the world are a valuable resource to the Cosmic Ray community. Such beams have been used to test detector concepts, calibrate balloon-borne and space flight experiments and to measure fundamental nuclear physics parameter necessary for the interpretation of Cosmic Ray data. As new experiments are flown the quality and extent of Cosmic Ray measurements will continue to improve. It will be necessary to increase activity at ground based accelerators in order to test/calibrate these new instruments and to maintain (or possibly improve) the ability to interpret these data. In this area, the newly formed Transport Collaboration, supported by NASA, will be providing new nuclear interaction cross section measurements for beams with Z less than or = 58 and supporting new instrument calibrations at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac accelerator.

  16. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  17. Photon detectors with gaseous amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1996-08-01

    Gaseous photon detectors, including very large 4{pi}-devices such as those incorporated in SLD and DELPHI, are finally delivering physics after many years of hard work. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photoelectrons. Among detector builders, there is hardly anybody who did not make mistakes in this area, and who does not have a healthy respect for the problems involved. This point is stressed in this paper, and it is suggested that only a very small operating phase space is available for running gaseous photon detectors in a very large system with good efficiency and few problems. In this paper the authors discuss what was done correctly or incorrectly in first generation photon detectors, and what would be their recommendations for second generation detectors. 56 refs., 11 figs.

  18. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-28

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

  19. Particle physics---Experimental

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-08-21

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density {approximately} 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams.

  20. Physics Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents nine physics notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) speed of sound in a steel rod; (2) physics extracts-part four (1978); and (3) a graphical approach to acceleration. (HM)

  1. European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics, organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society, is a major international conference that reviews biennially since 1971 the state of our knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisbon, and Aachen. Jointly organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, the Vienna University of Technology, and the Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the 23rd edition of this conference took place in Vienna, Austria. Among the topics covered were Accelerators, Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Detector R&D and Data Handling, Education and Outreach, Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries, Heavy Ion Physics, Higgs and New Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Perturbative Field Theory and String Theory, QCD and Hadronic Physics, as well as Top and Electroweak Physics.

  2. Multi Electrode Semiconductor Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendolia, S. R.; Batignani, G.; Bertolucci, E.; Bosisio, L.; Budinich, M.; Bradaschia, C.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Giazotto, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Rolandi, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Vincelli, M. L.

    1981-04-01

    Detectors with very high space resolution have been built in our laboratory and tested at CERN in order to investigate their possible use in high energy physics experiments. These detectors consist of thin layers of silicon crystals acting as ionization chambers. Thin electrodes, structured in strips or in more fancy shapes are applied to their surfaces by metal coating. The space resolution which could be reached is of the order of a few microns. An interesting feature of these solid state detectors is that they can work under very high or low external pressure or at very low temperature. The use of these detectors would strongly reduce the dimensions and the cost of high energy experiments.

  3. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  4. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  5. Overview of accelerators in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Accelerators used for medicine include synchrotrons, cyclotrons, betatrons, microtrons, and electron, proton, and light ion linacs. Some accelerators which were formerly found only at physics laboratories are now being considered for use in hospital-based treatment and diagnostic facilities. This paper presents typical operating parameters for medical accelerators and gives specific examples of clinical applications for each type of accelerator, with emphasis on recent developments in the field.

  6. Silicon Detector System for Cross Section Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In order to estimate the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials it is necessary to know cosmic ray particles are broken up as they pass though these materials. The breakup of cosmic ray particles is characterized by the nuclear fragmentation cross sections, i.e. an effective geometrical cross section assigned to each target nucleus that represents its apparent size for fragmenting the incident particle. The values of these cross sections depend on the details of nuclear physics and cannot be calculated from first principles owing to the many-body nature of the interactions. The only way to determine them is to measure them. Once a sufficient number of cross sections have been measured, the systematic nature of the interactions allows other cross-sections to be estimated. The number of cross sections that contribute to the estimation of shielding effectiveness is very large 10,000. Fortunately most make minor contributions. These can be estimated from nuclear systematics. Only those who's uncertainties make significant contributions to the error in the shielding effectiveness estimations need to be measured. In the past it has proven difficult to measure light fragment production cross sections from the interactions of heavy cosmic rays owing to the size of the detectors used. We have developed a highly pixilated silicon (Si) detector system that can individually identify these light fragments while making efficient use of costly accelerator time. This system is an outgrowth of detector technology developed under a CDDF and a Code S sponsored cosmic ray experiment.

  7. Tracking parameter simulation for the Turkish accelerator center particle factory tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapan, I.; Pilicer, E.; Pilicer, F. B.

    2016-09-01

    The silicon tracker part of the Turkish Accelerator Center super charm particle factory detector was designed for effectively tracking charged particles with momentum values up to 2.0 GeV/c. In this work, the FLUKA simulation code has been used to estimate the track parameters and their resolutions in the designed tracker system. These results have been compared with those obtained by the tkLayout software package. The simulated track parameter resolutions are compatible with the physics goals of the tracking detector.

  8. Application of Accelerators in research and Industry: Proceedings of the fourteenth International Conference. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, J.L.; Morgan, I.

    1997-08-01

    The fourteenth International Conference on the Application of Accelerators in Research and Industry was held in November, 1996 in Texas, USA. The United States Department of Energy was one of the sponsors of this conference. The conference was widely attended by accelerator scientists throughout the world. The topics discussed included a wide range of applications spanning the fields from Art History to Zoology. An overview of the Design Project for the National spallation Neutron Source was presented in one of the plenary sessions, as was a summary of Accelerated Beams of Radioactive Ions. Accelerator based Atomic Physics had the most sessions. The subject of accelerator Technology covered topics such as new accelerators, beam handling systems, ion sources, detector, spectrometers, and magnets etc. Radioactive Beams and Nuclear Physics were also topics of several sessions. New Research Opportunities for Nuclear structure, Nuclear Astrophysics, Material Science, and the future facilities and applications of Accelerated Beams of Radioactive ions were discussed. These proceedings represent the papers presented at this exciting conference which summarized the State of the Art technology of Accelerator applications in research and Industry. These proceedings contain 341 papers, out of which, 99 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  9. Magnetic detector for projectiles in tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Knowlen, C.; Murakami, D.; Stonich, I.

    1990-01-01

    A new wall-mounted, magnetic detector is presented for measuring projectile passage times in tubes. The detector has the advantages of simplicity over laser and microwave techniques and has other advantages over the electrical contact wire technique. Representative data are presented. The detector is shown to be very insensitive to strong pressure waves and combustion, but able to detect the passage of the projectile (carrying one or two magnets) clearly. Two modes of operation of the detector are described and the use of these detectors to measure projectile velocities, accelerations, and spin rates is discussed.

  10. Rare Isotope Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2002-04-01

    The next frontier for low-energy nuclear physics involves experimentation with accelerated beams of short-lived radioactive isotopes. A new facility, the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), is proposed to produce large amount of these rare isotopes and post-accelerate them to energies relevant for studies in nuclear physics, astrophysics and the study of fundamental interactions at low energy. The basic science motivation for this facility will be introduced. The general facility layout, from the 400 kW heavy-ion superconducting linac used for production of the required isotopes to the novel production and extraction schemes and the highly efficient post-accelerator, will be presented. Special emphasis will be put on a number of technical breakthroughs and recent R&D results that enable this new facility.

