Science.gov

Sample records for accelerator research department

  1. Essay: Robert H. Siemann As Leader of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, Eric R.; Hogan, Mark J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-14

    Robert H. Siemann originally conceived of the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) as an academic, experimental group dedicated to probing the technical limitations of accelerators while providing excellent educational opportunities for young scientists. The early years of the Accelerator Research Department B, as it was then known, were dedicated to a wealth of mostly student-led experiments to examine the promise of advanced accelerator techniques. High-gradient techniques including millimeter-wave rf acceleration, beam-driven plasma acceleration, and direct laser acceleration were pursued, including tests of materials under rf pulsed heating and short-pulse laser radiation, to establish the ultimate limitations on gradient. As the department and program grew, so did the motivation to found an accelerator research center that brought experimentalists together in a test facility environment to conduct a broad range of experiments. The Final Focus Test Beam and later the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator provided unique experimental facilities for AARD staff and collaborators to carry out advanced accelerator experiments. Throughout the evolution of this dynamic program, Bob maintained a department atmosphere and culture more reminiscent of a university research group than a national laboratory department. His exceptional ability to balance multiple roles as scientist, professor, and administrator enabled the creation and preservation of an environment that fostered technical innovation and scholarship.

  2. Accelerator research studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  3. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  4. Accelerating Ocean Energy to the Marketplace – Environmental Research at the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; Cada, G. F.; Roberts, Jesse; Bevelhimer, Mark

    2010-10-06

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) has mobilized its National Laboratories to address the broad range of environmental effects of ocean and river energy development. The National Laboratories are using a risk-based approach to set priorities among environmental effects, and to direct research activities. Case studies will be constructed to determine the most significant environmental effects of ocean energy harvest for tidal systems in temperate estuaries, for wave energy installations in temperate coastal areas, wave installations in sub-tropical waters, and riverine energy installations in large rivers. In addition, the National Laboratories are investigating the effects of energy removal from waves, tides and river currents using numerical modeling studies. Laboratory and field research is also underway to understand the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise, toxicity from anti-biofouling coatings, effects on benthic habitats, and physical interactions with tidal and wave devices on marine and freshwater organisms and ecosystems. Outreach and interactions with stakeholders allow the National Laboratories to understand and mitigate for use conflicts and to provide useful information for marine spatial planning at the national and regional level.

  5. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  6. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  7. Safety of Department of Energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.E.

    1994-12-31

    In keeping with the enhancement of environmental, safety, and health programs which has occurred in DOE over the past six years, a Safety Order, DOE Order 5480.25, {open_quotes}Safety of Accelertor Facilities,{close_quotes} was issued on November 3, 1992. This order applies to all DOE-owned accelerators capable of creating a radiation area except for commercial radiation-generating equipment. It is the intent of the Order to provide a level of safety comparable to that required of reactors and nuclear processing facilities, without imposing the rigidity of the DOE Nuclear Facility Safety Orders. Key requirements for each facility are: (1) a hazard classification approved by DOE; (2) a design-stage safety review of new large facilities; (3) readiness reviews before commissioning and before routine operation; (4) a safety envelope specifying limits for operation; (5) a Safety Assessment Document; and (6) a documented training program. This Order does not supersede other DOE safety requirements.

  8. Proposed research on advanced accelerator concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes technical progress and accomplishments during the proposed three-year research on advanced accelerator concepts supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-88ER40465. A vigorous theoretical program has been pursued in critical problem areas related to advanced accelerator concepts and the basic equilibrium, stability, and radiation properties of intense charged particle beams. Broadly speaking, our research has made significant contributions in the following three major areas: Investigations of physics issues related to particle acceleration including two-beam accelerators and cyclotron resonance laser (CRL) accelerators; Investigations of RF sources including the free- electron lasers, cyclotron resonance masers, and relativistic magnetrons; Studies of coherent structures in electron plasmas and beams ranging from a low-density, nonrelativistic, pure electron plasma column to high-density, relativistic, non-neutral electron flow in a high-voltage diode. The remainder of this report presents theoretical and computational advances in these areas.

  9. Accelerators for research and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs.

  10. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  11. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  12. UCLA accelerator research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  13. Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator In The Department Of Physics And Nuclear Engineering At West Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillich, Don; Shannon, Mike; Kovanen, Andrew; Anderson, Tom; Bright, Kevin; Edwards, Ronald; Danon, Yaron; Moretti, Brian; Musk, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    The Nuclear Science and Engineering Research Center (NSERC), a Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) office located at the United States Military Academy (USMA), sponsors and manages cadet and faculty research in support of DTRA objectives. The NSERC has created an experimental pyroelectric crystal accelerator program to enhance undergraduate education at USMA in the Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering. This program provides cadets with hands-on experience in designing their own experiments using an inexpensive tabletop accelerator. This device uses pyroelectric crystals to ionize and accelerate gas ions to energies of ˜100 keV. Within the next year, cadets and faculty at USMA will use this device to create neutrons through the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion process, effectively creating a compact, portable neutron generator. The double crystal pyroelectric accelerator will also be used by students to investigate neutron, x-ray, and ion spectroscopy.

  14. Department of Energy. Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge (JIAC) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Jon

    2016-05-05

    local large manufacturers (OEMs) who could provide pull to encourage SMMs (current and future suppliers) to participate. Central to this entire effort was the opportunity that this Final Report documents corresponding to the specific tasks associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded component of the InnoState Jobs Innovation Accelerator Challenge (JIAC) Program.

  15. Accelerator Facilities for Radiation Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1999-01-01

    HSRP Goals in Accelerator Use and Development are: 1.Need for ground-based heavy ion and proton facility to understand space radiation effects discussed most recently by NAS/NRC Report (1996). 2. Strategic Program Goals in facility usage and development: -(1) operation of AGS for approximately 600 beam hours/year; (2) operation of Loma Linda University (LLU) proton facility for approximately 400 beam hours/year; (3) construction of BAF facility; and (4) collaborative research at HIMAC in Japan and with other existing or potential international facilities. 3. MOA with LLU has been established to provide proton beams with energies of 40-250 important for trapped protons and solar proton events. 4. Limited number of beam hours available at Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS).

  16. Rail accelerator research at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Cybyk, B. Z.

    1982-01-01

    A rail accelerator was chosen for study as an electromagnetic space propulsion device because of its simplicity and existing technology base. The results of a mission feasibility study using a large rail accelerator for direct launch of ton-size payloads from the Earth's surface to space, and the results of initial tests with a small, laboratory rail accelerator are presented. The laboratory rail accelerator has a bore of 3 by 3 mm and has accelerated 60 mg projectiles to velocities of 300 to 1000 m/s. Rail materials of Cu, W, and Mo were tested for efficiency and erosion rate.

  17. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on heavy-ion fusion accelerator research: MBE-4: the induction-linac approach; transverse beam dynamics and current amplification; scaling up the results; through ILSE to a driver; ion-source and injector development; and accelerator component research and development.

  18. 17 GHz High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard J.; Shapiro, Michael A.

    2013-07-10

    This is a report on the MIT High Gradient Accelerator Research program which has included: Operation of the 17 GHz, 25 MeV MIT/Haimson Research Corp. electron accelerator at MIT, the highest frequency, stand-alone accelerator in the world; collaboration with members of the US High Gradient Collaboration, including the design and test of novel structures at SLAC at 11.4 GHz; the design, construction and testing of photonic bandgap structures, including metallic and dielectric structures; the investigation of the wakefields in novel structures; and the training of the next generation of graduate students and postdoctoral associates in accelerator physics.

  19. Comparative Research Productivity Measures for Economic Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huettner, David A.; Clark, William

    1997-01-01

    Develops a simple theoretical model to evaluate interdisciplinary differences in research productivity between economics departments and related subjects. Compares the research publishing statistics of economics, finance, psychology, geology, physics, oceanography, chemistry, and geophysics. Considers a number of factors including journal…

  20. Application of particle accelerators in research.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Since the beginning of the past century, accelerators have started to play a fundamental role as powerful tools to discover the world around us, how the universe has evolved since the big bang and to develop fundamental instruments for everyday life. Although more than 15 000 accelerators are operating around the world only a very few of them are dedicated to fundamental research. An overview of the present high energy physics (HEP) accelerator status and prospectives is presented.

  1. NIH/NSF accelerate biomedical research innovations

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration between the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health will give NIH-funded researchers training to help them evaluate their scientific discoveries for commercial potential, with the aim of accelerating biomedical in

  2. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  3. University programs of the U.S. Department of Energy advanced accelerator applications program

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, D. E.; Ward, T. E.; Bresee, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) Program was initiated in fiscal year 2001 (FY-01) by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with other national laboratories. The primary goal of this program is to investigate the feasibility of transmutation of nuclear waste. An Accelerator-Driven Test Facility (ADTF), which may be built during the first decade of the 21st Century, is a major component of this effort. The ADTF would include a large, state-of-the-art charged-particle accelerator, proton-neutron target systems, and accelerator-driven R&D systems. This new facility and its underlying science and technology will require a large cadre of educated scientists and trained technicians. In addition, other applications of nuclear science and engineering (e.g., proliferation monitoring and defense, nuclear medicine, safety regulation, industrial processes, and many others) require increased academic and national infrastructure and student populations. Thus, the AAA Program Office has begun a multi-year program to involve university faculty and students in various phases of the Project to support the infrastructure requirements of nuclear energy, science and technology fields as well as the special needs of the DOE transmutation program. In this paper we describe university programs that have supported, are supporting, and will support the R&D necessary for the AAA Project. Previous work included research for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) project, current (FY-01) programs include graduate fellowships and research for the AAA Project, and it is expected that future programs will expand and add to the existing programs.

  4. Accelerating Geothermal Research (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    Geothermal research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is advancing geothermal technologies to increase renewable power production. Continuous and not dependent on weather, the geothermal resource has the potential to jump to more than 500 gigawatts in electricity production, which is equivalent to roughly half of the current U.S. capacity. Enhanced geothermal systems have a broad regional distribution in the United States, allowing the potential for development in many locations across the country.

  5. Accelerator R&D: Research for Science - Science for Society

    SciTech Connect

    The HEP Accelerator R&D Task Force: N.R. Holtkamp,S. Biedron, S.V. Milton, L. Boeh, J.E. Clayton, G. Zdasiuk, S.A. Gourlay, M.S. Zisman,R.W. Hamm, S. Henderson, G.H. Hoffstaetter, L. Merminga, S. Ozaki, F.C. Pilat, M. White

    2012-07-01

    In September 2011 the US Senate Appropriations Committee requested a ten-year strategic plan from the Department of Energy (DOE) that would describe how accelerator R&D today could advance applications directly relevant to society. Based on the 2009 workshop 'Accelerators for America's Future' an assessment was made on how accelerator technology developed by the nation's laboratories and universities could directly translate into a competitive strength for industrial partners and a variety of government agencies in the research, defense and national security sectors. The Office of High Energy Physics, traditionally the steward for advanced accelerator R&D within DOE, commissioned a task force under its auspices to generate and compile ideas on how best to implement strategies that would help fulfill the needs of industry and other agencies, while maintaining focus on its core mission of fundamental science investigation.

  6. Final Report to the Department of Energy on the 1994 International Accelerator School: Frontiers of Accelerator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, F.A.

    1998-09-17

    The international accelerator school on Frontiers of Accelerator Technology was organized jointly by the US Particle Accelerator School (Dr. Mel Month and Ms. Marilyn Paul), the CERN Accelerator School, and the KEK Accelerator School, and was hosted by the University of Hawaii. The course was held on Maui, Hawaii, November 3-9, 1994 and was made possible in part by a grant from the Department of Energy under award number DE-FG03-94ER40875, AMDT M006. The 1994 program was preceded by similar joint efforts held at Santa Margherita di Pula, Sardinia in February 1985, South Padre Island, Texas in October 1986, Anacapri, Italy in October 1988, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina in October 1990, and Benalmedena, Spain in October/November 1992. The most recent program was held in Montreux, Switzerland in May 1998. The purpose of the program is to disseminate knowledge on the latest ideas and developments in the technology of particle accelerators by bringing together known world experts and younger scientists in the field. It is intended for individuals with professional interest in accelerator physics and technology, for graduate students, for post-docs, for those interested in accelerator based sciences, and for scientific and engineering staff at industrial firms, especially those companies specializing in accelerator components.

  7. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  8. Standard operating procedures for clinical research departments.

    PubMed

    Kee, Ashley Nichole

    2011-01-01

    A set of standard operating procedures (SOPs) provides a clinical research department with clear roles, responsibilities, and processes to ensure compliance, accuracy, and timeliness of data. SOPs also serve as a standardized training program for new employees. A practice may have an employee that can assist in the development of SOPs. There are also consultants that specialize in working with a practice to develop and write practice-specific SOPs. Making SOPs a priority will save a practice time and money in the long run and make the research practice more attractive to corporate study sponsors.

  9. Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The National Energy Strategy calls for a demonstration IFE power plant by the year 2025. The cornerstone of the plan to meet this ambitious goal is research and development for heavy-ion driver technology. A series of successes indicates that the technology being studied by the HIFAR Group -- the induction accelerator -- is a prime candidate for further technology development toward this long-range goal. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions; the understanding of the scaling laws that apply in this hitherto little-explored physics regime; and the validation of new, potentially more economical accelerator strategies. Key specific elements to be addressed include: fundamental physical limits of transverse and longitudinal beam quality; development of induction modules for accelerators, along with multiple-beam hardware, at reasonable cost; acceleration of multiple beams, merging of the beams, and amplification of current without significant dilution of beam quality; final bunching, transport, and focusing onto a small target. In 1992, the HIFAR Program was concerned principally with the next step toward a driver: the design of ILSE, the Induction Linac Systems Experiments. ILSE will address most of the remaining beam-control and beam-manipulation issues at partial driver scale. A few parameters -- most importantly, the line charge density and consequently the size of the ILSE beams -- will be at full driver scale. A theory group closely integrated with the experimental groups continues supporting present-day work and looking ahead toward larger experiments and the eventual driver. Highlights of this long-range, driver-oriented research included continued investigations of longitudinal instability and some new insights into scaled experiments with which the authors might examine hard-to-calculate beam-dynamics phenomena.

  10. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1993-10-20

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10{sup 9}) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10{sup 13--15} on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels that are commonly used to trace biochemical pathways in natural systems. {sup 14}C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. The primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subject research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. {sup 3} H, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 26}Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry in biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.; Turteltaub, K. W.

    1994-06-01

    Biological effects occur in natural systems at chemical concentrations of parts per billion (1:10 9) or less. Affected biomolecules may be separable in only milligram or microgram quantities. Quantification at attomole sensitivity is needed to study these interactions. AMS measures isotope concentrations to parts per 10 13-15 on milligram-sized samples and is ideal for quantifying long-lived radioisotopic labels for tracing biochemical pathways in natural systems. 14C-AMS has now been coupled to a variety of organic separation and definition technologies. Our primary research investigates pharmacokinetics and genotoxicities of toxins and drugs at very low doses. Human subjects research using AMS includes nutrition, toxicity and elemental balance studies. 3H, 41Ca and 26Al are also traced by AMS for fundamental biochemical kinetic research. Expansion of biomedical AMS awaits further development of biochemical and accelerator technologies designed specifically for these applications.

  12. Science Highlight: Researchers Demonstrate 'Accelerator on a Chip'

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-01

    In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers at DOE's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice. This technique uses ultrafast lasers to drive the accelerator. (This achievement was reported in Nature, 27 Sept 2013)

  13. DOE (Department of Energy) Epidemiologic Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Epidemiologic Research Program is to determine the human health effects resulting from the generation and use of energy, and of the operation of DOE facilities. The program is divided into seven general areas of activity; the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) which supports studies of survivors of the atomic weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mortality and morbidity studies of DOE workers, studies on internally deposited alpha emitters, medical/histologic studies, studies on the aspects of radiation damage, community health surveillance studies, and the development of computational techniques and of databases to make the results as widely useful as possible. Excluding the extensive literature from the RERF, the program has produced 340 publications in scientific journals, contributing significantly to improving the understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation exposure. In addition, a large number of public presentations were made and are documented elsewhere in published proceedings or in books. The purpose of this bibliography is to present a guide to the research results obtained by scientists supported by the program. The bibliography, which includes doctoral theses, is classified by laboratory and by year and also summarizes the results from individual authors by journal.

  14. Summary of Research 1997, Department of Operations Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    for addressing warfighting problems. This capabil- ity is especially important at the present time when technology in general, and information...Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, 1993 Master of Science in Operations Research-September 1997 Advisor: W. Max Woods, Department of

  15. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  16. University Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy Advance Accelerator Applications Program

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) Program was initiated in fiscal year 2001 (FY01) by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with other national laboratories. The primary goal of this program is to investigate the feasibility of accelerator-driven transmutation of nuclear waste (ATW). Because a large cadre of educated scientists and trained technicians will be needed to conduct the investigations of science and technology for transmutation, the AAA Program Office has begun a multi-year program to involve university faculty and students in various phases of the Project.

  17. Biomedical research with heavy ions at the IMP accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    The main ion-beam acceleration facilities and research activities at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences are briefly introduced. Some of the biomedical research with heavy ions such as heavy-ion biological effect, basic research related to heavy-ion cancer therapy and radiation breeding at the IMP accelerators are presented.

  18. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  19. Accelerating Neoproterozoic Research through Scientific Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, Daniel; Prave, Anthony; Boggiani, Paulo; Fike, David; Halverson, Galen; Kasemann, Simone; Knoll, Andrew; Zhu, Maoyan

    2014-05-01

    The Neoproterozoic Era (1.0 to 0.541 Ga) and earliest Cambrian (541 to ca. 520 Ma) records geologic changes unlike any other in Earth history: supercontinental tectonics of Rodinia followed by its breakup and dispersal into fragments that form the core of today's continents; a rise in oxygen that, perhaps for the first time in Earth history, resulted in the deep oceans becoming oxic; snowball Earth, which envisages a blanketing of global ice cover for millions of years; and, at the zenith of these combined biogeochemical changes, the evolutionary leap from eukaryotes to animals. Such a concentration of hallmark events in the evolution of our planet is unparalleled and many questions regarding Earth System evolution during times of profound climatic and geological changes remain to be answered. Neoproterozoic successions also offer insight into the genesis of a number of natural resources. These include banded-iron formation, organic-rich shale intervals (with demonstrated hydrocarbon source rocks already economically viable in some countries), base and precious metal ore deposits and REE occurrences, as well as industrial minerals and dimension stone. Developing our understanding of the Neoproterozoic Earth-system, combined with regional geology has the potential to impact the viability of these resources. Our understanding of the Neoproterozoic and early Cambrian, though, is overwhelmingly dependent on outcrop-based studies, which suffer from lack of continuity of outcrop and, in many instances, deep weathering profiles. A limited number of research projects study Precambrian strata have demonstrated the potential impact of scientific drilling to augment and complement ongoing outcrop based studies and advancing research. An ICDP and ECORD sponsored workshop, to be held in March 2014, has been convened to discuss the utility of scientific drilling for accelerating research of the Neoproterozoic through early Cambrian (ca. 0.9 to 0.52 Ga) rock record. The aim is to

  20. Model Diagnostics for the Department of Energy's Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B.

    2015-12-01

    In 2014, eight Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, four academic institutions, one company, and the National Centre for Atmospheric Research combined forces in a project called Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) with the goal to speed Earth system model development for climate and energy. Over the planned 10-year span, the project will conduct simulations and modeling on DOE's most powerful high-performance computing systems at Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Lawrence Berkeley Leadership Compute Facilities. A key component of the ACME project is the development of an interactive test bed for the advanced Earth system model. Its execution infrastructure will accelerate model development and testing cycles. The ACME Workflow Group is leading the efforts to automate labor-intensive tasks, provide intelligent support for complex tasks and reduce duplication of effort through collaboration support. As part of this new workflow environment, we have created a diagnostic, metric, and intercomparison Python framework, called UVCMetrics, to aid in the testing-to-production execution of the ACME model. The framework exploits similarities among different diagnostics to compactly support diagnosis of new models. It presently focuses on atmosphere and land but is designed to support ocean and sea ice model components as well. This framework is built on top of the existing open-source software framework known as the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT). Because of its flexible framework design, scientists and modelers now can generate thousands of possible diagnostic outputs. These diagnostics can compare model runs, compare model vs. observation, or simply verify a model is physically realistic. Additional diagnostics are easily integrated into the framework, and our users have already added several. Diagnostics can be generated, viewed, and manipulated from the UV-CDAT graphical user interface, Python command line scripts and programs

  1. Relativistic klystron research for high gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fowkes, W.R.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Higo, T.; Hoag, H.A.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-06-01

    Relativistic klystrons are being developed as a power source for high gradient accelerator applications which include large linear electron--positron colliders, compact accelerators, and FEL sources. We have attained 200MW peak power at 11.4 GHz from a relativistic klystron, and 140 MV/m longitudinal gradient in a short 11.4 GHz accelerator section. We report here on the design of our first klystrons, the results of our experiments so far, and some of our plans for the near future. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics: emittance variations in current-amplifying ion induction lina; transverse emittance studies of an induction accelerator of heavy ions; drift compression experiments on MBE-4 and related emittance; low emittance uniform- density C{sub s}+ sources for heavy ion fusion accelerator studies; survey of alignment of MBE-4; time-of-flight dependence on the MBE-4 quadrupole voltage; high order calculation of the multiple content of three dimensional electrostatic geometries; an induction linac injector for scaled experiments; induction accelerator test module for HIF; longitudinal instability in HIF beams; and analysis of resonant longitudinal instability in a heavy ion induction linac.

  3. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-15

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  4. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  5. Summary of Research, Academic Departments, 1982-1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    PD-R1469659 SUMMARY OF RESEARCH ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 1982-1983(U) 1/3 NARIR RCRDEMY ANNAPOLIS NO Rd I HEFLIN OCT 93 USNR-AR-8 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 5/2 NI...SUMMARY OF RESEARCH 4, 1982- 1983 COMPILED AND EDITED BY PROFESSOR WILSON L. HEFLIN ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 1-4. OCTOBER 1983-M UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY...WEAPONS Aerospace Engineering Department .......................................... 3 Electrical Engineering Department

  6. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  7. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  8. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  9. Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    A plan for exploring the physics and technology of induction linac development is discussed which involves a series of increasingly sophisticated experiments. The first is the single-beam transport experiment, which has explored the physics of a single space-charge-dominated beam. Second is the multiple-beam experiment in which four independent beams will be transported and accelerated through a multigap accelerating structure. The single-beam transport experiment is described, and some results are given of stability studies and instrumentation studies. The design and fabrication of the multi-beam experiment are described, as well as results of a first round of experiments in which beam-current amplification was observed. Concurrent theoretical work, resulting in a variety of acce-leration schedules and sets of associated voltage waveforms required to implement the experiments, is also reported. (LEW)

  10. Summary of Research 1997, Department of Meteorology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System ( COAMPS ) from the Naval Research Laboratory-Monterey. Although the predicted storm motion was...Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX), EOPACE and most recently ACE-2 (included two Desert Dust cases). Information about the aerosol size...during the ANZFLUX project. The longwave radiation balance, in turn, was mostly controlled by the amount of clouds. Despite intense storm activity, cloud

  11. Department of Defense Basic Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    radiation that is well-suited the potential for range determination, weapons gui- for use in lithography, chemical analysis and strain dance, and...exercises the appropriate analysis and synthesis subroutines, accepts performance pa- rameters (e.g., main beamwidth) as input data, synthe- sizes the...physical dexterity. It miniticenvionmnt. ncrn i wih mehod of includes fundamental research on machine represen- analysis which reduce costs and enhance

  12. Mercury ion thruster research, 1977. [plasma acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    The measured ion beam divergence characteristics of two and three-grid, multiaperture accelerator systems are presented. The effects of perveance, geometry, net-to-total accelerating voltage, discharge voltage and propellant are examined. The applicability of a model describing doubly-charged ion densities in mercury thrusters is demonstrated for an 8-cm diameter thruster. The results of detailed Langmuir probing of the interior of an operating cathode are given and used to determine the ionization fraction as a function of position upstream of the cathode orifice. A mathematical model of discharge chamber electron diffusion and collection processes is presented along with scaling laws useful in estimating performance of large diameter and/or high specific impluse thrusters. A model describing the production of ionized molecular nitrogen in ion thrusters is included.

  13. Application of Accelerators in research and Industry: Proceedings of the fourteenth International Conference. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, J.L.; Morgan, I.

    1997-08-01

    The fourteenth International Conference on the Application of Accelerators in Research and Industry was held in November, 1996 in Texas, USA. The United States Department of Energy was one of the sponsors of this conference. The conference was widely attended by accelerator scientists throughout the world. The topics discussed included a wide range of applications spanning the fields from Art History to Zoology. An overview of the Design Project for the National spallation Neutron Source was presented in one of the plenary sessions, as was a summary of Accelerated Beams of Radioactive Ions. Accelerator based Atomic Physics had the most sessions. The subject of accelerator Technology covered topics such as new accelerators, beam handling systems, ion sources, detector, spectrometers, and magnets etc. Radioactive Beams and Nuclear Physics were also topics of several sessions. New Research Opportunities for Nuclear structure, Nuclear Astrophysics, Material Science, and the future facilities and applications of Accelerated Beams of Radioactive ions were discussed. These proceedings represent the papers presented at this exciting conference which summarized the State of the Art technology of Accelerator applications in research and Industry. These proceedings contain 341 papers, out of which, 99 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  14. The Influence of Accelerator Science on Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haussecker, Enzo F.; Chao, Alexander W.

    2011-06-01

    We evaluate accelerator science in the context of its contributions to the physics community. We address the problem of quantifying these contributions and present a scheme for a numerical evaluation of them. We show by using a statistical sample of important developments in modern physics that accelerator science has influenced 28% of post-1938 physicists and also 28% of post-1938 physics research. We also examine how the influence of accelerator science has evolved over time, and show that on average it has contributed to a physics Nobel Prize-winning research every 2.9 years.

  15. Research Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A.; Donahue, D. J.; Burr, G. S.; Beck, W.; Hatheway, A. L.; Biddulph, D. L.; McHargue, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility has been operated at the University of Arizona since 1982. This is an excellent example of a facility which has benefitted from the NSF Earth Sciences Instrumentation and Facilities Program. AMS has many applications to the fields of geochronology, geoarchaeology, paleoclimatology. A wide range of climatic, geologic and archeological records can be characterized by measuring their 14C and 10Be concentrations, using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). These records are found not only in the traditional sampling sites such as lake sediments and ice cores, but also in diverse natural accumulates and biogeochemical products such as: loess/paleosol deposits, corals, speleothems, and forest-fire horizons. The in-situ production of cosmogenic radionuclides in terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials provides several possibilities of determining their chronology. Thes studies are important for understanding cosmic-ray production of radionuclides in rock surfaces, by which we can draw conclusions about exposure time and erosion. Studies on extraterrestrial materials such as lunar samples allow us to determine the solar and galactic cosmic-ray fluxes in the past, and the cosmogenic 14C and 10Be in meteorites can be used to determine terrestrial ages. In this paper, we will highlight some selected applications of AMS, including dating of some interesting art works and artifacts, to show some of the great range of studies which can be undertaken.

  16. Teaching and Research with Accelerators at Tarleton State University

    SciTech Connect

    Marble, Daniel K.

    2009-03-10

    Tarleton State University students began performing both research and laboratory experiments using accelerators in 1998 through visitation programs at the University of North Texas, US Army Research Laboratory, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Carderock. In 2003, Tarleton outfitted its new science building with a 1 MV pelletron that was donated by the California Institution of Technology. The accelerator has been upgraded and supports a wide range of classes for both the Physics program and the ABET accredited Engineering Physics program as well as supplying undergraduate research opportunities on campus. A discussion of various laboratory activities and research projects performed by Tarleton students will be presented.

  17. Building a Research Administration Infrastructure at the Department Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Maria B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the current economic crisis, research administrators at public universities are grappling with declining state funding and are faced with identifying other potential sources of revenue to support operations. Research administrators at all levels are forced to do more with less. Department level research administrators must be innovative…

  18. Public health department accreditation: setting the research agenda.

    PubMed

    Riley, William J; Lownik, Elizabeth M; Scutchfield, F Douglas; Mays, Glen P; Corso, Liza C; Beitsch, Les M

    2012-03-01

    Health department accreditation is one of the most important initiatives in the field of public health today. The Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) is establishing a voluntary accreditation system for more than 3000 state, tribal, territorial, and local health departments using domains, standards, and measures with which to evaluate public health department performance. In addition, public health department accreditation has a focus on continuous quality improvement to enhance capacity and performance of health departments in order to advance the health of the population. In the accreditation effort, a practice-based research agenda is essential to build the scientific base and advance public health department accreditation as well as health department effectiveness. This paper provides an overview of public health accreditation and identifies the research questions raised by this accreditation initiative, including how the research agenda will contribute to better understanding of processes underlying the delivery of services by public health departments and how voluntary accreditation may help improve performance of public health departments.

  19. Natural and accelerated bioremediation research program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This draft plan describes a ten-year program to develop the scientific understanding needed to harness and develop natural and enhanced biogeochemical processes to bioremediate contaminated soils, sediments and groundwater at DOE facilities. The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) developed this program plan, with advice and assistance from DOE`s Office of Environmental Management (EM). The program builds on OHER`s tradition of sponsoring fundamental research in the life and environmental sciences and was motivated by OHER`s and Office of Energy Research`s (OER`s) commitment to supporting DOE`s environmental management mission and the belief that bioremediation is an important part of the solution to DOE`s environmental problems.

  20. Proton and heavy ion acceleration facilities for space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jack

    2003-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for medium energy nuclear physics and heavy charged particle radiobiology and radiotherapy at particle accelerators are in the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation health. In this article we survey some of the particle accelerator facilities in the United States and around the world that are being used for space radiation health and related research, and illustrate some of their capabilities with discussions of selected accelerator experiments applicable to the human exploration of space.

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1987 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    An overview of the design and the initial studies for the Advanced Light Source is given. The research efforts for the Center for X-Ray Optics include x-ray imaging, multilayer mirror technology, x-ray sources and detectors, spectroscopy and scattering, and synchrotron radiation projects. The Accelerator Operations highlights include the research by users in nuclear physics, biology and medicine. The upgrade of the Bevalac is also discussed. The High Energy Physics Technology review includes the development of superconducting magnets and superconducting cables. A review of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research is also presented. The Magnetic Fusion Energy research included the development of ion sources, accelerators for negative ions, diagnostics, and theoretical plasma physics. (WRF)

  2. Gender, Performativity, and Leadership: Department Chairs in Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepkowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Women are significantly underrepresented as administrators in higher education leadership. This qualitative study examined the leadership of department chairs at public research universities to better understand how their gender and other identities affected their leadership. The following research questions shaped the study: (1) How do department…

  3. idaho Accelerator Center Advanced Fuel Cycle Research

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Douglas; Dale, Dan

    2011-10-20

    The technical effort has been in two parts called; Materials Science and Instrumentation Development. The Materials Science technical program has been based on a series of research and development achievements in Positron-Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) for defect detection in structural materials. This work is of particular importance in nuclear power and its supporting systems as the work included detection of defects introduced by mechanical and thermal phenomena as well as those caused by irradiation damage. The second part of the program has focused on instrumentation development using active interrogation techniques supporting proliferation resistant recycling methodologies and nuclear material safeguards. This effort has also lead to basic physics studies of various phenomena relating to photo-fission. Highlights of accomplishments and facility improvement legacies in these areas over the program period include

  4. Current Research Activities of the Department of Oceanography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    cores indicate that concentrations of both chemical The goal of this continuing classes have increased by up to a research is to assemble a unified...ofOeaorah 0 EvhmtL .. - CURRENT RESEARCH ACTIVITIES / OF THE DEPARTMENT OF OCEANOGRAPHY University of Washington Seattle, Washington 98195 Reference: A81-3...Production control mechanisms of the subarctic Pacific Oceano.............7 Subarctic Pacific ecosystem research : a planning project

  5. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation.

  6. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division: 1993 Summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, J.

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) is not only one of the largest scientific divisions at LBL, but also the one of the most diverse. Major efforts include: (1) investigations in both inertial and magnetic fusion energy; (2) operation of the Advanced Light Source, a state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation facility; (3) exploratory investigations of novel radiation sources and colliders; (4) research and development in superconducting magnets for accelerators and other scientific and industrial applications; and (5) ion beam technology development for nuclear physics and for industrial and biomedical applications. Each of these topics is discussed in detail in this book.

  7. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  8. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  9. An ion accelerator for undergraduate research and teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monce, Michael

    1997-04-01

    We have recently upgraded our 400kV, single beam line ion accelerator to a 1MV, multiple beam line machine. This upgrade has greatly expanded the opportunities for student involvement in the laboratory. We will describe four areas of work in which students now participate. The first is the continuing research being conducted in excitations produced in ion-molecule collisions, which recently involved the use of digital imaging. The second area of research now opened up by the new accelerator involves PIXE. We are currently beginning a cross disciplinary study of archaeological specimens using PIXE and involving students from both anthropology and physics. Finally, two beam lines from the accelerator will be used for basic work in nuclear physics: Rutherford scattering and nuclear resonances. These two nuclear physics experiments will be integrated into our sophomore-junior level, year-long course in experimental physics.

  10. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  11. Acceleration display system for aircraft zero-gravity research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.

    1987-01-01

    The features, design, calibration, and testing of Lewis Research Center's acceleration display system for aircraft zero-gravity research are described. Specific circuit schematics and system specifications are included as well as representative data traces from flown trajectories. Other observations learned from developing and using this system are mentioned where appropriate. The system, now a permanent part of the Lewis Learjet zero-gravity program, provides legible, concise, and necessary guidance information enabling pilots to routinely fly accurate zero-gravity trajectories. Regular use of this system resulted in improvements of the Learjet zero-gravity flight techniques, including a technique to minimize later accelerations. Lewis Gates Learjet trajectory data show that accelerations can be reliably sustained within 0.01 g for 5 consecutive seconds, within 0.02 g for 7 consecutive seconds, and within 0.04 g for up to 20 second. Lewis followed the past practices of acceleration measurement, yet focussed on the acceleration displays. Refinements based on flight experience included evolving the ranges, resolutions, and frequency responses to fit the pilot and the Learjet responses.

  12. Environmental Assessment for US Department of Energy support of an Iowa State University Linear Accelerator Facility at Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    The proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action is financial and technical support of construction and initial operation of an agricultural commodity irradiator (principally for meat), employing a dual mode electron beam generator capable of producing x-rays, at the Iowa State University Linear Accelerator located at Ames, Iowa. The planned pilot commercial-scale facility would be used for the following activities: conducting irradiation research on agricultural commodities, principally meats; in the future, after the pilot phase, as schedules permit, possibly conducting research on other, non-edible materials; evaluating effects of irradiation on nutritional and sensory quality of agricultural products; demonstrating the efficiency of the process to control or eliminate pathogens, and/or to prolong the commodities' post-harvest shelf-life via control or elimination of bacteria, fungi, and/or insects; providing information to the public on the benefits, safety and risks of irradiated agricultural commodities; determining consumer acceptability of the irradiated products; providing data for use by regulatory agencies in developing protocols for various treatments of Iowa agricultural commodities; and training operators, maintenance and quality control technicians, scientists, engineers, and staff of regulatory agencies in agricultural commodity irradiation technology. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Harnessing the crowd to accelerate molecular medicine research.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert J; Merchant, Raina M

    2015-07-01

    Crowdsourcing presents a novel approach to solving complex problems within molecular medicine. By leveraging the expertise of fellow scientists across the globe, broadcasting to and engaging the public for idea generation, harnessing a scalable workforce for quick data management, and fundraising for research endeavors, crowdsourcing creates novel opportunities for accelerating scientific progress.

