Science.gov

Sample records for accelerator structure development

  1. Accelerator structure development for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Hoag, H.A.; Deruyter, H.; Pearson, C.; Ruth, R.D.; Wang, J.W.; Schaefer, J.

    1993-04-01

    In the program of work directed towards the development of an X-Band Next Linear Collider accelerator structure, two different test accelerator sections have been completed, and a third is being fabricated. The first is a simple 30-cell constant-impedance section in which no special attention was given to surface finish, pumping, and alignment. The second is an 86-cell section in which the cells were precision diamond-turned by Texas Instruments Inc. The structure has internal water-cooling and vacuum pumping manifolds. Some design details are given for the third section, which is a 206-cell structure with cavities dimensioned to give a Gaussian distribution of dipole mode frequencies. It has conventional-machining surface finishes and external water and pumping manifolds. Component design, fabrication, and assembly brazing are described for the first two experimental sections.

  2. High charge short electron bunches for wakefield accelerator structures development.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.

    1998-09-25

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator group develops accelerating structures based on dielectric loaded waveguides. We use high charge short electron bunches to excite wakefields in dielectric loaded structures, and a second (low charge) beam to probe the wakefields left behind by the drive beam. We report measurements of beam parameters and also initial results of the dielectric loaded accelerating structures. We have studied acceleration of the probe beam in these structures and we have also made measurements on the RF pulses that are generated by the drive beam. Single drive bunches, as well as multiple bunches separated by an integer number of RF periods have been used to generate the accelerating wakefields.

  3. Development of X-Band Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2010-11-04

    This paper presents a progress report on the development and testing of X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures. Recent tests on several quartz DLA structures with different inner diameters are reported. Designs for gap-free DLA structures are presented. Also, planned new experiments are discussed, including higher gradient traveling-wave and standing-wave structures and special grooved structures for multipactor suppression.

  4. Research and Development for Ultra-High Gradient Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    Research on the basic physics of high-gradient, high frequency accelerator structures and the associated RF/microwave technology are essential for the future of discovery science, medicine and biology, energy and environment, and national security. We will review the state-of-the-art for the development of high gradient linear accelerators. We will present the research activities aimed at exploring the basic physics phenomenon of RF breakdown. We present the experimental results of a true systematic study in which the surface processing, geometry, and materials of the structures have been varied, one parameter at a time. The breakdown rate or alternatively, the probability of breakdown/pulse/meter has been recorded for different operating parameters. These statistical data reveal a strong dependence of breakdown probability on surface magnetic field, or alternatively on surface pulsed heating. This is in contrast to the classical view of electric field dependence.

  5. Development of Dielectric-Based High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J.; Liu, W.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.; Kanareykin, A.; Kazakov, S.

    2006-11-27

    High gradient accelerating structures using dielectric-lined circular waveguides have been developed for a number of years at Argonne National Laboratory. In this article, we first report the experimental results of high power rf testing on the quartz based Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure carried out on Feb. 2006 at the Naval Research Laboratory. The motivation for this experiment is to test the multipactor effect on different materials under high power and high vacuum condition. Up to 12 MW pulsed rf went through the tube without breakdown. Multipactor appeared during the experiment but with different features compared to other materials like alumina. Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) measurements were introduced into the experiment for the first time to observe the light emission time and intensity. In the second part of this paper, ways to achieve higher gradient for DLA structures are proposed: 1) smaller ID and longitudinal gap free DLA structures to reduce multipactor and obtain higher gradient; 2) new coaxial type coupler to avoid dielectric gap and improve impedance matching; 3) double layered DLA structure to reduce rf loss and enhance shunt impedance as well.

  6. Development of a dual layered dielectric-loaded accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Liu, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.; Nenasheva, E.; Schoessow, P.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs, LLC; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; KEK

    2008-09-01

    Due to the high magnetic field-induced surface currents on its conducting sleeve, a conventional single layer Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure exhibits a relatively high RF loss. One possible way to solve this problem is to use multilayered DLA structures. In these devices, the RF power attenuation is reduced by making use of the Bragg Fiber concept: the EM fields are well confined by multiple reflections from multiple dielectric layers. This paper presents the design of an X-band dual layer DLA structure as well as the results of bench tests of the device. We will also present results on the design, numerical modeling, and fabrication of structures for coupling RF into multilayer DLAs such as a novel TM{sub 03} mode launcher and a TM{sub 01}-TM{sub 03} mode converter using dielectric-loaded corrugated waveguide.

  7. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  8. Latest Development in Superconducting RF Structures for beta=1 Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel

    2006-06-26

    Superconducting RF technology is since nearly a decade routinely applied to different kinds of accelerating devices: linear accelerators, storage rings, synchrotron light sources and FEL's. With the technology recommendation for the International Linear Collider (ILC) a year ago, new emphasis has been placed on improving the performance of accelerating cavities both in Q-value and in accelerating gradients with the goal to achieve performance levels close to the fundamental limits given by the material parameters of the choice material, niobium. This paper will summarize the challenges to SRF technology and will review the latest developments in superconducting structure design. Additionally, it will give an overview of the newest results and will report on the developments in alternative materials and technologies.

  9. Update on the development of externally powered dielectric-loaded accelerating structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Kanareykin, A.; Gold, S.; Kinkead, A. K.; High Energy Physics; EuclidTechlabs,; Naval Research Lab.; Icarus Research

    2009-01-01

    We report on recent progress in a program to develop an RF-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure, capable of supporting high gradient acceleration. Previous high power tests revealed that the earlier DLA structures suffered from multipactor and arcing at the dielectric joint. A few new DLA structures have been designed to alleviate this limitation including the coaxial coupler based DLA structure and the clamped DLA structure. These structures were recently fabricated and high power tested at the NRL X-band Magnicon facility. Results show the multipactor can be reduced by the TiN coating on the dielectric surface. Gradient of 15 MV/m has also been tested without dielectric breakdown in the test of the clamped DLA structure. Detailed results are reported, and future plans discussed.

  10. Update on the Development of Externally Powered Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A. K.

    2009-01-22

    We report on recent progress in a program to develop an RF-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure, capable of supporting high gradient acceleration. Previous high power tests revealed that the earlier DLA structures suffered from multipactor and arcing at the dielectric joint. A few new DLA structures have been designed to alleviate this limitation including the coaxial coupler based DLA structure and the clamped DLA structure. These structures were recently fabricated and high power tested at the NRL X-band Magnicon facility. Results show the multipactor can be reduced by the TiN coating on the dielectric surface. Gradient of 15 MV/m has also been tested without dielectric breakdown in the test of the clamped DLA structure. Detailed results are reported, and future plans discussed.

  11. Advanced accelerator theory development

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Houck, T.L.; Poole, B.; Tishchenko, N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wang, I.

    1998-02-09

    A new accelerator technology, the dielectric wall accelerator (DWA), is potentially an ultra compact accelerator/pulsed power driver. This new accelerator relies on three new components: the ultra-high gradient insulator, the asymmetric Blumlein and low jitter switches. In this report, we focused our attention on the first two components of the DWA system the insulators and the asymmetric Blumlein. First, we sought to develop the necessary design tools to model and scale the behavior of the high gradient insulator. To perform this task we concentrated on modeling the discharge processes (i.e., initiation and creation of the surface discharge). In addition, because these high gradient structures exhibit favorable microwave properties in certain accelerator configurations, we performed experiments and calculations to determine the relevant electromagnetic properties. Second, we performed circuit modeling to understand energy coupling to dynamic loads by the asymmetric Blumlein. Further, we have experimentally observed a non-linear coupling effect in certain asymmetric Blumlein configurations. That is, as these structures are stacked into a complete module, the output voltage does not sum linearly and a lower than expected output voltage results. Although we solved this effect experimentally, we performed calculations to understand this effect more fully to allow better optimization of this DWA pulse-forming line system.

  12. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  13. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  14. Dielectric assist accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, D.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    A higher-order TM02 n mode accelerating structure is proposed based on a novel concept of dielectric loaded rf cavities. This accelerating structure consists of ultralow-loss dielectric cylinders and disks with irises which are periodically arranged in a metallic enclosure. Unlike conventional dielectric loaded accelerating structures, most of the rf power is stored in the vacuum space near the beam axis, leading to a significant reduction of the wall loss, much lower than that of conventional normal-conducting linac structures. This allows us to realize an extremely high quality factor and a very high shunt impedance at room temperature. A simulation of a 5 cell prototype design with an existing alumina ceramic indicates an unloaded quality factor of the accelerating mode over 120 000 and a shunt impedance exceeding 650 M Ω /m at room temperature.

  15. Development of an S-band accelerating structure with quasi-symmetric single-feed racetrack couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Hoon; Joo, Young-Do; Park, Yong-Jung; Kang, Heung-Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Oh, Kyoung-Min; Seo, Hyung-Seok; Noh, Sung-Ju

    2015-03-01

    We developed an S-band traveling-wave accelerating structure for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory's X-ray free-electron laser (PAL-XFEL), and we fabricated and tested a full-scale prototype. In order to reduce the field asymmetry inside the coupler cavity, we used the SUPERFISH code and the CST MWS electromagnetic field solvers to design the constant-gradient traveling-wave accelerator to use quasi-symmetric single-feed racetrack couplers. The RF measurement results indicate that the accelerating gradient of the prototype structure is as high as 27 MV/m for an input RF power of 65 MW.

  16. Development and low power test of the parallel coupled accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. V.; Barnyakov, A. M.; Levichev, A. E.; Maltseva, M. V.; Nikiforov, D. A.; Samoylov, S. L.

    2016-06-01

    The parallel coupled accelerating structure with a frequency of 2856 MHz is described. The cavities and the power propagation efficiencies are calculated. The results of the structure tuning are described. Analysis of the measurements and comparison with calculated data are provided. On the base of the measured parameters of the parallel coupled accelerating structure the beam energy under different meanings of the current is predicted.

  17. The development of a TESLA recirculator with superconducting accelerating structures in Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guk, I. S.; Dovbnya, A. N.

    2008-12-01

    The recirculator project, which is to be built at the National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (NSC KIPT), is presented. The basic solutions incorporated in the design are given. The TESLA superconducting section is chosen as the accelerating structure of an accelerating complex.

  18. Twisted waveguide accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y. W.

    2000-08-15

    A hollow waveguide with a uniform cross section may be used for accelerating charged particles if the phase velocity of an accelerating mode is equal to or less than the free space speed of light. Regular straight hollow waveguides have phase velocities of propagating electromagnetic waves greater than the free-space speed of light. if the waveguide is twisted, the phase velocities of the waveguide modes become slower. The twisted waveguide structure has been modeled and computer simulated in 3-D electromagnetic solvers to show the slow-wave properties for the accelerating mode.

  19. Development of structural health assessment system for steel and reinforced concrete structures using acceleration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yu; Mita, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Because of the repeated earthquake and the problem such as the aging of buildings, a number of studies of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is have been done. Now, the writer is developing structural health assessment system for steel and reinforced concrete structures aiming for completion in 2014. In this system, following three programs for automatically estimating the physical quantity that is important for assessing the integrity of the structure are planned. First program is what automatically estimate the modal parameters (natural frequency and damping ratio) of the structure by the time history by using the subspace method. Second program is what automatically estimate the inter-layer parameters (stiffness and damping coefficient) by the time history by using the adaptive Kalman filter. Third program is what automatically estimate the story drift angle by time history by using the adaptive Kalman filter. The proposed method is expected to be estimated in consideration of the higher order modes than the conventional method by reverse modal analysis.

  20. Medium Beta Superconducting Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2001-09-01

    While, originally, the development of superconducting structures was cleanly divided between low-beta resonators for heavy ions and beta=1 resonators for electrons, recent interest in protons accelerators (high and low current, pulsed and cw) has necessitated the development of structures that bridge the gap between the two. These activities have resulted both in new geometries and in the adaptation of well-known geometries optimized to this intermediate velocity range. Their characteristics and properties are reviewed.

  1. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  2. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  3. Accelerator structure work for NLC

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.H.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Deruyter, H.; Farkas, Z.D.; Hoag, H.A.; Holtkamp, N.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Nelson, E.M.; Palmer, R.B.; Paterson, J.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. ); Gluckstern, R. ); Ko, K.; Kroll, N. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Ce

    1992-07-01

    The NLC design achieves high luminosity with multiple bunches in each RF pulse. Acceleration of a train of bunches without emittance growth requires control of long range dipole wakefields. SLAC is pursuing a structure design which suppresses the effect of wakefields by varying the physical dimensions of successive cells of the disk-loaded traveling wave structure in a manner which spreads the frequencies of the higher mode while retaining the synchronism between the electrons and the accelerating mode. The wakefields of structures incorporating higher mode detuning have been measured at the Accelerator Test Facility at Argonne. Mechanical design and brazing techniques which avoid getting brazing alloy into the interior of the accelerator are being studied. A test facility for high-power testing of these structures is complete and high power testing has begun.

  4. Development of millimeter-wave accelerating structures using precision metal forming technology

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    High gradients in radio-frequency (RF) driven accelerators require short wavelengths that have the concomitant requirements of small feature size and high tolerances, 1-2 {micro}m for millimeter wavelengths. Precision metal-forming stampling has the promise of meeting those tolerances with high production rates. This STI will evaluate that promise.

  5. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a

  6. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  7. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is part of the Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical (MEMS) acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical-sensor-based systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used in characterizing both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data has cross-disciplinary utility to the microgravity life and physical sciences and the structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, while providing enhanced stability.

  8. The fabrication of millimeter-wavelength accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of high gradient ({ge} 1 GeV/m) accelerating structures. The need for high gradient acceleration based on current microwave technology requires the structures to be operated in the millimeter wavelength. Fabrication of accelerating structures at millimeter scale with sub-micron tolerances poses great challenges. The accelerating structures impose strict requirements on surface smoothness and finish to suppress field emission and multipactor effects. Various fabrication techniques based on conventional machining and micromachining have been evaluated and tested. These will be discussed and measurement results presented.

  9. Accelerated leach test development program

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    In FY 1989, a draft accelerated leach test for solidified waste was written. Combined test conditions that accelerate leaching were validated through experimental and modeling efforts. A computer program was developed that calculates test results and models leaching mechanisms. This program allows the user to determine if diffusion controls leaching and, if this is the case, to make projections of releases. Leaching mechanisms other than diffusion (diffusion plus source term partitioning and solubility limited leaching) are included in the program is indicators of other processes that may control leaching. Leach test data are presented and modeling results are discussed for laboratory scale waste forms composed of portland cement containing sodium sulfate salt, portland cement containing incinerator ash, and vinyl ester-styrene containing sodium sulfate. 16 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Embryonic development during chronic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. H.; Abbott, U. K.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments carried out on chicken eggs indicate that the embryo is affected during very early development, especially over the first four days, and during hatching. In the first four days, the brain develops as well as the anlage for all other organs. In addition, the heart commences to function and the extraembryonic membranes that compartmentalize the egg contents form. The latter require an appreciable extension and folding of tissue which may be disrupted by the mechanical load. Observations of embryonic abnormalities that occur during chronic acceleration suggest an inhibition of development of the axial skeleton, which is rarely seen otherwise, a general retardation of embryonic growth, and circulatory problems. The final stages of development (after 18 days) involve the uptake of fluids, the transition to aerial respiration, and the reorientation of the embryo into a normal hatching position. At 4 G mortality is very high during this period, with a majority of embryos failing to reorient into the normal hatching position.

  11. UCLA accelerator research & development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report discusses work on advanced accelerators and beam dynamics at ANL, BNL, SLAC, UCLA and Pulse Sciences Incorporated. Discussed in this report are the following concepts: Wakefield acceleration studies; plasma lens research; high gradient rf cavities and beam dynamics studies at the Brookhaven accelerator test facility; rf pulse compression development; and buncher systems for high gradient accelerator and relativistic klystron applications.

  12. UCLA accelerator research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  13. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  14. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  15. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  16. S-band accelerating structures for the PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heung-Soo; Park, Young Jung; Joo, Young-Do; Heo, Hoon; Heo, Jinyul; Kim, Sang-Hee; Park, Soung-Soo; Hwang, Woon Ha; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Kwang-woo; Ko, In-Soo; Oh, Kyoung-Min; Noh, Sung-Joo; Bak, Yong Hwan; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    One hundred seventy-two accelerating structures are required for the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray free-electron laser's (PAL-XFEL's) 10-GeV main linear accelerator. So far, we have purchased 80 structures from Mitsubishi Heavy Industry (MHI), which have quasi-symmetric couplers in the accelerating structure to reduce the quadruple and the sextuple components of the electric field in the coupling cavity. High-power tests have been conducted for the first structure of the MHI structure, and Research Instruments (RI) has developed a 3-m long accelerating structure that has an operating frequency of 2856 MHz and in/out couplers of quasi-symmetric racetrack shape for the PAL-XFEL linear accelerator. This structure also has been tested by PAL and RI in the Pohang accelerator laboratory (PAL) to check the maximum available electric field gradient. We will describe the test results of these structures and the current status for the fabrication of the other accelerating structures in this paper.

  17. Particle accelerator development: Selected examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie

    2016-03-01

    About 30 years ago, I was among several students mentored by Professor Yang at Stony Brook to enter the field of particle accelerator physics. Since then, I have been fortunate to work on several major accelerator projects in USA and in China, guided and at times directly supported by Professor Yang. The field of accelerator physics is flourishing worldwide both providing indispensable tools for fundamental physics research and covering an increasingly wide spectrum of applications beneficial to our society.

  18. Particle Accelerator Development: Selected Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie

    About 30 years ago, I was among several students mentored by Professor Yang at Stony Brook to enter the field of particle accelerator physics. Since then, I have been fortunate to work on several major accelerator projects in USA and in China, guided and at times directly supported by Professor Yang. The field of accelerator physics is flourishing worldwide both providing indispensable tools for fundamental physics research and covering an increasingly wide spectrum of applications beneficial to our society.

  19. Micromechanical structures and microelectronics for acceleration sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Lemkin, M.

    1997-08-01

    MEMS is an enabling technology that may provide low-cost devices capable of sensing motion in a reliable and accurate manner. This paper describes work in MEMS accelerometer development at Sandia National Laboratories. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronis circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. The design and test results of an integrated MEMS high-g accelerometer will be detailed. Additionally a design for a high-g fuse component (low-G or {approx} 25 G accelerometer) will be discussed in the paper (where 1 G {approx} 9.81 m/s). In particular, a design team at Sandia was assembled to develop a new micromachined silicon accelerometer which would be capable of surviving and measuring high-g shocks. Such a sensor is designed to be cheaper and more reliable than currently available sensors. A promising design for a suspended plate mass sensor was developed and the details of that design along with test data will be documented in the paper. Future development in this area at Sandia will focus on implementing accelerometers capable of measuring 200 kilo-g accelerations. Accelerometer development at Sandia will also focus on multi-axis acceleration measurement with integrated microelectronics.

  20. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  1. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  2. A compact accelerating structure for stacked isochronous cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitzler, C. R.; Byeon, J.; McIntyre, P. M.; Rogers, Bob; Sattarov, A.

    2003-03-01

    An accelerator-driven thorium cycle power reactor is being developed, based on a flux-coupled stack of isochronous cyclotrons. (IC) The stack consists of seven independent accelerators (total beam power 15 MW at 1 GeV), stacked on a spacing ˜ 20 cm. The close spacing poses unique problems for the design of the accelerating cavities. We have invented a 4-bar RF dipole structure for the purpose. We have built a cold model and are studying its operating characteristics. The structure will be described. We present measurements of the resonant frequency, parasitic capacitances, and electric and magnetic field distributions in the structure.

  3. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We describe guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode, including particle beam dynamics and potential coupling methods for the structure. We also discuss possible materials and power sources for this structure and their effects on performance parameters, as well as possible manufacturing techniques and the required tolerances. In addition we describe the computational technique and possible improvements in numerical modeling that would aid development of photonic crystal structures.

  5. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  6. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1990-01-01

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90.degree. intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. Adjacent cylinder electrodes of the quadrupole structure are maintained at different potentials to thereby reshape the cross section of the charged particle beam to an ellipse in cross section at the mid point along each quadrupole electrode unit in the accelerator modules. The beam is maintained in focus by alternating the major axis of the ellipse along the x and y axis respectively at adjacent quadrupoles. In another embodiment, electrostatic ring electrodes may be utilized instead of the quadrupole electrodes.

  7. Preliminary results on open accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Giordano, S.

    1985-01-07

    In this paper we consider periodic structures consisting of rows of spherical conductors. In a plasma linac, these spherical conductors would be formed from liquid droplets on whose surfaces a plasma would be formed. For this paper, the field configurations have been investigated using copper spheres approximately 11 cm diameter and microwave radiation of approximately 30 cm wavelength. No suitable accelerating mode was found for relativistic particles using a single row of spheres, but with two parallel rows of spheres both accelerating and focusing modes were found. In Section II we re-examine the accelerating modes over a grating surface, including a grating of parallel conducting rods. In Section III we discuss the coupling of these structures to incoming radiation. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Design of the detuned accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Nelson, E.M.

    1993-05-01

    This is a summary of the design procedure for the detuned accelerator structure for SLAC's Next Linear Collider (NLC) program. The 11.424 GHz accelerating mode of each cavity must be synchronous with the beam. The distribution of the disk thicknesses and lowest synchronous dipole mode frequencies of the cavities in the structure is Gaussian in order to reduce the effect of wake fields. The finite element field solver YAP calculated the accelerating mode frequency and the lowest synchronous dipole mode frequency for various cavity diameters, aperture diameters and disk thicknesses. Polynomial 3-parameter fits are used to calculate the dimensions for a 1.8 m detuned structure. The program SUPERFISH was used to calculate the shunt impedances, quality factors and group velocities. The RF parameters of the section like filling time, attenuation factor, accelerating gradient and maximum surface field along the section are evaluated. Error estimates will be discussed and comparisons with conventional constant gradient and constant impedance structures will be presented.

  9. Design of the detuned accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Nelson, E.M.

    1993-05-01

    This is a summary of the design procedure for the detuned accelerator structure for SLAC`s Next Linear Collider (NLC) program. The 11.424 GHz accelerating mode of each cavity must be synchronous with the beam. The distribution of the disk thicknesses and lowest synchronous dipole mode frequencies of the cavities in the structure is Gaussian in order to reduce the effect of wake fields. The finite element field solver YAP calculated the accelerating mode frequency and the lowest synchronous dipole mode frequency for various cavity diameters, aperture diameters and disk thicknesses. Polynomial 3-parameter fits are used to calculate the dimensions for a 1.8 m detuned structure. The program SUPERFISH was used to calculate the shunt impedances, quality factors and group velocities. The RF parameters of the section like filling time, attenuation factor, accelerating gradient and maximum surface field along the section are evaluated. Error estimates will be discussed and comparisons with conventional constant gradient and constant impedance structures will be presented.

  10. Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Microgravity Acceleration Measurement Systems (AMAMS) project is part of NASA s Instrument Technology Development program to develop advanced sensor systems. The primary focus of the AMAMS project is to develop microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for acceleration sensor systems to replace existing electromechanical sensor systems presently used to assess relative gravity levels aboard spacecraft. These systems are used to characterize both vehicle and payload responses to low-gravity vibroacoustic environments. The collection of microgravity acceleration data is useful to the microgravity life sciences, microgravity physical sciences, and structural dynamics communities. The inherent advantages of semiconductor-based systems are reduced size, mass, and power consumption, with enhanced long-term calibration stability.

  11. Arrayed Diagnostic Development on the HyperV Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockington, Samuel; Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2008-11-01

    The sparkgap injected plasma accelerator is one of several coaxial railguns constructed at HyperV to accelerate dense plasmas to high velocities. A circumferential array of 112 high voltage tungsten electrodes ablates polyethylene to form and inject a toroidally shaped plasma into the annular breech at the rear of the accelerator. A pulse forming network then applies several hundred kiloamps to the coaxial electrodes to accelerate the plasma. A 4-chord laser deflectometer and a 32-sensor fast photodiode array are being developed to help resolve the structure, density, and velocity of the accelerated plasma jet for different accelerator parameters. We present details of the diagnostic designs and initial data. Work supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences.

  12. Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

    2000-11-28

    We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented.

  13. Summary report of working group 3: High gradient and laser-structure based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-01-01

    The charge for the working group on high gradient and laser-structure based acceleration was to assess the current challenges involved in developing an advanced accelerator based on electromagnetic structures, and survey state-of-the-art methods to address those challenges. The topics of more than 50 presentations in the working group covered a very broad range of issues, from ideas, theoretical models and simulations, to design and manufacturing of accelerating structures and, finally, experimental results on obtaining extremely high accelerating gradients in structures from conventional microwave frequency range up to THz and laser frequencies. Workshop discussion topics included advances in the understanding of the physics of breakdown and other phenomena, limiting high gradient performance of accelerating structures. New results presented in this workshop demonstrated significant progress in the fields of conventional vacuum structure-based acceleration, dielectric wakefield acceleration, and laser-structure acceleration.

  14. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  15. The Knowledge Accelerating the Society Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmíd, Jaroslav; Sakál, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The formation of appropriate conditions can accelerate the society development. According to the existing definitions, the society can be viewed as mankind as a whole, or a state, a region or a group of businessmen. This paper extends and supplements of the contribution [1]. It deals with the knowledge accelerating the society development using the modified formal notation of the society development according to [2]. The open innovation concept [3] presents the intentional use of external knowledge flow. This paper deals with the intentional use of knowledge in time.

  16. Accelerated Leadership Development: Fast Tracking School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earley, Peter; Jones, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Leadership Development" captures and communicates the lessons learned from successful fast-track leadership programmes in the private and public sector, and provides a model which schools can follow and customize as they plan their own leadership development strategies. As large numbers of headteachers and other senior staff retire,…

  17. Acceleration in dental development: fact or fiction.

    PubMed

    Holtgrave, E A; Kretschmer, R; Müller, R

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether an actual acceleration in dental development has taken place over the last 30 years in a European population group, as is so readily observable in relation to body height. In this study, radiographs of 1038 healthy European children, 516 boys and 522 girls, were evaluated. The methodology and norms given by Nolla (1960) for both sexes were used and compared with the tooth developmental stages in our subjects. In girls, no difference to Nolla's norms could be detected. However, in boys, dental development has accelerated. This difference was most apparent in the 3- to 9-year-old age group and was statistically significant. Thus, over the last 30 years, a small acceleration in dental development has taken place in very young males. PMID:9458603

  18. SIMULATING ACCELERATOR STRUCTURE OPERATION AT HIGH POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V

    2004-09-15

    The important limiting factors in high-gradient accelerator structure operation are dark current capture, RF breakdown and electron multipacting. These processes involve both primary and secondary electron field emission and produce plasma and X-rays. To better understand these phenomena, they have simulated dark current generation and transport in a linac structure and a square-bend waveguide, both high power tested at SLAC. For these simulations, they use the parallel, time-domain, unstructured-grid code Tau3P and the particle tracking module Track3P. In this paper, they present numerical results and their comparison with measurements on energy spectrum of electrons transmitted in a 30-cell structure and of X-rays emitted from the square-bend waveguide.

  19. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-15

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  20. Vehicle Systems Integration Laboratory Accelerates Powertrain Development

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-06-25

    ORNL's Vehicle Systems Integration (VSI) Laboratory accelerates the pace of powertrain development by performing prototype research and characterization of advanced systems and hardware components. The VSI Lab is capable of accommodating a range of platforms from advanced light-duty vehicles to hybridized Class 8 powertrains with the goals of improving overall system efficiency and reducing emissions.

  1. Woodpile Structure Fabrication for Photonic Crystal Laser Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; England, R. J.; Noble, R. J.; Sears, C. M.; Siemann, R.; Spencer, J.; Waltz, D.; Byer, R. L.; Plettner, T.; Cowan, B. M.

    2009-01-22

    We describe initial steps at fabricating a dielectric photonic bandgap accelerator structure designed to operate at near IR frequencies. Such a structure operating at these frequencies requires extremely small, sub-micron sized features, forcing one to use lithographic means for fabrication. A process based upon lithographic equipment at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility has been developed and a four layer test structure has been fabricated. Unexpected problems with the final etch step, and corresponding modifications to the process flow addressing these problems, are described. Spectroscopic measurements of the structure have been taken and are compared to simulations.

  2. Woodpile Structure Fabrication for Photonic Crystal Laser Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, C.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.; Cowan, B.M.; England, R.J.; Noble, R.J.; Plettner, T.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.; Spencer, J.; Waltz, D.; /SLAC

    2010-06-30

    We describe initial steps at fabricating a dielectric photonic bandgap accelerator structure designed to operate at near IR frequencies. Such a structure operating at these frequencies requires extremely small, sub-micron sized features, forcing one to use lithographic means for fabrication. A process based upon lithographic equipment at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility has been developed and a four layer test structure has been fabricated. Unexpected problems with the final etch step, and corresponding modifications to the process flow addressing these problems, are described. Spectroscopic measurements of the structure have been taken and are compared to simulations.

  3. Development of a wireless displacement measurement system using acceleration responses.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Woong; Sim, Sung-Han; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Spencer, Billie F

    2013-01-01

    Displacement measurements are useful information for various engineering applications such as structural health monitoring (SHM), earthquake engineering and system identification. Most existing displacement measurement methods are costly, labor-intensive, and have difficulties particularly when applying to full-scale civil structures because the methods require stationary reference points. Indirect estimation methods converting acceleration to displacement can be a good alternative as acceleration transducers are generally cost-effective, easy to install, and have low noise. However, the application of acceleration-based methods to full-scale civil structures such as long span bridges is challenging due to the need to install cables to connect the sensors to a base station. This article proposes a low-cost wireless displacement measurement system using acceleration. Developed with smart sensors that are low-cost, wireless, and capable of on-board computation, the wireless displacement measurement system has significant potential to impact many applications that need displacement information at multiple locations of a structure. The system implements an FIR-filter type displacement estimation algorithm that can remove low frequency drifts typically caused by numerical integration of discrete acceleration signals. To verify the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed system, laboratory tests are carried out using a shaking table and on a three storey shear building model, experimentally confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:23881123

  4. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-24

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS

  5. Analysis and Design of Optical Bragg Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Mizrahi, Amit; Schaechter, Levi

    2004-12-07

    It is demonstrated that a Bragg waveguide consisting of a series of dielectric layers may form an excellent optical acceleration structure. Confinement of the accelerating fields is achieved for both planar and cylindrical configurations by adjusting the first dielectric layer width. A typical structure made of Silica and Zirconia may support gradients of the order of 1 GV/m with an interaction impedance of a few hundreds of Ohms and with an energy velocity of less than 0.5c. An interaction impedance of about one thousand Ohms may be obtained by replacing the Zirconia with a (fictitious) material of {epsilon} = 25. Special attention is paid to the wake-field developing in such a structure. In case of a relatively small number of layers, a qualitative approach shows that the emitted power is inversely proportional to the number of micro-bunches. Quantitative results are given for a higher number of dielectric layers, showing that in comparison to a structure bounded by metallic walls, the emitted power is significantly smaller due to propagation bands allowing electromagnetic energy to escape. The efficiency of the acceleration structures is investigated and shown to have an optimum as a function of the vacuum core dimension.

  6. The fabrication of millimeter-wavelength accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Bowden, G.B.; Copeland, M.R.; Farvid, A.; Kirby, R.E.; Menegat, A.; Pearson, C.; Shere, L.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; Whittum, D.H.

    1997-03-01

    There is a growing interest in the research of high gradient ({ge}1GeV/m) accelerating structures. The need for high gradient acceleration based on current microwave technology requires the structures to be operated in the millimeter wavelength. Fabrication of accelerating structures at millimeter scale with sub-micron tolerances poses great challenges. The accelerating structures impose strict requirements on surface smoothness and finish to suppress field emission and multipactor effects. Various fabrication techniques based on conventional machining and micromachining have been evaluated and tested. These will be discussed and measurement results presented. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Guidelines for Developing an Academic Acceleration Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Nicholas; Assouline, Susan G.; Marron, Maureen A.; Castellano, Jaime A.; Clinkenbeard, Pamela R.; Rogers, Karen; Calvert, Eric; Malek, Rosanne; Smith, Donnajo

    2010-01-01

    As an educational intervention, acceleration is decidedly effective for high-ability students. The research support for acceleration that has accumulated over many decades is robust and consistent and allows us to confidently state that carefully planned acceleration decisions are successful. Both grade-based and content-based acceleration are…

  8. High-performance insulator structures for accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Sanders, D.M.; Stoddard, R.D.; Trimble, D.O.; Elizondo, J.; Krogh, M.L.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1997-05-01

    A new, high gradient insulator technology has been developed for accelerator systems. The concept involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods of order 1 mm or less. These structures perform many times better (about 1.5 to 4 times higher breakdown electric field) than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We describe our ongoing studies investigating the degradation of the breakdown electric field resulting from alternate fabrication techniques, the effect of gas pressure, the effect of the insulator-to-electrode interface gap spacing, and the performance of the insulator structure under bi-polar stress.

  9. R&D of Accelerator Structures at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; /SLAC

    2007-01-17

    The research activities for accelerator structures at SLAC are reviewed including the achievement via the main linac design for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), the program adjustment after the decision of the International Linear Collider (ILC) to be based on superconducting technology, and the work progress for the ILC, photon science at SLAC and basic accelerator structure studies.

  10. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin; Lin, M.C.; Schwartz, Brian; Byer, Robert; McGuinness, Christopher; Colby, Eric; England, Robert; Noble, Robert; Spencer, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90{sup o}. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  11. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Guobao; Chu, Chungming; Wu, Juhao; Kraimer, Martin; /Argonne

    2012-07-06

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  12. Numerical studies of multipactor in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an rf electric field under vacuum conditions. MP may occur in various microwave and rf systems such as microwave tubes, rf windows and launchers, accelerating structures, and rf satellite payloads. In this work we present results of MP analysis in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. The starting point of our work was experimental and theoretical studies of DLA structures jointly done by Argonne National Laboratory and Naval Research Laboratory (J. G. Power et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 164801 (2004); J. G. Power et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 877, 362 (2006)). In the theoretical model developed during those studies the space-charge field due to the total number of particles is taken into account as a parameter. We perform our studies using a self-consistent approach with the help of time-dependent two-dimensional code developed at the University of Maryland (O. V. Sinitsyn et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 073102 (2009)). Results include analysis of MP evolution at an early stage, detailed studies of individual electron trajectories, analysis of MP onset time under various conditions and comparison of some results with the experimental data.

  13. Investigations of the plasma and structure based accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Gennady

    2012-08-30

    The objective of our research during the reported period was three-fold: (a) theoretical investigation of novel mechanisms of injection into laser wake field accelerators; (b) theoretical investigation of single-shot frequency domain diagnostics of relativistic plasma wakes, specifically in the context of spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma bubble;(c) experimental and theoretical investigation of laser-driven accelerating structure, specifically in the context of the Surface Wave Accelerator Based on SiC (SWABSIC).

  14. Low-Field Accelerator Structure Couplers and Design Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C

    2004-07-29

    Recent experience with X-band accelerator structure development has shown the rf input coupler to be the region most prone to rf breakdown and degradation, effectively limiting the operating gradient. A major factor in this appears to be high magnetic fields at the sharp edges of the coupling irises. As a first response to this problem, couplers with rounded and thickened iris horns have been employed and successfully tested at high power. To further reduce fields for higher power flow, conceptually new coupler designs have been developed, in which power is coupled through the broadwall of the feed waveguide, rather than through terminating irises. A 'mode launcher' coupler, which launches the TM{sub 01} mode in circular waveguide before coupling through a matching cell into the main structure, has been tested with great success. With peak surface fields below those in the body of the structure, this coupler represented a break-through in the NLC structure program. The design of this coupler and of variations which use beamline space more efficiently are described here. The latter include a coupler in which power passes directly through an iris in the broad wall of the rectangular waveguide into a matching cell, also successfully implemented, and a variation which makes the waveguide itself an accelerating cell. The authors also discuss in some detail a couple of techniques for matching such couplers to travelling-wave structures using a field solver. The first exploits the cell number independence of a travelling-wave match, and the second optimizes using the fields of an internally driven structure.

  15. Experimental demonstration of wakefield acceleration in a tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure.

    PubMed

    Jing, C; Kanareykin, A; Power, J G; Conde, M; Liu, W; Antipov, S; Schoessow, P; Gai, W

    2011-04-22

    We report on a collinear wakefield experiment using the first tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure. By introducing an extra layer of nonlinear ferroelectric, which has a dielectric constant sensitive to temperature and dc bias, the frequency of a dielectric loaded accelerating structure can be tuned. During the experiment, the energy of a witness bunch at a fixed delay with respect to the drive beam was measured while the temperature of the structure was scanned over a 50 °C range. The energy change corresponded to a change of more than half of the nominal structure wavelength. PMID:21599371

  16. Experimental demonstration of Wakefield acceleration in a tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Antipov, S.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.

    2011-04-21

    We report on a collinear wakefield experiment using the first tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure. By introducing an extra layer of nonlinear ferroelectric, which has a dielectric constant sensitive to temperature and dc bias, the frequency of a dielectric loaded accelerating structure can be tuned. During the experiment, the energy of a witness bunch at a fixed delay with respect to the drive beam was measured while the temperature of the structure was scanned over a 50 C range. The energy change corresponded to a change of more than half of the nominal structure wavelength.

  17. Experimental Demonstration of Wakefield Acceleration in a Tunable Dielectric Loaded Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Antipov, S.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Liu, W.; Gai, W.

    2011-04-22

    We report on a collinear wakefield experiment using the first tunable dielectric loaded accelerating structure. By introducing an extra layer of nonlinear ferroelectric, which has a dielectric constant sensitive to temperature and dc bias, the frequency of a dielectric loaded accelerating structure can be tuned. During the experiment, the energy of a witness bunch at a fixed delay with respect to the drive beam was measured while the temperature of the structure was scanned over a 50 deg. C range. The energy change corresponded to a change of more than half of the nominal structure wavelength.

  18. Development of Transverse Modes Damped DLA Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.

    2009-01-22

    As the dimensions of accelerating structures become smaller and beam intensities higher, the transverse wakefields driven by the beam become quite large with even a slight misalignment of the beam from the geometric axis. These deflection modes can cause inter-bunch beam breakup and intra-bunch head-tail instabilities along the beam path, and thus BBU control becomes a critical issue. All new metal based accelerating structures, like the accelerating structures developed at SLAC or power extractors at CLIC, have designs in which the transverse modes are heavily damped. Similarly, minimizing the transverse wakefield modes (here the HEMmn hybrid modes in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures) is also very critical for developing dielectric based high energy accelerators. In this paper, we present the design of a 7.8 GHz transverse mode damped DLA structure currently under construction, along with plans for the experimental program.

  19. Accelerator System Development at High Voltage Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M. G.; Gottdang, A.; Haitsma, R. G.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2009-03-10

    Throughout the years, HVE has continuously extended the capabilities of its accelerator systems to meet the rising demands from a diverse field of applications, among which are deep level ion implantation, micro-machining, neutron production for biomedical research, isotope production or accelerator mass spectrometry. Characteristic for HVE accelerators is the coaxial construction of the all solid state power supply around the acceleration tubes. With the use of solid state technology, the accelerators feature high stability and very low ripple. Terminal voltages range from 1 to 6 MV for HVE Singletrons and Tandetrons. The high-current versions of these accelerators can provide ion beams with powers of several kW. In the last years, several systems have been built with terminal voltages of 1.25 MV, 2 MV and 5 MV. Recently, the first system based on a 6 MV Tandetron has passed the factory tests. In this paper we describe the characteristics of the HVE accelerator systems and present as example recent systems.

  20. Technologies using accelerator-driven targets under development at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1994-08-01

    Recent development work conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory on technologies which use particle accelerator-driven targets is summarized. These efforts include development of the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC) Target for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), the Accelerator-Driven Assembly for Plutonium Transformation (ADAPT) Target for the Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) of excess weapons plutonium. The PHOENIX Concept for the accelerator-driven transmutation of minor actinides and fission products from the waste stream of commercial nuclear power plants, and other potential applications.

  1. Kif14 overexpression accelerates murine retinoblastoma development.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Michael; Shadmand, Mehdi; Sulaiman, Rania S; Sishtla, Kamakshi; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Corson, Timothy W

    2016-10-15

    The mitotic kinesin KIF14 has an essential role in the recruitment of proteins required for the final stages of cytokinesis. Genomic gain and/or overexpression of KIF14 has been documented in retinoblastoma and a number of other cancers, such as breast, lung and ovarian carcinomas, strongly suggesting its role as an oncogene. Despite evidence of oncogenic properties in vitro and in xenografts, Kif14's role in tumor progression has not previously been studied in a transgenic cancer model. Using a novel Kif14 overexpressing, simian virus 40 large T-antigen retinoblastoma (TAg-RB) double transgenic mouse model, we aimed to determine Kif14's role in promoting retinal tumor formation. Tumor initiation and development in double transgenics and control TAg-RB littermates were documented in vivo over a time course by optical coherence tomography, with subsequent ex vivo quantification of tumor burden. Kif14 overexpression led to an accelerated initiation of tumor formation in the TAg-RB model and a significantly decreased tumor doubling time (1.8 vs. 2.9 weeks). Moreover, overall percentage tumor burden was also increased by Kif14 overexpression. These data provide the first evidence that Kif14 can promote tumor formation in susceptible cells in vivo. PMID:27270502

  2. Simulation Studies of the Dielectric Grating as an Accelerating and Focusing Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Peralta, E.A.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    A grating-based design is a promising candidate for a laser-driven dielectric accelerator. Through simulations, we show the merits of a readily fabricated grating structure as an accelerating component. Additionally, we show that with a small design perturbation, the accelerating component can be converted into a focusing structure. The understanding of these two components is critical in the successful development of any complete accelerator. The concept of accelerating electrons with the tremendous electric fields found in lasers has been proposed for decades. However, until recently the realization of such an accelerator was not technologically feasible. Recent advances in the semiconductor industry, as well as advances in laser technology, have now made laser-driven dielectric accelerators imminent. The grating-based accelerator is one proposed design for a dielectric laser-driven accelerator. This design, which was introduced by Plettner, consists of a pair of opposing transparent binary gratings, illustrated in Fig. 1. The teeth of the gratings serve as a phase mask, ensuring a phase synchronicity between the electromagnetic field and the moving particles. The current grating accelerator design has the drive laser incident perpendicular to the substrate, which poses a laser-structure alignment complication. The next iteration of grating structure fabrication seeks to monolithically create an array of grating structures by etching the grating's vacuum channel into a fused silica wafer. With this method it is possible to have the drive laser confined to the plane of the wafer, thus ensuring alignment of the laser-and-structure, the two grating halves, and subsequent accelerator components. There has been previous work using 2-dimensional finite difference time domain (2D-FDTD) calculations to evaluate the performance of the grating accelerator structure. However, this work approximates the grating as an infinite structure and does not accurately model a

  3. Accelerated Application Development: The ORNL Titan Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, Wayne; Archibald, Richard K.; Berrill, Mark A.; Brown, W. Michael; Eisenbach, Markus; Grout, Ray; Larkin, Jeff; Levesque, John; Messer, Bronson; Norman, Matthew R.; Philip, Bobby; Sankaran, Ramanan; Tharrington, Arnold N.; Turner, John A.

    2015-05-09

    The use of computational accelerators such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi processors is now widespread in the high performance computing community, with many applications delivering impressive performance gains. However, programming these systems for high performance, performance portability and software maintainability has been a challenge. In this paper we discuss experiences porting applications to the Titan system. Titan, which began planning in 2009 and was deployed for general use in 2013, was the first multi-petaflop system based on accelerator hardware. To ready applications for accelerated computing, a preparedness effort was undertaken prior to delivery of Titan. In this paper we report experiences and lessons learned from this process and describe how users are currently making use of computational accelerators on Titan.

  4. Accelerated Application Development: The ORNL Titan Experience

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Joubert, Wayne; Archibald, Richard K.; Berrill, Mark A.; Brown, W. Michael; Eisenbach, Markus; Grout, Ray; Larkin, Jeff; Levesque, John; Messer, Bronson; Norman, Matthew R.; et al

    2015-05-09

    The use of computational accelerators such as NVIDIA GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi processors is now widespread in the high performance computing community, with many applications delivering impressive performance gains. However, programming these systems for high performance, performance portability and software maintainability has been a challenge. In this paper we discuss experiences porting applications to the Titan system. Titan, which began planning in 2009 and was deployed for general use in 2013, was the first multi-petaflop system based on accelerator hardware. To ready applications for accelerated computing, a preparedness effort was undertaken prior to delivery of Titan. In this papermore » we report experiences and lessons learned from this process and describe how users are currently making use of computational accelerators on Titan.« less

  5. Alignment issues of the SLC linac accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Adolphsen, C.; Decker, F.J.; Fischer, G.; Hodgson, J.; Pennacchi, R.; Perkins, C.; Pietryka, M.