  11. Introductory Physics Experiments Using the Wiimote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, William; Rooney, Frank; Ochoa, Romulo

    2009-03-01

    The Wii, a video game console, is a very popular device with millions of units sold worldwide over the past two years. Although computationally it is not a powerful machine, to a physics educator its most important components can be its controllers. The Wiimote (or remote) controller contains three accelerometers, an infrared detector, and Bluetooth connectivity at a relatively low price. Thanks to available open source code, any PC with Bluetooth capability can detect the information sent out by the Wiimote. We have designed several experiments for introductory physics courses that make use of the accelerometers and Bluetooth connectivity. We have adapted the Wiimote to measure the: variable acceleration in simple harmonic motion, centripetal and tangential accelerations in circular motion, and the accelerations generated when students lift weights. We present the results of our experiments and compare them with those obtained when using motion and/or force sensors.

  12. Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Norman Robert

    2013-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. The Propositions of Science: 1. The subject matter of science; 2. The nature of laws; 3. The nature of laws (contd); 4. The discovery and proof of laws; 5. The explanation of laws; 6. Theories; 7. Chance and probability; 8. The meaning of science; 9. Science and philosophy; Part II. Measurement: 10. Fundamental measurement; 11. Physical number; 12. Fractional and negative magnitudes; 13. Numerical laws and derived magnitudes; 14. Units and dimensions; 15. The uses of dimensions; 16. Errors of measurement; methodical errors; 17. Errors of measurement; errors of consistency and the adjustment of observations; 18. Mathematical physics; Appendix; Index.

  13. A guide to experimental elementary particle physics literature, 1985--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Alekhin, S.I.; Bazeeva, V.V.; Ezhela, V.V.; Filimonov, B.B.; Lugovsky, S.B.; Nikolaev, A.S.; Petrova, N.L.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Striganov, S.I.; Stroganov, Y.G.; Shelkovenko, A.N.; Yuschenko, O.P. . Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Yost, G.P.; Rittenberg, A.; Armstrong, F.E.; Barnett, R.M.; Simpson, K.H.; Trippe, T.G.; Wagman, G.S.; W

    1990-11-01

    We present an indexed guide to experimental high energy physics literature for the years 1985--1989. No actual data are given, but approximately 3500 papers are indexed by Beam/Target/Momentum, Reaction/Momentum (including the final stare), Final State Particle, and Accelerator/Experiment/ Detector.

  14. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-01

    This report is divided into: the experimental research program; theoretical physics program; accelerator research and development; and divisional computing activities. The experimental research program covers: experiments with data; experiments in planning or construction; and detector development. Work done for this period is summarized for each area.

  15. LCDD: A complete detector description package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman; McCormick, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    LCDD has been developed to provide a complete detector description package for physics detector simulations using Geant4. All aspects of the experimental setup, such as the physical geometry, magnetic fields, and sensitive detector readouts, as well as control of the physics simulations, such as physics processes, interaction models and kinematic limits, are defined at runtime. Users are therefore able to concentrate on the design of the detector system without having to master the intricacies of C++ programming or being proficient in setting up their own Geant4 application. We describe both the XML-based file format and the processors which communicate this information to the underlying Geant4 simulation toolkit.

  16. Fishing for New Physics with Massive Neutral Dibosons: Measurements of ZZ Production Cross Section and the Search for Invisible Higgs Boson Decays Beyond the Standard Model with the CMS Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasco, Matthew Ervin

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a theory describing the fundamental interactions and properties of subatomic particles. A key feature is its ability to explain particle mass through the Higgs mechanism, and a by-product of this mechanism is the Higgs boson. The discovery of the Higgs boson, in 2012 at CERN, completed the Standard Model particle zoo, but observed phenomena, like dark matter, remain unexplained. The analyses presented explore proton-proton collison events resulting in a Z boson plus missing transverse energy (MET). The motivation for this is to investigate two processes: Standard Model (SM) ZZ production, and beyond Standard Model (BSM) ZH production, in particular the ZZ to 2l2nu and ZH to 2l + H(inv) channels. The place-holder H(inv) is for all Higgs boson decay modes resulting in undetected "invisible" particles, which may branch to new physics, like dark matter particles. The data used are from Run 1 (2011--2012) of CMS, where proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV were delivered by the LHC. The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector located along the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is a particle accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. To extract these signals containing real MET from background containing fake mismeasured MET, a new "reduced MET" variable is constructed and optimized. This assists in the measurement of the ZZ production cross section. The results of the exclusive ZZ to 2l2nu cross section measurement are 201+82/-69 fb and 264+81/-64 fb from the 7 and 8 TeV portions of Run 1 data, respectively. Bayesian unfolding is used to measure a cross section of 224+68/-70 fb from the 8 TeV data. These results both agree with next-to-leading order predictions from the Standard Model. The differential cross section as a function of transverse momentum of the Z boson is also measured from unfolding, for the purpose of providing a way to compare data to new theories. To distinguish ZH to 2l + H(inv) from

  17. Comparison of the imaging physics performance of a prototype flat-panel detector with a 400-speed screen-film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Rush, Charles

    2001-06-01

    The performance of a digital radiography system that included a prototype flat panel detector (StingRay) was compared with a 400 speed screen-film system. The flat panel detector consisted of a 500 micrometers thick CsI scintillator with an image matrix size of 3k2. The limiting spatial resolution of screen-film (approximately 4 line pairs/mm) was superior to that of the flat panel detector (approximately 2.5 line pairs/mm). The digital detector had an excellent linearity response (r2 equals 0.997), a dynamic range of 20,000:1, and saturated at a radiation exposure of 60 mR.