  14. Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS)/Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak

    1998-01-01

    The Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) payload flew on the Orbiter Columbia on mission STS-78 from June 20th to July 7th, 1996. The LMS payload on STS-78 was dedicated to life sciences and microgravity experiments. Two accelerometer systems managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) flew to support these experiments, namely the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS). In addition, the Microgravity Measurement Assembly (NOAA), managed by the European Space Research and Technology Center (ESA/ESTEC), and sponsored by NASA, collected acceleration data in support of the experiments on-board the LMS mission. OARE downlinked real-time quasi-steady acceleration data, which was provided to the investigators. The SAMS recorded higher frequency data on-board for post-mission analysis. The MMA downlinked real-time quasi-steady as well as higher frequency acceleration data, which was provided to the investigators. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at NASA LERC supports principal investigators of microgravity experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. A summary report was prepared by PIMS to furnish interested experiment investigators with a guide to evaluate the acceleration environment during STS-78, and as a means of identifying areas which require further study. The summary report provides an overview of the STS-78 mission, describes the accelerometer systems flown on this mission, discusses some specific analyses of the accelerometer data in relation to the various activities which occurred during the mission, and presents plots resulting from these analyses as a snapshot of the environment during the mission. Numerous activities occurred during the STS-78 mission that are of interest to the low-gravity community. Specific activities of interest during this mission were crew exercise, radiator deployment, Vernier Reaction

  15. Professionalizing Foreign Language Teaching in a Research Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Fuente, Maria J.

    This paper reports on a 2-year project carried out in a foreign language department at a research institution in the United States that intended to professionalize the language teaching faculty. A change in the university's core curriculum resulted in the implementation of the foreign language requirement for undergraduate students. This led to a…

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughman, Jack A.; Micheletti, David A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheletti, David A.; Baughman, Jack A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  18. Research and Development for Ultra-High Gradient Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Research on the basic physics of high-gradient, high frequency accelerator structures and the associated RF/microwave technology are essential for the future of discovery science, medicine and biology, energy and environment, and national security. We will review the state-of-the-art for the development of high gradient linear accelerators. We will present the research activities aimed at exploring the basic physics phenomenon of RF breakdown. We present the experimental results of a true systematic study in which the surface processing, geometry, and materials of the structures have been varied, one parameter at a time. The breakdown rate or alternatively, the probability of breakdown/pulse/meter has been recorded for different operating parameters. These statistical data reveal a strong dependence of breakdown probability on surface magnetic field, or alternatively on surface pulsed heating. This is in contrast to the classical view of electric field dependence.

  19. Summary of Research 1997 Department of Systems Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    Formats 26 Decision Support for Command and Control Using the World Wide Web 46 Decision Technologies 21 Disputes Arising Under Department of the...Research Support for Naval Inventory Control Point (NAVICP) - Evaluation of Automated Non-Standard Requisitioning System (ANSRS) 30 Office of the...TAV) and real-time logistics/Transportation control ; *modeling and simulation for logistics decision support; deduction of manpower in aircraft and

  20. Geodynamic Research at the Department of Planetary Geodesy, SRC PAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Aleksander; Jóźwik, Mieczysław; Kaczorowski, Marek; Kalarus, Maciej; Kasza, Damian; Kosek, Wiesław; Nastula, Jolanta; Szczerbowski, Zbigniew; Wińska, Małgorzata; Wronowski, Roman; Zdunek, Ryszard; Zieliński, Janusz B.

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Planetary Geodesy of the Space Research Centre PAS has been conducting research on a broad spectrum of problems within a field of global dynamics of the Earth. In this report we describe the investigations on selected subjects concerning polar motion (modeling and geophysical interpretation of the Chandler wobble, hydrological excitation of seasonal signals, search for optimal prediction methods), tectonic activity in the region of the Książ Geodynamic Laboratory of the SRC, and finally the new joint Polish-Italian project GalAc analyzing feasibility and usefulness of equipping second-generation Galileo satellites with accelerometers.

  1. Mechanical Engineering Department engineering research: Annual report, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.; Essary, K.L.; Genin, M.S.; Highstone, H.H.; Hymer, J.D.; Taft, S.O.

    1986-12-01

    This report provides information on the five areas of research interest in LLNL's Mechanical Engineering Department. In Computer Code Development, a solid geometric modeling program is described. In Dynamic Systems and Control, structure control and structure dynamics are discussed. Fabrication technology involves machine cutting, interferometry, and automated optical component manufacturing. Materials engineering reports on composite material research and measurement of molten metal surface properties. In Nondestructive Evaluation, NMR, CAT, and ultrasound machines are applied to manufacturing processes. A model for underground collapse is developed. Finally, an alternative heat exchanger is investigated for use in a fusion power plant. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 13 reports in this publication. (JDH)

  2. The Awful Truth About Zero-Gravity: Space Acceleration Measurement System; Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Earth's gravity holds the Shuttle in orbit, as it does satellites and the Moon. The apparent weightlessness experienced by astronauts and experiments on the Shuttle is a balancing act, the result of free-fall, or continuously falling around Earth. An easy way to visualize what is happening is with a thought experiment that Sir Isaac Newton did in 1686. Newton envisioned a mountain extending above Earth's atmosphere so that friction with the air would be eliminated. He imagined a cannon atop the mountain and aimed parallel to the ground. Firing the cannon propels the cannonball forward. At the same time, Earth's gravity pulls the cannonball down to the surface and eventual impact. Newton visualized using enough powder to just balance gravity so the cannonball would circle the Earth. Like the cannonball, objects orbiting Earth are in continuous free-fall, and it appears that gravity has been eliminated. Yet, that appearance is deceiving. Activities aboard the Shuttle generate a range of accelerations that have effects similar to those of gravity. The crew works and exercises. The main data relay antenna quivers 17 times per second to prevent 'stiction,' where parts stick then release with a jerk. Cooling pumps, air fans, and other systems add vibration. And traces of Earth's atmosphere, even 200 miles up, drag on the Shuttle. While imperceptible to us, these vibrations can have a profound impact on the commercial research and scientific experiments aboard the Shuttle. Measuring these forces is necessary so that researchers and scientists can see what may have affected their experiments when analyzing data. On STS-107 this service is provided by the Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free Flyers (SAMS-FF) and the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE). Precision data from these two instruments will help scientists analyze data from their experiments and eliminate outside influences from the phenomena they are studying during the mission.

  3. Research Challenges and Opportunities for Clinically Oriented Academic Radiology Departments.

    PubMed

    Decker, Summer J; Grajo, Joseph R; Hazelton, Todd R; Hoang, Kimberly N; McDonald, Jennifer S; Otero, Hansel J; Patel, Midhir J; Prober, Allen S; Retrouvey, Michele; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Roth, Christopher G; Ward, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Between 2004 and 2012, US funding for the biomedical sciences decreased to historic lows. Health-related research was crippled by receiving only 1/20th of overall federal scientific funding. Despite the current funding climate, there is increased pressure on academic radiology programs to establish productive research programs. Whereas larger programs have resources that can be utilized at their institutions, small to medium-sized programs often struggle with lack of infrastructure and support. To address these concerns, the Association of University Radiologists' Radiology Research Alliance developed a task force to explore any untapped research productivity potential in these smaller radiology departments. We conducted an online survey of faculty at smaller clinically funded programs and found that while they were interested in doing research and felt it was important to the success of the field, barriers such as lack of resources and time were proving difficult to overcome. One potential solution proposed by this task force is a collaborative structured research model in which multiple participants from multiple institutions come together in well-defined roles that allow for an equitable distribution of research tasks and pooling of resources and expertise. Under this model, smaller programs will have an opportunity to share their unique perspective on how to address research topics and make a measureable impact on the field of radiology as a whole. Through a health services focus, projects are more likely to succeed in the context of limited funding and infrastructure while simultaneously providing value to the field.

  4. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Ingwersen, P.; Bennett, L.F.; Boyes, J.D.; Anderson, D.E.; Greenly, J.B.; Sudan, R.N.

    1995-05-01

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-III intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell`s LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180{degrees} about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  5. COBRA accelerator for Sandia ICF diode research at Cornell University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.; Ingwersen, Pete; Bennett, Lawrence F.; Boyes, John D.; Anderson, David E.; Greenly, John B.; Sudan, Ravi N.

    The new COBRA accelerator is being built in stages at the Laboratory of Plasma Studies in Cornell University where its applications will include extraction diode and ion beam research in support of the light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The 4- to 5-MV, 125- to 250-kA accelerator is based on a four-cavity inductive voltage adder (IVA) design. It is a combination of new ferromagnetically-isolated cavities and self magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) hardware and components from existing Sandia and Cornell facilities: Marx generator capacitors, hardware, and power supply from the DEMON facility; water pulse forming lines (PFL) and gas switch from the Subsystem Test Facility (STF); a HERMES-3 intermediate store capacitor (ISC); and a modified ion diode from Cornell's LION. The present accelerator consists of a single modified cavity similar to those of the Sandia SABRE accelerator and will be used to establish an operating system for the first stage initial lower voltage testing. Four new cavities will be fabricated and delivered in the first half of FY96 to complete the COBRA accelerator. COBRA is unique in the sense that each cavity is driven by a single pulse forming line, and the IVA output polarity may be reversed by rotating the cavities 180(degrees) about their vertical axis. The site preparations, tank construction, and diode design and development are taking place at Cornell with growing enthusiasm as this machine becomes a reality. Preliminary results with the single cavity and short positive inner cylinder MITL configuration will soon be available.

  6. Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, I. S.; Andreani, C.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C.-K.; Senesi, R.

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the neutron in 1932 neutron beams have been used in a very broad range of applications, As an aging fleet of nuclear reactor sources is retired the use of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) is becoming more prevalent. CANS are playing a significant and expanding role in research and development in science and engineering, as well as in education and training. In the realm of multidisciplinary applications, CANS offer opportunities over a wide range of technical utilization, from interrogation of civil structures to medical therapy to cultural heritage study. This paper aims to provide the first comprehensive overview of the history, current status of operation, and ongoing development of CANS worldwide. The basic physics and engineering regarding neutron production by accelerators, target-moderator systems, and beam line instrumentation are introduced, followed by an extensive discussion of various evolving applications currently exploited at CANS.

  7. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers.

  8. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research - conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}3{sup {minus}} linear colliders.

  9. Accelerators: Sparking Innovation and Transdisciplinary Team Science in Disparities Research.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Carol R; Shameer, Khader; Gabrilove, Janice; Atreja, Ashish; Shepard, Peggy; Goytia, Crispin N; Smith, Geoffrey W; Dudley, Joel; Manning, Rachel; Bickell, Nina A; Galvez, Maida P

    2017-02-23

    Development and implementation of effective, sustainable, and scalable interventions that advance equity could be propelled by innovative and inclusive partnerships. Readied catalytic frameworks that foster communication, collaboration, a shared vision, and transformative translational research across scientific and non-scientific divides are needed to foster rapid generation of novel solutions to address and ultimately eliminate disparities. To achieve this, we transformed and expanded a community-academic board into a translational science board with members from public, academic and private sectors. Rooted in team science, diverse board experts formed topic-specific "accelerators", tasked with collaborating to rapidly generate new ideas, questions, approaches, and projects comprising patients, advocates, clinicians, researchers, funders, public health and industry leaders. We began with four accelerators-digital health, big data, genomics and environmental health-and were rapidly able to respond to funding opportunities, transform new ideas into clinical and community programs, generate new, accessible, actionable data, and more efficiently and effectively conduct research. This innovative model has the power to maximize research quality and efficiency, improve patient care and engagement, optimize data democratization and dissemination among target populations, contribute to policy, and lead to systems changes needed to address the root causes of disparities.

  10. Rail accelerator development for ultra-high pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Nellis, W.J.; Rego, J.; Susoeff, A.R.; Newman, G.H.

    1983-09-20

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a rail accelerator system for launching hypervelocity projectiles suitable for ultrahigh pressure shockwave research. The primary goal is to accelerate 1 g projectiles with disk impactors to velocities in excess of 12 km/s and generate uniform, planar shockwaves at pressures above 0.5 TPa (5 Mbar) in metal targets. In order to generate precisely controlled impacts and shockwaves, several strigent requirements are imposed on the railgun system. During the last year, we have begun detailed development of a railgun launcher and power source. We are developing a launcher with a gas injector. The injector accelerates the projectile to more than 1 km/s reducing the dwell time of the plasma arc and the erosion of the rails. The injected projectile, with a fuse, also serves as the main switch in the power supply circuit. Current pulse shaping is used to control the applied stress to the projectile and launcher. Results of experiments with the new system will be reported and compared to computer simulations.

  11. Rail accelerator development for ultra-high pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Nellis, W.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a rail accelerator system for launching hypervelocity projectiles suitable for ultrahigh pressure shockwave research. The primary goal is to accelerate 1 g projectiles with disk impactors to velocities in excess of 12 km/s and generate uniform, planar shockwaves at pressures above 0.5 TPa (5 Mbar) in metal targets. In order to generate precisely controlled impacts and shockwaves, several stringent requirements are imposed on the railgun system. During the last year, detailed development of a railgun launcher and power source has begun. A launcher with a gas injector is being developed. The injector accelerates the projectile to more than 1 km/s reducing the dwell time of the plasma arc and the erosion of the rails. The injected projectile, with a fuse, also serves as the main switch in the power supply circuit. Current pulse shaping is used to control the applied stress to the projectile and launcher. Results of experiments with the new system are reported and compared to computer simulations.

  12. Internal-control weaknesses at Department of Energy research laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-15

    Two requests were made by Chairman, Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, that GAO review the vulnerability of selected Department of Energy (DOE) research facilities to fraud, waste, and abuse. The review examined internal controls over payroll, procurement, and property management at six government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) research laboratories (Sandia, Hanford, Argonne, Oak Ridge, Fermi, and Brookhaven) and four government-owned, government-operated energy technology centers (Bartlesville, Laramie, Morgantown, and Pittsburgh). In fiscal 1982, DOE budgeted over $3 billion for its GOCO facilities and over $230 million for its energy technology centers. GAO noted specific problems at a number of the laboratories in each of the areas covered. In many instances, DOE has acknowledged the problems and corrective action is underway or is planned.

  13. Heavy-ion accelerator research for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers a most attractive long-term solution to the problem of future energy supplies: The fuel is virtually inexhaustible and the fusion reaction is notably free of long-lived radioactive by-products. Also, because the fuel is in the form of a plasma, there is no solid fuel core that could melt down. The DOE supports two major fusion research programs to exploit these virtues, one based on magnetic confinement and a second on inertial confinement. One part of the program aimed at inertial fusion is known as Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research, or HIFAR. In this booklet, the aim is to place this effort in the context of fusion research generally, to review the brief history of heavy-ion fusion, and to describe the current status of the HIFAR program.

  14. Department Chair Advice on Teaching and Research at U.S. Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taggart, Gabel

    2015-01-01

    Using data from a 2010 survey of academic chairs, this study reports on academic department chairs' recommended time allocations to new assistant professors. I contend that personal values about research and teaching influence the department chair's recommendations along with organizational characteristics. Multi-level modeling indicates that…

  15. Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the first year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams, TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams; TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders. In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

  16. Accelerating Translational Research through Open Science: The Neuro Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Gold, E. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Translational research is often afflicted by a fundamental problem: a limited understanding of disease mechanisms prevents effective targeting of new treatments. Seeking to accelerate research advances and reimagine its role in the community, the Montreal Neurological Institute (Neuro) announced in the spring of 2016 that it is launching a five-year experiment during which it will adopt Open Science—open data, open materials, and no patenting—across the institution. The experiment seeks to examine two hypotheses. The first is whether the Neuro’s Open Science initiative will attract new private partners. The second hypothesis is that the Neuro’s institution-based approach will draw companies to the Montreal region, where the Neuro is based, leading to the creation of a local knowledge hub. This article explores why these hypotheses are likely to be true and describes the Neuro’s approach to exploring them. PMID:27932848

  17. DOE (Department of Energy) Epidemiologic Research Program: Selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Epidemiologic Research Program is to determine the human health effects resulting from the generation and use of energy, and from the operation of DOE facilities. The program has been divided into seven general areas of activity: the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) which supports studies of survivors of the atomic weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mortality and morbidity studies of DOE workers, studies on internally deposited alpha emitters, medical/histologic studies, studies on the genetic aspects of radiation damage, community health surveillance studies, and the development of computational techniques and of databases to make the results as widely useful as possible. Excluding the extensive literature from the RERF, the program has produced 380 publications in scientific journals, contributing significantly to improving the understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation exposure. In addition, a large number of public presentations were made and are documented elsewhere in published proceedings or in books. The purpose of this bibliograhpy is to present a guide to the research results obtained by scientists supported by the program. The bibliography, which includes doctoral theses, is classified by national laboratory and by year. Multi-authored studies are indicated only once, according to the main supporting laboratory.

  18. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, fiscal year 1980, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Research during October 1979 to September 1980 is summarized. Areas covered include: accelerator operations; positron-electron project; stochastic beam cooling; high-field superconducting magnets; accelerator theory; neutral beam sources; and heavy ion fusion. (GHT)

  19. Double-negative metamaterial research for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, S.; Spentzouris, L.; Gai, W.; Liu, W.; Power, J. G.

    2007-09-01

    Material properties are central to the design of particle accelerators. One area of advanced accelerator research is to investigate novel materials and structures and their potential use in extending capabilities of accelerator components. Within the past decade a new type of artificially constructed material having the unique property of simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability has been realized, and is under intense investigation, primarily by the optical physics and microwave engineering communities [C.M. Soukoulis, Science 315 (2007) 47; D.R. Smith, J.B. Pendry, M.C.K. Wiltshire, Science 305 (2004) 788; J.B. Pendry, A.J. Holden, W.J. Stewart, I. Youngs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 4773]. Although they are typically constructed of arrays of discrete cells, as long as the condition that the wavelength of applied radiation is significantly greater than the cell dimensions is met, the material mimics a continuous medium and can be described with the bulk properties of permittivity, ɛ, and permeability, μ. When the permittivity and permeability are simultaneously negative in some frequency range, the metamaterial is called double negative (DNM) or left-handed (LHM) and has unusual properties, such as a negative index of refraction. An investigation of these materials in the context of accelerators is being carried out by IIT and the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility [S. Antipov, W. Liu, W. Gai, J. Power, L. Spentzouris, AIP Conf. Proc. 877 (2006); S. Antipov, W. Liu, J. Power, L. Spentzouris, Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Left-Handed Metamaterial, Wakefield Notes at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, ]. Waveguides loaded with metamaterials are of interest because the DNM can change the dispersion relation of the waveguide significantly. For example, slow backward waves can be produced in a DNM-loaded waveguide without having corrugations. This article begins with a brief introduction of known design

  20. Collaborative Research on Sustainability: Myths and Conundrums of Interdisciplinary Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherren, Kate; Klovdahl, Alden S.; Robin, Libby; Butler, Linda; Dovers, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Establishing interdisciplinary academic departments has been a common response to the challenge of addressing complex problems. However, the assumptions that guide the formation of such departments are rarely questioned. Additionally, the designers and managers of interdisciplinary academic departments in any field of endeavour struggle to set an…

  1. 50 Years of the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF).

    PubMed

    Marino, Stephen A

    2017-01-31

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is in its 50th year of operation. It was commissioned on April 1, 1967 as a collaboration between the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) of Columbia University, and members of the Medical Research Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). It was initially funded as a user facility for radiobiology and radiological physics, concentrating on monoenergetic neutrons. Facilities for irradiation with MeV light charged particles were developed in the mid-1970s. In 1980 the facility was relocated to the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University. RARAF now has seven beam lines, each having a dedicated irradiation facility: monoenergetic neutrons, charged particle track segments, two charged particle microbeams (one electrostatically focused to <1 μm, one magnetically focused), a 4.5 keV soft X-ray microbeam, a neutron microbeam, and a facility that produces a neutron spectrum similar to that of the atomic bomb dropped at Hiroshima. Biology facilities are available on site within close proximity to the irradiation facilities, making the RARAF very user friendly.

  2. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  3. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; ...

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will bemore » based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.« less

  4. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A.; Massey, Thomas N.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Brenner, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10–20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components. PMID:22545061

  5. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, Thomas Neal; Johnson, G. W.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-16

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction. Lastly, this novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  6. Post-harvest entomology research in the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service.

    PubMed

    Throne, James E; Hallman, Guy J; Johnson, Judy A; Follett, Peter A

    2003-01-01

    This is a review of current post-harvest entomology research conducted by the Agricultural Research Service, the research branch of the US Department of Agriculture. The review covers both durable and perishable commodities. Research on biochemistry, genetics, physiology, monitoring and control of insects infesting stored grain, dried fruits and nuts, and processed commodities is reviewed. Research on development of quarantine treatments, particularly for fruit flies, is also reviewed, including research on thermal and irradiation treatments and a discussion of risk management for quarantine pests. Two areas of research are covered more extensively: a project to map the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and the use of near-infrared spectroscopy for detection of hidden infestations in grain, quantification of insect fragments in food, determination of quality in dried fruits, identification of insect species and age-grading insects. Future research directions are identified.

  7. Pushing the accelerator - speeding up drug research with accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, R. C.; Leong, D.

    2000-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive analytical method yet developed for elemental isotope analysis and has a broad range of applications. The measurement of 14C is of most interest to biomedical researchers but few studies have been reported using AMS in drug discovery and development. For biomedical use, 14C is incorporated into organic molecules by either radiosynthesis or biosynthetically and the isotope is used as a surrogate for the distribution of the radiolabelled molecule either in animal or human studies. The majority of users of 14C quantitate the radioactivity using decay counting usually with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). Our Centre over the past 12 months has been evaluating and validating the use of AMS as an alternative detection method. In vitro spiking studies of human plasma with 14C-Fluconazole, a prescription antifungal drug has demonstrated an excellent correlation between AMS and LSC (correlation coefficient 0.999). Human Phase I clinical studies have been conducted with radioactive doses ranging from 120 Bq (7000 dpm) to 11 kBq (300 nCi) to provide mass balance, plasma concentration and radioactive metabolite profiling data. Limits of detection of 0.00022 Bq 14C-labelled drug/ml plasma have been accurately quantitated in a plasma background of 0.0078 Bq/ml (0.013 dpm/ml in a plasma background of 0.47 dpm/ml or 2.72 pMC in a background of 90.19 pMC).

  8. Making Department of Defense Basic Research Purple (Joint), but NOT the Department of Defense Laboratories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    outside of government, where they report to the chief executive officer (CEO) or to the CEO through a chief technology officer ( CTO ). The panel...Technology ASDR&E Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering CEO chief executive officer COE Center of Excellence CTO chief

  9. Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research Strategic Data Roadmap for Earth System Science

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.; Palanisamy, Giri; Shipman, Galen; Boden, Thomas A.; Voyles, Jimmy W.

    2014-04-25

    Rapid advances in experimental, sensor, and computational technologies and techniques are driving exponential growth in the volume, acquisition rate, variety, and complexity of scientific data. This wealth of scientifically meaningful data has tremendous potential to lead to scientific discovery. However, to achieve scientific breakthroughs, these data must be exploitable—they must be analyzed effectively and efficiently and the results shared and communicated easily within the wider Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) community. The explosion in data complexity and scale makes these tasks exceedingly difficult to achieve, particularly given that an increasing number of disciplines are working across techniques, integrating simulation and experimental or observational results (see Table 5 in Appendix 2). Consequently, we need new approaches to data management, analysis, and visualization that provide research teams with easy-to-use and scalable end-to-end solutions. These solutions must facilitate (and where feasible, automate and capture) every stage in the data lifecycle (shown in Figure 1), from collection to management, annotation, sharing, discovery, analysis, and visualization. In addition, the core functionalities are the same across climate science communities, but they require customization to adapt to specific needs and fit into research and analysis workflows. To this end, the mission of CESD’s Data and Informatics Program is to integrate all existing and future distributed CESD data holdings into a seamless and unified environment for the acceleration of Earth system science.

  10. Research Collaborations Between Universities and Department of Defense Laboratories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    Council – Resident Research Associateship (USAF/NRC-RRA) Program,5 the Naval Research Sabbatical Leave Program6 for faculty, and the College Qualified...http://www.onr.navy.mil/Education-Outreach/Summer-Faculty- Research-Sabbatical.aspx. 7 See U. S. Army website, “CQL Program – College Qualified... tuition assistance for researchers who are completing advanced degrees and opportunities for graduate students to work temporarily in a laboratory. These

  11. A Division of Research in an Academic Clinical Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traystman, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses in general the importance of a research division, whether basic or clinical, in an academic setting and factors to consider in establishing one. Uses John Hopkins' newly created research division for Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine to specifically address funding and intra- and interdepartmental clinical research programs. (DC)

  12. Employee Drug Testing Policies in Police Departments. Research in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, J. Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The development of drug testing policies and the implementation of drug testing procedures involve legal, ethical, medical, and labor relations issues. To learn how police departments are addressing the problem of drug use and drug testing of police officers, the National Institute of Justice sponsored a telephone survey of 33 major police…

  13. Journal Usage at Department and Research Group Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Journal usage in the Department of Polymer Science at the University of Akron from 2006 to 2011 was determined by counting citations within faculty-supervised dissertations and faculty publications. Ranked title lists were created and correlations between journal usage in faculty publications and faculty-supervised dissertations were measured…

  14. Status and future directions for advanced accelerator research-conventional and non-conventional collider concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, R.H.

    1997-03-01

    The relationship between advanced accelerator research and future directions for particle physics is discussed. Comments are made about accelerator research trends in hadron colliders, muon colliders, and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. The Role of Research in Academic Psychiatric Departments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pato, Carlos; Abulseoud, Osama; Pato, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors demonstrate the role that research can play in the development of an academic department of psychiatry. Method: The authors explore the challenges and achievements in the transition of one department from a strong clinically- and educationally-centered department to one with an equally strong research focus. Results: The…

  16. Research spending up slightly in Energy Department's 1994 budget

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.

    1993-04-26

    Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary says her department's proposed budget for fiscal 1994 reflects shifting priorities to meet the needs of a changing world. Thus, nuclear weapons programs, once defended as necessary to protect the nation's security, are being diminished or phased out while support for environmental programs is being increased. Caught in the middle is total R and D, which is slated to increase 2.8% to $7.4 billion in fiscal 1994. For fiscal 1994, President Bill Clinton is asking for a total of $19.6 billion for DOE, a 3% increase from fiscal 1993. According to O'Leary, DOE will place increased emphasis on developing new, clean, and renewable energy sources that meet national energy and economic requirements, and will spend more to increase energy efficiency and conservation.

  17. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Research Progress Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-30

    Cell Lysate with Subsequent Recovery of DNA Other nominees were: Adolescent Risk Behavior and the Influence of Parents and Education by MAJ Brent V... Adolescent Risk Behavior and the Influence of Parents and Education Start Date: 09/02/94 Est. Completion Date: Department: Clinical Investigation...activities, and parental involvement in providing students with information and guidance, have any effect on adolescent risk taking behavior. Technical

  18. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves.

  19. Summary of Research Activities Academic Departments 1980-1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    collaboration with personnel of the Coastal Studies Institute of Louisiana State University. SCOUR AROUND MULTIPLE PILE GROUPS SUBJECTED TO UNIDIRECTIONAL AND...academic excellence of an educational institution is measured by the achievements of its faculty in teaching, research, and related scholarly endeavors. It...the faculty and outstanding midshipmen may flourish. The research activities of the faculty range from very applied cooperative studies with the Navy

  20. Summary of Research Academic Departments, 1987-1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    each phase, HALBIG, Michael C., Professor, The Jesuit Theater the true motive of Lukdcs’ interest in literature of Jacob Masen. New York: Peter Lang...1987. presents itself as a pretext to the study of reality. In the tradition of the Jesuit school theater, Jacob FLETCHER, William H., Assistant...access. The material for this study has become part and extensive documentary research. This portion of an official report by the Office of Technology

  1. Summary of Research, Academic Departments, 1983-1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    researcher believedtreatments of cancer patients. These -"... therapies exploit the different growth an investigation of a simple but clearly. patterns of...normal and cancer cells. For defined discrete-stage optimization problem growth between treatments, an exponential was needed to understand more fully...the model is used for cancer cells; for normal earlier results and to generalize them to cells a logistic model is used. The effect of more realistic

  2. Department of Defense Research & Engineering Strategic Plan, 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-11

    match those biometrics to take away a potential adver - sary’s anonymity, both in direct contact and remotely. Research conducted to discover... vaccines and other pre-exposure prophylactic measures, post-exposure therapeutics, and diagnostic methods and devices. Directed Energy Technologies...products that include methodologies to collect socio-cultural data in denied areas, validated adver - sary and non-adversary models and synthetic

  3. Summary of Research Activities. Academic Departments, 1979-1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    study of American naval policy and strategy under the leadership of Fleet Admiral King during the Second World W-ar. Research on the first portion of the...beryllium copper. 4. The effect of a stub-fin under the cap is being investigated. 5. The literature is being reviewed on ablation theory of reentry...bodies to see how it applies to NAHBE processes. 6. Using the heat transfer study of Professor J. Alan Adams, the material properties of first

  4. Summary of Research 2000: Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    Communications, Signal Processing , Computers, Network Security NRL SUPPORT FOR NPS STUDENT THESIS RESEARCH ON VSAT EXPLORATION H. H. Loomis, Jr... Thesis , Naval Postgraduate School, March 2000. McCabe, E.D. and Stone, C.D., "Development of the Beartrap Post Mission Processing System 2000 (S2K) HTML...manufacturer could then build radiation-tolerant commercial devices on these wafer substrates with little or no changes in the manufacturing process . This thesis

  5. Establishing the Biodynamics Data Resource (BDR): Human Volunteer Impact Acceleration Research Data in the BDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    using special procedures. One such study focused on the effects of added head mass during an impact acceleration. In these tests, volunteers would...11  Special test series...unique motion devices, including horizontal and vertical accelerators, when conducting research on the effects of mechanical forces on humans. Several

  6. The Scope of Acceleration-Induced Loss of Consciousness Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-04

    clinical medicine and minimal incomplete qualitative and quantitative data from aviation medicine. The study of Rossen , Kabat, Anderson published in 1946...all by acceleration physiologists. A full quntitation of all the symptoms, however, remained lacking even in the Rossen , Kabat, Anderson study. The...studies involving induction of loss of consciousness in healthy humans are extremely few in number. Besides the 1946 studies of Rossen , Kabat, and

  7. Accelerator mass spectrometry as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.

    1997-09-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry is a mass spectrometric method of detecting long-lived radioisotopes without regard to their decay products or half-life. The technique is normally applied to geochronology, but recently has been developed for bioanalytical tracing. AMS detects isotope concentrations to parts per quadrillion, quantifying labeled biochemicals to attomole levels in milligram- sized samples. Its advantages over non-isotopeic and stable isotope labeling methods are reviewed and examples of analytical integrity, sensitivity, specificity, and applicability are provided.

  8. U.S, Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect

    2009-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass--plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves--are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced'. In the United States, the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 is an important driver for the sustainable development of renewable biofuels. As part of EISA, the Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that 36 billion gallons of biofuels are to be produced annually by 2022, of which 16 billion gallons are expected to come from cellulosic feedstocks. Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain--the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 25 years. The DOE Genomic Science Program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding for biology. This program

  9. Enhancing research in academic radiology departments: recommendations of the 2003 Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Alderson, Philip O; Bresolin, Linda B; Becker, Gary J; Thrall, James H; Dunnick, N Reed; Hillman, Bruce J; Lee, Joseph K T; Nagy, Edward C

    2004-08-01

    Opportunities for funded radiologic research are greater than ever, and the amount of federal funding coming to academic radiology departments is increasing. Even so, many medical school-based radiology departments have little or no research funding. Accordingly, a consensus panel was convened to discuss ways to enhance research productivity and broaden the base of research strength in as many academic radiology departments as possible. The consensus panel included radiologists who have leadership roles in some of the best-funded research departments, radiologists who direct other funded research programs, and radiologists with related expertise. The goals of the consensus panel were to identify the attributes associated with successful research programs and to develop an action plan for radiology research based on these characteristics.

  10. 78 FR 57401 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... SECURITY Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of Homeland Security for the Production and Associated Research of Purpose Bred Explosive Detection Canines AGENCY..., collection and analysis of quantitative behavior trait measurement; application of quantitative techniques...

  11. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, October 1, 1987--March 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification -- both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  12. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  13. Basic research supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation will outline the basic research activities of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The BES mission is to develop understanding and to stimulate innovative thinking needed to fortify the Department`s mission. Of particular focus in the presentation are the research programs, amounting to about $10 million, supported by the Materials Sciences Division and the Chemical Sciences Division which are fairly directly related to electrochemical technologies.

  14. Rail-accelerator development for ultra-high-pressure research

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Nellis, W.J.; Rego, J.; Susoeff, A.R.; Newman, G.H.

    1983-09-14

    During the last year, we have begun detailed development of a railgun launcher and power source. We are developing a launcher with a gas injector. The injector accelerates the projectile to more than 1 km/s reducing the dwell time of the plasma arc and the erosion of the rails. The injected projectile, with a fuse, also serves as the main switch in the power supply circuit. Current pulse shaping is used to control the applied stress to the projectile and launcher. Results of experiments with the new system will be reported and compared to computer simulations.

  15. EuCARD2: enhanced accelerator research and development in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. EuCARD2 is an European research project which will be realized during 2013-2017 inside the EC FP7 framework. The project concerns the development and coordination of European Accelerator Research and Development. The project is particularly important, to a number of domestic laboratories, due to some plans to build large accelerator infrastructure in Poland. Large accelerator infrastructure of fundamental and applied research character stimulates around it the development and industrial applications as well as biomedical of advanced accelerators, material research and engineering, cryo-technology, mechatronics, robotics, and in particular electronics - like networked measurement and control systems, sensors, computer systems, automation and control systems. The paper presents a digest of the European project EuCARD2 which is Enhanced European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of the research results and assumptions in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator R&D, and the kick-off meeting of the EuCARD2. There are debated a few basic groups of accelerator systems components like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution, high field magnets, superconducting cavities, novel beam collimators, etc. The paper bases on the following materials: Internet and Intranet documents combined with EuCARD2, Description of Work FP7 EuCARD-2 DoW-312453, 2013-02-13, and discussions and preparatory materials worked on by Eucard-2 initiators.

  16. Final report to US Department of Energy: Cyclotron autoresonance accelerator for electron beam dry scrubbing of flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, J.L.

