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Sample records for accelerator target materials

  1. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies evaluated and presents the model for tritium retention in aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy tritium production targets.

  2. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H. B. Jr.; Iyer, N. C.; Louthan, M. R. Jr.

    1995-09-15

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from, the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. The model assumed that tritium atoms, formed by the 6Li(n,a)3He reaction, were produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly became supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes

  3. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, H. B.; Iyer, N. C.; Louthan, M. R.

    1995-09-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from, the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. The model assumed that tritium atoms, formed by the 6Li(n,a)3He reaction, were produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly became supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes

  4. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  5. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ∼800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set. PMID:27079901

  6. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  7. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  8. Assessment of candidates for target window material in accelerator-driven molybdenum-99 production

    SciTech Connect

    Strons, Philip; Bailey, James; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Vandegrift, George

    2016-10-01

    NorthStar Medical Technologies is pursuing production of an important medical isotope, Mo-99, through a photo-nuclear reaction of a Mo-100 target using a high-power electron accelerator. The current target utilizes an Inconel 718 window. The purpose of this study was to evaluate other candidate materials for the target window, which separates the high-pressure helium gas inside the target from the vacuum inside the accelerator beamline and is subjected to significant stress. Our initial analysis assessed the properties (density, thermal conductivity, maximum stress, minimum window thickness, maximum temperature, and figure of merit) for a range of materials, from which the three most promising were chosen: Inconel 718, 250 maraging steel, and standard-grade beryllium. These materials were subjected to further analysis to determine the effects of thermal and mechanical strain versus beam power at varying thicknesses. Both beryllium and the maraging steel were calculated to withstand more than twice as high beam power than Inconel 718.

  9. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, John J.; Buksa, John J.

    1995-09-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment. Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  10. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  11. STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TARGET/BLANKET SYSTEM COMPONENT MATERIALS FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    W. JOHNSON; R. RYDER; P. RITTENHOUSE

    2001-01-01

    The design of target/blanket system components for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant is dependent on the development of materials properties data specified by the designer. These data are needed to verify that component designs are adequate. The adequacy of the data will be related to safety, performance, and economic considerations, and to other requirements that may be deemed necessary by customers and regulatory bodies. The data required may already be in existence, as in the open technical literature, or may need to be generated, as is often the case for the design of new systems operating under relatively unique conditions. The designers' starting point for design data needs is generally some form of design criteria used in conjunction with a specified set of loading conditions and associated performance requirements. Most criteria are aimed at verifying the structural adequacy of the component, and often take the form of national or international standards such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B and PV Code) or the French Nuclear Structural Requirements (RCC-MR). Whether or not there are specific design data needs associated with the use of these design criteria will largely depend on the uniqueness of the conditions of operation of the component. A component designed in accordance with the ASME B and PV Code, where no unusual environmental conditions exist, will utilize well-documented, statistically-evaluated developed in conjunction with the Code, and will not be likely to have any design data needs. On the other hand, a component to be designed to operate under unique APT conditions, is likely to have significant design data needs. Such a component is also likely to require special design criteria for verification of its structural adequacy, specifically accounting for changes in materials properties which may occur during exposure in the service environment. In such a situation it is common for the design criteria and

  12. ACCELERATOR TARGET POSITIONER AND CONTROL CIRCUIT THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Stone, K.F.; Force, R.J.; Olson, W.W.; Cagle, D.S.

    1959-12-15

    An apparatus is described for inserting and retracting a target material with respect to the internal beam of a charged particle accelerator and to circuitry for controlling the timing and motion of the target placement. Two drive coils are mounted on the shaft of a target holder arm and disposed within the accelerator magnetic field with one coil at right angles to the other. Control circuitry alternately connects each coil to a current source and to a varying shorting resistance whereby the coils interchangeably produce driving and braking forces which swing the target arm within a ninety degree arc. The target is thus moved into the beam and away from it at high speeds and is brought to rest after each movement without whiplash or vibration.

  13. Accelerating advanced-materials commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maine, Elicia; Seegopaul, Purnesh

    2016-05-01

    Long commercialization times, high capital costs and sustained uncertainty deter investment in innovation for advanced materials. With appropriate strategies, technology and market uncertainties can be reduced, and the commercialization of advanced materials accelerated.