  18. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  19. The BABAR detector: Upgrades, operation and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Garra Tico, J.; Lopez, L.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Clark, A. R.; Day, C. T.; Furman, M.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Merchant, A. M.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Suzuki, A.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zisman, M.; Barrett, M.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; O'Neale, S. W.; Penny, R. C.; Smith, D.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Fella, A.; Antonioli, E.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Foster, B.; Mackay, C.; Walker, D.; Abe, K.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Randle-Conde, A.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Telnov, V. I.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Atmacan, H.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Wang, K.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, L.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Echenard, B.; Erwin, R. J.; Fang, F.; Flood, K.; Hitlin, D. G.; Metzler, S.; Narsky, I.; Oyang, J.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Antillon, E. A.; Barillari, T.; Becker, J.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Clifton, Z. C.; Derrington, I. M.; Destree, J.; Dima, M. O.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Gilman, J. D.; Hachtel, J.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Wagner, S. R.; West, C. G.; Zhang, J.; Ayad, R.; Blouw, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q. L.; Altenburg, D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kaiser, S.; Kobel, M. J.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Mader, W. F.; Maly, E.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Dohou, F.; Ferrag, S.; Latour, E.; Mathieu, A.; Renard, C.; Schrenk, S.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Clark, P. J.; Lavin, D. R.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Swain, J. E.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, D.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Carassiti, V.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Evangelisti, F.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Landi, L.; Luppi, E.; Malaguti, R.; Negrini, M.; Padoan, C.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Sarti, A.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; de Sangro, R.; Santoni, M.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musico, P.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Bailey, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Wu, J.; Adametz, A.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Gaillard, J. R.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Taylor, G. P.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Grenier, G. J.; Hamilton, R.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Fischer, P.-A.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Schott, G.; Albert, J. N.; Arnaud, N.; Beigbeder, C.; Breton, D.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Dû, S.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Nief, J. Y.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Tocut, V.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Wang, L. L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Bellodi, G.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; Cormack, C. M.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dixon, P.; George, K. A.; Menges, W.; Potter, R. J. L.; Sacco, R.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Sigamani, M.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Allison, J.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Forti, A. C.; Fullwood, J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Jackson, G.; Kelly, M. P.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Naisbit, M. T.; Savvas, N.; Weatherall, J. H.; West, T. J.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Farbin, A.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S. Y.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Koeneke, K.; Lang, M. I.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yi, M.; Zhao, M.; Zheng, Y.; Klemetti, M.; Lindemann, D.; Mangeol, D. J. J.; Mclachlin, S. E.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Cerizza, G.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Pellegrini, R.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Godang, R.; Brunet, S.; Cote, D.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Brau, B.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Smith, D. S.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Iwasaki, M.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Borsato, E.; Castelli, G.; Colecchia, F.; Crescente, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dorigo, A.; Fanin, C.; Furano, F.; Gagliardi, N.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Solagna, P.; Stevanato, E.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Akar, S.; Bailly, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J. J.; Lebbolo, H.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Marchiori, G.; Martin, L.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Pivk, M.; Prendki, J.; Roos, L.; Sitt, S.; Stark, J.; Thérin, G.; Vallereau, A.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Pennazzi, S.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Fernholz, R. E.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Sands, W. R.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Bulfon, C.; Buccheri, E.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Li Gioi, L.; Lunadei, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; del Re, D.; Renga, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Bünger, C.; Christ, S.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Bly, M.; Brew, C.; Condurache, C.; De Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Ricciardi, S.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Bourgeois, P.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Georgette, Z.; Graziani, G.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Serfass, B.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Akre, R.; Aston, D.; Azemoon, T.; Bard, D. J.; Bartelt, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Becla, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Berger, N.; Bertsche, K.; Boeheim, C. T.; Bouldin, K.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Browne, M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Burgess, W.; Cai, Y.; Cartaro, C.; Ceseracciu, A.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Craddock, W. W.; Crane, G.; Cristinziani, M.; DeBarger, S.; Decker, F. J.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Donald, M.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fan, S.; Field, R. C.; Fisher, A.; Fox, J.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Gaponenko, I.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Haller, G.; Hamilton, J.; Hanushevsky, A.; Hasan, A.; Hast, C.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Iverson, R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kharakh, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Krasnykh, A.; Krebs, J.; Kroeger, W.; Kulikov, A.; Kurita, N.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Libby, J.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lüth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; McCulloch, M.; McDonald, J.; Melen, R.; Menke, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Messner, R.; Moss, L. J.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, D.; Nelson, S.; Nordby, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; O'Grady, C. P.; O'Neill, F. G.; Ofte, I.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Piemontese, M.; Pierson, S.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Ratkovsky, S.; Reif, R.; Rivetta, C.; Rodriguez, R.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwarz, H.; Schwiening, J.; Seeman, J.; Smith, D.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stanek, M.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Teytelman, D.; Thompson, J. M.; Tinslay, J. S.; Trunov, A.; Turner, J.; van Bakel, N.; van Winkle, D.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Weber, T.; West, C. A.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wittmer, W.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yan, Y.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Yocky, G.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Singh, H.; Weidemann, A. W.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Meyer, T. I.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Liu, J.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.; Soffer, A.; De Silva, A.; Lund, P.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Rashevskaya, I.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Agarwal, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Brown, C. M.; Choi, H. H. F.; Fortin, D.; Fransham, K. B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hollar, J. J.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Tan, P.; Vuosalo, C. O.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Greene, M. G.; Kordich, T. M. B.

    2013-11-01

    The BABAR detector operated successfully at the PEP-II asymmetric e+e- collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory from 1999 to 2008. This report covers upgrades, operation, and performance of the collider and the detector systems, as well as the trigger, online and offline computing, and aspects of event reconstruction since the beginning of data taking.

  20. Intelligent Detector Design

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.; Cassell, R.; Johnson, T.; McCormick, J.; Magill, S.; Kuhlmann, S.; /Argonne

    2007-02-13

    At a future e+e- linear collider, precision measurements of jets will be required in order to understand physics at and beyond the electroweak scale. Calorimetry will be used with other detectors in an optimal way to reconstruct particle 4-vectors with unprecedented precision. This Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA) approach is seen as the best way to achieve particle mass resolutions from dijet measurements in the range of {approx} 30%/{radical}E, resulting in innovative methods for choosing the calorimeter technology and optimizing the detector design.

  1. The CDF SVX II detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    The proposed CDF SVX II detector upgrade for secondary vertex detection during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II collider run is described. The general design and important features of this silicon vertex detector are presented. The CDF physics goals which are addressed by this detector are also given.

  2. Diagnostics for induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1996-04-01

    The induction accelerator was conceived by N. C. Christofilos and first realized as the Astron accelerator that operated at LLNL from the early 1960`s to the end of 1975. This accelerator generated electron beams at energies near 6 MeV with typical currents of 600 Amperes in 400 ns pulses. The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) built at Livermore`s Site 300 produced 10,000 Ampere beams with pulse widths of 70 ns at energies approaching 50 MeV. Several other electron and ion induction accelerators have been fabricated at LLNL and LBNL. This paper reviews the principal diagnostics developed through efforts by scientists at both laboratories for measuring the current, position, energy, and emittance of beams generated by these high current, short pulse accelerators. Many of these diagnostics are closely related to those developed for other accelerators. However, the very fast and intense current pulses often require special diagnostic techniques and considerations. The physics and design of the more unique diagnostics developed for electron induction accelerators are presented and discussed in detail.

  3. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects.

  4. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  5. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tull, Carolyn R.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  6. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, D.; Bernardi, G.; Gerber, C.; Junk, T.; Juste, A.; Kotwal, A.; Lewis, J.; Mesropian, C.; Schellman, H.; Sekaric, J.; Toback, D.; Van Kooten, R.; Vellidis, C.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-02-27

    We present a comprehensive review of the physics results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations up to summer 2014, with emphasis on those achieved in the Run II of the Tevatron collider which delivered a total integrated luminosity of ~10 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~{\\rm TeV}$. The results are presented in six main physics topics: QCD, Heavy Flavor, Electroweak, Top quark, Higgs boson and searches for New Particles and Interactions. The characteristics of the accelerator, detectors, and the techniques used to achieve these results are also briefly summarized.