    2001-05-25

    Several designs have been built and operated of microwave cyclotron autoresonance accelerators (CARA's) with electron beam parameters suitable for remediation of pollutants in flue gas emissions from coal-burning power plants. CARA designs have also been developed with a TW-level 10.6 micron laser driver for electron acceleration from 50 to 100 MeV, and with UHF drivers for proton acceleration to over 500 MeV. Dose requirements for reducing SO2, NOx, and particulates in flue gas emissions to acceptable levels have been surveyed, and used to optimize the design of an electron beam source to deliver this dose.

  17. Embedding research culture and productivity in hospital physiotherapy departments: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Williams, Cylie M; Haines, Terry P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have investigated research culture in the Australian hospital system. Although physiotherapists working in tertiary hospital departments conduct and publish research, a conflict between service delivery and research productivity remains. Few departments record research achievements, which limits the accuracy of investigating factors associated with research productivity within allied health. The conduct and translation of research within acute physiotherapy and allied health departments is imperative to improve patient health outcomes, optimise health service efficiency and cost-effectiveness and to improve staff and patient satisfaction and staff retention. Allied health departments should institute a research register and consider implementing other strategies to improve research culture and productivity, such as dedicating equivalent full-time staff to research, supporting staff with joint clinical and academic appointments, ensuring a research register is available and used and having events available for the dissemination of research. Future research should focus on improving research productivity within acute allied health departments to provide Level 1 and 2 evidence of service effectiveness and cost-effectiveness to optimise health care delivery and to maximise the benefit of allied health staff to Australia's healthcare system.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Research Centers An Overview of the Science

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Alternative fuels from renewable cellulosic biomass - plant stalks, trunks, stems, and leaves - are expected to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil while enhancing national energy security and decreasing the environmental impacts of energy use. Ethanol and other advanced biofuels from cellulosic biomass are renewable alternatives that could increase domestic production of transportation fuels, revitalize rural economies, and reduce carbon dioxide and pollutant emissions. According to U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, 'Developing the next generation of biofuels is key to our effort to end our dependence on foreign oil and address the climate crisis while creating millions of new jobs that can't be outsourced.' Although cellulosic ethanol production has been demonstrated on a pilot level, developing a cost-effective, commercial-scale cellulosic biofuel industry will require transformational science to significantly streamline current production processes. Woodchips, grasses, cornstalks, and other cellulosic biomass are widely abundant but more difficult to break down into sugars than corn grain - the primary source of U.S. ethanol fuel production today. Biological research is key to accelerating the deconstruction of cellulosic biomass into sugars that can be converted to biofuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science continues to play a major role in inspiring, supporting, and guiding the biotechnology revolution over the past 30 years. The DOE Genomic Science program is advancing a new generation of research focused on achieving whole-systems understanding of biology. This program is bringing together scientists in diverse fields to understand the complex biology underlying solutions to DOE missions in energy production, environmental remediation, and climate change science. For more information on the Genomic Science program, see p. 26. To focus the most advanced biotechnology-based resources on the biological challenges of biofuel

  19. Impact of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network: Accelerating the Translation of Research Into Practice.

    PubMed

    Ribisl, Kurt M; Fernandez, Maria E; Friedman, Daniela B; Hannon, Peggy A; Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Olson, Lindsay; Ory, Marcia; Risendal, Betsy; Sheble, Laura; Taylor, Vicky M; Williams, Rebecca S; Weiner, Bryan J

    2017-03-01

    The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) is a thematic network dedicated to accelerating the adoption of evidence-based cancer prevention and control practices in communities by advancing dissemination and implementation science. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute, CPCRN has operated at two levels: Each participating network center conducts research projects with primarily local partners as well as multicenter collaborative research projects with state and national partners. Through multicenter collaboration, thematic networks leverage the expertise, resources, and partnerships of participating centers to conduct research projects collectively that might not be feasible individually. Although multicenter collaboration is often advocated, it is challenging to promote and assess. Using bibliometric network analysis and other graphical methods, this paper describes CPCRN's multicenter publication progression from 2004 to 2014. Searching PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science in 2014 identified 249 peer-reviewed CPCRN publications involving two or more centers out of 6,534 total. The research and public health impact of these multicenter collaborative projects initiated by CPCRN during that 10-year period were then examined. CPCRN established numerous workgroups around topics such as: 2-1-1, training and technical assistance, colorectal cancer control, federally qualified health centers, cancer survivorship, and human papillomavirus. This paper discusses the challenges that arise in promoting multicenter collaboration and the strategies that CPCRN uses to address those challenges. The lessons learned should broadly interest those seeking to promote multisite collaboration to address public health problems, such as cancer prevention and control.

  20. An adaptive approach to facilitating research productivity in a primary care clinical department.

    PubMed

    Weber-Main, Anne Marie; Finstad, Deborah A; Center, Bruce A; Bland, Carole J

    2013-07-01

    Efforts to foster the growth of a department's or school's research mission can be informed by known correlates of research productivity, but the specific strategies to be adopted will be highly context-dependent, influenced by local, national, and discipline-specific needs and resources. The authors describe a multifaceted approach-informed by a working model of organizational research productivity-by which the University of Minnesota Department of Family Medicine and Community Health (Twin Cities campus) successfully increased its collective research productivity during a 10-year period (1997-2007) and maintained these increases over time.Facing barriers to recruitment of faculty investigators, the department focused instead on nurturing high-potential investigators among their current faculty via a new, centrally coordinated research program, with provision of training, protected time, technical resources, mentoring, and a scholarly culture to support faculty research productivity. Success of these initiatives is documented by the following: substantial increases in the department's external research funding, rise to a sustained top-five ranking based on National Institutes of Health funding to U.S. family medicine departments, later-stage growth in the faculty's publishing record, increased research capacity among the faculty, and a definitive maturation of the department's research mission. The authors offer their perspectives on three apparent drivers of success with broad applicability-namely, effective leadership, systemic culture change, and the self-awareness to adapt to changes in the local, institutional, and national research environment.

  1. Basic Research Policy of the Department of Defense: Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-02-20

    Classification) Basic Research Policy of the Department of Defense, Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force, UNCLASSIFIED 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) N/A...obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE — In wcnssrnw BASIC RESEARCH POLICY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Report of the Defense Science Board Task...BOARD SUBJECT: Report of Task Force on Basic Research Policy The Task Force of the Defense Science Board, appointed at the request of the

  2. United States Air Force Academy, Department of Chemistry Research: AY 1983-1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    CODES 18- SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necesarv and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB. GR Chemical Research, Energetic Materials ...Department of Chemistry research during AY 1983-84 has progressed well in the areas of energetic materials , theoretical chemistry, and catalysis...Abstract Department of Che .try research durinq AY 1983-84 has pro- gressed well in the areas of energetic materials , theoretical chem

  3. Graduate education and research in the ERA of large accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1988-04-01

    Questions and concerns of the experimental particle physics community are addressed in these categories: quality of research, independence, creativity, evaluation and recognition, and value in graduate education. (LEW)

  4. Accelerated Laboratory Research Experience in Psychology through Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatfield, Douglas C.; Cruse, Bradley H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes implementation of computer simulation to aid in training psychology students in research methodology. Four skills required in research are reviewed; the simulation's context and the software used are described; and student activities, including submission of articles to online class journals and students' responses to the method, are…

  5. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Linda

    2016-07-07

    The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

  6. Bioanalytical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmaceutical research.

    PubMed

    Turteltaub, K W; Vogel, J S

    2000-07-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying isotopes. It has had great impact in the geosciences and is now being applied in the biomedical fields. AMS measures radioisotopes such as 14C, 3H, 41Ca, and 36Cl, and others, with attomole sensitivity and high precision. Its use is allowing absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination studies, as well as detailed pharmacokinetics, to be carried out directly in humans with very low chemical or radiological hazard. It is used in combination with standard separation methodologies, such as chromatography, in identification of metabolites and molecular targets for both toxicants and pharmacologic agents. AMS allows the use of very low specific activity chemicals (< 1 mCi/mmol), creating opportunities to use compounds not available in a high specific activity form, such as those that must be biosynthesized, produced in combinatorial libraries, or made through inefficient synthesis. AMS is allowing studies to be carried out with agents having low bioavailability, low systemic distributions, or high toxicity where administered doses must be kept low (<1 microg/kg). It may have uses in tests for idiosyncratic metabolism, drug interaction, or individual susceptibility, among others. The ability to use very low chemical doses, low radiological doses, small samples and conduct multiple dose studies may help move drug candidates into humans faster and safer than before. The uses of AMS are growing and its potential for drug development is only now beginning to be realized.

  7. Developments and applications of accelerator system at the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatori, S.; Kurita, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamada, H.; Mori, J.; Hamachi, H.; Kimura, S.; Shimoda, T.; Hiroto, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Ohtani, N.; Yasuda, K.; Ishigami, R.; Sasase, M.; Ito, Y.; Hatashita, M.; Takagi, K.; Kume, K.; Fukuda, S.; Yokohama, N.; Kagiya, G.; Fukumoto, S.; Kondo, M.

    2005-12-01

    At the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center (WERC), an accelerator system with a 5 MV tandem accelerator and a 200 MeV proton synchrotron is used for ion beam analyses and irradiation experiments. The study of cancer therapy with a proton beam is also performed. Therefore, the stable operation and efficient sharing of beam time of the system are required, based on the treatment standard. Recent developments and the operation status of the system put stress on the tandem accelerator operation, magnifying the problems.

  8. Present and Future of Forensics in the Research Based Communication Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Craig R.; Birkholt, Marty J.

    The social scientific research focus of major United States universities places the forensics programs at these institutions in a unique position. Three areas of tension between forensics and research based communication departments are as follows: research quality/utility, applicability of forensic training, and resource conflicts. Solutions to…

  9. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. Annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Topics covered include: Super HILAC and Bevalac operations; high intensity uranium beams line item; advanced high charge state ion source; 184-inch synchrocyclotron; VENUS project; positron-electron project; high field superconducting accelerator magnets; beam cooling; accelerator theory; induction linac drivers; RF linacs and storage rings; theory; neutral beam systems development; experimental atomic physics; neutral beam plasma research; plasma theory; and the Tormac project. (GHT)

  10. NASA's Spaceflight Visual Impairment and Intracranial Hypertension Research Plan: An accelerated Research Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, Christian; Fogarty, J.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J.

    2010-01-01

    To date six long duration astronauts have experienced in flight visual changes and post flight signs of optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, hyperoptic shifts and or raised intracranial pressure. In some cases the changes were transient while in others they are persistent with varying degrees of visual impairment. Given that all astronauts exposed to microgravity experience a cephalad fluid shift, and that both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients have exhibited optic nerve sheath edema on MRI, there is a high probability that all astronauts develop in-flight idiopathic intracranial hypertension to some degree. Those who are susceptible, have an increased likelihood of developing treatment resistant papilledema resulting in visual impairment and possible long-term vision loss. Such an acquired disability would have a profound mission impact and would be detrimental to the long term health of the astronaut. The visual impairment and increased intracranial pressure phenomenon appears to have multiple contributing factors. Consequently, the working "physiological fault bush" with elevated intracranial pressure at its center, is divided into ocular effects, and CNS and other effects. Some of these variables have been documented and or measured through operational data gathering, while others are unknown, undocumented and or hypothetical. Both the complexity of the problem and the urgency to find a solution require that a unique, non-traditional research model be employed such as the Accelerated Research Collaboration(TM) (ARC) model that has been pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. In the ARC model a single entity facilitates and manages all aspects of the basic, translational, and clinical research, providing expert oversight for both scientific and managerial efforts. The result is a comprehensive research plan executed by a multidisciplinary team and the elimination of stove-piped research. The ARC model emphasizes efficient and effective

  11. The Gender and Race-Ethnicity of Faculty in Top Science and Engineering Research Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Ann M.; Nelson, Donna J.

    This study examines the gender and racial-ethnic composition of faculty in top research departments for science and engineering "S-E - disciplines. There are critical masses of at least 15% women in top research departments in biological sciences, psychology, and social sciences but not in physical sciences and engineering. Blacks and Hispanics together make up only 4.1% of the faculty in our study. Black and Hispanic females are the most poorly represented groups; together, they make up only 1% of the faculty in top S-E research departments. For most S-E disciplines, less than 15% of full professors in top research departments are women or non-Whites.

  12. THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY (DEARS): BRIEFING TO THE MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) has completed its first monitoring season (summer 2005) and is progressing toward initiation of its second season (February 2005). The assistance obtained from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has been instr...

  13. Accelerating Medical Research using the Swift Workflow System

    PubMed Central

    STEF-PRAUN, Tiberiu; CLIFFORD, Benjamin; FOSTER, Ian; HASSON, Uri; HATEGAN, Mihael; SMALL, Steven L.; WILDE, Michael; ZHAO, Yong

    2009-01-01

    Both medical research and clinical practice are starting to involve large quantities of data and to require large-scale computation, as a result of the digitization of many areas of medicine. For example, in brain research – the domain that we consider here – a single research study may require the repeated processing, using computationally demanding and complex applications, of thousands of files corresponding to hundreds of functional MRI studies. Execution efficiency demands the use of parallel or distributed computing, but few medical researchers have the time or expertise to write the necessary parallel programs. The Swift system addresses these concerns. A simple scripting language, SwiftScript, provides for the concise high-level specification of workflows that invoke various application programs on potentially large quantities of data. The Swift engine provides for the efficient execution of these workflows on sequential computers, parallel computers, and/or distributed grids that federate the computing resources of many sites. Last but not least, the Swift provenance catalog keeps track of all actions performed, addressing vital bookkeeping functions that so often cause difficulties in large computations. To illustrate the use of Swift for medical research, we describe its use for the analysis of functional MRI data as part of a research project examining the neurological mechanisms of recovery from aphasia after stroke. We show how SwiftScript is used to encode an application workflow, and present performance results that demonstrate our ability to achieve significant speedups on both a local parallel computing cluster and multiple parallel clusters at distributed sites. PMID:17476063

  14. Accelerators: Sparking Innovation and Transdisciplinary Team Science in Disparities Research

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Carol R.; Shameer, Khader; Gabrilove, Janice; Atreja, Ashish; Shepard, Peggy; Goytia, Crispin N.; Smith, Geoffrey W.; Dudley, Joel; Manning, Rachel; Bickell, Nina A.; Galvez, Maida P.

    2017-01-01

    Development and implementation of effective, sustainable, and scalable interventions that advance equity could be propelled by innovative and inclusive partnerships. Readied catalytic frameworks that foster communication, collaboration, a shared vision, and transformative translational research across scientific and non-scientific divides are needed to foster rapid generation of novel solutions to address and ultimately eliminate disparities. To achieve this, we transformed and expanded a community-academic board into a translational science board with members from public, academic and private sectors. Rooted in team science, diverse board experts formed topic-specific “accelerators”, tasked with collaborating to rapidly generate new ideas, questions, approaches, and projects comprising patients, advocates, clinicians, researchers, funders, public health and industry leaders. We began with four accelerators—digital health, big data, genomics and environmental health—and were rapidly able to respond to funding opportunities, transform new ideas into clinical and community programs, generate new, accessible, actionable data, and more efficiently and effectively conduct research. This innovative model has the power to maximize research quality and efficiency, improve patient care and engagement, optimize data democratization and dissemination among target populations, contribute to policy, and lead to systems changes needed to address the root causes of disparities. PMID:28241508

  15. Principal Investigator and Department Administrator Perceptions of Services Provided by Offices of Research Administration at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Kimberley W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine what service attributes were perceived as important factors for a successful Office of Research Administration (ORA) to provide to principal investigators and department administrators. Initially established more than 50 years ago, The Office of Research Administration (ORA) has evolved into an…

  16. Arthropod genomics research in the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service: Current impacts and future prospects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) is the intramural research agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) which employs scientists to conduct basic and applied research aimed to develop and transfer solutions to agricultural problems of high national priority and to ensure food...

  17. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua; Parker, Jack; Brandt, Craig; Holladay, Susan; Wolfe, Amy; Bogle, Mary Anna; Lowe, Kenneth; Hyder, Kirk

    2006-06-01

    The Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge (Fig. 1), Tennessee supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) goal of understanding the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites for new solutions to environmental remediation and long-term stewardship. In particular, the FRC provides the opportunity for researchers to conduct studies that promote the understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of existing remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies. It offers a series of contaminated sites around the former S-3 Waste Disposal Ponds and uncontaminated sites in which investigators and students conduct field research or collect samples for laboratory analysis. FRC research also spurs the development of new and improved characterization and monitoring tools. Site specific knowledge gained from research conducted at the FRC also provides the DOE-Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) the critical scientific knowledge needed to make cleanup decisions for the S-3 Ponds and other sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR).

  18. Accelerating Biomedical Research in Designing Diagnostic Assays, Drugs, and Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    structures by ab initio folding us- ing the Rosetta code, a computationally intensive method. We structurally compare the approach’s derived models to a...attempts are unsuccessful, then the computationally intensive ab initio Rosetta program is used. The ab initio models are annotated by structurally...Biololgy, vol. 3, no. 64, 2009; doi:10.1186/1752-0509-3-64. 12. Y. Chushak and M.O. Stone , “In Silico Selection of RNA Aptamers,” Nucleic Acids Research

  19. Accelerating cancer systems biology research through Semantic Web technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Sagotsky, Jonathan; Taylor, Thomas; Shironoshita, Patrick; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems biology is an interdisciplinary, rapidly expanding research field in which collaborations are a critical means to advance the field. Yet the prevalent database technologies often isolate data rather than making it easily accessible. The Semantic Web has the potential to help facilitate web-based collaborative cancer research by presenting data in a manner that is self-descriptive, human and machine readable, and easily sharable. We have created a semantically linked online Digital Model Repository (DMR) for storing, managing, executing, annotating, and sharing computational cancer models. Within the DMR, distributed, multidisciplinary, and inter-organizational teams can collaborate on projects, without forfeiting intellectual property. This is achieved by the introduction of a new stakeholder to the collaboration workflow, the institutional licensing officer, part of the Technology Transfer Office. Furthermore, the DMR has achieved silver level compatibility with the National Cancer Institute's caBIG, so users can interact with the DMR not only through a web browser but also through a semantically annotated and secure web service. We also discuss the technology behind the DMR leveraging the Semantic Web, ontologies, and grid computing to provide secure inter-institutional collaboration on cancer modeling projects, online grid-based execution of shared models, and the collaboration workflow protecting researchers' intellectual property.

  20. Public health practice vs research: implications for preparedness and disaster research review by State Health Department IRBs.

    PubMed

    Perlman, David

    2008-10-01

    Under the current US Department of Health and Human Services regulatory and ethical system for research involving human subjects, research is defined in terms of several key concepts: intent, systematic investigation, and generalizability. If an investigator engages in a systematic investigation designed or intended to contribute to generalizable knowledge, then he or she is engaged in research. If that research involves living individuals and the investigator will either interact or intervene with people or obtain their identifiable personal information, then the research must be prospectively reviewed by an institutional review board (IRB), a federally mandated committee that ensures the ethical and regulatory appropriateness of proposed research. In public health institutions, and especially at state departments of health, this definition of research may prove vexing for determining when particular public health activities must be reviewed by IRBs. This article outlines several reasons for such vexation and 2 key responses from major public health stakeholders. In the current climate of public health preparedness initiatives at state health departments for disasters and bioterrorism, how research is defined vis-à-vis public health interventions may add even more confusion to preparedness initiatives and pose difficulties in determining when IRB review and the added protections it affords are appropriate. This article suggests several practical ways to avoid confusion and attempts to strike a balance between the need for expeditious approvals of research-based responses to public health disasters and to ensure proper protections for human subjects at state health departments. It is hoped that these suggestions can assist not only state health departments but also academically based researchers who either collaborate with those departments or whose research will need to be reviewed by their IRBs.

  1. Strategies to accelerate translation of research into primary care within practices using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Lynne S; Wessell, Andrea M; Jenkins, Ruth G; Nietert, Paul J; Liszka, Heather A; Ornstein, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    This research describes implementation strategies used by primary care practices using electronic medical records in a national quality improvement demonstration project, Accelerating Translation of Research into Practice, conducted within the Practice Partner Research Network. Qualitative methods enabled identification of strategies to improve 36 quality indicators. Quantitative survey results provide mean scores reflecting the integration of these strategies by practices. Nursing staff plays important roles to facilitate quality improvement within collaborative primary care practices.

  2. Comparing Research Activities of Women and Men Faculty in Departments of Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Barbara A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study compared research activities of men and women from data obtained in a 1982-83 survey of 7,947 medical school faculty in departments of internal medicine. Among findings were that women researchers had significantly fewer National Institutes of Health grants as well as reduced laboratory space. (Author/DB)

  3. Research and Teaching Work within University Education Departments: Fragmentation or Integration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    This article raises some questions about the current policy context of debates on the link between research and teaching in academic work, specifically within university education departments. It draws selectively from a research project which investigated education academics' perceptions and experiences in Scotland and England but focuses…

  4. Research Cultures in English and Scottish University Education Departments: An Exploratory Study of Academic Staff Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris; Wilson, Michael; Humes, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the findings of a small-scale qualitative investigation into academic staff perceptions of research cultures across 10 English and Scottish university education departments. The study sheds light on four interrelated issues: the nature of research cultures, perceived facilitators, perceived constraints and the emotional landscape…

  5. The Department of Veterans Affairs pre- and post-doctoral nurse fellowships: diverse opportunities for research.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Jennifer; Shively, Martha; Bormann, Jill; Johnson, Linda; Alt-White, Anna C; Fairman, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explicate research funding and training opportunities available through the Department of Veterans Affairs to nurses seeking advanced preparation at the pre- and post-doctoral levels. A brief discussion of the available resources including student stipend and health insurance, workspace, and research support is presented. Additionally, articulation of the benefits and challenges associated with these types of fellowships is delineated from the perspective of a fellow, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) site preceptor, and dissertation faculty. Discussion of the post-doctoral fellowship and the extensive resources of the VA related to overall research career development are also addressed.

  6. Extending VIVO ontology to represent research and educational resources in an academic biomedical informatics department.

    PubMed

    Nakikj, Drashko; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    The increasing need for interdisciplinary team sciences makes it vital for academic research departments to publicize their research and educational resources as part of "linked data" on the semantic web to facilitate research networking and recruitment. We extended an open-source ontology, VIVO, to represent the research and educational resources in an academic biomedical informatics department to enable ontology-based information storage and retrieval. Using participatory design methods, we surveyed representative types of visitors to the department web site to understand their information needs, and incorporated these needs into the ontology design. We added 114 classes and 186 properties to VIVO. Generalizability and scalability are the measures used in our theoretical evaluation.

  7. Prevention Research Center Collaborations With State Departments of Health: Washington State.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Peggy A; Vu, Thuy T; Santiago, Patricia Migliore; Joyner, Pama; Mason, Caitlin; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2017-03-01

    State health departments and Prevention Research Centers (PRCs) have complementary mandates and expertise important to improving population health. State health departments manage and administer numerous programs with broad population reach. PRCs bridge dissemination and implementation research and public health practice to improve health programming and outcomes. This paper describes the 15-year partnership between the Washington State Department of Health and the PRC at the University of Washington. Through this partnership, the Washington State Department of Health increases their research and evaluation capacity by working with the University of Washington PRC, and the University of Washington PRC receives opportunities to apply evidence in a variety of practice settings, expand the reach of their research-tested programs to new populations, and form new partnerships. The partnership focused initially on improving colorectal cancer screening rates through increased dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions. The partnership scope has grown to include small cancer screening projects in worksites and healthcare systems, Washington's Colorectal Cancer Control Program, breast and cervical cancer screening, hypertension control, and worksite health promotion. The partnership yields three main types of outcomes that strengthen practice and science: (1) findings from each major assessment or evaluation activity, published in the peer-reviewed literature when possible; (2) use of the findings to improve public health practice and impact; and (3) training opportunities for employees of local and state health departments and public health students. PRCs, health departments, and the populations they serve have much to gain from this type of partnership.

  8. Targeted Alpha Therapy: The US DOE Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an emerging discipline of cancer therapy that exploits the biochemical differences between normal cells and cancer cells to selectively deliver a lethal dose of radiation to cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells relatively unperturbed. A broad overview of targeted alpha therapy including isotope production methods, and associated isotope production facility needs, will be provided. A more general overview of the US Department of Energy Isotope Program's Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy will also be presented focusing on the accelerator-production of 225Ac and final product isolation methodologies for medical applications.

  9. Research program for the 660 MeV proton accelerator driven MOX-plutonium subcritical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barashenkov, V. S.; Buttsev, V. S.; Buttseva, G. L.; Dudarev, S. Ju.; Polanski, A.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sissakian, A. N.

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the research program of the Experimental Accelerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton accelerator operating in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel (25% PuO2+75% UO2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient keff=0.945, energetic gain G=30, and accelerator beam power of 0.5 kW.

  10. Artificial intelligence research in particle accelerator control systems for beam line tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Pieck, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Tuning particle accelerators is time consuming and expensive, with a number of inherently non-linear interactions between system components. Conventional control methods have not been successful in this domain and the result is constant and expensive monitoring of the systems by human operators. This is particularly true for the start-up and conditioning phase after a maintenance period or an unexpected fault. In turn, this often requires a step-by-step restart of the accelerator. Surprisingly few attempts have been made to apply intelligent accelerator control techniques to help with beam tuning, fault detection, and fault recovery problems. The reason for that might be that accelerator facilities are rare and difficult to understand systems that require detailed expert knowledge about the underlying physics as well as months if not years of experience to understand the relationship between individual components, particularly if they are geographically disjoint. This paper will give an overview about the research effort in the accelerator community that has been dedicated to the use of artificial intelligence methods for accelerator beam line tuning.

  11. NDCX-II, A New Induction Linear Accelerator for Warm Dense Matter Research

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, M.; Bieniosek, F.; Kwan, J.; Logan, G.; Waldron, W.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Sharp, B.; Gilson, E.; Davidson, R.

    2009-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL), a collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), is currently constructing a new induction linear accelerator, called Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment NDCX-II. The accelerator design makes effective use of existing components from LLNL's decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), especially induction cells and Blumlein voltage sources that have been transferred to LBNL. We have developed an aggressive acceleration 'schedule' that compresses the emitted ion pulse from 500 ns to 1 ns in just 15 meters. In the nominal design concept, 30 nC of Li{sup +} are accelerated to 3.5 MeV and allowed to drift-compress to a peak current of about 30 A. That beam will be utilized for warm dense matter experiments investigating the interaction of ion beams with matter at high temperature and pressure. Construction of the accelerator will be complete within a period of approximately two and a half years and will provide a worldwide unique opportunity for ion-driven warm dense matter experiments as well as research related to novel beam manipulations for heavy ion fusion drivers.

  12. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  13. 75 FR 49357 - United States Department of Agriculture Research Misconduct Regulations for Extramural Research

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... includes, but is not limited to, research in economics, education, linguistics, medicine, psychology, social sciences, statistics, and research involving human subjects or animals regardless of the...

  14. Accelerator research on MBE-4, an experimental multi-beam induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Meuth, H.; Fessenden, T.J.; Keefe, D.; Warwick, A.I.

    1988-06-01

    The multiple beam accelerator MBE-4 is a device for research toward a heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion, based on the induction linac concept. Its main goal is proof of the principle of current amplification by acceleration and controlled self-similar beam pulse compression. Into the 16-m long device four beams, each with an initial current of 10 mA are injected from a Marx-driven diode at 200 keV. The current amplification is up to nine-fold, with a final beam energy of about 800 keV in the middle of the bunch. Now that all the apparatus' accelerator sections have been completed, installed and aligned, and its unaccelerated transport properties have been studied, our experimental research has reached the crucial phase of implementing appropriate accelerator schedules that approximate self-similar current-pulse compression. These schedules are established through a close interplay of computations using a one-dimensional simulation code and a manual empirical tuning procedure. In a first approach, with a rather vigorous schedule that uses most of the accelerator modules to their voltage limits, we have determined the limits of our capability for controlled pulse compression, mainly due to waveform shaping of the driving pulse-forming networks. We shall report on these results. In the future, we will also aim for gentler schedules that would model more closely an inertial confinement fusion scenario. 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Human Short-Latency Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Impact Acceleration Research: Equipment, Procedures and Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Instrumentation Data Sheet .......................... 10 Figure 8. Human Physiology Screen One ....................................... 1I1 Figure 9. Human ... Physiology Screen Two...................................... 12 Figure 10. Human Physiology Screen Three ..................................... 12 Figure...Short-Latency Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Impact Acceleration Research ***** HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY SCREEN***** Please Read First To move from one

  16. FAIR - An International Accelerator Facility for Research with Ions and Antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Walter

    2005-06-08

    An overview is given on the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, its science motivation and goals, the facility lay-out and characteristics, the accelerator design challenges, the schedule for construction, and the international interest/participation in the project.

  17. Priority research areas to accelerate the development of practical ultraconductive copper conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dominic F.; Burwell, Malcolm; Stillman, H.

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the findings at an Ultraconductive Copper Strategy Meeting held on March 11, 2015 in Washington DC. The aim of this meeting was to bring together researchers of ultraconductive copper in the U.S. to identify and prioritize critical non-proprietary research activities that will enhance the understanding in the material and accelerate its development into practical conductors. Every effort has been made to ensure that the discussion and findings are accurately reported in this document.

  18. Research and Development of Wires and Cables for High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-04-01

    The latest strategic plans for High Energy Physics endorse steadfast superconducting magnet technology R&D for future Energy Frontier Facilities. This includes 10 to 16 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for the luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider and eventually for a future 100 TeV scale proton-proton (pp) collider. This paper describes the multi-decade R&D investment in the Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which was crucial to produce the first reproducible 10 to 12 T accelerator-quality dipoles and quadrupoles, as well as their scale-up. We also indicate prospective research areas in superconducting Nb3Sn wires and cables to achieve the next goals for superconducting accelerator magnets. Emphasis is on increasing performance and decreasing costs while pushing the Nb3Sn technology to its limits for future pp colliders.

  19. BESTIA - the next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    DOE PAGES

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; ...

    2015-12-02

    Over the last two decades, BNL’s ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. In addition, our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particlemore » acceleration of ions and electrons.« less

  20. BESTIA - The next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  1. STS-40 orbital acceleration research experiment flight results during a typical sleep period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Nicholson, John Y.; Ritter, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), an electrostatic accelerometer package with complete on-orbit calibration capabilities was flown aboard Shuttle on STS-40. The instrument is designed to measure and record the Shuttle aerodynamic acceleration environment from the free molecule flow regime through the rarefied flow transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Because of its sensitivity, the OARE instrument detects aerodynamic behavior of the Shuttle while in low-earth orbit. A 2-h orbital time period on day seven of the mission, when the crew was asleep and other spacecraft activities were at a minimum, was examined. Examination of the model with the flight data shows the instrument to be sensitive to all major expected low-frequency acceleration phenomena; however, some erratic instrument bias behavior persists in two axes. In these axes, the OARE data can be made to match a comprehensive atmospheric-aerodynamic model by making bias adjustments and slight liner corrections for drift.

  2. FORT KEOGH LIVESTOCK & RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-AGRICULTRAL RESEARCH SERVICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Article describes Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory to an audience of scientific researchers (i.e. ecologists) interested in the interactions among organisms and their environment. Article outlines the facilities, environment, history, and ongoing types of research. Emphasis is on...

  3. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy's Genomics: GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-08-01

    The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission and goals.

  5. Mississippi State University’s Geoscience Education and Geocognition Research Program in the Department of Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K.; Clary, R. M.; Sherman-Morris, K.; Kirkland, B.; Gillham, D.; Moe-Hoffman, A.

    2009-12-01

    The Department of Geosciences at Mississippi State University offers both a MS in Geosciences and a PhD in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, with the possibility of a concentration in geoscience education. The department offers broad research opportunities in the geoscience sub-disciplines of Geology, Meteorology, GIS, and Geography. Geoscience education research is one of the research themes emphasized in the department and focuses on geoscience learning in traditional, online, field-based, and informal educational environments. Approximately 20% of the faculty are actively conducting research in geoscience education and incorporate both qualitative and quantitative research approaches in areas including: the investigation of effective teaching strategies, the implementation and evaluation of geoscience teacher professional development programs and diversity enhancement programs, the study of the history and philosophy of science in geoscience teaching, the exploration of student cognition and understanding of complex and dynamic earth systems, and the investigation of using visualizations to enhance learning in the geosciences. The inception and continued support of an active geoscience education research program is derived from a variety of factors including: (1) the development of the on-line Teachers in Geosciences (TIG) Masters Degree Program which is the primary teaching appointment for the majority of the faculty conducting geoscience education research, (2) the securing of federal funds to support geoscience education research, (3) the publication of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers in both geoscience education and traditional research domains, (4) the active contribution of the geoscience education faculty in their traditional research domains, (5) a faculty that greatly values teaching and recognizes the research area of geoscience education as a sub-domain of the broader geoscience disciplines, (6) the involvement of university faculty, outside

  6. U.S. Department of Energy student research participation programs. Underrepresented minorities in U.S. Department of Energy student research participation programs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify those particular aspects of US Department of Energy (DOE) research participation programs for undergraduate and graduate students that are most associated with attracting and benefiting underrepresented minority students and encouraging them to pursue careers in science, engineering, and technology. A survey of selected former underrepresented minority participants, focus group analysis, and critical incident analysis serve as the data sources for this report. Data collected from underrepresented minority participants indicate that concerns expressed and suggestions made for conducting student research programs at DOE contractor facilities are not remarkably different from those made by all participants involved in such student research participation programs. With the exception of specific suggestions regarding recruitment, the findings summarized in this report can be interpreted to apply to all student research participants in DOE national laboratories. Clearly defined assignments, a close mentor-student association, good communication, and an opportunity to interact with other participants and staff are those characteristics that enhance any educational program and have positive impacts on career development.

  7. Space Acceleration Measurement System-II: Microgravity Instrumentation for the International Space Station Research Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station opens for business in the year 2000, and with the opening, science investigations will take advantage of the unique conditions it provides as an on-orbit laboratory for research. With initiation of scientific studies comes a need to understand the environment present during research. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II provides researchers a consistent means to understand the vibratory conditions present during experimentation on the International Space Station. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II, or SAMS-II, detects vibrations present while the space station is operating. SAMS-II on-orbit hardware is comprised of two basic building block elements: a centralized control unit and multiple Remote Triaxial Sensors deployed to measure the acceleration environment at the point of scientific research, generally within a research rack. Ground Operations Equipment is deployed to complete the command, control and data telemetry elements of the SAMS-II implementation. Initially, operations consist of user requirements development, measurement sensor deployment and use, and data recovery on the ground. Future system enhancements will provide additional user functionality and support more simultaneous users.