    1991-05-01

    The accelerating structure of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is required to be aligned to 100--200 {mu}m rms. Alignment at such a level will reduce transverse wakefield effects sufficiently so that only a small emittance enlargement of the beam is expected during acceleration to 50 GeV with up to 7 {times} 10{sup 10} particles per bunch. This report describes many aspects of the alignment including global alignment, local alignment, construction of the accelerating cavities, active controls of the structure alignment, external constraints, temperature and airflow effects, and alignment stability. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  6. SLAB symmetric dielectric micron scale structures for high gradient electron acceleration.

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Schoessow, P. V.

    1999-06-12

    A class of planar microstructure is proposed which provide high accelerating gradients when excited by an infrared laser pulse. These structures consist of parallel dielectric slabs separated by a vacuum gap; the dielectric or the outer surface coating are spatially modulated at the laser wavelength along the beam direction so as to support a standing wave accelerating field. We have developed numerical and analytic models of the accelerating mode fields in the structure. We show an optimized coupling scheme such that this mode is excited resonantly with a large quality factor. The status of planned experiments on fabricating and measuring these planar structures will be described.

  7. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2014-07-22

    This report consists of two parts. In the first part we describe a study of the heating of microprotrusions on surfaces of accelerating structures. This ;process is believed to lead to breakdown in these structures. Our study revealed that for current accelerator parameters melting should not occur due to space charge limitations of the current emitted by a protrusion. The second part describes a novel concept to develop THz range sources based on harmonic cyclotron masers for driving future colliders. This work was stimulated by a recent request of SLAC to develop high power, high-efficiency sources of sub-THz radiation for future high-gradient accelerators.

  8. Accelerator development for a radioactive beam facility based on ATLAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-08

    The existing superconducting linac ATLAS is in many respects an ideal secondary beam accelerator for an ISOL (Isotope separator on-line) type radioactive beam facility. Such a facility would require the addition of two major accelerator elements: a low charge state injector for the existing heavy ion linac, and a primary beam accelerator providing 220 MV of acceleration for protons and light ions. Development work for both of these elements, including the option of superconducting cavities for the primary beam accelerator is discussed.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Woodpile Structures for Direct Laser Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, C.; Peralta, E.; Soong, K.; Colby, E.; England, R. J.; Ng, J.; Noble, R. J.; Spencer, J.; Walz, D.; Cowan, B.; Byer, R. L.

    2010-11-04

    Eight and nine layer three dimensional photonic crystals with a defect designed specifically for accelerator applications have been fabricated. The structures were fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques, including low pressure chemical vapor deposition, optical lithography, and chemical mechanical polishing. Limits imposed by the optical lithography set the minimum feature size to 400 nm, corresponding to a structure with a bandgap centered at 4.26 {mu}m. Reflection spectroscopy reveal a peak in reflectivity about the predicted region, and good agreement with simulation is shown. The eight and nine layer structures will be aligned and bonded together to form the complete seventeen layer woodpile accelerator structure.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Woodpile Structures for Direct Laser Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, C.; Colby, E.; England, R.J.; Ng, J.; Noble, R.J.; Peralta, E.; Soong, K.; Spencer, J.; Walz, D.; Byer, R.L.

    2010-08-26

    An eight and nine layer three dimensional photonic crystal with a defect designed specifically for accelerator applications has been fabricated. The structures were fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques, including low pressure chemical vapor deposition, optical lithography, and chemical mechanical polishing. Limits imposed by the optical lithography set the minimum feature size to 400 nm, corresponding to a structure with a bandgap centered at 4.26 {micro}m. Reflection spectroscopy reveal a peak in reflectivity about the predicted region, and good agreement with simulation is shown. The eight and nine layer structures will be aligned and bonded together to form the complete seventeen layer woodpile accelerator structure.

  11. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  12. Road Map for Studies to Produce Consistent and High Performance SRF Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapati Rao Myneni; John F. O’Hanlon

    2007-06-20

    Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator structures made from high purity niobium are becoming the technological choice for a large number of future accelerators and energy recovery LINAC’s (ERL). Most of the presently planned accelerators and ERL requirements will be met with some effort by the current SRF technology where accelerating gradients of about 20 MV/m can be produced on a routine basis with an acceptable yield. However, the XFEL at DESY and the planned ILC require acceleration gradients more than 28 MV/m and 35 MV/m respectively. At the recent ILC meeting at Snowmass (2005) concern was expressed regarding the wide spread in the achieved accelerator gradients and the relatively low yields. For obtaining accelerating gradients of 35 MV/m in SRF accelerator structures consistently, a deeper understanding of the causes for the spread has to be gained and advances have to be made in many scientific and high technology fields, including materials, surface and vacuum sciences, application of reliable processes and procedures, which provide contamination –free surfaces and avoid recontamination and cryogenics related technologies. In this contribution a road map for studies needed to produce consistent and high performance SRF accelerator structures from the needed materials development to clean and non-recontaminating processes and procedures will be presented.

  13. High frequency planar accelerating structures for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Ben-Menahem, S.; Wilson, P.; Miller, R.; Ruth, R.; Nassiri, A.

    1994-12-31

    Modern microfabrication techniques based on deep etch x-ray lithography, e.g., LIGA, can be used to produce large-aspect-ratio, metallic or dielectric, planar structures suitable for high-frequency RF acceleration of charged particle beams. Specifically, these techniques offer significant advantages over conventional manufacturing methods for future linear colliders (beyond NLC, the Next Linear Collider) because of several unique systems requirements. First, to have the required ac wall plug power within reasonable limits, such future linear colliders (5 TeV) must operate at high frequency (30 GHz). Secondly, luminosity requirements suggest the use of multi-bunch acceleration of electrons and positrons in the linear collider. Thirdly, in order to clearly discriminate physics events in the final interaction point at which electrons and positrons collide, it is required that secondary particle production from beamstrahlung be minimized. Flat electron and positron beams with a large aspect ratio will be beneficial in reducing beamstrahlung in the final focus region, but cause the beam to be more sensitive to wakefields in the vertical dimension. In principle, a flat beam can be accelerated in a planar structure with reduced wakefield in the vertical direction for the entire length of the accelerator. The LIGA process is particularly suitable for manufacturing miniaturized, planar, asymmetric cavities at high frequency. The main advantages of the LIGA process are fabrication of structures with high aspect ratio, small dimensional tolerances, and arbitrary mask shape (cross-section). Other advantages include mass-production with excellent repeatability and precision of up to an entire section of an accelerating structure consisting of a number of cells. It eliminates the need of tedious machining and brazing, for example, of individual disks and cups in conventional disk-loaded structures. Also, planar input/output couplers for the accelerating structure can be easily

  14. The structural response of a rail accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-1o) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected.

  15. The structural response of a rail acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.

    1984-01-01

    The transient response of a 0.4 by 0.6 cm rectangular bore rail accelerator was analyzed by a three dimensional finite element code. The copper rail deflected to a peak value of 0.08 mm in compression and then oscillated at an amplitude of 0.02 mm. Simultaneously the insulating side wall of glass fabric base, epoxy resin laminate (G-10) was compressed to a peak value of 0.13 mm and rebounded to a steady state in extension. Projectile pinch or blowby due to the rail extension or compression, respectively, can be identified by examining the time history of the rail displacement. The effect of blowby was most significant at the side wall characterized by mm size displacement in compression. Dynamic stress calculations indicate that the G-10 supporting material behind the rail is subjected to over 21 MPa at which the G-10 could fail if the laminate was not carefully oriented. Results for a polycarbonate resin (Lexan) side wall show much larger displacements and stresses than for G-10. The tradeoff between the transparency of Lexan and the mechanical strength of G-10 for sidewall material is obvious. Displacement calculations from the modal method are smaller than the results from the direct integration method by almost an order of magnitude, because the high frequency effect is neglected. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35412

  16. Development of a 20-MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.G.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R.W.; Bruce, R.L.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lewis, D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /LET Corp., Washington /Argonne /SLAC /Tsinghua U., Beijing

    2005-06-22

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron inector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx} 8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRl, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  17. Rectangular Dielectric-loaded Structures for Achieving High Acceleration Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Changbiao; Yakovlev, V. P.; Marshall, T. C.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2006-11-27

    Rectangular dielectric-loaded structures are described that may sustain higher acceleration gradients than conventional all-metal structures with similar apertures. One structure is a test cavity designed to ascertain the breakdown limits of dielectrics, while a second structure could be the basis for a two-beam accelerator. CVD diamond is an attractive dielectric for a high-gradient structure, since the published DC breakdown limit for CVD diamond is {approx} 2 GV/m, although the limit has never been determined for RF fields. Here we present a design of a diamond-lined test cavity to measure the breakdown limit. The designed cavity operates at 34 GHz, where with 10-MW input power it is expected to produce an {approx}800 MV/m field on the diamond surface - provided breakdown is avoided. The two channel rectangular dielectric-loaded waveguide could be a two-beam accelerator structure, in which a drive beam is in one channel and an accelerated beam is in the other. The RF power produced by drive bunches in the drive channel is continuously coupled to the acceleration channel. The ratio of fields in the channels (transformer ratio) for the operating mode can be designed by adjusting the dimensions of the structure. An example of the two-channel structure is described, in which a train of five 3-nC drive bunches excites wake fields in the accelerator channel of up to 1.3 GV/m with a transformer ratio of 10 for the design mode.

  18. Gradient Limitations in Room Temperature and Superconducting Acceleration Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N. A.

    2009-01-22

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx}10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R and D program.

  19. Gradient limitations in room temperature and superconducting acceleration structures

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Accelerating gradient is a key parameter of the accelerating structure in large linac facilities, like future Linear Collider. In room temperature accelerating structures the gradient is limited mostly by breakdown phenomena, caused by high surface electric fields or pulse surface heating. High power processing is a necessary procedure to clean surface and improve the gradient. In the best tested X-band structures the achieved gradient is exceed 100 MV/m in of {approx}200 ns pulses for breakdown rate of {approx} 10{sup -7}. Gradient limit depends on number of factors and no one theory which can explain all sets of experimental results and predict gradient in new accelerating structure. In paper we briefly overview the recent experimental results of breakdown studies, progress in understanding of gradient limitations and scaling laws. Although superconducting rf technology has been adopted throughout the world for ILC, it has frequently been difficult to reach the predicted performance in these structures due to a number of factors: multipactoring, field emission, Q-slope, thermal breakdown. In paper we are discussing all these phenomena and the ways to increase accelerating gradient in SC cavity, which are a part of worldwide R&D program.

  20. RF properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    With the advent of the SLAC electron-positron linear collider (SLC) in the 100 GeV center-of-mass energy range, research and development work on even higher energy machines of this type has started in several laboratories in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union and Japan. These linear colliders appear to provide the only promising approach to studying e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// physics at center-of-mass energies approaching 1 TeV. This thesis concerns itself with the study of radio frequency properties of periodic accelerating structures for linear colliders and their interaction with bunched beams. The topics that have been investigated are: experimental measurements of the energy loss of single bunches to longitudinal modes in two types of structures, using an equivalent signal on a coaxial wire to simulate the beam; a method of canceling the energy spread created within a single bunch by longitudinal wakefields, through appropriate shaping of the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch; derivation of the complete transient beam-loading equation for a train of bunches passing through a constant-gradient accelerator section, with application to the calculation and minimization of multi-bunch energy spread; detailed study of field emission and radio frequency breakdown in disk-loaded structures at S-, C- and X-band frequencies under extremely high-gradient conditions, with special attention to thermal effects, radiation, sparking, emission of gases, surface damage through explosive emission and its possible control through RF-gas processing. 53 refs., 49 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.; Long, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lombardi, M.; Lewis, D.; Bruce, R.W.; /Unlisted

    2007-04-13

    This paper presents a progress report on a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the magnicon facility at NRL. The accelerator will be powered by an experimental 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that presently produces 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator will include a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate DLA structures up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by ANL, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC has developed components to distribute the power from the two magnicon output arms to the injector and to the DLA accelerating structure with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, has investigated means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by a brazing process using an intense 83-GHz beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  2. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.; Lombardi, Marcie; Kinkead, Allen K.; Gai, Wei; Power, John G.; Konecny, Richard; Long, Jidong; Jing, Chunguang; Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Bruce, Ralph W.; Lewis, David III

    2006-11-27

    This paper presents a progress report on a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the magnicon facility at NRL. The accelerator will be powered by an experimental 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that presently produces 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator will include a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate DLA structures up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by ANL, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC has developed components to distribute the power from the two magnicon output arms to the injector and to the DLA accelerating structure with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, has investigated means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by a brazing process using an intense 83-GHz beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  3. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O' Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  4. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  5. Development of a dedicated superconducting accelerator for positron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Oshima, N.; Kuroda, R.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.; Kinomura, A.; Hayashizaki, N.; Minehara, E.; Yamauchi, H.; Fukamizu, Y.; Shikibu, M.; Kawamoto, T.; Minehara, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the current status of a project to develop a dedicated superconducting accelerator for slow positron production at AIST. Two 500 MHz, 5 cell cavities will form the basis of the new accelerator. Initial set-up and preliminary design activities are reported.

  6. Grating-based deflecting, focusing, and diagnostic dielectric laser accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Ken; Byer, R. L.; Colby, E. R.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.

    2012-12-21

    Recent technological advances has made possible the realization of the first laser-driven particle accelerator structure to be fabricated lithographically. However, a complete particle accelerator requires more than just accelerating elements. In this paper, we present a grating-based design for three other quintessential accelerator elements: the focusing structure, the deflecting structure, and the diagnostic structure.

  7. Observation of multipactor suppression in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure using an applied axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Konecny, R.; Antipov, S.; Chang, C.; Gold, S. H.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.

    2013-11-18

    Efforts by a number of institutions to develop a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure capable of supporting high gradient acceleration when driven by an external radio frequency source have been ongoing over the past decade. Single surface resonant multipactor has been previously identified as one of the major limitations on the practical application of DLA structures in electron accelerators. In this paper, we report the results of an experiment that demonstrated suppression of multipactor growth in an X-band DLA structure through the use of an applied axial magnetic field. This represents an advance toward the practical use of DLA structures in many accelerator applications.

  8. Observation of multipactor suppression in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure using an applied axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, C.; Chang, C.; Gold, S. H.; Konecny, R.; Antipov, S.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gai, W.

    2013-11-01

    Efforts by a number of institutions to develop a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structure capable of supporting high gradient acceleration when driven by an external radio frequency source have been ongoing over the past decade. Single surface resonant multipactor has been previously identified as one of the major limitations on the practical application of DLA structures in electron accelerators. In this paper, we report the results of an experiment that demonstrated suppression of multipactor growth in an X-band DLA structure through the use of an applied axial magnetic field. This represents an advance toward the practical use of DLA structures in many accelerator applications.

  9. Progress toward externally powered x-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Liu, W.; Jing, C.; Gold, S. H.; Kinead, A. K.; Tantawi, S. G.; Dolgashev, V.; Kanareykin, A.; Konecny, R.; Wanming, L.

    2010-06-01

    We summarize recent progress in a program to develop externally powered dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures that can sustain high accelerating gradients. High-power RF tests of earlier structures showed strong multipactor loading. In addition, arcing at dielectric joints between the uniform DLA structure and matching sections at either end limited the achievable gradient. In this paper, we study the onset of multipactor in a DLA structure. We also study the effect of thin-film TiN coatings applied by atomic layer deposition and the effect of a reduction in the inner diameter of the structure. Test results of these structures show significant decreases in multipactor loading. We also test new structure designs that eliminate separate dielectric matching sections and, thus, the requirement for dielectric joints, including a DLA structure using a coaxial coupler and a clamped DLA structure. The clamped structure demonstrated a significantly improved gradient without breakdown.

  10. Efficient low-beta H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O' Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency room-temperature RF accelerating structures for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light by merging two well-known ideas: H-mode cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we have found that the H-mode structures with PMQ focusing provide a very efficient and practical accelerator for light-ion beams of considerable currents. Such accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications such as a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of a few MeV.

  11. Two-beam, Multi-mode Detuned Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, S. Yu.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A two-beam accelerator structure is described having several novel features including all metal construction, no transfer structures required between the drive and accelerator channels, symmetric fields at the axes of each channel, RF micropulse widths on cavity irises that are less than half those for a conventional cavity at the same fundamental frequency by virtue of using several harmonically-related cavity modes, and a transformer ratio much greater than unity by the use of detuned cavities. Detuning is also shown to allow either parallel or anti-parallel directions for the drive and accelerated beams. A preliminary calculation for the dilution of emittance due to short-range wakes for drive beam parameters similar to those for CLIC shows this effect to be acceptably small.

  12. Development of a Compact Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator at 11.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    This paper presents a progress report on the development of a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the Magnicon Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The accelerator will be powered by an 11.4-GHz magnicon amplifier that provides up to 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator includes a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures of up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Euclid Techlabs, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone rf testing at NRL at accelerating gradients up to 15 MV/m. The first stage of the accelerator, including the 5-MeV injector, has recently begun operation, and initial operation of the complete dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  13. Acceleration of stable interface structure searching using a kriging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Shin; Oda, Hiromi; Tsuda, Koji; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2016-04-01

    Crystalline interfaces have a tremendous impact on the properties of materials. Determination of the atomic structure of the interface is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the interface properties. Despite this importance, extensive calculation is necessary to determine even one interface structure. In this study, we apply a technique called kriging, borrowed from geostatistics, to accelerate the determination of the interface structure. The atomic structure of simplified coincidence-site lattice interfaces were determined using the kriging approach. Our approach successfully determined the most stable interface structure with an efficiency almost 2 orders of magnitude better than the traditional “brute force” approach.

  14. Development of compact linear accelerator in KBSI

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Won, Mi-Sook

    2012-02-15

    The compact linear accelerator using a 28 GHz ECRIS is under construction in KBSI, South Korea. The main capability of this facility is the production of fast neurons for the neutron radiography. The designing of a superconducting magnet, microwave transmission system, beam extraction, and plasma chamber of ECRIS were finished. The nominal axial design fields of the magnets are 3.6 T at injection and 2.2 T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2.1 T. We already installed 10 kW, 28 GHz gyrotron, and tested a microwave power from gyrotron using a dummy load. The current status will be discussed in this paper.

  15. Development of compact linear accelerator in KBSI.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Park, Jin Yong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Won, Mi-Sook

    2012-02-01

    The compact linear accelerator using a 28 GHz ECRIS is under construction in KBSI, South Korea. The main capability of this facility is the production of fast neurons for the neutron radiography. The designing of a superconducting magnet, microwave transmission system, beam extraction, and plasma chamber of ECRIS were finished. The nominal axial design fields of the magnets are 3.6 T at injection and 2.2 T at extraction; the nominal radial design field strength at the plasma chamber wall is 2.1 T. We already installed 10 kW, 28 GHz gyrotron, and tested a microwave power from gyrotron using a dummy load. The current status will be discussed in this paper. PMID:22380162

  16. Two-Channel Rectangular Dielectric Wake Field Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, G. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Didenko, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A design is presented for a two-channel 30-GHz rectangular dielectric wake field accelerator structure being built for experimental tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This structure allows for a transformer ratio T much greater than two, and permits continuous coupling of energy from drive bunches to accelerated bunches. It consists of three planar slabs of cordierite ceramic ({epsilon} = 4.7) supported within a rectangular copper block, forming a drive channel 12 mmx6 mm, and an accelerator channel 2 mmx6 mm. When driven by a 50 nC, 14 MeV single bunch available at ANL, theory predicts an acceleration field of 6 MeV/m, and T = 12.6. Inherent transverse wake forces introduce deflections and some distortion of bunch profiles during transit through the structure that are estimated to be tolerable. Additionally, a cylindrical two-channel DWFA is introduced which shares many advantages of the rectangular structure including high T, and the added virtue of axisymmetry that eliminates lowest-order transverse deflecting forces.

  17. The Organizational Culture and Structure of Accelerated Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steaffens, Susan; McCarthy, Jane; Putney, LeAnn; Steinhoff, Carl

    This paper describes the organizational culture and structure of five accelerated schools in the Clark County School District in Nevada, focusing on the similarities and differences among these schools. The cultural aspects of the schools under comparison included the guiding principles, the central values, and the learning philosophy, whereas the…

  18. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  19. Photonic Band Gap structures: A new approach to accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, N. |; Smith, D.R.; Schultz, S.

    1992-12-31

    We introduce a new accelerator cavity design based on Photonic Band Gap (PGB) structures. The PGB cavity consists of a two-dimensional periodic array of high dielectric, low loss cylinders with a single removal defect, bounded on top and bottom by conducting sheets. We present the results of both numerical simulations and experimental measurements on the PGB cavity.

  20. Summary Report of Working Group 7: Electromagnetic-Structure Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.; Musumeci, P.; /INFN, Rome

    2007-04-02

    We detail the most pressing physics and technical issues confronting short-wavelength acceleration. We review new acceleration concepts that are proposed and under development, and recent progress on technical issues such as structure fabrication and material damage. We outline key areas where work is still needed before a reliable assessment of the value of working at wavelengths below 1 cm can be made. Possible ways to enhance collaboration and progress in this important area are also discussed.

  1. Comparisons of radio frequency technology for superconducting accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimber, Andrew J.

    2015-12-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities, normal conducting as well as superconducting, there has been a need to drive them with RF power. At first glance, the function of an RF drive system may seem simple and straightforward, but this belies subtleties that greatly affect the performance of the cavity itself, diminishing efforts in perfecting techniques in design and manufacture. It can also contribute to a significant portion of the initial capital and ongoing running costs of a facility, maintenance labor, downtime and future expenditure as the system ages. The RF `system', should be thought of as just that, the entire collection of components from wall plug to cavity. Following this integrated approach will enable the system to meet or exceed its design goals. This paper seeks to review the current state of RF technology for superconducting structures and to compare these technologies, looking at what has traditionally been used, developments that have enabled higher efficiencies and higher reliabilities as well as looking towards future technologies. It will concentrate on superconducting applications, but much of the narrative is equally applicable to normal conducting structures as well.

  2. Improved input and output couplers for SC acceleration structure

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Latina, A.; Lunin, A.; Poloubotko, V.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Different couplers are described that allow the reduction of both transverse wake potential and RF kick in the SC acceleration structure of ILC. A simple rotation of the couplers reducing the RF kick and transverse wake kick is discussed for both the main linac and bunch compressors, along with possible limitations of this method. Designs of a coupler unit are presented which preserve axial symmetry of the structure, and provide reduced both the RF kick and transverse wake field.

  3. Calculation of structural dynamic forces and stresses using mode acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, Paul

    1989-01-01

    While the standard mode acceleration formulation in structural dynamics has often been interpreted to suggest that the reason for improved convergence obtainable is that the dynamic correction factor is divided by the modal frequencies-squared, an alternative formulation is presented which clearly indicates that the only difference between mode acceleration and mode displacement data recovery is the addition of a static correction term. Attention is given to the advantages in numerical implementation associated with this alternative, as well as to an illustrative example.

  4. Variable frequency heavy-ion linac, RILAC I. Design, construction and operation of its accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odera, Masatoshi; Chiba, Yoshiaki; Tonuma, Tadao; Hemmi, Masatake; Miyazawa, Yoshitoshi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Kambara, Tadashi; Kase, Masayuki; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Fusako

    1984-11-01

    A variable frequency linear accelerator at RIKEN (IPCR), which is named RILAC, is designed to accelerate ions of almost every element in the periodic table. In this report, the design, construction and performance of the resonator cavities of this linac are described. A new accelerating structure was developed for the variable frequency scheme. The principal aim of the development was to obtain a configuration within the cavity to keep a uniform voltage distribution along the accelerating axis over the wide range of resonant frequencies required. The final form adopted is a coaxial quarter-wave type resonator with a race-track-like cross section for its coaxial inner and outer conductors. It has a movable shorting device as a frequency tuner and its open end is enlarged and loaded with drift tubes, connected to the inner and outer conductors alternatingly. The structure can maintain the required uniformity of the accelerating voltage within 10% in spite of resonant frequency tuning between 17 and 45 MHz. A relatively modest accelerating gradient was chosen so that cw operation could be realized. The RILAC is composed of six such cavities which are independently excited and it succeeded in the acceleration of a beam through all the cavities in 1981.

  5. Simulations of Relativistic Collisionless Shocks: Shock Structure and Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Spitkovsky, Anatoly; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-10

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization (''sigma'' parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray bursts and pulsar wind outflows.

  6. Comparison of the conditioning of high gradient accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiovanni, Alberto; Wuensch, Walter; Giner Navarro, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Accelerating gradients in excess of 100 MV /m , at very low breakdown rates, have been successfully achieved in numerous prototype CLIC accelerating structures. The conditioning and operational histories of several structures, tested at KEK and CERN, have been compared and there is clear evidence that the conditioning progresses with the number of rf pulses and not with the number of breakdowns. This observation opens the possibility that the optimum conditioning strategy, which minimizes the total number of breakdowns the structure is subject to without increasing conditioning time, may be to never exceed the breakdown rate target for operation. The result is also likely to have a strong impact on efforts to understand the physical mechanism underlying conditioning and may lead to preparation procedures which reduce conditioning time.

  7. Developing of superconducting niobium cavities for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobol, I. L.; Yurevich, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of a study of structure and mechanical properties of welding joints, superconducting characteristics of the material after joining of welded components of superconducting radio frequency cavities are presented. The paper also describes the results of testing of the RF 1.3 GHz single-cell niobium cavity manufactured in the PTI NAS Belarus.

  8. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David; Sahinidis, N V; Cozad, A; Lee, A; Kim, H; Morinelly, J; Eslick, J; Yuan, Z

    2013-06-04

    This presentation reports development of advanced computational tools to accelerate next generation technology development. These tools are to develop an optimized process using rigorous models. They include: Process Models; Simulation-Based Optimization; Optimized Process; Uncertainty Quantification; Algebraic Surrogate Models; and Superstructure Optimization (Determine Configuration).

  9. Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans Accelerate Transthyretin Amyloidogenesis by Quaternary Structural Conversion†

    PubMed Central

    Bourgault, Steve; Solomon, James P.; Reixach, Natàlia; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are found in association with all extracellular amyloid deposits in humans, are known to accelerate the aggregation of various amyloidogenic proteins in vitro. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which GAGs accelerate amyloidogenesis remains elusive. Herein, we show that sulfated GAGs, especially heparin, accelerate transthyretin (TTR) amyloidogenesis by quaternary structural conversion. The clustering of sulfate groups on heparin and its polymeric nature are essential features for accelerating TTR amyloidogenesis. Heparin does not influence TTR tetramer stability or TTR dissociation kinetics, nor does it alter the folded monomer – misfolded monomer equilibrium directly. Instead, heparin accelerates the conversion of preformed TTR oligomers into larger aggregates. The more rapid disappearance of monomeric TTR in the presence of heparin likely reflects the fact that the monomer–misfolded amyloidogenic monomer–oligomer–TTR fibril equilibria are all linked—a hypothesis that is strongly supported by the light scattering data. TTR aggregates prepared in presence of heparin showed a higher resistance to trypsin and proteinase K proteolysis and a lower exposure of hydrophobic side chains comprising hydrophobic clusters, suggesting an active role in amyloidogenesis. Our data suggest that heparin accelerates TTR aggregation by a scaffold-based mechanism, in which the sulfate groups comprising GAGs interact primarily with TTR oligomers through electrostatic interactions, concentrating and orienting the oligomers, facilitating the formation of higher molecular weight aggregates. This model raises the possibility that GAGs may play a protective role in human amyloid diseases by interacting with proteotoxic oligomers and promoting their association into less toxic amyloid fibrils. PMID:21194234

  10. Enhanced Ion Acceleration from Micro-tube Structured Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    We present an enhanced ion acceleration method that leverages recent advancements in 3D printing for target fabrication. Using the three-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation code Virtual Laser-Plasma Lab (VLPL), we model the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with a micro-tube plasma (MTP) structured target. When compared to flat foils, the MTP target enhances the maximum proton energy by a factor of about 4. The ion enhancement is attributed to two main factors: high energy electrons extracted from the tube structure enhancing the accelerating field and light intensification within the MTP target increasing the laser intensity at the location of the foil. We also present results on ion energy scaling with micro-tube diameter and incident laser pulse intensity. This work was supported by the AFOSR under contract No. FA9550-14-1-0085.

  11. Research and development of capacitive transducer with linear acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Natalia; Kochurina, Elena; Timoshenkov, Sergey; Chaplygin, Yuriy; Anchutin, Stepan; Kosolapov, Andrey

    2015-05-01

    Paper presents the study results and modeling of functional characteristics of the linear acceleration transducers, enabling sensors creation with the specified parameters. Sensing element made for linear acceleration transducer with torsion cruciform section has been proposed on the based design and technological principles. It allows minimizing the impact of cross-acceleration and gives the maximum of center mass displacement for high sensors sensitivity in the given dimensions. The range of measured acceleration from ± 0.2g to ± 50g was provided by changing the torsion bar thickness n = 34 ÷ 56 microns. The transducers frequency range of linear acceleration 100-150 Hz depends on the gas pressure P = 700-800Pa in which the sensor element was located. Methods converting displacement of sensing element in the sensor output have been provided. On their basis the linear acceleration transducers with analog output signal having a predetermined frequency range and high linearity of the transformation (nonlinearity 0.2-1.5%) was developed. Also the linear acceleration transducers with digital signal consuming little (no more than 850 μA), low noisy (standard deviation to 0.1mg/rt-Hz) and high sensitivity (up to 0.1mg) to the accelerations was made. Errors in manufacturing process of sensitive elements and operating environment temperature affect the changes in the characteristics of the linear acceleration transducers. It has been established that different plate thickness up to 3.6% leads to the scale factor error to 4.7%. Irreproducibility of depth anisotropic etching of silicon up to 6.6% introduces an error in the output signal of 2.9 ... 13.8mg.

  12. Computational Tools to Accelerate Commercial Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the work reported are: to develop new computational tools and models to enable industry to more rapidly develop and deploy new advanced energy technologies; to demonstrate the capabilities of the CCSI Toolset on non-proprietary case studies; and to deploy the CCSI Toolset to industry. Challenges of simulating carbon capture (and other) processes include: dealing with multiple scales (particle, device, and whole process scales); integration across scales; verification, validation, and uncertainty; and decision support. The tools cover: risk analysis and decision making; validated, high-fidelity CFD; high-resolution filtered sub-models; process design and optimization tools; advanced process control and dynamics; process models; basic data sub-models; and cross-cutting integration tools.

  13. Status of high temperature superconductor development for accelerator magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirabayashi, H.

    1995-01-01

    High temperature superconductors are still under development for various applications. As far as conductors for magnets are concerned, the development has just been started. Small coils wound by silver sheathed Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 oxide conductors have been reported by a few authors. Essential properties of high T(sub c) superconductors like pinning force, coherent length, intergrain coupling, weak link, thermal property, AC loss and mechanical strength are still not sufficiently understandable. In this talk, a review is given with comparison between the present achievement and the final requirement for high T(sub c) superconductors, which could be particularly used in accelerator magnets. Discussions on how to develop high T(sub c) superconductors for accelerator magnets are included with key parameters of essential properties. A proposal of how to make a prototype accelerator magnet with high T(sub c) superconductors with prospect for future development is also given.

  14. Nb3Sn accelerator magnet development around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Lamm

    2003-06-23

    During the past 30 years superconducting magnet systems have enabled accelerators to achieve energies and luminosities that would have been impractical if not impossible with resistive magnets. By far, NbTi has been the preferred conductor for this application because of its ductility and insensitivity of Jc to mechanical strain. This is despite the fact that Nb{sub 3}Sn has a more favorable Jc vs. B dependence and can operate at much higher temperatures. Unfortunately, NbTi conductor is reaching the limit of it usefulness for high field applications. Despite incremental increases in Jc and operation at superfluid temperatures, magnets are limited to approximately a 10 T field. Improvements in conductor performance combined with future requirements for accelerator magnets to have bore fields greater than 10 T or operate in areas of large beam-induced heat loads now make Nb{sub 3}Sn look attractive. Thus, laboratories in several countries are actively engaged in programs to develop Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets for future accelerator applications. A summary of this important research activity is presented along with a brief history of Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnet development and a discussion of requirements for future accelerator magnets.

  15. Durability analysis of composite structures using the accelerated testing methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraishi, Akira

    The applications of composite materials are increasing significantly due to their excellent properties and design flexibility, and composite materials have completely replaced conventional metals in several applications. However, much larger opportunities will be likely to occur when physical bases for durability characterization become established. Polymeric composite materials are in general viscoelastic, and their stiffness and strength depend on temperature and loading rate. These effects play an important role in the long-term durability of the composite materials, and therefore it is important to develop a durability analysis method for composite structures that considers these effects. The present approach is based on three components, a new accelerated material characterization methodology, statistical analysis of this methodology, and conventional design tools tailored for the temperature and loading rate dependence. The material characterization methodology uses series of short-term tests at elevated temperatures to predict life for wide ranges of temperature and loading conditions. This methodology is based on the empirical relation between the effects of temperature and loading rate on the stiffness and strength of polymeric composite materials. The statistical analysis allows us to create the confidence interval of the prediction, which is essential in generating the design allowables. Common design tools such as failure criteria and cumulative damage laws can be tailored to consider the temperature and loading rate dependence. These components are integrated into the proposed durability analysis and design method for composite structures. The durability design of a composite rotor for the flywheel energy storage system is shown as an example. This example demonstrates that the proposed design method is not significantly different from conventional designs in terms of complexity and required effort.

  16. Accelerated larvae development of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs with ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladawi, M. A.; Albarodi, H.; Hammoudeh, A.; Shamma, M.; Sharabi, N.

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of UV radiation on the development of Ascaris lumbricoides larvae, eggs were exposed to increasing UV doses. Filtered wastewater from the secondary effluent taken from the Damascus wastewater treatment plant (DWTP) was used as irradiation and incubation medium. The progressive and accelerated embryonation stages were microscopically observed and the percentages of completely developed larvae were determined weekly. Results indicated that the UV radiation accelerated the development of larvae with increasing UV dose. Preliminary information about the relationship between the UV radiation dose and rate of embryonation is also presented.

  17. Space Launch System Accelerated Booster Development Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arockiam, Nicole; Whittecar, William; Edwards, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA is seeking to reinvigorate the national space program and recapture the public s interest in human space exploration by developing missions to the Moon, near-earth asteroids, Lagrange points, Mars, and beyond. The would-be successor to the Space Shuttle, NASA s Constellation Program, planned to take humans back to the Moon by 2020, but due to budgetary constraints was cancelled in 2010 in search of a more "affordable, sustainable, and realistic" concept2. Following a number of studies, the much anticipated Space Launch System (SLS) was unveiled in September of 2011. The SLS core architecture consists of a cryogenic first stage with five Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs), and a cryogenic second stage using a new J-2X engine3. The baseline configuration employs two 5-segment solid rocket boosters to achieve a 70 metric ton payload capability, but a new, more capable booster system will be required to attain the goal of 130 metric tons to orbit. To this end, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center recently released a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) entitled "Space Launch System (SLS) Advanced Booster Engineering Demonstration and/or Risk Reduction." The increased emphasis on affordability is evident in the language used in the NRA, which is focused on risk reduction "leading to an affordable Advanced Booster that meets the evolved capabilities of SLS" and "enabling competition" to "enhance SLS affordability. The purpose of the work presented in this paper is to perform an independent assessment of the elements that make up an affordable and realistic path forward for the SLS booster system, utilizing advanced design methods and technology evaluation techniques. The goal is to identify elements that will enable a more sustainable development program by exploring the trade space of heavy lift booster systems and focusing on affordability, operability, and reliability at the system and subsystem levels5. For this study

  18. Can hydromorphic conditions accelerate soil development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringer, Marianna; Kiss, Klaudia; Horváth-Szabó, Kata; Réka Balázs, Brigitta; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Szabó, Máté; Jakab, Gergely; Madarász, Balázs; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    The formation and development of waterlogged (hydromorphic) soils are primarily determined by long-term water saturation. The presence of water in the profile can result increasing speed of soil forming processes including the accumulation of organic matter or other components and mineralogical transformations. Original papers refer more than hundreds of years for this kinds of mineral transformations. We suppose that this process could be more rapid. This study focuses on the mineralogical investigation of a sandy meadow soil (calcic, gleyic Phaeozem ferric, arenic) located in a swampy area in Central Hungary. The starting time of the soil formation is a well documented fact: the parent material deposited during an extremely heavy flood event in the 1960s. Therefore, the studied soil profile is the result of the last half century. Our aim was to explore the degree of mineral phase alteration via soil formation during a half-century under hydromorphic conditions. Routine laboratory measurements (selective dissolution methods for the determination of amorphous and crystalline Fe, and Mn content, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy measurements for elemental composition determination, X-ray powder diffraction for mineralogical composition, and particle sizing by laser diffraction) were implemented. Morphological and chemical study of carbonate and iron nodules was carried out by electron microprobe. Simple chemical tests (eg. Fe2+ indication by dipiridil test) and morphological observations were performed on the field. Redox potential (Eh) and pH were measured in 20 cm and 40 cm depths by field monitoring station during the vegetation period. Results show that well developed horizons have emerged during fifty years in the studied soil profile. The most intense mineralogical transformations developed in the zone of the heaviest redox oscillation. Soil formation under hydromorphic conditions proceeds at higher speeds contrariwise to the century time scale reported in

  19. An accelerated fusion power development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.; Baker, Charles C.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Kinkead, Susan D.

    1991-06-01

    Energy for electricity and transportation is a national issue with worldwide environmental and political implications. The world must have energy options for the next century that are not vulnerable to possible disruption for technical, environmental, public confidence, or other reasons. Growing concerns about the greenhouse effect and the safety of transporting oil may lead to reduced burning of coal and other fossil fuels, and the incidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, as well as nuclear waste storage problems, have eroded public acceptance of nuclear fission. Meeting future world energy needs will require improvements in energy efficiency and conservation. However, the world will soon need new central station power plants and increasing amounts of fuel for the transportation sector. The use of fossil fuels, and possibly even fission power, will very likely be restricted because of environmental, safety, and, eventually, supply considerations. Time is running out for policymakers. New energy technologies cannot be brought to the marketplace overnight. Decades are required to bring a new energy production technology from conception to full market penetration. With the added urgency to mitigate deleterious environmental effects of energy use, policymakers must act decisively now to establish and support vigorous energy technology development programs. The U.S. has invested 8 billion over the past 40 years in fusion research and development. If the U.S. fusion program proceeds according to its present strategy, an additional 40 years, and more money, will be expended before fusion will provide commercial electricity. Such an extended schedule is neither cost-effective nor technically necessary. It is time to launch a national venture to construct and operate a fusion power pilot plant. Such a plant could be operational within 15 years of a national commitment to proceed.

  20. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  1. Accelerating Leadership Development via Immersive Learning and Cognitive Apprenticeship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Clark; Keegan, Kevin; Gluck, Charles; Gulick, Lisa M. V.

    2010-01-01

    The authors put forward an approach to leadership development that builds on the principle of accelerated learning. They argue that leadership development, particularly in a period of recession or slow economic growth, needs to deliver results more quickly and with fewer resources. Indeed, they raise the question of whether or not this is what is…

  2. No Time To Kill: Entrainment and Accelerating Courseware Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millington, Paula Crnkovich

    This paper examines the concept of time in multimedia, World Wide Web-based courseware development. The biological concept of entrainment (the alignment of rhythms within and between systems) to accelerate courseware development is explored. The discussion begins with the foundational concepts of entrainment from biological systems and social…

  3. Separations technology development to support accelerator-driven transmutation concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Arthur, E.; Bowman, C.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project investigated separations technology development needed for accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) concepts, particularly those associated with plutonium disposition (accelerator-based conversion, ABC) and high-level radioactive waste transmutation (accelerator transmutation of waste, ATW). Specific focus areas included separations needed for preparation of feeds to ABC and ATW systems, for example from spent reactor fuel sources, those required within an ABC/ATW system for material recycle and recovery of key long-lived radionuclides for further transmutation, and those required for reuse and cleanup of molten fluoride salts. The project also featured beginning experimental development in areas associated with a small molten-salt test loop and exploratory centrifugal separations systems.

  4. Space station structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teller, V. B.

    1986-01-01

    A study of three interrelated tasks focusing on deployable Space Station truss structures is discussed. Task 1, the development of an alternate deployment system for linear truss, resulted in the preliminary design of an in-space reloadable linear motor deployer. Task 2, advanced composites deployable truss development, resulted in the testing and evaluation of composite materials for struts used in a deployable linear truss. Task 3, assembly of structures in space/erectable structures, resulted in the preliminary design of Space Station pressurized module support structures. An independent, redundant support system was developed for the common United States modules.

  5. The coupled dipole modes of the NLC accelerator structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Gluckstern, R.; Holtkamp, N.

    1992-03-01

    The proposed accelerator cavity of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is a disk-loaded structure composed of 200 cells, operating at 11.42 GHz. The proposed mode of operation is to accelerate bunches in trains of 10, with a bunch spacing of 42 cm. One problem is that one bunch in a train can excite transverse wakefields in the accelerator cavity which, in turn, can deflect following bunches and result in emittance growth. A method of curing this problem is to detune the transverse modes of the cavity. Beam dynamics simulations for the NLC have shown that by keeping the transverse wakefield at the positions of the nine trailing bunches at or below 1 MW/nC/m{sup 2} we can void emittance growth. Earlier, approximate calculations of the wakefields, which did not include the cell-to-cell coupling of the modes, have shown that by the proper Gaussian detuning the above level of cancellation can be achieved. A specific goal of this report is to see if this conclusion still holds when coupling is included in the calculation. Note that in this paper we focus on the modes belonging to the first dipole passband, which are the most important. A special feature of these modes in the detuned NLC cavity is that the cell-to-cell coupling changes sign somewhere in the middle of the structure.

  6. Development of wide area environment accelerator operation and diagnostics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Akito; Furukawa, Kazuro

    2015-08-01

    Remote operation and diagnostic systems for particle accelerators have been developed for beam operation and maintenance in various situations. Even though fully remote experiments are not necessary, the remote diagnosis and maintenance of the accelerator is required. Considering remote-operation operator interfaces (OPIs), the use of standard protocols such as the hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP) is advantageous, because system-dependent protocols are unnecessary between the remote client and the on-site server. Here, we have developed a client system based on WebSocket, which is a new protocol provided by the Internet Engineering Task Force for Web-based systems, as a next-generation Web-based OPI using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System Channel Access protocol. As a result of this implementation, WebSocket-based client systems have become available for remote operation. Also, as regards practical application, the remote operation of an accelerator via a wide area network (WAN) faces a number of challenges, e.g., the accelerator has both experimental device and radiation generator characteristics. Any error in remote control system operation could result in an immediate breakdown. Therefore, we propose the implementation of an operator intervention system for remote accelerator diagnostics and support that can obviate any differences between the local control room and remote locations. Here, remote-operation Web-based OPIs, which resolve security issues, are developed.

  7. Mid-infrared Laser System Development for Dielectric Laser Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott

    Laser-driven particle accelerators based on dielectric laser acceleration are under development and exhibit unique and challenging pump requirements. Operation in the mid-infrared (5 μm) range with short pulses (<1 ps FWHM), high pulse energy (>500 μJ) and good beam quality is required. We present our progress on the design and development of a novel two- stage source of mid-infrared pulses for this application, which is based on optical parametric amplification. Beta barium borate and zinc germanium phosphide crystals are used, and are pumped by a Ti:sapphire ultrashort laser and seeded by self-phase modulation and parametric generation-based sources.