  14. Accelerator breeder with uranium, thorium target

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Powell, J.; Kouts, H.

    1983-01-01

    An accelerator breeder, that uses a low-enriched fuel as the target material, can produce substantial amounts of fissile material and electric power. A study of H/sub 2/O- and D/sub 2/O-cooled, UO/sub 2/, U, (depleted U), or thorium indicates that U-metal fuel produces a good fissile production rate and electrical power of about 60% higher than UO/sub 2/ fuel. Thorium fuel has the same order of magnitude as UO/sub 2/ fuel for fissile-fuel production, but the generating electric power is substantially lower than in a UO/sub 2/ reactor. Enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel increases the generating electric power but not the fissile-material production rate. The Na-cooled breeder target has many advantages over the H/sub 2/O-cooled breeder target.

  15. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  16. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  17. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes > 1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa ("displacement-per-atom", the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  18. Accelerated Taylor plumes for MIF targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Parks, H. L.; Rock, A. B.

    2015-11-01

    The SSX plasma device has been converted to a 2.5 m merging plasma wind tunnel configuration. Experiments are underway to study merging and stagnation of high density, helical Taylor states to employ as a potential target for magneto-inertial fusion. Eventually, SSX Taylor states will be accelerated to over 100 km / s and compressed to small volumes either by stagnation or merging. Initial un-accelerated merging studies produce peak proton densities of 5 ×1015cm-3 . Densities are measured with a precision quadrature He-Ne laser interferometer. Typical merged plasma parameters are Ti = 20 eV, Te = 10 eV, B = 0 . 4 T with lifetimes of 100 μs. Results from a single prototype acceleration coil will be presented, as well as initial simulation studies of Taylor state plasma acceleration using multiple staged, pulsed theta-pinch coils. Work supported by DOE ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  19. Target and accelerator developments at CTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvord, C. W.; Mendez, A. J.; Wittner, D. E.

    2001-07-01

    The accelerator products marketed by CTI have exclusively focused on proton-only, low energy (11 MeV) designs. This choice best suited the research customer, interested in producing several doses a day of a variety of positron emitting compounds. The PET cyclotron market has evolved into a high output, cost driven, competitive radiotracer production environment. A thoughtful analysis of the choices of energy and particle reveals that an 11 MeV proton accelerator outfitted with target changers and automated target loading and unloading equipment is still the best choice for FDG distribution. However technological innovations are required to face the challenges of the rapidly growing PET radiotracer business. Modifications to the CTI line of accelerators developed to face this evolving need will be presented.

  20. Accelerator Science: Collider vs. Fixed Target

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-09-07

    Particle physics experiments employ high energy particle accelerators to make their measurements. However there are many kinds of particle accelerators with many interesting techniques. One important dichotomy is whether one takes a particle beam and have it hit a stationary target of atoms, or whether one takes two counter rotating beams of particles and smashes them together head on. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of these two powerful methods of exploring the rules of the universe.

  1. Accelerator Science: Collider vs. Fixed Target

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-09-21

    Particle physics experiments employ high energy particle accelerators to make their measurements. However there are many kinds of particle accelerators with many interesting techniques. One important dichotomy is whether one takes a particle beam and have it hit a stationary target of atoms, or whether one takes two counter rotating beams of particles and smashes them together head on. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains the pros and cons of these two powerful methods of exploring the rules of the universe.

  2. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  3. Target Housing Material Options

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert

    2016-02-11

    With gas cooling, heat transfer coefficients are low compared to water. The benefit of gas from a heat transfer point of view is that there is really no upper temperature limit for the coolant, as compared to water, which is limited ultimately by the critical point, and in practice the critical heat flux. In our case with parallel flow channels, water is limited to even lower operating limits by nucleate boiling. So gas can get as hot as the containment material will allow, but to get the density and heat transfer up to something reasonable, we must also increase pressure, thus increasing stress on the containment, namely the front and back faces. We are designing to ASME BPVC, which, for most materials allows a maximum stress of UTS/3. So we want the highest possible UTS. For reference, the front face stress in the 12 mm target at 300 psi was about 90 MPa. The inconel 718 allowable stress at 900°C is 1/3 of 517 or 172 MPa. So we are in a very safe place, but the uTS is dropping rapidly with temperature above 900°C. As we increase target diameter, the challenge will be to keep the stress down. We are probably looking at keeping the allowable at or above the present value, and at as high a temperature as possible.