  8. Learning from the Apprentice: An Account of Action Research Practice in a University Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockburn-Wootten, Cheryl; Henderson, Alison; Rix, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    An action research project, managed by a graduate student, resulted in the development of an academic website as an effective internal and external communication tool. The main focus of the investigation was to uncover the tacit knowledge held by staff in the Department of Management Communication through a series of in-depth interviews, a focus…

  9. Evaluating the Efficiency of Research in Academic Departments: An Empirical Analysis in an Italian Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Dal Bianco, Antonio; Landoni, Paolo; Sala, Alessandro; Salerno, Mario

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the efficiency of university departments in science, technology and medicine in an Italian Region (Lombardy). The aim of the paper is twofold: (i) to analyse the changes in productivity in recent years (from 2004 and 2007); and (ii) to detect factors that are potentially affecting efficiency. The research benefited from a…

  10. Sustainability in Teaching, Research, and Community Practice: The FCS Department at California State University, Northridge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontikis, Kyriakos; Martin, Allen; Cai, Yi; Kim, Jongeun; Cao, Wei; Giordano, Angie; Torabian-Riasati, Setareh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how a large comprehensive family and consumer sciences unit has incorporated sustainability into its curriculum and research agenda. It summarizes how each area within the department (Interior Design, Apparel Design and Merchandising, Consumer Affairs, Family Studies, Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food…

  11. Evaluation of performance of the Medical Research Department in ‘Research naive’ non-academic hospital: An audit

    PubMed Central

    Kuyare, Mukta Sunil; Sarve, Parag Vijayrao; Dalal, Komal S.; Tripathi, Raakhi K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Conducting medical research is not limited to academia and pharmaceutical industry but even multispeciality hospitals need to venture in this area along with patient care. To develop research culture among well-established non-acedemic hospital is always difficult and challenging task. This article attempts to evaluate the performance of the department in ‘Research naïve’ hospital in the last two years and review the strengths and challenges it faced at each step. Methods: This was a retrospective document analysis study evaluating the steps towards setting and sustaining of Medical Research Department of Bhaktivedanta Hospital during the period of January 2013 to June 2015 (30 Months). The authors developed a checklist (along with performance indicators) to assess the Preparatory phase and Activity phase of the research department which were evaluated by Institute Quality Management Team. Each step of both phases was also reviewed in terms of strengths and challenges as perceived by the authors. Results: During 2 year journey of research naïve Hospital, Institute had witnessed Hospital initiated (n=24, 59%) and sponsored projects (n=17, 41%) in all specialties. HRC reviewed (n=2.13) projects per meeting for administrative consideration while IEC reviewed (n=2.15) projects for scientific and ethical review. Challenges during preparatory phases were circumvent by immense cooperation of hospital management for initial investment, sensitization through research workshops for consultants, established procedures and trained support manpower and constant encouragement by research coordinator. Conclusion: Considering evaluation of 41 studies in very first 2 years in ‘Research naive non academic institute demonstrated successful implementation of trio model of Hospital Research Committee for administrative review, IEC for scientific-ethical review, centralized MRD for coordinating all research projects under one roof which may act as role model for

  12. Shortening tobacco life cycle accelerates functional gene identification in genomic research.

    PubMed

    Ning, G; Xiao, X; Lv, H; Li, X; Zuo, Y; Bao, M

    2012-11-01

    Definitive allocation of function requires the introduction of genetic mutations and analysis of their phenotypic consequences. Novel, rapid and convenient techniques or materials are very important and useful to accelerate gene identification in functional genomics research. Here, over-expression of PmFT (Prunus mume), a novel FT orthologue, and PtFT (Populus tremula) lead to shortening of the tobacco life cycle. A series of novel short life cycle stable tobacco lines (30-50 days) were developed through repeated self-crossing selection breeding. Based on the second transformation via a gusA reporter gene, the promoter from BpFULL1 in silver birch (Betula pendula) and the gene (CPC) from Arabidopsis thaliana were effectively tested using short life cycle tobacco lines. Comparative analysis among wild type, short life cycle tobacco and Arabidopsis transformation system verified that it is optional to accelerate functional gene studies by shortening host plant material life cycle, at least in these short life cycle tobacco lines. The results verified that the novel short life cycle transgenic tobacco lines not only combine the advantages of economic nursery requirements and a simple transformation system, but also provide a robust, effective and stable host system to accelerate gene analysis. Thus, shortening tobacco life cycle strategy is feasible to accelerate heterologous or homologous functional gene identification in genomic research.

  13. UCLA accelerator research and development. Progress report, [November 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-09-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  14. Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park, Department of Energy Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, P.D.

    1987-11-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Health and Environmental Research (DOE-OHER) is developing an overall research plan for the National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) program, which it administers nationally. Each NERP will develop its own program plan, following an outline developed by NERP managers, DOE Operations Offices, and DOE-OHER. The Oak Ridge NERP program plan includes an introduction to the concept and mission of a NERP; the philosophy, program integration, and administration of the Oak Ridge NERP; specific goals and objectives; progress to date; and, future issues on a national and local level. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service research in application technology for pest management.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Thomson, S J

    2003-01-01

    A research summary is presented that emphasizes ARS achievements in application technology over the past 2-3 years. Research focused on the improvement of agricultural pesticide application is important from the standpoint of crop protection as well as environmental safety. Application technology research is being actively pursued within the ARS, with a primary focus on application system development, drift management, efficacy enhancement and remote sensing. Research on application systems has included sensor-controlled hooded sprayers, new approaches to direct chemical injection, and aerial electrostatic sprayers. For aerial application, great improvements in on-board flow controllers permit accurate field application of chemicals. Aircraft parameters such as boom position and spray release height are being altered to determine their effect on drift. Other drift management research has focused on testing of low-drift nozzles, evaluation of pulsed spray technologies and evaluation of drift control adjuvants. Research on the use of air curtain sprayers in orchards, air-assist sprayers for row crops and vegetables, and air deflectors on aircraft has documented improvements in application efficacy. Research has shown that the fate of applied chemicals is influenced by soil properties, and this has implications for herbicide efficacy and dissipation in the environment. Remote sensing systems are being used to target areas in the field where pests are present so that spray can be directed to only those areas. Soil and crop conditions influence propensity for weeds and insects to proliferate in any given field area. Research has indicated distinct field patterns favorable for weed growth and insect concentration, which can provide further assistance for targeted spraying.

  16. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1994-04-01

    This document begins with a general description of the facility to include historical and up-to-date aspects of design and operation. A user`s guide and a review of research using the facility follows. Next the accelerator utilization and operation and the development of the facilities is given. Personnel currently working at the facility are listed. Lastly, recent publications and literature cited are presented.

  17. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006

    SciTech Connect

    FOX, K.J.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

  18. Mathematics and statistics research department. Progress report, period ending June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lever, W.E.; Kane, V.E.; Scott, D.S.; Shepherd, D.E.

    1981-09-01

    This report is the twenty-fourth in the series of progress reports of the Mathematics and Statistics Research Department of the Computer Sciences Division, Union Carbide Corporation - Nuclear Division (UCC-ND). Part A records research progress in biometrics research, materials science applications, model evaluation, moving boundary problems, multivariate analysis, numerical linear algebra, risk analysis, and complementary areas. Collaboration and consulting with others throughout the UCC-ND complex are recorded in Part B. Included are sections on biology and health sciences, chemistry, energy, engineering, environmental sciences, health and safety research, materials sciences, safeguards, surveys, and uranium resource evaluation. Part C summarizes the various educational activities in which the staff was engaged. Part D lists the presentations of research results, and Part E records the staff's other professional activities during the report period.

  19. Impact of integrated health system changes, accelerated due to an earthquake, on emergency department attendances and acute admissions: a Bayesian change-point analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Philip J; Hamilton, Greg J; Deely, Joanne M; Ardagh, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To chart emergency department (ED) attendance and acute admission following a devastating earthquake in 2011 which lead to Canterbury's rapidly accelerated integrated health system transformations. Design Interrupted time series analysis, modelling using Bayesian change-point methods, of ED attendance and acute admission rates over the 2008–2014 period. Setting ED department within the Canterbury District Health Board; with comparison to two other district health boards unaffected by the earthquake within New Zealand. Participants Canterbury's health system services ∼500 000 people, with around 85 000 ED attendances and 37 000 acute admissions per annum. Main outcome measures De-seasoned standardised population ED attendance and acute admission rates overall, and stratified by age and sex, compared before and after the earthquake. Results Analyses revealed five global patterns: (1) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population attending the ED; (2) the growth rate of ED attendances per head of population did not change between the pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods; (3) postearthquake, there was a sudden and persisting decrease in the proportion of the population admitted to hospital; (4) the growth rate of hospital admissions per head of the population declined between pre-earthquake and postearthquake periods and (5) the most dramatic reduction in hospital admissions growth after the earthquake occurred among those aged 65+ years. Extrapolating from the projected and fitted deseasoned rates for December 2014, ∼676 (16.8%) of 4035 projected hospital admissions were avoided. Conclusions While both necessarily and opportunistically accelerated, Canterbury's integrated health systems transformations have resulted in a dramatic and sustained reduction in ED attendances and acute hospital admissions. This natural intervention experiment, triggered by an earthquake, demonstrated that

  20. Pharmacogenomics education and research at the Department of Pharmacy, University of Patras, Greece.

    PubMed

    Patrinos, George P; Katsila, Theodora

    2016-10-28

    The Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine group belongs to the Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Department of Pharmacy and is active since 2009 mainly in the field of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. Herein, we describe the research interests, collaborations and accomplishments of the Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine group together with the teaching activities of the group that greatly enhance the pharmacogenomics knowledge of graduate/postgraduate students and healthcare professionals.

  1. Particle Accelerators in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  2. 15 CFR 27.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 27.103 Section 27.103 Commerce and... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  3. 40 CFR 26.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 26.103 Section 26.103 Protection of... Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  4. 28 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Judicial... this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  5. 38 CFR 16.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... anticipated scope of the institution's research activities and the types of subject populations likely to be... this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 16.103 Section 16.103....103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department...

  6. 40 CFR 26.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 26.103 Section 26.103 Protection of... Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  7. 38 CFR 16.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  8. 38 CFR 16.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 16.103 Section 16.103....103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is...

  9. 28 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Judicial... this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  10. 16 CFR 1028.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1028.103 Section 1028.103 Commercial... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  11. 38 CFR 16.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 16.103 Section 16.103....103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is...

  12. 38 CFR 16.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 16.103 Section 16.103....103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is...

  13. 16 CFR 1028.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1028.103 Section 1028.103 Commercial... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  14. 40 CFR 26.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 26.103 Section 26.103 Protection of... Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  15. 15 CFR 27.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 27.103 Section 27.103 Commerce and... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  16. 40 CFR 26.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 26.103 Section 26.103 Protection of... Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  17. 28 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Judicial... this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  18. 28 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Judicial... this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  19. 40 CFR 26.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 26.103 Section 26.103 Protection of... Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  20. 16 CFR 1028.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1028.103 Section 1028.103 Commercial... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  1. 16 CFR 1028.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1028.103 Section 1028.103 Commercial... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  2. 15 CFR 27.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 27.103 Section 27.103 Commerce and... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  3. 15 CFR 27.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 27.103 Section 27.103 Commerce and... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by...

  4. 28 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Judicial... this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  5. STS-40 orbital acceleration research experiment flight results during a typical sleep period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Nicholson, J. Y.; Ritter, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), an electrostatic accelerometer package with complete on-orbit calibration capabilities, was flown for the first time aboard the Space Shuttle on STS-40. This is also the first time an accelerometer package with nano-g sensitivity and a calibration facility has flown aboard the Space Shuttle. The instrument is designed to measure and record the Space Shuttle aerodynamic acceleration environment from the free molecule flow regime through the rarified flow transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Because of its sensitivity, the OARE instrument defects aerodynamic behavior of the Space Shuttle while in low-earth orbit. A 2-hour orbital time period on day seven of the mission, when the crew was asleep and other spacecraft activities were at a minimum, was examined. During the flight, a 'trimmed-mean' filter was used to produce high quality, low frequency data which was successfully stored aboard the Space Shuttle in the OARE data storage system. Initial review of the data indicated that, although the expected precision was achieved, some equipment problems occurred resulting in uncertain accuracy. An acceleration model which includes aerodynamic, gravity-gradient, and rotational effects was constructed and compared with flight data. Examination of the model with the flight data shows the instrument to be sensitive to all major expected low frequency acceleration phenomena; however, some erratic instrument bias behavior persists in two axes. In these axes, the OARE data can be made to match a comprehensive atmospheric-aerodynamic model by making bias adjustments and slight linear corrections for drift. The other axis does not exhibit these difficulties and gives good agreement with the acceleration model.

  6. Mathematics and Statistics Research Department progress report, period ending June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Denson, M.V.; Funderlic, R.E.; Gosslee, D.G.; Lever, W.E.

    1982-08-01

    This report is the twenty-fifth in the series of progress reports of the Mathematics and Statistics Research Department of the Computer Sciences Division, Union Carbide Corporation Nuclear Division (UCC-ND). Part A records research progress in analysis of large data sets, biometrics research, computational statistics, materials science applications, moving boundary problems, numerical linear algebra, and risk analysis. Collaboration and consulting with others throughout the UCC-ND complex are recorded in Part B. Included are sections on biology, chemistry, energy, engineering, environmental sciences, health and safety, materials science, safeguards, surveys, and the waste storage program. Part C summarizes the various educational activities in which the staff was engaged. Part D lists the presentations of research results, and Part E records the staff's other professional activities during the report period.

  7. Prompt nuclear analytical techniques for material research in accelerator driven transmutation technologies: Prospects and quantitative analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Červená, J.; Peřina, V.; Mach, R.; Peka, I.

    1998-04-01

    Accelerator driven transmutation technology (ADTT) is a promissing way toward liquidation of spent nuclear fuel, nuclear wastes and weapon grade Pu. The ADTT facility comprises a high current (proton) accelerator supplying a subcritical reactor assembly with spallation neutrons. The reactor part is supposed to be cooled by molten fluorides or metals which serve, at the same time, as a carrier of nuclear fuel. Assumed high working temperature (400-600°C) and high radiation load in the subcritical reactor and spallation neutron source put forward the problem of optimal choice of ADTT construction materials, especially from the point of their radiation and corrosion resistance when in contact with liquid working media. The use of prompt nuclear analytical techniques in ADTT related material research is considered and examples of preliminary analytical results obtained using neutron depth profiling method are shown for illustration.

  8. The development of HIV research laboratories in the Royal Thai Army Medical Department.

    PubMed

    Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Sukwit, Suchitra; Gaywee, Jariyanart; Viputtikul, Kwanjai; Eamsila, Chirapa; Tabprasit, Sutchana; de Souza, Mark; Sirisopana, Narongrid; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Brown, Arthur E; Chuenchitra, Cheodchai

    2005-11-01

    The development of HIV research laboratories at the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS), Royal Thai Army Medical Department in supporting of HIV-1 vaccine trials in Thailand was implemented in 1991. The collaboration between AFRIMS, Royal Thai Army Medical Department, and the US Military HIV Research Program with the ultimate goal to conduct the HIV-1 vaccine trial phase III. The HIV serology lab was set up for surveillance program in military recruits. Then, there was a need to strengthen more on the existing laboratories by training personnel to cope with the confidentiality of the lab results, specimen processing and data management which are critical. Later on, the necessary laboratory for measuring of vaccine immunogenicity was developed, such as lymphoproliferation assay. Additionally, a molecular biology lab was also developed. The HIV research laboratory management must include an ability to deal with some problems, such as late specimen receiving, fluctuating of power supply, technical staffs maintained. Good laboratory practices and safety must be strictly implemented. Communication network among facilities also played an important role in HIV laboratory strengthening at AFRIMS.

  9. Accelerating Progress in Eating Disorders Prevention: A Call for Policy Translation Research and Training.

    PubMed

    Austin, S Bryn

    2016-01-01

    The public health burden of eating disorders is well documented, and over the past several decades, researchers have made important advances in the prevention of eating disorders and related problems with body image. Despite these advances, however, several critical limitations to the approaches developed to date leave the field far from achieving the large-scale impact that is needed. This commentary provides a brief review of what achievements in prevention have been made and identifies the gaps that limit the potential for greater impact on population health. A plan is then offered with specific action steps to accelerate progress in high-impact prevention, most compellingly by promoting a shift in priorities to policy translation research and training for scholars through the adoption of a triggers-to-action framework. Finally, the commentary provides an example of the application of the triggers-to-action framework as practiced at the Strategic Training Initiative for the Prevention of Eating Disorders, a program based at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Boston Children's Hospital. Much has been achieved in the nearly 30 years of research carried out for the prevention of eating disorders and body image problems, but several critical limitations undermine the field's potential for meaningful impact. Through a shift in the field's priorities to policy translation research and training with an emphasis on macro-environmental influences, the pace of progress in prevention can be accelerated and the potential for large-scale impact substantially improved.

  10. Consensus statement on advancing research in emergency department operations and its impact on patient care.

    PubMed

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Ward, Michael J; Chang, Anna Marie; Pines, Jesse M; Jouriles, Nick; Yealy, Donald M

    2015-06-01

    The consensus conference on "Advancing Research in Emergency Department (ED) Operations and Its Impact on Patient Care," hosted by The ED Operations Study Group (EDOSG), convened to craft a framework for future investigations in this important but understudied area. The EDOSG is a research consortium dedicated to promoting evidence-based clinical practice in emergency medicine. The consensus process format was a modified version of the NIH Model for Consensus Conference Development. Recommendations provide an action plan for how to improve ED operations study design, create a facilitating research environment, identify data measures of value for process and outcomes research, and disseminate new knowledge in this area. Specifically, we call for eight key initiatives: 1) the development of universal measures for ED patient care processes; 2) attention to patient outcomes, in addition to process efficiency and best practice compliance; 3) the promotion of multisite clinical operations studies to create more generalizable knowledge; 4) encouraging the use of mixed methods to understand the social community and human behavior factors that influence ED operations; 5) the creation of robust ED operations research registries to drive stronger evidence-based research; 6) prioritizing key clinical questions with the input of patients, clinicians, medical leadership, emergency medicine organizations, payers, and other government stakeholders; 7) more consistently defining the functional components of the ED care system, including observation units, fast tracks, waiting rooms, laboratories, and radiology subunits; and 8) maximizing multidisciplinary knowledge dissemination via emergency medicine, public health, general medicine, operations research, and nontraditional publications.

  11. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to access the suitabilty of heavy ion accelerators as iginiters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accerelator techonolgy, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawerence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the vadidation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. The papers in this report that address these goals are: MBE-4 mechanical progress, alignment of MBE-4, a compact energy analyzer for MBE-4, Cs/sup +/ injector modeling with the EGUN code, an improved emittance scanning system for HIFAR, 2-MV injector, carbon arc source development, beam combining in ILSE, emittance growth due to transverse beam combining in ILSE - particle simulation results, achromatic beam combiner for ILSE, additional elements for beam merging, quadrupole magnet design for ILSE, and waveforms and longitudinal beam-parameters for ILSE.

  12. Design studies and commissioning plans for plasma acceleration research station experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O.; Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J.; Smith, J.

    2015-10-15

    Plasma acceleration research station is an electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration test stand proposed for CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the interaction between the electron beam and the plasma is numerically characterised via 2D numerical studies by using VSIM code. The wakefields induced by a single bunch travelling through the plasma were found to vary from 200 MV/m to 3 GV/m for a range of bunch length, bunch radius, and plasma densities. Energy gain for the particles populating the bunch tail through the wakefields driven by the head of the bunch was demonstrated. After determining the achievable field for various beams and plasma configurations, a reference setting was determined for further studies. Considering this reference setting, the beam quality studies were performed for a two-bunch acceleration case. The maximum energy gain as well as the energy spread mitigation by benefiting from the beam loading was investigated by positioning the witness and driver bunches with respect to each other. Emittance growth mechanisms were studied considering the beam-plasma and beam-wakefield interactions. Eventually, regarding the findings, the initial commissioning plans and the aims for the later stages were summarised.

  13. Accelerator-based radiation sources for next-generation radiobiological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVeaux, Linda C.; Wells, Douglas P.; Hunt, Alan; Webb, Tim; Beezhold, Wendland; Harmon, J. Frank

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) of Idaho State University has developed a unique radiation research facility to answer next-generation radiobiological questions. The IAC has 10 operating research accelerators. These include continuously delivered radiation beams such as a 950 keV electron beam and a 2 MeV light-ion Van de Graaff. The IAC also has a number of pulsed electron linacs which range in energy from 4 to 40 MeV. The most intense amongst them deliver peak dose rates greater than 10 12 Gy/s. The operational flexibility of pulsed electron linacs allows control of peak and average dose rate, pulse separation and total dose over many orders of magnitude in these parameters. These high dose rates also allow delivery of large doses on time scales that are very small when compared to biological responses. The spectrum of particle beams that the IAC can deliver includes alphas, protons, neutrons, electrons (betas), and gammas (X-rays). Current radiobiological research at the IAC is focused upon radiation effects in unicellular organisms. The effectiveness of extremely high dose rate electron irradiation for the neutralization of microbes is being investigated. Concurrently, we are characterizing the survival mechanisms employed by microbes when exposed to these extremely high doses and dose rates. We have isolated strains from several diverse species that show increased radiation-resistance over normal populations. In addition, we were the first to demonstrate radiation-induced Bystander effects in unicellular organisms. Because of the numerous and diverse accelerators at the IAC, these and many other novel radiobiological investigations are readily attainable.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-10-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

  15. Magnet R&D for the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP)

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, S.A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gupta, R.; Ghosh, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Harrison, M.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lietzke, A.F.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nobrega, F.; Novitsky, I.; Sabbi, G.L.; Schmazle, J.; Stanek, R.; Turrioni, D.; Wanderer, P.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2006-06-01

    In 2004, the US DOE established the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) with the goal of developing a technology base for future upgrades of the LHC. The focus of the magnet program, which is a collaboration of three US laboratories, BNL, FNAL and LBNL, is on development of high gradient quadrupoles using Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor. Other program components address issues regarding magnet design, radiation-hard materials, long magnet scale-up, quench protection, fabrication techniques and conductor and cable R&D. This paper presents an overall view of the program with emphasis on the current quadrupole project and outlines the long-term goals of the program.

  16. Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

  17. Executive summary of the CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: How to make research succeed in your department.

    PubMed

    Stiell, Ian G; Artz, Jennifer D; Perry, Jeffrey; Vaillancourt, Christian; Calder, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The vision of the recently created Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section is to promote high-quality emergency patient care by conducting world-leading education and research in emergency medicine. The Academic Section plans to achieve this goal by enhancing academic emergency medicine primarily at Canadian medical schools and teaching hospitals. It seeks to foster and develop education, research, and academic leadership amongst Canadian emergency physicians, residents, and students. In this light, the Academic Section began in 2013 to hold the annual Academic Symposia to highlight best practices and recommendations for the three core domains of governance and leadership, education scholarship, and research. Each year, members of three panels are asked to review the literature, survey and interview experts, achieve consensus, and present their recommendations at the Symposium (2013, Education Scholarship; 2014, Research; and 2015, Governance and Funding). Research is essential to medical advancement. As a relatively young specialty, emergency medicine is rapidly evolving to adapt to new diagnostic tools, the challenges of crowding in emergency departments, and the growing needs of emergency patients. There is significant variability in the infrastructure, support, and productivity of emergency medicine research programs across Canada. All Canadians benefit from an investigation of the means to improve research infrastructure, training programs, and funding opportunities. Such an analysis is essential to identify areas for improvement, which will support the expansion of emergency medicine research. To this end, physician-scientist leaders were gathered from across Canada to develop pragmatic recommendations on the improvement of emergency medicine research through a comprehensive analysis of current best practices, systematic literature reviews, stakeholder surveys, and expert interviews.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD) A model for internal oversight and external transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2012-12-12

    This poster introduces the Department of Energy (DOE) Human Subjects Research Database (HSRD), which contains information on all Department of Energy research projects involving human subjects that: are funded by DOE; are conducted in DOE facilities; are performed by DOE personnel; include current or former DOE or contract personnel.

  19. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Pena, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this…

  20. Final report for the Department of Energy funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project'' [University electronic research administration demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, John

    1998-07-31

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy (DOE) funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project (DE-FC02-92ER35180)'' for the period August 1994-July 1998. The goal of the project, referred to as NewERA, was to demonstrate the use of open standards for electronic commerce to support research administration, otherwise referred to as Electronic Research Administration (ERA). The NewERA demonstration project provided a means to test interagency standards developed within the Federal Grant Electronic Commerce Committee, a group comprised of federal granting agencies. The NewERA program was initiated by DOE. NewERA was comprised of three separate, but related, ERA activities in preaward administration, postaward administration, and secure Internet commerce. The goal of New ERA was to demonstrate an open standard implementation of ERA using electronic data interchange, e-mail and Internet transaction security between grant applicants and DOE, along with t h e other participating agencies.

  1. Department of Energy Nanoscale Science Research Centers: Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-05-12

    The following non-mandatory guidance is intended for the Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) funded by the Basic Energy Sciences program office under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. It describes practices thought appropriate to the management of environmental, safety and health (ES&H) concerns associated with laboratory-scale operations involving the design, synthesis, or characterization of engineered nanomaterials, In general, it is intended to apply to precursors, intermediates, and wastes used during, or resulting from synthesizing such nanomaterials. In general, it is not intended to apply to materials for which an occupational exposure limit has been established.

  2. Optics and photonics research in the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing Department at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons-Potter, K.; Meister, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    Photonic system and device technologies have claimed a significant share of the current high-tech market. In particular, laser systems and optical devices impact a broad range of technological areas including telecommunications, optical computing, optical data storage, integrated photonics, remote environmental sensing and biomedical applications. Below we present an overview of photonics research being conducted within the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing department of the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Recent results in the fields of photosensitive materials and devices, binary optics device applications, wavelength generation using optical parametric oscillators, and remote sensing are highlighted. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Review of modeling approaches for emergency department patient flow and crowding research.

    PubMed

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Griffey, Richard T; Olsen, Tava

    2011-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is an international phenomenon that continues to challenge operational efficiency. Many statistical modeling approaches have been offered to describe, and at times predict, ED patient load and crowding. A number of formula-based equations, regression models, time-series analyses, queuing theory-based models, and discrete-event (or process) simulation (DES) models have been proposed. In this review, we compare and contrast these modeling methodologies, describe the fundamental assumptions each makes, and outline the potential applications and limitations for each with regard to usability in ED operations and in ED operations and crowding research.

  4. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  5. Salt-gradient Solar Ponds: Summary of US Department of Energy Sponsored Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. L.; Johnson, D. H.; Jones, G. F.; Zangrando, F.

    1984-01-01

    The solar pond research program conducted by the United States Department of Energy was discontinued after 1983. This document summarizes the results of the program, reviews the state of the art, and identifies the remaining outstanding issues. Solar ponds is a generic term but, in the context of this report, the term solar pond refers specifically to saltgradient solar pond. Several small research solar ponds have been built and successfully tested. Procedures for filling the pond, maintaining the gradient, adjusting the zone boundaries, and extracting heat were developed. Theories and models were developed and verified. The major remaining unknowns or issues involve the physical behavior of large ponds; i.e., wind mixing of the surface, lateral range or reach of horizontally injected fluids, ground thermal losses, and gradient zone boundary erosion caused by pumping fluid for heat extraction. These issues cannot be scaled and must be studied in a large outdoor solar pond.

  6. Gender-specific research on mental illness in the emergency department: current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ranney, Megan L; Locci, Natalie; Adams, Erica J; Betz, Marian; Burmeister, David B; Corbin, Ted; Dalawari, Preeti; Jacoby, Jeanne L; Linden, Judith; Purtle, Jonathan; North, Carol; Houry, Debra E

    2014-12-01

    Mental illness is a growing, and largely unaddressed, problem for the population and for emergency department (ED) patients in particular. Extensive literature outlines sex and gender differences in mental illness' epidemiology and risk and protective factors. Few studies, however, examined sex and gender differences in screening, diagnosis, and management of mental illness in the ED setting. Our consensus group used the nominal group technique to outline major gaps in knowledge and research priorities for these areas, including the influence of violence and other risk factors on the course of mental illness for ED patients. Our consensus group urges the pursuit of this research in general and conscious use of a gender lens when conducting, analyzing, and authoring future ED-based investigations of mental illness.

  7. Gender-Specific Research on Mental Illness in the Emergency Department: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ranney, Megan L.; Locci, Natalie; Adams, Erica J.; Betz, Marian; Burmeister, David B.; Corbin, Ted; Dalawari, Preeti; Jacoby, Jeanne L.; Linden, Judith; Purtle, Jonathan; North, Carol; Houry, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Mental illness is a growing, and largely unaddressed, problem for the population and for emergency department (ED) patients in particular. Extensive literature outlines sex and gender differences in mental illness’ epidemiology and risk and protective factors. Few studies, however, examined sex and gender differences in screening, diagnosis, and management of mental illness in the ED setting. Our consensus group used the nominal group technique to outline major gaps in knowledge and research priorities for these areas, including the influence of violence and other risk factors on the course of mental illness for ED patients. Our consensus group urges the pursuit of this research in general, and conscious use of a gender lens when conducting, analyzing, and authoring future ED-based investigations of mental illness. PMID:25413369

  8. Integrating certification into the US Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Turbine Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C P; Link, H; Smith, B

    1997-07-01

    The Wind Turbine Research Program conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) employs a comprehensive engineering development process which includes regular design, testing, and documentation reviews throughout the process. This process follows accepted international procedures, including the International Standards Organization ISO 9001. International wind turbine certification practice typically requires a review of only the final design and testing results of a wind turbine system. Using this approach, if the design does not meet requirements, the designer is faced with the lengthy and inefficient process of rerunning engineering calculations or tests or even redesigning major components. NREL has recognized the similarity between its development process and international certification practice and has integrated the two. The result is a comprehensive engineering development process, which enables subcontractors participating in the DOE/NREL Wind Turbine Research Program to develop a mature product, which is ready for commercialization and certification.

  9. US Department of Energy Environmental Cleanup Technology Development program: Business and research opportunities guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is charged with overseeing a multi-billion dollar environmental cleanup effort. EM leads an aggressive national research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program to provide environmental restoration and waste management technologies to DOE sites, and to manage DOE-generated waste. DOE is firmly committed to working with industry to effectuate this cleanup effort. We recognize that private industry, university, and other research and development programs are valuable sources of technology innovation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide you with information on potential business opportunities in the following technical program areas: Remediation of High-Level Waste Tanks; Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal of Mixed Waste; Migration of Contaminants; Containment of Existing Landfills; Decommissioning and Final Disposition, and Robotics.

  10. ERTS-A data as a teaching and research tool in the Department of Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grybeck, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The project was an attempt to integrate ERTS-1 data into teaching introductory, specialized, and graduate courses in the Department of Geology, University of Alaska. This data was to be utilized principally through a specially selected, high quality collection of black and white, and color 9.5 mosaics of the State of Alaska. In completing these tasks, the data accumulated has proved highly useful in a variety of ways including: (1) discussions of the uses and availability of ERTS imagery; (2) as a medium for talking about and showing various areas of Alaska; (3) in discussing geology in general; and (4) as an aid in doing research and as possible research topics themselves. Use of ERTS-1 imagery in geology proved highly successful and its use is now an integral part of many courses.

  11. Acceleration Tolerance: Effect of Exercise, Acceleration Training; Bed Rest and Weightlessness Deconditioning. A Compendium of Research (1950-1996)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, J. L.; McKenzie, M. A.; Stad, N. J.; Barnes, P. R.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Ghiasvand, F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    This compendium includes abstracts and annotations of clinical observations and of more basic studies involving physiological mechanisms concerning interaction of acceleration, training and deconditioning. If the author's abstract or summary was appropriate, it was included. In other cases a more detailed annotation of the paper was prepared under the subheadings Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions. Author and keyword indices are provided, plus an additional selected bibliography of related work and of those papers received after the volume was prepared for publication. This volume includes material published from 1950-1996.

  12. Research on Vacuum Laser Accelerator and Proof-of Principle Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lei

    This thesis discovers a proof-of-principle theory of Vacuum Laser Acceleration (VLA) and proposes a new acceleration mechanism---Capture and Acceleration Scenario (CAS) in our far-field laser acceleration research, which is a promising new scheme in advanced acceleration field. In this thesis, I studied electrons' dynamic behaviors while interacting with intense laser beam. There are two kinds of dynamics trajectories, namely IS (Inelastic Scattering) and CAS. In CAS, electrons can be captured and moving along the laser beam for a long time and receive considerable energy exchange from the laser field, rather than quickly expelled from the intense field region of the laser as predicted by the conventional Ponderomotive Potential Model (PPM). This thesis shows the research on most parameters of both laser beam and electron beam which will affect this VLA scheme. One of the primary factors is the laser intensity. Relatively high laser intensity is critically required for VLA, and there are thresholds of intensity a0( th) for CAS occurrence; the thresholds are different under different laser beam waist widths which is also a very important parameter of laser beam. Laser intensity is still a big obstacle nowadays. In the last decade there are only a few laboratories have the laser power to ˜1019 W/cm2 and above. Our simulation shows that laser intensity threshold of CAS is around a0 = 5˜8, in correspondence to laser power around 1019˜1022 W/cm 2 depending on different wave length and waist width. The interaction is also sensitive to various electron beam parameters, such as the optimal initial electron energy falls in the range of 4--15 MeV, electron incident angle and position, and so on. At last the thesis presents out experimental work on this new VLA scheme. The collaboration is between our UCLA group and Brookhaven National Lab - Accelerator Test Facility (BNL-ATF). At BNL-ATF, they have both intense laser beam and high quality electron beam. The characters of

  13. 49 CFR 11.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., appropriate for the research in question, on file with the Office for Human Research Protections, HHS, or any... Human Research Protections, HHS, or any successor office. (b) Departments and agencies will conduct or... responsibilities for protecting the rights and welfare of human subjects of research conducted at or sponsored...

  14. 22 CFR 225.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., appropriate for the research in question, on file with the Office for Human Research Protections, HHS, or any... Human Research Protections, HHS, or any successor office. (b) Departments and agencies will conduct or... responsibilities for protecting the rights and welfare of human subjects of research conducted at or sponsored...

  15. 15 CFR 27.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., appropriate for the research in question, on file with the Office for Human Research Protections, HHS, or any... Human Research Protections, HHS, or any successor office. (b) Departments and agencies will conduct or... responsibilities for protecting the rights and welfare of human subjects of research conducted at or sponsored...

  16. Fiscal year 2013 energy department budget: Proposed investments in clean energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-03-01

    Energy and environmental research programs generally fared well in President Barack Obama's proposed budget for the Department of Energy (DOE) for fiscal year (FY) 2013. In his State of the Union address, Obama called for the United States to pursue an "all of the above" energy strategy that includes fossil fuels, as well as a variety of renewable sources of energy. The DOE budget request supports that strategy, Energy Secretary Steven Chu said in a 13 February press briefing announcing the budget proposal. The proposed budget gives DOE 27.2 billion overall, a 3.2% increase from the FY 2012 enacted budget (see Table 1). This budget "reflects some tough choices," Chu said. The proposed budget would cut 4 billion in subsidies for oil and gas companies; many Republican members of Congress have already indicated that they oppose such cuts, suggesting that congressional approval of this budget may run into stumbling blocks. The budget would also cut funding for research and development projects that are already attracting private-sector investment or that are not working, and would reduce some of the department's operational costs.

  17. Correction of static pressure on a research aircraft in accelerated flight using differential pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodi, A. R.; Leon, D. C.