  8. Characteristics of large beam hole biperiodic accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.C.D.; Schriber, S.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large beam hole biperiodic rf structures operating at ..pi../2 mode with a/R of 0.31 and 0.51 have been studied. A larger beam hole reduces the amount of higher order mode excitations for modes with frequencies below the beam pipe cutoff frequency. Further reductions can be made by reducing the accelerating cell lengths. Endcell effects can be corrected by detuning the endcell; a residual field imbalance in the endcell remains because of the reduced coupling coefficient caused by field leakage into the beam pipe. The dependence of the coupling coefficient and cell frequency of a detuned cell has to be taken into account when a structure with a large tuning range is analyzed using a RLC equivalent circuit model. The reductions in the first neighbour coupling coefficient in the two structures with aperture radius 8 cm and 13 cm are respectively 0.023% and 0.056% per MHz increase in cell frequency. A comparison with a singly periodic structure operating in the ..pi.. mode shows that: The additional couplers in a biperiodic structure increase the energy loss slightly (9% in this case). Although the field flatness of a ..pi.. mode structure is worse than that of a ..pi../2 mode structure close to the design frequency, a singly periodic structure, which has no lossy couplers, may be preferred if a large tuning range is required. An 'idle' biperiodic structure can be detuned to reduce the Q and therefore cause less disturbance than a singly periodic structure.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT RADIOGRAPHY ACCELERATOR USING DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; McCarrick, J; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2005-06-02

    We are developing an inexpensive compact accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. Design characteristics are an 8 MeV endpoint energy, 2 kA beam current, a cell gradient of approximately 3 MV/m (for an overall accelerator length is 2-3 m), and <$1/Volt capital costs. Such designs have been made possible with the development of high specific energy dielectrics (>10J/cm{sup 3}), specialized transmission line designs and multi-gap laser triggered low jitter (<1 ns) gas switches. In this geometry, the pulse forming lines, switches, and insulator/beam pipe are fully integrated within each cell to form a compact, stand-alone, stackable unit. We detail our research and modeling to date, recent high voltage test results, and the integration concept of the cells into a radiographic system.

  10. Space Structure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The duration of my Summer 2015 Internship Tour at NASA's Johnson Space Center was spent working in the Structural Engineering Division's Structures Branch. One of the two main roles of the Structures Branch, ES2, is to ensure the structural integrity of spacecraft vehicles and the structural subsystems needed to support those vehicles. The other main objective of this branch is to develop the lightweight structures that are necessary to take humans beyond Low-Earth Orbit. Within ES2, my four projects involved inflatable space structure air bladder material testing; thermal and impact material testing for spacecraft windows; structural analysis on a joint used in the Boeing CST-100 airbag system; and an additive manufacturing design project.

  11. Accelerating Child Survival and Development in Dark Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, James P.

    Measures were proposed that would enable UNICEF, in association with others and despite prevailing difficult economic circumstances, to more effectively bring well-being and hope to hundreds of millions of children. Specific proposals were designed to help most countries accelerate child survival and development. Most particularly, it was…

  12. Accelerating Early Language Development with Multi-Sensory Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorn, Piia M.; Kakkuri, Irma; Karvonen, Pirkko; Leppanen, Paavo H. T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the outcome of a multi-sensory intervention on infant language skills. A programme titled "Rhyming Game and Exercise Club", which included kinaesthetic-tactile mother-child rhyming games performed in natural joint attention situations, was intended to accelerate Finnish six- to eight-month-old infants' language development. The…

  13. Prompt Gas Desorption Due to Ion Impact on Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Sagar; Seidl, Peter A.; Faltens, Andy; Lidia, Steven M.

    2011-10-01

    The repetition rate and peak current of high intensity ion accelerators for inertial fusion or other applications may be limited under certain conditions by the desorption of gas molecules and atoms due to stray ions striking the accelerator structure. We have measured the prompt yield of atoms in close proximity to the point of impact of the ions on a surface. Using the 300-keV, K+ ion beam of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I), ions strike a metal target in a 5-10 microsecond bunch. The collector of a Bayert-Alpert style ionization gauge is used to detect the local pressure burst several centimeters away. Pressure transients are observed on a micro-second time scale due to the initial burst of desorbed gas, and on a much longer (~1 second) timescale, corresponding to the equilibration of the pressure after many ``bounces'' of atoms in the vacuum chamber. We report on these time dependent pressure measurements, modeling of the pressure transient, and implications for high-intensity ion accelerators. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  14. Multipactor discharge in a dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Ang, L. K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a Monte-Carlo model to explain the multipactor discharge and its high-power absorption in a dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structure reported recently [J. G. Power et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 164801 (2004)]. Susceptibility diagrams are constructed. Dynamic calculations for beam loading and its power absorption by the multipactor discharge are performed. It is found that the fraction of power absorbed by multipactor discharge at saturation is much larger than the case of a simple rf window, and it is sensitive to the incident power, which confirms the prior experimental results. This enhanced power absorption is due to the fact that the length of a DLA structure is much larger than the radius of the structure. A resonant condition of a maximum growth region has also been determined numerically and analytically. The difference between the resonant condition and saturation (due to beam loading) is clarified.

  15. Niobium resonator development for high-brightness ion beam acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Roche, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    Two niobium resonant cavities for high-brightness ion beam acceleration have been constructed and tested. The first was based on a coaxial quarter-wave geometry and was optimized for phase velocity {beta}{sub o} = 0.15. This cavity, which resonates at 400 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average (wall-to-wall) accelerating gradient of 12.9 MV/m under continuous-wave (cw) fields. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured. The second was based on a coaxial half-wave geometry and was optimized for {beta}{sub o} = 0.12. This cavity, which resonates at 355 MHz in the fundamental mode, operated at an average accelerating gradient of 18.0 MV/m under cw fields. This is the highest average accelerating gradient achieved to date in low-velocity structures designed for cw operation. At this gradient, a cavity Q of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} was measured.

  16. Advanced low-beta cavity development for proton and ion accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Z. A.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2015-05-01

    Recent developments in designing and processing low-beta superconducting cavities at Argonne National Laboratory are very encouraging for future applications requiring compact proton and ion accelerators. One of the major benefits of these accelerating structures is achieving real-estate accelerating gradients greater than 3 MV/m very efficiently either continuously or for long-duty cycle operation (>1%). The technology has been implemented in low-beta accelerator cryomodules for the Argonne ATLAS heavy-ion linac where the cryomodules are required to have real-estate gradients of more than 3 MV/m. In offline testing low-beta cavities with even higher gradients have already been achieved. This paper will review this work where we have achieved surface fields greater than 166 mT magnetic and 117 MV/m electric in a 72 MHz quarter-wave resonator optimized for β = 0.077 ions.

  17. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  18. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  19. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test. PMID:26918995

  20. Development of a Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility Based on an X-Band Magnicon Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.; Tantawi, S. G.; Nantista, C. D.; Hu, Y.; Du, X.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R. W.; Bruce, R. L.; Lewis, D. III

    2006-01-03

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), are developing a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by the 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that was developed jointly by NRL and Omega-P, Inc. Thus far, DLA structures developed by ANL have been tested at the NRL Magnicon Facility without injected electrons, including tests of alumina and magnesium calcium titanate structures at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. The next step is to inject electrons in order to build a compact DLA test accelerator. The Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China has developed a 5-MeV electron injector for the accelerator, and SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive the injector and an accelerator section with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. Also, RWBruce Associates, working with NRL, is developing a means to join ceramic tubes to produce long accelerating sections using a microwave brazing process. The installation and commissioning of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  1. Development of an artificial climatic complex accelerated corrosion tester and investigation of complex accelerated corrosion test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Li, M.; Sun, Z. )

    1999-05-01

    During recent decades, accelerated corrosion test equipment and methods simulating atmospheric corrosion have been developed to incorporate the many factors involved in complex accelerated corrosion. A new accelerated corrosion tester was developed to simulate various kinds of atmospheric corrosion environments. The equipment can be used to simulate various types of atmospheric corrosion environments with up to eight factors and can be used to carry out 18 kinds of standard corrosion and environmental tasks.

  2. Design of 57.5 MHz cw RFQ structure for the rare isotope accelerator facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Tretyakova, T. E.

    2002-01-29

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility includes a driver linac for production of 400 kW CW heavy-ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy-ions delivered from an ECR ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz four-meter long RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are: (1) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance; (2) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation; (3) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. CW operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as, some aspects of the mechanical design of this low-frequency CW RFQ.

  3. Reduced-Order Simulation of Large Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Simon

    2007-11-01

    Simulating electromagnetic waves inside finite periodic or almost periodic three-dimensional structures is important to research in linear particle acceleration, high power microwave generation, and photonic bandgap structures. While eigenmodes of periodic structures can be determined from analysis of a single unit cell, based on Floquet theory, the general case of aperiodic structures, with defects or non-uniform properties, typically requires 3D electromagnetic simulation of the entire structure. When the structure is large and high accuracy is necessary this can require high-performance computing techniques to obtain even a few eigenmodes [1]. To confront this problem, we describe an efficient, field-based algorithm that can accurately determine the complete eigenmode spectrum for extended aperiodic structures, up to some chosen frequency limit. The new method combines domain decomposition with a non-traditional, dual eigenmode representation of the fields local to each cell of the structure. Two related boundary value eigenproblems are solved numerically in each cell, with (a) electrically shielded, and (b) magnetically shielded interfaces, to determine a combined set of basis fields. By using the dual solutions in our field representation we accurately represent both the electric and magnetic surface currents that mediate coupling at the interfaces between adjacent cells. The solution is uniformly convergent, so that typically only a few modes are used in each cell. We present results from 3D simulations that demonstrate the speed and low computational needs of the algorithm. [1] Z. Li, et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 558 (2006), 168-174.

  4. Conceptual design of an L-band recirculating superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure for ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Liu, Z.; Kazakov, S.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

    2007-06-01

    With this paper, we propose the conceptual design of a traveling wave accelerating structure for a superconducting accelerator. The overall goal is to study a traveling wave (TW) superconducting (SC) accelerating structure for ILC that allows an increased accelerating gradient and, therefore reduction of the length of the collider. The conceptual studies were performed in order to optimize the acceleration structure design by minimizing the surface fields inside the cavity of the structure, to make the design compatible with existing technology, and to determine the maximum achievable gain in the accelerating gradient. The proposed solution considers RF feedback system redirecting the accelerating wave that passed through the superconducting traveling wave acceleration (STWA) section back to the input of the accelerating structure. The STWA structure has more cells per unit length than a TESLA structure but provides an accelerating gradient higher than a TESLA structure, consequently reducing the cost. In this paper, the STWA cell shape optimization, coupler cell design and feedback waveguide solution are considered. We also discuss the field flatness in the superconducting TW structure, the HOM modes and multipactor performance have been studied as well. The proposed TW structure design gives an overall 46% gain over the SW ILC structure if the 10 m long TW structure is employed.

  5. Application of accelerators for the research and development of scintillators.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-08-01

    We introduce experimental systems which use accelerators to evaluate scintillation properties such as scintillation intensity, wavelength, and lifetime. A single crystal of good optical quality is often unavailable during early stages in the research and development (R&D) of new scintillator materials. Because of their beams' high excitation power and/or low penetration depth, accelerators facilitate estimation of the properties of early samples which may only be available as powders, thin films, and very small crystals. We constructed a scintillation spectrum measurement system that uses a Van de Graaff accelerator and an optical multichannel analyzer to estimate the relative scintillation intensity. In addition, we constructed a scintillation time profile measurement system that uses an electron linear accelerator and a femtosecond streak camera or a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube followed by a digital oscilloscope to determine the scintillation lifetimes. The time resolution is approximately 10 ps. The scintillation spectra or time profiles can be obtained in a significantly shorter acquisition time in comparison with that required by conventional measuring systems. The advantages of the systems described in this study can significantly promote the R&D of novel scintillator materials. PMID:17764319

  6. Advances in Parallel Electromagnetic Codes for Accelerator Science and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Kwok; Candel, Arno; Ge, Lixin; Kabel, Andreas; Lee, Rich; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Rawat, Vineet; Schussman, Greg; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    Over a decade of concerted effort in code development for accelerator applications has resulted in a new set of electromagnetic codes which are based on higher-order finite elements for superior geometry fidelity and better solution accuracy. SLAC's ACE3P code suite is designed to harness the power of massively parallel computers to tackle large complex problems with the increased memory and solve them at greater speed. The US DOE supports the computational science R&D under the SciDAC project to improve the scalability of ACE3P, and provides the high performance computing resources needed for the applications. This paper summarizes the advances in the ACE3P set of codes, explains the capabilities of the modules, and presents results from selected applications covering a range of problems in accelerator science and development important to the Office of Science.

  7. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods: introduction and recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Voter, Arthur F; Perez, Danny; Shim, Y; Amar, J G

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing limitation in the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is that it can only be applied directly to processes that take place on very short timescales: nanoseconds if empirical potentials are employed, or picoseconds if we rely on electronic structure methods. Many processes of interest in chemistry, biochemistry, and materials science require study over microseconds and beyond, due either to the natural timescale for the evolution or to the duration of the experiment of interest. Ignoring the case of liquids xxx, the dynamics on these time scales is typically characterized by infrequent-event transitions, from state to state, usually involving an energy barrier. There is a long and venerable tradition in chemistry of using transition state theory (TST) [10, 19, 23] to directly compute rate constants for these kinds of activated processes. If needed dynamical corrections to the TST rate, and even quantum corrections, can be computed to achieve an accuracy suitable for the problem at hand. These rate constants then allow them to understand the system behavior on longer time scales than we can directly reach with MD. For complex systems with many reaction paths, the TST rates can be fed into a stochastic simulation procedure such as kinetic Monte Carlo xxx, and a direct simulation of the advance of the system through its possible states can be obtained in a probabilistically exact way. A problem that has become more evident in recent years, however, is that for many systems of interest there is a complexity that makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine all the relevant reaction paths to which TST should be applied. This is a serious issue, as omitted transition pathways can have uncontrollable consequences on the simulated long-time kinetics. Over the last decade or so, we have been developing a new class of methods for treating the long-time dynamics in these complex, infrequent-event systems. Rather than trying to guess in advance what

  8. Comparative study of medium damped and detuned linear accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy et al.

    2001-08-22

    Long range wakefields are a serious concern for a future linear collider based on room temperature accelerating structures. They can be suppressed either by detuning and or local damping or with some combination of both strategies. Detuning relies on precisely phasing the contributions of the dipole modes excited by the passage of a single bunch. This is accomplished by controlling individual mode frequencies, a process which dictates individual cell dimensional tolerances. Each mode must be excited with the correct strength; this in turn, determines cell-to-cell alignment tolerances. In contrast, in a locally damped structure, the modes are attenuated at the cell level. Clearly, mode frequencies and relative excitation become less critical in that context; mechanical fabrication tolerances can be relaxed. While local damping is ideal from the stand-point of long range wakefield suppression, this comes at the cost of reducing the shunt impedance and possibly unacceptable localized heating. Recently, the Medium Damped Structure (MDS), a compromise between detuning and local damping, has generated some interest. In this paper, we compare a hypothetical MDS to the NLC Rounded Damped Detuned Structure (RDDS) and investigate possible advantages from the standpoint fabrication tolerances and their relation to beam stability and emittance preservation.

  9. H-mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Focusing for Low-Beta Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on results of the project developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of IH-PMQ structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. The H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications. Results of the combined 3-D modeling -- electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis -- for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of EM and beamdynamics modeling. Multi-particle simulations withParmela and CST Particle Studio have been used to confirm the design. Measurement results of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank are presented.

  10. Developments in Laser and Plasma-Based Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downer, Michael

    2001-04-01

    The explosive growth of multiterawatt laser technology combined with the increasing size and cost of conventional RF particle accelerators has driven intense research into more compact laser-driven and/or plasma based acceleration concepts. Although schemes for direct laser acceleration without plasmas or, conversely, plasma acceleration without lasers have been studied, the greatest recent progress has been made with concepts that combine lasers and plasmas [1]. Tajima and Dawson [2] proposed in 1979 that a sufficiently intense single laser pulse of duration t ω_p-1, or a pair of laser pulses with Δω ω_p, could be efficiently drive a longitudinal electron plasma wave with phase velocity approaching c via the ponderomotive force. Charged particles that "surf" such waves experience accelerating gradients (E 10^9 V/cm) as much as a thousand times greater than conventional RF accelerators. Numerous experiments have now demonstrated acceleration of up to 10^9 electrons per laser pulse to energies exceeding 100 MeV, with wide energy spread, but competitive beam emittance. Such sources have proven useful for nuclear activation analysis in their current form. However for such accelerators to be useful to a wider community, including high energy physics, key challenges must be addressed. These include: 1) Guiding terawatt laser pulses. Achieving useful laser intensities requires focusing, thus limiting interaction length to < 1 mm, whereas interaction lengths of several cm are needed to use laser energy efficiently and reach GeV acceleration in a single stage. Several groups are now developing high-throughput plasma "fibers" that have supported peak powers near a terawatt over > 1 cm without distortion [3]. 2) Phased injection. Since plasma waves with useful gradients have wavelengths of micron dimensions, charged particles must be injected with unprecedented spatial and temporal precision to achieve a monochromatic output beam. Several groups are developing new laser

  11. Advances in X-Band TW Accelerator Structures Operating in the 100 MV/M Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Higo, Toshiyasu; Higashi, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Shuji; Yokoyama, Kazue; Adolphsen, Chris; Dolgashev, Valery; Jensen, Aaron; Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Wang, Faya; Wang, Juwen; Dobert, Steffen; Grudiev, Alexej; Riddone, Germana; Wuensch, Walter; Zennaro, Riccardo; /CERN

    2012-07-05

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band accelerator structure development for CLIC has been ongoing for three years. The major outcome has been the demonstration of stable 100 MV/m gradient operation of a number of CLIC prototype structures. These structures were fabricated using the technology developed from 1994 to 2004 for the GLC/NLC linear collider initiative. One of the goals has been to refine the essential parameters and fabrication procedures needed to realize such a high gradient routinely. Another goal has been to develop structures with stronger dipole mode damping than those for GLC/NLC. The latter requires that the surface temperature rise during the pulse be higher, which may increase the breakdown rate. One structure with heavy damping has been RF processed and another is nearly finished. The breakdown rates of these structures were found to be higher by two orders of magnitude compared to those with equivalent acceleration mode parameters but without the damping features. This paper presents these results together with some of the earlier results from non-damped structures.

  12. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Benjamin M.; Paul, Kevin; Mullowney, Paul J.; Messmer, Peter; Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Esarey, Eric; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Leemans, Wim; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-22

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating >10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of {approx}2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  13. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Cowan, B.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Mullowney, P.J.; Messmer, P.; Esarey, E.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W.P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2008-09-10

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating>10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ~;;2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  14. PRSEUS Structural Concept Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velicki, Alex; Jegley, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    A lighter, more robust airframe is one of the key technological advancements necessary for the successful launch of any large next-generation transport aircraft. Such a premise dictates that considerable improvements beyond current state-of-the-art aluminum structures is needed, and that improvements of this magnitude will require an extensive use of composite materials that are not only lightweight, but also economical to produce. To address this challenge, researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company are developing a novel structural concept called the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. It is an integrally stiffened panel concept that is stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. In addition to improved structural performance, an important facet of this unique arrangement of stitched carbon fibers is its innovative manufacturing method that has the potential to lower fabrication costs by eliminating fasteners and autoclave cures. The rationale and development status for this new approach forms the basis of the work described in this paper. The test specimens described herein were fabricated, or are currently being fabricated, by The Boeing Company, while the structural analyses and testing tasks are being performed by NASA and Boeing personnel.

  15. Development of the brine shrimp Artemia is accelerated during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Metcalf, J.; DeBell, L.; Paulsen, A.; Noren, W.; Guikema, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Developmentally arrested brine shrimp cysts have been reactivated during orbital spaceflight on two different Space Shuttle missions (STS-50 and STS-54), and their subsequent development has been compared with that of simultaneously reactivated ground controls. Flight and control brine shrimp do not significantly differ with respect to hatching rates or larval morphology at the scanning and transmission EM levels. A small percentage of the flight larvae had defective nauplier eye development, but the observation was not statistically significant. However, in three different experiments on two different flights, involving a total of 232 larvae that developed in space, a highly significant difference in degree of flight to control development was found. By as early as 2.25 days after reactivation of development, spaceflight brine shrimp were accelerated, by a full instar, over ground control brine shrimp. Although developing more rapidly, flight shrimp grew as long as control shrimp at each developmental instar or stage.

  16. Theoretical Investigations of Plasma-Based Accelerators and Other Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Shuets, G.

    2004-05-21

    Theoretical investigations of plasma-based accelerators and other advanced accelerator concepts. The focus of the work was on the development of plasma based and structure based accelerating concepts, including laser-plasma, plasma channel, and microwave driven plasma accelerators.

  17. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  18. Development of a sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator

    PubMed

    Verbeke; Leung; Vujic

    2000-10-01

    Sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generators are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for applications ranging from neutron radiography to boron neutron capture therapy and neutron activation analysis. The new generation of high-output neutron generators is based on the D-T fusion reaction, producing 14.1-MeV neutrons. The main components of the neutron tube--the ion source, the accelerator and the target--are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Thick-target neutron yield computations are performed in this paper to estimate the neutron yield of titanium and scandium targets. With an average deuteron beam current of 1 A and an energy of 120 keV, a time-averaged neutron production of approximately 10(14) n/s can be estimated for a tritiated target, for both pulsed and cw operations. In mixed deuteron/triton beam operation, a beam current of 2 A at 150 keV is required for the same neutron output. Recent experimental results on ion sources and accelerator columns are presented and discussed. PMID:11003523

  19. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  20. A THz Coaxial Two-Channel Dielectric Wakefield Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2010-11-04

    A coaxial two-channel dielectric wakefield structure is examined for use as a high gradient accelerator. A THz design, having radius {approx}1 mm, is shown to provide GeV/m--level acceleration gradient, high transformer ratio, and stable accelerated bunch motion when excited by a stable-moving 5-GeV 6-nC annular drive bunch.

  1. A THz Coaxial Two-Channel Dielectric Wakefield Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2010-11-01

    A coaxial two-channel dielectric wakefield structure is examined for use as a high gradient accelerator. A THz design, having radius ˜1 mm, is shown to provide GeV/m—level acceleration gradient, high transformer ratio, and stable accelerated bunch motion when excited by a stable-moving 5-GeV 6-nC annular drive bunch.

  2. THE SPECIFIC ACCELERATION RATE IN LOOP-STRUCTURED SOLAR FLARES-IMPLICATIONS FOR ELECTRON ACCELERATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jingnan; Emslie, A. Gordon; Piana, Michele E-mail: piana@dima.unige.it

    2013-03-20

    We analyze electron flux maps based on RHESSI hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy data for a number of extended coronal-loop flare events. For each event, we determine the variation of the characteristic loop length L with electron energy E, and we fit this observed behavior with models that incorporate an extended acceleration region and an exterior 'propagation' region, and which may include collisional modification of the accelerated electron spectrum inside the acceleration region. The models are characterized by two parameters: the plasma density n in, and the longitudinal extent L{sub 0} of, the acceleration region. Determination of the best-fit values of these parameters permits inference of the volume that encompasses the acceleration region and of the total number of particles within it. It is then straightforward to compute values for the emission filling factor and for the specific acceleration rate (electrons s{sup -1} per ambient electron above a chosen reference energy). For the 24 events studied, the range of inferred filling factors is consistent with a value of unity. The inferred mean value of the specific acceleration rate above E{sub 0} = 20 keV is {approx}10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} spread of about a half-order-of-magnitude above and below this value. We compare these values with the predictions of several models, including acceleration by large-scale, weak (sub-Dreicer) fields, by strong (super-Dreicer) electric fields in a reconnecting current sheet, and by stochastic acceleration processes.

  3. Temporal Development of Auroral Acceleration Potentials: High-Altitude Evolutionary Sequences, Drivers and Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Wilber, M.; Chaston, C.; Bonnell, J.; Mozer, F.; McFadden, J.; Goldstein, M.; Fillingim, M.

    2007-12-01

    The region above the auroral acceleration region is an integral part of the auroral zone electrodynamic system. At these altitudes (≥ 3 Re) we find the source plasma and fields that determine acceleration processes occurring at lower altitudes, which play a key role in the transport of mass and energy into the ionosphere. Dynamic changes in these high-altitude regions can affect and/or control lower-altitude acceleration processes according to how field-aligned currents and specific plasma sources form and decay and how they are spatially distributed, and through magnetic configuration changes deeper in the magnetotail. Though much progress has been made, the time development and consequential effects of the high-altitude plasma and fields are still not fully understood. We present Cluster multi-point observations at key instances within and above the acceleration region (> 3 RE) of evolving auroral arc current systems. Results are presented from events occurring under different conditions, such as magnetospheric activity, associations with density depletions or gradients, and Alfvenic turbulence. A preliminary survey, primarily at or near the plasma sheet boundary, indicates quasi- static up-down current pair systems are at times associated with density depletions and other instances occur in association with density gradients. The data suggest that such quasi-static current systems may be evolving from structured Alfvenic current systems. We will discuss the temporal development of auroral acceleration potentials, plasma and currents, including quasi-static system formation from turbulent systems of structured Alfvenic field-aligned currents, density depletion and constituent reorganization of the source and ionospheric plasma that transpire in such systems. Of particular emphasis is how temporal changes in magnetospheric source plasma and fields affect the development of auroral acceleration potentials at lower altitudes.

  4. Parallel Computation of Integrated Electromagnetic, Thermal and Structural Effects for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Candel, A.E.; Kabel, A.C.; Ko, K.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    The successful operation of accelerator cavities has to satisfy both rf and mechanical requirements. It is highly desirable that electromagnetic, thermal and structural effects such as cavity wall heating and Lorentz force detuning in superconducting rf cavities can be addressed in an integrated analysis. Based on the SLAC parallel finite-element code infrastructure for electromagnetic modeling, a novel multi-physics analysis tool has been developed to include additional thermal and mechanical effects. The parallel computation enables virtual prototyping of accelerator cavities on computers, which would substantially reduce the cost and time of a design cycle. The multi-physics tool is applied to the LCLS rf gun for electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses.

  5. Parallel Computation of Intergrated Electronmagnetic, Thermal and Structural Effects for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, V.; Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L-Q.; Li, Z.; Ng, C-K.; Xiao, L.; Ko, K.

    2008-07-02

    The successful operation of accelerator cavities has to satisfy both rf and mechanical requirements. It is highly desirable that electromagnetic, thermal and structural effects such as cavity wall heating and Lorentz force detuning in superconducting rf cavities can be addressed in an integrated analysis. Based on the SLAC parallel finite-element code infrastructure for electromagnetic modeling, a novel multi-physics analysis tool has been developed to include additional thermal and mechanical effects. The parallel computation enables virtual prototyping of accelerator cavities on computers, which would substantially reduce the cost and time of a design cycle. The multi-physics tool is applied to the LCLS rf gun for electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses.

  6. Acceleration response spectrum for prediction of structural vibration due to individual bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Lei; Racic, Vitomir; Lou, Jiayue

    2016-08-01

    This study is designed to develop an acceleration response spectrum that can be used in vibration serviceability assessment of civil engineering structures, such as floors and grandstands those are dynamically excited by individual bouncing. The spectrum is derived from numerical simulations and statistical analysis of acceleration responses of a single degree of freedom system with variable natural frequency and damping under a large number of experimentally measured individual bouncing loads. Its mathematical representation is fit for fast yet reliable application in design practice and is comprised of three equations that describe three distinct frequency regions observed in the actual data: the first resonant plateau (2-3.5 Hz), the second resonant plateau (4-7 Hz) and a descension region (7-15 Hz). Finally, this paper verifies the proposed response spectrum approach to predict structural vibration by direct comparison against numerical simulations and experimental results.

  7. Latest Diagnostic Electronics Development for the PROSCAN Proton Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Duperrex, P.A.; Frei, U.; Gamma, G.; Mueller, U.; Rezzonico, L.

    2004-11-10

    New VME-based diagnostic electronics are being developed for PROSCAN, a proton accelerator for medical application presently under construction at PSI. One new development is a VME-based multi-channel logarithmic amplifier for converting current to voltage (LogIV). The LogIV boards are used for measuring current from the multiple wire (harp) profile monitors. The LogIV calibration method, current dependant bandwidth and temperature stability are presented. Another development is a BPM front end, based on the newest digital receiver techniques. Features of this new system are the remote control of the preamplifier stage and the continuous monitoring of each individual signal overall gain. Characteristics of the developed prototype are given.

  8. Development of the accelerator-driven energy production concept

    SciTech Connect

    Venneri, F.; Beard, C.; Bowman, C.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) offers a means of generating nuclear energy in a clean, safe way that can be attractive to the general public. However, there are issues associated with the energy story (both at the system level and technical detail) that have to be seriously addressed before the scientific community, the public, and potential industrial sponsors can be compellingly convinced of its cost/benefit.

  9. Ion acceleration and coherent structures generated by lower hybrid shear-driven instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, H.; Ganguli, G.; Lee, Y. C.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that if k = omega(S)/omega(LH) greater than 1 (omega(S) and omega(LH) are the shear and lower hybrid frequencies), a sheared electron cross-field flow excites the electron-ion-hybrid mode, causing significant perpendicular ion acceleration. The electric potential develops coherent structures (vortexlike) longer than the electron Larmor radius, rho(e). For k less than 1, a smooth transition occurs where the wavelength becomes of the order of rho(e), the lower hybrid drift instability dominates, and the formation of vortexlike structures is no longer observed. The results are relevant to laboratory, laser-produced, and space plasmas.

  10. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  11. Design and development of pulsed electron beam accelerator 'AMBICA - 600'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rishi; Deb, Pankaj; Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, Surender; Shyam, Anurag

    2012-11-01

    Short duration, high power pulses with fast rise time and good flat-top are essentially required for driving pulsed electron beam diodes. To attain this objective, a dual resonant Tesla transformer based pulsed power accelerator 'AMBICA-600' has been developed. In this newly developed system, a coaxial water line is charged through single turn Tesla transformer that operates in the dual resonant mode. For making the accelerator compact, in the high power pulse forming line, water has been used as dielectric medium because of its high dielectric constant, high dielectric strength and high energy density. The coaxial waterline can be pulsed charged up to 600kV, has impedance of ~5Ω and generates pulse width of ~60ns. The integrated system is capable of producing intense electron beam of 300keV, 60kA when connected to impedance matched vacuum diode. In this paper, system hardware details and experimental results of gigawatt electron beam generation have been presented.

  12. Studies of coupled cavity LINAC (CCL) accelerating structures with 3-D codes

    SciTech Connect

    Spalek, G.

    2000-08-01

    The cw CCL being designed for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project accelerates protons from 96 MeV to 211 MeV. It consists of 99 segments each containing up to seven accelerating cavities. Segments are coupled by intersegment coupling cavities and grouped into supermodules. The design method needs to address not only basic cavity sizing for a given coupling and pi/2 mode frequency, but also the effects of high power densities on the cavity frequency, mechanical stresses, and the structure's stop band during operation. On the APT project, 3-D RF (Ansoft Corp.'s HFSS) and coupled RF/structural (Ansys Inc.'s ANSYS) codes are being used. to develop tools to address the above issues and guide cooling channel design. The code's predictions are being checked against available low power Aluminum models. Stop band behavior under power will be checked once the tools are extended to CCDTL structures that have been tested at high power. A summary of calculations made to date and agreement with measured results will be presented.

  13. Two Channel Dielectric-Lined Rectangular High Transformer Ratio Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shchelkunov, S. V.; LaPointe, M. A.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G.; Gai, Wei; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Mihalcea, D.

    2010-11-04

    Current status of a two-channel cm-scale rectangular dielectric lined wakefield accelerator structure is described. This structure is installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility (AWA), and is presently being evaluated. The device has a transformer ratio of {approx}12.5:1. When driven by a {approx}50 nC single drive bunch it is expected to obtain {approx}6 MV/m acceleration gradient. Related issues are discussed.

  14. Improving and Accelerating Drug Development for Nervous System Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pankevich, Diana E.; Altevogt, Bruce M.; Dunlop, John; Gage, Fred H.; Hyman, Steve E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the neurosciences have placed the field in the position where it is poised to significantly reduce the burden of nervous system disorders. However, drug discovery, development and translation for nervous system disorders still pose many unique challenges. The key scientific challenges can be summarized as follows: mechanisms of disease, target identification and validation, predictive models, biomarkers for patient stratification and as endpoints for clinical trials, clear regulatory pathways, reliability and reproducibility of published data, and data sharing and collaboration. To accelerate nervous system drug development the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders has hosted a series of public workshops that brought together representatives of industry, government (including both research funding and regulatory agencies), academia, and patient groups to discuss these challenges and offer potential strategies to improve the translational neuroscience. PMID:25442933

  15. Development of high purity niobium used in SRF accelerating cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Xie, Wei-Ping; Li, Ming-Yang; He, Ji-Lin; Fan, Hui-Ru; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; He, Fei-Si; Zhao, Kui; Chen, Jia-Er; Liu, Ke-Xin

    2008-12-01

    Niobium is widely used in SRF (Superconducting Radio Frequency) cavities due to its excellent superconductivity and workability. With the continuous development of technology, higher demands of material are raised. One of the key issues is that RRR (Residual Resistance Ratio) of the Nb material should be more than 300, which requires that the Nb ingot have even higher RRR. This article introduces the development and the experimental results of high purity niobium in OTIC in Ningxia (Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co. Ltd.), and the test results of the single cell TESLA (Tera Electron volt energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) shaped cavity manufactured by Peking University using Nb material from OTIC. Supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2002CB713600)

  16. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Michael C.

    2014-12-19

    -15 seconds) in duration and 150 Joules in energy (equivalent to the muzzle energy of a small pistol bullet). This duration was well matched to the natural electron density oscillation period of plasma of 1/100 atmospheric density, enabling efficient excitation of a plasma wake, while this energy was sufficient to drive a high-amplitude wake of the right shape to produce an energetic, collimated electron beam. Continuing research is aimed at increasing electron energy even further, increasing the number of electrons captured and accelerated, and developing applications of the compact, multi-GeV accelerator as a coherent, hard x-ray source for materials science, biomedical imaging and homeland security applications. The second major advance under this project was to develop new methods of visualizing the laser-driven plasma wake structures that underlie laser-plasma accelerators. Visualizing these structures is essential to understanding, optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Yet prior to work under this project, computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions were the sole source of detailed knowledge of the complex, evolving internal structure of laser-driven plasma wakes. In this project we developed and demonstrated a suite of optical visualization methods based on well-known methods such as holography, streak cameras, and coherence tomography, but adapted to the ultrafast, light-speed, microscopic world of laser-driven plasma wakes. Our methods output images of laser-driven plasma structures in a single laser shot. We first reported snapshots of low-amplitude laser wakes in Nature Physics in 2006. We subsequently reported images of high-amplitude laser-driven plasma “bubbles”, which are important for producing electron beams with low energy spread, in Physical Review Letters in 2010. More recently, we have figured out how to image laser-driven structures that change shape while propagating in a single laser shot. The latter techniques, which use

  17. Highly Productive Application Development with ViennaCL for Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, K.; Weinbub, J.; Rudolf, F.

    2012-12-01

    The use of graphics processing units (GPUs) for the acceleration of general purpose computations has become very attractive over the last years, and accelerators based on many integrated CPU cores are about to hit the market. However, there are discussions about the benefit of GPU computing when comparing the reduction of execution times with the increased development effort [1]. To counter these concerns, our open-source linear algebra library ViennaCL [2,3] uses modern programming techniques such as generic programming in order to provide a convenient access layer for accelerator and GPU computing. Other GPU-accelerated libraries are primarily tuned for performance, but less tailored to productivity and portability: MAGMA [4] provides dense linear algebra operations via a LAPACK-comparable interface, but no dedicated matrix and vector types. Cusp [5] is closest in functionality to ViennaCL for sparse matrices, but is based on CUDA and thus restricted to devices from NVIDIA. However, no convenience layer for dense linear algebra is provided with Cusp. ViennaCL is written in C++ and uses OpenCL to access the resources of accelerators, GPUs and multi-core CPUs in a unified way. On the one hand, the library provides iterative solvers from the family of Krylov methods, including various preconditioners, for the solution of linear systems typically obtained from the discretization of partial differential equations. On the other hand, dense linear algebra operations are supported, including algorithms such as QR factorization and singular value decomposition. The user application interface of ViennaCL is compatible to uBLAS [6], which is part of the peer-reviewed Boost C++ libraries [7]. This allows to port existing applications based on uBLAS with a minimum of effort to ViennaCL. Conversely, the interface compatibility allows to use the iterative solvers from ViennaCL with uBLAS types directly, thus enabling code reuse beyond CPU-GPU boundaries. Out-of-the-box support

  18. Development of an annular arc accelerator shock tube driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator (ANAA) shock tube driver has been developed that deposits the energy of an arc discharge into a flowing gas, which then expands and cools without any delay for the opening of a diaphragm. A simplified one-dimensional flow analysis of the ANAA shock tube has been performed, which indicates that shock velocities greater than 40 km/sec may be obtained using a 300-kJ capacitor bank. The ANAA driver consists of a high-pressure driver, an expansion section, and an electrode section. In operation, the cold gas driver is pressurized until the diaphragm bursts, sending a pressure front down the expansion tube to the arc section. When the accelerated flow arrives at the electrode section, a 100-capacitor, 300-kJ capacitor bank is discharged either by breaking an insulating diaphragm between the electrodes or by the triggering of a series of external switches. Shock velocities of 28 km/sec have been obtained, and modifications are described that are expected to improve performance.

  19. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  20. Progress In Plasma Accelerator Development for Dynamic Formation of Plasma Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Cassibry, Jason T.; Griffin, Steven; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental plasma accelerator for magnetic target fusion (MTF) applications under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is described. The accelerator is a coaxial pulsed plasma thruster (Figure 1). It has been tested experimentally and plasma jet velocities of approx.50 km/sec have been obtained. The plasma jet has been photographed with 10-ns exposure times to reveal a stable and repeatable plasma structure (Figure 2). Data for velocity profile information has been obtained using light pipes and magnetic probes embedded in the gun walls to record the plasma and current transit respectively at various barrel locations. Preliminary spatially resolved spectral data and magnetic field probe data are also presented. A high speed triggering system has been developed and tested as a means of reducing the gun "jitter". This jitter is being characterized and future work for second generation "ultra-low jitter" gun development is being identified.

  1. The buncher optimization for the biperiodic accelerating structure with the high-frequency focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, A. I.

    2006-03-01

    The bunching part optimization results of an on-axis-coupled biperiodic accelerating structure for electron linac with high-frequency focusing are presented. System is intended for operation in the continuous regime at operating frequency of 2856 MHz and input power 5.5 MW. The basic development challenge for such installations on average input currents is the effective beam transfer through the structure. Some variants of the bunching sections distinguished by number of bunching cells were considered. The optimum capture ratio and an acceptable spectrum are provided by structure with five bunching cells. Optimization was carried out by means of dynamics simulation code PARMELA and a package of applied programs for the axial symmetric structures calculation SUPERFISH. Taking into account, space-charge limitation, the maximum capture ratio is 55%.

  2. Developing an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) based on electron accelerators and heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizi, H.; Ranjbar, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    An ADS based on electron accelerators has been developed specifically for energy generation and medical applications. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using FLUKA code to design a hybrid electron target and the core components. The composition, geometry of conversion targets and the coolant system have been optimized for electron beam energies of 20 to 100 MeV . Furthermore, the photon and photoneutron energy spectra, distribution and energy deposition for various incoming electron beam powers have been studied. Light-heavy water of various mixtures have been used as heat removal for the targets, as γ-n converters and as neutron moderators. We have shown that an electron LINAC, as a neutron production driver for ADSs, is capable of producing a neutron output of > 3.5 × 1014 (n/s/mA). Accordingly, the feasibility of an electron-based ADS employing the designed features is promising for energy generation and high intense neutron production which have various applications such as medical therapies.

  3. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Kishek, Rami

    2014-07-25

    This final report summarizes the research performed during the time period from 8/1/2010 to 7/31/2013. It consists of two parts describing our studies in two directions: (a) analysis of factors limiting operation of dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures where the main problem is the occurrence of multipactor on dielectric surfaces, and (b) studies of effects associated with either RF magnetic or RF electric fields which may cause the RF breakdown in high-gradient metallic accelerating structures. In the studies of DLA structures, at least, two accomplishments should be mentioned: the development of a 3D non-stationary, self-consistent code describing the multipactor phenomena and yielding very good agreement with some experimental data obtained in joint ANL/NRL experiments. In the metallic structures, such phenomena as the heating and melting of micro-particles (metallic dust) by RF electric and magnetic fields in single-shot and rep-rate regimes is analyzed. Also, such processes in micro-protrusions on the structure surfaces as heating and melting due to the field emitted current and the Nottingham effect are thoroughly investigated with the account for space charge of emitted current on the field emission from the tip.

  4. Development of an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer based on a Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dogyun; Bhang, Hyeongchan; Kim, Jongwon

    2011-12-13

    An accelerator mass spectrometer based on a cyclotron has been developed, and a prototype of the injection beam line has been constructed. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is designed to be over 4000. A sawtooth RF buncher in the beam line and a flat-topping RF system for the cyclotron were utilized to enhance beam transmission efficiency, which is a primary factor for improvement compared to previous cyclotron mass spectrometers. The injection beam line comprises an ion source, Einzel lens, RF buncher, 90 deg. dipole magnet and a slit box containing beam diagnostic devices. A carbon beam was measured at the location of the slit box, and beam phase spaces will be measured. The design of a cyclotron magnet was done, and orbit tracking was carried out using cyclotron optics codes. A scheme of radial injection was chosen to place a beam on the equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection scheme will be optimized after the beam measurements are completed.

  5. Status and Future Developments in Large Accelerator Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. White

    2006-10-31

    Over the years, accelerator control systems have evolved from small hardwired systems to complex computer controlled systems with many types of graphical user interfaces and electronic data processing. Today's control systems often include multiple software layers, hundreds of distributed processors, and hundreds of thousands of lines of code. While it is clear that the next generation of accelerators will require much bigger control systems, they will also need better systems. Advances in technology will be needed to ensure the network bandwidth and CPU power can provide reasonable update rates and support the requisite timing systems. Beyond the scaling problem, next generation systems face additional challenges due to growing cyber security threats and the likelihood that some degree of remote development and operation will be required. With a large number of components, the need for high reliability increases and commercial solutions can play a key role towards this goal. Future control systems will operate more complex machines and need to present a well integrated, interoperable set of tools with a high degree of automation. Consistency of data presentation and exception handling will contribute to efficient operations. From the development perspective, engineers will need to provide integrated data management in the beginning of the project and build adaptive software components around a central data repository. This will make the system maintainable and ensure consistency throughout the inevitable changes during the machine lifetime. Additionally, such a large project will require professional project management and disciplined use of well-defined engineering processes. Distributed project teams will make the use of standards, formal requirements and design and configuration control vital. Success in building the control system of the future may hinge on how well we integrate commercial components and learn from best practices used in other industries.

  6. The ANL experiment for a wake field accelerator using an rf structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1986-08-27

    Experiments are planned at ANL to study a new accelerating concept that has been developed during the last few years named the WAKEATRON. This requires a very special, simple configuration of the beams and of the rf structure involved. The basic concepts are explained. Like most proposed experimental work, this too was initiated by a considerable amount of computational work, both analytical and numerical, on which we would like to report. We will then describe details of the planned experiments we will carry out at ANL to check some of our predictions for this concept. These experiments concentrate on beam and cavity geometry applicable to the Wakeatron.

  7. Accelerate!

    PubMed

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves. PMID:23155997

  8. Accelerating structure design and fabrication for KIPT and PAL XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Mi; He, Xiang; Pei, Shi-Lun; Na, Bin; Chi, Yun-Long

    2015-05-01

    ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) and the National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics Technology” (NSC KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine) jointly propose to design and build a 100 MeV/100 kW linear accelerator which will be used to drive the neutron source subcritical assembly. The linac has almost finished assembly in KIPT by a team from the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP, Beijing, China). The design and measurement result of the accelerating system of the linac will be described in this paper.

  9. Auroral ion acceleration from lower hybrid solitary structures: A summary of sounding rocket observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Schuck, P.; Bonnell, J. W.; Coffey, V.