  7. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  8. Physics.

    PubMed

    Bromley, D A

    1980-07-01

    From massive quarks deep in the hearts of atomic nuclei to the catastrophic collapse of giant stars in the farthest reaches of the universe, from the partial realization of Einstein's dream of a unified theory of the forces of nature to the most practical applications in technology, medicine, and throughout contemporary society, physics continues to have a profound impact on man's view of the universe and on the quality of life. The author argues that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, new insight-and the new questions-have been among the most productive in the history of the field and puts into context his selection of some of the most important new developments in this fundamental science.

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry for measurement of long-lived radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Elmore, D; Phillips, F M

    1987-05-01

    Particle accelerators, such as those built for research in nuclear physics, can also be used together with magnetic and electrostatic mass analyzers to measure rare isotopes at very low abundance ratios. All molecular ions can be eliminated when accelerated to energies of millions of electron volts. Some atomic isobars can be eliminated with the use of negative ions; others can be separated at high energies by measuring their rate of energy loss in a detector. The long-lived radioisotopes (10)Be, (14)C,(26)A1, 36Cl, and (129)1 can now be measured in small natural samples having isotopic abundances in the range 10(-12) to 10(- 5) and as few as 10(5) atoms. In the past few years, research applications of accelerator mass spectrometry have been concentrated in the earth sciences (climatology, cosmochemistry, environmental chemistry, geochronology, glaciology, hydrology, igneous petrogenesis, minerals exploration, sedimentology, and volcanology), in anthropology and archeology (radiocarbon dating), and in physics (searches for exotic particles and measurement of halflives). In addition, accelerator mass spectrometry may become an important tool for the materials and biological sciences. PMID:17740475

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry for measurement of long-lived radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Elmore, D; Phillips, F M

    1987-05-01

    Particle accelerators, such as those built for research in nuclear physics, can also be used together with magnetic and electrostatic mass analyzers to measure rare isotopes at very low abundance ratios. All molecular ions can be eliminated when accelerated to energies of millions of electron volts. Some atomic isobars can be eliminated with the use of negative ions; others can be separated at high energies by measuring their rate of energy loss in a detector. The long-lived radioisotopes (10)Be, (14)C,(26)A1, 36Cl, and (129)1 can now be measured in small natural samples having isotopic abundances in the range 10(-12) to 10(- 5) and as few as 10(5) atoms. In the past few years, research applications of accelerator mass spectrometry have been concentrated in the earth sciences (climatology, cosmochemistry, environmental chemistry, geochronology, glaciology, hydrology, igneous petrogenesis, minerals exploration, sedimentology, and volcanology), in anthropology and archeology (radiocarbon dating), and in physics (searches for exotic particles and measurement of halflives). In addition, accelerator mass spectrometry may become an important tool for the materials and biological sciences.

  11. The Watchman Detector Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dazeley, Steven

    2014-03-01

    The Watchman collaboration is proposing a kiloton scale antineutrino detector of reactor-based antineutrinos for non-proliferation purposes. As an added bonus the detector will also have the capability to search for evidence of sterile neutrino oscillation, super-nova antineutrinos and, in a second phase, measure the neutrino mass hierarchy. Despite that fact that KamLAND demonstrated the feasibility of kiloton scale, long distance antineutrino detection with liquid scintillator, similar detectors at the megaton scale remain problematic for environmental, cost and light attenuation reasons. Water, with gadolinium added for neutron sensitivity, may be the detection medium of choice if its efficiency can be shown to be competitive with scintillator. The goal of the Watchman project, therefore, is to demonstrate medium distance reactor antineutrino detection, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of moving to water-based megaton scale antineutrino detectors in the future. In this talk I will describe the scope of the experiment, the physics and engineering challenges involved, the proposed design and the predicted performance of the experimental non-proliferation and high-energy physics program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-648381.

  12. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yudong |

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  14. Symposium report on frontier applications of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1993-09-28

    This report contains viewgraph material on the following topics: Electron-Positron Linear Colliders; Unconventional Colliders; Prospects for UVFEL; Accelerator Based Intense Spallation; Neutron Sources; and B Physics at Hadron Accelerators with RHIC as an Example.

  15. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  16. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema

    Andrei Seryi

    2016-07-12

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  17. The neutrino electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P.K.; Stenflo, L.; Bingham, R.; Bethe, H.A.; Dawson, J.M.; Mendonca, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that a wake of electron plasma oscillations can be created by the nonlinear ponderomotive force of an intense neutrino flux. The electrons trapped in the plasma wakefield will be accelerated to high energies. Such processes may be important in supernovas and pulsars. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Results from the characterisation of Advanced GAmma Tracking Array prototype detectors and their consequences for the next-generation nuclear physics spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, M. R.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P.; Rigby, S.; Unsworth, C.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Medina, P.; Parisel, C.; Santos, C.

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project that is aiming to construct a complete 4π High Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer for nuclear structure studies at future Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) Facilities. The proposed array will utilise digital electronics, Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) and Gamma-Ray Tracking (GRT) algorithms, to overcome the limited efficiencies encountered by current Escape Suppressed Spectrometers (ESS), whilst maintaining the high Peak-to-Total ratio. Two AGATA symmetrical segmented Canberra Eurisys (CE) prototype HPGe detectors have been tested at the University of Liverpool. A highly collimated Cs-137 (662keV) beam was raster scanned across each detector and data were collected in both singles and coincidence modes. The charge sensitive preamplifier output pulse shapes from all 37 channels (one for each of the 36 segments and one for the centre contact) were digitised and stored for offline analysis. The shapes of the real charge and image charge pulses have been studied to give detailed information on the position dependent response of each detector. 1mm position sensitivity has been achieved with the parameterisation of average pulse shapes, calculated from data collected with each of the detectors. The coincidence data has also been utilised to validate the electric field simulation code Multi Geometry Simulation (MGS). The precisely determined 3D interaction positions allow the comparison of experimental pulse shapes from single site interactions with those generated by the simulation. It is intended that the validated software will be used to calculate a basis data set of pulse shapes for the array, from which any interaction site can be determined through a χ2 minimisation of the digitized pulse with linear combinations of basis pulseshapes. The results from this partial validation, along with those from the investigation into the position sensitivity of each detector are presented.

  19. (Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors)

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  20. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  1. New light weakly-coupled particle searches in a neutrino detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzikoutelis, A.; Kotelnikov, S.; Bambah, B. A.; Kasetti, S. P.

    2014-03-11

    Neutrino detectors at the accelerator machines of the Intensity Frontier in particle physics are becoming commonplace. As their capabilities are being understood, they seem to have the potential for studies beyond the neutrino oscillations measurements. Besides these primary neutrino physics goals, a number of exotic searches can be done with such detectors in general, and the NOvA detectors that we present here, as a particular example. Specifically, we focus on simulating signatures in NOvA experiment's Near-Detector (300 ton, 900 m from the NuMI target of Fermilab) that correspond to beam-generated new physics states from hidden sectors, dark sectors, axion-like particles, heavy or sterile neutrinos, and heavy photons. As there are no physics generators that can inherently include such states, along with the mainstream production branches, we present here the initial stages of an effort to incorporate these signatures manually in the overall simulation framework of the NOvA experiment. For this, we discuss examples and examine the potential and challenges for detecting such signatures.