    2012-11-01

    A method is described that estimates the error in the static pressure measurement on an aircraft from differential pressure measurements on the hemispherical surface of a Rosemount model 858AJ air velocity probe mounted on a boom ahead of the aircraft. The theoretical predictions for how the pressure should vary over the surface of the hemisphere, involving an unknown sensitivity parameter, leads to a set of equations that can be solved for the unknowns - angle of attack, angle of sideslip, dynamic pressure and the error in static pressure - if the sensitivity factor can be determined. The sensitivity factor was determined on the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft by comparisons with the error measured with a carefully designed sonde towed on connecting tubing behind the aircraft - a trailing cone - and the result was shown to have a precision of about ±10 Pa over a wide range of conditions, including various altitudes, power settings, and gear and flap extensions. Under accelerated flight conditions, geometric altitude data from a combined Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and inertial measurement unit (IMU) system are used to estimate acceleration effects on the error, and the algorithm is shown to predict corrections to a precision of better than ±20 Pa under those conditions. Some limiting factors affecting the precision of static pressure measurement on a research aircraft are discussed.

  18. Neutron research and facility development at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator 1970 to 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Peelle, R.W.; Harvey, J.A.; Maienschein, F.C.; Weston, L.W.; Olsen, D.K.; Larson, D.C.; Macklin, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    This report reviews the accomplishments of the first decade of operation of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and discusses the plans for the facility in the coming decade. Motivations for scientific and applied research during the next decade are included. In addition, ORELA is compared with competing facilities, and prospects for ORELA's improvement and even replacement are reported. Development efforts for the next few years are outlined that are consistent with the anticipated research goals. Recommendations for hardware development include improving the electron injection system to give much larger short-pulse currents on a reliable basis, constructing an Electron Beam Injector Laboratory to help make this improvement possible, continuing a study of possibly replacing the electron accelerator with a proton machine, and replacing or upgrading the facility's data-acquistion and immediate-analysis computer systems. Increased operating time and more involvement of nuclear theorists are recommended, and an effective staff size for optimum use of this unique facility is discussed. A bibliography of all ORELA-related publications is included.

  19. A 12 GHZ 50 MW Klystron for Support of Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, Daryl; Haase, Andrew; Jensen, Aaron; Jongewaard, Erik; Nantista, Christopher; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC

    2011-05-31

    A 12 GHz 50MW X-band klystron is under development at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department. The klystron will be fabricated to support programs currently underway at three European Labs; CERN, PSI, and INFN Trieste. The choice of frequency selection was due to the CLIC RF frequency changing from 30 GHz to the European X-band frequency of 11.99 GHz in 2008. Since the Klystron Department currently builds 50MW klystrons at 11.424 GHz known collectively as the XL4 klystrons, it was deemed cost-effective to utilize many XL4 components by leaving the gun, electron beam transport, solenoid magnet and collector unchanged. To realize the rf parameters required, the rf cavities and rf output hardware were necessarily altered. Some improvements to the rf design have been made to reduce operating gradients and increase reliability. Changes in the multi-cell output structure, waveguide components, and the window will be discussed along with testing of the devices. Five klystrons known as XL5 klystrons are scheduled for production over the next two years.

  20. A new world of biomedical research - the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, C.

    1997-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore`s Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is one of the leading AMS facilities in the world, performing about 25% of all AMS analyses. It is also at the forefront of the emerging field of AMS as applied to biomedical research. AMS is so sensitive that it can identify just a few molecules of a substance among trillions of molecules. This sensitivity makes possible for the first time the study of toxins, dietary nutrients, drugs, and other substances in dosages that are relevant to humans. Work with volunteer subjects indicates that a chemical that is produced when meat is cooked adversely affects human DNA more than it does the DNA of laboratory animals. This research supports the need to pursue additional human biological risk assessment using AMS. Livermore is also performing studies of the human metabolism of calcium, which are difficult without AMS.

  1. Analysis of research ethics board approval times in an academic department of medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Teresa S M; Jones, Meaghan; Meneilly, Graydon S

    2015-04-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to better understand barriers to academic research, we reviewed and analyzed the process of research ethics applications, focusing on ethics approval time, within the Department of Medicine from 2006 to 2011. A total of 1,268 applications for approval to use human subjects in research were included in our analysis. Three variables, risk category (minimal vs. non-minimal risk), type of funding, and year of submission, were statistically significant for prediction of ethics approval time, with risk status being the most important of these. The covariate-adjusted mean time for approval for minimal risk studies (35.7 days) was less than half that of non-minimal risk protocols (76.5 days). Studies funded through a for-profit sponsor had significantly longer approval times than those funded through other means but were also predominantly (87%) non-minimal risk protocols. Further investigations of the reasons underlying the observed differences are needed to determine whether improved training for research ethics board (REB) members and/or greater dialogue with investigators may reduce the lengthy approval times associated with non-minimal risk protocols.

  2. Building a common pediatric research terminology for accelerating child health research.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Michael G; Bailey, L Charles; Forrest, Christopher B; Padula, Michael A; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal observational clinical data on pediatric patients in electronic format is becoming widely available. A new era of multi-institutional data networks that study pediatric diseases and outcomes across disparate health delivery models and care settings are also enabling an innovative collaborative rapid improvement paradigm called the Learning Health System. However, the potential alignment of routine clinical care, observational clinical research, pragmatic clinical trials, and health systems improvement requires a data infrastructure capable of combining information from systems and workflows that historically have been isolated from each other. Removing barriers to integrating and reusing data collected in different settings will permit new opportunities to develop a more complete picture of a patient's care and to leverage data from related research studies. One key barrier is the lack of a common terminology that provides uniform definitions and descriptions of clinical observations and data. A well-characterized terminology ensures a common meaning and supports data reuse and integration. A common terminology allows studies to build upon previous findings and to reuse data collection tools and data management processes. We present the current state of terminology harmonization and describe a governance structure and mechanism for coordinating the development of a common pediatric research terminology that links to clinical terminologies and can be used to align existing terminologies. By reducing the barriers between clinical care and clinical research, a Learning Health System can leverage and reuse not only its own data resources but also broader extant data resources.

  3. Medical research and multidisciplinary applications with laser-accelerated beams: the ELIMED netwotk at ELI-Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, A.; Anzalone, A.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.; Licciardello, T.; Maggiore, M.; Manti, L.; Margarone, D.; Musumarra, A.; Perozziello, F.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Romano, F. P.; Stancampiano, C.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Torrisi, L.; Tudisco, S.

    2014-04-01

    Laser accelerated proton beams represent nowadays an attractive alternative to the conventional ones and they have been proposed in different research fields. In particular, the interest has been focused in the possibility of replacing conventional accelerating machines with laser-based accelerators in order to develop a new concept of hadrontherapy facilities, which could result more compact and less expensive. With this background the ELIMED (ELIMED: ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) research project has been launched by LNS-INFN researchers (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, IT) and ASCR-FZU researchers (Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic-Fyzikální ústar, Prague, Cz), within the pan-European ELI-Beamlines facility framework. Its main purposes are the demonstration of future applications in hadrontherapy of optically accelerated protons and the realization of a laser-accelerated ion transport beamline for multidisciplinary applications. Several challenges, starting from laser-target interaction and beam transport development, up to dosimetric and radiobiological issues, need to be overcome in order to reach the final goals. The design and the realization of a preliminary beam handling and dosimetric system and of an advanced spectrometer for high energy (multi-MeV) laser-accelerated ion beams will be shortly presented in this work.

  4. Accelerating Research Productivity in Social Work Programs: Perspectives on NIH's Postdoctoral T32 Research Training Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, Monica M.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.; Peña, Juan B.; Scott, Lionel D.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four social work researchers who pursued an alternative career path immediately following their doctorate in social work by accepting a postdoctoral training fellowship funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). As schools of social work look for creative ways to build research capacity, this article describes the authors' perspectives regarding the considerations to accept postdocs, key elements in their training programs, lessons learned, and outcomes from training. To provide an overview of the funding mechanism and distribution of funds to institutes and centers relevant to social work, data were obtained from databases that list NIH training grants awarded each year. Study results showed a limited amount of variation in fellows' training plans. The majority of training time was spent building skill in manuscript preparation, grant development, and socialization to the NIH culture. Above all other themes, the desire for advanced research training was a critically important factor in accepting a postdoctoral training position. Finally, the outcomes of training may have a profound effect on professional development, yet the long-term trajectory of postdoctoral fellows in academic positions as compared with people without postdoctoral training in social work programs requires further study.

  5. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research.

  6. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  7. A new LabVIEW-based control system for the Naval Research Laboratory Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    DeTurck, T. M.; Treacy, D. J. Jr.; Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Knoll, C.; Kennedy, C. A.; Hubler, G. K.

    1999-06-10

    A new LabVIEW-based control system for the existing tandem accelerator and new AMS components has been implemented at the Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Through the use of Device Interfaces (DIs) distributed along a fiber optic network, virtually every component of the accelerator system can be controlled from any networked computer terminal as well as remotely via modem or the internet. This paper discusses the LabVIEW-based control software, including remote operation, automatic calculation of ion optical component parameters, beam optimization, and data logging and retrieval.

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  10. Nurturing a positive research culture: the Academic Department of Military Nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Di

    2015-12-01

    The structure and quality of nurse education in the UK has been scrutinised for many decades, culminating in a significant shift from ward-based learning at certificate level to that at diploma or degree level being delivered in higher education institutions. This professionalisation of nursing in the last decade of the 20th century was influenced by major changes in Department of Health policy, which demanded that a sound evidence base must be applied to nursing practice thereby replicating the model of evidence-based medicine. The requirement for care delivery to be evidence based is built on the premise that a continual research programme to investigate, disseminate and implement findings will enhance decision making in the clinical environment, thereby improving standards of care and patient outcomes. However, for this to be achieved there is an organisational responsibility to drive a positive research culture in order to effectively generate new knowledge and expertise. This paper explores the nursing research culture in the NHS and the strategies employed by the Defence Medical Services for supporting its nurses to generate the high-quality evidence that informs best practice.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy thermal energy storage research activities review: 1989 Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, H.W.; Tomlinson, J.J.

    1989-03-01

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) offers the opportunity for the recovery and re-use of heat currently rejected to the ambient environment. Further, through the ability of TES to match an energy supply with a thermal energy demand, TES increases efficiencies of energy systems and improves capacity factors of power plants. The US Department of Energy has been the leader in TES research, development, and demonstration since recognition in 1976 of the need for fostering energy conservation as a component of the national energy budget. The federal program on TES R and D is the responsibility of the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution within the US Department of Energy (DOE). The overall program is organized into three program areas: diurnal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat for use in residential and commercial buildings on a daily cycle; industrial--relating primarily to higher temperature heat for use in industrial and utility processes on an hourly to daily cycle; seasonal--relating primarily to lower temperature heat or chill for use in residential complexes (central supply as for apartments or housing developments), commercial (light manufacturing, processing, or retail), and industrial (space conditioning) on a seasonal to annual cycle. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. A bibliometric analysis of research in psychopharmacology by psychology departments (1987-2007).

    PubMed

    Portillo-Salido, Enrique F

    2010-05-01

    From the very outset of scientific Psychology, psychologists have shown interest for drugs and their effects on behavior. This has given rise to numerous contributions, mostly in the form of Psychopharmacology publications. The aim of this study was to quantitatively evaluate these contributions and compare them with other academic disciplines related to Psychopharmacology. Using the PubMed database, we retrieved information about articles from 15 journals included in the Pharmacology and Pharmacy category of the Journal Citation Reports database for a 21-year period (1987 to 2007). There were 37540 articles which about 52% were represented by 3 journals. About 70% of psychology publications were represented by 2 of these journals. Psychology departments accounted for the 11% of the published papers, which places Psychology third behind Psychiatry and Pharmacology, which contributed to 22.69 and 13% respectively. Psychology contributed to the greatest number of studies in 3 journals, second in 3 and third in 8. This report represents the first effort to explore the contribution of academic Psychology to the multidisciplinary science of psychopharmacology. Although leaders of production of psychopharmacology research were from Psychiatry and Pharmacology, Psychology departments are an important source of studies and thus of knowledge in the field of Psychopharmacology.

  13. Intelligent Processing Equipment Research and Development Programs of the Department of Commerce

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The intelligence processing equipment (IPE) research and development (R&D) programs of the Department of Commerce are carried out within the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This institute has had work in support of industrial productivity as part of its mission since its founding in 1901. With the advent of factory automation these efforts have increasingly turned to R&D in IPE. The Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory (MEL) of NIST devotes a major fraction of its efforts to this end while other elements within the organization, notably the Material Science and Engineering Laboratory, have smaller but significant programs. An inventory of all such programs at NIST and a representative selection of projects that at least demonstrate the scope of the efforts are presented.

  14. Intercampus institute for research at particle accelerators. Final report, March 15, 1992--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-22

    This is the final report to the DOE for the Intercampus Institute for Research at Particle Accelerators, or IIRPA, at least for the San Diego branch. Over the years that DOE supported IIRPA, we were told that yearly reports (and the final report) were not necessary because the previous year`s summary in our annual request for funds constituted those reports. Therefore, it has taken some effort, and a corresponding long time, to put something together, after the fact. The IIRPA was born as an idea that arose during discussions at the 1974 PEP summer study, and began to be funded by DoE during the early stages of PEP detector design and construction. The intent was for the members of the Institute to be responsible for the PEP-9 Facility; all of the PEP experiments were supposed to be facilities, rather than just experimental setups for a particular group or research goal. IIRPA was approved as a Multicampus Research Unit (MRU) in 1977 by the University of California, and it was active on the UCD, UCSB and UCSD campuses for 10 years. This report concentrates on the period of time when the Directorship of IIRPA was once again at the San Diego campus, 1989 to 1995. The collection of yearly reports consisting of research in different areas of particle physics, make up this report in the appendices.

  15. 10 CFR 745.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported... successor office. (b) Departments and agencies will conduct or support research covered by this policy...

  16. 49 CFR 11.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  17. 34 CFR 97.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted... Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  18. 45 CFR 690.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... current assurance, appropriate for the research in question, on file with the Office for Human Research... made to the Office for Human Research Protections, HHS, or any successor office. (b) Departments and... discharge of its responsibilities for protecting the rights and welfare of human subjects of...

  19. U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Mahantango Creek Watershed, Pennsylvania, United States: long-term precipitation database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term precipitation database has been developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit (PSWMRU) to support intensive hydrologic and water quality research within WE-38, a 7.3 km**2 experimental watershed loca...

  20. Highlights of Reading Research in the Labs and Centers of the U.S. Department of Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brynildssen, Shawna

    The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) promotes excellence and equity in education by conducting research and demonstration projects, collecting statistics, disseminating information, and providing technical assistance to those working to improve education. OERI supports two major research and…

  1. 10 CFR 745.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal department or agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered...

  2. 7 CFR 1c.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research...

  3. 34 CFR 97.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted... Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  4. 22 CFR 225.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  5. 49 CFR 11.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  6. 32 CFR 219.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy...

  7. 7 CFR 1c.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research...

  8. 32 CFR 219.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy...

  9. 49 CFR 11.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  10. 34 CFR 97.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted... Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  11. 7 CFR 1c.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research...

  12. 22 CFR 225.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  13. 10 CFR 745.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal department or agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered...

  14. 32 CFR 219.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy...

  15. 34 CFR 97.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted... Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  16. 49 CFR 11.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  17. 7 CFR 1c.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research...

  18. Annual Report and Abstracts of Research of the Department of Computer and Information Science, July 1976-June 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Computer and Information Science Research Center.

    The annual report of the Department of Computer and Information Science includes abstracts of research carried out during the 1976-77 academic year with support from grants by governmental agencies and industry, as well as The Ohio State University. The report covers the department's organizational structure, objectives, highlights of department…

  19. 45 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy...

  20. 45 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy...

  1. 45 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy...

  2. 45 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 46.103 Section 46.103 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy...

  3. Disciplinary and Contextually Appropriate Approaches to Leadership of Teaching in Research-Intensive Academic Departments in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Graham; Knapper, Christopher; Piccinin, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports aspects of an international study of leadership of teaching in 19 departments with outstanding teaching records in 11 research-intensive universities. Leadership was found to take different forms in different discipline areas, in different organisational cultures, and in response to major problems affecting the department. While…

  4. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2003

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 41 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  5. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2004-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  6. US Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of program administration by the Office of Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-02

    The objective of the audit was to determine whether Energy Research had established performance expectations, including performance criteria and metrics, and used these expectations to monitor progress for basic and applied research performed at the Department`s national laboratories. Congressional and Departmental initiatives envision improved contract and program performance by requiring program managers to set measurable performance expectations. Even though research outcomes are inherently unpredictable, performance expectations can and should be established for scopes of work, milestones, resource limits and deliverables. However, Energy Research generally did not clearly specify--at either an aggregated program or individual task level--such expectations for research at the Department`s national laboratories. While information was available in the contractor`s research proposals, Energy Research essentially relied on the contractors to initiate and execute the research without agreement on expectations. This practice provided the Department with little basis to measure and evaluate contractor performance. Energy Research agreed in part with the finding and will take action on the recommendations in the report.

  7. Big Data and Comparative Effectiveness Research in Radiation Oncology: Synergy and Accelerated Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Several advances in large data set collection and processing have the potential to provide a wave of new insights and improvements in the use of radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The era of electronic health records, genomics, and improving information technology resources creates the opportunity to leverage these developments to create a learning healthcare system that can rapidly deliver informative clinical evidence. By merging concepts from comparative effectiveness research with the tools and analytic approaches of “big data,” it is hoped that this union will accelerate discovery, improve evidence for decision making, and increase the availability of highly relevant, personalized information. This combination offers the potential to provide data and analysis that can be leveraged for ultra-personalized medicine and high-quality, cutting-edge radiation therapy. PMID:26697409

  8. Overview of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A

    2002-09-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed.

  9. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department`s environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department`s environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C.

  10. Mount Aragats as a stable electron accelerator for atmospheric high-energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot; Hovsepyan, Gagik; Mnatsakanyan, Eduard

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the numerous thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs), i.e., enhanced fluxes of electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons detected by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface and related to the strong thunderstorms above it, helped to establish a new scientific topic—high-energy physics in the atmosphere. Relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) are believed to be a central engine initiating high-energy processes in thunderstorm atmospheres. RREAs observed on Mount Aragats in Armenia during the strongest thunderstorms and simultaneous measurements of TGE electron and gamma-ray energy spectra proved that RREAs are a robust and realistic mechanism for electron acceleration. TGE research facilitates investigations of the long-standing lightning initiation problem. For the last 5 years we were experimenting with the "beams" of "electron accelerators" operating in the thunderclouds above the Aragats research station. Thunderstorms are very frequent above Aragats, peaking in May-June, and almost all of them are accompanied with enhanced particle fluxes. The station is located on a plateau at an altitude 3200 asl near a large lake. Numerous particle detectors and field meters are located in three experimental halls as well as outdoors; the facilities are operated all year round. All relevant information is being gathered, including data on particle fluxes, fields, lightning occurrences, and meteorological conditions. By the example of the huge thunderstorm that took place at Mount Aragats on August 28, 2015, we show that simultaneous detection of all the relevant data allowed us to reveal the temporal pattern of the storm development and to investigate the atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes.

  11. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.K.; Bouret, C.

    1983-05-01

    This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy.

  12. X-43A departs NASA Dryden Flight Research Center for first free-flight attempt.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The first X-43A hypersonic research aircraft and its modified Pegasus booster rocket were carried aloft by NASA's NB-52B carrier aircraft from Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., on June 2, 2001 for the first of three high-speed free flight attempts. About an hour and 15 minutes later the Pegasus booster was released from the B-52 to accelerate the X-43A to its intended speed of Mach 7. Before this could be achieved, the combined Pegasus and X-43A 'stack' lost control about eight seconds after ignition of the Pegasus rocket motor. The mission was terminated and explosive charges ensured the Pegasus and X-43A fell into the Pacific Ocean in a cleared Navy range area. A NASA investigation board is being assembled to determine the cause of the incident. Work continues on two other X-43A vehicles, the first of which could fly by late 2001. Central to the X-43A program is its integration of an air-breathing 'scramjet' engine that could enable a variety of high-speed aerospace craft, and promote cost-effective access to space. The 12-foot, unpiloted research vehicle was developed and built for NASA by MicroCraft Inc., Tullahoma, Tenn. The booster was built by Orbital Sciences Corp. at Chandler, Ariz. The X-43A flights are the first actual flight tests of an aircraft powered by a scramjet engine capable of operating at hypersonic speeds (above Mach 5, or five times the speed of sound). Some 90 minutes after takeoff, the Pegasus will launch from a B-52, rocketing the X-43A to Mach 7 at 95,000 feet altitude, or Mach 10 at 105,000 feet altitude. The X-43A will be powered by its revolutionary air-breathing supersonic-combustion ramjet or 'scramjet' engine. The X-43A will then fly a pre-programmed trajectory, conducting aerodynamic and propulsion experiments as it descends until it splashes into the Pacific Ocean.

  13. [Experience of Collaborative Research through Department of Medical Instrumental Research and Technology in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Both of Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine which offers high, technical and safe medical treatment and Horiba, Ltd. which has small CBC analyzers in a core product established a joint research institute for development of advanced laboratory test analyzer from January 1, 2012 in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine as the "advanced treatment hospital" where the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has got approved. Clinical needs about analyzer and reagent for a laboratory test are being investigated to the emergency medical care unit and the intensive care unit as well as the laboratory test part in the affiliated hospital and many medical departments of the pediatrics, the internal medicine and the surgery. Developing the new analyzer based on high technology, evaluating the performance of them and spreading them to a medical examination and treatment site is our main target.

  14. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  15. Student Research Projects in Geophysics Through a Consortium of Undergraduate Geology Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, G. C.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1987, and continuing to the present, the Keck Geology Consortium, a group of 12 undergraduate institutions, has sponsored a series of summer research projects. These projects typically involve from 9 to 12 students and 3 to 4 faculty members and consist of a 4 to 5 week summer research program followed by continuation of the research at the students' home institutions, often as a senior thesis. Many of these projects have included extensive field and laboratory geophysical components. In order for students to carry out successful research projects in geophysics, several hurdles have to be cleared. Frequently these students have not had a formal course in geophysics, so although they may have strong geologic and quantitative skills, there is usually the need for a concentrated classroom immersion in the geophysical theory and methods related to the project. Field geophysics projects are labor intensive, so it is common for a group of three or more students to produce only one or two complete data sets in the course of the summer program. Generating individualized projects so that students feel ownership of their thesis research can be challenging. Most of the departments do not have a geophysicist on the faculty, so follow-up support for the student research involves continued long-distance collaboration between project directors, students and sponsoring faculty. The impact of the internet on this collaboration cannot be overstated. Finally, diverse computing environments at the participating institutions were a significant problem in the early years. Migration of geophysical software to Windows from Unix, and the widespread availability of Linux has mitigated these problems in recent years. The geophysical components of these projects have been largely successful. A series of vignettes is presented showing the range and nature of geophysical projects that have been carried out. In addition to anecdotal evidence of student satisfaction, there is

  16. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-04-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or

  17. Overview of the United States department of energy's used fuel disposition research and development campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Nutt, Mark; Swift, Peter; MacKinnon, Robert; McMahon, Kevin; Sorenson, Ken; Birkholzer, Jens; Boyle, William; Gunter, Timothy; Larson, Ned

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) is conducting research and development (R and D) activities within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to support storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. R and D activities are ongoing at nine national laboratories, and are divided into two major topical areas: (1) storage and transportation research, and (2) disposal research. Storage R and D focuses on closing technical gaps related to extended storage of UNF. For example, uncertainties remain regarding high-burnup nuclear fuel cladding performance following possible hydride reorientation and creep deformation, and also regarding long-term canister integrity. Transportation R and D focuses on ensuring transportability of UNF following extended storage, addressing data gaps regarding nuclear fuel integrity, retrievability, and demonstration of subcriticality. Disposal R and D focuses on identifying multiple viable geologic disposal options and addressing technical challenges for generic disposal concepts in various host media (e.g., mined repositories in salt, clay/shale, and granitic rocks, and deep borehole disposal in crystalline rock). R and D will transition to site-specific challenges as national policy advances. R and D goals at this stage are to increase confidence in the robustness of generic disposal concepts, to reduce generic sources of uncertainty that may impact the viability of disposal concepts, and to develop science and engineering tools that will support the selection, characterization, and ultimately licensing of a repository. The US DOE has also initiated activities that can be conducted within the constraints of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to facilitate the development of an interim storage facility and supporting transportation infrastructure. (authors)

  18. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-30

    Surgeons, Whistler, BC, June 89 Nyreen R, The Case for Routine Gary P. Wratten Carter PL Cholecystectomy in Bariatric Surgical Symposium, Surgery Tacoma...of Nursing, 126 Department of OB/GYN, 135 Department of Pediatrics, 156 Department of Psychiatry, 168 Department of Surgery , 172 Physical Medicine...Oncology 2 General Surgery 3 * Mdternal/Fetal Med 1 Internal Medicine 8 Pulmonology 3 OB/GYN 8 Oral Maxillofacial Surg 1 Orthopedic Surgery 1

  19. DNASU plasmid and PSI:Biology-Materials repositories: resources to accelerate biological research.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Catherine Y; Park, Jin G; Sharma, Amit; Hunter, Preston; Surapaneni, Padmini; Sedillo, Casey; Field, James; Algar, Rhys; Price, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Throop, Andrea; Fiacco, Michael; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the DNASU Plasmid Repository is to accelerate research by providing high-quality, annotated plasmid samples and online plasmid resources to the research community through the curated DNASU database, website and repository (http://dnasu.asu.edu or http://dnasu.org). The collection includes plasmids from grant-funded, high-throughput cloning projects performed in our laboratory, plasmids from external researchers, and large collections from consortia such as the ORFeome Collaboration and the NIGMS-funded Protein Structure Initiative: Biology (PSI:Biology). Through DNASU, researchers can search for and access detailed information about each plasmid such as the full length gene insert sequence, vector information, associated publications, and links to external resources that provide additional protein annotations and experimental protocols. Plasmids can be requested directly through the DNASU website. DNASU and the PSI:Biology-Materials Repositories were previously described in the 2010 NAR Database Issue (Cormier, C.Y., Mohr, S.E., Zuo, D., Hu, Y., Rolfs, A., Kramer, J., Taycher, E., Kelley, F., Fiacco, M., Turnbull, G. et al. (2010) Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community. Nucleic Acids Res., 38, D743-D749.). In this update we will describe the plasmid collection and highlight the new features in the website redesign, including new browse/search options, plasmid annotations and a dynamic vector mapping feature that was developed in collaboration with LabGenius. Overall, these plasmid resources continue to enable research with the goal of elucidating the role of proteins in both normal biological processes and disease.

  20. Helping Basic Scientists Engage With Community Partners to Enrich and Accelerate Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Evering, Teresa H.; Holt, Peter R.; Neville-Williams, Maija; Vasquez, Kimberly S.; Coller, Barry S.; Tobin, Jonathan N.

    2017-01-01

    Problem Engaging basic scientists in community-based translational research is challenging but has great potential for improving health. Approach In 2009, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science partnered with Clinical Directors Network, a practice-based research network (PBRN), to create a community-engaged research navigation (CEnR-Nav) program to foster research pairing basic science and community-driven scientific aims. The program is led by an academic navigator and a PBRN navigator. Through meetings and joint activities, the program facilitates basic science–community partnerships and the development and conduct of joint research protocols. Outcomes From 2009–2014, 39 investigators pursued 44 preliminary projects through the CEnR-Nav program; 25 of those became 23 approved protocols and 2 substudies. They involved clinical scholar trainees, early-career physician–scientists, faculty, students, postdoctoral fellows, and others. Nineteen (of 25; 76%) identified community partners, of which 9 (47%) named them as coinvestigators. Nine (of 25; 36%) included T3–T4 translational aims. Seven (of 25; 28%) secured external funding, 11 (of 25; 44%) disseminated results through presentations or publications, and 5 (71%) of 7 projects publishing results included a community partner as a coauthor. Of projects with long-term navigator participation, 9 (of 19; 47%) incorporated T3–T4 aims and 7 (of 19; 37%) secured external funding. Next Steps The CEnR-Nav program provides a model for successfully engaging basic scientists with communities to advance and accelerate translational science. This model's durability and generalizability have not been determined, but it achieves valuable short-term goals and facilitates scientifically meaningful community–academic partnerships. PMID:27119330

  1. A descriptive analysis of research methods classes in departments of kinesiology and physical education in the United States.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Stephen; Keating, Xiaofen Deng

    2002-03-01

    Research training takes many forms and is generally a part of graduate education. A common and important aspect of research training is the introductory research methods class offered by many departments. The purpose of this study was to examine the content, process, and instructors of introductory research methods classes in departments of kinesiology and physical education in the United States. A survey was designed and extensively pilot tested. The sample was selected from all departments offering graduate degrees in the United States. Among the many results, the data indicate that one book was required reading in more than half the classes and class size averaged about 19 students. A number of objectives were statedfor most classes, with understanding research, applying research to professional situations, critiquing the research literature, and planning research indicated most often. Quantitative design and analysis topics were emphasized more strongly than qualitative design and analysis topics. Professors indicated that more than half the class time was spent lecturing and most grades were based on exams, preparation of a research proposal, and regular assignments. The professors were relatively experienced, had a variety ofspecialty areas, and were reasonably productive researchers. The trends suggest that alternative research methodologies have not been quickly added to the research methods curriculum.

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1980-September 1981. Fiscal year, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.K.; Thomson, H.A.

    1982-04-01

    Major accomplishments during fiscal year 1981 are presented. During the Laboratory's 50th anniversary celebrations, AFRD and the Nuclear Science Division formally dedicated the new (third) SuperHILAC injector that adds ions as heavy as uranium to the ion repertoire at LBL's national accelerator facilities. The Bevalac's new multiparticle detectors (the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System and the GSI-LBL Plastic Ball/Plastic Wall) were completed in time to take data before the mid-year shutdown to install the new vacuum liner, which passed a milestone in-place test with flying colors in September. The Bevalac biomedical program continued patient treatment with neon beams aimed at establishing a complete data base for a dedicated biomedical accelerator, the design of which NCI funded during the year. Our program to develop alternative Isabelle superconducting dipole magnets, which DOE initiated in FY80, proved the worth of a new magnet construction technique and set a world record - 7.6 Tesla at 1.8 K - with a model magnet in our upgraded test facility. Final test results at LBL were obtained by the Magnetic Fusion Energy Group on the powerful neutral beam injectors developed for Princeton's TFTR. The devices exceeded the original design requirements, thereby completing the six-year, multi-million-dollar NBSTF effort. The group also demonstrated the feasibility of efficient negative-ion-based neutral beam plasma heating for the future by generating 1 A of negative ions at 34 kV for 7 seconds using a newly developed source. Collaborations with other research centers continued, including: (1) the design of LBL/Exxon-dedicated beam lines for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory; (2) beam cooling tests at Fermilab and the design of a beam cooling system for a proton-antiproton facility there; and (3) the development of a high-current betatron for possible application to a free electron laser.

  3. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research Using Ground Based Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20% accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  4. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research using Ground Based Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20 percents accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  5. Quality Assurance Plan for Field Activities at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.C.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) program Field Research Center (FRC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The FRC is located in Bear Creek Valley within the Y-12 Plant area of responsibility on DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. The NABIR program is a long-term effort designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. The FRC provides a site for investigators in the NABIR program to conduct research and obtain samples related to in situ bioremediation. The FRC is integrated with existing and future laboratory and field research and provides a means of examining the biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) documents the quality assurance protocols for field and laboratory activities performed by the FRC staff. It supplements the requirements in the ORNL Nuclear Quality Assurance Program and the ESD Quality Assurance Program. The QAP addresses the requirements in Title 10 CFR, Part 830 Subpart A, ''Quality Assurance Requirements'', using a graded approach appropriate for Research and Development projects based on guidance from ''Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research'' (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). It also supports the NABIR FRC Management Plan (Watson and Quarles 2000a) which outlines the overall procedures, roles and responsibilities for conducting research at the FRC. The QAP summarizes the organization, work activities, and qualify assurance and quality control protocols that will be used to generate scientifically defensible data at the FRC. The QAP pertains to field measurements and sample collection conducted by the

  6. The Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine: a collaborative approach to Department of Defense-relevant research.

    PubMed

    Dean, Wendy

    2011-11-01

    The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have resulted in the most severe survivable war injuries ever seen in prolonged conflict. The Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine (AFIRM) was conceived as a way to deliver solutions to the existing gaps in military trauma care. The AFIRM is a collaborative effort between the Department of Defense, academia and private industry to accelerate the development of critically needed technology for the treatment of severely wounded warriors, and to restore to meaningful form and function those who have followed orders into harm's way.

  7. Accelerated failure time models provide a useful statistical framework for aging research.

    PubMed

    Swindell, William R

    2009-03-01

    Survivorship experiments play a central role in aging research and are performed to evaluate whether interventions alter the rate of aging and increase lifespan. The accelerated failure time (AFT) model is seldom used to analyze survivorship data, but offers a potentially useful statistical approach that is based upon the survival curve rather than the hazard function. In this study, AFT models were used to analyze data from 16 survivorship experiments that evaluated the effects of one or more genetic manipulations on mouse lifespan. Most genetic manipulations were found to have a multiplicative effect on survivorship that is independent of age and well-characterized by the AFT model "deceleration factor". AFT model deceleration factors also provided a more intuitive measure of treatment effect than the hazard ratio, and were robust to departures from modeling assumptions. Age-dependent treatment effects, when present, were investigated using quantile regression modeling. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survivorship data associated with currently known long-lived mouse models. In addition, from the standpoint of aging research, these statistical approaches have appealing properties and provide valuable tools for the analysis of survivorship data.

  8. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and its Applications in Archaeology, Geology, andEnvironmental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, Wolfgang

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is an ultrasensitive method for the measurement of isotope ratios in the range of 10 - 12 - 10 - 15. Most frequently the 14C / 12C ratio from biogenic samples is determined which gives information on the age of the sample of up to 50 ka with a precision of typically 40-80 years. In this paper the radiocarbon method is discussed and various applications to interdisciplinary research are presented. One application at the Erlangen AMS facility is the 14C dating of sediment samples which together with simultaneous pollen analyses can establish a better chronology of climate and vegetation during Holocene in Germany. For an enhanced reliability of sediment dating different fractions like bulk sediments, pollen grains, macrofossils, and humic acids have been measured. For environmental research the 14C content of aldehydes from indoor air samples can be used to disentangle the anthropogenic or biogenic origin of these compounds. Finally interesting archaeological samples from a Persian mummy are discussed.

  9. The biological research programme of the nuclear microprobe at the National Accelerator Centre, Faure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Churms, C. L.; Springhorn, K. A.; Moretto, Ph; Michelet, C.; Chikte, U.; Wenzl, P.

    2000-03-01

    The nuclear microprobe (NMP) unit of the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) has initiated a focused research programme on studies of biological material, ranging from applications in medicine to agriculture and botany. During this period a state-of-the-art cryo-preparation laboratory was also developed. This research programme has resulted in a wide range of projects, and has shown how well suited the NMP is for studies of biological material in general. This paper reports on some of the problems and demands in this field, as well as some of the results obtained using particle induced X-ray spectroscopy (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). True elemental imaging is routinely performed using the dynamic analysis (DA) method, which forms part of the GeoPIXE suite of programmes. A collaborative project, together with the CENBG group of Bordeaux-Gradignan in France, on the development of a facility with the aim of studying effects of single-events of radiation in living cells was recently established and is discussed.