    In this paper we present a review of sounding rocket observations of the ion acceleration seen in nightside auroral zone lower hybrid solitary structures. Observations from Topaz3, Amicist, and Phaze2 are presented on various spatial scales, including the two-point measurements of the Amicist mission. From this collection of observations we will demonstrate the following characteristics of transverse acceleration of ions (TAI) in lower hybrid solitary structures (LHSS). The ion acceleration process is narrowly confined to 90° pitch angle, in spatially confined regions of up to a few hundred meters across B. The acceleration process does not affect the thermal core of the ambient distribution and does not directly create a measurable effect on the ambient ion population outside the LHSS themselves. This precludes observation with these data of any nonlinear feedback between the ion acceleration and the existence or evolution of the density irregularities on which these LHSS events grow. Within the LHSS region the acceleration process creates a high-energy tail beginning at a few times the thermal ion speed. The ion acceleration events are closely associated with localized wave events. Accelerated ions bursts are also seen without a concurrent observation of a localized wave event, for two possible reasons. In some cases, the pitch angles of the accelerated tail ions are elevated above perpendicular; that is, the acceleration occurred below the observer and the mirror force has begun to act upon the distribution, moving it upward from the source. In other cases, the accelerated ion structure is spatially larger than the wave event structure, and the observation catches only the ion event. The occurrence rate of these ion acceleration events is related to the ambient environment in two ways: its altitude dependence can be modeled with the parameter B2/ne, and it is highest in regions of intense VLF activity. The cumulative ion outflow from these LHSS TAI is

  10. Accelerating technology development through integrated computation and experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Srivastava, Rameshwar

    2013-01-01

    This special section of Energy & Fuels comprises a selection of papers presented at the topical conference “Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation”, sponsored and organized by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting held in Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 28−Nov 2, 2012. That topical conference focused on the latest research and development efforts in five main areas related to fossil energy, with each area focusing on the utilization of both experimental and computational approaches: (1) gas separations (membranes, sorbents, and solvents for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} production), (2) CO{sub 2} utilization (enhanced oil recovery, chemical production, mineralization, etc.), (3) carbon sequestration (flow in natural systems), (4) advanced power cycles (oxy-combustion, chemical looping, gasification, etc.), and (5) fuel processing (H{sub 2} production for fuel cells).

  11. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway Development Using Publicly Available Data Sources.

    PubMed

    Oki, Noffisat O; Nelms, Mark D; Bell, Shannon M; Mortensen, Holly M; Edwards, Stephen W

    2016-03-01

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) concept links molecular perturbations with organism and population-level outcomes to support high-throughput toxicity (HTT) testing. International efforts are underway to define AOPs and store the information supporting these AOPs in a central knowledge base; however, this process is currently labor-intensive and time-consuming. Publicly available data sources provide a wealth of information that could be used to define computationally predicted AOPs (cpAOPs), which could serve as a basis for creating expert-derived AOPs in a much more efficient way. Computational tools for mining large datasets provide the means for extracting and organizing the information captured in these public data sources. Using cpAOPs as a starting point for expert-derived AOPs should accelerate AOP development. Coupling this with tools to coordinate and facilitate the expert development efforts will increase the number and quality of AOPs produced, which should play a key role in advancing the adoption of HTT testing, thereby reducing the use of animals in toxicity testing and greatly increasing the number of chemicals that can be tested. PMID:26809562

  12. Numerically optimized structures for dielectric asymmetric dual-grating laser accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Aimidula, A.; Bake, M. A.; Wan, F.; Xie, B. S.; Welsch, C. P.; Xia, G.; Mete, O.; Uesaka, M.; Matsumura, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Koyama, K.

    2014-02-15

    Optical scale dielectric structures are promising candidates to realize future compact, low cost particle accelerators, since they can sustain high acceleration gradients in the range of GeV/m. Here, we present numerical simulation results for a dielectric asymmetric dual-grating accelerator. It was found that the asymmetric dual-grating structures can efficiently modify the laser field to synchronize it with relativistic electrons, therefore increasing the average acceleration gradient by ∼10% in comparison to symmetric structures. The optimum pillar height which was determined by simulation agrees well with that estimated analytically. The effect of the initial kinetic energy of injected electrons on the acceleration gradient is also discussed. Finally, the required laser parameters were calculated analytically and a suitable laser is proposed as energy source.

  13. Experimental demonstration of wakefield effects in a THz planar diamond accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Butler, J. E.; Yakimenko, V.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Gai, W.

    2012-03-26

    We have directly measured THz wakefields induced by a subpicosecond, intense relativistic electron bunch in a diamond loaded accelerating structure via the wakefield acceleration method. We present here the beam test results from the diamond based structure. Diamond has been chosen for its high breakdown threshold and unique thermoconductive properties. Fields produced by a leading (drive) beam were used to accelerate a trailing (witness) electron bunch, which followed the drive bunch at a variable distance. The energy gain of a witness bunch as a function of its separation from the drive bunch describes the time structure of the generated wakefield.

  14. e-/e+ Accelerating Structure with Cyclic Variation of Azimuth Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2007-03-05

    A classical electron/positron accelerating structure is a disk-loaded cylindrical waveguide. The accelerator structure here has azimuth symmetry. The proposed structure contains a disk-loaded cylindrical waveguide where there is a periodical change of RF-field vs. azimuth. The modulation deforms the rf-field in such a manner that the accelerated particles undergo transverse focusing forces. The new class of accelerator structures covers the initial part of e+/e- linacs where a bunch is not rigid and additional transverse focusing fields are necessary. We discuss a bunch formation with a high transverse aspect ratio in the proposed structure and particularly in the photoinjector part of a linac.

  15. Development of Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Accelerator Magnet Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D. R.; English, C. D.; Felice, H.; Hannaford, C. R.; Prestemon, S. O.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R. M.; Hikichi, Y.; Nishioka, J.; Hasegawa, T.

    2007-08-28

    We report on the progress in our R&D program, targeted to develop the technology for the application of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi-2212) in accelerator magnets. The program uses subscale coils, wound from insulated cables, to study suitable materials, heat treatment homogeneity, stability, and effects of magnetic field and thermal and electro-magnetic loads. We have addressed material and reaction related issues and report on the fabrication, heat treatment, and analysis of subscale Bi-2212 coils. Such coils can carry a current on the order of 5000 A and generate, in various support structures, magnetic fields from 2.6 to 9.9 T. Successful coils are therefore targeted towards a hybrid Nb3Sn-HTS magnet which will demonstrate the feasibility of Bi-2212 for accelerator magnets, and open a new magnetic field realm, beyond what is achievable with Nb3Sn.

  16. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerating Structure as a Source of Terahertz Coherent Cerenkov Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A. M.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Badakov, H.; Travish, G.; Tikhoplav, R.; Williams, O. B.; England, R. J.; Thompson, M. C.

    2006-11-27

    We discuss future experimental work proposed to study the performance of a cylindrical dielectric wakefield accelerating structure as a coherent Cerenkov radiation source at the Neptune laboratory at UCLA. The Cerenkov wakefield acceleration experiment carried out recently by UCLA/SLAC/USC, using the ultrashort and high charge beam (Q = 3 nC, {sigma}z = 20 micron) at the SLAC FFTB, demonstrated electromagnetic wakes at the few GV/m level. The motivation of our prospective experiment is to investigate the operation of a similar scenario using the comparatively long pulse, low charge beam (Q = 0.5 nC, {sigma}z = 200 micron) at UCLA Neptune. The field amplitude produced in this setup would be one to two orders of magnitude lower, at the few tens to few 100 MV/m level. Such a decelerating field would extract a significant amount of energy from a low-energy beam in a distance on the order of a few centimeters, allowing the use of short dielectric structures. We discuss details of the geometry and composition of the structures to be used in the experiment. We also examine the possibility of a future dedicated facility at UCLA Neptune based on a hybrid photoinjector currently in development. The intrinsic bunch compression capabilities and improved beam parameters ({sigma}z = 100 micron, Q = 1 nC) of the photoinjector would allow the creation of a high power radiation source in the terahertz regime.

  17. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Broadhurst, John H.

    1989-01-01

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  18. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  19. Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development with Multiple Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Bench, G

    2009-08-19

    A fundamental issue in nuclear energy is the changes in material properties as a consequence of time, temperature, and neutron fluence. Usually, candidate materials for nuclear energy applications are tested in nuclear reactors to understand and model the changes that arise from a combination of atomic displacements, helium and hydrogen production, and other nuclear transmutations (e.g. fission and the production of fission products). Experiments may be carried out under neutron irradiation conditions in existing nuclear materials test reactors (at rates of 10 to 20 displacements per atom (DPA) per year or burn-up rates of a few percent per year for fertile fuels), but such an approach takes much too long for many high neutron fluence scenarios (300 DPA for example) expected in reactors of the next generation. Indeed it is reasonable to say that there are no neutron sources available today to accomplish sufficiently rapid accelerated aging let alone also provide the temperature and spectral characteristics of future fast spectrum nuclear energy systems (fusion and fission both). Consequently, materials research and development progress continues to be severely limited by this bottleneck.

  20. Potential structures and particle acceleration on auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, D. J.

    1985-05-01

    In the 1970's major advances in the understanding of auroral processes were brought about by observations of plasmas and electric fields within the regions of space responsible for auroral particle acceleration. The major contribution of these observations was the verification of the existence of electric fields with components parallel to the magnetic field over large regions of altitude (1000 to 20000 kilometers). These electric fields constitute potential drops of several kilovolts, accelerating magnetospheric electrons downward to form the aurora and ionospheric ions upward, where they contribute significantly to the magnetospheric hot ion population. Perpendicular spatial scales of about 100 kilometers are most common, although finer scales have been observed embedded, and individual small amplitude double layers occur on much smaller parallel spatial scales. More recently, the same data sets have revealed the existance of about 100 V electric potential drops directed downward in return current regions. Downward electric fields are in a direction to accelerate electrons out of the ionsphere and tend to retard the propagation of ions upward. An association between upflowing electron beams and transversely heated ions at low altitude has been noted, and a casual relationship between downward electric fields and ion conics is suggested.

  1. Vibration-Based Method Developed to Detect Cracks in Rotors During Acceleration Through Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in developing rotating machinery shaft crack-detection methodologies and online techniques. Shaft crack problems present a significant safety and loss hazard in nearly every application of modern turbomachinery. In many cases, the rotors of modern machines are rapidly accelerated from rest to operating speed, to reduce the excessive vibrations at the critical speeds. The vibration monitoring during startup or shutdown has been receiving growing attention (ref. 1), especially for machines such as aircraft engines, which are subjected to frequent starts and stops, as well as high speeds and acceleration rates. It has been recognized that the presence of angular acceleration strongly affects the rotor's maximum response to unbalance and the speed at which it occurs. Unfortunately, conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods have unacceptable limits in terms of their application for online crack detection. Some of these techniques are time consuming and inconvenient for turbomachinery service testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage be known in advance, and they can provide only local information, with no indication of the structural strength at a component or system level. In addition, the effectiveness of these experimental techniques is affected by the high measurement noise levels existing in complex turbomachine structures. Therefore, the use of vibration monitoring along with vibration analysis has been receiving increasing attention.

  2. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P.; Koppelman, David M.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J.; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249. PMID:27420300

  3. GeauxDock: Accelerating Structure-Based Virtual Screening with Heterogeneous Computing.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye; Ding, Yun; Feinstein, Wei P; Koppelman, David M; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Ramanujam, J; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of drug binding to proteins is an integral component of direct drug design. Particularly, structure-based virtual screening is often used to perform large-scale modeling of putative associations between small organic molecules and their pharmacologically relevant protein targets. Because of a large number of drug candidates to be evaluated, an accurate and fast docking engine is a critical element of virtual screening. Consequently, highly optimized docking codes are of paramount importance for the effectiveness of virtual screening methods. In this communication, we describe the implementation, tuning and performance characteristics of GeauxDock, a recently developed molecular docking program. GeauxDock is built upon the Monte Carlo algorithm and features a novel scoring function combining physics-based energy terms with statistical and knowledge-based potentials. Developed specifically for heterogeneous computing platforms, the current version of GeauxDock can be deployed on modern, multi-core Central Processing Units (CPUs) as well as massively parallel accelerators, Intel Xeon Phi and NVIDIA Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). First, we carried out a thorough performance tuning of the high-level framework and the docking kernel to produce a fast serial code, which was then ported to shared-memory multi-core CPUs yielding a near-ideal scaling. Further, using Xeon Phi gives 1.9× performance improvement over a dual 10-core Xeon CPU, whereas the best GPU accelerator, GeForce GTX 980, achieves a speedup as high as 3.5×. On that account, GeauxDock can take advantage of modern heterogeneous architectures to considerably accelerate structure-based virtual screening applications. GeauxDock is open-sourced and publicly available at www.brylinski.org/geauxdock and https://figshare.com/articles/geauxdock_tar_gz/3205249. PMID:27420300

  4. Development of Bipolar Pulse Accelerator for Pulsed Ion Beam Implantation to Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Kawahara, Yoshihiro; Mitsui, Chihiro; Kitamura, Iwao; Takahashi, Takakazu; Tanaka, Yasunori; Tanoue, Hisao; Arai, Kazuo

    2002-12-01

    To improve the purity of the ion beams new type of pulsed power ion accelerator named "bipolar pulse accelerator" was proposed. The accelerator consists of two acceleration gaps (an ion source gap and a post acceleration gap) and a drift tube, and a bipolar pulse is applied to the drift tube to accelerate the beam. In the accelerator intended ions are selectively accelerated and the purity of the ion beam is enhanced. As the first step of the development of the accelerator, a Br-type magnetically insulated acceleration gap is developed. The gap has an ion source of coaxial gas puff plasma gun on the grounded anode and a negative pulse is applied to the cathode to accelerate the ion beam. By using the plasma gun, ion source plasma (nitrogen) of current density around 100 A/cm2 is obtained. In the paper, the experimental results of the evaluation of the ion beam and the characteristics of the gap are shown with the principle and the design concept of the proposed accelerator.

  5. Acceleration of the GAMESS-UK electronic structure package on graphical processing units.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Karl A; Sherwood, Paul; Guest, Martyn F; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2011-07-30

    The approach used to calculate the two-electron integral by many electronic structure packages including generalized atomic and molecular electronic structure system-UK has been designed for CPU-based compute units. We redesigned the two-electron compute algorithm for acceleration on a graphical processing unit (GPU). We report the acceleration strategy and illustrate it on the (ss|ss) type integrals. This strategy is general for Fortran-based codes and uses the Accelerator compiler from Portland Group International and GPU-based accelerators from Nvidia. The evaluation of (ss|ss) type integrals within calculations using Hartree Fock ab initio methods and density functional theory are accelerated by single and quad GPU hardware systems by factors of 43 and 153, respectively. The overall speedup for a single self consistent field cycle is at least a factor of eight times faster on a single GPU compared with that of a single CPU. PMID:21541963

  6. Brain Structure and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teyler, T.J.; Chiaia, N.

    1983-01-01

    Considers basic biology of brain, what is known of how it operates, and something of how it develops. Discusses properties of neurons and specialized regions of the brain in linguistic and higher order processing skills, as well as genetic and environmental influences on brain development. (CMG)

  7. Technological Issues and High Gradient Test Results on X-Band Molybdenum Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  8. Using pattern enumeration to accelerate process development and ramp yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Linda; Pang, Jenny; Xu, Jessy; Tsai, Mengfeng; Wang, Amy; Zhang, Yifan; Sweis, Jason; Lai, Ya-Chieh; Ding, Hua

    2016-03-01

    During a new technology node process setup phase, foundries do not initially have enough product chip designs to conduct exhaustive process development. Different operational teams use manually designed simple test keys to set up their process flows and recipes. When the very first version of the design rule manual (DRM) is ready, foundries enter the process development phase where new experiment design data is manually created based on these design rules. However, these IP/test keys contain very uniform or simple design structures. This kind of design normally does not contain critical design structures or process unfriendly design patterns that pass design rule checks but are found to be less manufacturable. It is desired to have a method to generate exhaustive test patterns allowed by design rules at development stage to verify the gap of design rule and process. This paper presents a novel method of how to generate test key patterns which contain known problematic patterns as well as any constructs which designers could possibly draw based on current design rules. The enumerated test key patterns will contain the most critical design structures which are allowed by any particular design rule. A layout profiling method is used to do design chip analysis in order to find potential weak points on new incoming products so fab can take preemptive action to avoid yield loss. It can be achieved by comparing different products and leveraging the knowledge learned from previous manufactured chips to find possible yield detractors.

  9. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source. PMID:26932105

  10. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  11. Potential structures and particle acceleration on auroral field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorney, D. J.

    Observations of plasmas and electric field activity within regions of auroral particle acceleration have verified the existence of electric fields with components parallel to the magnetic field over large altitude regions. Evidence is presented which indicates that small-ampliatude double layers along the auroral magnetic field lines may provide a mechanism for the maintenance of auroral ion potential. Evidence is also presented of downward-directed parallel electric fields along the magnetic field lines in the return current region. It is suggested that the downward electric fields may have significant effects on ion trajectories, and further theoretical investigation of the effects of downward parallel electric fields on ion conic formation is recommended.

  12. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  13. Accelerator developments since the ZGS by ZGS people

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.

    1994-12-31

    The ZGS was a facility, as well as an organization, where people got together to pursue a common goal of doing exciting science of the day. In this note, the authors describe notable events related to accelerators and accelerator people since the closing of the ZGS program some 15 years ago. Many of the same ZGS people have been carrying out the state-of-the art accelerator work around the Laboratory with the same dedication that characterized their work in the earlier days. First the authors describe how the activities were re-organized after the closing of the ZGS, the migration of people, and the organizational evolution since that time. Doing this shows the similarity between the birth of the ZGS and the birth of the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Then, some of the accelerator work by the former ZGS people are described. These include: (1) Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), (2) GeV Electron Microtron (GEM), (3) Wake Field Accelerator Test Facility, (4) Advanced Photon Source, and (5) IPNS Upgrade.

  14. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m-1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  15. 2D and 3D multipactor modeling in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an RF electric field under vacuum conditions. MP is a severe problem in modern rf systems and, therefore, theoretical and experimental studies of MP are of great interest to the researchers working in various areas of physics and engineering. In this work we present results of MP studies in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. First, we show simulation results obtained with the use of the 2D self-consistent MP model (O. V. Sinitsyn, et. al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 16, 073102 (2009)) and compare those to experimental ones obtained during recent extensive studies of DLA structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs (C. Jing, et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., vol. 38, pp. 1354-1360 (2010)). Then we present some new results of 3D analysis of MP which include studies of particle trajectories and studies of MP development at the early stage.

  16. Laser Acceleration in Vacuum with an Open Iris-Loaded Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1997-07-01

    An open iris-loaded waveguide structure is considered for laser acceleration of highly relativistic particle in vacuum. Complete characterization of eigenmodes are given in analytical form for the structure. In particular acceleration performance of the dominant TM mode is evaluated in detail. Transparent scaling laws are derived, and through which significant advantages over other vacuum laser acceleration schemes are demonstrated. The entire parameter space is searched and it is found that below the laser damage threshold of the structure an acceleration gradient around 1 GV/m can be obtained over a phase slippage length of 10s of cm with TWs laser in the wavelength range from 1 to 10 {micro}m.

  17. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A residual acceleration data analysis plan is developed that will allow principal investigators of low-gravity experiments to efficiently process their experimental results in conjunction with accelerometer data. The basic approach consisted of the following program of research: (1) identification of sensitive experiments and sensitivity ranges by order of magnitude estimates, numerical modelling, and investigator input; (2) research and development towards reduction, supplementation, and dissemination of residual acceleration data; and (3) implementation of the plan on existing acceleration data bases.

  18. Studies of Multipactor in Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Structures: Comparison of Simulation Results with Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas Jr.

    2010-11-04

    In this paper new results of numerical studies of multipactor in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures are presented. The results are compared with experimental data obtained during recent studies of such structures performed by Argonne National Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Euclid TechLabs, LLC. Good agreement between the theory and experiment was observed for the structures with larger inner diameter, however the structures with smaller inner diameter demonstrated a discrepancy between the two. Possible reasons for such discrepancy are discussed.

  19. Particle Acceleration at Filamentary Structures Downstream of Collisionless Shocks in the Heliosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shocks are an important feature in astrophysical, heliospheric and magnetospheric settings. At these structures plasma is heated, the properties of flows are changed, and particles are accelerated to high energies. Particles are accelerated throughout the heliosphere. There are no times or conditions where suprathermal ions forming tails are not present on the solar wind ion distribution, and given the low speeds of these particles they must be accelerated locally in the heliosphere. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) accelerate particles up to 10s of MeV/nucleon. The termination shock of the solar and the heliosheath produce energetic particles including the Anomalous Cosmic Rays (ACRs), with energies in excess of 100 MeV. In the last few years' very interesting observations at low energies showing power laws that cannot be explained with commonly accepted acceleration mechanisms and thus increased the need for alternative acceleration processes. Fully consistent kinetic particle simulations such as hybrid simulations appear to be a powerful tool to investigated ion acceleration. Nowadays these simulations can be performed in 3D and relative large simulation domains covering up to hundreds of ion inertial length in size and thus representing the MHD scale. These 3D hybrid simulations show filamentary magnetic and density structures, which could be interpreted as small-scale flux ropes. The growth of these small-scale structures is also associated with ion acceleration. In this talk we will discuss properties of these filamentary structures, their spatial and temporal evolution and the particle dynamics during the acceleration process. The results of this study may be of particular importance for future high resolution magnetospheric and heliospheric mission such as THOR.

  20. Generation of periodic accelerating structures in plasma by colliding laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Shvets, G; Fisch, N J; Pukhov, A; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    1999-08-01

    A mechanism for generating large (>1 GeV/m) accelerating wakes in a plasma is proposed. Two slightly detuned counterpropagating laser beams, an ultrashort timing pulse and a long pump, exchange photons and deposit the recoil momentum in plasma electrons. This produces a localized region of electron current, which acts as a virtual electron beam, inducing intense plasma wakes with phase velocity equal to the group velocity of the short pulse. Modulating the pumping beam generates periodic accelerating structures in the plasma ("plasma linac") which can be used for particle acceleration unlimited by the dephasing between the particles and the wake. An important difference between this type of plasma accelerator and the conventional wakefield accelerators is that this type can be achieved with laser intensities I<10(18) W/cm(2). PMID:11970016

  1. Laser acceleration and deflection of 963 keV electrons with a silicon dielectric structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leedle, Kenneth J.; Pease, R. Fabian; Byer, Robert L.; Harris, James S.

    2015-02-12

    Radio frequency particle accelerators are ubiquitous in ultrasmall and ultrafast science, but their size and cost have prompted exploration of compact and scalable alternatives such as the dielectric laser accelerator. We present the first demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, of high gradient laser acceleration and deflection of electrons with a silicon structure. Driven by a 5 nJ, 130 fs mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser at 907 nm wavelength, our devices achieve accelerating gradients in excess of 200 MeV/m and suboptical cycle streaking of 96.30 keV electrons. These results pave the way for high gradient silicon dielectric laser accelerators using commercialmore » lasers and subfemtosecond electron beam experiments.« less

  2. Accelerator production of tritium plant design and supporting engineering development and demonstration work

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1997-11-01

    Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen with a half life of 12.3 years. Because it is essential for US thermonuclear weapons to function, tritium must be periodically replenished. Since K reactor at Savannah River Site stopped operating in 1988, tritium has been recycled from dismantled nuclear weapons. This process is possible only as long as many weapons are being retired. Maintaining the stockpile at the level called for in the present Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START-I) will require the Department of Energy to have an operational tritium production capability in the 2005--2007 time frame. To make the required amount of tritium using an accelerator based system (APT), neutrons will be produced through high energy proton reactions with tungsten and lead. Those neutrons will be moderated and captured in {sup 3}He to make tritium. The APT plant design will use a 1,700 MeV linear accelerator operated at 100 mA. In preparation for engineering design, starting in October 1997 and subsequent construction, a program of engineering development and demonstration is underway. That work includes assembly and testing of the first 20 MeV of the low energy plant linac at 100 mA, high-energy linac accelerating structure prototyping, radiofrequency power system improvements, neutronic efficiency measurements, and materials qualifications.

  3. Advanced laser particle accelerator development at LANL: from fast ignition to radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A; Offermann, D T; Cobble, J A; Schmitt, M J; Gautier, D C; Kwan, T J T; Montgomery, D S; Kluge, Thomas; Bussmann, Micheal; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Gall, B; Geissel, M; Korgan, G; Kovaleski, S; Lockard, T; Malekos, S; Schollmeier, M; Sentoku, Y; Cowan, T E

    2010-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerated ion and electron beam sources are an emerging field with vast prospects, and promise many superior applications in a variety of fields such as hadron cancer therapy, compact radioisotope generation, table-top nuclear physics, laboratory astrophysics, nuclear forensics, waste transmutation, SN M detection, and inertial fusion energy. LANL is engaged in several projects seeking to develop compact high current and high energy ion and electron sources. We are especially interested in two specific applications: ion fast ignition/capsule perturbation and radiation oncology in conjunction with our partners at the ForschungsZentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD). Laser-to-beam conversion efficiencies of over 10% are needed for practical applications, and we have already shown inherent etliciencies of >5% from flat foils, on Trident using only a 5th of the intensity and energy of the Nova Petawatt. With clever target designs, like structured curved cone targets, we have also been able to achieve major ion energy gains, leading to the highest energy laser-accelerated proton beams in the world. These new target designs promise to help usher in the next generation of particle sources realizing the potential of laser-accelerated beams.

  4. Developing and Maintaining Accelerated Degree Programs within Traditional Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husson, William J.; Kennedy, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Successful accelerated degree programs should be learner focused, market sensitive, accessible, and high quality. They should offer a variety of options and excellent customer service. Key elements include institutional purpose, decision-making process, curricular design, adjunct faculty, marketing, and promotional materials. (SK)

  5. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  6. On the Boundaries of the Acceleration of the Development of Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingma, Johannes; Tomic, Welko

    This paper examines the possibility of accelerating the development of intelligence when applying stringent Piagetian standards to evaluate the effects of short- and long-term intervention or instruction programs. The paper reviews previous Genevan and American research that shows that development can be accelerated by means of only a few…

  7. Accelerating materials discovery through the development of polymer databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra

    In our line of business we create chemical solutions for a wide range of applications, such as home and personal care, printing and packaging, automotive and structural coatings, and structural plastics and foams applications. In this environment, stable and highly automated workflows suitable to handle complex systems are a must. By satisfying these prerequisites, efficiency for the development of new materials can be significantly improved by combining modeling and experimental approaches. This is in fact in line with recent Materials Genome Initiative efforts sponsored by the US administration. From our experience, we know, that valuable contributions to product development are possible today by combining existing modeling techniques in an intelligent fashion, provided modeling and experiment work closely together. In my presentation I intend to review approaches to build and parameterize soft matter systems. As an example of our standard workflow, I will show a few applications, which include the design of a stabilizer molecule for dispersing polymer particles and the simulation of polystyrene dispersions.

  8. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  9. Thin current sheets in collisionless plasma: Equilibrium structure, plasma instabilities, and particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Malova, H. V.; Artemyev, A. V.; Popov, V. Yu.; Petrukovich, A. A.

    2011-02-15

    The review is devoted to plasma structures with an extremely small transverse size, namely, thin current sheets that have been discovered and investigated by spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail in the last few decades. The formation of current sheets is attributed to complicated dynamic processes occurring in a collisionless space plasma during geomagnetic perturbations and near the magnetic reconnection regions. The models that describe thin current structures in the Earth's magnetotail are reviewed. They are based on the assumption of the quasi-adiabatic ion dynamics in a relatively weak magnetic field of the magnetotail neutral sheet, where the ions can become unmagnetized. It is shown that the ion distribution can be represented as a function of the integrals of particle motion-the total energy and quasi-adiabatic invariant. Various modifications of the initial equilibrium are considered that are obtained with allowance for the currents of magnetized electrons, the contribution of oxygen ions, the asymmetry of plasma sources, and the effects related to the non-Maxwellian particle distributions. The theoretical results are compared with the observational data from the Cluster spacecraft mission. Various plasma instabilities developing in thin current sheets are investigated. The evolution of the tearing mode is analyzed, and the parameter range in which the mode can grow are determined. The paradox of complete stabilization of the tearing mode in current sheets with a nonzero normal magnetic field component is thereby resolved based on the quasi-adiabatic model. It is shown that, over a wide range of current sheet parameters and the propagation directions of large-scale unstable waves, various modified drift instabilities-kink and sausage modes-can develop in the system. Based on the concept of a turbulent electromagnetic field excited as a result of the development and saturation of unstable waves, a mechanism for charged particle acceleration in

  10. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density-modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  11. INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF PROTOCLUSTER GALAXIES: ACCELERATED STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION IN OVERDENSE ENVIRONMENTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zirm, Andrew W.; Toft, Sune; Tanaka, Masayuki E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk

    2012-01-10

    We present a high spatial resolution Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS imaging survey in the field of a known protocluster surrounding the powerful radio galaxy MRC1138-262 at z = 2.16. Previously, we have shown that this field exhibits a substantial surface overdensity of red J-H galaxies. Here we focus on the stellar masses and galaxy effective radii in an effort to compare and contrast the properties of likely protocluster galaxies with their field counterparts and to look for correlations between galaxy structure and (projected) distance relative to the radio galaxy. We find a hint that quiescent, cluster galaxies are on average less dense than quiescent field galaxies of similar stellar mass and redshift. In fact, we find that only two (of eight) quiescent protocluster galaxies are of similar density to the majority of the massive, quiescent compact galaxies (Semi-Evolved Elephantine Dense galaxies; SEEDs) found in several field surveys. Furthermore, there is some indication that the structural Sersic n parameter is higher (n {approx} 3-4) on average for cluster galaxies compared to the field SEEDs (n {approx} 1-2). This result may imply that the accelerated galaxy evolution expected (and observed) in overdense regions also extends to structural evolution presuming that massive galaxies began as dense (low n) SEEDs and have already evolved to be more in line with local galaxies of the same stellar mass.

  12. Development of a dual-pulse RF driver for an S-band (= 2856 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hui Su; Buaphad, Pikad

    2016-04-01

    The radiation equipment research division of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has developed a Container Inspection System (CIS) using a Radio Frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for port security. The primary purpose of the CIS is to detect nuclear materials and explosives, as well country-specific prohibited substances, e.g., smuggled. The CIS consists of a 9/6 MeV dualenergy electron linear accelerator for distinguishing between organic and inorganic materials. The accelerator consists of an electron gun, an RF accelerating structure, an RF driver, a modulator, electromagnets, a cooling system, a X-ray generating target, X-ray collimator, a detector, and a container moving system. The RF driver is an important part of the configuration because it is the RF power source: it supplies the RF power to the accelerating structure. A unique aspect of the RF driver is that it generates dual RF power to generate dual energy (9/6 MeV). The advantage of this RF driver is that it can allow the pulse width to vary and can be used to obtain a wide range of energy output, and pulse repetition rates up to 300 Hz. For this reason, 140 W (5 MW - 9 MeV) and 37 W (3.4 MW - 6 MeV) power outputs are available independently. A high power test for 20 minutes demonstrate that stable dual output powers can be generated. Moreover, the dual power can be applied to the accelerator which has stable accelerator operation. In this paper, the design, fabrication and high power test of the RF driver for the RF electron linear accelerator (linac) are presented.

  13. An Update on the DOE Early Career Project on Photonic Band Gap Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Edwards, Randall L.; Haynes, William B.; Madrid, Michael A.; Romero, Frank P.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Tuzel, Walter M.; Boulware , Chase H.; Grimm, Terry

    2012-06-07

    We performed fabrication of two SRF PBG resonators at 2.1 GHz and demonstrated their proof-of-principle operation at high gradients. Measured characteristics of the resonators were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We demonstrated that SRF PBG cavities can be operated at 15 MV/m accelerating gradients. We completed the design and started fabrication of the 16-cell PBG accelerating structure at 11.7 GHz for wakefield testing at AWA.

  14. Beam dynamics and wakefield simulations of the double grating accelerating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Najafabadi, B. Montazeri; Byer, R. L.; Ng, C. K.; England, R. J.; Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; Noble, R.; Wu, Z.

    2012-12-21

    Laser-driven acceleration in dielectric structures can provide gradients on the order of GeV/m. The small transverse dimension and tiny feature sizes introduce challenges in design, fabrication, and simulation studies of these structures. In this paper we present the results of beam dynamic simulation and short range longitudinal wakefield simulation of the double grating structure. We show the linear trend of acceleration in a dielectric accelerator design and calculate the maximum achievable gradient equal to 0.47E{sub 0} where E0 is maximum electric field of the laser excitation. On the other hand, using wakefield simulations, we show that the loss factor of the structure with 400nm gap size will be 0.12GV/m for a 10fC, 100as electron bunch which is an order of magnitude less than expected gradient near damage threshold of the device.

  15. Proposed Few-optical Cycle Laser-driven ParticleAccelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Lu, P.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2006-10-06

    We describe a transparent dielectric grating accelerator structure that is designed for ultra-short laser pulse operation. The structure is based on the principle of periodic field reversal to achieve phase synchronicity for relativistic particles, however to preserve ultra-short pulse operation it does not resonate the laser field in the vacuum channel. The geometry of the structure appears well suited for application with high average power lasers and high thermal loading. Finally, it shows potential for an unloaded gradient of 10 GeV/m with 10 fsec laser pulses and the possibility to accelerate 10{sup 6} electrons per bunch at an efficiency of 8%. The fabrication procedure and a proposed near term experiment with this accelerator structure are presented.

  16. Analytical validation of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmaceutical development

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Bradly D; Ognibene, Ted; Vogel, John S

    2011-01-01

    The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 14C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the 14C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least 1 year, linear over four orders of magnitude with an analytical range from 0.1 Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Furthermore, accuracy was excellent (between 1 and 3%), while precision expressed as coefficient of variation was between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of 14C, respectively (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with 14C corresponds to 30 fg equivalents. Accelerator mass spectrometry provides a sensitive, accurate and precise method of measuring drug compounds in biological matrices. PMID:21083256

  17. High Temperature μSR Experiments for Accelerator Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Koda, Akihiro; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Kusuo; Shimomura, Koichiro; Schnase, Alexander; Ezura, Eiji; Hara, Keigo; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Nomura, Masahiro; Shimada, Taihei; Takata, Koji; Tamura, Fumihiko; Toda, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    High temperature μSR is a powerful technique to study magnetic materials. In J-PARC accelerator synchrotrons, the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) and Main Ring (MR), a unique magnetic alloy-loaded cavity is used for the beam acceleration and much higher field gradient has been achieved. Such high field gradient cavities made a compact RCS possible by reducing the length for beam acceleration. Now, further upgrades of the J-PARC, RF cavities with higher RF voltage and less power loss in the magnetic core are needed for the MR. For the improvements of the magnetic property of magnetic alloy core, the high temperature μSR (muon Spin Rotation/Relaxation) was used to investigate the crystallization process of the material. Based on the measurement results, the test production of the large ring cores of a magnetic alloy, FT3L, was tried. The FT3L is the magnetic alloy which has two times better performance than the present one, FT3M. For the FT3L production, the magnetic annealing is needed to control the easy-magnetized axis of the crystalline. After the success of the test production, a mass production was started in the industry to replace all existing cavities in the MR. The first 5-cell FT3L cavity is assembled for the bench test before the installation in the accelerator tunnel. By the new cavities, the total RF voltage of J-PARC MR will be doubled to increase the beam power for neutrino experiment. In future, the cavities will be also used for the RCS to increase the beam power beyond 1 MW.

  18. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of our knowledge, no implementation combines both CPU and extra accelerators, such as GPUs, to accelerate the Zuker algorithm applications. Results In this paper, a CPU-GPU hybrid computing system that accelerates Zuker algorithm applications for RNA secondary structure prediction is proposed. The computing tasks are allocated between CPU and GPU for parallel cooperate execution. Performance differences between the CPU and the GPU in the task-allocation scheme are considered to obtain workload balance. To improve the hybrid system performance, the Zuker algorithm is optimally implemented with special methods for CPU and GPU architecture. Conclusions Speedup of 15.93× over optimized multi-core SIMD CPU implementation and performance advantage of 16% over optimized GPU implementation are shown in the experimental results. More than 14% of the sequences are executed on CPU in the hybrid system. The system combining CPU and GPU to accelerate the Zuker algorithm is proven to be promising and can be applied to other bioinformatics applications. PMID:22369626

  19. Cornerstones of Completion: State Policy Support for Accelerated, Structured Pathways to College Credentials and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couturier, Lara K.

    2012-01-01

    In spring 2012, after a year of intensive data analysis and planning, the colleges participating in Completion by Design announced strategies for creating clear, structured routes through college for more students, often referred to as accelerated, structured pathways to completion. These strategies contain elements unique to each college, but all…

  20. TRI-SERVICE SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND ANALYSIS PENETROMETER SYSTEM (SCAPS) ACCELERATED SENSOR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1994, the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) funded a Tri-Service effort to accelerate the development and fielding of environmental sensing technologies to extend the capabilities of the Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCA...

  1. Muscle mass, structural and functional investigations of senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, An Yun; Leung, Kwok Sui; Siu, Parco Ming Fai; Qin, Jiang Hui; Chow, Simon Kwoon Ho; Qin, Ling; Li, Chi Yu; Cheung, Wing Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is an age-related systemic syndrome with progressive deterioration in skeletal muscle functions and loss in mass. Although the senescence-accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8) was reported valid for muscular ageing research, there was no report on the details such as sarcopenia onset time. Therefore, this study was to investigate the change of muscle mass, structure and functions during the development of sarcopenia. Besides the average life span, muscle mass, structural and functional measurements were also studied. Male SAMP8 animals were examined at month 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, in which the right gastrocnemius was isolated and tested for ex vivo contractile properties and fatigability while the contralateral one was harvested for muscle fiber cross-sectional area (FCSA) and typing assessments. Results showed that the peak of muscle mass appeared at month 7 and the onset of contractility decline was observed from month 8. Compared with month 8, most of the functional parameters at month 10 decreased significantly. Structurally, muscle fiber type IIA made up the largest proportion of the gastrocnemius, and the fiber size was found to peak at month 8. Based on the altered muscle mass, structural and functional outcomes, it was concluded that the onset of sarcopenia in SAMP8 animals was at month 8. SAMP8 animals at month 8 should be at pre-sarcopenia stage while month 10 at sarcopenia stage. It is confirmed that SAMP8 mouse can be used in sarcopenia research with established time line in this study. PMID:26193895

  2. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  3. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  4. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinec, Pavel P.; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-01

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for 14C and 129I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  5. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    The research performed consisted of three stages: (1) identification of sensitive IML-1 experiments and sensitivity ranges by order of magnitude estimates, numerical modeling, and investigator input; (2) research and development towards reduction, supplementation, and dissemination of residual acceleration data; and (3) implementation of the plan on existing acceleration databases.

  6. Jefferson Lab Accelerator Operations Training and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Epps

    2008-01-23

    The mission of the Jefferson Lab Operations Group is to provide safe and efficient delivery of high quality electron beam for Jefferson Laboratory's nuclear and accelerator physics programs. The Operations staff must be able to setup, transport, maintain, and troubleshoot beam to all three experimental halls in a safe, efficient, and expeditious manner. Due to the nature of shift work, high employee turnover is always as issue. This creates a unique situation where highly trained staff members must quickly be produced and maintained in order to meet the needs of the Laboratory. Some methods used to address this problem will be presented here.

  7. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guidingmore » structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.« less

  8. Enhancement of maximum attainable ion energy in the radiation pressure acceleration regime using a guiding structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-03-13

    Radiation Pressure Acceleration is a highly efficient mechanism of laser driven ion acceleration, with the laser energy almost totally transferrable to the ions in the relativistic regime. There is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. In the case of a tightly focused laser pulses, which are utilized to get the highest intensity, another factor limiting the maximum ion energy comes into play, the transverse expansion of the target. Transverse expansion makes the target transparent for radiation, thus reducing the effectiveness of acceleration. Utilization of an external guiding structure for the accelerating laser pulse may provide a way of compensating for the group velocity and transverse expansion effects.

  9. Three-dimensional Dielectric Photonic Crystal Structures for Laser-driven Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-12-14

    We present the design and simulation of a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide for linear laser-driven acceleration in vacuum. The structure confines a synchronous speed-of-light accelerating mode in both transverse dimensions. We report the properties of this mode, including sustainable gradient and optical-to-beam efficiency. We present a novel method for confining a particle beam using optical fields as focusing elements. This technique, combined with careful structure design, is shown to have a large dynamic aperture and minimal emittance growth, even over millions of optical wavelengths.

  10. Experimental measurements of rf breakdowns and deflecting gradients in mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-05-01

    We present an experimental study of a high gradient metallic accelerating structure at sub-THz frequencies, where we investigated the physics of rf breakdowns. Wakefields in the structure were excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam. We present the first quantitative measurements of gradients and metal vacuum rf breakdowns in sub-THz accelerating cavities. When the beam travels off axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the longitudinal field. We measured the deflecting forces by observing the displacement and changes in the shape of the electron bunch. This behavior can be exploited for subfemtosecond beam diagnostics.

  11. Development of a low-energy beam transport system at KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Sato, Yoichi; Ok, Jung-Woo; Park, Jin Yong; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Won, Mi-Sook; Kim, Eun-San

    2015-01-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute has developed a heavy ion accelerator for fast neutron radiography [1]. To meet the requirements for fast neutron generation, we have developed an accelerator system that consists of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS), low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system, radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), medium-energy beam transport system, and drift tube linac. In this paper, we present the development of the LEBT system as a part of the heavy ion accelerator system, which operates from the ECR-IS to the RFQ entrance.

  12. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy from nonlinear structures in accelerating universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-09-15

    We study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to spherically symmetric nonlinear structures in flat universes with dust and a cosmological constant. By modeling a time-evolving spherical compensated void/lump by Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetimes, we numerically solve the null geodesic equations with the Einstein equations. We find that a nonlinear void redshifts the CMB photons that pass through it regardless of the distance to it. In contrast, a nonlinear lump blueshifts (or redshifts) the CMB photons if it is located near (or sufficiently far from) us. The present analysis comprehensively covers previous works based on a thin-shell approximation and a linear/second-order perturbation method and the effects of shell thickness and full nonlinearity. Our results indicate that, if quasilinear and large (> or approx.100 Mpc) voids/lumps would exist, they could be observed as cold or hot spots with temperature variance > or approx. 10{sup -5} K in the CMB sky.

  13. Laser acceleration with open waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-03-01

    A unified framework based on solid-state open waveguides is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and damage of waveguide structure by high power laser. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus the solutions provided here encompass all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  14. Comparison of accelerated T1-weighted whole-brain structural-imaging protocols.

    PubMed

    Falkovskiy, Pavel; Brenner, Daniel; Feiweier, Thorsten; Kannengiesser, Stephan; Maréchal, Bénédicte; Kober, Tobias; Roche, Alexis; Thostenson, Kaely; Meuli, Reto; Reyes, Denise; Stoecker, Tony; Bernstein, Matt A; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Krueger, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Imaging in neuroscience, clinical research and pharmaceutical trials often employs the 3D magnetisation-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequence to obtain structural T1-weighted images with high spatial resolution of the human brain. Typical research and clinical routine MPRAGE protocols with ~1mm isotropic resolution require data acquisition time in the range of 5-10min and often use only moderate two-fold acceleration factor for parallel imaging. Recent advances in MRI hardware and acquisition methodology promise improved leverage of the MR signal and more benign artefact properties in particular when employing increased acceleration factors in clinical routine and research. In this study, we examined four variants of a four-fold-accelerated MPRAGE protocol (2D-GRAPPA, CAIPIRINHA, CAIPIRINHA elliptical, and segmented MPRAGE) and compared clinical readings, basic image quality metrics (SNR, CNR), and automated brain tissue segmentation for morphological assessments of brain structures. The results were benchmarked against a widely-used two-fold-accelerated 3T ADNI MPRAGE protocol that served as reference in this study. 22 healthy subjects (age=20-44yrs.) were imaged with all MPRAGE variants in a single session. An experienced reader rated all images of clinically useful image quality. CAIPIRINHA MPRAGE scans were perceived on average to be of identical value for reading as the reference ADNI-2 protocol. SNR and CNR measurements exhibited the theoretically expected performance at the four-fold acceleration. The results of this study demonstrate that the four-fold accelerated protocols introduce systematic biases in the segmentation results of some brain structures compared to the reference ADNI-2 protocol. Furthermore, results suggest that the increased noise levels in the accelerated protocols play an important role in introducing these biases, at least under the present study conditions. PMID:26297848

  15. Development of accelerator mass spectrometer based on a compact cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-W.; Kim, D.-G.

    2011-07-01

    A small cyclotron has been designed for accelerator mass spectrometry, and the injection beam line is constructed as part of prototyping. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is estimated to be around 4000. The design of the cyclotron was performed with orbit-tracking computations using 3D magnetic and electric fields, and beam optics of the injection line was calculated using the codes such as IGUN and TRANSPORT. The radial injection scheme is chosen to place a beam on equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection line includes an ion source, Einzel lens, rf buncher, 90° dipole magnet, and quadrupole triplet magnet. A carbon beam was extracted from the front part of the injection line. An rf cavity system for the cyclotron was built and tested. A multi channel plates (MCP) detector to measure low-current ion beams was also tested. Design considerations are given to analyzing a few different radioisotopes in form of positive ions as well as negative ions.