  4. Intercepting accelerated moving targets: effects of practice on movement performance.

    PubMed

    Fialho, João V A P; Tresilian, James R

    2017-02-14

    When performing a rapid manual interception, targets moving under constant motion are often intercepted with greater accuracy when compared to targets moving under accelerated motion. Usually, accelerated targets are timed too late and decelerating ones too early. The present experiment sought to investigate whether these differences in performance when intercepting targets moving under constant and accelerated motions change after a short period of practice. The task involved striking targets that moved along a straight track by moving forward a manipulandum that moved along a slide perpendicular to the target's motion. Participants were allocated to one of the three experimental groups, defined according to the type of motion of the moving targets: constant speed, constant acceleration, and constant deceleration. Results showed that after some practice participants were able to intercept (positive and negative) accelerating moving targets as accurately as constant speed targets. These results suggest that people might be able to learn how to intercept accelerating targets, corroborating the results of some recent studies.

  5. Electron Beam/Converter Target Interactions in Radiographic Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J; Caporaso, G; Chambers, F; Chen, Y-J; Falabella, S; Goldin, F; Guethlein, G; Ho, D; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2003-05-27

    Linear induction accelerators used in X-ray radiography have single-pulse parameters of the order 20 MeV of electron beam energy, 2 kA of beam current, pulse lengths of 50-100 ns, and spot sizes of 1-2 mm. The thermal energy deposited in a bremsstrahlung converter target made of tantalum from such a pulse is {approx}80 kJ/cc, more than enough to bring the target material to a partially ionized state. The tail end of a single beam pulse, or any subsequent pulse in a multi-pulse train, undergoes a number of interactions with the target that can affect beam transport and radiographic performance. Positive ions extracted from the target plasma by the electron beam space charge can affect the beam focus and centroid stability. As the target expands on the inter-pulse time scale, the integrated line density of material decreases, eventually affecting the X-ray output of the system. If the target plume becomes sufficiently large, beam transport through it is affected by macroscopic charge and current neutralization effects and microscopic beam/plasma instability mechanisms. We will present a survey of some of these interactions, as well as some results of an extensive experimental and theoretical campaign to understand the practical amelioration of these effects, carried out at the ETA-II accelerator facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  6. Cybermaterials: materials by design and accelerated insertion of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Olson, Gregory B.

    2016-02-01

    Cybermaterials innovation entails an integration of Materials by Design and accelerated insertion of materials (AIM), which transfers studio ideation into industrial manufacturing. By assembling a hierarchical architecture of integrated computational materials design (ICMD) based on materials genomic fundamental databases, the ICMD mechanistic design models accelerate innovation. We here review progress in the development of linkage models of the process-structure-property-performance paradigm, as well as related design accelerating tools. Extending the materials development capability based on phase-level structural control requires more fundamental investment at the level of the Materials Genome, with focus on improving applicable parametric design models and constructing high-quality databases. Future opportunities in materials genomic research serving both Materials by Design and AIM are addressed.

  7. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-07-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and, at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  8. New Advanced Dielectric Materials for Accelerator Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.

    2010-11-04

    We present our recent results on the development and experimental testing of advanced dielectric materials that are capable of supporting the high RF electric fields generated by electron beams or pulsed high power microwaves. These materials have been optimized or specially designed for accelerator applications. The materials discussed here include low loss microwave ceramics, quartz, Chemical Vapor Deposition diamonds and nonlinear Barium Strontium Titanate based ferroelectrics.

  9. Accelerating materials property predictions using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Wang, Chenchen; Jiang, Xun; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Ramprasad, Ramamurthy

    2013-09-30

    The materials discovery process can be significantly expedited and simplified if we can learn effectively from available knowledge and data. In the present contribution, we show that efficient and accurate prediction of a diverse set of properties of material systems is possible by employing machine (or statistical) learning methods trained on quantum mechanical computations in combination with the notions of chemical similarity. Using a family of one-dimensional chain systems, we present a general formalism that allows us to discover decision rules that establish a mapping between easily accessible attributes of a system and its properties. It is shown that fingerprints based on either chemo-structural (compositional and configurational information) or the electronic charge density distribution can be used to make ultra-fast, yet accurate, property predictions. Harnessing such learning paradigms extends recent efforts to systematically explore and mine vast chemical spaces, and can significantly accelerate the discovery of new application-specific materials.