  10. United States Department of Energy severe accident research following the Fukushima Daiichi accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Corradini, M.; Rempe, J.; Reister, R.; Peko, D.

    2016-11-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has played a major role in the U.S. response to the events at Fukushima Daiichi. During the first several weeks following the accident, U.S. assistance efforts were guided by results from a significant and diverse set of analyses. In the months that followed, a coordinated analysis activity aimed at gaining a more thorough understanding of the accident sequence was completed using laboratory-developed, system-level best-estimate accident analysis codes, while a parallel analysis was conducted by U.S. industry. A comparison of predictions for Unit 1 from these two studies indicated significant differences between MAAP and MELCOR results for key plant parameters, such as in-core hydrogen production. On that basis, a crosswalk was completed to determine the key modeling variations that led to these differences. In parallel with these activities, it became clear that there was a need to perform a technology gap evaluation on accident-tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research and augmented by insights from Fukushima. In addition, there is growing international recognition that data from Fukushima could significantly reduce uncertainties related to severe accident progression, particularly for boiling water reactors. On these bases, a group of U. S. experts in LWR safety and plant operations was convened by the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to complete technology gap analysis and Fukushima forensics data needs identification activities. The results from these activities were used as the basis for refining DOE-NE's severe accident research and development (R&D) plan. Finally, this paper provides a high-level review of DOE-sponsored R&D efforts in these areas, including planned activities on accident-tolerant components and accident analysis methods.

  11. United States Department of Energy severe accident research following the Fukushima Daiichi accidents

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, M. T.; Corradini, M.; Rempe, J.; ...

    2016-11-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has played a major role in the U.S. response to the events at Fukushima Daiichi. During the first several weeks following the accident, U.S. assistance efforts were guided by results from a significant and diverse set of analyses. In the months that followed, a coordinated analysis activity aimed at gaining a more thorough understanding of the accident sequence was completed using laboratory-developed, system-level best-estimate accident analysis codes, while a parallel analysis was conducted by U.S. industry. A comparison of predictions for Unit 1 from these two studies indicated significant differences between MAAP and MELCORmore » results for key plant parameters, such as in-core hydrogen production. On that basis, a crosswalk was completed to determine the key modeling variations that led to these differences. In parallel with these activities, it became clear that there was a need to perform a technology gap evaluation on accident-tolerant components and severe accident analysis methodologies with the goal of identifying any data and/or knowledge gaps that may exist given the current state of light water reactor (LWR) severe accident research and augmented by insights from Fukushima. In addition, there is growing international recognition that data from Fukushima could significantly reduce uncertainties related to severe accident progression, particularly for boiling water reactors. On these bases, a group of U. S. experts in LWR safety and plant operations was convened by the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to complete technology gap analysis and Fukushima forensics data needs identification activities. The results from these activities were used as the basis for refining DOE-NE's severe accident research and development (R&D) plan. Finally, this paper provides a high-level review of DOE-sponsored R&D efforts in these areas, including planned activities on accident-tolerant components and accident analysis methods.« less

  12. Career opportunities for college graduates with the Agricultural Research Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Research Service is the principal scientific research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This agency employs more than 7,600 people working at various locations in the United States and U.S. territories. Careers for new scientists span a variety of disciplines such as c...

  13. [Research work in the Department of Pharmaceutical Technology of the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University].

    PubMed

    Selmeczi, B

    1993-05-01

    A short review is given of the research carried out in recent years in the Department of Pharmaceutical Technology headed by the author on the occasion of the 75th birthday of Professor Károly Nikolics. The main results of the scientific activities performed in the four research groups are reported and a few important references to literature are made.

  14. Female Academic Department Chairs at a Public, Very High Research Activity University: Exploring Their Career Pathways to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Marthe, Tamara Jaslene Marcelle

    2012-01-01

    The advancement of women into academic leadership remains a problem facing public, high-research activity universities. While there are more women who are qualified to assume the position of department chair in research institutions today than there were 30 years ago, women still lag behind their male counterparts in holding these academic…

  15. Our Future Selves; A Research Plan Toward Understanding Aging, of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Aging (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet presents a research plan of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (DHEW) aimed at understanding aging in the United States. The following subjects are discussed: (1) demographic information that outlines major issues affecting aging; (2) priorities for aging research in the biomedical, behavioral and social science and…

  16. 34 CFR 97.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 97.103 Section 97.103 Education Office of the... continuing review of research and for reporting its findings and actions to the investigator and...

  17. Implications of the HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Synthesis Project for the efforts of state, territorial, and local health departments.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Julie M; Smith, Raymond A

    2002-07-01

    State, territorial and local health departments have responsibility for all three of the HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Synthesis (PRS) project's intervention categories: behavioral, social, and policy. These health departments may be aided by the PRS project in a number of ways. These ways include the provision of information on scientifically proven interventions; the determination of sociodemographic categories underrepresented in research; the promotion of consistent methodologies and standards for reporting findings; and the fostering of greater engagement with HIV prevention research among program staff. Further development of the PRS project can enhance and expand these benefits, although the project must be sure to keep practical applications in mind.

  18. Promoting Interdisciplinary Research in Departments of Medicine: Results from Two Models at Boston University School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, David L.; Spira, Avrum; Ravid, Katya

    2013-01-01

    We have sought to broaden our department's research capacity using two different interdisciplinary approaches. First, we created the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research (ECIBR) — a virtual center that promotes and funds Affinity Research Collaboratives (ARCs) initiated by faculty from within and outside Boston University (BU). Of the 11 funded ARCs, the 4 ARCs in existence for a minimum of 3 years have a total of 37 participants, 93 co-authored publications, and 33 new grants. Second, the Department of Medicine (DOM) created a Section of Computational Biomedicine in 2009 to enhance analytical and computational expertise in the DOM. After 3 years, the section is comprised of 10 faculty members and 21 trainees. The faculty members have collaborated with 20 faculty members in other sections or departments and secured 12 extramural grants (totaling ∼$20 million in direct costs). The ECIBR and the Section of Computational Biomedicine represent new organizational approaches to stimulating innovation in research in a DOM. PMID:23874035

  19. Research and fabrication of harmonic oscillator with high quality in Si-based MOEMS acceleration seismic geophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhengrong; Wang, Zhiyong; En, De; Chen, Caihe; Li, Xuejiao; Xie, Xiaofang

    2008-03-01

    A kind of photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic detecting technology, which is novel and precise based on waveguide M-Z interference, is presented. It provieds modern geologic prospect with a novel detection technology. The principle of the photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic geophone is introduced in this paper. The core of the photo-electronic integrated acceleration is the silicon harmonic oscillator, which is supported by four silicon beams and integrated on the signal beam of the M-Z interferometer. When the seismic mass is subjected to a normal acceleration a z, the acceleration a z, will result in an inertial force F z, causing the mass to move up or down like the piston, until the counter force of the beam suspension equals this inertial force. The principle of the harmonic oscillator is briefly introduced, the factors influencing the anisotropic etching quality of the harmonic oscillator are analyzed in detail. In experiment, the fabrication technology was studied and improved. The high quality harmonic oscillator has been successfully fabricated. It has been applied in the integrated optical chip of "the theory and experiment research of photoelectric integrated acceleration seismic geophone technology".

  20. Research Administration Training and Compliance at the Department Level for a Predominantly Undergraduate Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temples, Beryline; Simons, Paula; Atkinson, Timothy N.

    2012-01-01

    By providing training from the Central Sponsored Programs Office (SPO), departments, and colleges at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) can increase compliance with grant requirements. PUIs usually do not focus on department- or college-level grants administration and lack monetary resources to support this function. However, at the…

  1. Economic analysis of opportunities to accelerate Alzheimer’s disease research and development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Troy J; O'Connor, Alan C; Link, Albert N; Beaulieu, Travis J

    2014-01-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) faces a number of barriers. Among these are the lack of surrogate biomarkers, the exceptional size and duration of clinical trials, difficulties in identifying appropriate populations for clinical trials, and the limitations of monotherapies in addressing such a complex multifactorial disease. This study sets out to first estimate the consequent impact on the expected cost of developing disease-modifying treatments for AD and then to estimate the potential benefits of bringing together industry, academic, and government stakeholders to co-invest in, for example, developing better biomarkers and cognitive assessment tools, building out advanced registries and clinical trial-readiness cohorts, and establishing clinical trial platforms to investigate combinations of candidate drugs and biomarkers from the portfolios of multiple companies. Estimates based on interviews with experts on AD research and development suggest that the cost of one new drug is now $5.7 billion (95% confidence interval (CI) $3.7–9.5 billion) and could be reduced to $2.0 billion (95% CI $1.5–2.9 billion). The associated acceleration in the arrival of disease-modifying treatments could reduce the number of case years of dementia by 7.0 million (95% CI 4.4–9.4 million) in the United States from 2025 through 2040. PMID:24673372

  2. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K.; Mitchell, Grant W.; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A.; Croglio, Michael P.; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y.; Razzo, Beatrice M.; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R.; Fajgenbaum, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in “omics” technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN’s collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care. PMID:26604862

  3. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research

    PubMed Central

    Banda, Juan M.; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S.; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Ryan, Patrick B.; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies. PMID:27193236

  4. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research.

    PubMed

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K; Mitchell, Grant W; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A; Croglio, Michael P; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y; Razzo, Beatrice M; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R; Fajgenbaum, David C

    2015-12-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in "omics" technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN's collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care.

  5. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) half-year report: October 1, 1986-March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    For this report we have collected the papers presented by the HIFAR group at the IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference held in Washington, DC, on March 16-19, 1987, which essentially coincides with the end of the reporting period. In addition, we report on research to determine the cause of the failures of Re-X insulator that are used as the high-voltage feed-through for the electrostatic quadrupoles on MBE-4. This report contains papers on the following topics: LBL multiple beam experiments, pulsers for the induction linac experiment (MBE-4), HIF insulator failure, experimental measurement of emittance growth in mismatched space-charge dominated beams, the effect of nonlinear forces on coherently oscillating space-charge dominated beams, space-charge effects in a bending magnet system, transverse combining of nonrelativistic beams in a multiple beam induction linac, comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF driver. Eight individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  6. Economic analysis of opportunities to accelerate Alzheimer's disease research and development.

    PubMed

    Scott, Troy J; O'Connor, Alan C; Link, Albert N; Beaulieu, Travis J

    2014-04-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) faces a number of barriers. Among these are the lack of surrogate biomarkers, the exceptional size and duration of clinical trials, difficulties in identifying appropriate populations for clinical trials, and the limitations of monotherapies in addressing such a complex multifactorial disease. This study sets out to first estimate the consequent impact on the expected cost of developing disease-modifying treatments for AD and then to estimate the potential benefits of bringing together industry, academic, and government stakeholders to co-invest in, for example, developing better biomarkers and cognitive assessment tools, building out advanced registries and clinical trial-readiness cohorts, and establishing clinical trial platforms to investigate combinations of candidate drugs and biomarkers from the portfolios of multiple companies. Estimates based on interviews with experts on AD research and development suggest that the cost of one new drug is now $5.7 billion (95% confidence interval (CI) $3.7-9.5 billion) and could be reduced to $2.0 billion (95% CI $1.5-2.9 billion). The associated acceleration in the arrival of disease-modifying treatments could reduce the number of case years of dementia by 7.0 million (95% CI 4.4-9.4 million) in the United States from 2025 through 2040.

  7. A curated and standardized adverse drug event resource to accelerate drug safety research.

    PubMed

    Banda, Juan M; Evans, Lee; Vanguri, Rami S; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Ryan, Patrick B; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-05-10

    Identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) during the post-marketing phase is one of the most important goals of drug safety surveillance. Spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) data, which are the mainstay of traditional drug safety surveillance, are used for hypothesis generation and to validate the newer approaches. The publicly available US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) data requires substantial curation before they can be used appropriately, and applying different strategies for data cleaning and normalization can have material impact on analysis results. We provide a curated and standardized version of FAERS removing duplicate case records, applying standardized vocabularies with drug names mapped to RxNorm concepts and outcomes mapped to SNOMED-CT concepts, and pre-computed summary statistics about drug-outcome relationships for general consumption. This publicly available resource, along with the source code, will accelerate drug safety research by reducing the amount of time spent performing data management on the source FAERS reports, improving the quality of the underlying data, and enabling standardized analyses using common vocabularies.

  8. A National Research Council Evaluation of the Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Holmes, K. J.; Cooke, D.

    2012-12-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) resources are increasingly becoming part of energy regulatory, planning, and marketing activities in the U.S. and elsewhere. In particular, state-based renewable portfolio standards and federal production and investment tax credits have led to an increased interest in the possible deployment of MHK technologies. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the size of the MHK resource base. In order to help DOE prioritize its overall portfolio of future research, increase the understanding of the potential for MHK resource development, and direct MHK device and/or project developers to locations of greatest promise, the DOE Wind and Water Power Program requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide an evaluation of the detailed assessments being conducted by five individual resource assessment groups. These resource assessment groups were contracted to estimate the amount of extractable energy from wave, tidal, ocean current, ocean thermal energy conversion, and riverine resources. Performing these assessments requires that each resource assessment group estimate the average power density of the resource base, as well as the basic technology characteristics and spatial and temporal constituents that convert power into electricity for that resource. The NRC committee evaluated the methodologies, technologies, and assumptions associated with each of these resource assessments. The committee developed a conceptual framework for delineating the processes used to develop the assessment results requested by the DOE, with definitions of the theoretical, technical, and practical resource to clarify elements of the overall resource assessment process. This allowed the NRC committee to make a comparison of different methods, terminology, and processes among the five resource assessment groups. The committee concluded that the overall approach taken by the wave resource and

  9. Research of the optical properties of solar-reflective materials subjected to accelerated and nonaccelerated exposure tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rausch, R A

    1980-10-01

    Research on candidate reflective materials for use in solar thermal power applications is reported. The candidate materials have been subjected to exposure tests conducted previously at the Phoenix, Arizona test site. The samples have been exposed to each of three test conditions - one non-accelerated and two different accelerated tests (nominally 8 suns). Post-exposure optical measurements of spectral reflectance were then conducted for the exposure test samples. Reflectance specularity data for the subject materials are obtained from optical measurements performed by Battelle-PNL. Summarized is an investigation of the accumulated reflectance data for correlations using three of the various materials included in the exposure test sample set. (LEW)

  10. THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE RESEARCH COORDINATING UNIT IN THE CONNECTICUT STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RIGHTHAND, HERBERT; AND OTHERS

    A RESEARCH COORDINATING UNIT WAS ESTABLISHED TO ENCOURAGE VOCATIONAL RESEARCH THROUGH THE IDENTIFICATION OF RESEARCH RESOURCES, PERSONNEL, AND TECHNIQUES. IN ADDITION, THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROPOSALS FOR THE CONDUCT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH BY LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEMS, COLLEGES, AND UNIVERSITIES WAS ENCOURAGED. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES TO DATE…

  11. Report of the Defense Science Board Subcommittee on Department of Defense Research Policy. Part 1. Policy on Support of Basic Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-12-31

    f. .. AD-A955 482 Report of the Defen e Science Board Subcomtnittee on Depart•eat of Defense RESEARCH POLICY OTIC SELECTED NOV 2 91J88 0(/H...ACCESSION NO NA 11 TITLE (inc/ud* Stcunty Oassificat/on) Report of the Defense Science Board Subcomittee on Department of Defense Research Policy , Part...Defense Research Policy Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering Washington, D. C. 31 December 1963 OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF DEFENSE

  12. Report of the Defense Science Board Subcommittee on Department of Defense Research Policy. Part 2. Further Analysis of Basic Research Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-01-14

    POLICY „_-, < ^ZLECTE OCT 1 7 1988 Ha Part n. Further Analysis of Basic Research Policy 14 January 1965 Office of the Director of Defense Research... Research Policy Part II. Further Analysis of Basic Rssearch Policy, UNCLASSIFIED 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) N/A 13a. TYPE OF REPORT Final 13b TIME COVERED...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Report of the Defense Science Board Subcommittee on DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE RESEARCH POLICY ThÄtocument contains information

  13. Induction accelerators and free-electron lasers at LLNL: Beam Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.

    1989-02-15

    Linear induction accelerators have been developed to produce pulses of charged particles at voltages exceeding the capabilities of single-stage, diode-type accelerators and at currents too high rf accelerators. In principle, one can accelerate charged particles to arbitrarily high voltages using a multistage induction machine. The advent of magnetic pulse power systems makes sustained operation at high repetition rates practical, and high-average-power capability is very likely to open up many new applications of induction machines. In Part A of this paper, we survey the US induction linac technology, emphasizing electron machines. We also give a simplified description of how induction machines couple energy to the electron beam to illustrate many general issues that designers of high-brightness and high-average-power induction linacs must consider. We give an example of the application of induction accelerator technology to the relativistic klystron, a power source for high-gradient accelerators. In Part B we address the application of LIAs to free-electron lasers. The multikiloampere peak currents available from linear induction accelerators make high-gain, free-electron laser amplifier configurations feasible. High extraction efficiencies in a single mass of the electron beam are possible if the wiggler parameters are appropriately ''tapered'', as recently demonstrated at millimeter wavelengths on the 4-MeV ELF facility. Key issues involved in extending the technology to shorter wavelengths and higher average powers are described. Current FEL experiments at LLNL are discussed. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  14. 78 FR 42532 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...: Science and Technology Directorate, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Department of Homeland Security... Directorate (DHS S&T), through its Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC), published a document in...

  15. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1985-March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: (1) beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; (2) development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple beam hardware, at affordable costs; (3) acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification - both new features in a linac - without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; (4) fianl bunching, transport, and accurate focussing on a small target.

  16. BESTIA - the next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2015-12-02

    Over the last two decades, BNL’s ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. In addition, our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  17. Progress towards the development of transient ram accelerator simulation as part of the U.S. Air Force Armament Directorate Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, N.; York, B. J.; Dash, S. M.; Drabczuk, R.; Rolader, G. E.

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the development of an advanced CFD simulation capability in support of the U.S. Air Force Armament Directorate's ram accelerator research initiative. The state-of-the-art CRAFT computer code has been specialized for high fidelity, transient ram accelerator simulations via inclusion of generalized dynamic gridding, solution adaptive grid clustering, high pressure thermochemistry, etc. Selected ram accelerator simulations are presented which serve to exhibit the CRAFT code's capabilities and identify some of the principal research/design issues.

  18. LLNL/UC (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)/(University of California) AMS (accelerator mass spectrometry) facility and research program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.C.; Proctor, I.D.; Southon, J.R.; Caffee, M.W.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Roberts, M.L.; Moore, T.L.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Nelson, D.E.; Loyd, D.H.; Vogel, J.S.

    1990-04-18

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California (UC) now have in operation a large AMS spectrometer built as part of a new multiuser laboratory centered on an FN tandem. AMS measurements are expected to use half of the beam time of the accelerator. LLNL use of AMS is in research on consequences of energy usage. Examples include global warming, geophysical site characterization, radiation biology and dosimetry, and study of mutagenic and carcinogenic processes. UC research activities are in clinical applications, archaeology and anthropology, oceanography, and geophysical and geochemical research. Access is also possible for researchers outside the UC system. The technological focus of the laboratory is on achieving high rates of sample through-put, unattended operation, and advances in sample preparation methods. Because of the expected growth in the research programs and the other obligations of the present accelerator, we are designing a follow-on dedicated facility for only AMS and microprobe analysis that will contain at least two accelerators with multiple spectrometers. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1985-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The heavy ion accelerator is profiled. Energy losses, currents, kinetic energy, beam optics, pulse models and mechanical tolerances are included in the discussion. In addition, computational efforts and an energy analyzer are described. 37 refs., 27 figs. (WRF)

  20. The role of the emergency department in the management of acute heart failure: An international perspective on education and research.

    PubMed

    Pang, Peter S; Collins, Sean P; Miró, Òscar; Bueno, Hector; Diercks, Deborah B; Di Somma, Salvatore; Gray, Alasdair; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Hollander, Judd E; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Levy, Phillip D; Papa, AnnMarie; Möckel, Martin

    2015-08-11

    Emergency departments are a major entry point for the initial management of acute heart failure (AHF) patients throughout the world. The initial diagnosis, management and disposition - the decision to admit or discharge - of AHF patients in the emergency department has significant downstream implications. Misdiagnosis, under or overtreatment, or inappropriate admission may place patients at increased risk for adverse events, and add costs to the healthcare system. Despite the critical importance of initial management, data are sparse regarding the impact of early AHF treatment delivered in the emergency department compared to inpatient or chronic heart failure management. Unfortunately, outcomes remain poor, with nearly a third of patients dying or re-hospitalised within 3 months post-discharge. In the absence of robust research evidence, consensus is an important source of guidance for AHF care. Thus, we convened an international group of practising emergency physicians, cardiologists and advanced practice nurses with the following goals to improve outcomes for AHF patients who present to the emergency department or other acute care setting through: (a) a better understanding of the pathophysiology, presentation and management of the initial phase of AHF care; (b) improving initial management by addressing knowledge gaps between best practices and current practice through education and research; and (c) to establish a framework for future emergency department-based international education and research.

  1. Report of the Subpanel on Accelerator Research and Development of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Accelerator R and D in the US High Energy Physics (HEP) program is reviewed. As a result of this study, some shift in priority, particularly as regards long-range accelerator R and D, is suggested to best serve the future needs of the US HEP program. Some specific new directions for the US R and D effort are set forth. 18 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

  2. Experimental Research on the Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator “LACARA”

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T C

    2008-11-11

    The Laser Cyclotron Auto-Resonant Accelerator LACARA has successfully operated this year. Results are summarized, an interpretation of operating data is provided in the body of the report, and recommendations are made how the experiment should be carried forward. The Appendix A contains a description of the LACARA apparatus, currently installed at the Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes the project, extending over three grant-years.

  3. Accelerator Development for the NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) Free Electron Laser Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    34triple point" junction of the vacuum , ceramic insulator , and metal electrode. This leads to the flashover of the insulator , causing an arc which acts as...tungsten wire (25.4 um) into the transport vacuum system. The diode is housed in an Astron ceramic insulator stack. The voltage profile across the diode...accelerator vacuum wall. It is across these insulating breaks that the accelerating voltage is applied to the electron beam and any breakdown in these gaps

  4. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program. Industry, university and research interest in the US Department of Energy ECUT biocatalysis research activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Research Opportunity Notice (RON) disseminated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program's Biocatalysis Research Activity are presented. The RON was issued in late April of 1983 and solicited expressions of interest from petrochemical and chemical companies, bioengineering firms, biochemical engineering consultants, private research laboratories, and universities for participating in a federal research program to investigate potential applications of biotechnology in producing chemicals. The RON results indicate that broad interest exists within the nation's industry, universities, and research institutes for the Activity and its planned research and development program.

  5. Parameter study of a laser-driven dielectric accelerator for radiobiology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Otsuki, Shohei; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Aimidula, Aimiding

    2014-12-01

    A parameter study for a transmission grating type laser-driven dielectric accelerator (TG-LDA) was performed. The optimum pulse laser width was concluded to be 2 ps from the restrictions on the optical damage threshold intensity and the nonlinear optical effects such as the self-phase modulation and self-focus. An irradiation intensity of 5× {{10}11} W c{{m}-2} (2 GV m-1) was suitable for a silica TG-LDA with a pulse width range from 1 ps to 10 ps. The higher order harmonics of the axial electric field distribution was capable of accelerating electrons provided that the electron speed approximately satisfies the conditions of v/c=1/2,1/3, or 1/4. The electrons at the initial energy of 20 kV are accelerated by an acceleration field strength of 20 MV m-1, and the electrons were accelerated by higher fields as the speed increased. For relativistic energy electrons,the acceleration gradient was 600 MV {{m}-1}.

  6. 14 CFR 1230.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1230.103 Section 1230.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS §...

  7. 14 CFR 1230.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1230.103 Section 1230.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS §...

  8. 14 CFR 1230.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1230.103 Section 1230.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS §...

  9. 14 CFR 1230.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 1230.103 Section 1230.103 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS §...

  10. Developing Comparative Bibliometric Indicators for Evaluating the Research Performance of Four Academic Nutrition Departments, 1992-1996: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Eric George

    This study develops a set of empirically and theoretically sound citation-based bibliometric indicators of scientific research performance and applies them in an exploratory comparative study of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville's (UTK's) Nutrition Department with three of its peer programs at the University of Florida, the University of…

  11. Safety Issues at the DOE Test and Research Reactors. A Report to the U.S. Department of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    This report provides an assessment of safety issues at the Department of Energy (DOE) test and research reactors. Part A identifies six safety issues of the reactors. These issues include the safety design philosophy, the conduct of safety reviews, the performance of probabilistic risk assessments, the reliance on reactor operators, the fragmented…

  12. Department of Clinical Investigation, Annual Research Progress Report Fiscal Year 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-30

    DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Garland FN, Robichaud MR Knowledge of Battle Fatigue Among Division Combat Medics and the Effectiveness of Training. Mil Med 152(12...Department 132 #87/75 JANOSIK, LM C The Glasgow Coma Scale : Observer Variability and 133 #87/78 Correctness of Scores Obtained with Its Use SMITH PS 0...fluorescent illumination. The tests will be scored on a scale of 0 for blue, 1 for green, 2 for yellow-green, and 3 for yellow, with 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5

  13. Building system integration research: recommendations for a US Department of Energy multiyear program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This plan describes the scope, technical content, and resources required to conduct the Building System Integration (BSI) research program during FY 1987 through 1991. System integration research is defined, the need for the research is discussed, its benefits are outlined, and the history of building system integration research is summarized. The program scope, the general approach taken in developing this program plan, and the plan's contents are also described.

  14. Evaluation of the Department for Education School Exclusion Trial. Research Briefing No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Lynne; Hallam, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The Department for Education is running a three-year school exclusion trial, which started in autumn 2011 and continues until July 2014. The trial sees schools taking on responsibility for placing permanently excluded pupils in alternative provision and funding the placements from money devolved from.

  15. 78 FR 28866 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Technology Directorate, Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of...), through its Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC), is seeking industry collaborators to aid DHS S&T in.... Selection Criteria The Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC) reserves the right to select...

  16. An Analysis of the Goal Transformation Process in a State Department of Education. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marockie, Henry R.

    This study focused on the process by which stated organizational goals of a State Department of Education were transformed into the organization's real goals. The purpose of the study was to identify and examine (1) the mechanisms operating in the organization which aided this transformation, (2) the organization's real goal, and (3) the effects…

  17. An Exploratory Study of the Conflict Management Styles of Department Heads in a Research University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Christine A.; Algert, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    Conflict in the university setting is an inherent component of academic life. Leaders spend more than 40% of their time managing conflict. Department heads are in a unique position--they encounter conflict from individuals they manage and from others to whom they report such as a senior administrator in the position of dean. There are very few…

  18. Some Empirical Issues in Research on Academic Departments: Homogeneity, Aggregation, and Levels of Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, V. Jean; Dodge, L. Delf

    1983-01-01

    The appropriateness of using academic departments as a level of analysis of organizational administration is examined. Factors analyzed include homogeneity of faculty responses to measures of organizational structure, environmental uncertainty, and task routineness. Results were mixed, demonstrating the importance of empirically testing rather…

  19. Department of Clinical Investigation, Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 2006 (Madigan Army Medical Center)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    Findings in Bariatric Surgery Specimens DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Cason RL #203014 T L Clinical Use of Reticulocyte Hemoglobin to Detect Iron...Status: Ongoing Title: Incidental Anatomic and Histologic Findings in Bariatric Surgery Specimens Principal Investigator: MAJ Anne L. Champeaux, MC...Collection, review and analysis of bariatric surgery specimen reports generated by the MAMC Anatomic Pathology service from 1994 through 2004 to

  20. Organizational Learning for Library Enhancements: A Collaborative, Research-Driven Analysis of Academic Department Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Jeffery L.; Dupuis, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative evaluation methodology of academic departments for library organizational learning and library enhancement planning. This evaluation used campus units' academic program review reports as a data source and employed collaborative content analysis by library liaisons to extract departmental strengths, weaknesses,…

  1. Simulation of launch and re-entry acceleration profiles for testing of shuttle and unmanned microgravity research payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanto, J. M.; Ziserman, H. I.; Chapman, D. K.; Korszun, Z. R.; Todd, P.

    Microgravity experiments designed for execution in Get-Away Special canisters, Hitchhiker modules, and Reusable Re-entry Satellites will be subjected to launch and re-entry accelerations. Crew-dependent provisions for preventing acceleration damage to equipment or products will not be available for these payloads during flight; therefore, the effects of launch and re-entry accelerations on all aspects of such payloads must be evaluated prior to flight. A procedure was developed for conveniently simulating the launch and re-entry acceleration profiles of the Space Shuttle (3.3 and 1.7 × g maximum, respectively) and of two versions of NASA's proposed materials research Re-usable Re-entry Satellite (8 × g maximum in one case and 4 × g in the other). By using the 7 m centrifuge of the Gravitational Plant Physiology Laboratory in Philadelphia it was found possible to simulate the time dependence of these 5 different acceleration episodes for payload masses up to 59 kg. A commercial low-cost payload device, the “Materials Dispersion Apparatus” of Instrumentation Technology Associates was tested for (1) integrity of mechanical function, (2) retention of fluid in its compartments, and (3) integrity of products under simulated re-entry g-loads. In particular, the sharp rise from 1 g to maximum g-loading that occurs during re-entry in various unmanned vehicles was successfully simulated, conditions were established for reliable functioning of the MDA, and crystals of 5 proteins suspended in compartments filled with mother liquor were subjected to this acceleration load.

  2. The Department of Medical Education at the University of Michigan Medical School: a case study in medical education research productivity.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Larry D

    2004-10-01

    The Department of Medical Education (DME) at the University of Michigan Medical School has a strong and sustained history of contributing to medical education research. The author identifies several dimensions that contribute to this productivity: (1) the quality of department faculty and the complementary areas of expertise they possess; (2) a critical mass of educational scholars, both within and outside the DME; (3) extensive collaborations of DME faculty with colleagues in other departments on educational innovation; (4) the departmental status of the DME; (5) the separation of the DME from the administration of the curriculum; (6) the need to balance the missions of research and educational support of the medical school; (7) the research-intensive nature of the larger University of Michigan environment; (8) the complex challenge of funding the educational scholarship mission; and (9) the importance of maintaining visibility within the institution. Factors that will affect the health of future educational scholarship include (1) the response to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's definition of resident competencies and similar initiatives; (2) the growth of opportunities for advanced training in educational scholarship and the corresponding expansion of medical school faculty with greater interest and skills in educational research; (3) an emerging emphasis on the importance of behavioral science in medical care; (4) demands on the clinical productivity of collaborating faculty; and (5) the paucity of funding for medical education research.

  3. Technology evaluation of man-rated acceleration test equipment for vestibular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taback, I.; Kenimer, R. L.; Butterfield, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The considerations for eliminating acceleration noise cues in horizontal, linear, cyclic-motion sleds intended for both ground and shuttle-flight applications are addressed. the principal concerns are the acceleration transients associated with change in direction-of-motion for the carriage. The study presents a design limit for acceleration cues or transients based upon published measurements for thresholds of human perception to linear cyclic motion. The sources and levels for motion transients are presented based upon measurements obtained from existing sled systems. The approaches to a noise-free system recommends the use of air bearings for the carriage support and moving-coil linear induction motors operating at low frequency as the drive system. Metal belts running on air bearing pulleys provide an alternate approach to the driving system. The appendix presents a discussion of alternate testing techniques intended to provide preliminary type data by means of pendulums, linear motion devices and commercial air bearing tables.

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: Annual report to the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1994-12-01

    Project program summaries are presented for: effect of bacterial spore protein on mutagenesis; cellular toxicity of coaine and cocaethylene; calcinfication in marine alga (global carbon cycling); advanced permanent magnet materials; a high flux neutron source; genetics of drug addiction; microdialysis; analysis of powder diffraction data; accelerator technology; nucleic acids and proteins and their interactions, by small-angle XRD; enhancement of microplanar beam radiation therapy of gliosarcoma; relaxographic and functional MRI; low-temperature infrared laser absorption spectroscopy; photodesorption of H{sub 2}; helical magnet for RHIC; novel microporous solids; chemistry and physics of stratospheric aerosols (ozone depletion); rf source for linear colliders; resonance Raman detection of VOCs; synthesis of plant fatty acids with unusual double bond positions; outer surface proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete; multiwire proportional chambers for collider muons; self-organized criticality; PCR-SSCP detection of genetic changes at single cell level; proton facility for cancer therapy; and visible free-electron laser experiment.

  5. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-259

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.

    2011-10-01

    This agreement allowed NREL to serve as an advisor on SolarTAC - a collaborative effort between Xcel Energy, NREL, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. The collaboration was formed to accelerate pre-commercial and early commercial solar energy technologies to the marketplace. Through this CRADA, NREL participated in the deployment of solar energy generation technologies and related solar equipment for research, testing, validation, and demonstration purposes.

  6. Laser wakefield acceleration research by using a tapered capillary waveguide at GIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseok; Jang, Donggyu; Nam, Inhyuk; Lee, Taehee; Suk, Hyyong

    2012-10-01

    The tapered plasma density in a gas-filled capillary waveguide can suppress the dephasing problem in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). As a result, the acceleration distance and the gained electron energy are expected to be increased significantly. For this purpose, we recently developed a tapered capillary waveguide, which can produce a plasma density of 10^18 cm-3. This capillary plasma waveguide will be used for high-energy electron generation experiment together with a 20 TW/35 fs Ti:sapphire laser system that will be completed by this summer. In this presentation, the ongoing experiments will be reported.

  7. Role of the Department of Defense in the Research and Development of Alternative Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    This paper examined the implications of the U.S. national energy strategies and policies that directly or indirectly require the Department of...how the political process inhibits an effective DOD alternative energy program. It shows that the individual service s initiatives must be nested with...the DOD s programs and U.S. national strategy. This thesis recommends that the nation s energy security strategy should provide clear guidance to the

  8. ERTS-A data as a teaching and research tool in the Department of Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grybeck, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ERTS-1 materials continue to be used in a number of courses including Geology of Alaska, Economic Geology, and Structural Geology. In addition, specific talks about the ERTS-1 material were given at a seminar at the Geophysical Institute, to the Geology Department, to numerous individuals, and were extensively used in a popularized talk on the Geology of Alaska to the local Historical Society.