  16. Niobium cavity development for the high-energy linac of the rare isotope accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; C. Compton; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; H. Podlech; R. York; G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel

    2001-08-01

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) is being designed to supply an intense beam of exotic isotopes for nuclear physics research [1]. Superconducting cavities are to be used to accelerate the CW beam of heavy ions to 400 MeV per nucleon, with a beam power of up to 400 kW. Because of the varying velocity of the ion beam along the linac, a number of different types of superconducting structures are needed. The RIA linac will accelerate heavy ions over the same velocity range as the proton linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). It was decided to use the 6-cell axisymmetric 805 MHz cavities and cryostats of SNS for the downstream portion of the RIA linac, thereby saving the non-recurring development and engineering costs. For additional cost saving, it was decided to extend the SNS multi-cell axisymmetric cavity design to lower velocity, {beta} = v/c = 0.4, using the same cryostats and RF systems. Axisymmetric cavities will thus constitute about three-quarters of RIA's total accelerating voltage, and most of that voltage will be provided by cavities already developed for SNS. The axisymmetric cavities will accelerate the RIA beam from {beta} = 0.4 to {beta} = 0.72. This velocity range can be efficiently covered with two different types of 6-cell cavities, one with a geometric {beta}, {beta}{sub g}, of 0.47, and the other with a {beta}{sub g} of 0.61. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 cavity will be of the existing SNS design; some {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 SNS cavities may also be desired at the end of the RIA linac for acceleration of light ions above 400 MeV per nucleon. Prototypes for both {beta}{sub g} = 0.61 and {beta}{sub g} = 0.81 have been fabricated and tested [2]. The {beta}{sub g} = 0.47 cavity is the focus of the present work. The reduction in {beta}{sub g} to 0.47 results in less favourable electromagnetic and mechanical properties, and opens up the possibility of multipacting, but several groups have already designed and prototyped cavities in this range. These

  17. Interaction of an Ultrarelativistic Electron Bunch Train with a W-Band Accelerating Structure: High Power and High Gradient.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Antipov, S; Jing, C; Power, J G; Conde, M; Wisniewski, E; Liu, W; Qiu, J; Ha, G; Dolgashev, V; Tang, C; Gai, W

    2016-02-01

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to the interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. Measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method. PMID:26894715

  18. Interaction of an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train with a W-band accelerating structure: High power and high gradient

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, D.; Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Wisniewski, E.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.; Ha, G.; Dolgashev, V.; et al

    2016-02-05

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to themore » interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. As a result, measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method.« less

  19. Interaction of an Ultrarelativistic Electron Bunch Train with a W -Band Accelerating Structure: High Power and High Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Antipov, S.; Jing, C.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Wisniewski, E.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.; Ha, G.; Dolgashev, V.; Tang, C.; Gai, W.

    2016-02-01

    Electron beam interaction with high frequency structures (beyond microwave regime) has a great impact on future high energy frontier machines. We report on the generation of multimegawatt pulsed rf power at 91 GHz in a planar metallic accelerating structure driven by an ultrarelativistic electron bunch train. This slow-wave wakefield device can also be used for high gradient acceleration of electrons with a stable rf phase and amplitude which are controlled by manipulation of the bunch train. To achieve precise control of the rf pulse properties, a two-beam wakefield interferometry method was developed in which the rf pulse, due to the interference of the wakefields from the two bunches, was measured as a function of bunch separation. Measurements of the energy change of a trailing electron bunch as a function of the bunch separation confirmed the interferometry method.

  20. Observation of wakefields in a beam-driven photonic band gap accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M.; Yusof, Z.; Power, J. G.; Jing, C.; Gao, F.; Antipov, S.; Xu, P.; Zheng, S.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Gai, W.; High Energy Physics; Euclid Techlabs LLC; Tsinghua Univ.

    2009-12-01

    Wakefield excitation has been experimentally studied in a three-cell X-band standing wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure. Major monopole (TM{sub 01}- and TM{sub 02}-like) and dipole (TM{sub 11}- and TM{sub 12}-like) modes were identified and characterized by precisely controlling the position of beam injection. The quality factor Q of the dipole modes was measured to be {approx}10 times smaller than that of the accelerating mode. A charge sweep, up to 80 nC, has been performed, equivalent to {approx} 30 MV/m accelerating field on axis. A variable delay low charge witness bunch following a high charge drive bunch was used to calibrate the gradient in the PBG structure by measuring its maximum energy gain and loss. Experimental results agree well with numerical simulations.

  1. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Roark A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  2. Accelerating Full Configuration Interaction Calculations for Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Sternberg, Philip; Maris, Pieter; Ng, Esmond; Sosonkina, Masha; Le, Hung Viet; Vary, James; Yang, Chao

    2008-04-14

    One of the emerging computational approaches in nuclear physics is the full configuration interaction (FCI) method for solving the many-body nuclear Hamiltonian in a sufficiently large single-particle basis space to obtain exact answers - either directly or by extrapolation. The lowest eigenvalues and correspondingeigenvectors for very large, sparse and unstructured nuclear Hamiltonian matrices are obtained and used to evaluate additional experimental quantities. These matrices pose a significant challenge to the design and implementation of efficient and scalable algorithms for obtaining solutions on massively parallel computer systems. In this paper, we describe the computational strategies employed in a state-of-the-art FCI code MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics - nuclear) as well as techniques we recently developed to enhance the computational efficiency of MFDn. We will demonstrate the current capability of MFDn and report the latest performance improvement we have achieved. We will also outline our future research directions.

  3. FETAL DEXAMETHASONE EXPOSURE ACCELERATES DEVELOPMENT OF RENAL FUNCTION: RELATIONSHIP TO DOSE, CELL DIFFERENTIATION AND GROWTH INHIBITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fetal exposure to high doses of glucocorticoids slows cellular development and impairs organ performance, in association with growth retardation. evertheless, low doses of glucocorticoids may enhance cell differentiation and accelerate specific functions. he current study examine...

  4. NASA - 77M prototype hall thruster built under the High Voltage Hall accelerator development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA - 77M prototype hall thruster built under the High Voltage Hall accelerator development project funded by the Science Mission Directorate ; potential use is propulsion for deep space science missions

  5. Development of High Power Vacuum Tubes for Accelerators and Plasma Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishnu

    2012-11-01

    High pulsed power magnetrons and klystrons for medical and industrial accelerators, and high CW power klystrons and gyrotrons for plasma heating in tokamak, are being developed at CEERI. S-band 2.0MW pulsed tunable magnetrons of centre frequency 2856MHz and 2998 MHz were developed, and S-band 2.6MW pulsed tunable magnetron is being developed for medical LINAC, and 3MW pulsed tunable magnetron is being developed for industrial accelerator. S-band (2856MHz), 5MW pulsed klystron was developed for particle accelerator, and S-band 6MW pulsed klystron is under development for 10MeV industrial accelerator. 350MHz, 100kW (CW) klystron is being developed for proton accelerator, and C-band 250kW (CW) klystron is being developed for plasma heating. 42GHz, 200kW (CW/Long pulse) gyrotron is under development for plasma heating. Plasma filled tubes are also being developed for switching. 25kV/1kA and 40kV/3kA thyratrons were developed for high voltage high current switching in pulse modulators for magnetrons and klystrons. 25kV/3kA Pseudospark switch of current rise time of 1kA/|a-sec and pulse repetition rate of 500Hz is being developed. Plasma assisted high power microwave device is also being investigated.

  6. Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings.

  7. EuCARD2: enhanced accelerator research and development in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    Accelerator science and technology is one of a key enablers of the developments in the particle physic, photon physics and also applications in medicine and industry. EuCARD2 is an European research project which will be realized during 2013-2017 inside the EC FP7 framework. The project concerns the development and coordination of European Accelerator Research and Development. The project is particularly important, to a number of domestic laboratories, due to some plans to build large accelerator infrastructure in Poland. Large accelerator infrastructure of fundamental and applied research character stimulates around it the development and industrial applications as well as biomedical of advanced accelerators, material research and engineering, cryo-technology, mechatronics, robotics, and in particular electronics - like networked measurement and control systems, sensors, computer systems, automation and control systems. The paper presents a digest of the European project EuCARD2 which is Enhanced European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of the research results and assumptions in the domain of accelerator science and technology in Europe, shown during the final fourth annual meeting of the EuCARD - European Coordination of Accelerator R&D, and the kick-off meeting of the EuCARD2. There are debated a few basic groups of accelerator systems components like: measurement - control networks of large geometrical extent, multichannel systems for large amounts of metrological data acquisition, precision photonic networks of reference time, frequency and phase distribution, high field magnets, superconducting cavities, novel beam collimators, etc. The paper bases on the following materials: Internet and Intranet documents combined with EuCARD2, Description of Work FP7 EuCARD-2 DoW-312453, 2013-02-13, and discussions and preparatory materials worked on by Eucard-2 initiators.

  8. PPM focused X-band klystron development at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.; Phillips, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    X-band klystrons capable of 50 MW and utilizing Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM) focusing are undergoing design and fabrication at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The klystron development is part of an effort to realize components necessary for the construction of the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The first klystron to be tested this year has a 0.6 microK beam at 465 kV, a 5 cells traveling wave output structure and a predicted efficiency of 63%. A 465 kV, 190 A beam stick with 12 periods of PPM focusing has recently operated to verify the gun optics and transmission of the beam in the absence of rf bunching. Beam transmission greater than 99.8% has been measured. Design and simulation of the beam stick and klystron are discussed, along with performance of the beam stick under confined flow and shielded conditions.

  9. Development of a 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ Accelerator Dipole Demonstrator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Novitski, I.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Carmichael, J.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Turrion, D.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    100 TeV scale Hadron Collider (HC) with a nominal operation field of at least 15 T is being considered for the post-LHC era, which requires using the $Nb_3Sn$ technology. Practical demonstration of this field level in an accelerator-quality magnet and substantial reduction of the magnet costs are the key conditions for realization of such a machine. FNAL has started the development of a 15 T Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale HC. The magnet design is based on 4-layer shell type coils, graded between the inner and outer layers to maximize the performance and reduce the cost. The experience gained during the Nb3Sn magnet R&D is applied to different aspects of the magnet design. This paper describes the magnetic and structural designs and parameters of the 15 T Nb3Sn dipole and the steps towards the demonstration model fabrication.

  10. Development of Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Accelerator MagnetTechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; English, C.D.; Felice,H.; Hannaford, C.R.; Prestemon, S.O.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.; Hikichi,Y.; Nishioka, J.; Hasegawa, T.

    2007-08-28

    We report on the progress in our R&D program, targetedto develop the technology for the application of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi-2212)in accelerator magnets. The program uses subscale coils, wound frominsulated cables, to study suitable materials, heat treatmenthomogeneity, stability, and effects ofmagnetic field and thermal andelectro-magnetic loads. We have addressed material and reaction relatedissues and report onthe fabrication, heat treatment, and analysis ofsubscale Bi-2212 coils. Such coils can carry a current on the order of5000 A and generate, in various support structures, magnetic fields from2.6 to 9.9 T. Successful coils are therefore targeted towards a hybridNb3Sn-HTS magnet which will demonstrate the feasibility of Bi-2212 foraccelerator magnets, and open a new magnetic field realm, beyond what isachievable with Nb3Sn.

  11. Development of Wind-and-React Bi-2212 Accelerator Magnet Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Daniel; Dietderich, Daniel R.; English, C.D.; Felice, Helene; Hannaford, Charles R.; Prestemon, Soren O.; Sabbi, GianLuca; Scanlan, Ron M.; Hikichi, Y.; Nishioka, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Godeke, A.

    2007-06-01

    We report on the progress in our R&D program, targeted to develop the technology for the application of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} (Bi-2212) in accelerator magnets. The program uses subscale coils, wound from insulated cables, to study suitable materials, heat treatment homogeneity, stability, and effects of magnetic field and thermal and electro-magnetic loads. We have addressed material and reaction related issues and report on the fabrication, heat treatment, and analysis of subscale Bi-2212 coils. Such coils can carry a current on the order of 5000 A and generate, in various support structures, magnetic fields from 2.6 to 9.9 T. Successful coils are therefore targeted towards a hybrid Nb{sub 3}Sn-HTS magnet which will demonstrate the feasibility of Bi-2212 for accelerator magnets, and open a new magnetic field realm, beyond what is achievable with Nb{sub 3}Sn.

  12. Development of an H- ion source for Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex upgradea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkoshi, K.; Namekawa, Y.; Ueno, A.; Oguri, H.; Ikegami, K.

    2010-02-01

    A cesium (Cs) free H- ion source driven with a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) filament was adopted as an ion source for the first stage of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). At present, the maximum H- ion current produced by the ion source is 38 mA, using which J-PARC can produce a proton beam power of 0.6 MW by accelerating it with the 181 MeV linac and the 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron. In order to satisfy the beam power of 1 MW required for the second stage of the J-PARC in the near future, we have to increase the ion current to more than 60 mA. Therefore, we have started to develop a Cs-seeded ion source by adding an external Cs-seeding system to a J-PARC test ion source that has a structure similar to that of the J-PARC ion source except for the fact that the plasma chamber is slightly larger. As a result, a H- ion current of more than 70 mA was obtained from the ion source using a tungsten filament instead of a LaB6 filament with a low arc discharge power of 15 kW (100 V, 150 A).

  13. Temporal and Spatial Characteristics of Acceleration Structures in the Auroral Return Current Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G. T.; Karlsson, T.; Figueiredo, S.; Johansson, T.; Buchert, S.

    2003-12-01

    Temporal and spatial characteristics of high-altitude auroral electric fields, and, in particular, those which are related to quasi-static auroral electric potential structures, are discussed using Cluster multi-point observations from auroral field line crossings at geocentric distances of about 5 RE. Intense and narrow-structured diverging electric fields, associated with upward accelerated electrons, being fingerprints of quasi-static acceleration structures in the auroral return current region, appear more frequently at these altitudes than their counterpart, converging electric fields, on auroral field lines, for reasons not yet understood. The time needed for evacuating ionospheric electrons at the ionospheric end of the return current flux tube, which depend on the field-aligned current density, represent one characteristic time scale for the accelerating electric fields. We present results from four Cluster encounters with such acceleration structures and how these and their associated field-aligned current and electron distributions, evolve on the different time scales given by different inter-spacecraft separation distances.

  14. Alignment tolerance of accelerating structures and corrections for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, K.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.L.F.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Thompson, K.A.

    1995-06-01

    The alignment tolerance of accelerating structures is estimated by tracking simulations. Both single-bunch and multi-bunch effects are taken into account. Correction schemes for controlling the single and multi-bunch emittance growth in the case of large misalignment are also tested by simulations.

  15. Proposal for a study of laser acceleration of electrons using micrograting structures at ATF (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Claus, J.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Kramer, H.; Li, Z.; Palmer, R.B.; Rogers, J.; Shrinvasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Ulc, S.; Veligdan, J.; Warren, J.; Bigio, I.; Kurnit, N.; Shimada, T.; Wang, X.; McDonald, K.T.; Russell, D.P.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Princeton Univ., NJ; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA )

    1989-10-29

    We propose to investigate new methods of particle acceleration using a short-pulse CO{sub 2} laser as the power source and grating-like structures as accelerator cavities''. Phase I of this program is intended to demonstrate the principle of the method. We will focus the laser light to a 3 mm line on the surface of the microstructure. The structure is used to transform the electric field pattern of the incoming transversely polarized laser beam to a mode which has a component along the electron beam direction in the vicinity of the surface. With 6 mJ of laser energy and a 6 ps pulse length, the electric field in the spot will be around 1 GV/m. The electron beam from the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) will be focused transversely within the few micron transverse dimension of the microstructure. The maximum expected acceleration for a 1 GV/m field and a 3 mm acceleration length is 3 MeV. 17 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectric structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.

  17. First high-power model of the annular-ring coupled structure for use in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yoshishige

    2012-01-01

    A prototype cavity for the annular-ring coupled structure (ACS) for use in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) linac has been developed to confirm the feasibility of achieving the required performance. This prototype cavity is a buncher module, which includes ten accelerating cells in total. The ACS cavity is formed by the silver brazing of ACS half-cell pieces stacked in a vacuum furnace. The accelerating cell of the ACS is surrounded by a coupling cell. We, therefore, tuned the frequencies of the accelerating and coupling cells by an ultraprecision lathe before brazing, taking into account the frequency shift due to brazing. The prototype buncher module was successfully conditioned up to 600 kW, which corresponds to an accelerating field that is higher than the designed field of 4.1MV/m by 30%. We describe the frequency-tuning results for the prototype buncher module and its high-power conditioning.

  18. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-10-19

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner.

  19. Near Catastrophic Accelerated Structural Degeneration of the Perimount Magna Pericardial Bioprosthesis in Children.

    PubMed

    Philip, Ranjit; Kumar, T K Susheel; Waller, B Rush; McCoy, Mia; Knott-Craig, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Experience with pericardial bioprostheses in young patients is limited. Accelerated degeneration of the Mitroflow valve has recently been reported. We report early accelerated structural valve degeneration with the Perimount Magna bioprosthesis, which has not been previously reported. Young patients with the Magna bioprosthesis are at high risk for rapid progression to severe stenosis, which underscores their need for more vigilant surveillance. The benefits and risks of these bioprosthetic valves must be weighed carefully when options for replacement in these young patients are discussed. PMID:27343502

  20. Design and RF Measurements of AN X-Band Accelerating Structure for the Sparc Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Bacci, A.; Falone, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palpini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The nine cells structure, operating on the π standing wave mode, is fed by a central coupler and has been designed to obtain a 42 MV/m accelerating gradient. The 2D profile has been obtained using the electromagnetic codes Superfish and Oscar2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurements made on a copper prototype have been performed and the results are illustrated and compared with the numerical predictions.

  1. Design and RF Measurements of AN X-Band Accelerating Structure for the Sparc Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Bacci, A.; Falone, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palpini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2007-09-01

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The nine cells structure, operating on the π standing wave mode, is fed by a central coupler and has been designed to obtain a 42 MV/m accelerating gradient. The 2D profile has been obtained using the electromagnetic codes Superfish and Oscar2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurements made on a copper prototype have been performed and the results are illustrated and compared with the numerical predictions.

  2. Structural Analysis of Communication Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conville, Richard L.

    This paper discusses the question of the legitimacy of applying structural analysis to actual human behavior and illustrates its legitimacy by using the reasoning in an essay by Paul Ricoeur. It then asks if the principles of communication development (obliqueness, exchange, and dying) derived from Helen Keller's experience of communication…

  3. Structural Limits on Organizational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, George H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Organizational development practitioners tend to assume that all workplaces are pretty much alike, and that emotional health in all job situations can be described in approximately the same way. They have failed to recognize the sociological and structural/functional limitations of the workplace. (Author/JG)

  4. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m−1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  5. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure.

    PubMed

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L S; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P L; Schroer, Anna M; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m(-1), already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications. PMID:27089200

  6. Group living accelerates bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) development.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Virna L; Santangelo, Richard G; Vargo, Edward L; Schal, Coby

    2014-01-01

    For many insect species, group living provides physiological and behavioral benefits, including faster development. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.) live in aggregations composed of eggs, nymphs, and adults of various ages. Our aim was to determine whether bed bug nymphs reared in groups develop faster than solitary nymphs. We reared first instars either in isolation or in groups from hatching to adult emergence and recorded their development time. In addition, we investigated the effects of group housing on same-age nymphs versus nymphs reared with adults. Nymphal development was 2.2 d faster in grouped nymphs than in solitary-housed nymphs, representing 7.3% faster overall development. However, this grouping effect did not appear to be influenced by group composition. Thus, similar to other gregarious insect species, nymph development in bed bugs is faster in aggregations than in isolation. PMID:24605482

  7. Developments in laser wakefield accelerators: From single-stage to two-stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Tao; Wang, Wen-Tao; Liu, Jian-Sheng; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Qi, Rong; Yu, Chang-Hai; Li, Ru-Xin; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are compact accelerators which can produce femtosecond high-energy electron beams on a much smaller scale than the conventional radiofrequency accelerators. It is attributed to their high acceleration gradient which is about 3 orders of magnitude larger than the traditional ones. The past decade has witnessed the major breakthroughs and progress in developing the laser wakfield accelerators. To achieve the LWFAs suitable for applications, more and more attention has been paid to optimize the LWFAs for high-quality electron beams. A single-staged LWFA does not favor generating controllable electron beams beyond 1 GeV since electron injection and acceleration are coupled and cannot be independently controlled. Staged LWFAs provide a promising route to overcome this disadvantage by decoupling injection from acceleration and thus the electron-beam quality as well as the stability can be greatly improved. This paper provides an overview of the physical conceptions of the LWFA, as well as the major breakthroughs and progress in developing LWFAs from single-stage to two-stage LWFAs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11127901, 11425418, and 61221064), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808100), and the Science and Technology Talent Project of Shanghai City, China (Grant Nos. 12XD1405200 and 12ZR1451700).

  8. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Sridharan, K.

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  9. Statistical model for field emitter activation on metallic surfaces used in high-gradient accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagotzky, S.; Müller, G.

    2016-01-01

    Both super- and normal-conducting high-gradient linear accelerators are limited by enhanced field emission (EFE) in the accelerating structures, e.g. due to power loss or ignition of discharges. We discuss the dependence of the number density of typical emitters, i.e. particulates and surface defects, on the electric field level at which they are activated for naturally oxidized metallic surfaces. This activation is explained by the transition of a metal-insulator interface into geometric features that enhance the EFE process. A statistical model is successfully compared to systematic studies of niobium and copper relevant for recent and future linear accelerators. Our results show that the achievable surface quality of Nb might be sufficient for the suppression of EFE in the superconducting accelerating structures for the actual European XFEL but not for the planned International Linear Collider. Moreover, some effort will be required to reduce EFE and thus the breakdown rate of the normal conducting Cu structures for the Compact Linear Collider.

  10. A model for earthquake acceleration monitoring with wireless sensor networks in a structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takahiro; Nakamura, Yugo; Jinno, Kousei; Matsubara, Taku; Uehara, Hideyuki

    2014-03-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) technologies have attracted much attention to collect damage information in a natural disaster. WSNs to monitor temperature or humidity usually collect data once in some seconds or some minutes. Since structural health monitoring (SHM), meanwhile, aims to make a diagnosis for the state of a structure based on detected acceleration, WSNs are a promising technology to collect acceleration data. One concern to employ WSNs in SHM is to detect phenomena at a high sampling rate under energy-aware condition. In this paper, we describe a model for seismic acceleration monitoring, configured with multi-layer networks: WSNs, a wireless distribution system (WDS) and a database server, where the WDS is mainly operating in a wireless local area network (WLAN). Examining the performance in the test bed for the monitoring system, the results showed the system was capable of collecting acceleration at a rate of 100 sampling per second (sps) even in the fashion of intermittent operation, and capable of storing data into a database. We also suggest that the method using intermittent operation with appropriate sampling rate is effective in providing a long time operation for the system by considering in the response motion of a structure.

  11. Accelerating NASA GN&C Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamblyn, Scott; Henry, Joel; Rapp, John

    2010-01-01

    When the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system for the Orion crew vehicle undergoes Critical Design Review (CDR), more than 90% of the flight software will already be developed - a first for NASA on a project of this scope and complexity. This achievement is due in large part to a new development approach using Model-Based Design.

  12. The influence of acceleration forces on dendritic growth and grain structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. H.; Parr, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experiments on the tin-15 wt pct lead system are presented, showing the effects on microstructure of solidification in the presence of acceleration forces from 0.0001 to 5 g for three cooling rates. An increase in the acceleration level is shown to drive fluid flow and cause dendrite remelting, fragmentation, and macrosegregation. The cooling rate impacts the final structure through its control of dendrite arm spacings and permeability to fluid flow. At the low (0.0001 g) acceleration, dendrite arm spacings deviated from the predicted relationship to cooling rate. An explanation for this anomaly is given which considers the temperature and concentration gradients in the low-gravity environment.

  13. Development of integrated superconducting quadrupole doublet modules for operation in the SIS100 accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Bleile, A.; Ceballos Velasco, J.; Fischer, E.; Hess, G.; Macavei, J.; Spiller, P.

    2015-12-01

    The FAIR project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) evolves and builds an international accelerator- and experimental facility for basic research activities in various fields of modern physics. Within the course of this project, integrated quadrupole doublet modules are in development. The quadrupole doublet modules provide a pair of superconducting main quadrupoles (focusing and defocusing), corrector magnets, cryogenic collimators and beam position monitors as integrated sets of ion-optical elements. Furthermore LHe cooled beam pipes and vacuum cold-warm transitions are used as ultra-high vacuum components for beam transportation. Superconducting bus bars are used for 13 kA current supply of the main quadrupole magnets. All components are integrated as one common cold mass into one cryostat. High temperature super conductor local current leads will be applied for the low current supply of corrector magnets. The quadrupole doublet modules will be operated in the SIS100 heavy ion accelerator, the core component of the FAIR project. A first version of a corrector magnet has already been manufactured at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Russia, and is now ready for testing. The ion-optical lattice structure of SIS100 requires multiple configurations of named components. Eleven different configurations, organized in four categories, provide the required quadrupole doublet module setups. The high integration level of multiple ion-optical, mechanical and cryogenic functions, based on requirements of operation safety, is leading towards a sophisticated mechanical structure and cooling solution, to satisfy the demanding requirements on position preservation during thermal cycling. The mechanical and cryogenic design solutions will be discussed.

  14. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids. Accelerating Project Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Brian; Burman, Kari; Davidson, Carolyn; Elchinger, Michael; Hardison, R.; Karsiwulan, D.; Castermans, B.

    2015-06-30

    Sustainable Energy for Remote Indonesian Grids (SERIG) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to support Indonesia’s efforts to develop clean energy and increase access to electricity in remote locations throughout the country. With DOE support, the SERIG implementation team consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Winrock International’s Jakarta, Indonesia office. Through technical assistance that includes techno-economic feasibility evaluation for selected projects, government-to-government coordination, infrastructure assessment, stakeholder outreach, and policy analysis, SERIG seeks to provide opportunities for individual project development and a collective framework for national replication office.

  15. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  16. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Orešič, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice

  17. Fast Track Teaching: Beginning the Experiment in Accelerated Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churches, Richard; Hutchinson, Geraldine; Jones, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the development of the Fast Track teaching programme and personalised nature of the training and support that has been delivered. Fast Track teacher promotion rates are compared to national statistics demonstrating significant progression for certain groups, particularly women. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  18. New Features of Time Domain Electric-Field Structures in the Auroral Acceleration Region

    SciTech Connect

    Mozer, F.S.; Ergun, R.; Temerin, M.; Cattell, C.; Dombeck, J.; Wygant, J.

    1997-08-01

    The Polar Satellite carries the first three-axis electric field detector flown in the magnetosphere. Its direct measurement of electric field components perpendicular and parallel to the local magnetic field has revealed new classes and features of electric field structures associated with the plasma acceleration that produces discrete auroras and that populates the magnetosphere with plasma of ionospheric origin. These structures, associated with the hydrogen ion cyclotron mode, include very large solitary waves, spiky field structures, wave envelopes of parallel electric fields, and very large amplitude, nonlinear, coherent ion cyclotron waves. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  20. Magnetosheath filamentary structures formed by ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-04-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  1. Development of polarized ion source for the JINR accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimushkin, V. V.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kutuzova, L. V.; Prokofichev, Yu V.; Shutov, B.; Belov, A. S.; Zubets, V. N.; Turbabin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Status of the JINR polarized ion source development is described. The source is under tests at the test-bench of LHEP, JINR. A charge-exchange plasma ionizer has been tested initially without a storage cell in the ionization region. An unpolarized deuterium ion beam with peak current of 160 mA, 23 keV energy, pulse duration of 100 μs and repetition rate of 1 Hz has been extracted from the ionizer. With a free polarized atomic hydrogen beam injected into the ionizer a polarized proton beam with peak current of 1.4 mA has been obtained. The nearest plans for the source development include tests of the ionizer with the storage cell and tuning of the high frequency transition units installed in their operating position with a Breit-Rabi polarimeter.

  2. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the work reported are: to develop new computational tools and models to enable industry to more rapidly develop and deploy new advanced energy technologies; to demonstrate the capabilities of the CCSI Toolset on non-proprietary case studies; and to deploy the CCSI Toolset to industry. Challenges of simulating carbon capture (and other) processes include: dealing with multiple scales (particle, device, and whole process scales); integration across scales; verification, validation, and uncertainty; and decision support. The tools cover: risk analysis and decision making; validated, high-fidelity CFD; high-resolution filtered sub-models; process design and optimization tools; advanced process control and dynamics; process models; basic data sub-models; and cross-cutting integration tools.

  3. Project development teams: a novel mechanism for accelerating translational research.

    PubMed

    Sajdyk, Tammy J; Sors, Thomas G; Hunt, Joe D; Murray, Mary E; Deford, Melanie E; Shekhar, Anantha; Denne, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    The trend in conducting successful biomedical research is shifting from individual academic labs to coordinated collaborative research teams. Teams of experienced investigators with a wide variety of expertise are now critical for developing and maintaining a successful, productive research program. However, assembling a team whose members have the right expertise requires a great deal of time and many resources. To assist investigators seeking such resources, the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (Indiana CTSI) created the Project Development Teams (PDTs) program to support translational research on and across the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana University, Purdue University, and University of Notre Dame campuses. PDTs are multidisciplinary committees of seasoned researchers who assist investigators, at any stage of research, in transforming ideas/hypotheses into well-designed translational research projects. The teams help investigators capitalize on Indiana CTSI resources by providing investigators with, as needed, mentoring and career development; protocol development; pilot funding; institutional review board, regulatory, and/or nursing support; intellectual property support; access to institutional technology; and assistance with biostatistics, bioethics, recruiting participants, data mining, engaging community health, and collaborating with other investigators.Indiana CTSI leaders have analyzed metrics, collected since the inception of the PDT program in 2008 from both investigators and team members, and found evidence strongly suggesting that the highly responsive teams have become an important one-stop venue for facilitating productive interactions between basic and clinical scientists across four campuses, have aided in advancing the careers of junior faculty, and have helped investigators successfully obtain external funds. PMID:25319172

  4. Photoneutron target development for the RPI linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overberg, M. E.; Moretti, B. E.; Slovacek, R. E.; Block, R. C.

    1999-12-01

    Two new photoneutron targets have been developed for neutron time-of-flight experiments, the axial water-moderated target (AWMT) and the bare bounce target (BBT). These targets operate without any lead shielding nearby and both have superior neutron resolution compared to the older bounce target. The BBT has been selected over the AWMT for general time-of-flight measurements because it exhibited lower neutron background in the keV energy region.

  5. Accelerated field facility development for hot sour gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, L.K.

    1983-10-01

    This paper presents the chronological plan by which a grass roots sweetening facility was constructed in a minimum amount of time. The facility design was based on production with 9% carbon dioxide and 40 ppm hydrogen sulfide. Flowing wellhead temperatures were predicted to be approximately 300/sup 0/F with flowing wellhead pressures to 11,500 psi. The production facility, with a current total nominal capacity of 100 MMcf/D, was installed as five separate parallel sweetening units. The units were put on-stream in phases in order to maintain a sweetening capacity schedule compatible with wells being put on production. The first units were available for service in three months. All five units were complete in nine months, and a permanent facility installation was commissioned three months later. The process design, equipment procurement, and installation phases of the project were pursued concurrently. Three different sweetening systems were operated during the facility development. A conventional DEA (diethanolamine) system was used because of its simple operation. Conversions were made to a proprietary MDEA (methyldiethanolamine) system in order to increase capacity. A proprietary activated MDEA was tested and operated in order to determine sweetening system selection for future facility capacity and for other applications. Included is a discussion of the project development procedure and key considerations that led to minimal development time. General comparisons are made concerning the performance of several sweetening systems.

  6. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  7. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-20

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  8. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110 W Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  9. Magnetic and structural design of a 15 T Nb3Sn accelerator dipole model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashikhin, V. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Hadron Colliders (HC) are the most powerful discovery tools in modern high energy physics. A 100 TeV scale HC with a nominal operation field of at least 15 T is being considered for the post-LHC era. The choice of a 15 T nominal field requires using the Nb3Sn technology. Practical demonstration of this field level in an accelerator-quality magnet and substantial reduction of the magnet costs are the key conditions for realization of such a machine. FNAL has started the development of a 15 T Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale HC. The magnet design is based on 4-layer shell type coils, graded between the inner and outer layers to maximize the performance. The experience gained during the 11-T dipole R&D campaign is applied to different aspects of the magnet design. This paper describes the magnetic and structural designs and parameters of the 15 T Nb3Sn dipole and the steps towards the demonstration model.

  10. Magnetic and Structural Design of a 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ Accelerator Depole Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Hadron Colliders (HC) are the most powerful discovery tools in modern high energy physics. A 100 TeV scale HC with a nominal operation field of at least 15 T is being considered for the post-LHC era. The choice of a 15 T nominal field requires using the Nb3Sn technology. Practical demonstration of this field level in an accelerator-quality magnet and substantial reduction of the magnet costs are the key conditions for realization of such a machine. FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale HC. The magnet design is based on 4-layer shell type coils, graded between the inner and outer layers to maximize the performance. The experience gained during the 11-T dipole R&D campaign is applied to different aspects of the magnet design. This paper describes the magnetic and structural designs and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_3Sn$ dipole and the steps towards the demonstration model.

  11. Development of a 10 MW, 91 GHz gyroklystron for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Lawson, Wes; Neilson, Jeff M.; Read, Michael

    2001-05-01

    A 10 MW, 91 GHz gyroklystron is under development for W-Band accelerator applications. The device will generate 1.5 microsecond pulses at 120 Hz and will be provided to Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for testing of W-Band accelerator components and subsystems. A magnetron injection gun operating at 500 kV will provide a 55 amp beam for interaction in a 5 cavity circuit. The output will be in a hybrid TE01/TE02 mode that can be converted to a more suitable mode at the accelerator. The device is expected to operate with efficiency close to 40% with a gain of 55 dB. A depressed collector will be implemented to allow improvement in the total efficiency to more than 50%.

  12. Development of repetitive railgun pellet accelerator and steady-state pellet supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Y.; Onozuka, M.; Azuma, K.; Kasai, S.; Hasegawa, K.

    1995-12-31

    A railgun system for repetitive high-speed pellet acceleration and steady-state pellet supply system has been developed and investigated. Using a 2m-long railgun system, the hydrogen pellet was accelerated to 2.6km/sec by the supplied energy of 1.7kJ. It is expected that the hydrogen pellet can be accelerated to 3km/sec using the present pneumatic pellet accelerator and a 2m-long augment railgun. Screw-driven hydrogen-isotope filament extruding system has been fabricated and will be tested to examine its applicability to the steady-state extrusion of the solid hydrogen-isotope filament.

  13. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  14. Pre-Implementation and Performance Plan for the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroga, Marcelo

    2007-03-30

    This report discusses the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center (Center) and its innovative economic development program. The chapters describe the organization and the operations of a two-pillar model for training and business acceleration and how the program focuses on the economic development of a disadvantaged Chicago, Illinois, Hispanic community located in Humboldt Park. The Humboldt Park community is located 3 miles west of Chicago's affluent downtown. Humboldt Park residents have income levels below the poverty line and unemployment rates twice the national average.

  15. An L-Band Superconducting Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure With Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kazakov, S.

    2009-01-22

    The most severe problem of the International Linear Collider is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the ILC. In the ILC project the required accelerating gradient is higher than 30 MeV/m. Further improvement of the coupling to the beam may be achieved by using a Traveling Wave SC structure [1]. We have demonstrated that an additional gradient increase of up to 46% may be possible if a {pi}/2 TW SC structure is employed. However, a TW SC structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few GW of circulating RF power from the structure output back to the structure input. The test cavity with feedback is designed to demonstrate the possibility of achieving a significantly higher gradient than existing SC structures. The double-coupler powering excitation and tuning have been studied numerically and the corresponding model results are presented. The proposed double-coupler powering scheme significantly reduces the tuning requirements as long as any of the partial modes of given magnitude and phase are excited independently, providing a clear traveling wave regime of structure operation.

  16. APS linac klystron and accelerating structure gain measurements and klystron PFN voltage regulation requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.

    1997-07-01

    This note details measurements of the APS positron linac klystron and accelerating structure gain and presents an analysis of the data using fits to simple mathematical models. The models are used to investigate the sensitivity of the energy dependence of the output positron beam to klystron parameters. The gain measurements are separated into two parts: first, the energy gains of the accelerating structures of the positron linac are measured as a function of output power of the klystron; second, the klystron output power is measured as a function of input drive power and pulse forming network (PFN) voltage. This note concentrates on the positron linac rf and its performance as it directly affects the energy stability of the positron beam injected into the positron accumulator ring (PAR). Ultimately it is important to be able to minimize beam energy variations to maximize the PAR accumulation efficiency.

  17. Ion Acceleration at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and its Global Impact on Magnetospheric Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2016-07-01

    The ion plasma pressures at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter are significant players in the electrodynamic force-balance that governs the structure and dynamics of these magnetospheres. There are many similarities between the physical mechanisms that are thought to heat the ion plasma to temperatures that even exceed those of the solar corona. In this presentation we compare the ion acceleration mechanisms at the three planetary magnetospheres and discuss their global impacts on magnetopsheric structure. At Earth, bursty-bulk flows, or "bubbles", have been shown to accelerate protons and O+ to high energies by the earthward moving magnetic dipolarization fronts. O+ ions display a more non-adiabatic energization in response to these fronts than protons do as they are energized and transported in to the ring-current region where they reach energies of several 100's keV. We present both in-situ measurements from the NASA Van Allen Probes Mission and global Energetic Neutral (ENA) images from the High-Energy Neutral Atom (HENA) Camera on board the IMAGE Mission, that illustrate these processes. The global impact on the magnetospheric structure is explored by comparing the empirical magnetic field model TS07d for given driving conditions with global plasma pressure distributions derived from the HENA images. At Saturn, quasi-periodic energization events, or large-scale injections, occur beyond about 9 RS around the post-midnight sector, clearly shown by the Ion and Neutral Atom Camera (INCA) on board the Cassini mission. In contrast to Earth, the corotational drift dominates even the energetic ion distributions. The large-scale injections display similar dipolarization front features can be found and there are indications that like at Earth the O+ responds more non-adiabatically than protons do. However, at Saturn there are also differences in that there appears to be energization events deep in the inner magnetosphere (6-9 RS) preferentially occurring in the pre

  18. Development of accelerator radiation protection at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Toohig, T.

    1993-11-01

    The design of the Superconducting Super Collider evolved over a series of studies from 1984 to 1989. Considerations of concentration of radiation sources and provisions for operational control and monitoring of radiation were determining elements in the design concepts for the facility. The development of the designs involved an extension of the range of applicability of energy deposition and radiation shielding codes beyond the 3 TeV level of the proposed UNK collider to 20 TeV for single beam effects and to 40 TeV in the collision regions. This extrapolation was complicated by the newly discovered, very energetic muons from short-lived states associated with heavy quark states. The design guideline for radiation protection was specified to be 10 mRem/yr, 10% of the Federal limit. In order to limit the amount of land required for the facility, which would extend over some 250 mi. sq., the configuration of the land to be acquired was tailored to the requirements for radiation containment below the levels of the guideline.

  19. Accelerating development of a predictive science of climate.

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, John B; Jones, Phil

    2007-01-01

    Climate change and studies of its implications are front page news. Could the heat waves of July 2006 in Europe and the US be caused by global warming? Are increased incidences of strong tropical storms and hurricanes like Katrina to be expected? Will coastal cities be flooded due to sea level rise? The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) which archives all weather data for the nation reports that global surface temperatures have increased at a rate near 0.6 C over the last century but that the trend is three times larger since 1976 [Easterling, 2006]. Will this rate continue or will climate change be even more abrupt? Stepping back from the flurry of questions, scientists must take a systematic approach and develop a predictive framework. With responsibility for advising on energy and technology strategies, the Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research has chosen to bolster the science of climate in order to get the story straight on the factors that cause climate change and the role of carbon loading from fossil fuel use.

  20. Synapsin IIa accelerates functional development of neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, E; Alder, J; Greengard, P; Poo, M M

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the possible involvement of the synaptic vesicle protein synapsin IIa in synapse development. Synapsin IIa was introduced into Xenopus embryonic spinal neurons by early blastomere injection, and nerve-muscle cultures were prepared. Synaptic currents were measured by comparing synapses in which the presynaptic neuron either contained [syn IIa (+)] or lacked (control) exogenous synapsin IIa. Syn IIa (+) synapses had a 3.6-fold increase in the frequency and a 2.1-fold increase in the amplitude of spontaneous synaptic currents, compared to controls, after 2 days in culture. Synapsin IIa also increased the amplitude of evoked synaptic currents by 2.3-fold in 2-day cultures. The evoked synaptic current amplitudes of syn IIa (+) synapses had a lower coefficient of variation indicating a more stable evoked response. These enhanced synaptic activities were independent of the presence or absence of the protein in the postsynaptic muscle cell. The findings indicate a role for synapsin IIa in synapse maturation. Images PMID:8171006

  1. Noninvasive Laser Probing of Ultrashort Single Electron Bunches for Accelerator And Light Source Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.; /SLAC

    2007-06-11

    Companion development of ultrafast electron beam diagnostics capable of noninvasively resolving single bunch detail is essential for the development of high energy, high brightness accelerator facilities and associated beam-based light source applications. Existing conventional accelerators can exhibit timing-jitter down to the 100 femtosecond level which exceeds their single bunch duration capability. At the other extreme, in relatively jitterless environments, laser-plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can generate single electron bunches of duration estimated to be of order 10 femtoseconds making this setting a valuable testbed for development of broadband electron bunch diagnostics. Characteristics of electro-optic schemes and laser-induced reflectance are discussed with emphasis on temporal resolution.

  2. Collaborative workbench for cyberinfrastructure to accelerate science algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Maskey, M.; Kuo, K.; Lynnes, C.

    2013-12-01

    There are significant untapped resources for information and knowledge creation within the Earth Science community in the form of data, algorithms, services, analysis workflows or scripts, and the related knowledge about these resources. Despite the huge growth in social networking and collaboration platforms, these resources often reside on an investigator's workstation or laboratory and are rarely shared. A major reason for this is that there are very few scientific collaboration platforms, and those that exist typically require the use of a new set of analysis tools and paradigms to leverage the shared infrastructure. As a result, adoption of these collaborative platforms for science research is inhibited by the high cost to an individual scientist of switching from his or her own familiar environment and set of tools to a new environment and tool set. This presentation will describe an ongoing project developing an Earth Science Collaborative Workbench (CWB). The CWB approach will eliminate this barrier by augmenting a scientist's current research environment and tool set to allow him or her to easily share diverse data and algorithms. The CWB will leverage evolving technologies such as commodity computing and social networking to design an architecture for scalable collaboration that will support the emerging vision of an Earth Science Collaboratory. The CWB is being implemented on the robust and open source Eclipse framework and will be compatible with widely used scientific analysis tools such as IDL. The myScience Catalog built into CWB will capture and track metadata and provenance about data and algorithms for the researchers in a non-intrusive manner with minimal overhead. Seamless interfaces to multiple Cloud services will support sharing algorithms, data, and analysis results, as well as access to storage and computer resources. A Community Catalog will track the use of shared science artifacts and manage collaborations among researchers.

  3. Structure of Developing Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the numerical modeling of tropical cyclones. The very high resolution now routinely used in research models allows realistic simulation of eyewall structure and breakdown, vortex Rossby waves, and numerous other processes that were beyond the capability of previous generations of models. At least one aspect of tropical cyclones, however, has not been reproduced in the current generation of models: early development (or lack of development) during tropical depression and early tropical storm stages. During such times, vertical wind shear often plays a critical role. In this presentation, details of the structure of four tropical cyclones at early stages will be given: Claudette (2003), Danny (1997), Gabrielle (2001), and Edouard (2002). The first three contained intense vortices that formed within downshear convection. Deep-layer vertical wind shear ranged from 8-15 m/s in the storms. In Claudette, a hurricane formed that lasted only 6 hours. In Danny and Gabrielle, the downshear vortices became the new storm center. One became a hurricane and one did not. In Edouard, vertical shear was even larger. Convection fluctuated between downshear of the center and over the center, with analogous intensity changes. This behavior is known to forecasters, but the causes of such fluctuations remain uncertain. The evolving structure of these four storms will be shown, with emphasis on the variation of convection, equivalent potential temperature in the lower troposphere, and azimuthal asymmetries of wind and circulation. Contrast will be made between the structure of forming tropical cyclones in nature and those seen in mesoscale numerical models. Some remarks will be given on the key physical processes that must be simulated.