  2. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  3. SuperB Progress Report for Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Buonomo, B.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Esposito, M.; Guiducci, S.; Mazzitelli, G.; Pellegrino, L.; Preger, M.A.; Raimondi, P.; Ricci, R.; Rotundo, U.; Sanelli, C.; Serio, M.; Stella, A.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; Bertsche, K.; Brachman, A.; /SLAC /Novosibirsk, IYF /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPP /LPSC, Grenoble /IRFU, SPP, Saclay /DESY /Cockroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /U. Liverpool /CERN

    2012-02-14

    This report details the progress made in by the SuperB Project in the area of the Collider since the publication of the SuperB Conceptual Design Report in 2007 and the Proceedings of SuperB Workshop VI in Valencia in 2008. With this document we propose a new electron positron colliding beam accelerator to be built in Italy to study flavor physics in the B-meson system at an energy of 10 GeV in the center-of-mass. This facility is called a high luminosity B-factory with a project name 'SuperB'. This project builds on a long history of successful e+e- colliders built around the world, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. The key advances in the design of this accelerator come from recent successes at the DAFNE collider at INFN in Frascati, Italy, at PEP-II at SLAC in California, USA, and at KEKB at KEK in Tsukuba Japan, and from new concepts in beam manipulation at the interaction region (IP) called 'crab waist'. This new collider comprises of two colliding beam rings, one at 4.2 GeV and one at 6.7 GeV, a common interaction region, a new injection system at full beam energies, and one of the two beams longitudinally polarized at the IP. Most of the new accelerator techniques needed for this collider have been achieved at other recently completed accelerators including the new PETRA-3 light source at DESY in Hamburg (Germany) and the upgraded DAFNE collider at the INFN laboratory at Frascati (Italy), or during design studies of CLIC or the International Linear Collider (ILC). The project is to be designed and constructed by a worldwide collaboration of accelerator and engineering staff along with ties to industry. To save significant construction costs, many components from the PEP-II collider at SLAC will be recycled and used in this new accelerator. The interaction region will be designed in collaboration with the particle physics detector to guarantee successful mutual use. The accelerator collaboration will consist of several groups at present universities and national

  4. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  5. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  6. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  7. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  8. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  9. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  10. Thicker, more efficient superconducting strip-line detectors for high throughput macromolecules analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Casaburi, A.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M.; Pagano, S.

    2011-01-10

    Fast detectors with large area are required in time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high throughput analysis of biological molecules. We fabricated and characterized subnanosecond 1x1 mm{sup 2} NbN superconducting strip-line detectors. The influence of the strip-line thickness on the temporal characteristics and efficiency of the detector for the impacts of keV accelerated molecules is investigated. We find that the increase of thickness improves both efficiency and response time. In the thicker sample we achieved a rise time of 380 ps, a fall time of 1.38 ns, and a higher count rate. The physics involved in this behavior is investigated.

  11. Acquisition System and Detector Interface for Power Pulsed Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornat, Rémi; CALICE Colaboration

    A common DAQ system is being developed within the CALICE collaboration. It provides a flexible and scalable architecture based on giga-ethernet and 8b/10b serial links in order to transmit either slow control data, fast signals or read out data. A detector interface (DIF) is used to connect detectors to the DAQ system based on a single firmware shared among the collaboration but targeted on various physical implementations. The DIF allows to build, store and queue packets of data as well as to control the detectors providing USB and serial link connectivity. The overall architecture is foreseen to manage several hundreds of thousands channels.

  12. New directions in linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Current work on linear particle accelerators is placed in historical and physics contexts, and applications driving the state of the art are discussed. Future needs and the ways they may force development are outlined in terms of exciting R and D challenges presented to today's accelerator designers. 23 references, 7 figures.

  13. Proceedings of the 1987 IEEE particle accelerator conference: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, E.R.; Taylor, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains papers from the IEEE particle accelerator conference. This second volume of three covers the following main topics: Instrumentation and control, accelerators for medium energies and nuclear physics, high current accelerators, and beam dynamics. (LSP)

  14. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  15. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12 GeV Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  16. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers, the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.

  17. Detector development for Jefferson Lab's 12GeV Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Qiang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Jefferson Lab will soon finish its highly anticipated 12 GeV Upgrade. With doubled maximum energy, Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential, addressing important topics in nuclear, hadronic and electroweak physics. In order to take full advantage of the high energy, high luminosity beam, new detectors are being developed, designed and constructed to fit the needs of different physics topics. The paper will give an overview of various new detector technologies to be used for 12 GeV experiments. It will then focus on the development of two solenoid-based spectrometers,more » the GlueX and SoLID spectrometers. The GlueX experiment in Hall D will study the complex properties of gluons through exotic hybrid meson spectroscopy. The GlueX spectrometer, a hermetic detector package designed for spectroscopy and the associated partial wave analysis, is currently in the final stage of construction. Hall A, on the other hand, is developing the SoLID spectrometer to capture the 3D image of the nucleon from semi-inclusive processes and to study the intrinsic properties of quarks through mirror symmetry breaking. Such a spectrometer will have the capability to handle very high event rates while still maintaining a large acceptance in the forward region.« less

  18. Wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The search for new methods to accelerate particle beams to high energy using high gradients has resulted in a number of candidate schemes. One of these, wakefield acceleration, has been the subject of considerable R D in recent years. This effort has resulted in successful proof of principle experiments and in increased understanding of many of the practical aspects of the technique. Some wakefield basics plus the status of existing and proposed experimental work is discussed, along with speculations on the future of wake field acceleration. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  19. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  20. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  1. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  2. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  3. The atmosphere as particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanev, T.

    1990-03-01

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV gamma-ray detector on the moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the moon.

  4. The atmosphere as particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stanev, T. )

    1990-03-15

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV {gamma}-ray detector on the Moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the Moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the Moon.

  5. The atmosphere as particle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, Todor

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using an inflatable, gas-filled balloon as a TeV gamma-ray detector on the moon is considered. By taking an atmosphere of Xenon gas there, or by extracting it on the moon, a layman's detector design is presented. In spite of its shortcomings, the exercise illustrates several of the novel features offered by particle physics on the moon.

  6. The Physics of the CMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sanabria, J. C.

    2007-10-26

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will start running 2008 producing proton-proton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. Four large experiments will operate together with this accelerator: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. The main scientific goal of this project is to understand in detail the mechanism for electro-weak symmetry breaking and to search for physics beyond the standard model of particles. ATLAS and CMS are general purpose detectors designed for search and discovery of new physics, and optimized to search for Higgs and signals of supersymmetric matter (SUSY). In this paper the main features of the CMS detector will be presented and its potential for Higgs and SUSY discoveries will be discussed.