  9. The Intersecting Roles of Violence, Gender, and Substance Use in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Esther K.; Benz, Madeline; Rybarczyk, Megan; Broderick, Kerry; Linden, Judith; Boudreaux, Edwin L.; Ranney, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between gender, violence, and substance use in the emergency department (ED) is complex. This paper examines the role of gender in the intersection of substance use and three types of violence: peer violence, intimate partner violence, and firearm violence. Current approaches to treatment of substance abuse and violence are similar across both genders; however, as patterns of violence and substance abuse differ by gender, interventions may be more effective if they are designed with a specific gender focus. PMID:25421993

  10. Department of Defense Plan to Establish Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    14 9.4 Preservation ...across the DoD.  Ensure effective access to and reliable preservation of DoD scholarly publications and digitally formatted scientific data for...research, development, and education.  Preserve and increase the use of research results to enhance scientific discovery. 2 Approved for public

  11. The United Kingdom's Research Assessment Exercise: Impact on Institutions, Departments, Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Paul G.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the United Kingdom's Research Assessment Exercises (RAE) affect institutional grants for university-based research projects. Explains the RAE system, discussing its advantages and disadvantages, outlines a framework within which it can be analyzed, and examines some of the available evidence about the impact of the RAE. (SWM)

  12. "Departmental Climate and Student Experiences in Geography Graduate Programs": Research for Enhancing Departments and Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solem, Michael N.; Lee, Jenny; Schlemper, M. Beth

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the authors' research which combined quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze a rather intangible phenomenon of interest to higher education researchers and administrators, that being "departmental climate" (often referred to as "academic climate"). This investigation required the authors to develop a method by which…

  13. The research on the photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic detecting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Zhengrong; Wei, Jianxia; En, De; Chen, Caihe; Cui, Yuming; Li, Chao

    2007-01-01

    For high resolution application in seismic detection, the geophone should be smaller in size, more reliable and sensitive. So a kind of photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic detecting technology, which is novel and precise based on waveguide M-Z interference, is presented. The principle of the photo-electronic integrated acceleration seismic geophone is introduced in this paper. The seismometer is composed of a waveguide M-Z interferometer, a sensing element, a modulation LD and signal processing system. The silicon crystal is adopted as the substrate. The core of the photoelectronic integrated acceleration is the silicon harmonic oscillator, which is supported by four silicon beams and integrated on the signal beam of the M-Z interferometer . The harmonic oscillator translates the acceleration information of the external vibrational signal into phase variation of optical signal in the sensing arm, which is converted into optical signal by M-Z interferometer, then PIN converts the optical signal into electric signal to process by the signal processing. The experimental curve of seismometer frequency response is achieved.

  14. Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1990--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The program consisted of the following three tasks: TASK A, ``Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,`` TASK B, ``Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,`` and TASK C, ``Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders.``

  15. Research and development for electropolishing of Nb for ILC accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Michael J.

    2009-09-21

    The objectives of this project are to 1, Expand the scientific and technological understanding of the effect of post-treatment (electropolish, buffered chemical polish, low-temperature baking) on the surface of niobium; 2, Relate the knowledge to the performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities; and, 3, Thereby design and demonstrate an electropolish process that can be applied to complete cavities.

  16. Accelerator Research Studies. Annual report for June 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, P. G.; Reiser, M.; Granatstein, V. L.; Lawson, W.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R.

    2004-01-23

    The report provides a summary progress on three tasks: Task A: Study of the Physics of Space-Charge Dominated Beams for Advanced Accelerator Applications; Task B: Studies of High-Power Gyroklystrons and Application to Linear Colliders; and, Task C: Theory and Simulation of the Physics Space-Charge Dominated Beams

  17. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Pirruccello, M.C.; Tobias, C.A.

    1980-11-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980. (KRM)

  18. The FY 1982 Department of Defense Program for Research, Development, and Acquisition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-20

    J C E E m Wm C Zo0) > Ui .U 22* ~ ~ o Es ,-)0 2.7s ,32-4)0 E E ) ~ 0 C 4)0 -E r E 4) .0 Ca Z 0 7E 0 E 4 4 0 0 2 4 ~g K in~ G2O - >~ ~ ~ M ’ C M...opportunities for cooperative development of equipment and systems. The Next Generation Weather Radar ( NEXRAD ) is a prime example of interagency system...istratior (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ( NOAA ) of the Department of Commerce. For the first planned spacecraft launch

  19. Department of the Navy FY 1995 Budget Estimates. Justification of Estimates, Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy Descriptive Summaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    original copy. This document contains blank pages that were not filmed NAVY RDT&E PROGRAM ELEMENT DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARIES INTRODUCTION AND KIPLANATION OF...CONTENTS 1. general. This document has been prepared to provide information on the Department of the Navy Research, Development, Test and Evaluation...Program to Congressional committees during the FY 1995 hearings. The Descriptive Summaries provide narrative information on all non-special access Navy RDT

  20. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cialella, A.; Gregory, L.; Lazar, K.; Liang, M.; Ma, L.; Tilp, A.; Wagener, R.

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  1. 14 CFR § 1230.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. § 1230.103 Section § 1230.103...-14-14) § 1230.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which...

  2. Introduction of an accelerated diagnostic protocol in the assessment of emergency department patients with possible acute coronary syndrome: the Nambour Short Low-Intermediate Chest pain project.

    PubMed

    George, Terry; Ashover, Sarah; Cullen, Louise; Larsen, Peter; Gibson, Jason; Bilesky, Jennifer; Coverdale, Steven; Parsonage, William

    2013-08-01

    Emergency physicians can feel pressured by opposing forces of clinical reality and the need to publish successful key performance indicators in an environment of increasing demands and cost containment. This is particularly relevant to management of patients with undifferentiated chest pain and possible acute coronary syndrome. Unreliability of clinical assessment and high risk of adverse outcomes for all concerned exist, yet national guidelines are at odds with efforts to reduce ED crowding and access block. We report findings from the Nambour Short Low-Intermediate Chest pain risk trial, which safely introduced an accelerated diagnostic protocol with reduced ED length of stay and high patient acceptability. Over a 7-month period, there were no major adverse cardiac events by 30 days in 19% of undifferentiated chest pain presentations with possible acute coronary syndrome discharged after normal sensitive cardiac troponin taken 2 h after presentation and scheduled to return for outpatient exercise stress test.

  3. Overview of Mosquito Research Programs at the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural & Veterinary Entomology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE), a U.S. Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service laboratory, was established in World War II to produce products to protect military personnel against insect vector of disease. Currently the mission of CMAVE is ...

  4. Laboratory Directed Research & Development program. Annual report to the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following projects coordinated at Brookhaven National Laboratory: investigation of the utility of max-entropy methods for the analysis of powder diffraction data; analysis of structures and interactions of nucleic acids and proteins by small angle x-ray diffraction; relaxographic MRI and functional MRI; very low temperature infra-red laser absorption as a potential analytical tool; state-resolved measurements of H{sub 2} photodesorption: development of laser probes of H{sub 2} for in-situ accelerator measurements; Siberian snake prototype development for RHIC; synthesis and characterization of novel microporous solids; ozone depletion, chemistry and physics of stratospheric aerosols; understanding the molecular basis for the synthesis of plant fatty acids possessing unusual double bond positions; structure determination of outer surface proteins of the Lyme disease spirochete; low mass, low-cost multi-wire proportional chambers for muon systems of collider experiments; theory of self-organized criticality; development of the PCR-SSCP technique for the detection, at the single cell level, of specific genetic changes; feasibility of SPECT in imaging of F-18 FDG accumulation in tumors; visible free electron laser oscillator experiment; study of possible 2 + 2 TeV muon-muon collider; ultraviolet FEL R & D; precision machining using hard x-rays; new directions in in-vivo enzyme mapping: catechol-O-methyltransferase; proposal to develop a high rate muon polarimeter; development of intense, tunable 20-femtosecond laser systems; use of extreme thermophilic bacterium thermatoga maritima as a source of ribosomal components and translation factors for structural studies; and biochemical and structural studies of Chaperon proteins from thermophilic bacteria and other experiments.

  5. Colleagues as Change Agents: How Department Networks and Opinion Leaders Influence Teaching at a Single Research University.

    PubMed

    Andrews, T C; Conaway, E P; Zhao, J; Dolan, E L

    2016-01-01

    Relationships with colleagues have the potential to be a source of support for faculty to make meaningful change in how they teach, but the impact of these relationships is poorly understood. We used a mixed-methods approach to investigate the characteristics of faculty who provide colleagues with teaching resources and facilitate change in teaching, how faculty influence one another. Our exploratory investigation was informed by social network theory and research on the impact of opinion leaders within organizations. We used surveys and interviews to examine collegial interactions about undergraduate teaching in life sciences departments at one research university. Each department included discipline-based education researchers (DBERs). Quantitative and qualitative analyses indicate that DBERs promote changes in teaching to a greater degree than other departmental colleagues. The influence of DBERs derives, at least partly, from a perception that they have unique professional expertise in education. DBERs facilitated change through coteaching, offering ready and approachable access to education research, and providing teaching training and mentoring. Faculty who had participated in a team based-teaching professional development program were also credited with providing more support for teaching than nonparticipants. Further research will be necessary to determine whether these results generalize beyond the studied institution.

  6. Colleagues as Change Agents: How Department Networks and Opinion Leaders Influence Teaching at a Single Research University

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, T. C.; Conaway, E. P.; Zhao, J.; Dolan, E. L.

    2016-01-01

    Relationships with colleagues have the potential to be a source of support for faculty to make meaningful change in how they teach, but the impact of these relationships is poorly understood. We used a mixed-methods approach to investigate the characteristics of faculty who provide colleagues with teaching resources and facilitate change in teaching, how faculty influence one another. Our exploratory investigation was informed by social network theory and research on the impact of opinion leaders within organizations. We used surveys and interviews to examine collegial interactions about undergraduate teaching in life sciences departments at one research university. Each department included discipline-based education researchers (DBERs). Quantitative and qualitative analyses indicate that DBERs promote changes in teaching to a greater degree than other departmental colleagues. The influence of DBERs derives, at least partly, from a perception that they have unique professional expertise in education. DBERs facilitated change through coteaching, offering ready and approachable access to education research, and providing teaching training and mentoring. Faculty who had participated in a team based–teaching professional development program were also credited with providing more support for teaching than nonparticipants. Further research will be necessary to determine whether these results generalize beyond the studied institution. PMID:27174582

  7. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2000-12-31

    The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and I exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, ,projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2000. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2000 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2001. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2000 was $6 million. The.actual allocation totaled $5.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission

  8. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    ScienceCinema

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  9. Accelerating Particles with Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, Michael; Hogan, Mark

    2014-11-05

    Researchers at SLAC explain how they use plasma wakefields to accelerate bunches of electrons to very high energies over only a short distance. Their experiments offer a possible path for the future of particle accelerators.

  10. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  11. Department of Clinical Investigation Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1984. Volume 1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    Suture Ligation in Tonsillectomy . (0) :. ... Comparison and Cp~ibration of the Gates Method for Glomerular 214 Fitration Rate , A the Tauxe Method... Laser treated rat soft tissue injury. Mary -. - Lipscomb Hamrick Army Medical Specialist Corps Research Course, Walter Reed Army Institute of... Laser repositioning device for quantitative exercise thallium examination. SW Chapter Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting, Houston, TX, Mar 84

  12. Co-­Teaching Social Research Methods in a Joint Sociology/Anthropology Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manthei, Jennifer; Isler, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    In the course of developing and co-­teaching Social Research Methods (SRM), an interdisciplinary, upper-­division undergraduate course at the University of Illinois at Springfield (UIS), the authors discovered that this type of partnership is ripe ground for exploring integration of anthropology and sociology on epistemological and methodological…

  13. MANPOWER INVENTORY AND TRAINING NEEDS ANALYSIS. LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS MAINTENANCE RESEARCH PROJECT, REPORT NUMBER 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen (Roy) and Associates, Washington, DC.

    AS PART OF A LONG-RANGE (1965-69) RESEARCH PROJECT IN LOUISIANA, A STUDY (1) IDENTIFIED TRAINING NEEDS OF PERSONS SUPERVISING THE MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION OF HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES, FERRIES, AND EQUIPMENT, (2) ESTIMATED TRAINING NEEDS OF POTENTIAL SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL, (3) DETERMINED CHARACTERISTICS OF BOTH GROUPS, AND (4) MADE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A…

  14. Research programs for Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    A chemical sciences review meeting was held in which research programs in chemistry were discussed. Major topics included: chemistry of actinides and fission products, interactions of solvents, solutes and surfaces in supercritical extraction, chemical and physical principles in multiphase separations, and chemical kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  15. Experimental research on the feature of an x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer versus tube accelerating voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hao; Margie, P. Olbinado; Atsushi, Momose; Hua-Jie, Han; Hu, Ren-Fang; Wang, Zhi-Li; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2015-06-01

    X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer has been used most widely to perform x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a conventional low-brilliance x-ray source, and it yields high-sensitivity phase and dark-field images of samples producing low absorption contrast, thus bearing tremendous potential for future clinical diagnosis. In this work, by changing the accelerating voltage of the x-ray tube from 35 kV to 45 kV, x-ray phase-contrast imaging of a test sample is performed at each integer value of the accelerating voltage to investigate the characteristic of an x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer (located in the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Japan) versus tube voltage. Experimental results and data analysis show that within a range this x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer is not sensitive to the accelerating voltage of the tube with a constant fringe visibility of ˜ 44%. This x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer research demonstrates the feasibility of a new dual energy phase-contrast x-ray imaging strategy and the possibility to collect a refraction spectrum. Project supported by the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825800), the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups, China (Grant No. 11321503), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11179004, 10979055, 11205189, and 11205157), and the Japan-Asia Youth Exchange Program in Science (SAKURA Exchange Program in Science) Administered by the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  16. A 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research.

    PubMed

    Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian; Auer, Siegfried; Baust, Günter; Colette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Fiege, Katherina; Grün, Eberhard; Heckmann, Frieder; Helfert, Stefan; Hillier, Jonathan; Kempf, Sascha; Matt, Günter; Mellert, Tobias; Munsat, Tobin; Otto, Katharina; Postberg, Frank; Röser, Hans-Peter; Shu, Anthony; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Srama, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Investigating the dynamical and physical properties of cosmic dust can reveal a great deal of information about both the dust and its many sources. Over recent years, several spacecraft (e.g., Cassini, Stardust, Galileo, and Ulysses) have successfully characterised interstellar, interplanetary, and circumplanetary dust using a variety of techniques, including in situ analyses and sample return. Charge, mass, and velocity measurements of the dust are performed either directly (induced charge signals) or indirectly (mass and velocity from impact ionisation signals or crater morphology) and constrain the dynamical parameters of the dust grains. Dust compositional information may be obtained via either time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the impact plasma or direct sample return. The accurate and reliable interpretation of collected spacecraft data requires a comprehensive programme of terrestrial instrument calibration. This process involves accelerating suitable solar system analogue dust particles to hypervelocity speeds in the laboratory, an activity performed at the Max Planck Institut für Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Here, a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically accelerates charged micron and submicron-sized dust particles to speeds up to 80 km s(-1). Recent advances in dust production and processing have allowed solar system analogue dust particles (silicates and other minerals) to be coated with a thin conductive shell, enabling them to be charged and accelerated. Refinements and upgrades to the beam line instrumentation and electronics now allow for the reliable selection of particles at velocities of 1-80 km s(-1) and with diameters of between 0.05 μm and 5 μm. This ability to select particles for subsequent impact studies based on their charges, masses, or velocities is provided by a particle selection unit (PSU). The PSU contains a field programmable gate array, capable of monitoring in real time the particles' speeds and charges, and

  17. A 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as a tool for planetary and impact physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Mocker, Anna; Bugiel, Sebastian; Srama, Ralf; Auer, Siegfried; Baust, Guenter; Matt, Guenter; Otto, Katharina; Colette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Shu, Anthony; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Fiege, Katherina; Postberg, Frank; Gruen, Eberhard; Heckmann, Frieder; Helfert, Stefan; Hillier, Jonathan; Mellert, Tobias; and others

    2011-09-15

    Investigating the dynamical and physical properties of cosmic dust can reveal a great deal of information about both the dust and its many sources. Over recent years, several spacecraft (e.g., Cassini, Stardust, Galileo, and Ulysses) have successfully characterised interstellar, interplanetary, and circumplanetary dust using a variety of techniques, including in situ analyses and sample return. Charge, mass, and velocity measurements of the dust are performed either directly (induced charge signals) or indirectly (mass and velocity from impact ionisation signals or crater morphology) and constrain the dynamical parameters of the dust grains. Dust compositional information may be obtained via either time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the impact plasma or direct sample return. The accurate and reliable interpretation of collected spacecraft data requires a comprehensive programme of terrestrial instrument calibration. This process involves accelerating suitable solar system analogue dust particles to hypervelocity speeds in the laboratory, an activity performed at the Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik in Heidelberg, Germany. Here, a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator electrostatically accelerates charged micron and submicron-sized dust particles to speeds up to 80 km s{sup -1}. Recent advances in dust production and processing have allowed solar system analogue dust particles (silicates and other minerals) to be coated with a thin conductive shell, enabling them to be charged and accelerated. Refinements and upgrades to the beam line instrumentation and electronics now allow for the reliable selection of particles at velocities of 1-80 km s{sup -1} and with diameters of between 0.05 {mu}m and 5 {mu}m. This ability to select particles for subsequent impact studies based on their charges, masses, or velocities is provided by a particle selection unit (PSU). The PSU contains a field programmable gate array, capable of monitoring in real time the particles' speeds and

  18. The US Department of Defense Hemorrhage and Resuscitation Research and Development Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Biomedical Advanced Re- search and Development Authority, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, and the US Food and Drug Administration Office of...conflicts demonstrate the continuing need for research and development focusing on hemorrhage control, fluid resuscitation, blood products, transfusion...often received blood transfusions at forward-positioned hospitals and surgical teams. The magnitude of this requirement is evidenced by the fact that more

  19. Laboratory directed research and development: Annual report to the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, Brookhaven must continuously foster the development of new ideas and technologies, promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develop new fundable R and D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments are described in this report. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  20. Multidisciplinary "Boot Camp" Training in Cellular Bioengineering to Accelerate Research Immersion for REU Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreiber, David I.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Roth, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) sites widely serve as the first major research gateway for undergraduates seeking a structured research experience. Given their lack of prior research skills, and the highly compressed duration of the REU programs, these students frequently encounter barriers to a seamless transition into a new…

  1. The Ecological Areawide Management (TEAM) of leafy spurge program of the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gerald L; Prosser, Chad W; Wendel, Lloyd E; Delfosse, Ernest S; Faust, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    The Ecological Areawide Management (TEAM) of Leafy Spurge program was developed to focus research and control efforts on a single weed, leafy spurge, and demonstrate the effectiveness of a coordinated, biologically based, integrated pest management program (IPM). This was accomplished through partnerships and teamwork that clearly demonstrated the advantages of the biologically based IPM approach. However, the success of regional weed control programs horizontally across several states and provinces also requires a vertical integration of several sectors of society. Awareness and education are the essential elements of vertical integration. Therefore, a substantial effort was made to produce a wide variety of information products specifically designed to educate different segments of society. During its tenure, land managers and agency decision makers have seen the potential of using the TEAM approach to accelerate the regional control of leafy spurge. The example set by the TEAM organization and participants is viewed as a model for future weed-control efforts.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM RESEARCH PROJECTS TO IMPROVE DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISIONING OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Ann Marie

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes fourteen basic science projects aimed at solving decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) problems within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Funded by the Environmental Science Management Program (EMSP), these research projects address D&D problems where basic science is needed to expand knowledge and develop solutions to help DOE meet its cleanup milestones. EMSP uses directed solicitations targeted at identified Environmental Management (EM) needs to ensure that research results are directly applicable to DOE's EM problems. The program then helps transition the projects from basic to applied research by identifying end-users and coordinating proof-of-principle field tests. EMSP recently funded fourteen D&D research projects through the directed solicitation process. These research projects will be discussed, including description, current status, and potential impact. Through targeted research and proof-of-principle tests, it is hoped that EMSP's fourteen D&D basic research projects will directly impact and provide solutions to DOE's D&D problems.

  3. Implementation of a volunteer university student research assistant program in an emergency department: the nuts and bolts for success.

    PubMed

    Steadman, Patrick E; Crudden, Johanna; Boutis, Kathy

    2015-09-01

    Prospective research studies often advance clinical practice in the emergency department (ED), but they can be costly and difficult to perform. In this report, we describe the implementation of a volunteer university student research assistant program that provides students exposure to medicine and clinical research while simultaneously increasing the capacity of an ED's research program. This type of program provides 15 hours per day of research assistant coverage for patient screening and enrolment for minimal risk research studies, and screening for higher risk studies. The latter is true without the added burden or costs of co-administering university course credit or pay for service, which are common features of most of these types of programs currently in operation. We have shown that our volunteer-based program is effective for an ED's research success as well as for its student participants. For other EDs interested in adopting similar programs, we provide the details on how to get such a program started and highlight the structure and non-monetary incentives that facilitate a program's ongoing success.

  4. Research in experimental elementary particle physics. A proposal to the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew P. White; Kaushik De; Paul A. Draper; Ransom Stephens

    1995-04-13

    We report on the activities of the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington for the period 1994-95. We propose the continuation of the research program for 1996-98 with strong participation in the detector upgrade and physics analysis work for the D0 Experiment at Fermilab, prototyping and pre-production studies for the muon and calorimeter systems for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN, and detector development and simulation studies for the PP2PP Experiment at Brookhaven.

  5. Inverse free electron laser beat-wave accelerator research. Annual progress report, [August 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1993-09-01

    A calculation on the stabilization of the sideband instability in the free electron laser (FEL) and inverse FEL (IFEL) was completed. The issue arises in connection with the use of a tapered (``variable-parameter``) undulator of extended length, such as might be used in an ``enhanced efficiency`` traveling-wave FEL or an IFEL accelerator. In addition, the FEL facility at Columbia was configured as a traveling wave amplifier for a 10-kW signal from a 24-GHz magnetron. The space charge field in the bunches of the FEL was measured. Completed work has been published.

  6. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1986-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    Activities are reported on MBE-4, the four-beam proof-of-principle ion induction linear accelerator with the capability of beam-current amplification. Mechanical aspects of MBE-4, quadrupole insulator performance, and pulsers are discussed. The computer code, SLID, has been used to help understand the longitudinal beam dynamics in MBE-4. A computer-controlled emittance scanning system is in use in MBE-4. A systematic effort is under way to discover and correct all the defects peculiar to the low energy part of the linac design code. (LEW)

  7. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1989--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This report contains the following topics on heavy ion fusion: MBE-4 drifting beam quadrupole operating range; transverse emittance growth in MBE-4; an improved ion source for MBE-4; drifting beam studies on MBE-4; 2-MV injector; improvements in lifetime of the C{sup +} source; injector control system; Maxwell spark gap test update; ILSE cosine 2{theta} quadrupole magnet development; electrostatic quadrupole prototype development activity; induction accelerator cell development; effect of a spread in beamlet currents on longitudinal stability; and heavy ion linac driver analysis.

  8. Research proposal for development of an electron stripper using a thin liquid lithium film for rare isotope accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Momozaki, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-03-06

    Hydrodynamic instability phenomena in a thin liquid lithium film, which has been proposed for the first stripper in the driver linac of Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), were discussed. Since it was considered that film instability could significantly impair the feasibility of the liquid lithium film stripper concept, potential issues and research tasks in the RIA project due to these instability phenomena were raised. In order to investigate these instability phenomena, a research proposal plan was developed. In the theoretical part of this research proposal, a use of the linear stability theory was suggested. In the experimental part, it was pointed out that the concept of Reynolds number and Weber number scaling may allow conducting a preliminary experiment using inert simulants, hence reducing technical difficulty, complexity, and cost of the experiments. After confirming the thin film formation in the preliminary experiment using simulants, demonstration experiments using liquid lithium were proposed.

  9. A researcher's perceptions of United States Department of Agriculture funding in animal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J J

    2007-03-01

    Dedicated funding for animal reproduction did not start until 1985 and was available primarily in the reproductive efficiency and physiology areas of the Animal Science Program. Funding for individual grants and duration of funding were similar between the National Institutes of Health and the USDA, typically in the range of 3 yr, with total direct costs of $150,000. The names of these programs have changed over time; the National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program started in 1991 with a program in animal reproduction. The USDA did not change the award size for individual grants until 2001, when it gradually increased through 2003. The USDA then markedly increased individual grants in 2004 to a funding level of $300,000 to $500,000 over 3 to 4 yr. This has been beneficial for the funded scientist but discouraging to the applicants with high-ranking nonfunded grants. The number of grants funded per year is approaching a low critical number, with an average of only 10 new grants funded per year. At the present funding level it will be difficult for even the best scientist to sustain a research career based only on USDA funding.

  10. Biological control of weeds: research by the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service: selected case studies.

    PubMed

    Quimby, Paul C; DeLoach, C Jack; Wineriter, Susan A; Goolsby, John A; Sobhian, Rouhollah; Boyette, C Douglas; Abbas, Hamed K

    2003-01-01

    Research by the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) on biological control of weeds has been practiced for many years because of its inherent ecological and economic advantages. Today, it is further driven by ARS adherence to Presidential Executive Order 13112 (3 February 1999) on invasive species and to USDA-ARS policy toward developing technology in support of sustainable agriculture with reduced dependence on non-renewable petrochemical resources. This paper reports examples or case studies selected to demonstrate the traditional or classical approach for biological control programs using Old World arthropods against Tamarix spp, Melaleuca quinquenervia (Cav) ST Blake and Galium spurium L/G aparine L, and the augmentative approach with a native plant pathogen against Pueraria lobata Ohwi = P montana. The examples illustrated various conflicts of interest with endangered species and ecological complexities of arthropods with associated microbes such as nematodes.

  11. Emission Control Research to Enable Fuel Efficiency: Department of Energy Heavy Vehicle Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gurpreet Singh; Ronald L. Graves; John M. Storey; William P. Partridge; John F. Thomas; Bernie M. Penetrante; Raymond M. Brusasco; Bernard T. Merritt; George E. Vogtlin; Christopher L. Aardahl; Craig F. Habeger; M.L. Balmer

    2000-06-19

    The Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies supports research to enable high-efficiency diesel engines to meet future emissions regulations, thus clearing the way for their use in light trucks as well as continuing as the most efficient powerplant for freight-haulers. Compliance with Tier 2 rules and expected heavy duty engine standards will require effective exhaust emission controls (after-treatment) for diesels in these applications. DOE laboratories are working with industry to improve emission control technologies in projects ranging from application of new diagnostics for elucidating key mechanisms, to development and tests of prototype devices. This paper provides an overview of these R and D efforts, with examples of key findings and developments.

  12. Coordinating research and practice: challenges testing messages to increase medical reserve corps participation in local health department activities.

    PubMed

    Klaiman, Tamar; Higdon, Melissa; Galarce, Ezequiel

    2013-04-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) increasingly depend on volunteers, often Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteers, to assist with a variety of functions. While LHDs have extensive lists of volunteers, only about 10 % are actively involved in LHD activities. Psychological literature has shown that well-designed messages can motivate behavior among individuals. Key to this theory is the concept of "framing," defined as the influence the characterization of an issue can have on its understanding. Research has been conducted on how to frame and disseminate both political and public health messages to alter individual behavior. We aimed to design and test appropriate evidence-based messages to increase volunteer participation rates in LHD flu clinics. After inviting over 900 MRC units to participate during the 2011-2012 influenza season, five were able to collect and report data to the research team. Using a randomized trial design, we tested messages among the five participating MRC units consisting of a total of 2,020 volunteers. Chi Square analysis showed no difference in attendance between those who received either of the test messages versus the control message (p = .305). Our small sample size of MRC units likely biased our sample and reduced the external validity of our study. Our experience in conducting research with MRC coordinators and volunteers highlights the challenges of conducting research with practitioners who lack the time, infrastructure and resources necessary to work with researchers. There is a strong need for more supportive infrastructure for conducting research with practitioners.

  13. Accelerating translation of physical activity and cancer survivorship research into practice: recommendations for a more integrated and collaborative approach.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Siobhan M; Alfano, Catherine M; Perna, Frank M; Glasgow, Russell E

    2014-05-01

    Physical activity has been deemed safe and effective in reducing many negative side effects of treatment for cancer survivors and promoting better overall health. However, most of this research has focused on highly controlled randomized trials and little of this research has been translated into care or policy for survivors. The purpose of the present article is to present a research agenda for the field to accelerate the dissemination and implementation of empirically supported physical activity interventions into care. We provide rationale for the role of basic, behavioral, clinical implementation, and population scientists in moving this science forward and call for a more coordinated effort across different phases of research. In addition, we provide key strategies and examples for ongoing and future studies using the RE-AIM (reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) framework and pose recommendations for collaborations between researchers and stakeholders to enhance the integration of this research into policy and practice. Overall, we recommend that physical activity and cancer survivorship research use additional study designs, include relevant stakeholders, and be more collaborative, integrated, contextual, and representative in terms of both setting and participants.

  14. Final Report for "Non-Accelerator Physics – Research in High Energy Physics: Dark Energy Research on DES"

    SciTech Connect

    Ritz, Steve; Jeltema, Tesla

    2016-12-01

    One of the greatest mysteries in modern cosmology is the fact that the expansion of the universe is observed to be accelerating. This acceleration may stem from dark energy, an additional energy component of the universe, or may indicate that the theory of general relativity is incomplete on cosmological scales. The growth rate of large-scale structure in the universe and particularly the largest collapsed structures, clusters of galaxies, is highly sensitive to the underlying cosmology. Clusters will provide one of the single most precise methods of constraining dark energy with the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES). The accuracy of the cosmological constraints derived from DES clusters necessarily depends on having an optimized and well-calibrated algorithm for selecting clusters as well as an optical richness estimator whose mean relation and scatter compared to cluster mass are precisely known. Calibrating the galaxy cluster richness-mass relation and its scatter was the focus of the funded work. Specifically, we employ X-ray observations and optical spectroscopy with the Keck telescopes of optically-selected clusters to calibrate the relationship between optical richness (the number of galaxies in a cluster) and underlying mass. This work also probes aspects of cluster selection like the accuracy of cluster centering which are critical to weak lensing cluster studies.

  15. ERTS-A data as a teaching and research tool in the Department of Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grybeck, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 prints have been used extensively in a geology of Alaska class to give a basic framework of the geology of the state. In addition, they have been intermittantly used in such diverse classes as: (1) Economic Geology (e.g. the Sn-bearing granites of the Seward Peninsula are particularly noticeable due to their wide contact metamorphic aureoles.) (2) A canned geology of Alaska lecture which has been given to two different introductory geology courses. (3) Structural Geology (e.g. the Fairweather and Denali faults are striking obvious). It was found most convenient for larger classes to prepare 35mm slides of the ERTS-1 prints that are used in conjunction with slides of the topographic and geologic maps at about the same scale. Thus the emphasis has been in integration of the ERTS-1 material into existing courses. As such, the ERTS-1 data has provided a unique and striking viewpoint that never fails to initiate favorable comment. In addition, prints have been examined by numerous researchers to develop a regional, integrated overview of such varied topics as regional geology to a background for local geologic mapping to studies of ore deposits and to the definition of a formation to be studied in detail at its type locality.

  16. Project hindsight. A Defense Department study of the utility of research.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, C W; Isenson, R S

    1967-06-23

    Recently developed weapon systems were compared with systems of similar function in use 10 to 20 years earlier. The most significant finding was that the improvement in performance or reduction in cost is largely the synergistic effect of a large number of scientific and technological innovations, of which only about 10 percent had been made at the time the earlier system was designed. The common scientific and technological base of the systems was not analyzed. Of the innovations, or Events, 9 percent were classified as science and 91 percent as technology. Ninety-five percent of all Events were funded by the defense sector. Nearly 95 percent were motivated by a recognized defense need. Only 0.3 percent came from undirected science. The results of the study do not call in question the value of undirected science on the 50-year-or-more time scale. In light of our finding that 5 to 10 years are often required before even a piece of highly applied research is "fitted in" as an effective contributing member of a large assembly of other Events, it is not surprising that "fragments" of undirected science are infrequently utilized on even a 20-year time scale. The most obvious way in which undirected science appears to enter into technology and utilization on a substantial scale seems to be in the compressed, highly organized form of a well-established, clearly expressed general theory, or in the evaluated, ordered knowledge of handbooks, textbooks, and university courses.

  17. Department of Energy Recovery Act Investment in Biomass Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided more than $36 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE) to accelerate work on existing projects, undertake new and transformative research, and deploy clean energy technologies across the nation. Of this funding, $1029 million is supporting innovative work to advance biomass research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

  18. The 3-D numerical simulation research of vacuum injector for linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dagang; Xie, Mengjun; Tang, Xinbing; Liao, Shuqing

    2017-01-01

    Simulation method for voltage in-feed and electron injection of vacuum injector is given, and verification of the simulated voltage and current is carried out. The numerical simulation for the magnetic field of solenoid is implemented, and a comparative analysis is conducted between the simulation results and experimental results. A semi-implicit difference algorithm is adopted to suppress the numerical noise, and a parallel acceleration algorithm is used for increasing the computation speed. The RMS emittance calculation method of the beam envelope equations is analyzed. In addition, the simulated results of RMS emittance are compared with the experimental data. Finally, influences of the ferromagnetic rings on the radial and axial magnetic fields of solenoid as well as the emittance of beam are studied.

  19. Research on acceleration method of reactor physics based on FPGA platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Yu, G.; Wang, K.

    2013-07-01

    The physical designs of the new concept reactors which have complex structure, various materials and neutronic energy spectrum, have greatly improved the requirements to the calculation methods and the corresponding computing hardware. Along with the widely used parallel algorithm, heterogeneous platforms architecture has been introduced into numerical computations in reactor physics. Because of the natural parallel characteristics, the CPU-FPGA architecture is often used to accelerate numerical computation. This paper studies the application and features of this kind of heterogeneous platforms used in numerical calculation of reactor physics through practical examples. After the designed neutron diffusion module based on CPU-FPGA architecture achieves a 11.2 speed up factor, it is proved to be feasible to apply this kind of heterogeneous platform into reactor physics. (authors)

  20. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  1. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory avian research program

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, K.C.; Morrison, M.L.

    1997-06-01

    As wind energy use continues to expand, concern over the possible impacts of wind farms on birds continues to be an issue. The concern includes two primary areas: the effect of avian mortality on bird populations, and possible litigation over the killing of even one bird if it is protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act or the Endangered Species Act or both. In order to address these concerns, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), working collaboratively with all stakeholders including utilities, environmental groups, consumer advocates, utility regulators, government officials, and the wind industry, has an active avian-wind power research program. DOE/NREL is conducting and sponsoring research with the expectation of developing solutions to educe or avoid avian mortality due to wind energy development throughout the US. This paper outlines the DOE/NREL approach and summarizes completed, current, and planned projects.

  2. Advanced energy design and operation technologies research: Recommendations for a US Department of Energy multiyear program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, M.R.; Crawley, D.B.; Hostetler, D.D.; Stratton, R.C.; Addision, M.S.; Deringer, J.J.; Hall, J.D.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1988-12-01

    This document describes recommendations for a multiyear plan developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project. The plan is an outgrowth of earlier planning activities conducted for DOE as part of design process research under the Building System Integration Program (BSIP). The proposed research will produce intelligent computer-based design and operation technologies for commercial buildings. In this document, the concept is explained, the need for these new computer-based environments is discussed, the benefits are described, and a plan for developing the AEDOT technologies is presented for the 9-year period beginning FY 1989. 45 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. On the Future of Media Research: No More Full Acceleration in Neutral Gear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, Gavriel

    1978-01-01

    Media research in the future is seen as focusing on the educational potentialities of the distinguishing qualities that cut across media in interaction with personal, social, and cultural qualities. Media research will also become better oriented toward understanding and generating theoretical constructs. (Author/STS)

  4. The Study of Advanced Accelerator Physics Research at UCLA Using the ATF at BNL: Vacuum Acceleration by Laser of Free Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, David B.