  4. GPU-Accelerated Analysis and Visualization of Large Structures Solved by Molecular Dynamics Flexible Fitting

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Ryan; Isralewitz, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid structure fitting methods combine data from cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography with molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of all-atom structures of large biomolecular complexes. Evaluating the quality-of-fit obtained from hybrid fitting is computationally demanding, particularly in the context of a multiplicity of structural conformations that must be evaluated. Existing tools for quality-of-fit analysis and visualization have previously targeted small structures and are too slow to be used interactively for large biomolecular complexes of particular interest today such as viruses or for long molecular dynamics trajectories as they arise in protein folding. We present new data-parallel and GPU-accelerated algorithms for rapid interactive computation of quality-of-fit metrics linking all-atom structures and molecular dynamics trajectories to experimentally determined density maps obtained from cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. We evaluate the performance and accuracy of the new quality-of-fit analysis algorithms vis-a-vis existing tools, examine algorithm performance on GPU-accelerated desktop workstations and supercomputers, and describe new visualization techniques for results of hybrid structure fitting methods. PMID:25340325

  5. Studies of beam induced dipole-mode signals in accelerating structures at the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, M.

    1997-06-01

    Beam emittance dilution by self induced transverse fields (wakefields) in accelerating structures is a key problem in linear accelerators. To minimize the wakefield effects the beam trajectory must be precisely centered within the structures. An efficient way to achieve this is to detect beam induced microwave signals in the lowest dipole mode band and to steer the beam by minimizing these signals. This paper briefly covers some experiences from SLC S-band structures, but mainly concentrates on results of a wakefield instrumentation scheme applied to a NLC prototype X-band structure and tested with beam in the SLC linac. A beam based in-situ structure straightness measurement is shown as well as results of beam steering experiments based on phase and amplitude detection of two separated modes in the structure. After centering the beam the reduction of the wakefield was demonstrated independently by probing it with a test bunch that is deflected by the residual wakefield at a short distance behind the drive bunch.

  6. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, C. E.; Adli, E.; Allen, J.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Xu, X.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within ±3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m−1 to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity. PMID:27527569

  7. Self-mapping the longitudinal field structure of a nonlinear plasma accelerator cavity.

    PubMed

    Clayton, C E; Adli, E; Allen, J; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Xu, X; Yakimenko, V

    2016-01-01

    The preservation of emittance of the accelerating beam is the next challenge for plasma-based accelerators envisioned for future light sources and colliders. The field structure of a highly nonlinear plasma wake is potentially suitable for this purpose but has not been yet measured. Here we show that the longitudinal variation of the fields in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator cavity produced by a relativistic electron bunch can be mapped using the bunch itself as a probe. We find that, for much of the cavity that is devoid of plasma electrons, the transverse force is constant longitudinally to within ±3% (r.m.s.). Moreover, comparison of experimental data and simulations has resulted in mapping of the longitudinal electric field of the unloaded wake up to 83 GV m(-1) to a similar degree of accuracy. These results bode well for high-gradient, high-efficiency acceleration of electron bunches while preserving their emittance in such a cavity. PMID:27527569

  8. Acceleration ground test program to verify GAS payload No. 559 structure/support avionics and experiment structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassanto, John M.; Cassanto, Valerie A.

    1988-01-01

    Acceleration ground tests were conducted on the Get Away Special (GAS) payload 559 to verify the structural integrity of the structure/support avionics and two of the planned three flight experiments. The ITA (Integrated Test Area) Standardized Experiment Module (ISEM) structure was modified to accommodate the experiments for payload 559. The ISEM avionics consisted of a heavy duty sliver zinc power supply, three orthogonal-mounted low range microgravity accelerometers, a tri-axis high range accelerometer, a solid state recorder/programmer sequencer, and pressure and temperature sensors. The tests were conducted using the Gravitational Plant Physiology Laboratory Centrifuge of the University City Science Center in Philadelphia, PA. The launch-powered flight steady state acceleration profile of the shuttle was simulated from lift-off through jettison of the External Tank (3.0 g's). Additional tests were conducted at twice the nominal powered flight acceleration levels (6 g's) and an over-test condition of four times the powered flight loads to 12.6 g's. The present test program has demonstrated the value of conducting ground tests to verify GAS payload experiment integrity and operation before flying on the shuttle.

  9. Complete multipactor suppression in an X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, C.; Gold, S. H.; Fischer, Richard; Gai, W.

    2016-05-01

    Multipactor is a major issue limiting the gradient of rf-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures. Theoretical models have predicted that an axial magnetic field applied to DLA structures may completely block the multipactor discharge. However, previous attempts to demonstrate this magnetic field effect in an X-band traveling-wave DLA structure were inconclusive, due to the axial variation of the applied magnetic field, and showed only partial suppression of the multipactor loading [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 213503 (2013)]. The present experiment has been performed under improved conditions with a uniform axial magnetic field extending along the length of an X-band standing-wave DLA structure. Multipactor loading began to be continuously reduced starting from 3.5 kG applied magnetic field and was completely suppressed at ˜8 kG. Dependence of multipactor suppression on the rf gradient inside the DLA structure was also measured.

  10. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-01-01

    The main thrust of our work in the third year of contract NAG8-759 was the development and analysis of various data processing techniques that may be applicable to residual acceleration data. Our goal is the development of a data processing guide that low gravity principal investigators can use to assess their need for accelerometer data and then formulate an acceleration data analysis strategy. The work focused on the flight of the first International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission. We are also developing a data base management system to handle large quantities of residual acceleration data. This type of system should be an integral tool in the detailed analysis of accelerometer data. The system will manage a large graphics data base in the support of supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition. The goal of the pattern recognition phase is to identify specific classes of accelerations so that these classes can be easily recognized in any data base. The data base management system is being tested on the Spacelab 3 (SL3) residual acceleration data.

  11. Use of spectral acceleration data for determination of three-dimensional attenuation structure in the Pithoragarh region of Kumaon Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A.; Mohanty, M.; Bansal, A. R.; Dimri, V. P.; Chadha, R. K.

    2010-04-01

    Three-dimensional attenuation structures are related to the subsurface heterogeneities present in the earth crust. An algorithm for estimation of three-dimensional attenuation structure in the part of Garhwal Himalaya, India has been presented by Joshi (Curr Sci 90:581-585, 2006b; Nat Hazards 43:129-146, 2007). In continuation of our earlier approach, we have presented a method in which strong motion data have been used to estimate frequency-dependent three-dimensional attenuation structure of the region. The border district of Pithoragarh in the Higher Himalaya, India, lies in the central seismic gap region of Himalaya. This region falls in the seismic zones IV and V of the seismic zoning map of India. A dense network consisting of eight accelerographs has been installed in this region. This network has recorded several local events. An algorithm based on inversion of strong motion digital data is developed in this paper to estimate attenuation structure at different frequencies using the data recorded by this network. Twenty strong motion records observed at five stations have been used to estimate the site amplification factors using inversion algorithm defined in this paper. Site effects obtained from inversion has been compared with that obtained using Nakamura (1988) and Lermo et al. (Bull Seis Soc Am 83:1574-1594, 1993) approach. The obtained site amplification term has been used for correcting spectral acceleration data at different stations. The corrected spectral acceleration data have been used as an input to the developed algorithm to avoid effect of near-site soil amplification term. The attenuation structure is estimated by dividing the entire area in several three-dimensional block of different frequency-dependent shear wave quality factor Q β ( f). The input to this algorithm is the spectral acceleration of S phase of the corrected accelerogram. The outcome of the algorithm is given in terms of attenuation coefficient and source acceleration

  12. Estimating double tuned mass dampers for structures under ground acceleration using a novel optimum criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunxiang; Zhu, Bilei

    2006-11-01

    The double tuned mass dampers (DTMD), consisting of one larger mass block (i.e. one larger tuned mass damper (TMD)) and one smaller mass block (i.e. one smaller TMD), have been proposed to seek for the mass dampers with high effectiveness and robustness for the reduction of the undesirable vibrations of structures under the ground acceleration. The structure is represented by the mode-generalized system corresponding to the specific vibration mode that needs to be controlled. In light of the developed dynamic magnification factors (DMF) of the DTMD structure system, the criterion used for assessing the optimum parameters and effectiveness of the DTMD is selected as the minimization of the minimum values of the maximum DMF of the structure with the DTMD. With resorting to the maximum DMF of both the larger and smaller TMDs in the DTMD, the stroke of the DTMD is simultaneously investigated too. It is highlighted that a novel optimum objective function has been proposed in order to acquire high robust control system. Consequently, the two types of optimum goal functions (including the optimum goal function commonly used) have been applied for the optimum searching of the DTMD. The numerical results indicate that the DTMD designed in terms of the second type of optimum objective functions (i.e. the novel optimum objective function) practically provides the same effectiveness and robustness to the changes in the drift frequency ratio (DFR) as the multiple tuned mass dampers (MTMD) with the distributed natural frequencies with the total number of the TMD units equal to five and with equal total mass ratio. Likewise, the DTMD designed with resort to the second type of optimum objective functions can practically attain the same effectiveness as the TMD with equal total mass ratio. More importantly, in the robustness to the changes in the DFR, the DTMD is significantly better than the TMD, whereas in the robustness to the natural frequency tuning (NFT), measured by the

  13. The MIT Accelerator Laboratory for Diagnostic Development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Hahn, K.; Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products, which are used for development of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved with this accelerator, and fluence and energy of the fusion products are accurately characterized. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) CVD-diamond-based bang time detector. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  14. Development of and flight results from the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; Finley, Brian D.; Baugher, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the development of and the flight results from the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) flight units used in the Orbiter middeck, Spacelab module, and the Orbitercargo bay. The SAMS units are general purpose microgravity accelerometers designed to support a variety of science experiments with microgravity acceleration measurements. A total of six flight units have been fabricated; four for use in the Orbiter middeck and Spacelab module, and two for use in the Orbiter cargo bay. The design of the units is briefly described. The initial two flights of SAMS units on STS-40 (June 1991) and STS-43 (August 1991) resulted in 371 megabytes and 2.6 gigabytes of data respectively. Analytical techniques developed to examine this quantity of acceleration data are described and sample plots of analyzed data are illustrated. Future missions for the SAMS units are listed.

  15. FPGA accelerator for protein secondary structure prediction based on the GOR algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein is an important molecule that performs a wide range of functions in biological systems. Recently, the protein folding attracts much more attention since the function of protein can be generally derived from its molecular structure. The GOR algorithm is one of the most successful computational methods and has been widely used as an efficient analysis tool to predict secondary structure from protein sequence. However, the execution time is still intolerable with the steep growth in protein database. Recently, FPGA chips have emerged as one promising application accelerator to accelerate bioinformatics algorithms by exploiting fine-grained custom design. Results In this paper, we propose a complete fine-grained parallel hardware implementation on FPGA to accelerate the GOR-IV package for 2D protein structure prediction. To improve computing efficiency, we partition the parameter table into small segments and access them in parallel. We aggressively exploit data reuse schemes to minimize the need for loading data from external memory. The whole computation structure is carefully pipelined to overlap the sequence loading, computing and back-writing operations as much as possible. We implemented a complete GOR desktop system based on an FPGA chip XC5VLX330. Conclusions The experimental results show a speedup factor of more than 430x over the original GOR-IV version and 110x speedup over the optimized version with multi-thread SIMD implementation running on a PC platform with AMD Phenom 9650 Quad CPU for 2D protein structure prediction. However, the power consumption is only about 30% of that of current general-propose CPUs. PMID:21342582

  16. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  17. Survivability of integrated PVDF film sensors to accelerated ageing conditions in aeronautical/aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, E.; Cugnoni, J.; Gmür, T.; Bonhôte, P.; Schorderet, A.

    2013-06-01

    This work validates the use of integrated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film sensors for dynamic testing, even after being subjected to UV-thermo-hygro-mechanical accelerated ageing conditions. The verification of PVDF sensors’ survivability in these environmental conditions, typically confronted by civil and military aircraft, is the main concern of the study. The evaluation of survivability is made by a comparison of dynamic testing results provided by the PVDF patch sensors subjected to an accelerated ageing protocol, and those provided by neutral non-aged sensors (accelerometers). The available measurements are the time-domain response signals issued from a modal analysis procedure, and the corresponding frequency response functions (FRF). These are in turn used to identify the constitutive properties of the samples by extraction of the modal parameters, in particular the natural frequencies. The composite specimens in this study undergo different accelerated ageing processes. After several weeks of experimentation, the samples exhibit a loss of stiffness, represented by a decrease in the elastic moduli down to 10%. Despite the ageing, the integrated PVDF sensors, subjected to the same ageing conditions, are still capable of providing reliable data to carry out a close followup of these changes. This survivability is a determinant asset in order to use integrated PVDF sensors to perform structural health monitoring (SHM) in the future of full-scale composite aeronautical structures.

  18. Conceptual Design of Dielectric Accelerating Structures for Intense Neutron and Monochromatic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Blanovsky, Anatoly

    2004-12-07

    Bright compact photon sources, which utilize electron beam interaction with periodic structures, may benefit a broad range of medical, industrial and scientific applications. A class of dielectric-loaded periodic structures for hard and soft X-ray production has been proposed that would provide a high accelerating gradient when excited by an external RF and/or primary electron beam. Target-distributed accelerators (TDA), in which an additional electric field compensates for lost beam energy in internal targets, have been shown to provide the necessary means to drive a high flux subcritical reactor (HFSR) for nuclear waste transmutation. The TDA may also be suitable for positron and nuclear isomer production, X-ray lithography and monochromatic computer tomography. One of the early assumptions of the theory of dielectric wake-field acceleration was that, in electrodynamics, the vector potential was proportional to the scalar potential. The analysis takes into consideration a wide range of TDA design aspects including the wave model of observed phenomena, a layered compound separated by a Van der Waals gap and a compact energy source based on fission electric cells (FEC) with a multistage collector. The FEC is a high-voltage power source that directly converts the kinetic energy of the fission fragments into electrical potential of about 2MV.

  19. Numerical simulations of input and output couplers for linear accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.K.; Ko, K.

    1993-04-01

    We present the numerical procedures involved in the design of coupler cavities for accelerator sections for linear colliders. The MAFIA code is used to simulate an X-band accelerator section with a symmetrical double-input coupler at each end. The transmission properties of the structure are calculated in the time domain and the dimensions of the coupler cavities are adjusted until the power coupling is optimized and frequency synchronism is obtained. We compare the performance of the symmetrical double-input design with that of the conventional single-input type by evaluating the field amplitude and phase asymmetries. We also evaluate the peak gradient in the coupler and discuss the implication of pulse rise time on dark current generation.

  20. Beam Based HOM Analysis of Accelerating Structures at the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Schreiber, S.; Castro, P.; Gossel, A.; Huning, M.; Devanz, G.; Jablonka, M.; Magne, C.; Napoly, O.; Baboi, N.; /SLAC

    2005-08-09

    The beam emittance in future linear accelerators for high energy physics and SASE-FEL applications depends highly on the field performance in the accelerating structures, i.e. the damping of higher order modes (HOM). Besides theoretical and laboratory analysis, a beam based analysis technique was established [1] at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac. It uses a charge modulated beam of variable modulation frequency to excite dipole modes. This causes a modulation of the transverse beam displacement, which is observed at a downstream BPM and associated with a direct analysis of the modes at the HOM-couplers. A brief introduction of eigenmodes of a resonator and the concept of the wake potential is given. Emphasis is put on beam instrumentation and signal analysis aspects, required for this beam based HOM measurement technique.

  1. Planar-Dielectric-Wakefield Accelerator Structure Using Bragg-Reflector Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonian, G.; Williams, O.; Barber, S.; Bruhwiler, D.; Favier, P.; Fedurin, M.; Fitzmorris, K.; Fukasawa, A.; Hoang, P.; Kusche, K.; Naranjo, B.; O'Shea, B.; Stoltz, P.; Swinson, C.; Valloni, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We report experimental measurements of narrow-band, single-mode excitation, and drive beam energy modulation, in a dielectric wakefield accelerating structure with planar geometry and Bragg-reflector boundaries. A short, relativistic electron beam (˜1 ps ) with moderate charge (˜100 pC ) is used to drive the wakefields in the structure. The fundamental mode of the structure is reinforced by constructive interference in the alternating dielectric layers at the boundary, and is characterized by the spectral analysis of the emitted coherent Cherenkov radiation signal. Data analysis shows a narrow-band peak at 210 GHz corresponding to the fundamental mode of the structure. Simulations in both 2D and 3D provide insight into the propagating fields and reproduction of the electron beams dynamics observables and emitted radiation characteristics.

  2. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Kiyoshi

    2003-07-07

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 {micro}m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  3. Planar-dielectric-wakefield accelerator structure using Bragg-reflector boundaries.

    PubMed

    Andonian, G; Williams, O; Barber, S; Bruhwiler, D; Favier, P; Fedurin, M; Fitzmorris, K; Fukasawa, A; Hoang, P; Kusche, K; Naranjo, B; O'Shea, B; Stoltz, P; Swinson, C; Valloni, A; Rosenzweig, J B

    2014-12-31

    We report experimental measurements of narrow-band, single-mode excitation, and drive beam energy modulation, in a dielectric wakefield accelerating structure with planar geometry and Bragg-reflector boundaries. A short, relativistic electron beam (∼1  ps) with moderate charge (∼100  pC) is used to drive the wakefields in the structure. The fundamental mode of the structure is reinforced by constructive interference in the alternating dielectric layers at the boundary, and is characterized by the spectral analysis of the emitted coherent Cherenkov radiation signal. Data analysis shows a narrow-band peak at 210 GHz corresponding to the fundamental mode of the structure. Simulations in both 2D and 3D provide insight into the propagating fields and reproduction of the electron beams dynamics observables and emitted radiation characteristics. PMID:25615344

  4. X-band accelerator structures: On going R&D at the INFN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, G.; Marcelli, A.; Spataro, B.; Dolgashev, V.; Lewandowski, J.; Tantawi, S. G.; Yeremian, A. D.; Higashi, Y.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sarti, S.; Caliendo, C.; Castorina, G.; Cibin, G.; Carfora, L.; Leonardi, O.; Rigato, V.; Campostrini, M.

    2016-09-01

    The next generation of accelerators, from the compact to the large infrastructure dedicated to high energy physics, is highly demanding in terms of accelerating gradients. To upgrade performances of X band linacs at 11.424 GHz many resources are devoted to achieve high accelerating gradients and at the same time to obtain a high reliability. In the framework of a three-year funded project by the Vth Committee of the INFN to the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) and to the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL). Within a broad international collaboration the LNF has been involved in the design, manufacture and test of compact high power standing wave (SW) sections operating at high frequency while LNL is actively involved in the development of new materials and multilayers using PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) methods. We will report about the status of the accelerating device and of the different ongoing R&D activities and characterization procedures such as tests of different materials and metallic coatings.

  5. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  6. Rapid analysis of scattering from periodic dielectric structures using accelerated Cartesian expansions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Miller, Nicholas C.; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2012-03-22

    Here, the analysis of fields in periodic dielectric structures arise in numerous applications of recent interest, ranging from photonic bandgap structures and plasmonically active nanostructures to metamaterials. To achieve an accurate representation of the fields in these structures using numerical methods, dense spatial discretization is required. This, in turn, affects the cost of analysis, particularly for integral-equation-based methods, for which traditional iterative methods require Ο(Ν2) operations, Ν being the number of spatial degrees of freedom. In this paper, we introduce a method for the rapid solution of volumetric electric field integral equations used in the analysis of doubly periodic dielectricmore » structures. The crux of our method is the accelerated Cartesian expansion algorithm, which is used to evaluate the requisite potentials in Ο(Ν) cost. Results are provided that corroborate our claims of acceleration without compromising accuracy, as well as the application of our method to a number of compelling photonics applications.« less

  7. Accelerating Content-Based Image Retrieval via GPU-Adaptive Index Structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A tremendous amount of work has been conducted in content-based image retrieval (CBIR) on designing effective index structure to accelerate the retrieval process. Most of them improve the retrieval efficiency via complex index structures, and few take into account the parallel implementation of them on underlying hardware, making the existing index structures suffer from low-degree of parallelism. In this paper, a novel graphics processing unit (GPU) adaptive index structure, termed as plane semantic ball (PSB), is proposed to simultaneously reduce the work of retrieval process and exploit the parallel acceleration of underlying hardware. In PSB, semantics are embedded into the generation of representative pivots and multiple balls are selected to cover more informative reference features. With PSB, the online retrieval of CBIR is factorized into independent components that are implemented on GPU efficiently. Comparative experiments with GPU-based brute force approach demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve high speedup with little information loss. Furthermore, PSB is compared with the state-of-the-art approach, random ball cover (RBC), on two standard image datasets, Corel 10 K and GIST 1 M. Experimental results show that our approach achieves higher speedup than RBC on the same accuracy level. PMID:24782668

  8. Acceleration of Vascular Sprouting from Fabricated Perfusable Vascular-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Tatsuya; Kakegawa, Takahiro; Kageyama, Tatsuto; Enomoto, Junko; Nittami, Tadashi; Fukuda, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of vascular networks is essential for engineering three-dimensional thick tissues and organs in the emerging fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we describe the fabrication of perfusable vascular-like structures by transferring endothelial cells using an electrochemical reaction as well as acceleration of subsequent endothelial sprouting by two stimuli: phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and fluidic shear stress. The electrochemical transfer of cells was achieved using an oligopeptide that formed a dense molecular layer on a gold surface and was then electrochemically desorbed from the surface. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adhered to gold-coated needles (ϕ600 μm) via the oligopeptide, were transferred to collagen gel along with electrochemical desorption of the molecular layer, resulting in the formation of endothelial cell-lined vascular-like structures. In the following culture, the endothelial cells migrated into the collagen gel and formed branched luminal structures. However, this branching process was strikingly slow (>14 d) and the cell layers on the internal surfaces became disrupted in some regions. To address these issues, we examined the effects of the protein kinase C (PKC) activator, PMA, and shear stress generated by medium flow. Addition of PMA at an optimum concentration significantly accelerated migration, vascular network formation, and its stabilization. Exposure to shear stress reoriented the cells in the direction of the medium flow and further accelerated vascular network formation. Because of the synergistic effects, HUVECs began to sprout as early as 3 d of perfusion culture and neighboring vascular-like structures were bridged within 5 d. Although further investigations of vascular functions need to be performed, this approach may be an effective strategy for rapid fabrication of perfusable microvascular networks when engineering three-dimensional fully vascularized

  9. Methoprene and protein supplements accelerate reproductive development and improve mating success of male tephritid flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have been studying the physiological mechanisms responsible for coordination of reproductive maturity and sex pheromone communication in males of tephritid flies in order to develop methods for acceleration of reproductive maturity among sterilized males. Our studies revealed that the juvenile ho...

  10. Future Development Of The Flerov Laboratory Accelerator Complex (Project DRIBs-III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbekian, G. G.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Popeko, A. G.

    2010-04-01

    Future development of the FLNR accelerator complex (project DRIBs-III) includes modernization of existing cyclotrons, construction of a new experimental hall, creation of a new high current cyclotron and of next generation experimental set-ups. Realization of the project is planned for 2010-2016.

  11. Accelerating the Early Numeracy Development of Kindergartners with Limited Working Memory Skills through Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toll, Sylke W. M.; Van Luit, Johannes E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Young children with limited working memory skills are a special interest group among all children that score below average on early numeracy tests. This study examines the effect of accelerating the early numeracy development of these children through remedial education, by comparing them with children with typically working memory…

  12. Accelerated Professional Development and Peer Consultation: Two Strategies for Continuing Professional Education for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Gail; Clinton, Michael; Edwards, Helen; Evans, Katie; Lunney, Paul; Posner, Natasha; Tooth, Barbara; Weir, Derek; Ryan, Yoni

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was made of accelerated professional development (APD) for nurses (n=64), involving peer consultation and reflective practice, and peer consultation alone (n=30). Although APD participants had a higher completion rate, improvements in caregiver behaviors and work environment were not significantly different. (SK)

  13. Accelerating the Development of Expertise: A Step-Change in Social Science Research Capacity Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Alison; Wallace, Mike

    2011-01-01

    It is argued that future research capacity building for the social sciences needs to incorporate methods to accelerate the acquisition by researchers of holistic expertise relevant to their roles as researchers and as developers of others. An agenda is presented, based on a model of learning that highlights missing elements of current provision,…

  14. Evolutionary development of tensegrity structures.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Daniel; Vico, Francisco J

    2010-09-01

    Contributions from the emerging fields of molecular genetics and evo-devo (evolutionary developmental biology) are greatly benefiting the field of evolutionary computation, initiating a promise of renewal in the traditional methodology. While direct encoding has constituted a dominant paradigm, indirect ways to encode the solutions have been reported, yet little attention has been paid to the benefits of the proposed methods to real problems. In this work, we study the biological properties that emerge by means of using indirect encodings in the context of form-finding problems. A novel indirect encoding model for artificial development has been defined and applied to an engineering structural-design problem, specifically to the discovery of tensegrity structures. This model has been compared with a direct encoding scheme. While the direct encoding performs similarly well to the proposed method, indirect-based results typically outperform the direct-based results in aspects not directly linked to the nature of the problem itself, but to the emergence of properties found in biological organisms, like organicity, generalization capacity, or modularity aspects which are highly valuable in engineering. PMID:20619314

  15. Development of the CRISP Package for Spallation Studies and Accelerator-Driven Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos, S.; Deppman, A.; Silva, Gilson da; Maiorino, J.R.; Santos, A. dos; Garcia, F.

    2005-09-15

    Power generation from nuclear reactors provides an almost inexhaustive power source due to the huge quantities of nuclear fuel existent in our planet, which guarantees its utilization for thousands of years. Interest has been shifted to the so-called hybrid reactors [accelerator-driven systems (ADS)] as an alternative technology for power generation and transmutation, thus requiring precise knowledge about nuclear structure and nuclear reaction characteristics. Research groups from Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo and Brazilian Center for Research in Physics made a joint effort to develop a computer program, CRISP, to calculate the intranuclear cascade proprieties and the nuclear evaporation process, present in all nuclear reactions with energies above a few tens of mega-electron-volts, using Monte Carlo techniques. Some reaction channels were included in these programs, resulting in a more realistic representation of the processes involved, aiming at reactor physics studies and academic studies about hadron and meson properties in nuclear matter. Some results obtained with this code and a comparison with experimental data are presented. Although all these results are preliminary, they are very consistent with the available experimental data. Since the applicability of the CRISP package has a wide range of options, especially in ADS, some results describing the effectiveness of the code were achieved.

  16. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-15

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mmx0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-I{sub b} (mA)x0.00808 (MeV/mA), where I{sub b} is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  17. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1. PMID:17555261

  18. Helicon Plasma Injector and Ion Cyclotron Acceleration Development in the VASIMR Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang, Franklin R.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2000-01-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) radio frequency (rf) waves both produce the plasma and then accelerate the ions. The plasma production is done by action of helicon waves. These waves are circular polarized waves in the direction of the electron gyromotion. The ion acceleration is performed by ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) acceleration. The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) is actively developing efficient helicon plasma production and ICRF acceleration. The VASIMR experimental device at the ASPL is called VX-10. It is configured to demonstrate the plasma production and acceleration at the 10kW level to support a space flight demonstration design. The VX-10 consists of three electromagnets integrated into a vacuum chamber that produce magnetic fields up to 0.5 Tesla. Magnetic field shaping is achieved by independent magnet current control and placement of the magnets. We have generated both helium and hydrogen high density (>10(exp 18) cu m) discharges with the helicon source. ICRF experiments are underway. This paper describes the VX-10 device, presents recent results and discusses future plans.

  19. Using combinatorial bioinformatics methods to analyze annual perspective changes of influenza viruses and to accelerate development of effective vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Jen; Chow, Kuan-Chih; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Li-Jen; Wang, Sheng-Cheng; Wang, Shulhn-Der

    2015-08-01

    The standard World Health Organization procedure for vaccine development has provided a guideline for influenza viruses, but no systematic operational model. We recently designed a systemic analysis method to evaluate annual perspective sequence changes of influenza virus strains. We applied dnaml of PHYLIP 3.69, developed by Joseph Felsenstein of Washington University, and ClustalX2, developed by Larkin et al, for calculating, comparing, and localizing the most plausible vaccine epitopes. This study identified the changes in biological sequences and associated alignment alterations, which would ultimately affect epitope structures, as well as the plausible hidden features to search for the most conserved and effective epitopes for vaccine development. Addition our newly designed systemic analysis method to supplement the WHO guidelines could accelerate the development of urgently needed vaccines that might concurrently combat several strains of viruses within a shorter period. PMID:26044364

  20. DEVELOPING THE PHYSICS DESIGN FOR NDCX-II, A UNIQUE PULSE-COMPRESSING ION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Grote, D. P.; Lund, S. M.; Sharp, W. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J-Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2009-07-20

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory(a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the"warm dense matter" regime at<~;; 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a ~;;500 ns pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over ~;;15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  1. Accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells: Development of test methods and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    If thin film cells are to be considered a viable option for terrestrial power generation their reliability attributes will need to be explored and confidence in their stability obtained through accelerated testing. Development of a thin film accelerated test program will be more difficult than was the case for crystalline cells because of the monolithic construction nature of the cells. Specially constructed test samples will need to be fabricated, requiring committment to the concept of accelerated testing by the manufacturers. A new test schedule appropriate to thin film cells will need to be developed which will be different from that used in connection with crystalline cells. Preliminary work has been started to seek thin film schedule variations to two of the simplest tests: unbiased temperature and unbiased temperature humidity. Still to be examined are tests which involve the passage of current during temperature and/or humidity stress, either by biasing in the forward (or reverse) directions or by the application of light during stress. Investigation of these current (voltage) accelerated tests will involve development of methods of reliably contacting the thin conductive films during stress.

  2. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  3. Origins of Highly Structured Distribution Functions in Magnetic Reconnection Exhausts: Understanding Electron Acceleration and Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Wang, S.; Chen, L. J.; Bessho, N.; Guo, R.; Torbert, R. B.; Daughton, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    Electron velocity distribution functions (VDFs) during reconnection with negligible guide field from particle in cell (PIC) simulations and Cluster observations are studied to further understand electron acceleration and heating. Until recently, electrons in the exhaust of reconnection with negligible guide field were thought to be isotropic. PIC simulation results with zero guide field reveal that near the time of peak reconnection, VDFs become highly structured in magnetic islands and open exhausts. Ring, arc, and counterstreaming populations are generic and lasting constituents of exhaust electron VDFs. Analyses of particle trajectories indicate that a number of mechanisms including Fermi acceleration, the parallel potential, and adiabatic heating contribute to the energization of exhaust electrons. Near the electron diffusion region (EDR), exhaust electrons exhibit large Te⊥ due to ring and arc populations of electrons accelerated in the EDR. Farther away from the EDR, the VDFs show a mixture of electrons from the EDR and those crossing the separatrix from the inflow. Pitch angle scattering is effective near the exhaust midplane, away from the EDR and before reaching the magnetic pileup region, producing isotropic, high-energy electrons, while the low energy exhaust electrons exhibit the anisotropy Te// > Te⊥ characteristic of the inflow. The work done on the electrons by the perpendicular electric field between the end of EDR and the magnetic pileup region is due to Fermi acceleration which leads to a net increase in the electron's parallel velocity. For the net increase of electrons' v⊥ beyond the EDR, pitch angle scattering effectively converts v// gained by acceleration from the parallel potential into v⊥. Electron's v⊥ further increases downstream through adiabatic heating from the increasing magnetic field in addition to less efficient pitch angle scattering. The parallel potential and the magnetic bottle together determine the trapped

  4. A STUDY ON APPLICABILITY OF GROUND RESPONSE ACCELERATION METHOD TO DEEP VERTICAL UNDERGROUND STRUCTURES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Mai; Shiba, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuaki

    This paper discusses the applicability of ground response acceleration method to seismic analysis for deep vertical underground structures. To examine the applicability, an analysis of relationships between response of ground and the shaft was conducted. It was found from the analysis that vertical axial stress of the shaft was not correspond with shear stress of ground. Accordingly, it was concluded that the axial stress was not evaluated correctly by the existing method. Therefore, to extend the applicability of the method, ground responses correlated with the axial stress were analyzed and a new method using these ground responses was proposed.

  5. Laser Wakefield Structures and Electron Acceleration in Gas Jet and Capillary Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2007-11-01

    Laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have the potential to become the next generation of particle accelerators because of the very high acceleration gradients. The beam quality from such accelerators depends critically on the details plasma wave spatial structures. In experiments at the University of Michigan it was possible in a single shot by frequency domain holography (FDH) to visualize individual plasma waves produced by the 40 TW, 30 fs Hercules laser focused to the intensity of 10^19 W/cm^2 onto a supersonic He gas jet [1]. These holographic ``snapshots'' capture the evolution of multiple wake periods, and resolve wavefront curvature seen previously only in simulations. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic electron beams for plasma density in the specific range 1.5x10^19<=ne<=3.5x10^19 cm-3 were generated [2]. The experiments show that the energy, charge, divergence and pointing stability of the beam can be controlled by changing ne, and that higher electron energies and more stable beams are produced for lower densities. An optimized quasi-monoenergetic beam of over 300 MeV and 10 mrad angular divergence is demonstrated at a plasma density of ne=1.5x10^19 cm-3. The resulted relativistic electron beams have been used to perform gamma-neutron activation of ^12C and ^63Cu and photo-fission of ^238U with a record high reaction yields of ˜5x10^5/Joule [3]. Experiments performed with ablative capillary discharge plasma demonstrate stable guiding for laser power up to 10 TW with the transmission of 50% and guided intensity of ˜10^17 W/cm^2. Study of the staged electron acceleration have been performed which uses ablated plasma in front of the capillary to inject electrons into the wakefield structures. [1] N. H. Matlis et. al., Nature Physics 2, 749 (2006). [2] A. Maksimchuk et. al., Journal de Physique IV 133, 1123 (2006). [3] S. A. Reed et. al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 231107 (2006).

  6. Temporal evolution and electric potential structure of the auroral acceleration region from multispacecraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Walsh, A. P.; Watt, C. E.; Garza, K.; Owen, C. J.; Constantinescu, D. O.; Dandouras, I. S.; Fornacon, K.; Lucek, E. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S. S.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Masson, A.; Doss, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bright aurorae can be excited by the acceleration of electrons into the atmosphere in violation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Modelling studies predict that the accelerating electric potential consists of electric double layers at the boundaries of an acceleration region but observations suggest that particle acceleration occurs throughout this region. Using multispacecraft observations from Cluster, we have examined two upward current regions on 14 December 2009. Our observations show that the potential difference below C4 and C3 changed by up to 1.7 kV between their respective crossings, which were separated by 150 s. The field-aligned current density observed by C3 was also larger than that observed by C4. The potential drop above C3 and C4 was approximately the same in both crossings. Using a novel technique of quantitively comparing the electron spectra measured by Cluster 1 and 3, which were separated in altitude, we determine when these spacecraft made effectively magnetically conjugate observations, and we use these conjugate observations to determine the instantaneous distribution of the potential drop in the AAR. Our observations show that an average of 15% of the potential drop in the AAR was located between C1 at 6235 km and C3 at 4685 km altitude, with a maximum potential drop between the spacecraft of 500 V, and that the majority of the potential drop was below C3. Assuming a spatial invariance along the length of the upward current region, we discuss these observations in terms of temporal changes and the vertical structure of the electrostatic potential drop and in the context of existing models and previous single- and multispacecraft observations.

  7. Temporal evolution and electric potential structure of the auroral acceleration region from multispacecraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Walsh, A. P.; Watt, C. E. J.; Garza, K. J.; Owen, C. J.; Constantinescu, D.; Dandouras, I.; FornaçOn, K.-H.; Lucek, E.; Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S. S.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Masson, A.; Doss, N.

    2012-12-01

    Bright aurorae can be excited by the acceleration of electrons into the atmosphere in violation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Modeling studies predict that the accelerating electric potential consists of electric double layers at the boundaries of an acceleration region but observations suggest that particle acceleration occurs throughout this region. Using multispacecraft observations from Cluster, we have examined two upward current regions on 14 December 2009. Our observations show that the potential difference below C4 and C3 changed by up to 1.7 kV between their respective crossings, which were separated by 150 s. The field-aligned current density observed by C3 was also larger than that observed by C4. The potential drop above C3 and C4 was approximately the same in both crossings. Using a novel technique of quantitively comparing the electron spectra measured by Cluster 1 and 3, which were separated in altitude, we determine when these spacecraft made effectively magnetically conjugate observations, and we use these conjugate observations to determine the instantaneous distribution of the potential drop in the AAR. Our observations show that an average of 15% of the potential drop in the AAR was located between C1 at 6235 km and C3 at 4685 km altitude, with a maximum potential drop between the spacecraft of 500 V, and that the majority of the potential drop was below C3. Assuming a spatial invariance along the length of the upward current region, we discuss these observations in terms of temporal changes and the vertical structure of the electrostatic potential drop and in the context of existing models and previous single- and multispacecraft observations.

  8. Analysis of requirements for accelerating the development of geothermal energy resources in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    Various resource data are presented showing that geothermal energy has the potential of satisfying a singificant part of California's increasing energy needs. General factors slowing the development of geothermal energy in California are discussed and required actions to accelerate its progress are presented. Finally, scenarios for developing the most promising prospects in the state directed at timely on-line power are given. Specific actions required to realize each of these individual scenarios are identified.

  9. Development of an ADME and drug-drug interactions knowledge database for the acceleration of drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Petitet, François; Barberan, Olivier; Dubus, Elodie; Ijjaali, Ismail; Donlan, Mary; Ollivier, Sophie; Michel, André

    2006-12-01

    It is widely recognised that predicting or determining the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of a compound as early as possible in the drug discovery process helps to prevent costly late-stage failures. Although in recent years high-throughput in vitro absorption distribution metabolism excretion toxicity (ADMET) screens have been implemented, more efficient in silico filters are still highly needed to predict and model the most relevant metabolic and pharmacokinetic end points, and thereby accelerate drug discovery and development. The usefulness of the data generated and published for the chemist, biologist or project manager who ultimately wants to understand and optimise the ADME properties of lead compounds cannot be argued with. Collecting and comparing data is an overwhelming task for the time-pressed scientist. Aureus Pharma provides a uniquely specialised solution for knowledge generation in drug discovery. AurSCOPE(®) ADME/DDI (drug-drug interaction) is a fully annotated, structured knowledge database containing all the pertinent biological and chemical information on the metabolic properties of drugs. This Aureus knowledge database has proven to be highly useful in designing predictive models and identifying potential drug-drug interactions. PMID:23495997

  10. Uniform Plasma Etching of Complex Shaped Three Dimensional Niobium Structures for Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Peshl, Jeremy; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Lepsha; Phillips, Larry; Valente-Felliciano, Anne-Marie

    2014-10-01

    Complex shaped three dimensional niobium structures are used in particle accelerators as super conducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The inner surfaces of these structures have to be chemically etched for better performance, as SRF performance parameters are very sensitive to their properties. Plasma etching of inner surface of three dimensional niobium structures has not been reported even though plasma etching of niobium has been reported earlier for Josephson junction and other applications. We are proposing an RF capacitively coupled coaxial (ccp) plasma etching method for nano machining of niobium structures for SRF applications. We are using gas mixture of Argon and Chlorine. We report the effects of the pressure, RF power, gas concentration, shape and size of the inner electrode, temperature of the structure, DC bias voltage and residence time on the etch rate of the niobium. We also show the method to reduce the asymmetry effect in coaxial ccp by changing the shape of the inner electrode in cylindrical structure, as well as a method to overcome the severe loading effect in etching of 3D structures for uniform mass removal purpose. Supported by DOE under Grant No. DE-SC0007879. J.U. acknowledges support by JSA/DOE via DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  11. Recent developments in the application of electron accelerators for polymer processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Al-Sheikhly, M.; Berejka, A. J.; Cleland, M. R.; Antoniak, M.

    2014-01-01

    There are now over 1700 high current, electron beam (EB) accelerators being used world-wide in industrial applications, most of which involve polymer processing. In contrast to the use of heat, which transfers only about 5-10% of input energy into energy useful for materials modification, radiation processing is very energy efficient, with 60% or more of the input energy to an accelerator being available for affecting materials. Historic markets, such as the crosslinking of wire and cable jacketing, of heat shrinkable tubings and films, of partial crosslinking of tire components and of low-energy EB to cure or dry inks and coatings remain strong. Accelerator manufacturers have made equipment more affordable by down-sizing units while maintaining high beam currents. Very powerful accelerators with 700 kW output have made X-ray conversion a practical alternative to the historic use of radioisotopes, mainly cobalt-60, for applications as medical device sterilization. New EB end-uses are emerging, such as the development of nano-composites and nano-gels and the use of EB processing to facilitate biofuel production. These present opportunities for future research and development.

  12. A Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Development of Lift on Wings in Accelerated Longitudinal Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Thomas R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley 300 MPH 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the development of lift on a wing during a simulated constant-acceleration catapult take-off. The investigation included models of a two-dimensional wing, an unswept wing having an aspect ratio of 6, a 35 deg. swept wing having an aspect ratio of 3.05, and a 60 deg. delta wing having an aspect ratio of 2.31. All the wings investigated developed at least 90 percent of their steady-state lift in the first 7 chord lengths of travel. The development of lift was essentially independent of the acceleration when based on chord lengths traveled, and was in qualitative agreement with theory.

  13. Acceleration of solar wind ions to 1 MeV by electromagnetic structures upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiewicz, K.; Markidis, S.; Eliasson, B.; Strumik, M.; Yamauchi, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present measurements from the ESA/NASA Cluster mission that show in situ acceleration of ions to energies of 1 MeV outside the bow shock. The observed heating can be associated with the presence of electromagnetic structures with strong spatial gradients of the electric field that lead to ion gyro-phase breaking and to the onset of chaos in ion trajectories. It results in rapid, stochastic acceleration of ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The electric potential of the structures can be compared to a field of moguls on a ski slope, capable of accelerating and ejecting the fast running skiers out of piste. This mechanism may represent the universal mechanism for perpendicular acceleration and heating of ions in the magnetosphere, the solar corona and in astrophysical plasmas. This is also a basic mechanism that can limit steepening of nonlinear electromagnetic structures at shocks and foreshocks in collisionless plasmas.

  14. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  15. Electron acceleration at localized wave structures in the solar corona (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung an lokalen Wellenstrukturen in der Sonnenkorona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, Rositsa Stoycheva

    2007-07-01

    Our dynamic Sun manifests its activity by different phenomena: from the 11-year cyclic sunspot pattern to the unpredictable and violent explosions in the case of solar flares. During flares, a huge amount of the stored magnetic energy is suddenly released and a substantial part of this energy is carried by the energetic electrons, considered to be the source of the nonthermal radio and X-ray radiation. One of the most important and still open question in solar physics is how the electrons are accelerated up to high energies within (the observed in the radio emission) short time scales. Because the acceleration site is extremely small in spatial extent as well (compared to the solar radius), the electron acceleration is regarded as a local process. The search for localized wave structures in the solar corona that are able to accelerate electrons together with the theoretical and numerical description of the conditions and requirements for this process, is the aim of the dissertation. Two models of electron acceleration in the solar corona are proposed in the dissertation: I. Electron acceleration due to the solar jet interaction with the background coronal plasma (the jet--plasma interaction) A jet is formed when the newly reconnected and highly curved magnetic field lines are relaxed by shooting plasma away from the reconnection site. Such jets, as observed in soft X-rays with the Yohkoh satellite, are spatially and temporally associated with beams of nonthermal electrons (in terms of the so-called type III metric radio bursts) propagating through the corona. A model that attempts to give an explanation for such observational facts is developed here. Initially, the interaction of such jets with the background plasma leads to an (ion-acoustic) instability associated with growing of electrostatic fluctuations in time for certain range of the jet initial velocity. During this process, any test electron that happen to feel this electrostatic wave field is drawn to co

  16. Textile composite fuselage structures development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Chu, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Phase 2 of the NASA ACT Contract (NAS1-18888), Advanced Composite Structural Concepts and Materials Technology for Transport Aircraft Structures, focuses on textile technology, with resin transfer molding or powder coated tows. The use of textiles has the potential for improving damage tolerance, reducing cost and saving weight. This program investigates resin transfer molding (RTM), as a maturing technology for high fiber volume primary structures and powder coated tows as an emerging technology with a high potential for significant cost savings and superior structural properties. Powder coated tow technology has promise for significantly improving the processibility of high temperature resins such as polyimides.