  10. Accelerated Aging of Polymer Composite Bridge Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Nancy Margaret; Blackwood, Larry Gene; Torres, Lucinda Laine; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo; Yoder, Timothy Scott

    1999-03-01

    Accelerated aging research on samples of composite material and candidate ultraviolet (UV) protective coatings is determining the effects of six environmental factors on material durability. Candidate fastener materials are being evaluated to determine corrosion rates and crevice corrosion effects at load-bearing joints. This work supports field testing of a 30-ft long, 18-ft wide polymer matrix composite (PMC) bridge at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Durability results and sensor data from tests with live loads provide information required for determining the cost/benefit measures to use in life-cycle planning, determining a maintenance strategy, establishing applicable inspection techniques, and establishing guidelines, standards, and acceptance criteria for PMC bridges for use in the transportation infrastructure.

  11. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  12. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-07-20

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  13. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  14. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Austin, K. N.; Waisman, E. M.; Hickman, R. J.; Davis, J.-P.; Haill, T. A.; Knudson, M. D.; Seagle, C. T.; Brown, J. L.; Goerz, D. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Goldlust, J. A.; Cravey, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM), circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  15. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel

    2013-05-06

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40{sup th} year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  16. Acceleration of high charge-state target ions in high-intensity laser interactions with sub-micron targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuffey, C.; Raymond, A.; Batson, T.; Hua, R.; Petrov, G. M.; Kim, J.; Krauland, C. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied laser acceleration of ions from Si3N4 and Al foils ranging in thickness from 1800 to 8 nm with particular interest in acceleration of ions from the bulk of the target. The study includes results of experiments conducted with the HERCULES laser with pulse duration 40 fs and intensity 3 × 1020 W cm-2 and corresponding two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. When the target thickness was reduced the distribution of ion species heavier than protons transitioned from being dominated by carbon contaminant ions of low ionization states to being dominated by high ionization states of bulk ions (such as Si12+) and carbon. Targets in the range 50-150 nm yielded dramatically greater particle number and higher ion maximum energy for these high ionization states compared to thicker targets typifying the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) regime. The high charge states persisted for the thinnest targets, but the accelerated particle numbers decreased for targets 35 nm and thinner. This transition to an enhanced ion TNSA regime, which more efficiently generates ion beams from the bulk target material, is also seen in the simulations.

  17. Modification of the argon stripping target of the tandem accelerator.

    PubMed

    Makarov, A; Ostreinov, Yu; Taskaev, S; Vobly, P

    2015-12-01

    The tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation has been proposed and developed in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. Negative hydrogen ions are accelerated by the positive 1MV potential of the high-voltage electrode, converted into protons in the gas stripping target inside the electrode, and then protons are accelerated again by the same potential. A stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy, 1.6 mA current, 0.1% energy monochromaticity, and 0.5% current stability is obtained now. To conduct Boron Neutron Capture Therapy it is planned to increase the proton beam current to at least 3 mA. The paper presents the results of experimental studies clarifying the reasons for limiting the current, and gives suggestions for modifying the gas stripping target in order to increase the proton beam current along with the stability of the accelerator.

  18. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  19. Accelerated nonlinear multichannel ultrasonic tomographic imaging using target sparseness.

    PubMed

    Chengdong Dong; Yuanwei Jin; Enyue Lu

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an accelerated iterative Landweber method for nonlinear ultrasonic tomographic imaging in a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) configuration under a sparsity constraint on the image. The proposed method introduces the emerging MIMO signal processing techniques and target sparseness constraints in the traditional computational imaging field, thus significantly improves the speed of image reconstruction compared with the conventional imaging method while producing high quality images. Using numerical examples, we demonstrate that incorporating prior knowledge about the imaging field such as target sparseness accelerates significantly the convergence of the iterative imaging method, which provides considerable benefits to real-time tomographic imaging applications.