    2016-09-07

    An experiment was designed and data were taken to demonstrate that a tightly focused laser on vacuum can accelerate an electron beam in free space. The experiment was proof-of-principle and showed a clear effect for the laser beam off and on. The size of the effect was about 20% and was consistent over 30 laser and beam shots.

  5. Applications of Accelerators and Radiation Sources in the Field of Space Research and Industry.

    PubMed

    Campajola, Luigi; Di Capua, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Beyond their important economic role in commercial communications, satellites in general are critical infrastructure because of the services they provide. In addition to satellites providing information which facilitates a better understanding of the space environment and improved performance of physics experiments, satellite observations are also used to actively monitor weather, geological processes, agricultural development and the evolution of natural and man-made hazards. Defence agencies depend on satellite services for communication in remote locations, as well as for reconnaissance and intelligence. Both commercial and government users rely on communication satellites to provide communication in the event of a disaster that damages ground-based communication systems, provide news, education and entertainment to remote areas and connect global businesses. The space radiation environment is an hazard to most satellite missions and can lead to extremely difficult operating conditions for all of the equipment travelling in space. Here, we first provide an overview of the main components of space radiation environment, followed by a description of the basic mechanism of the interaction of radiation with matter. This is followed by an introduction to the space radiation hardness assurance problem and the main effects of natural radiation to the microelectronics (total ionizing dose, displacement damage and the single-event effect and a description of how different effects occurring in the space can be tested in on-ground experiments by using particle accelerators and radiation sources. We also discuss standards and the recommended procedures to obtain reliable results.

  6. Implementing performance improvement in New Zealand emergency departments: the six hour time target policy national research project protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In May 2009, the New Zealand government announced a new policy aimed at improving the quality of Emergency Department care and whole hospital performance. Governments have increasingly looked to time targets as a mechanism for improving hospital performance and from a whole system perspective, using the Emergency Department waiting time as a performance measure has the potential to see improvements in the wider health system. However, the imposition of targets may have significant adverse consequences. There is little empirical work examining how the performance of the wider hospital system is affected by such a target. This project aims to answer the following questions: How has the introduction of the target affected broader hospital performance over time, and what accounts for these changes? Which initiatives and strategies have been successful in moving hospitals towards the target without compromising the quality of other care processes and patient outcomes? Is there a difference in outcomes between different ethnic and age groups? Which initiatives and strategies have the greatest potential to be transferred across organisational contexts? Methods/design The study design is mixed methods; combining qualitative research into the behaviour and practices of specific case study hospitals with quantitative data on clinical outcomes and process measures of performance over the period 2006-2012. All research activity is guided by a Kaupapa Māori Research methodological approach. A dynamic systems model of acute patient flows was created to frame the study. Consequences of the target (positive and negative) will be explored by integrating analyses and insights gained from the quantitative and qualitative streams of the study. Discussion At the time of submission of this protocol, the project has been underway for 12 months. This time was necessary to finalise both the case study sites and the secondary outcomes through key stakeholder consultation. We

  7. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-02

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  8. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Baker, D.

    1993-01-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics for the U.S. Department of Energy. The DIII-D is the most flexible and best diagnosed tokamak in the world and the second largest tokamak in the U.S. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by ITER and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated in three major areas: Tokamak Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, and Advanced Tokamak Studies.

  9. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.

    1993-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by, General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics.

  10. Department of Clinical Investigation, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington. Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1993

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    Bariatric Surgery . October 92. Chandler DW, Auditory Spatial Resolution in the Acoustical Society of America, Grantham DW Horizontal Plane As a Function...250 Department of Surgery , Anesthesia Service ............................ 273 Department of Surgery , ENT Service...284 Department of Surgery , General Surgery Service ................ 289 Department of Surgery , Ophthamology Service

  11. [Human resources management in a mother and child department: a research study on new nursing and obstetric staff].

    PubMed

    Sferrazza, Silvia; Papalia, Monica; Rossi, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    To put "human resources" in the first place in a working context is an ambitious target. The basic idea is the give more value to the human and professional contribution of each individual in order to create an alliance between an organization and the people who work in it. In this context, the nursing coordinator plays a key role in inserting new staff. In this delicate phase, the expectations of new staff may or may not be fulfilled. The aim of the present study is to examine the possible difficulties that may occur during this phase. The study included 175 new staff and 175 nurses, obstetricians and pediatric nurses already at work for a total of 350. Research instruments consisted of two anonymous ad hoc questionnaires, the first issued to new staff at the Mother and Child Department, the second to staff already working in the same department. Results showed a lack of sensitivity towards new staff and a lack of dedicated procedures to help them during this delicate phase which is fundamental for their future career. Key words: newly assumed staff, work insertion, nurses.

  12. Accelerating Translational Research by Clinically Driven Development of an Informatics Platform–A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Abugessaisa, Imad; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Tsipras, Giorgos; Lindblad, Staffan; Sandin, Charlotta; Nikamo, Pernilla; Ståhle, Mona; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Tegnér, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Translational medicine is becoming increasingly dependent upon data generated from health care, clinical research, and molecular investigations. This increasing rate of production and diversity in data has brought about several challenges, including the need to integrate fragmented databases, enable secondary use of patient clinical data from health care in clinical research, and to create information systems that clinicians and biomedical researchers can readily use. Our case study effectively integrates requirements from the clinical and biomedical researcher perspectives in a translational medicine setting. Our three principal achievements are (a) a design of a user-friendly web-based system for management and integration of clinical and molecular databases, while adhering to proper de-identification and security measures; (b) providing a real-world test of the system functionalities using clinical cohorts; and (c) system integration with a clinical decision support system to demonstrate system interoperability. We engaged two active clinical cohorts, 747 psoriasis patients and 2001 rheumatoid arthritis patients, to demonstrate efficient query possibilities across the data sources, enable cohort stratification, extract variation in antibody patterns, study biomarker predictors of treatment response in RA patients, and to explore metabolic profiles of psoriasis patients. Finally, we demonstrated system interoperability by enabling integration with an established clinical decision support system in health care. To assure the usefulness and usability of the system, we followed two approaches. First, we created a graphical user interface supporting all user interactions. Secondly we carried out a system performance evaluation study where we measured the average response time in seconds for active users, http errors, and kilobits per second received and sent. The maximum response time was found to be 0.12 seconds; no server or client errors of any kind were detected

  13. Impact of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on academic radiology departments' clinical, research, and education missions.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, Bahar; Vidal, Lorenna L; Applegate, Kimberly; Rawson, James V; Novak, Ronald D; Ros, Pablo R

    2013-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) generated significant media attention since its inception. When the law was approved in 2010, the U.S. health care system began facing multiple changes to adapt and to incorporate measures to meet the new requirements. These mandatory changes will be challenging for academic radiology departments (ARDs) since they will need to promote a shift from a volume-focused to a value-focused practice. This will affect all components of the mission of ARDs, including clinical practice, education, and research. A unique key element to success in this transition is to focus on both quality and safety, thus improving the value of radiology in the post-ACA era. Given the changes ARDs will face during the implementation of ACA, suggestions are provided on how to adapt ARDs to this new environment.

  14. Development of a cryogenic load frame for the neutron diffractometer at Takumi in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinzhe; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Harjo, Stefanus; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Umeno, Takahiro; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Sugano, Michinaka; Aizawa, Kazuya; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki

    2013-06-01

    To prepare for projects such as the Large Hadron Collider upgrade, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and Demonstration reactor, it is important to form a clear understanding of stress-strain properties of the materials that make up superconducting magnets. Thus, we have been studying the mechanical properties of superconducting wires using neutron diffraction measurements. To simulate operational conditions such as temperature, stress, and strain, we developed a cryogenic load frame for stress-strain measurements of materials using a neutron diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) Takumi beam line. The maximum load that can be applied to a sample using an external driving machine is 50 kN. Using a Gifford-MacMahon cryocooler, samples can be measured down to temperatures below 10 K when loaded. In the present paper, we describe the details of the cryogenic load frame with its test results by using type-304 stainless steel wire.

  15. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  16. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  17. U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Mahantango Creek Watershed, Pennsylvania, United States: long-term stream discharge database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A long-term streamflow discharge database has been developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit (PSWMRU) to support intensive hydrologic and water quality research within WE-38, a 7.3 km**2 experimental watersh...

  18. U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Mahantango Creek Watershed, Pennsylvania, United States: long-term water quality database

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit (PSWMRU) has developed a long-term water quality database to support water quality research within the 7.3 km**2 WE-38 experimental watershed in east-central Pennsyl...

  19. Journal of Rehabilitation of the Deaf: Deafness; Research and Professional Training Programs on Deafness Sponsored by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Edna P., Ed.

    Research and professional training programs on deafness sponsored by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare are introduced and detailed in chart form. The programs are listed according to the Department agencies responsible, including the following divisions of the Social and Rehabilitation Service: the Rehabilitation Services…

  20. How efficient is translational research in radiation oncology? The example of a large Dutch academic radiation oncology department

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Liesbeth; Merode, Frits V; Dekker, Andre; Verhaegen, Frank; Linden, Luc; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficiency of research implementation in a large radiotherapy institute, in either an internal review board-approved clinical trial or clinical routine. Methods: Scientific publications of the institute were listed. We asked clinicians from tumour expert groups whether the study had been implemented yet in a clinical trial or in clinical practice and which facilitators or barriers were relevant. An independent investigator verified all results. We calculated the implementation rates and the frequency of mentioned facilitators and barriers. Results: Resident researchers had published 234 studies over the past 4 years. Overall, 70/234 (30%) technical or preclinical studies were tested or implemented in a clinical environment in either trials or routine. In total, 45/234 (19%) studies were routinely implemented; in the 61 clinical studies, this percentage was higher: 38% (23/61). The main facilitator was the level of evidence and the main barriers were workload and high complexity. Conclusion: We were able to calculate the implementation ratio of published research into clinical practice and set benchmark figures for other radiotherapy clinics. Level of evidence was an important facilitator, while workload and high complexity of the new procedures were important barriers for implementation. Recent articles suggest that academic entrepreneurship will facilitate this process further. Advances in knowledge: This study is the first of its kind calculating implementation rates of published studies in the clinical environment and can contribute to the efficiency of translational research in radiotherapy. We propose to use this metric as a quality indicator to evaluate academic departments. PMID:27347636

  1. Harnessing person-generated health data to accelerate patient-centered outcomes research: the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America PCORnet Patient Powered Research Network (CCFA Partners).

    PubMed

    Chung, Arlene E; Sandler, Robert S; Long, Millie D; Ahrens, Sean; Burris, Jessica L; Martin, Christopher F; Anton, Kristen; Robb, Amber; Caruso, Thomas P; Jaeger, Elizabeth L; Chen, Wenli; Clark, Marshall; Myers, Kelly; Dobes, Angela; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners Patient-Powered Research Network (PPRN) seeks to advance and accelerate comparative effectiveness and translational research in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Our IBD-focused PCORnet PPRN has been designed to overcome the major obstacles that have limited patient-centered outcomes research in IBD by providing the technical infrastructure, patient governance, and patient-driven functionality needed to: 1) identify, prioritize, and undertake a patient-centered research agenda through sharing person-generated health data; 2) develop and test patient and provider-focused tools that utilize individual patient data to improve health behaviors and inform health care decisions and, ultimately, outcomes; and 3) rapidly disseminate new knowledge to patients, enabling them to improve their health. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Partners PPRN has fostered the development of a community of citizen scientists in IBD; created a portal that will recruit, retain, and engage members and encourage partnerships with external scientists; and produced an efficient infrastructure for identifying, screening, and contacting network members for participation in research.

  2. Patient-derived xenografts: A platform for accelerating translational research in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Davies, Alastair H; Wang, Yuzhuo; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2017-03-15

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in the development and characterization of patient-derived tumour xenograft (PDX) models. Numerous PDX models have been established for prostate cancer and, importantly, retain the principal molecular, genetic, and histological characteristics of the donor tumour. As such, these models provide significant improvements over standard cell line xenograft models for biological studies, preclinical drug development, and personalized medicine strategies. This review summarizes the current state of the art in this field, illustrating the opportunities and limitations of PDX models in translational prostate cancer research.

  3. Humanized mouse as an appropriate model for accelerated global HIV research and vaccine development: current trend.

    PubMed

    Ibeh, Bartholomew Okechukwu; Furuta, Yasuhide; Habu, Josiah Bitrus; Ogbadu, Lucy

    2016-09-23

    Humanized mouse models currently have seen improved development and have received wide applications. Its usefulness is observed in cell and tissue transplant involving basic and applied human disease research. In this article, the development of a new generation of humanized mice was discussed as well as their relevant application in HIV disease. Furthermore, current techniques employed to overcome the initial limitations of mouse model were reviewed. Highly immunodeficient mice which support cell and tissue differentiation and do not reject xenografts are indispensable for generating additional appropriate models useful in disease study, this phenomenom deserves emphases, scientific highlight and a definitive research focus. Since the early 2000s, a series of immunodeficient mice appropriate for generating humanized mice has been successively developed by introducing the IL-2Rγ(null) gene (e.g. NOD/SCID/γc(null) and Rag2(null)γc(null) mice) through various genomic approaches. These mice were generated by genetically introducing human cytokine genes into NOD/SCID/γc(null) and Rag2(null)γc(null) mouse backgrounds. The application of these techniques serves as a quick and appropriate mechanistic model for basic and therapeutic investigations of known and emerging infections.

  4. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The DIII-D research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is aimed at developing the knowledge base for an economically and environmentally attractive energy source for the nation and the world. The DIII-D program mission is to advance fusion energy science understanding and predictive capability and improve the tokamak concept. The DIII-D scientific objectives are: (1) Advance understanding of fusion plasma physics and contribute to the physics base of ITER through extensive experiment and theory iteration in the following areas of fusion science - Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability - Plasma turbulence and transport - Wave-particle interactions - Boundary physics plasma neutral interaction (2) Utilize scientific understanding in an integrated manner to show the tokamak potential to be - More compact by increasing plasma stability and confinement to increase the fusion power density ({Beta}{tau}) - Steady-state through disruption control, handling of divertor heat and particle loads and current drive (3) Acquire understanding and experience with environmentally attractive low activation material in an operating tokamak. This report contains the research conducted over the past year in search of these scientific objectives.

  5. Laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  6. Enabling department-scale supercomputing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.S.; Hart, W.E.; Phillips, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories have one of the longest and most consistent histories of supercomputer use. The authors summarize the architecture of DOE`s new supercomputers that are being built for the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The authors then argue that in the near future scaled-down versions of these supercomputers with petaflop-per-weekend capabilities could become widely available to hundreds of research and engineering departments. The availability of such computational resources will allow simulation of physical phenomena to become a full-fledged third branch of scientific exploration, along with theory and experimentation. They describe the ASCI and other supercomputer applications at Sandia National Laboratories, and discuss which lessons learned from Sandia`s long history of supercomputing can be applied in this new setting.

  7. DIII-D Research Operations annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.

    1995-07-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is managed by General Atomics (GA) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Major program participants include GA, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the University of California together with several other national laboratories and universities. The DIII-D is a moderate sized tokamak with great flexibility and extremely capable subsystems. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data for development of a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive fusion power plant. In so doing, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R&D output to aid the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Princeton Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) projects. Specific DIII-D objectives include the achievement of steady-state plasma current as well as the demonstration of techniques for radio frequency heating, divertor heat removal, particle exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion in plasmas with high beta and with high confinement. The long-range plan is organized with two principal elements, the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two elements have a common goal: an improved demonstration reactor (DEMO) with lower cost and smaller size than present DEMO concepts. In order to prepare for this long-range development, in FY94 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak studies, and Tokamak Physics.

  8. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center: A Collaborative Model for Accelerating Research into Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Dodge, J.; Bradshaw, T.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama was created to accelerate the infusion of NASA earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The principal focus of experimental products is on the regional scale with an emphasis on forecast improvements on a time scale of 0-24 hours. The SPoRT Center research is aligned with the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues ranging from convective initiation to 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The SPoRT Center, together with its other interagency partners, universities, and the NASA/NOAA Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, provides a means and a process to effectively transition NASA Earth Science Enterprise observations and technology to National Weather Service operations and decision makers at both the global/national and regional scales. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future.

  9. Microwave and accelerator research. Final report on Grant DE-FG02-92ER40731

    SciTech Connect

    Nation, John A.

    2002-09-01

    This report summarizes the main technical objectives and accomplishments during the life of the grant, and concludes with data on publications describing the research. The main activity was the development of very high power microwave sources, initially in X-band, and recent initial work on a Ka band TWT amplifier. There was additional activity on ferroelectric emitters. Highlights include the following: (1) The development of a relatively broad band microwave source yielding approx. 75 MW power at a power efficiency of 54% and an energy conversion efficiency of 43%. (2) The development of a ferroelectric cathode electron gun which yielded a beam current of up to 350 A at 500 kV. The device was shown to operate satisfactorily at a low repetition rate, limited by the available power supplies. The final beam power obtained exceeds that achieved elsewhere by several orders of magnitude. The gun development achieved was shown to give an electron beam suitable for high power X-band microwave sources with the demonstration of a 5-MW tunable X-band TWT single-stage amplifier. (3) Work was initiated on a Ka-Band TWT amplifier. Gains of over 30 dB were achieved at peak output powers of about 4 MW. Appendices include two submitted papers: Symmetric and asymmetric mode interaction in high-power traveling wave amplifiers: experiments and theory and High power microwave generation using a ferroelectric cathode electron gun.

  10. [The experience of implementation of system of quality management in the Department of Laboratory Diagnostic of the N.V. Sklifosofskiy Research Institute of Emergency Care of Moscow Health Department: a lecture].

    PubMed

    Zenina, L P; Godkov, M A

    2013-08-01

    The article presents the experience of implementation of system of quality management into the practice of multi-field laboratory of emergency medical care hospital. The analysis of laboratory errors is applied and the modes of their prevention are demonstrated. The ratings of department of laboratory diagnostic of the N. V. Sklifosofskiy research institute of emergency care in the program EQAS (USA) Monthly Clinical Chemistry from 2007 are presented. The implementation of the system of quality management of laboratory analysis into department of laboratory diagnostic made it possible to support physicians of clinical departments with reliable information. The confidence of clinicians to received results increased. The effectiveness of laboratory diagnostic increased due to lowering costs of analysis without negative impact to quality of curative process.

  11. Lab-Corps: Creating Market Pathways for Laboratory Research; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    The Lab-Corps program is a specialized training curriculum aimed at accelerating the transfer of clean energy technologies from national laboratories into the commercial marketplace. Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Lab-Corps is a new model of engagement as a part of the Lab Impact Initiative. In addition to Lab-Corps, the Lab Impact Initiative utilizes the Small Business Voucher and Technologist-in-Residence programs to increase and enhance laboratory-private sector relationships, streamline access to national laboratory capabilities, and demonstrate the value of laboratory-developed science and technology.

  12. U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-Monitoring and Research Program and Integrated Crop Modeling Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, W.; Davis, J. M.; Liang, X.; Schmoldt, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Agriculture's UV Monitoring and Research Program (USDA-UVMRP) has monitored surface solar irradiance in the UV and visible regions of the spectrum for over a decade. Measurements of spectral irradiance have been made at 34 sites in the US as well as one site in New Zealand and two in Canada. These measurements are complemented by readings of the erythemally weighted irradiance and Photosynthetically Active Radiation. The purpose of the network is to supply datan used to assess the risk to agriculture of variations in incident solar radiation. A robust climatology of these data has been constructed, and it serves a multitude of requests from the agricultural, medical and industrial communities. The USDA- UVMRP at Colorado State University is also the home of the Center of Remote Sensing and Modeling for Agricultural Sustainability (CRSMAS). The purpose of CRSMAS is twofold: first, to evaluate response of plants, forests, ecosystems, and animals to UV-B and other climate stress factors; and second, to develop an Integrated Agricultural Impact Assessment System. The Integrated Agricultural Impact Assessment System couples a state-of-the-art mesoscale region Climate-Weather Research and Forecasting model (CWRF) with the most comprehensive crop growth models to study climate-crop interactions. The data from the USDA- UVMRP network is used in conjunction with data assimilated from various satellite platforms as input into the CWRF model. A overview of the UVMRP network, its instrumentation and climatological results will be presented as well as an example of the application of the Integrated Impact Assessment System to a study of the response of cotton yields to climate stresses during the 1979-2005 period.

  13. "HTLV-I Infection" Twenty-Year Research in Neurology Department of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Shoeibi, Ali; Etemadi, Mohammdmahdi; Moghaddam Ahmadi, Amir; Amini, Mona; Boostani, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL) and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL) disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM) in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP) in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment) of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years.

  14. Funding priorities in animal reproduction at the United States Department of Agriculture's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.

    PubMed

    Mirando, Mark A; Hamernik, Debora L

    2006-03-01

    The National Research Initiative (NRI) Competitive Grants Program is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's major competitive grants program and is administered by the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES). Since its inception in 1991, the NRI has funded competitive grants in the discipline of animal reproduction. Previously, this program provided funding for a broad range of projects encompassing almost every subdiscipline in reproductive biology of farm animals, including aquatic species important to the aquaculture industry. During fiscal year 2004, the NRI Animal Reproduction Program narrowed the focus of funding priorities to the topics of infertility, basic mechanisms regulating fertility, cryopreservation of gametes, reducing the postpartum interval to conception, and sterilization methods or development of monosex populations. In response to a directive to further narrow the focus of funding priorities for fiscal year 2005 and beyond, CSREES conducted a Stakeholder Workshop on Funding Priorities in Animal Reproduction at the 37th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Reproduction in Vancouver, Canada. More than 75 stakeholder scientists from a cross section of federal, public, and private institutions from across the United States participated in the workshop and provided recommendations to CSREES for future NRI-funding priorities in Animal Reproduction. The recommendations provided by stakeholders included continuing efforts to focus funding priorities into fewer high-impact areas relevant to animal agriculture and aquaculture. Recommendations also included movement back toward subdisciplines of animal reproduction that cut across all applicable species. The three funding priorities that consistently emerged as recommendations from the workshop participants were 1) gonadal function and production of gametes, 2) pituitary-hypothalamic function, and 3) embryo and conceptus development, including interaction between the

  15. Clinical care of persons with dementia in the emergency department: a review of the literature and agenda for research.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Carolyn K; Chu, Thasha A; Yang, Zhou; Hepburn, Kenneth W

    2012-09-01

    The segment of older adults who present to the emergency department (ED) with cognitive impairment ranges from 21% to 40%. Difficulties inherent in the chaotic ED setting combined with dementia may result in a number of unwanted clinical outcomes, but strategies to minimize these outcomes are lacking. A review of the literature was conducted to examine the practices undertaken in the care of persons with dementia (PWD) specific to the ED setting. PubMed and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for published articles specific to the care of PWD provided in the ED. All English-language articles were reviewed; editorials and reflective journals were excluded. Seven articles ultimately met inclusion criteria; all provided Level 7 evidence: narrative review or opinions from authorities. The articles recommended clinical practices that can be categorized into five themes: assessment of cognitive impairment, dementia communication strategies, avoidance of adverse events, alterations to the physical environment, and education of ED staff. Many recommendations are extrapolated from residential care settings. Review results indicate that there is minimal guidance for the care of PWD specific to the ED setting. There are no empirical studies of the care (assessment, interventions) of PWD in the ED. The existing (Level 7) recommendations lack a research base to support their effectiveness or adoption as evidence-based practice. There is a significant opportunity for research to identify and test ways to meet the needs of PWD in the ED to ensure a safe visit, accurate diagnosis, and prudent transfer to the most appropriate level of care.

  16. “HTLV-I Infection” Twenty-Year Research in Neurology Department of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Shoeibi, Ali; Etemadi, Mohammdmahdi; Moghaddam Ahmadi, Amir; Amini, Mona; Boostani, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL) and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL) disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM) in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP) in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment) of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years. PMID:24470862

  17. The Impact of International Trade and Investment on Employment. A Conference on the Department of Labor Research Results (Washington, D.C., December 2-3, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, William G., Ed.; And Others

    Taken from a December 1976, conference sponsored by the Bureau of International Labor Affairs, these proceedings present research reports on the impact of international trade and investment on U.S. employment. The research, produced or in some instances contracted and monitored by the Department of Labor, is intended to be of use to economists and…

  18. Research and Teaching Cultures in Two Contrasting UK Policy Contexts: Academic Life in Education Departments in Five English and Scottish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deem, Rosemary; Lucas, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    The paper explores academic staff and departmental research and teaching cultures in the Education Departments of five universities in Scotland and England, countries with increasingly diverging public policies in respect of education. The relationship between research and teaching, how the purposes of universities are defined and the status of…

  19. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  20. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  1. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  2. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  3. 7 CFR 1206.5 - Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.5 Department. Department...

  4. Mathematics and science acceleration in grade eight: School leaders' perceptions and satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Kenneth

    Shifts in attitudes regarding academic program accessibility to provide the most rigorous academic opportunities to all students will not occur smoothly without departmental level leaders who believe in the potential benefits of accelerating larger numbers of students. Without the support and the belief of the department level leadership, practices such as open enrollment and universal acceleration that target school equity will be doomed to failure. This study was conducted using a questionnaire developed by the researcher called the Perceptions of Acceleration and Leadership Survey. The survey was distributed to all math and science department leaders within a suburban region of New York. The survey sought to determine how the perceptions of acceleration, job satisfaction, self-efficacy, and role longevity for the department level leaders are impacted by their personal demographics, professional characteristics, and community characteristics. The study did not reveal any statistically significant differences among department level leaders' personal, professional, and community characteristics with respect to perceptions of acceleration. There were significant differences for job satisfaction, self-efficacy, and role longevity for several intervening and independent variables within the study. Statistically significant correlations were found between beliefs in college preparation and perceptions of acceleration as well as relationships with the community and perceptions of acceleration. The results indicate the importance of hiring department leaders who recognize the potential for accelerating more students, hiring more ethnically diverse candidates for these leadership positions, affording department level leaders with significant professional development, and evaluation of administrative structures to maximize student success.

  5. Organ retention and communication of research use following medico-legal autopsy: a pilot survey of university forensic medicine departments in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura-Ito, Takako; Inoue, Yusuke; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the circumstances and problems that departments of forensic medicine encounter with bereaved families regarding samples obtained from medico-legal autopsies. A questionnaire was posted to all 76 departments of forensic medicine performing medico-legal autopsies in Japan, and responses were received from 48 (63.2%). Of the respondents, 12.8% had approached and communicated with bereaved families about collecting samples from the deceased person during an autopsy and the storage of the samples. In addition, 23.4% of these had informed families that samples might be used in research. Eighteen departments had received enquiries and requests from families about the samples, with most requests concerning their return. The response to such requests varied according to the department. Few departments interacted with the bereaved families regarding the procedure for obtaining autopsy samples, and their methods for handling family concerns differed depending on the person within the department authorised to contact the family. Moreover, the procedures for engaging in such communication have long been unclear, and no legal or ethical consensus or agreement with the general public has been established. It is important for researchers to further discuss the correct way for forensic medicine departments to communicate with bereaved families.

  6. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  7. Accelerators for heavy ion inertial fusion: Progress and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.; Friedman, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion Program is the principal part of the Inertial Fusion Energy Program in the Office of Fusion Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy. The emphasis of the Heavy Ion Program is the development of accelerators for fusion power production. Target physics research and some elements of fusion chamber development are supported in the much larger Inertial Confinement Fusion Program, a dual purpose (defense and energy) program in the Defense Programs part of the Department of Energy. The accelerator research program will establish feasibility through a sequence of scaled experiments that will demonstrate key physics and engineering issues at low cost compared to other fusion programs. This paper discusses progress in the accelerator program and outlines how the planned research will address the key economic issues of inertial fusion energy.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of acquisition of scientific research at Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Department awards grants and cooperative agreements and contracts to sponsor scientific research at colleges and universities. Compared to cooperative agreements, contracts, particularly management and operating contracts, often impose duplicative and/or unnecessary administrative and compliance burdens on a college or university. Since the Department bears the cost of those additional burdens, the authors audited the cost effectiveness of the Department`s sponsorship of research at Ames Laboratory under a management and operating contract with Iowa State University. The research conducted at Ames is of the type that Congress intended to be sponsored by assistance agreements, rather than contracts. Moreover, they found the contract for managing and operating Ames Laboratory caused micromanagement and unnecessary costs, most of which could have been avoided with a cooperative agreement. However, after completion of the field work, the Department announced initiatives to reduce or eliminate some compliance and oversight burdens associated with management and operating contracts, but did not opt to sponsor research under cooperative agreements. The authors are unable to determine the monetary impact because the initiatives have not been implemented. Nevertheless, they continue to believe that cooperative agreements, having fewer unique bureaucratic requirements, offer the potential for reducing administrative overhead.

  9. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  10. A systematic review of crisis interventions used in the emergency department: recommendations for pediatric care and research

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Michele P.; Osmond, Martin; Curran, Janet; Scott, Shannon; Ali, Samina; Hartling, Lisa; Gokiert, Rebecca; Cappelli, Mario; Hnatko, Gary; Newton, Amanda S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this systematic review we evaluated the effectiveness of emergency department (ED)-based management interventions for mental health presentations with an aim to provide recommendations for pediatric care. Methods A search of electronic databases, references, key journals and conference proceedings was conducted and primary authors contacted. Experimental and observational studies that evaluated ED crisis care with pediatric and adult patients were included. Adult-based studies were evaluated for potential translation to pediatric investigation. Pharmacological-based studies were excluded. Inclusion screening, study selection, and methodological quality were assessed by two independent reviewers. One reviewer extracted the data and a second checked for completeness and accuracy. Presentation of study outcomes included odds ratios (OR) and mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-analysis was deferred due to clinical heterogeneity in intervention, patient population, and outcome. Results Twelve observational studies were included in the review with pediatric (n=3), and adult or unknown (n=9) aged participants. Pediatric studies supported the use of specialized care models to reduce hospitalization (OR=0.45; 95%CI:0.33,0.60), return ED visits (OR=0.60, 95%CI:0.28,1.25), and length of ED stay (MD=−43.1min; 95%CI:−63.088,−23.11). In an adult study, reduced hospitalization was reported in a comparison of a crisis intervention team to standard care (OR=0.59; 95%CI:0.43,0.82). Five adult-based studies assessed triage scales; however, little overlap in the scales investigated and the outcomes measured limited comparability and generalizability for pediatrics. In a comparison of a mental health scale to a national standard, one study demonstrated reduced ED wait (MD=−7.7 min; 95%CI:−12.82,−2.58) and transit (MD=−17.5 min; 95%CI:−33.00,−1.20) times. Several studies reported a shift in triage scores of psychiatric patients

  11. Disruptive Influences on Research in Academic Pathology Departments: Proposed Changes to the Common Rule Governing Informed Consent for Research Use of Biospecimens and to Rules Governing Return of Research Results.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Mark E; Dreyfus, Jennifer C

    2017-01-01

    Academic pathology departments will be dramatically affected by proposed United States federal government regulatory initiatives. Pathology research will be substantially altered if proposed changes to the Common Rule (Code of Federal Regulations: Protection of Human Subjects title 45 CFR 46) and regulations governing the return of individual research results are approved and finalized, even more so now that the Precision Medicine initiative has been launched. Together, these changes are disruptive influences on academic pathology research as we know it, straining limited resources and compromising advances in diagnostic and academic pathology. Academic research pathologists will be challenged over the coming years and must demonstrate leadership to ensure the continued availability of and the ethical use of research pathology specimens.

  12. A report on the Academic Emergency Medicine 2015 consensus conference "Diagnostic imaging in the emergency department: a research agenda to optimize utilization".

    PubMed

    Gunn, Martin L; Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M; Chong, Suzanne T; Froemming, Adam T; Johnson, Jamlik O; Kumaravel, Manickam; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2016-08-01

    In May 2015, the Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic imaging in the emergency department: a research agenda to optimize utilization" was held. The goal of the conference was to develop a high-priority research agenda regarding emergency diagnostic imaging on which to base future research. In addition to representatives from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine, the multidisciplinary conference included members of several radiology organizations: American Society for Emergency Radiology, Radiological Society of North America, the American College of Radiology, and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The specific aims of the conference were to (1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging utilization and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; (2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and (3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Through a multistep consensus process, participants developed targeted research questions for future research in six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use.

  13. 45 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... IRB in light of the anticipated scope of the institution's research activities and the types of... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted...

  14. Strong Geoscience Departments in Research-Intensive Universities: How do you Know you are One and how Much Planning is Needed to Stay One?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; Beck, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    How do you know your geoscience department is strong? Can it stay that way without conscious planning, relying instead primarily upon day-to-day decisions? The University of Arizona is a member of the American Association of Universities (AAU), a self-selected group of 63 of the most research-intensive public and private institutions in the United States. We will present results of a concentrated look at our own department from both the perspective of the department head (SLB) and a newly reunited member of the department (RMR), returning from an extended stint in administration. In addition, we will present the results of a survey of selected geoscience departments at other AAU institutions. The survey will include demographic data on these departments in terms of numbers of faculty and students, and grant dollars if available, as well as what department heads see as the largest threats and opportunities for their departments in the next five years. We will also seek information on departmental efforts to recruit and retain both faculty and students, and efforts to integrate/balance research and education within the department and the institution. Finally, we will ask departments the extent to which they rely upon, or value, departmental planning efforts. As a beginning, the Department of Geosciences at the University currently has 27 tenure/tenure eligible faculty, 84 graduate students, and 68 undergraduate majors. Approximate annual grant dollars are on the order of \\$4M. The department head (SLB) feels that faculty retention and lack of space are among the largest threats to the department. Faculty retention is critical in an environment where funding is chronically short, and budget cuts have been significant over the last two years. Retention efforts typically involve collaborative efforts with the dean and/or provost. Among the opportunities for the department are the ability to extend and diversify funding within and beyond the NSF, typically multi- and

  15. Biotechnology: The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Biotechnology Research Efforts. Briefing Report. To the Chairman, Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Information pertaining to biotechnology research that was funded in whole or in part by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is presented in this report. Findings obtained from state agricultural experimental stations and colleges of veterinary medicine are discussed in 11 appendices. These include: (1) information on USDA's biotechnology…

  16. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-2 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Department of Labor for purposes of research and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Department of Labor for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Internal... PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Information and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Disclosure of... rule. Pursuant to the provisions of section 6103(l)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code and subject to...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-2 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Department of Labor for purposes of research and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Department of Labor for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Internal... PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Information and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Disclosure of... rule. Pursuant to the provisions of section 6103(l)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code and subject to...

  18. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-2 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Department of Labor for purposes of research and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Department of Labor for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Internal... PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Information and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Disclosure of... rule. Pursuant to the provisions of section 6103(l)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code and subject to...

  19. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-2 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Department of Labor for purposes of research and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Department of Labor for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Internal... PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Information and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Disclosure of... rule. Pursuant to the provisions of section 6103(l)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code and subject to...

  20. 26 CFR 301.6103(l)(2)-2 - Disclosure of returns and return information to Department of Labor for purposes of research and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Department of Labor for purposes of research and studies. 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Section 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Internal... PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Information and Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(l)(2)-2 Disclosure of... rule. Pursuant to the provisions of section 6103(l)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code and subject to...