  17. Fabrication Technologies of the High Gradient Accelerator Structures at 100MV/M Range

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Juwen; Lewandowski, James; Van Pelt, John; Yoneda, Charles; Gudkov, Boris; Riddone, Germana; Higo, Toshiyasu; Takatomi, Toshikazu; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-07-03

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research has been established in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC baseline design for the main linac stably operating at more than 100 MV/m loaded accelerating gradient. Several prototype CLIC structures were successfully fabricated and high power tested. They operated at 105 MV/m with a breakdown rate that meets the CLIC linear collider specifications of < 5 x 10{sup -7}/pulse/m. This paper summarizes the fabrication technologies including the mechanical design, precision machining, chemical cleaning, diffusion bonding as well as vacuum baking and all related assembly technologies. Also, the tolerances control, tuning and RF characterization will be discussed.

  18. Convergence acceleration for partitioned simulations of the fluid-structure interaction in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Lars; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Düster, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    We present a partitioned approach to fluid-structure interaction problems arising in analyses of blood flow in arteries. Several strategies to accelerate the convergence of the fixed-point iteration resulting from the coupling of the fluid and the structural sub-problem are investigated. The Aitken relaxation and variants of the interface quasi-Newton -least-squares method are applied to different test cases. A hybrid variant of two well-known variants of the interface quasi-Newton-least-squares method is found to perform best. The test cases cover the typical boundary value problem faced when simulating the fluid-structure interaction in arteries, including a strong added mass effect and a wet surface which accounts for a large part of the overall surface of each sub-problem. A rubber-like Neo Hookean material model and a soft-tissue-like Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden material model are used to describe the artery wall and are compared in terms of stability and computational expenses. To avoid any kind of locking, high-order finite elements are used to discretize the structural sub-problem. The finite volume method is employed to discretize the fluid sub-problem. We investigate the influence of mass-proportional damping and the material model chosen for the artery on the performance and stability of the acceleration strategies as well as on the simulation results. To show the applicability of the partitioned approach to clinical relevant studies, the hemodynamics in a pathologically deformed artery are investigated, taking the findings of the test case simulations into account.

  19. Convergence acceleration for partitioned simulations of the fluid-structure interaction in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Lars; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Düster, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We present a partitioned approach to fluid-structure interaction problems arising in analyses of blood flow in arteries. Several strategies to accelerate the convergence of the fixed-point iteration resulting from the coupling of the fluid and the structural sub-problem are investigated. The Aitken relaxation and variants of the interface quasi-Newton -least-squares method are applied to different test cases. A hybrid variant of two well-known variants of the interface quasi-Newton-least-squares method is found to perform best. The test cases cover the typical boundary value problem faced when simulating the fluid-structure interaction in arteries, including a strong added mass effect and a wet surface which accounts for a large part of the overall surface of each sub-problem. A rubber-like Neo Hookean material model and a soft-tissue-like Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden material model are used to describe the artery wall and are compared in terms of stability and computational expenses. To avoid any kind of locking, high-order finite elements are used to discretize the structural sub-problem. The finite volume method is employed to discretize the fluid sub-problem. We investigate the influence of mass-proportional damping and the material model chosen for the artery on the performance and stability of the acceleration strategies as well as on the simulation results. To show the applicability of the partitioned approach to clinical relevant studies, the hemodynamics in a pathologically deformed artery are investigated, taking the findings of the test case simulations into account.

  20. Twin-Screw Extruder and Pellet Accelerator Integration Developments for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Meitner, Steven J; Baylor, Larry R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Fehling, Dan T; Foust, Charles R; McGill, James M; Rasmussen, David A; Maruyama, So

    2011-01-01

    The ITER pellet injection system consisting of a twinscrew frozen hydrogen isotope extruder, coupled to a combination solenoid actuated pellet cutter and pneumatic pellet accelerator, is under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A prototype extruder has been built to produce a continuous solid deuterium extrusion and will be integrated with a secondary section, where pellets are cut, chambered, and launched with a single-stage pneumatic accelerator into the plasma through a guide tube. This integrated pellet injection system is designed to provide 5 mm fueling pellets, injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, or 3 mm edge localized mode (ELM) triggering pellets, injected at higher rates up to 20 Hz. The pellet cutter, chamber mechanism, and the solenoid operated pneumatic valve for the accelerator are optimized to provide pellet velocities between 200-300 m/s to ensure high pellet survivability while traversing the inner wall fueling guide tubes, and outer wall ELMpacing guide tubes. This paper outlines the current twin-screwextruder design, pellet accelerator design, and the integrationrequired for both fueling and ELM pacing pellets.

  1. Priority research areas to accelerate the development of practical ultraconductive copper conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dominic F.; Burwell, Malcolm; Stillman, H.

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the findings at an Ultraconductive Copper Strategy Meeting held on March 11, 2015 in Washington DC. The aim of this meeting was to bring together researchers of ultraconductive copper in the U.S. to identify and prioritize critical non-proprietary research activities that will enhance the understanding in the material and accelerate its development into practical conductors. Every effort has been made to ensure that the discussion and findings are accurately reported in this document.

  2. Development of an accelerated reliability test schedule for terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Prince, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    An accelerated test schedule using a minimum amount of tests and a minimum number of cells has been developed on the basis of stress test results obtained from more than 1500 cells of seven different cell types. The proposed tests, which include bias-temperature, bias-temperature-humidity, power cycle, thermal cycle, and thermal shock tests, use as little as 10 and up to 25 cells, depending on the test type.

  3. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  4. Development of a photovoltaic module qualification test based on combined-environment accelerated stress data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenchard, S. E.; Royal, E.; Anderson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a qualification test to screen photovoltaic modules for utilization on marine aids to navigation. The test is based on a combined-environment of hot and cold saltwater immersion and air pressurization. The test has demonstrated a very high acceleration factor and excellent correlation of electrical failures with modules in a concurrent real-time marine exposure.

  5. Requirements and Development of an Acceleration Measurement System for International Space Station Microgravity Science Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Space Station is being developed by NASA and international partners as a versatile user platform to allow long term on-orbit investigations of a variety of scientific and technology arenas. In particular, scientific studies are planned within a research class known as microgravity science in areas such as biotechnology, combustion, fluid physics, and materials sciences. An acceleration measurement system is in development to aid such research conducted in the on-orbit conditions of apparent weightlessness. This system provides a general purpose acceleration measurement capability in support of these payloads and investigators. Such capability allows for systematic study of scientific phenomena by obtaining information regarding the local accelerations present during experiment operations. Preparations for implementing this flight measurement system involves two distinct stages: requirements development prior to initiating the design activity, and the design activity itself. This paper defines the requirements definition approach taken, provides an overview of the results of the requirements phase, and outlines the initial design considerations being addressed for this measurement system. Some preliminary engineering approaches are also described.

  6. Acceleration Data Reveal Highly Individually Structured Energetic Landscapes in Free-Ranging Fishers (Pekania pennanti)

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Anne K.; LaPoint, Scott; Wikelski, Martin; Safi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Investigating animal energy expenditure across space and time may provide more detailed insight into how animals interact with their environment. This insight should improve our understanding of how changes in the environment affect animal energy budgets and is particularly relevant for animals living near or within human altered environments where habitat change can occur rapidly. We modeled fisher (Pekania pennanti) energy expenditure within their home ranges and investigated the potential environmental and spatial drivers of the predicted spatial patterns. As a proxy for energy expenditure we used overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) that we quantified from tri-axial accelerometer data during the active phases of 12 individuals. We used a generalized additive model (GAM) to investigate the spatial distribution of ODBA by associating the acceleration data to the animals' GPS-recorded locations. We related the spatial patterns of ODBA to the utilization distributions and habitat suitability estimates across individuals. The ODBA of fishers appears highly structured in space and was related to individual utilization distribution and habitat suitability estimates. However, we were not able to predict ODBA using the environmental data we selected. Our results suggest an unexpected complexity in the space use of animals that was only captured partially by re-location data-based concepts of home range and habitat suitability. We suggest future studies recognize the limits of ODBA that arise from the fact that acceleration is often collected at much finer spatio-temporal scales than the environmental data and that ODBA lacks a behavioral correspondence. Overcoming these limits would improve the interpretation of energy expenditure in relation to the environment. PMID:26840399

  7. Acceleration Data Reveal Highly Individually Structured Energetic Landscapes in Free-Ranging Fishers (Pekania pennanti).

    PubMed

    Scharf, Anne K; LaPoint, Scott; Wikelski, Martin; Safi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Investigating animal energy expenditure across space and time may provide more detailed insight into how animals interact with their environment. This insight should improve our understanding of how changes in the environment affect animal energy budgets and is particularly relevant for animals living near or within human altered environments where habitat change can occur rapidly. We modeled fisher (Pekania pennanti) energy expenditure within their home ranges and investigated the potential environmental and spatial drivers of the predicted spatial patterns. As a proxy for energy expenditure we used overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA) that we quantified from tri-axial accelerometer data during the active phases of 12 individuals. We used a generalized additive model (GAM) to investigate the spatial distribution of ODBA by associating the acceleration data to the animals' GPS-recorded locations. We related the spatial patterns of ODBA to the utilization distributions and habitat suitability estimates across individuals. The ODBA of fishers appears highly structured in space and was related to individual utilization distribution and habitat suitability estimates. However, we were not able to predict ODBA using the environmental data we selected. Our results suggest an unexpected complexity in the space use of animals that was only captured partially by re-location data-based concepts of home range and habitat suitability. We suggest future studies recognize the limits of ODBA that arise from the fact that acceleration is often collected at much finer spatio-temporal scales than the environmental data and that ODBA lacks a behavioral correspondence. Overcoming these limits would improve the interpretation of energy expenditure in relation to the environment. PMID:26840399

  8. The trade-off between maturation and growth during accelerated development in frogs.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Augustine, Starrlight; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M; Kearney, Michael R; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-09-01

    Developmental energetics are crucial to a species' life history and ecology but are poorly understood from a mechanistic perspective. Traditional energy and mass budgeting does not distinguish between costs of growth and maturation, making it difficult to account for accelerated development. We apply a metabolic theory that uniquely considers maturation costs (Dynamic Energy Budget theory, DEB) to interpret empirical data on the energetics of accelerated development in amphibians. We measured energy use until metamorphosis in two related frogs, Crinia georgiana and Pseudophryne bibronii. Mass and energy content of fresh ova were comparable between the species. However, development to metamorphosis was 1.7 times faster in C. georgiana while P. bibronii produced nine times the dry biomass at metamorphosis and had lower mass-specific oxygen requirements. DEB theory explained these patterns through differences in ontogenetic energy allocation to maturation. P. bibronii partitioned energy in the same (constant) way throughout development whereas C. georgiana increased the fraction of energy allocated to maturation over growth between hatching and the onset of feeding. DEB parameter estimation for additional, direct-developing taxa suggests that a change in energy allocation during development may result from a selective pressure to increase development rate, and not as a result of development mode. PMID:22613786

  9. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  10. SOFIA-EXES: Probing the Thermal Structure of M Supergiant Wind Acceleration Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Graham M.; O'Gorman, Eamon; Guinan, Edward F.; EXES Instrument Team, EXES Science Team

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard model for mass loss from cool evolved stars, particularly for non-pulsating giants and supergiants. For the early-M supergiants, radiation pressure, convective ejections, magnetic fields, and Alfven waves have all been put forward as potential mass loss mechanisms. A potential discriminator between these ideas is the thermal structure resulting from the heating-cooling balance in the acceleration zone - the most important region to study mass loss physics.We present mid-IR [Fe II] emission line profiles of Betelgeuse and Antares obtained with NASA-DLR SOFIA-EXES and NASA IRTF-TEXES that were obtained as part of a GO program (Harper: Cycle 2-0004) and EXES instrument commissioning observations. The intra-term transitions sample a range of excitation conditions, Texc=540K, 3,400K, and 11,700K, i.e., from the warm chromospheric plasma, that also emits in the cm-radio and ultraviolet, to the cold inner circumstellar envelope. The spectrally-resolved profiles, when combined with VLA cm-radio observations, provide new constraints on the temperature and flow velocity in the outflow accelerating region. The semi-empirical energy balance can be used to test theoretical predictions of wind heating.

  11. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PLASMOID EJECTIONS DERIVED FROM RADIO DRIFTING PULSATING STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizuka, N.; Karlický, M.; Bárta, M.; Janvier, M.

    2015-02-01

    We report observations of slowly drifting pulsating structures (DPSs) in the 0.8-4.5 GHz frequency range of the RT4 and RT5 radio spectrographs at Ondřejov Observatory, between 2002 and 2012. We found 106 events of DPSs, which we classified into four cases: (I) single events with a constant frequency drift (12 events), (II) multiple events occurring in the same flare with constant frequency drifts (11 events), (III) single or multiple events with increasing or decreasing frequency drift rates (52 events), and (IV) complex events containing multiple events occurring at the same time in a different frequency range (31 events). Many DPSs are associated with hard X-ray (HXR) bursts (15-25 keV) and soft X-ray (SXR) gradient peaks, as they typically occurred at the beginning of HXR peaks. This indicates that DPS events are related to the processes of fast energy release and particle acceleration. Furthermore, interpreting DPSs as signatures of plasmoids, we measured their ejection velocity, their width, and their height from the DPS spectra, from which we also estimated the reconnection rate and the plasma beta. In this interpretation, constant frequency drift indicates a constant velocity of a plasmoid, and an increasing/decreasing frequency drift indicates a deceleration/acceleration of a plasmoid ejection. The reconnection rate shows a good positive correlation with the plasmoid velocity. Finally we confirmed that some DPS events show plasmoid counterparts in Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images.

  12. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  13. Testing Done for Lorentz Force Accelerators and Electrodeless Propulsion Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Gilland, James H.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing Lorentz force accelerators and electrodeless plasma propulsion for a wide variety of space applications. These applications range from precision control of formation-flying spacecraft to primary propulsion for very high power interplanetary spacecraft. The specific thruster technologies being addressed are pulsed plasma thrusters, magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, and helicon-electron cyclotron resonance acceleration thrusters. The pulsed plasma thruster mounted on the Earth Observing-1 spacecraft was operated successfully in orbit in 2002. The two-axis thruster system is fully incorporated in the attitude determination and control system and is being used to automatically counteract disturbances in the pitch axis of the spacecraft. Recent on-orbit operations have focused on extended operations to add flight operation time to the total accumulated thruster life. The results of the experiments pave the way for electric propulsion applications on future Earth-imaging satellites.

  14. Recent Progress in the Development of a Circular Ion Induction Accelerator for Space Charge Dominated Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahle, L.; Sangster, T. C.; Autrey, D.; Barnard, J.; Craig, G.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Halaxa, E.; Hanks, R. L.; Hernandez, M.; Kirbie, H. C.; Logan, B. G.; Lund, S. M.; Mant, G.; Molvik, A.; Sharp, W.; Berners, D.; Eylon, S.; Judd, D. L.; Reginato, L.; Debeling, A.; Fritz, W.

    1998-11-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been developing the world's first ion induction accelerator. This machine has recently been extended to 90 degress, or 10 half-lattice periods(HLP) with full beam transport. As part of this extension, two new diagnostic systems have been fully enabled, the Capacitive Beam Probes(C-probes) and the Gated Beam Imager(GBI). The C-probes measure the charge centroid of the beam in each HLP and the GBI measures emittance in both transverse planes. Output from both diagnostics will be presented. In addition, induction cores have been installed on five of the HLP's, in anticipation of the first attempts at acceleration. The status of these attempts will also be discussed.

  15. Increasing Spontaneous Retinal Activity before Eye Opening Accelerates the Development of Geniculate Receptive Fields

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zachary W.; Chapman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Visually evoked activity is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. However, little is known about the capacity for patterned spontaneous activity to drive the maturation of receptive fields before visual experience. Retinal waves provide instructive retinotopic information for the anatomical organization of the visual thalamus. To determine whether retinal waves also drive the maturation of functional responses, we increased the frequency of retinal waves pharmacologically in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) during a period of retinogeniculate development before eye opening. The development of geniculate receptive fields after receiving these increased neural activities was measured using single-unit electrophysiology. We found that increased retinal waves accelerate the developmental reduction of geniculate receptive field sizes. This reduction is due to a decrease in receptive field center size rather than an increase in inhibitory surround strength. This work reveals an instructive role for patterned spontaneous activity in guiding the functional development of neural circuits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Patterned spontaneous neural activity that occurs during development is known to be necessary for the proper formation of neural circuits. However, it is unknown whether the spontaneous activity alone is sufficient to drive the maturation of the functional properties of neurons. Our work demonstrates for the first time an acceleration in the maturation of neural function as a consequence of driving patterned spontaneous activity during development. This work has implications for our understanding of how neural circuits can be modified actively to improve function prematurely or to recover from injury with guided interventions of patterned neural activity. PMID:26511250

  16. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  17. Determination of molecular-ion structures through the use of accelerated beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    In this talk we report on recent research on molecular-ion structures using fast molecular-ion beams provided by Argonne's 5-MV Dynamitron accelerator. The method has become known as the ''Coulomb-explosion'' technique. When molecular-ion projectiles travelling at velocities of a few percent of the velocity of light strike a foil, the electrons that bind the molecular projectiles are almost always totally stripped off within the first few Angstroms of penetration into the solid target. This leaves a cluster of bare (or nearly bare) nuclei which separate rapidly as a result of their mutual Coulomb repulsion. This violent dissociation process in which the initial electrostatic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy of relative motion in the center-of-mass, has been termed a ''Coulomb explosion.'' 4 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Relativistic magnetosonic shock waves in synchrotron sources - Shock structure and nonthermal acceleration of positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Arons, Jonathan; Gallant, Yves A.; Langdon, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    The theoretical properties of relativistic, transverse, magnetosonic collisionless shock waves in electron-positron-heavy ion plasmas of relevance to astrophysical sources of synchrotron radiation are investigated. Both 1D electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations and quasi-linear theory are used to examine the spatial and kinetic structure of these nonlinear flows. A new process of shock acceleration of nonthermal positrons, in which the gyrating reflected heavy ions dissipate their energy in the form of collectively emitted, left-handed magnetosonic waves which are resonantly absorbed by the positrons immediately behind the ion reflection region, is described. Applications of the results to the termination shocks of pulsar winds and to the termination shocks of jets emanating from the AGN are outlined.

  19. Influence of solidification accelerators on structure formation of anhydrite-containing binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikanova, L.; Volkova, O.; Kudyakov, A.; Sarkisov, Y.; Tolstov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results of scientific analysis of chemical additives influence on acid fluoride binder. It was found that the influence of sulfate nature additives on the process of hydration and solidification of the binder is similar to influence of additives on indissoluble anhydrite. Additives with SO42- anion NO- are more efficient. The mentioned additives according to accelerating effect belong to the following succession: K2SO4 > Na2SO4 > FeSO4 > MgSO4. Facilitation of the process of hydration and solidification of the binder, increase in density and durability of the binder (32 MPa) is to the greatest extent achieved with the introduction of 2% sodium sulfate additive of the binder's mass into the composition of the binder along with the ultrasonic treatment of water solution. Directed crystal formation process with healing of porous structure by new growths presented as calcium sulfate dehydrate and hydroglauberite provides positive effect.

  20. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  1. Recent developments in rf superconductivity for high-brightness and high-gradient ion beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Kennedy, W.L.; Nichols, G.L.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-02-01

    Recent progress in on-going development program leading to the design of superconducting continuous-wave (cw) linear accelerators for high-brightness ion beams is reviewed. A new spoke-resonator geometry incorporating a half-wavelength resonant line was fabricated and tested. This geometry serves as the basis for the constituent cavities of a superconducting section being designed for high-current testing with a deuterium beam. Considerable progress has been made in the design of this section. A multi-phased program leading to the development of a superconducting radio-frequency quadrupole (SCRFQ) has been initiated. Design considerations and test results from the various activities are presented.

  2. An R&D Approach to the Development of Long Nb3Sn Accelerator Magnets Using the key and Bladder Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, S. E.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D. R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S. A.; Hannaford, C. R.; Hafalia, A. R.; Lietzke, A. F.; McInturff, A. D.; Mattafirri, S.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R. M.

    2004-08-01

    Building accelerator quality magnets using Nb{sub 3}Sn for next generation facilities is the challenge of the next decade. The Superconducting Magnet Group at LBNL has developed an innovative support structure for high field magnets. The structure is based on an aluminum shell over iron yokes using hydraulic bladders and locking keys for applying the pre-stress. At cool down the pre-stress is almost doubled due to the differences of thermal contraction. This new structure allows precise control of the pre-stress with minimal spring back and conductor over-stress. At present the support structure has been used with prototype magnets up to one meter in length. In this paper, the design of a 4-meter long, 11 Tesla, wind-and-react racetrack dipole will be presented as a possible step toward the fabrication of long Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets.

  3. SSME structural dynamic model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, M. J.; Tilley, D. M.; Welch, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) as a complete assembly, with detailed emphasis on LOX and High Fuel Turbopumps is developed. The advantages of both complete engine dynamics, and high fidelity modeling are incorporated. Development of this model, some results, and projected applications are discussed.

  4. Education and Skills for Development in South Africa: Reflections on the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, S.; Akoojee, Salim

    2007-01-01

    In July 2005, President Mbeki announced the launch of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA), a new development strategy designed to help the South African state meet the ANC's 2004 election pledges, namely: (1) halve unemployment; (2) halve poverty; (3) accelerate employment equity; and (4) improve broad-based…

  5. Structure Loaded Vacuum Laser-Driven Particle Acceleration Experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; McGuinness, C.; Lincoln, M.R.; Sears, C.M.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-04-09

    We present an overview of the future laser-driven particle acceleration experiments. These will be carried out at the E163 facility at SLAC. Our objectives include a reconfirmation of the proof-of-principle experiment, a staged buncher laser-accelerator experiment, and longer-term future experiments that employ dielectric laser-accelerator microstructures.

  6. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  7. Word Structures of Granada Spanish-Speaking Preschoolers with Typical versus Protracted Phonological Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May Bernhardt, B.; Hanson, R.; Perez, D.; Ávila, C.; Lleó, C.; Stemberger, J. P.; Carballo, G.; Mendoza, E.; Fresneda, D.; Chávez-Peón, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on children's word structure development is limited. Yet, phonological intervention aims to accelerate the acquisition of both speech-sounds and word structure, such as word length, stress or shapes in CV sequences. Until normative studies and meta-analyses provide in-depth information on this topic, smaller investigations can…

  8. Accelerating vaccine development and deployment: report of a Royal Society satellite meeting

    PubMed Central

    Bregu, Migena; Draper, Simon J.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Greenwood, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    The Royal Society convened a meeting on the 17th and 18th November 2010 to review the current ways in which vaccines are developed and deployed, and to make recommendations as to how each of these processes might be accelerated. The meeting brought together academics, industry representatives, research sponsors, regulators, government advisors and representatives of international public health agencies from a broad geographical background. Discussions were held under Chatham House rules. High-throughput screening of new vaccine antigens and candidates was seen as a driving force for vaccine discovery. Multi-stakeholder, small-scale manufacturing facilities capable of rapid production of clinical grade vaccines are currently too few and need to be expanded. In both the human and veterinary areas, there is a need for tiered regulatory standards, differentially tailored for experimental and commercial vaccines, to allow accelerated vaccine efficacy testing. Improved cross-fertilization of knowledge between industry and academia, and between human and veterinary vaccine developers, could lead to more rapid application of promising approaches and technologies to new product development. Identification of best-practices and development of checklists for product development plans and implementation programmes were seen as low-cost opportunities to shorten the timeline for vaccine progression from the laboratory bench to the people who need it. PMID:21893549

  9. Accelerating vaccine development and deployment: report of a Royal Society satellite meeting.

    PubMed

    Bregu, Migena; Draper, Simon J; Hill, Adrian V S; Greenwood, Brian M

    2011-10-12

    The Royal Society convened a meeting on the 17th and 18th November 2010 to review the current ways in which vaccines are developed and deployed, and to make recommendations as to how each of these processes might be accelerated. The meeting brought together academics, industry representatives, research sponsors, regulators, government advisors and representatives of international public health agencies from a broad geographical background. Discussions were held under Chatham House rules. High-throughput screening of new vaccine antigens and candidates was seen as a driving force for vaccine discovery. Multi-stakeholder, small-scale manufacturing facilities capable of rapid production of clinical grade vaccines are currently too few and need to be expanded. In both the human and veterinary areas, there is a need for tiered regulatory standards, differentially tailored for experimental and commercial vaccines, to allow accelerated vaccine efficacy testing. Improved cross-fertilization of knowledge between industry and academia, and between human and veterinary vaccine developers, could lead to more rapid application of promising approaches and technologies to new product development. Identification of best-practices and development of checklists for product development plans and implementation programmes were seen as low-cost opportunities to shorten the timeline for vaccine progression from the laboratory bench to the people who need it. PMID:21893549

  10. Performance and Environmental Test Results of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Mathers, Alex

    2012-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.5 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the high voltage Hall accelerator engineering development unit have been performed. Performance test results indicated that at 3.9 kW the thruster achieved a total thrust efficiency and specific impulse of 58%, and 2,700 sec, respectively. Thermal characterization tests indicated that the thruster component temperatures were within the prescribed material maximum operating temperature limits during full power thruster operation. Finally, thruster vibration tests indicated that the thruster survived the 3-axes qualification full-level random vibration test series. Pre and post-vibration test performance mappings indicated almost identical thruster performance. Finally, an update on the development progress of a power processing unit and a xenon feed system is provided.

  11. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Latina, Andrea; Grudiev, Alexej; De Michele, Giovanni; Solodko, Anastasiya; Wuensch, Walter; Schulte, Daniel; Adli, Erik; Lipkowitz, Nate; Yocky, Gerald S.

    2016-01-01

    The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1 V /(pC mm m ) .

  12. CO2 enrichment accelerates successional development of an understory plant community

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Lara; Belote, R. Travis Travis; Kardol, Paul; Weltzin, Jake; Norby, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    Rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide ([CO{sub 2}]) may influence forest successional development and species composition of understory plant communities by altering biomass production of plant species of functional groups. Here, we describe how elevated [CO{sub 2}] (eCO{sub 2}) affects aboveground biomass within the understory community of a temperate deciduous forest at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) facility in eastern Tennessee, USA. We asked if (i) CO{sub 2} enrichment affected total understory biomass and (ii) whether total biomass responses could be explained by changes in understory species composition or changes in relative abundance of functional groups through time. The FACE experiment started in 1998 with three rings receiving ambient [CO{sub 2}] (aCO{sub 2}) and two rings receiving eCO{sub 2}. From 2001 to 2003, we estimated species-specific, woody versus herbaceous and total aboveground biomass by harvesting four 1 x 0.5-m subplots within the established understory plant community in each FACE plot. In 2008, we estimated herbaceous biomass as previously but used allometric relationships to estimate woody biomass across two 5 x 5-m quadrats in each FACE plot. Across years, aboveground biomass of the understory community was on average 25% greater in eCO{sub 2} than in aCO{sub 2} plots. We could not detect differences in plant species composition between aCO{sub 2} and eCO{sub 2} treatments. However, we did observe shifts in the relative abundance of plant functional groups, which reflect important structural changes in the understory community. In 2001-03, little of the understory biomass was in woody species; herbaceous species made up 94% of the total understory biomass across [CO{sub 2}] treatments. Through time, woody species increased in importance, mostly in eCO{sub 2}, and in 2008, the contribution of herbaceous species to total understory biomass was

  13. WInd-and-react Bi-2212 coil development for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Acosta, P.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D. R.; Mentink, M. G. T.; Prestemon, S. O.; Meinesz, M.; Hong, S.; Huang, Y.; Miao, H.; Parrell, J.; Sabbi, G.L.

    2009-10-13

    Sub-scale coils are being manufactured and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in order to develop wind-and-react Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} (Bi-2212) magnet technology for future graded accelerator magnet use. Previous Bi-2212 coils showed significant leakage of the conductors core constituents to the environment, which can occur during the partial melt reaction around 890 C in pure oxygen. The main origin of the observed leakage is intrinsic leakage of the wires, and the issue is therefore being addressed at the wire manufacturing level. We report on further compatibility studies, and the performance of new sub-scale coils that were manufactured using improved conductors. These coils exhibit significantly reduced leakage, and carry currents that are about 70% of the witness wire critical current (I{sub c}). The coils demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of round wire Bi-2212 conductors for accelerator magnet technology use. Successful high temperature superconductor coil technology will enable the manufacture of graded accelerator magnets that can surpass the, already closely approached, intrinsic magnetic field limitations of Nb-based superconducting magnets.

  14. Development of High Gradient Laser Wakefield Accelerators Towards Nuclear Detection Applications at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G. R.; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Lin Chen; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Mike; Leemans, Wim P.

    2009-03-10

    Compact high-energy linacs are important to applications including monochromatic gamma sources for nuclear material security applications. Recent laser wakefield accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy spread beams, now with energies of up to 1 GeV in 3 cm using a plasma channel at low density. This demonstrates the production of GeV beams from devices much smaller than conventional linacs, and confirms the anticipated scaling of laser driven accelerators to GeV energies. Stable performance at 0.5 GeV was demonstrated. Experiments and simulations are in progress to control injection of particles into the wake and hence to improve beam quality and stability. Using plasma density gradients to control injection, stable beams at 1 MeV over days of operation, and with an order of magnitude lower absolute momentum spread than previously observed, have been demonstrated. New experiments are post-accelerating the beams from controlled injection experiments to increase beam quality and stability. Thomson scattering from such beams is being developed to provide collimated multi-MeV monoenergetic gamma sources for security applications from compact devices. Such sources can reduce dose to target and increase accuracy for applications including photofission and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  15. Development of high gradient laser wakefield accelerators towards nuclear detection applications at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron GR; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Esarey, Eric H.; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Lin, Chen; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Mike; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Plateau, Guillaume R.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim P.

    2008-09-08

    Compact high-energy linacs are important to applications including monochromatic gamma sources for nuclear material security applications. Recent laser wakefield accelerator experiments at LBNL demonstrated narrow energy spread beams, now with energies of up to 1 GeV in 3 cm using a plasma channel at low density. This demonstrates the production of GeV beams from devices much smaller than conventional linacs, and confirms the anticipated scaling of laser driven accelerators to GeV energies. Stable performance at 0.5 GeV was demonstrated. Experiments and simulations are in progress to control injection of particles into the wake and hence to improve beam quality and stability. Using plasma density gradients to control injection, stable beams at 1 MeV over days of operation, and with an order of magnitude lower absolute momentum spread than previously observed, have been demonstrated. New experiments are post-accelerating the beams from controlled injection experiments to increase beam quality and stability. Thomson scattering from such beams is being developed to provide collimated multi-MeV monoenergetic gamma sources for security applications from compact devices. Such sources can reduce dose to target and increase accuracy for applications including photofission and nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  16. Development of backsheet tests and measurements to improve correlation of accelerated exposures to fielded modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Thomas C.; Gambogi, William J.; Kopchick, James G.; Amspacher, Lucas; Peacock, R. Scott; Foltz, Benjamin; Stika, Katherine M.; Bradley, Alexander Z.; Hamzavy, Babak; Yu, Bao-Ling; Garreau-iles, Lucie; Fu, Oakland; Hu, Hongjie; Trout, T. John

    2015-09-01

    Matching accelerated test results to field observations is an important objective in the photovoltaic industry. We continue to develop test methods to strengthen correlations. We have previously reported good correlation of FTIR spectra between accelerated tests and field measurements. The availability of portable FTIR spectrometers has made measurement in the field convenient and reliable. Recently, nano-indentation has shown promise to correlate changes in backsheet mechanical properties. A precisely shaped stylus is pressed into a sample, load vs displacement recorded and mechanical properties of interest calculated in a nondestructive test. This test can be done on full size modules, allowing area variations in mechanical properties to be recorded. Finally, we will discuss optical profilometry. In this technique a white light interferogram of a surface is Fourier transformed to produce a three-dimensional image. Height differences from 1 nm to 5 mm can be detected over an area of a few cm. This technique can be used on minimodules, and is useful to determine crack and defect dimensions. Results will be presented correlating accelerated tests with fielded modules covering spectroscopic, mechanical, and morphological changes.

  17. Development of a multiplexed electrospray micro-thruster with post-acceleration and beam containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenguito, G.; Gomez, A.

    2013-10-01

    We report the development of a compact thruster based on Multiplexed ElectroSprays (MES). It relied on a microfabricated Si array of emitters coupled with an extractor electrode and an accelerator electrode. The accelerator stage was introduced for two purposes: containing beam opening and avoiding electrode erosion due to droplet impingement, as well as boosting specific impulse and thrust. Multiplexing is generally necessary as a thrust multiplier to reach eventually the level required (O(102) μN) by small satellites. To facilitate system optimization and debugging, we focused on a 7-nozzle MES device and compared its performance to that of a single emitter. To ensure uniformity of operation of all nozzles their hydraulic impedance was augmented by packing them with micrometer-size beads. Two propellants were tested: a solution of 21.5% methyl ammonium formate in formamide and the better performing pure ionic liquid ethyl ammonium nitrate (EAN). The 7-MES device spraying EAN at ΔV = 5.93 kV covered a specific impulse range from 620 s to 1900 s and a thrust range from 0.6 μN to 5.4 μN, at 62% efficiency. Remarkably, less than 1% of the beam was demonstrated to impact on the accelerator electrode, which bodes well for long-term applications in space.

  18. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  19. Teacher Attitudes toward Subject-Specific Acceleration: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambo, Karen E.; McCoach, D. Betsy

    2012-01-01

    Despite the research supporting acceleration, some teachers are still hesitant to recommend acceleration for advanced students. The Teacher Attitudes Toward Subject-Specific Acceleration (TATSSA) instrument was designed to uncover the factors that influence teacher decisions to recommend students for subject-specific acceleration. First, we…

  20. Socioeconomic status and structural brain development.

    PubMed

    Brito, Natalie H; Noble, Kimberly G

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging methods have made accessible new ways of disentangling the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors that influence structural brain development. In recent years, research investigating associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and brain development have found significant links between SES and changes in brain structure, especially in areas related to memory, executive control, and emotion. This review focuses on studies examining links between structural brain development and SES disparities of the magnitude typically found in developing countries. We highlight how highly correlated measures of SES are differentially related to structural changes within the brain. PMID:25249931

  1. Socioeconomic status and structural brain development

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Natalie H.; Noble, Kimberly G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging methods have made accessible new ways of disentangling the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors that influence structural brain development. In recent years, research investigating associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and brain development have found significant links between SES and changes in brain structure, especially in areas related to memory, executive control, and emotion. This review focuses on studies examining links between structural brain development and SES disparities of the magnitude typically found in developing countries. We highlight how highly correlated measures of SES are differentially related to structural changes within the brain. PMID:25249931

  2. Probabilistic structural analysis methods development for SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of probabilistic structural analysis methods is a major part of the SSME Structural Durability Program and consists of three program elements: composite load spectra, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic structural analysis applications. Recent progress includes: (1) the effects of the uncertainties of several factors on the HPFP blade temperature pressure and torque, (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function of structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties on primitive structural variables, and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results obtained demonstrate that the structural durability of critical SSME components can be probabilistically evaluated.

  3. Electron acceleration at localized wave structures in the solar corona (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung an lokalen Wellenstrukturen in der Sonnenkorona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, Rositsa Stoycheva

    2007-07-01

    Our dynamic Sun manifests its activity by different phenomena: from the 11-year cyclic sunspot pattern to the unpredictable and violent explosions in the case of solar flares. During flares, a huge amount of the stored magnetic energy is suddenly released and a substantial part of this energy is carried by the energetic electrons, considered to be the source of the nonthermal radio and X-ray radiation. One of the most important and still open question in solar physics is how the electrons are accelerated up to high energies within (the observed in the radio emission) short time scales. Because the acceleration site is extremely small in spatial extent as well (compared to the solar radius), the electron acceleration is regarded as a local process. The search for localized wave structures in the solar corona that are able to accelerate electrons together with the theoretical and numerical description of the conditions and requirements for this process, is the aim of the dissertation. Two models of electron acceleration in the solar corona are proposed in the dissertation: I. Electron acceleration due to the solar jet interaction with the background coronal plasma (the jet--plasma interaction) A jet is formed when the newly reconnected and highly curved magnetic field lines are relaxed by shooting plasma away from the reconnection site. Such jets, as observed in soft X-rays with the Yohkoh satellite, are spatially and temporally associated with beams of nonthermal electrons (in terms of the so-called type III metric radio bursts) propagating through the corona. A model that attempts to give an explanation for such observational facts is developed here. Initially, the interaction of such jets with the background plasma leads to an (ion-acoustic) instability associated with growing of electrostatic fluctuations in time for certain range of the jet initial velocity. During this process, any test electron that happen to feel this electrostatic wave field is drawn to co

  4. Increasing Spontaneous Retinal Activity before Eye Opening Accelerates the Development of Geniculate Receptive Fields.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary W; Chapman, Barbara; Cheng, Hwai-Jong

    2015-10-28

    Visually evoked activity is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. However, little is known about the capacity for patterned spontaneous activity to drive the maturation of receptive fields before visual experience. Retinal waves provide instructive retinotopic information for the anatomical organization of the visual thalamus. To determine whether retinal waves also drive the maturation of functional responses, we increased the frequency of retinal waves pharmacologically in the ferret (Mustela putorius furo) during a period of retinogeniculate development before eye opening. The development of geniculate receptive fields after receiving these increased neural activities was measured using single-unit electrophysiology. We found that increased retinal waves accelerate the developmental reduction of geniculate receptive field sizes. This reduction is due to a decrease in receptive field center size rather than an increase in inhibitory surround strength. This work reveals an instructive role for patterned spontaneous activity in guiding the functional development of neural circuits. PMID:26511250

  5. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  6. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  7. UCLA accelerator research and development. Progress report, [November 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-09-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  8. Analysis of a Symmetric Terahertz Dielectric-Lined Rectangular Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T. C.; Sotnikov, G. V.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    We study, using computational methods based on analytic theory as well as a PIC code, the wakefields set up in a seven-zone symmetric rectangular THZ structure, and find that for overall transverse x/y dimensions 2.121 mmx0.6 mm, two 5-GeV drive bunches (3 nC, with x/y/z dimensions 0.3/0.3/0.12 mm{sup 3} as available at SLAC) will set up an axial wakefield {approx}350 MV/m in the witness channel, with a transformer ratio {approx}18-20. The symmetry of the structure ensures not only that small transverse forces are imposed on the witness bunch, but also that the two components of transverse force are equal and opposite at the bunch location so as to enable dynamical stabilization in an accelerator comprising many modules. Transverse forces on the drive bunch tails may allow bunches to move {approx}0.5-1 m without suffering excessive erosion.

  9. Soil Potassium Deficiency Reduces Cotton Fiber Strength by Accelerating and Shortening Fiber Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia-Shuo; Hu, Wei; Zhao, Wenqing; Meng, Yali; Chen, Binglin; Wang, Youhua; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Low potassium (K)-induced premature senescence in cotton has been observed worldwide, but how it affects cotton fiber properties remain unclear. We hypothesized that K deficiency affects cotton fiber properties by causing disordered fiber development, which may in turn be caused by the induction of a carbohydrate acquisition difficulty. To investigate this issue, we employed a low-K-sensitive cotton cultivar Siza 3 and a low-K-tolerant cultivar Simian 3 and planted them in three regions of different K supply. Data concerning lint yield, Pn and main fiber properties were collected from three years of testing. Soil K deficiency significantly accelerated fiber cellulose accumulation and dehydration processes, which, together with previous findings, suggests that the low-K induced carbohydrate acquisition difficulty could cause disordered fiber development by stimulating the expression of functional proteins such as CDKA (cyclin-dependent kinase). As a result, fiber strength and lint weight were reduced by up to 7.8% and 2.1%, respectively. Additional quantitative analysis revealed that the degree of accelerated fiber development negatively correlated with fiber strength. According to the results of this study, it is feasible to address the effects of soil K deficiency on fiber properties using existing cultivation strategies to prevent premature senescence of cotton plants. PMID:27350236

  10. Development and evaluation of polybenzoxazole fibrous structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    1995-01-01

    Woven and braided polybenzoxazole (PBO) structures have been developed for aerospace applications. The properties of PBO fibers are compared to those of other high performance fibers. PBO is unique for combining excellent flammability properties with the highest tensile strength and modulus of all synthetic organic fibers. The PBO structures are specifically developed to be compared to similar Kevlar structures. The physical, mechanical, thermal, and oxidative properties of the PBO woven and braided structures are determined. The resistance to various chemicals and to UV light is evaluated. Recommendations for specific aerospace applications are given with comments for further development and industrial applications.

  11. Effect of gravitational acceleration, hypokinesia and hypodynamia on the structure of the intestinal vascular bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitin, M. V.

    1980-01-01

    A series of experiments comparing single and combined effects of hypokinesia and gravitational acceleration on morphology of intestinal blood vessels are discussed. Results indicate that hypokinesia has a whole body nonspecific effect reflected even in an organ whose activity shows little or no change due to hypokinesia. In early hypokinetic stages blood redistribution caused anorexia, intestinal atonia, and secretory disruption. Destructive changes from further exposure include aneurisms, varicoses, extravascular movement of blood elements, and vascular wall muscle fiber degeneration. The effect of acceleration is greatest in the ventrodorsal direction. Changes due to acceleration then hypokinesia are like those due to hypokinesia alone; changes due to acceleration before and after hypokinesia are like those due to acceleration. Adaptation raises acceleration tolerance but the effects do not survive four-week hypokinesia.

  12. WIPO Re:Search: Accelerating anthelmintic development through cross-sector partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthi, Roopa; Graef, Katy M.; Dent, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), malaria, and tuberculosis have a devastating effect on an estimated 1.6 billion people worldwide. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Re:Search consortium accelerates the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics for these diseases by connecting the assets and resources of pharmaceutical companies, such as compound libraries and expertise, to academic or nonprofit researchers with novel product discovery or development ideas. As the WIPO Re:Search Partnership Hub Administrator, BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH) fields requests from researchers, identifies Member organizations able to fulfill these requests, and helps forge mutually beneficial collaborations. Since its inception in October 2011, WIPO Re:Search membership has expanded to more than 90 institutions, including leading pharmaceutical companies, universities, nonprofit research institutions, and product development partnerships from around the world. To date, WIPO Re:Search has facilitated over 70 research agreements between Consortium Members, including 11 collaborations focused on anthelmintic drug discovery. PMID:25516832

  13. Surface water geochemical and isotopic variations in an area of accelerating Marcellus Shale gas development.

    PubMed

    Pelak, Adam J; Sharma, Shikha

    2014-12-01

    Water samples were collected from 50 streams in an area of accelerating shale gas development in the eastern U.S.A. The geochemical/isotopic characteristics show no correlation with the five categories of Marcellus Shale production. The sub-watersheds with the greatest density of Marcellus Shale development have also undergone extensive coal mining. Hence, geochemical/isotopic compositions were used to understand sources of salinity and effects of coal mining and shale gas development in the area. The data indicates that while some streams appear to be impacted by mine drainage; none appear to have received sustained contribution from deep brines or produced waters associated with shale gas production. However, it is important to note that our interpretations are based on one time synoptic base flow sampling of a few sampling stations and hence do account potential intermittent changes in chemistry that may result from major/minor spills or specific mine discharges on the surface water chemistry. PMID:25201226

  14. Structural reliability methods: Code development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, Harry R.; Thacker, Ben H.; Wu, Y.-T.; Cruse, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Probabilistic Structures Analysis Method (PSAM) program integrates state of the art probabilistic algorithms with structural analysis methods in order to quantify the behavior of Space Shuttle Main Engine structures subject to uncertain loadings, boundary conditions, material parameters, and geometric conditions. An advanced, efficient probabilistic structural analysis software program, NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) was developed as a deliverable. NESSUS contains a number of integrated software components to perform probabilistic analysis of complex structures. A nonlinear finite element module NESSUS/FEM is used to model the structure and obtain structural sensitivities. Some of the capabilities of NESSUS/FEM are shown. A Fast Probability Integration module NESSUS/FPI estimates the probability given the structural sensitivities. A driver module, PFEM, couples the FEM and FPI. NESSUS, version 5.0, addresses component reliability, resistance, and risk.