  20. Enhanced Ion Acceleration from Micro-tube Structured Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    We present an enhanced ion acceleration method that leverages recent advancements in 3D printing for target fabrication. Using the three-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation code Virtual Laser-Plasma Lab (VLPL), we model the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with a micro-tube plasma (MTP) structured target. When compared to flat foils, the MTP target enhances the maximum proton energy by a factor of about 4. The ion enhancement is attributed to two main factors: high energy electrons extracted from the tube structure enhancing the accelerating field and light intensification within the MTP target increasing the laser intensity at the location of the foil. We also present results on ion energy scaling with micro-tube diameter and incident laser pulse intensity. This work was supported by the AFOSR under contract No. FA9550-14-1-0085.

  1. The Accelerator Production of Tritium Materials Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Sommer, Walter F.; James, Michael R.; Romero, Tobias J.; Lopez, Manuel R.; Zimmermann, Eugene; Ledbetter, James M.

    2000-10-15

    A materials qualification program has been developed to irradiate and test candidate materials (alloy 718, Type 316L, and Type 304L stainless steel, modified Fe9Cr-1Mo(T91), Al-6061-T6, and Al-5052-O) for use in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) target and blanket. The irradiations were performed in prototypic proton and neutron spectra at prototypic temperatures (50 to 160 deg. C). The study used the 800-MeV, 1.0-mA proton accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, which produces a Gaussian beam with 2 sigma = 3 cm. The experiment geometry is arranged to contain near-prototypic modules of the tungsten neutron source and the lead and aluminum blanket as well as mechanical test specimens of candidate APT materials. The particle spectrum varies throughout the irradiation volume; specimens are exposed to protons and a variety of mixed proton and neutron spectra, depending on the specimen's position relative to the beam center. These specimens have been irradiated for >3600 h to a maximum proton fluence of 4 x 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} in the center of the proton beam. Specimens will yield data on the effect of proton irradiation, to high dose, on material properties from tensile tests, three-point bend tests, fracture toughness tests, pressurized tubes, U-bend stress corrosion cracking specimens, corrosion measurements, and microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy specimens. Results from these studies are applicable to all spallation neutron sources now in operation and under consideration, including the Spallation Neutron Source, the European Spallation Source, and The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste project.

  2. Ion acceleration by femtosecond laser pulses in small multispecies targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikal, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A. A.; Brantov, A. V.

    2008-05-01

    Ion acceleration by ultrashort intense femtosecond laser pulses (˜4×1019W/cm2, ˜30fs) in small targets of uniform chemical composition of two ion species (protons and carbon C4+ ions) is studied theoretically via a particle-in-cell code with two spatial and three velocity components. Energy spectra of accelerated ions, the number and divergence of fast protons, are compared for various target shapes (cylinder, flat foil, curved foil) and density profiles. Dips and peaks are observed in proton energy spectra due to mutual interaction between two ion species. The simulations demonstrate that maximum energy of fast protons depends on the efficiency of laser absorption and the cross section of the hot electron cloud behind the target. A rear-side plasma density ramp can substantially decrease the energy of fast ions and simultaneously enhance their number. These results are compared with analytical estimates and with previously published experiments.

  3. Commentary: The Materials Project: A materials genome approach to accelerating materials innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anubhav; Ong, Shyue Ping; Hautier, Geoffroy; Chen, Wei; Richards, William Davidson; Dacek, Stephen; Cholia, Shreyas; Gunter, Dan; Skinner, David; Ceder, Gerbrand; Persson, Kristin A.

    2013-07-01

    Accelerating the discovery of advanced materials is essential for human welfare and sustainable, clean energy. In this paper, we introduce the Materials Project (www.materialsproject.org), a core program of the Materials Genome Initiative that uses high-throughput computing to uncover the properties of all known inorganic materials. This open dataset can be accessed through multiple channels for both interactive exploration and data mining. The Materials Project also seeks to create open-source platforms for developing robust, sophisticated materials analyses. Future efforts will enable users to perform ``rapid-prototyping'' of new materials in silico, and provide researchers with new avenues for cost-effective, data-driven materials design.