  7. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Detector design for a Future Electron-Positron Collider (4/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In this lecture I will discuss the issues related to the overall design and optimization of a detector for ILC and CLIC energies. I will concentrate on the two main detector concepts which are being developed in the context of the ILC. Here there has been much recent progress in developing realistic detector models and in understanding the physics performance of the overall detector concept. In addition, I will discuss the how the differences in the detector requirements for the ILC and CLIC impact the overall detector design.

  8. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  9. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  10. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  11. Accelerators for America's Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Particle accelerator, a powerful tool to energize beams of charged particles to a desired speed and energy, has been the working horse for investigating the fundamental structure of matter and fundermental laws of nature. Most known examples are the 2-mile long Stanford Linear Accelerator at SLAC, the high energy proton and anti-proton collider Tevatron at FermiLab, and Large Hadron Collider that is currently under operation at CERN. During the less than a century development of accelerator science and technology that led to a dazzling list of discoveries, particle accelerators have also found various applications beyond particle and nuclear physics research, and become an indispensible part of the economy. Today, one can find a particle accelerator at almost every corner of our lives, ranging from the x-ray machine at the airport security to radiation diagnostic and therapy in hospitals. This presentation will give a brief introduction of the applications of this powerful tool in fundermental research as well as in industry. Challenges in accelerator science and technology will also be briefly presented

  12. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  13. The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 2013 Europhysics conference on High Energy Physics is a biennial conference organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society since 1971. The conference in this series usually attracts 600-700 participants and is one of the worlds largest conferences in this field. The latest conferences in this series were held in Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisabon and Aachen. The conference has parallel, plenary and poster sessions as well as an industrial exhibition. The conference is jointly organised by the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm University, Chalmers University of Technology, Lund University, Uppsala University, Nordita and the Oskar Klein Centre. Topics covered are: Standard Model and Beyond Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Neutrino Physics Flavour Physics CP Violation and Tests of Fundamental Symmetries QCD and Hadronic Physics Heavy Ions Astroparticle Physics High Energy Astrophysics Cosmology Non-perturbative Field Theory String Theory Detectors and Data Handling Accelerator R&D Future Facilities. Special ECFA session 20 July: Particle Physics after the European strategy update

  14. A Laser Testing Facility for the Characterization of Silicon Strip Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    Silicon strip detectors are used for high-precision tracking systems in particle physics experiments. During the 12 GeV upgrade to the accelerator at Jefferson Lab, a new spectrometer, CLAS12, will be built in Hall B. The University of New Hampshire is part of the collaboration designing and building CLAS12. Among the detector systems being developed for CLAS12 is a silicon vertex tracker that will be placed close to the target, providing excellent position resolution for vertex determination. It is vital to have the ability to perform quality assurance tests and to evaluate the performance of the individual silicon strip detectors before installation in CLAS12. UNH is designing and building a laser testing facility to perform this task. The design consists of an infrared laser system and a precision computer-controlled positioning system that scans the laser light on the detector. The detector signals are read out by a data acquisition system for analysis. The facility includes a cleanroom area and a dry storage containment system. The facility allows the characterization of the large number of detectors before the final assembly of the silicon vertex tracker.

  15. The Next Generation of Crystal Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Crystal detectors have been used widely for decades in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, medical instruments and homeland security applications. Novel crystal detectors are continuously being found. Future HEP experiments require bright and fast crystal detectors with excellent radiation hardness. Cost-effectiveness is also a crucial issue for crystal detectors to be used in a large volume. To face these new challenges a thorough R&D program is required to investigate and develop crystal detectors for future HEP experiments in all frontiers.

  16. Pulse height fluctuations of integrated micromegas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefdeville, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Hartjes, F.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J.; Blanco Carballo, V. M.; Salm, C.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Colas, P.; Giomataris, I.

    2008-06-01

    Recent publications report that Micromegas-based detectors exhibit very good energy resolution for gaseous radiation detectors. When made in microtechnology, the physical dimensions of such a detector can be controlled with micrometer precision over a large area. In this paper we report an energy resolution of 5.2% r.m.s. at 5.9 keV of such a detector (called InGrid) and present experimental and simulation results to explain and quantify the contributions to the gain fluctuations. Our results may be applicable also for other micropattern gas detectors.

  17. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, K.

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, in which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.

  18. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kamdin, K.

    2015-03-24

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, in which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.

  19. Understanding the SNO+ Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Kamdin, K.

    2015-03-24

    SNO+, a large liquid scintillator experiment, is the successor of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The scintillator volume will be loaded with large quantities of 130Te, an isotope that undergoes double beta decay, in order to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. In addition to this search, SNO+ has a broad physics program due to its sensitivity to solar and supernova neutrinos, as well as reactor and geo anti-neutrinos. SNO+ can also place competitive limits on certain modes of invisible nucleon decay during its first phase. The detector is currently undergoing commissioning in preparation for its first phase, inmore » which the detector is filled with ultra pure water. This will be followed by a pure scintillator phase, and then a Tellurium-loaded scintillator phase to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Here we present the work done to model detector aging, which was first observed during SNO. The aging was found to reduce the optical response of the detector. We also describe early results from electronics calibration of SNO+.« less

  20. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  1. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  2. Microwave inverse Cerenkov accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. B.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1997-03-01

    A Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) is currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. The accelerating structure in MICA consists of an axisymmetric dielectrically lined waveguide. For the injection of 6 MeV microbunches from a 2.856 GHz RF gun, and subsequent acceleration by the TM01 fields, particle simulation studies predict that an acceleration gradient of 6.3 MV/m can be achieved with a traveling-wave power of 15 MW applied to the structure. Synchronous injection into a narrow phase window is shown to allow trapping of all injected particles. The RF fields of the accelerating structure are shown to provide radial focusing, so that longitudinal and transverse emittance growth during acceleration is small, and that no external magnetic fields are required for focusing. For 0.16 nC, 5 psec microbunches, the normalized emittance of the accelerated beam is predicted to be less than 5πmm-mrad. Experiments on sample alumina tubes have been conducted that verify the theoretical dispersion relation for the TM01 mode over a two-to-one range in frequency. No excitation of axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric competing waveguide modes was observed. High power tests showed that tangential electric fields at the inner surface of an uncoated sample of alumina pipe could be sustained up to at least 8.4 MV/m without breakdown. These considerations suggest that a MICA test accelerator can be built to examine these predictions using an available RF power source, 6 MeV RF gun and associated beam line.

  3. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  4. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  5. Accelerator mass spectrometry of molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golser, Robin; Gnaser, Hubert; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Vockenhuber, Christof; Wallner, Anton

    2005-10-01

    The use of tandem accelerators for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allows to literally "analyze" molecules. When a molecular ion with mass M and charge Q is injected at the low-energy side, it is efficiently broken up into its atomic constituents during the stripping process in the terminal. At the high-energy side the positively charged atomic ions are again analyzed by their mass-to-charge ratio and by their energy in the detector (and eventually by their nuclear charge, too). We show the usefulness of the AMS method by identifying unambiguously the doubly-charged negative molecule (43Ca19F4)2- for the first time. It considerably eases the task that the total mass M = 119 is odd, so the di-anion is injected at the half-integer mass-to-charge ratio M/Q = 59.5, where no singly charged ions can interfere. The full power of AMS is needed when we try to proof the existence of di-anions with an integer M/Q, e.g. (23Na35Cl3)2-, whose stability is of interest for atomic physics theory.