  15. ConnectViz: Accelerated Approach for Brain Structural Connectivity Using Delaunay Triangulation.

    PubMed

    Adeshina, A M; Hashim, R

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality and long-term disability in the world. Normal functioning of the brain is dependent on the adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients to the brain complex network through the blood vessels. Stroke, occasionally a hemorrhagic stroke, ischemia or other blood vessel dysfunctions can affect patients during a cerebrovascular incident. Structurally, the left and the right carotid arteries, and the right and the left vertebral arteries are responsible for supplying blood to the brain, scalp and the face. However, a number of impairment in the function of the frontal lobes may occur as a result of any decrease in the flow of the blood through one of the internal carotid arteries. Such impairment commonly results in numbness, weakness or paralysis. Recently, the concepts of brain's wiring representation, the connectome, was introduced. However, construction and visualization of such brain network requires tremendous computation. Consequently, previously proposed approaches have been identified with common problems of high memory consumption and slow execution. Furthermore, interactivity in the previously proposed frameworks for brain network is also an outstanding issue. This study proposes an accelerated approach for brain connectomic visualization based on graph theory paradigm using compute unified device architecture, extending the previously proposed SurLens Visualization and computer aided hepatocellular carcinoma frameworks. The accelerated brain structural connectivity framework was evaluated with stripped brain datasets from the Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA. Significantly, our proposed framework is able to generate and extract points and edges of datasets, displays nodes and edges in the datasets in form of a network and clearly maps data volume to the corresponding brain surface. Moreover, with the framework, surfaces of the dataset were simultaneously displayed with the

  16. STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TARGET/BLANKET SYSTEM COMPONENT MATERIALS FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    W. JOHNSON; R. RYDER; P. RITTENHOUSE

    2001-01-01

    The design of target/blanket system components for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant is dependent on the development of materials properties data specified by the designer. These data are needed to verify that component designs are adequate. The adequacy of the data will be related to safety, performance, and economic considerations, and to other requirements that may be deemed necessary by customers and regulatory bodies. The data required may already be in existence, as in the open technical literature, or may need to be generated, as is often the case for the design of new systems operating under relatively unique conditions. The designers' starting point for design data needs is generally some form of design criteria used in conjunction with a specified set of loading conditions and associated performance requirements. Most criteria are aimed at verifying the structural adequacy of the component, and often take the form of national or international standards such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B and PV Code) or the French Nuclear Structural Requirements (RCC-MR). Whether or not there are specific design data needs associated with the use of these design criteria will largely depend on the uniqueness of the conditions of operation of the component. A component designed in accordance with the ASME B and PV Code, where no unusual environmental conditions exist, will utilize well-documented, statistically-evaluated developed in conjunction with the Code, and will not be likely to have any design data needs. On the other hand, a component to be designed to operate under unique APT conditions, is likely to have significant design data needs. Such a component is also likely to require special design criteria for verification of its structural adequacy, specifically accounting for changes in materials properties which may occur during exposure in the service environment. In such a situation it is common for the design criteria and

  17. Development of an accelerated leach test(s) for low-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-01-01

    An accelerated leach test(s) is being developed to predict long-term leaching behavior of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) forms in their disposal environments. As necessary background, a literature survey of reported leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching of LLW forms has been compiled. Mechanisms which have been identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. A computerized data base of LLW leaching data and mathematical models is being developed. The data is being used for model evaluation by curve fitting and statistical analysis according to standard procedures of statistical quality control. Long-term leach tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms. Initial results on the effect of temperature on leachability indicate that the leach rates of cement and VES waste forms increase with increasing temperature, whereas, the leach rate of bitumen is little affected. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  18. OpenMP-accelerated SWAT simulation using Intel C and FORTRAN compilers: Development and benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Seo Jin; Sugimura, Tak; Kim, Albert S.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a practical method to accelerate execution of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) using open (free) computational resources. The SWAT source code (rev 622) was recompiled using a non-commercial Intel FORTRAN compiler in Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Linux platform, and newly named iOMP-SWAT in this study. GNU utilities of make, gprof, and diff were used to develop the iOMP-SWAT package, profile memory usage, and check identicalness of parallel and serial simulations. Among 302 SWAT subroutines, the slowest routines were identified using GNU gprof, and later modified using Open Multiple Processing (OpenMP) library in an 8-core shared memory system. In addition, a C wrapping function was used to rapidly set large arrays to zero by cross compiling with the original SWAT FORTRAN package. A universal speedup ratio of 2.3 was achieved using input data sets of a large number of hydrological response units. As we specifically focus on acceleration of a single SWAT run, the use of iOMP-SWAT for parameter calibrations will significantly improve the performance of SWAT optimization.

  19. Development of a quantitative accelerated sulphate attack test for mine backfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnorhokian, Shahe

    Mining operations produce large amounts of tailings that are either disposed of in surface impoundments or used in the production of backfill to be placed underground. Their mineralogy is determined by the local geology, and it is not uncommon to come across tailings with a relatively high sulphide mineral content, including pyrite and pyrrhotite. Sulphides oxidize in the presence of oxygen and water to produce sulphate and acidity. In the concrete industry, sulphate is known to produce detrimental effects by reacting with the cement paste to produce the minerals ettringite and gypsum. Because mine backfill uses tailings and binders---including cement---it is therefore prone to sulphate attack where the required conditions are met. Currently, laboratory tests on mine backfill mostly measure mechanical properties such as strength parameters, and the study of the chemical aspects is restricted to the impact of tailings on the environment. The potential of sulphate attack in mine backfill has not been studied at length, and no tests are conducted on binders used in backfill for their resistance to attack. Current ASTM guidelines for sulphate attack tests have been deemed inadequate by several authors due to their measurement of only expansion as an indicator of attack. Furthermore, the tests take too long to perform or are restricted to cement mortars only, and not to mixed binders that include pozzolans. Based on these, an accelerated test for sulphate attack was developed in this work through modifying and compiling procedures that had been suggested by different authors. Small cubes of two different binders were fully immersed in daily-monitored sodium sulphate and sulphuric acid solutions for a total of 28 days, after 7 days of accelerated curing at 50°C. In addition, four binders were partially immersed in the same solutions for 8 days for an accelerated attack process. The two procedures were conducted in tandem with leach tests using a mixed solution of

  20. A piezo-driven micro-inclination stage for calibration of a micro-acceleration transducer: structure and control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shubao; Song, Siyang; Xu, Minglong; Xie, Shilin; Li, Liang

    2016-02-01

    In some space applications, such as space navigation and vibration control of the large space structures, micro-acceleration transducers are required and have to be calibrated accurately. Unfortunately, providing extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) for the calibration of the micro-acceleration transducer has been a challenging task. This paper proposes a novel piezo-driven micro-inclination stage (PMIS) that can produce both discrete and continuous tumbles in a gravity field so that extremely small static and quasi-static stimuli (accelerations) can be obtained from a tiny component of the gravity constant. The proposed PMIS, which is driven by the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stack, employs a rhombic mechanism to provide the PZT stack with a proper preload for the purpose of outputting a bidirectional force. To produce accurate static and quasi-static stimuli, the hysteresis non-linearity inherent in PZT stack is compensated by employing the strain feedback based adaptive control where the hysteresis property is identified online using the controlled auto-regressive moving average model. Furthermore, to improve the resolution of strain feedback, the strain sensitivity is maximized through structure optimization of the rhombic mechanism. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed PMIS can produce minimal micro-inclination of {{0.1}\\prime \\prime} (corresponding to the induced micro-acceleration of 0.5μ g ) with the frequency ranging from 0 (DC) to 2 Hz.

  1. High Voltage Hall Accelerator Propulsion System Development for NASA Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Mathers, Alex

    2013-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorates In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.8 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn Research Center and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) thruster that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the HiVHAc engineering development unit thruster have been performed. In addition, the HiVHAc project is also pursuing the development of a power processing unit (PPU) and xenon feed system (XFS) for integration with the HiVHAc engineering development unit thruster. Colorado Power Electronics and NASA Glenn Research Center have tested a brassboard PPU for more than 1,500 hours in a vacuum environment, and a new brassboard and engineering model PPU units are under development. VACCO Industries developed a xenon flow control module which has undergone qualification testing and will be integrated with the HiVHAc thruster extended duration tests. Finally, recent mission studies have shown that the HiVHAc propulsion system has sufficient performance for four Discovery- and two New Frontiers-class NASA design reference missions.

  2. Development and use of molecular markers to accelerate peanut cultivar development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Close cooperation between conventional plant breeders and molecular geneticists will be needed to efficiently and effectively utilize modern genetic tools in the development of peanut cultivars. We have used this approach at Tifton to develop molecular markers for resistance to the peanut root-knot...

  3. Effects of Prenatal Irradiation with an Accelerated Heavy-Ion Beam on Postnatal Development in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Murakami, M.; Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Nojima, K.; Shang, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, K.; Coffigny, H.; Hayata, I.

    Effects on postnatal neurophysiological development in offspring were studied following exposure of pregnant Wistar rats to accelerated neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV mu m at a dose range from 0 1 Gy to 2 0Gy on the 15th day of gestation The age at which four physiologic markers appeared and five reflexes were acquired was examined prior to weaning Gain in body weight was monitored until the offspring were 3 months old Male offspring were evaluated as young adults using two behavioral tests The effects of X-rays at 200 kVp measured for the same biological end points were studied for comparison Our previous study on carbon-ion beams with a LET value of about 13 keV mu m was also cited to elucidate a possible LET-related effect For most of the endpoints at early age significant alteration was even observed in offspring prenatally received 0 1 Gy of accelerated neon ions while neither X rays nor carbon-ions under the same dose resulted in such a significant alteration compared to that from the sham-irradiated dams All offspring whose mothers received 2 0 Gy died prior to weaning Offspring from dams irradiated with accelerated neon ions generally showed higher incidences of prenatal death and preweaning mortality markedly delayed accomplishment in their physiological markers and reflexes and gain in body weight compared to those exposed to X-rays or carbon ions at doses of 0 1 to 1 5 Gy Significantly reduced ratios of main organ weight to body weight at postnatal ages of 30 60 and 90 days were also observed

  4. MALVAC 2012 scientific forum: accelerating development of second-generation malaria vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a malaria vaccines committee (MALVAC) scientific forum from 20 to 21 February 2012 in Geneva, Switzerland, to review the global malaria vaccine portfolio, to gain consensus on approaches to accelerate second-generation malaria vaccine development, and to discuss the need to update the vision and strategic goal of the Malaria Vaccine Technology Roadmap. This article summarizes the forum, which included reviews of leading Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidates for pre-erythrocytic vaccines, blood-stage vaccines, and transmission-blocking vaccines. Other major topics included vaccine candidates against Plasmodium vivax, clinical trial site capacity development in Africa, trial design considerations for a second-generation malaria vaccine, adjuvant selection, and regulatory oversight functions including vaccine licensure. PMID:23140365

  5. Accelerating Development of EV Batteries Through Computer-Aided Engineering (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Santhanagopalan, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Vehicle Technology Program has launched the Computer-Aided Engineering for Automotive Batteries (CAEBAT) project to work with national labs, industry and software venders to develop sophisticated software. As coordinator, NREL has teamed with a number of companies to help improve and accelerate battery design and production. This presentation provides an overview of CAEBAT, including its predictive computer simulation of Li-ion batteries known as the Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional (MSMD) model framework. MSMD's modular, flexible architecture connects the physics of battery charge/discharge processes, thermal control, safety and reliability in a computationally efficient manner. This allows independent development of submodels at the cell and pack levels.

  6. Aggressive, accelerated subdomain smoothers for Stokes flow with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanan, Patrick; May, Dave; Schenk, Olaf; Rupp, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Scalable solvers for mantle convection and lithospheric dynamics with highly heterogeneous viscosity structure typically require the use of a multigrid method. To leverage new hybrid CPU-accelerator architectures on leadership compute clusters, multigrid hierarchies which can reduce communication and use high available arithmetic intensity are at a premium, motivating more aggressive coarsening schemes and smoothers. We present results of a comparative study of two competitive GPU-enabled subdomain smoothers within an additive Schwarz method. Chebyshev-Jacobi smoothing has been shown to be an effective smoother, and its nature as a low-communication method built from basic linear algebra routines allows its use on a wide range of devices with current libraries. ILU smoothing is also of interest and is known to provide robust smoothing in some cases, but has traditionally been difficult to use in a fine-grained parallel environment. However, a recently-introduced variant by Chow and Patel allows for incomplete factorizations to be computed and applied in these environments, hence allowing us to study them as well. We use and extend the pTatin3D, PETSc, and ViennaCL libraries to integrate promising methods into a realistic application framework.

  7. Accelerated dynamic MRI exploiting sparsity and low-rank structure: k-t SLR.

    PubMed

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Hu, Yue; DiBella, Edward; Jacob, Mathews

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a novel algorithm to reconstruct dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from under-sampled k-t space data. In contrast to classical model based cine MRI schemes that rely on the sparsity or banded structure in Fourier space, we use the compact representation of the data in the Karhunen Louve transform (KLT) domain to exploit the correlations in the dataset. The use of the data-dependent KL transform makes our approach ideally suited to a range of dynamic imaging problems, even when the motion is not periodic. In comparison to current KLT-based methods that rely on a two-step approach to first estimate the basis functions and then use it for reconstruction, we pose the problem as a spectrally regularized matrix recovery problem. By simultaneously determining the temporal basis functions and its spatial weights from the entire measured data, the proposed scheme is capable of providing high quality reconstructions at a range of accelerations. In addition to using the compact representation in the KLT domain, we also exploit the sparsity of the data to further improve the recovery rate. Validations using numerical phantoms and in vivo cardiac perfusion MRI data demonstrate the significant improvement in performance offered by the proposed scheme over existing methods. PMID:21292593

  8. Beta/A4 proteinlike immunoreactive granular structures in the brain of senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, M.; Nakamura, S.; Akiguchi, I.; Ueno, M.; Oka, N.; Ishikawa, S.; Shimada, A.; Kimura, J.; Takeda, T.

    1993-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of amyloid beta/A4 protein in the senescence-accelerated mouse brain was studied using six different antisera against human amyloid precursor protein peptides. beta/A4 proteinlike immunoreactivity was observed in the form of granular structures (beta-LIGS) in various regions, including the medial septum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and some cranial nerve roots. beta-LIGS were 1.5 to 2.5 mu in diameter and irregularly shaped. They increased significantly in number with aging, predominantly in animals with a phenotype of age-related deterioration of memory and learning abilities. Congo red and thioflavine S did not stain the granules. On immunoblots, the main immunoreactive bands were observed at 14 to 18 kd. The staining intensities of these bands also increased with advancing age. We consider that beta-LIGS are not only a new morphological manifestation of senescence in mice, but also a pertinent clue in understanding the mechanisms of amyloid deposition. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8506956

  9. GPU-accelerated model for fast, three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction computations.

    PubMed

    Nita, Cosmin; Itu, Lucian; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Rapaka, Saikiran

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a methodology for performing one-way Fluid-Structure interaction (FSI), i.e. where the motion of the wall boundaries is imposed. We use a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated Lattice-Boltzmann Method (LBM) implementation and present an efficient workflow for embedding the moving geometry, given as a set of polygonal meshes, in the LBM computation. The proposed method is first validated in a synthetic experiment: a vessel which is periodically expanding and contracting. Next, the evaluation focuses on the 3D Peristaltic flow problem: a fluid flows inside a flexible tube, where a periodic wave-like deformation produces a fluid motion along the centerline of the tube. Different geometry configurations are used and results are compared against previously published solutions. The efficient approach leads to an average execution time of approx. one hour per computation, whereas 50% of it is required for the geometry update operations. Finally, we also analyse the effect of changing the Reynolds number on the flow streamlines: the flow regime is significantly affected by the Reynolds number. PMID:26736424

  10. School Site Staff Development: Structures and Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solo, Leonard J.

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the importance of staff development (broadly defined as anything that enables teachers to learn) and considers different development structures. Describes the role and duties of staff developer at a Cambridge, Massachusetts, elementary school as well as its "teacher teams," groups of instructors who meet monthly to discuss issues…

  11. One DOF mechanism for the mechanical harvest of vines in an arbor structure and the validation of the acceleration of grape berry harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penisi, Osvaldo; Bocca, José; Aguilar, Horacio; Bocca, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    In the mechanized harvest of vines, grape berries are detached through the vibration to the structure supporting the clusters. According to the kind of guide selected, the clusters require one or two vibration directions in the structure. For guiding in parral structures, vibration is necessary in two directions or planes: One perpendicular to the other. The guide branches producing the clusters develop in these planes, and the guiding is called H-guiding. Mechanism theory indicates that a mechanism has as many degrees of freedom as its actuators, and an actuator is needed to achieve a certain vibration. Having the smallest number of possible actuators is beneficial in reducing moving parts and achieving more compact and easily controllable mechanisms. In this case, a single degree-of-freedom mechanism is proposed. It is capable of generating vibrations on two planes: One perpendicular to the other. This mechanism is the sum of two link mechanisms on perpendicular planes with a common outlet located at the output rod of the mechanism where the actuator is found. As the distance between the soil and the elements containing the clusters is not constant, a system has been designed to measure the accelerations at the bars and the rocker to validate the acceleration values that detach the grape berries in a prototype in a lab experiment, to ensure that the acceleration needed for pulling the grape berries are produced at any contact point of the bar.

  12. Nonlinear development of strong current-driven instabilities and selective acceleration of ^3He ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Mieko; Okumura, Hayato

    2003-10-01

    In some solar flares, the abundance of high-energy ^3He ions is extremely increased. As a mechanism for these ^3He rich events, current-driven instabilities are believed to be important. Nonlinear development of the strong current-driven instabilities and associated energy transfer to ^3He ions are studied theoretically and numerically [1]. First, by means of a two-dimensional, electrostatic, particle simulation code, it is demonstrated that ^3He ions are selectively accelerated by fundamental H cyclotron waves with frequencies ω ≃ 2Ω_3He (Ω_3He is the cyclotron frequency of ^3He). Then, from the analysis of the dispersion relation of these waves, it is found that the ω ≃ 2 Ω_ 3He waves have the greatest growth rate, if Te > 10 T_H. Energies of the ^3He ions are also discussed. Theoretical expression for the maximum ^3He energy is presented, which is in good agreement with the simulation results. Based on this theory, it is shown that when the initial electron drift energy is of the order of 10 keV, many ^3He ions can be accelerated to energies of the order of MeV/n. [1] M. Toida and H. Okumura, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72,1098 (2003)

  13. Development of a remote control console for the HHIRF 25-MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanul Basher, A.M.

    1991-09-01

    The CAMAC-based control system for the 25-MV Tandem Accelerator at HHIRF uses two Perkin-Elmer, 32-bit minicomputers: a message-switching computer and a supervisory computer. Two operator consoles are located on one of the six serial highways. Operator control is provided by means of a console CRT, trackball, assignable shaft encoders and meters. The message-switching computer transmits and receives control information on the serial highways. At present, the CRT pages with updated parameters can be displayed and parameters can be controlled only from the two existing consoles, one in the Tandem control room and the other in the ORIC control room. It has become necessary to expand the control capability to several other locations in the building. With the expansion of control and monitoring capability of accelerator parameters to other locations, the operators will be able to control and observe the result of the control action at the same time. Since the new control console will be PC-based, the existing page format will be changed. The PC will be communicating with the Perkin-Elmer through RS-232 and a communication software package. Hardware configuration has been established, a communication software program that reads the pages from the shared memory has been developed. In this paper, we present the implementation strategy, works completed, existing and new page format, future action plans, explanation of pages and use of related global variables, a sample session, and flowcharts.

  14. Recent advances in the development of high average power induction accelerators for industrial and environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1994-09-01

    Short-pulse accelerator technology developed during the early 1960`s through the late 1980`s is being extended to high average power systems capable of use in industrial and environmental applications. Processes requiring high dose levels and/or high volume throughput will require systems with beam power levels from several hundreds of kilowatts to megawatts. Beam accelerating potentials can range from less than 1 MeV to as much as 10 MeV depending on the type of beam, depth of penetration required, and the density of the product being treated. This paper addresses the present status of a family of high average power systems, with output beam power levels up to 200 kW, now in operation that use saturable core switches to achieve output pulse widths of 50 to 80 nanoseconds. Inductive adders and field emission cathodes are used to generate beams of electrons or x-rays at up to 2.5 MeV over areas of 1000 cm{sup 2}. Similar high average power technology is being used at {le} 1 MeV to drive repetitive ion beam sources for treatment of material surfaces over 100`s of cm{sup 2}.

  15. New options for developing of nuclear energy using an accelerator-driven reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1997-09-01

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor. Thus, the necessity of early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. High reliability of the proton accelerator, which is essential to implementing an accelerator-driven reactor in the nuclear energy field can be achieved by a slight extension of the accelerator`s length, with only a small economical penalty. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options including high neutron economy producing the fuel, transmuting high-level wastes, such as minor actinides, and of converting efficiently the excess Pu and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel.

  16. Particle acceleration in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The structure of pulsar magnetospheres and the acceleration mechanism for charged particles in the magnetosphere was studied using a pulsar model which required large acceleration of the particles near the surface of the star. A theorem was developed which showed that particle acceleration cannot be expected when the angle between the magnetic field lines and the rotation axis is constant (e.g. radial field lines). If this angle is not constant, however, acceleration must occur. The more realistic model of an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong dipole magnetic field aligned with the rotation axis was investigated. In this case, acceleration occurred at large distances from the surface of the star. The magnitude of the current can be determined using the model presented. In the case of nonaxisymmetric systems, the acceleration is expected to occur nearer to the surface of the star.

  17. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  18. Residual acceleration data on IML-1: Development of a data reduction and dissemination plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Wolf, Randy

    1992-01-01

    The need to record some measure of the low-gravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle was recognized at an early stage of the U.S. Space Program. Such information was considered important for both the assessment of an astronaut's physical condition during and after space missions and the analysis of the fluid physics, materials processing, and biological sciences experiments run in space. Various measurement systems were developed and flown on space platforms beginning in the early 1970's. Similar in concept to land based seismometers that measure vibrations caused by earthquakes and explosions, accelerometers mounted on orbiting space vehicles measure vibrations in and of the vehicle due to internal and external sources, as well as vibrations in a sensor's relative acceleration with respect to the vehicle to which it is attached. The data collected over the years have helped to alter the perception of gravity on-board a space vehicle from the public's early concept of zero-gravity to the science community's evolution of thought from microgravity to milligravity to g-jitter or vibrational environment. Since the advent of the Shuttle Orbiter Program, especially since the start of Spacelab flights dedicated to scientific investigations, the interest in measuring the low-gravity environment in which experiments are run has increased. This interest led to the development and flight of numerous accelerometer systems dedicated to specific experiments. It also prompted the development of the NASA MSAD-sponsored Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). The first SAMS units flew in the Spacelab on STS-40 in June 1991 in support of the first Spacelab Life Sciences mission (SLS-1). SAMS is currently manifested to fly on all future Spacelab missions.

  19. Advances in Hot-Structure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has actively participated in the development of hot structures technology for application to hypersonic flight systems. Hot structures have been developed for vehicles including the X-43A, X-37, and the Space Shuttle. These trans-atmospheric and atmospheric entry flight systems that incorporate hot-structures technology are lighter weight and require less maintenance than those that incorporate parasitic, thermal-protection materials that attach to warm or cool substructure. The development of hot structures requires a thorough understanding of material performance in an extreme environment, boundary conditions and load interactions, structural joint performance, and thermal and mechanical performance of integrated structural systems that operate at temperatures ranging from 1500 C to 3000 C, depending on the application. This paper will present recent advances in the development of hot structures, including development of environmentally durable, high temperature leading edges and control surfaces, integrated thermal protection systems, and repair technologies. The X-43A Mach-10 vehicle utilized carbon/carbon (C/C) leading edges on the nose, horizontal control surface, and vertical tail. The nose and vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased, high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three-layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the C/C, followed by a CVD layer of SiC, followed by a thin CVD layer of HfC. Work has also been performed on the development of an integrated structure and was focused on both hot and warm (insulated) structures and integrated fuselage/tank/TPS systems. The objective was to develop integrated multifunctional airframe structures that eliminate fragile external thermal-protection systems and incorporate the insulating function within the structure. The approach taken to achieve this goal was to develop candidate hypersonic

  20. Development of a Lorentz Force Accelerator Injector for the VASIMR Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, T. W.; Chan, A. A.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J.

    1998-11-01

    We report on the effort to develop a Lorentz Force Accelerator for use as a plasma injector for the VASIMR(Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) engine. Advantages of the LFA, also known as a magnetoplasmadynamic thruster, include simplicity of construction, the ability to use a wide variety of propellant gases without modification, and minimal power processing requirements. As a plasma source for the VASIMR engine, its feature of ejecting plasma in a tightly collimated jet allows it to inject plasma through the loss cone of the VASIMR magnetic field into the engine's central cell. This passage from weak to strong magnetic field regions may result in a desirable increase in plasma density in the central cell. Work to date has focused on achieving reliable start-up and steady-state operation.

  1. Development of a Nb 3Sn multifilamentary wire for accelerator magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Bredy, P.; Devred, A.; Otmani, R.; Reytier, M.; Schild, T.; Trillaud, F.

    2001-05-01

    CEA/Saclay and Alstom/MSA have carried out a program to develop a Nb 3Sn multifilamentary wire for accelerator magnet applications relying on the internal-tin process. The main wire specifications are: an overall diameter of 0.825 mm, a critical current larger than 405 A at 4.2 K and 7 T, hysteresis losses lower than 450 mJ/cm 3 for a±3 T trapezoidal cycle, and a copper-to-non-copper ratio greater than 1. The last phase of the optimization program was based on four different strands and we present here the results of the characterization tests, including residual resistivity ratio, critical current and AC loss measurements.

  2. Self-accelerated development of salt karst during flash floods along the Dead Sea Coast, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Yoav; Lensky, Nadav; Dente, Elad; Shviro, Maayan; Arav, Reuma; Gavrieli, Ittai; Yechieli, Yoseph; Abelson, Meir; Lutzky, Hallel; Filin, Sagi; Haviv, Itai; Baer, Gidon

    2016-01-01

    We document and analyze the rapid development of a real-time karst system within the subsurface salt layers of the Ze'elim Fan, Dead Sea, Israel by a multidisciplinary study that combines interferometric synthetic aperture radar and light detection and ranging measurements, sinkhole mapping, time-lapse camera monitoring, groundwater level measurements and chemical and isotopic analyses of surface runoff and groundwater. The >1 m/yr drop of Dead Sea water level and the subsequent change in the adjacent groundwater system since the 1960s resulted in flushing of the coastal aquifer by fresh groundwater, subsurface salt dissolution, gradual land subsidence and formation of sinkholes. Since 2010 this process accelerated dramatically as flash floods at the Ze'elim Fan were drained by newly formed sinkholes. During and immediately after these flood events the dissolution rates of the subsurface salt layer increased dramatically, the overlying ground surface subsided, a large number of sinkholes developed over short time periods (hours to days), and salt-saturated water resurged downstream. Groundwater flow velocities increased by more than 2 orders of magnitudes compared to previously measured velocities along the Dead Sea. The process is self-accelerating as salt dissolution enhances subsidence and sinkhole formation, which in turn increase the ponding areas of flood water and generate additional draining conduits to the subsurface. The rapid terrain response is predominantly due to the highly soluble salt. It is enhanced by the shallow depth of the salt layer, the low competence of the newly exposed unconsolidated overburden and the moderate topographic gradients of the Ze'elim Fan.

  3. Development of a four cavity second-harmonic gyroklystron as driver for a linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia, Emmanuel Steve

    Gyroklystrons are microwave amplifiers that combine the multi-cavity configuration of a klystron with the energy extraction mechanism of the cyclotron maser instability. These devices have been studied at the University of Maryland for several years. This work is focused on the development of a 17.14 GHz four-cavity frequency-doubling gyroklystron circuit. This device was designed specifically to drive a high gradient linear accelerator recently developed by the Haimson Corporation. The gyroklystron was designed using the code MAGYKL, yielding a predicted output power of 87 MW for an input drive power of 250 W, with a velocity pitch ratio (alpha) of 1.4. The tube was later fabricated, and underwent a series of experimental tests to evaluate its performance. The highest peak power observed was 18.5 +/- 1.7 MW, corresponding to an efficiency of 7.0% and a gain of 24.0 dB. This result fell short of the theoretical design, yet it was consistent with the low value of the velocity pitch ratio (alpha = 0.85) realized in the experiments. This limitation on alpha was linked to the onset of instabilities in the input cavity. The ultimate cause of these instabilities was the thermal non-uniformity in the emitter of our electron gun, which led to a significant variation (approximately 50%) of the current density across the beam. In order to remedy this problem, we have radically redesigned the input cavity, changing both its geometry and Q factor. These measures should dramatically reduce the probability of instabilities, thus allowing us to remove the experimental limitations imposed on alpha. This new design is presented here. We also describe advanced designs of an output cavity with radial power extraction, and a compact circular to rectangular mode converter. A detailed description of the present experimental setup is given, along with an overview of the power transport system necessary to feed the accelerator with output power from the gyroklystron.

  4. Magnetized Plasma-filled Waveguide: A New High-Gradient Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Avitzour, Yoav; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-01-22

    Electromagnetic waves confined between the metal plates of a plasma-filled waveguide are investigated. It is demonstrated that when the plasma is magnetized along the metallic plates, there exists a luminous accelerating wave propagating with a very slow group velocity. It is shown that the magnetized plasma 'isolates' the metal wall from the transverse electric field, thereby reducing potential breakdown problems. Applications of the metallic plasma-filled waveguide to particle accelerations and microwave pulse manipulation are described.

  5. The solar wind structures associated with cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    The time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at times of all greater than 3 percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978 to 1982 are studied. Essentially all 59 of the decreases commenced at or before the passages of interplanetary shocks, the majority of which accelerated energetic particles. We use the intensity-time profiles of the energetic particles to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which we subsequently associate with four types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) can be associated with shocks which are driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events the ejecta is detected at 1 AU whereas this is not the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the depression of cosmic rays in class 2 events. In all class 1 and 2 events (which comprise 69 percent of the total) the departure time of the ejection from the sun (and hence the location) can be determined from the rapid onset of energetic particles several days before the shock passage at Earth. The class 1 events originate from within 50 deg of central meridian. Class 3 events (10 decreases) can be attributed to less energetic ejections which are directed towards the Earth. In these events the ejecta is more important than the shock in causing a depression in the cosmic ray intensity. The remaining events (14 percent of the total) can be attributed to corotating streams which have ejecta material embedded in them.

  6. An accelerated remedial strategy developed for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, C.R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wrobel, J.

    1995-06-01

    For an installation with many disposal sites and multiple contaminant sources, successful remediation at minimum cost can be complicated by insufficient geologic and hydrogeologic information, incomplete records of historical disposal activities, and uncertainty about the effectiveness of different investigative methods. To reduce these uncertainties and to increase the probability of successful remediation at minimum cost, a ``Phased and pilot`` accelerated remedial strategy has been developed for the J-Field area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The strategy includes four phases. First, the most contaminated site is selected as a pilot for detailed investigation. Second, the most contaminated areas within the pilot site are chosen as a pilot source area for interim action study, and a remedial action is developed to remove the primary contaminant sources. The subsequent sitewide investigation uses the effective tools developed in the first phase. Third, a cleanup operation is initiated in the pilot source area, while a sitewide feasibility study is developed by taking advantage of lessons learned in the interim action. Fourth, a sitewide cleanup operation proceeds.

  7. A Bibliographical Guide to Structural Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Wayne H., Comp.

    A bibliography of literature on the relationship of social structures to development is presented. Development is defined as a decision-making process characterized by resource utilization which benefits the public interest as well as private economic interests. Entries are made under the following categories: changing social, political, and…

  8. Laser Acceleration in Vacuum and Gases with Capillary Waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    1999-02-01

    A unified framework is developed to overcome all three major limitations on acceleration and distance and hence on the feasibility of two classes of laser acceleration. The three limitations are due to laser diffraction, acceleration phase slippage, and structure damage by high power laser if solid-state optical waveguide is used. The two classes of laser acceleration are direct-field acceleration and ponderomotive-driven acceleration. Thus this letter and its companion [1] provide solutions that are crucial to all mainstream approaches for laser acceleration, either in vacuum, gases or plasmas.

  9. Effect of Hot Coiling Under Accelerated Cooling on Development of Non-equiaxed Ferrite in Low Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanjewar, H. A.; Tripathi, Pranavkumar

    2016-06-01

    Strengthening mechanisms dominant in non-equiaxed ferrite structures are not so familiar and well measured. In present study, non-equiaxed ferritic structures were generated and perceived to be strengthened by grain/crystal refinement, presence of varying substructures, solid solution strengthening, and textural hardening. A Nb-V microalloyed steel was modeled under various accelerated cooling and coiling temperature conditions in a thermo-mechanical simulator. Decrease in coiling temperature in conjunction with accelerated cooling resulted in non-equiaxed ferrite structures with array of phase morphologies. Intermediate transformation conditions produced increase in strength concurrent with observed smallness in crystallite size and high amount of microstrain in the matrix phase indicative of high dislocation densities and crystal imperfections. Increase in strength is partially attributed to solid solution and texture hardening owing to increase in (111) pole intensity in structure.

  10. Effect of Hot Coiling Under Accelerated Cooling on Development of Non-equiaxed Ferrite in Low Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanjewar, H. A.; Tripathi, Pranavkumar

    2016-04-01

    Strengthening mechanisms dominant in non-equiaxed ferrite structures are not so familiar and well measured. In present study, non-equiaxed ferritic structures were generated and perceived to be strengthened by grain/crystal refinement, presence of varying substructures, solid solution strengthening, and textural hardening. A Nb-V microalloyed steel was modeled under various accelerated cooling and coiling temperature conditions in a thermo-mechanical simulator. Decrease in coiling temperature in conjunction with accelerated cooling resulted in non-equiaxed ferrite structures with array of phase morphologies. Intermediate transformation conditions produced increase in strength concurrent with observed smallness in crystallite size and high amount of microstrain in the matrix phase indicative of high dislocation densities and crystal imperfections. Increase in strength is partially attributed to solid solution and texture hardening owing to increase in (111) pole intensity in structure.

  11. Accelerating the development of improved analgesic treatments: the ACTION public-private partnership.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2011-07-01

    There has been considerable progress identifying pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but analgesic medications with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability still represent an unmet public health need. Numerous treatments examined in recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have failed to show efficacy for neuropathic pain, including treatments that had previously demonstrated efficacy. This suggests that at least some negative results reflect limited assay sensitivity of RCTs to distinguish efficacious treatments from placebo. Patient characteristics, clinical trial research designs and methods, outcome measures, approaches to data analysis, and statistical power may all play a role in accounting for difficulties in demonstrating the benefits of efficacious analgesic treatments vs placebo. The identification of specific clinical trial characteristics associated with assay sensitivity in existing data has the potential to provide an evidence-based approach to the design of analgesic clinical trials. The US Food and Drug Administration recently launched the Analgesic Clinical Trial Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) public-private partnership, which is designed to facilitate the discovery and development of analgesics with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability for acute and chronic pain conditions. ACTION will establish a collaborative effort to prioritize research objectives, develop a standardized analgesic database platform, and conduct methodologically focused studies to increase the assay sensitivity and efficiency of analgesic clinical trials. The results of these activities have the potential to inform and accelerate the development of improved pain management interventions of all types, not just pharmacologic treatments. PMID:21752182

  12. Design and RF measurements of an X-band accelerating structure for linearizing the longitudinal emittance at SPARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, D.; Falone, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palpini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2005-12-01

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The nine cells structure, operating on the π standing wave mode, is fed by a central coupler and has been designed to obtain a 42 MV/m accelerating gradient. The two-dimensional (2D) profile has been obtained using the electromagnetic codes Superfish and Oscar-2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurements made on a copper prototype have been performed and the results are illustrated and compared with the numerical predictions. Mechanical details of the realized prototype and RF properties of the structure as a function of the assembly characteristics are also discussed.

  13. Development and applications of infrared structural biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhouyang

    Aspartic acid (Asp), Glutamic acid (Glu) and Tyrosine (Tyr) often play critical roles at the active sites of proteins. Probing the structural dynamics of functionally important Asp/Glu and Tyr provides crucial information for protein functionality. Time-resolved infrared structural biology offers strong advantages for its high structural sensitivity and broad dynamic range (picosecond to kilosecond). In order to connect the vibrational frequencies to specific structures of COO- groups and phenolic --OH groups, such as the number, type, and geometry of hydrogen bond interactions, we develop two sets of vibrational structural markers (VSM), built on the symmetric and asymmetric stretching frequencies for COO- and C-O stretching and C-O-H bending frequencies for phenolic --OH. Extensive quantum physics (density functional theory) based computational studies, combined with site-specific isotope labeling as well as site-directed mutagenesis, and experimental FTIR data on Asp/Glu in proteins, are used to establish a unique correlation between the vibrations and multiple types of hydrogen bonding interactions. Development of those vibrational structural markers significantly enhances the power of time-resolved infrared structural biology for the study of functionally important structural dynamics of COO- from Asp/Glu and phenolic --OH from Tyr residues in proteins, including rhodopsin for biological signaling, bacteriorhodopsin and PYP for proton transfer, photosystem II for energy transformation, and HIV protease for enzymatic catalysis. Furthermore, this approach can be adopted in the future development of vibrational structural markers for other functionally important amino acid residues in proteins, such as arginine (Arg), histidine (His), and serine (Ser).

  14. Molecule-optimized basis sets and Hamiltonians for accelerated electronic structure calculations of atoms and molecules.

    PubMed

    Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-01-16

    Molecule-optimized basis sets, based on approximate natural orbitals, are developed for accelerating the convergence of quantum calculations with strongly correlated (multireferenced) electrons. We use a low-cost approximate solution of the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrödinger equation (ACSE) for the one- and two-electron reduced density matrices (RDMs) to generate an approximate set of natural orbitals for strongly correlated quantum systems. The natural-orbital basis set is truncated to generate a molecule-optimized basis set whose rank matches that of a standard correlation-consistent basis set optimized for the atoms. We show that basis-set truncation by approximate natural orbitals can be viewed as a one-electron unitary transformation of the Hamiltonian operator and suggest an extension of approximate natural-orbital truncations through two-electron unitary transformations of the Hamiltonian operator, such as those employed in the solution of the ACSE. The molecule-optimized basis set from the ACSE improves the accuracy of the equivalent standard atom-optimized basis set at little additional computational cost. We illustrate the method with the potential energy curves of hydrogen fluoride and diatomic nitrogen. Relative to the hydrogen fluoride potential energy curve from the ACSE in a polarized triple-ζ basis set, the ACSE curve in a molecule-optimized basis set, equivalent in size to a polarized double-ζ basis, has a nonparallelity error of 0.0154 au, which is significantly better than the nonparallelity error of 0.0252 au from the polarized double-ζ basis set. PMID:24387056

  15. Development of the field of structural physiology

    PubMed Central

    FUJIYOSHI, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Electron crystallography is especially useful for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins — key molecules with important functions in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique for analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers that closely simulate their natural biological environment. Utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium-cooled specimen stages that were developed through a personal motivation to understand the functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, the structures of membrane proteins can be analyzed at a higher than 3 Å resolution. This review covers four objectives. First, I introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, I recount some of the struggles involved in developing cryo-electron microscopes. Third, I review the structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins mainly by electron crystallography using cryo-electron microscopes. Finally, I discuss multifunctional channels named “adhennels” based on structures analyzed using electron and X-ray crystallography. PMID:26560835

  16. Structural basis of Ornithine Decarboxylase inactivation and accelerated degradation by polyamine sensor Antizyme1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Donghui; Kaan, Hung Yi Kristal; Zheng, Xiaoxia; Tang, Xuhua; He, Yang; Vanessa Tan, Qianmin; Zhang, Neng; Song, Haiwei

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step of polyamine biosynthesis in humans. Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation and are implicated in cellular processes, ranging from DNA replication to apoptosis. Excessive accumulation of polyamines has a cytotoxic effect on cells and elevated level of ODC activity is associated with cancer development. To maintain normal cellular proliferation, regulation of polyamine synthesis is imposed by Antizyme1 (AZ1). The expression of AZ1 is induced by a ribosomal frameshifting mechanism in response to increased intracellular polyamines. AZ1 regulates polyamine homeostasis by inactivating ODC activity and enhancing its degradation. Here, we report the structure of human ODC in complex with N-terminally truncated AZ1 (cAZ1). The structure shows cAZ1 binding to ODC, which occludes the binding of a second molecule of ODC to form the active homodimer. Consequently, the substrate binding site is disrupted and ODC is inactivated. Structural comparison shows that the binding of cAZ1 to ODC causes a global conformational change of ODC and renders its C-terminal region flexible, therefore exposing this region for degradation by the 26S proteasome. Our structure provides the molecular basis for the inactivation of ODC by AZ1 and sheds light on how AZ1 promotes its degradation. PMID:26443277

  17. Clinical leadership development in accelerated baccalaureate nursing students: an education innovation.

    PubMed

    Lekan, Deborah A; Corazzini, Kirsten N; Gilliss, Catherine L; Bailey, Donald E

    2011-01-01

    Nursing faculty members are responsible for assuring competence and safety in the preparation of prelicensure students who are preparing to deliver care in diverse settings. The growing complexity of care and the rapid expansion of knowledge have challenged the adequacy of traditional educational approaches. Proposed solutions have encouraged closer integration of classroom and clinical teaching. This article describes an integrated instructional approach to developing clinical leadership competencies in a cohort of accelerated, second-degree, baccalaureate nursing students. Fifty-six students completed an intensive clinical experience in long-term care settings in which they used evidence on improving care for persons with heart failure to practice the principles of delegation and supervision with nursing staff. The pre- and postassessments indicated improvement in heart failure knowledge and increased readiness for delegation and supervision of certified nursing assistants. As one component of the learning experience, the students completed reflection journals. The entries in the students' journals revealed five themes: (a) low leadership self-efficacy, (b) managing the credibility gap, (c) flexibility in communication strategies, (d) RN accountability in delegation and supervision, and (e) knowledge dissemination with diverse nursing staff. Students and faculty judged the learning experience to be successful and supported the experience for future cohorts of students. This report is one example of how innovative learning experiences could be developed to increase the "real-world" aspects of clinical care within a multidisciplinary team context for the entry-level learner. PMID:21767817

  18. Crizotinib: from discovery to accelerated development to front-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Blackhall, F; Cappuzzo, F

    2016-09-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with a poor prognosis and low survival rates, providing a strong rationale for the development of new treatment options. The discovery of ALK gene rearrangements in a subset of NSCLC specimens and the identification and development of the first-in-class ALK inhibitor crizotinib provided a personalised treatment option for patients with advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. Crizotinib demonstrated rapid and durable responses in advanced ALK-positive NSCLC patients in phase I and II studies, leading to accelerated FDA approval. Subsequent evaluation in phase III studies showed that crizotinib improved progression-free survival compared with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in previously untreated patients and compared with pemetrexed or docetaxel in previously treated patients. Crizotinib was shown to have an acceptable safety profile and also to improve quality of life and symptom scores. Overall, crizotinib has been shown to provide a valuable first- and second-line treatment option and is now the first-line standard of care for patients with advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:27573754

  19. MafB deficiency accelerates the development of obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mai Thi Nhu; Hamada, Michito; Nakamura, Megumi; Jeon, Hyojung; Kamei, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Kulathunga, Kaushalya; Lin, Yuan-Yu; Fujisawa, Kumiko; Kudo, Takashi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    MafB, a transcription factor expressed selectively in macrophages, has important roles in some macrophage-related diseases, especially in atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which hematopoietic-specific MafB deficiency induces the development of obesity. Wild-type and hematopoietic cell-specific Mafb-deficient mice were fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks. The Mafb-deficient mice exhibited higher body weights and faster rates of body weight increase than control mice. The Mafb-deficient mice also had a higher percentage of body fat than the wild-type mice, due to increased adipocyte size and serum cholesterol levels. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed a reduction in apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM) in Mafb-deficient adipose tissue. AIM is known as an inhibitor of lipogenesis in adipocytes and is expressed in adipose tissue macrophages. Collectively, our data suggest that Mafb deficiency in hematopoietic cells accelerates the development of obesity. PMID:27419056

  20. Development of a subway operation incident delay model using accelerated failure time approaches.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jinxian; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Xuedong; Meng, Qiang

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to develop a subway operational incident delay model using the parametric accelerated time failure (AFT) approach. Six parametric AFT models including the log-logistic, lognormal and Weibull models, with fixed and random parameters are built based on the Hong Kong subway operation incident data from 2005 to 2012, respectively. In addition, the Weibull model with gamma heterogeneity is also considered to compare the model performance. The goodness-of-fit test results show that the log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is most suitable for estimating the subway incident delay. First, the results show that a longer subway operation incident delay is highly correlated with the following factors: power cable failure, signal cable failure, turnout communication disruption and crashes involving a casualty. Vehicle failure makes the least impact on the increment of subway operation incident delay. According to these results, several possible measures, such as the use of short-distance and wireless communication technology (e.g., Wifi and Zigbee) are suggested to shorten the delay caused by subway operation incidents. Finally, the temporal transferability test results show that the developed log-logistic AFT model with random parameters is stable over time. PMID:25171521