  6. Beamlets from stochastic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Perri, Silvia; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a realization of the stochastic Fermi acceleration mechanism. The model consists of test particles moving between two oscillating magnetic clouds and differs from the usual Fermi-Ulam model in two ways. (i) Particles can penetrate inside clouds before being reflected. (ii) Particles can radiate a fraction of their energy during the process. Since the Fermi mechanism is at work, particles are stochastically accelerated, even in the presence of the radiated energy. Furthermore, due to a kind of resonance between particles and oscillating clouds, the probability density function of particles is strongly modified, thus generating beams of accelerated particles rather than a translation of the whole distribution function to higher energy. This simple mechanism could account for the presence of beamlets in some space plasma physics situations.

  7. Detectors of Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays, and Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Altamirano, A.; Navarra, G.

    2009-04-30

    We summarize the main features, properties and performances of the typical detectors in use in Cosmic Ray Physics. A brief historical and general introduction will focus on the main classes and requirements of such detectors.

  8. US accelerator contribution to the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, the United States entered into an agreement with CERN to help build the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with contributions to the accelerator and to the large HEP detectors. To accomplish this, the US LHC Accelerator Project was formed, encompassing expertise from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This report is a summary of these contributions including the progress towards project completion, as well as a discussion of future plans for continued US participation in the LHC accelerator.

  9. A first look at reconstructed data from the GlueX detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Simon; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Construction of the GlueX detector in Hall D at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has recently been completed as part of the 12 GeV Upgrade to the facility. The detector consists of a barrel region containing devices for tracking charged particles and a lead-scintillator calorimeter for detecting photons, and a forward region consisting of two layers of scintillator paddles for time-of-flight measurements and a lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter. The electron beam from the accelerator is converted into a photon beam by inserting a diamond radiator, thereby producing a coherent bremsstrahlung spectrum of photons impinging on a 30 cm-long LH2 target. The energy of the photon beam is determined using a tagging spectrometer. A commissioning run took place in Spring of 2015 during which all of the detector components were read out. Preliminary calibrations have been determined to a level sufficient to allow reconstruction of final states with several charged tracks and neutral particles. A first look at results of reconstruction of events using the GlueX detector will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  10. Elementary particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Elementary particle physics is discussed. Status of the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interactions; phenomena beyond the Standard Model; new accelerator projects; and possible contributions from non-accelerator experiments are examined.

  11. Figuring the Acceleration of the Simple Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberherr, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The centripetal acceleration has been known since Huygens' (1659) and Newton's (1684) time. The physics to calculate the acceleration of a simple pendulum has been around for more than 300 years, and a fairly complete treatise has been given by C. Schwarz in this journal. But sentences like "the acceleration is always directed towards the…

  12. Summary Scientific Performance of EUCLID Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) plan to partner to build the EUCLID mission. EUCLID is a mission concept for studying the Dark Energy that is hypothesized to account for the accelerating cosmic expansion. For the past year, NASA has been building detector prototypes at Teledyne Imaging Sensors. This talk will summarize the measured scientific performance of these detector prototypes for astrophysical and cosmological applications.

  13. Shielding and grounding in large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Radeka, V.

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ``noise pickup,`` is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed.

  14. The Zero-Degree Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.; Christl, Mark J.; Howell, Leonard W.; Kouznetsov, Evgueni

    2006-01-01

    We will report on a detector system used for accelerator measurement of nuclear fragmentation cross sections. This system consists of two detector planes, each carrying a ring of 8 detectors. Each detector has 64 pads. These two detector planes are arranged facing each other so that the matching detector pads on each plane form a two element charged particle telescope. Each of these telescopes is capable of determining the elemental identity of nuclear fragments passing through it. The system is used to measure light fragment production in the presence of heavier fragments. We will present a detailed discussion of the 64-pad detector design, the substrate design. The front-end electronics used to read out the signals is based on a custom VLSI chip developed for the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter experiment which has been flown successfully twice in Antarctica. Each of these chips has 16 channels and each channel consists of a charge-sensitive preamplifier followed by a shaping amplifier and a track-and-hold circuit. The track-and-hold circuits are connected via a multiplexer to an output line driver. This allows the held signals to be presented, one-by-one via a common data line to a analog-to-digital converter. Because the output line driver can be placed in a high input impedance state when not in use, it is possible to daisy-change many chips on the same common data line. The front-end electronics and data readout scheme will be discussed in detail. The Zero Degree Detector has been used in several accelerator experiments conducted at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory as well as at the HIMAC accelerator in Japan. We will show examples of data taken at these accelerator runs to demonstrate how the system works.

  15. SPICE models for simulating BDJ and BTJ detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Annick; Lu, Guo N.; Sedjil, Mohamed

    1999-03-01

    We have recently reported two novel integrated optical detectors called BDJ detector and BTJ detector. The BDJ detector elaborated in CMOS process can be applied for wavelength detection while the BTJ detector based on a bipolar structure finds its applications in colorimetry. In order to use electronic CAD tools for designing micro- systems we have developed SPICE models for these detectors. The device modeling with physical approach has allowed us to determine photocurrents, which are functions of physical, geometrical, electrical, technological parameters. We have also defined schematic diagram and small signal models and integrated them in the HSPICE program. Simulations and measurements have validated these models.

  16. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  17. Dust Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a recent sounding rocket experiment which found charged dust in the Earth's tropical mesosphere. The dust detector was designed to measure small (5000 - 10000 amu.) charged dust particles, most likely of meteoric origin. A 5 km thick layer of positively charged dust was found at an altitude of 90 km, in the vicinity of an observed sporadic sodium layer and sporadic E layer. The observed dust was positively charged in the bulk of the dust layer, but was negatively charged near the bottom.

  18. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  19. Fast ion energy distribution from third harmonic radio frequency heating measured with a single crystal diamond detector at the Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Muraro, A.; Binda, F.; Eriksson, J.; Sharapov, S.; Collaboration:

    2015-10-15

    Neutron spectroscopy measurements with a single crystal diamond detector have been carried out at JET, for the first time in an experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to MeV energies with radio frequency heating at the third harmonic. Data are interpreted by means of the expected response function of the detector and are used to extract parameters of the highly non-Maxwellian distribution function generated in this scenario. A comparison with observations using a time of flight and liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers is also presented. The results demonstrate the capability of diamond detectors to contribute to fast ion physics studies at JET and are of more general relevance in view of the application of such detectors for spectroscopy measurements in the neutron camera of next step tokamak devices.

  20. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  1. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  2. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  3. ALICE detector in construction phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peryt, Wiktor S.

    2005-09-01

    ALICE1 collaboration, which prepares one of the biggest physics experiments in the history, came into production phase of its detector. The experiment will start at LHC2 at CERN in 2007/2008. In the meantime about 1000 people from ~70 institutions are involved in this enterprise. ALICE detector consists of many sub-detectors, designed and manufactured in many laboratories and commercial firms, located mainly in Europe, but also in U.S., India, China and Korea. To assure appropriate working environment for such a specific task, strictly related to tests of particular components, measurements and assembly procedures Detector Construction Database system has been designed and implemented at CERN and at some labs involved in these activities. In this paper special attention is paid to this topic not only due to fact of innovative approach to the problem. Another reason is the group of young computer scientists (mainly students) from the Warsaw University of Technology, leaded by the author, has designed and developed the system for the whole experiment3. Another very interesting subject is the Data Acquisition System which has to fulfill very hard requirements concerning speed and high bandwidth. Required technical performance is achieved thanks to using PCI bus (usually in previous high energy physics experiments VME standard has been used) and optical links. Very general overview of the whole detector and physics goals of ALICE experiment will also be given.

  4. CLIC vertex detector R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2016-07-01

    A vertex detector concept is under development for the proposed multi-TeV linear e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). To perform precision physics measurements in a challenging environment, the CLIC vertex detector pushes the technological requirements to the limits. This paper reviews the requirements for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensor, readout, powering and cooling.

  5. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  6. The JADE project: an angular cosmic ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maire, Victor; Jago, Alban; Mertens, Alexandre; de Crombrugghe, Guerric; Reydams, Marc; van Vynckt, Delphine; Denies, Jonathan; de Lobkowicz, Ysaline

    the ground using a backpack drilling system. We will also use the angular measurement to monitor the cosmic ray activity by measuring the angular distribution of muons produced in the atmosphere, according to the time of the day and the weather conditions. We shall report on the science and technical results, and implications for Earth-Mars compar-ative studies. Reference: [1] CONNELL J.J. LOPATE C. MCKIBBEN R.B., Angle detecting inclined sensors (ADIS) system: Measuring particle angles of incidence without position sensing detectors, 2001, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 457 (1-2), pp. 220-229.

  7. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  8. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  9. Near infrared detectors for SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Schubnell, M.; Barron, N.; Bebek, C.; Brown, M.G.; Borysow, M.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, R.; Tarle, G.

    2006-05-23

    Large format (1k x 1k and 2k x 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell Scientific Center and Raytheon Vision Systems are characterized as part of the near infrared R&D effort for SNAP (the Super-Nova/Acceleration Probe). These are hybridized HgCdTe focal plane arrays with a sharp high wavelength cut-off at 1.7 um. This cut-off provides a sufficiently deep reach in redshift while it allows at the same time low dark current operation of the passively cooled detectors at 140 K. Here the baseline SNAP near infrared system is briefly described and the science driven requirements for the near infrared detectors are summarized. A few results obtained during the testing of engineering grade near infrared devices procured for the SNAP project are highlighted. In particular some recent measurements that target correlated noise between adjacent detector pixels due to capacitive coupling and the response uniformity within individual detector pixels are discussed.

  10. Review of multi-dimensional large-scale kinetic simulation and physics validation of ion acceleration in relativistic laser-matter interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hui-Chun; Hegelich, B.M.; Fernandez, J.C.; Shah, R.C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Jung, D.; Yin, L; Albright, B.J.; Bowers, K.; Huang, C.; Kwan, T.J.

    2012-06-19

    Two new experimental technologies enabled realization of Break-out afterburner (BOA) - High quality Trident laser and free-standing C nm-targets. VPIC is an powerful tool for fundamental research of relativistic laser-matter interaction. Predictions from VPIC are validated - Novel BOA and Solitary ion acceleration mechanisms. VPIC is a fully explicit Particle In Cell (PIC) code: models plasma as billions of macro-particles moving on a computational mesh. VPIC particle advance (which typically dominates computation) has been optimized extensively for many different supercomputers. Laser-driven ions lead to realization promising applications - Ion-based fast ignition; active interrogation, hadron therapy.

  11. Measurement of Coriolis Acceleration with a Smartphone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaku, Asif; Kraft, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories seldom have experiments that measure the Coriolis acceleration. This has traditionally been the case owing to the inherent complexities of making such measurements. Articles on the experimental determination of the Coriolis acceleration are few and far between in the physics literature. However, because modern…

  12. Centripetal Acceleration: Often Forgotten or Misinterpreted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration is a fundamental concept in physics which is taught in mechanics at all levels. Here, we discuss some challenges in teaching this concept effectively when the path along which the object is moving has a curvature and centripetal acceleration is present. We discuss examples illustrating that both physics teachers and students have…

  13. DUNE Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, James

    2015-08-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment is a worldwide effort to build a next-generation long-baseline neutrino experiment with a neutrino beam and near detector at Fermilab and a far detector at the Sanford Underground Research Facility 1,300 km from Fermilab. It is a merger of previous efforts and other interested parties to build, operate and exploit a staged 40-kt liquid argon detector and a high precision near detector exposed to a high-power, broad-band neutrino beam. The goals of the experiment are precision oscillation measurements, including CP violation and neutrino mass hierarchy determination, search for nucleon decay, and neutrino astrophysics, as well as precision neutrino physics at the near site.

  14. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  15. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  16. A Standing Location Detector Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Control Environmental Stimulation through Simple Physical Activities with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform simple physical activities by controlling their favorite environmental stimulation using Nintendo Wii Balance Boards with a newly developed standing location detection program (SLDP, i.e., a new software program turning a Nintendo Wii Balance…

  17. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  18. Performance of almost edgeless silicon detectors in CTS and 3D-planar technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagoz, E.; Anelli, G.; Antchev, G.; Avati, V.; Bassetti, V.; Berardi, V.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cuneo, S.; Da Vià, C.; Deile, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Hasi, J.; Haug, F.; Heino, J.; Jarron, P.; Kalliopuska, J.; Kašpar, J.; Kenney, C.; Kok, A.; Kundrát, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajíček, M.; Luntama, T.; Macina, D.; Macrí, M.; Minutoli, S.; Mirabito, L.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Parker, S.; Perrot, A.-L.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Santroni, A.; Sette, G.; Siegrist, P.; Smotlacha, J.; Snoeys, W.; Taylor, C.; Watts, S.; Whitmore, J.

    2013-06-01

    The physics programme of the TOTEM experiment requires the detection of very forward protons scattered by only a few microradians out of the LHC beams. For this purpose, stacks of planar Silicon detectors have been mounted in moveable near-beam telescopes (Roman Pots) located along the beamline on both sides of the interaction point. In order to maximise the proton acceptance close to the beams, the dead space at the detector edge had to be minimised. During the detector prototyping phase, different sensor technologies and designs have been explored. A reduction of the dead space to less than 50 μm has been accomplished with two novel silicon detector technologies: one with the Current Terminating Structure (CTS) design and one based on the 3D edge manufacturing. This paper describes performance studies on prototypes of these detectors, carried out in 2004 in a fixed-target muon beam at CERN's SPS accelerator. In particular, the efficiency and accuracy in the vicinity of the beam-facing edges are discussed.

  19. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  20. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.