  4. Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Georg; Baek, Inseok; Blideanu, Valentin; Lawton, Don; Mantica, Paul F.; Morrissey, David J.; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Sherrill, Bradley S.; Zeller, Albert; Beene, James R; Burgess, Tom; Carter, Kenneth; Carrol, Adam; Conner, David; Gabriel, Tony A; Mansur, Louis K; Remec, Igor; Rennich, Mark J; Stracener, Daniel W; Wendel, Mark W; Ahle, Larry; Boles, Jason; Reyes, Susana; Stein, Werner; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    The planned rare isotope accelerator facility RIA in the US would become the most powerful radioactive beam facility in the world. RIA s driver accelerator will be a device capable of providing beams from protons to uranium at energies of at least 400MeV per nucleon, with beam power up to 400 kW. Radioactive beam production relies on both the in-flight separation of fast beam fragments and on the ISOL technique. In both cases the high beam power poses major challenges for target technology and handling and on the design of the beam production areas. This paper will give a brief overview of RIA and discuss aspects of ongoing conceptual design work for the RIA target areas.

  5. Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B.; Belov, V.; Taskaev, S.

    2006-05-01

    Pilot innovative accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy of cancer is under construction now at the Budker Institute. One of the main elements of the facility is lithium target producing neutrons via threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at 10 mA proton beam with energies of 1.915 MeV or 2.5 MeV. In the present report, choice of target was substantiated. The main problems of lithium target were determined to be: 7Be radioactive isotope activation, keeping lithium layer solid, presence of photons resulted from proton inelastic scattering on lithium nuclei, and radiation blistering. The results of thermal testing of target prototype, investigation of radiation blistering and several simulations are presented. It becomes clear that water is preferable for cooling this target, and that the lithium target 10 cm in diameter is able to run up to 25 kW proton beam before melting. The conception of optimal target is proposed: thin and easy to detach metal disk 10 cm in diameter, evaporated with thin layer of pure lithium from the side of proton beam exposure: its back is intensively cooled with turbulent water flow to maintain lithium layer solid. Design of target for the neutron source constructed at BINP is shown. Conceptions of radiation protection and neutrons, γ-rays and α- particles diagnostics are presented. The immediate plans on obtaining epithermal neutron beam are declared.

  6. Deuteron frozen-spin- polarized target for nd experiments at the VdG accelerator of Charles University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, N. S.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Brož, J.; Černý, J.; Doležal, Z.; Fedorov, A. N.; Gurevich, G. M.; Ivanov, M. P.; Kodyš, P.; Kubík, P.; Kuzmin, E. S.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lehar, F.; Lukhanin, O. O.; Matafonov, V. N.; Neganov, A. B.; Pisarev, I. L.; Švejda, J.; Shilov, S. N.; Usov, Yu. A.; Wilhelm, I.

    2008-08-01

    A frozen-spin- polarized deuteron target cooled by the 3He/ 4He dilution refrigerator is described. Fully deuterated 1,2-propanediol was used as a target material. Deuteron vector polarization about 40% was obtained for the target in the shape of a cylinder of 2-cm diameter and 6-cm length. The target is intended for a study of 3N interactions at the polarized neutron beam generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator at the Charles University in Prague.

  7. Closed loop spray cooling apparatus. [for particle accelerator targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Schwab, W. B.; Furman, E. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A closed loop apparatus for spraying coolant against the back of a radiation target is described. The coolant was circulated through a closed loop with a bubble of inert gas being maintained around the spray. Mesh material was disposed between the bubble and the surface of the liquid coolant which was below the bubble at a predetermined level. In a second embodiment, no inert gas was used, the bubble consisting of a vapor produced when the coolant was sprayed against the target.

  8. Materials for Accelerator Technologies Beyond the Niobium Family

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, Lance; Larbalestier, David; Ghosh, Arup; Tollestrup, Alvin; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Three niobium-based materials make up the entire present portfolio of superconducting technology for accelerators: Nb-Ti and Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet wires and pure niobium for RF cavities. Because these materials are at a high level of maturity, limits imposed by the boundaries of their superconductivity constrain the energy reach of accelerators to several TeV. We sketch here a plan for targeted development of emerging higher field and higher temperature superconductors that could enable accelerators at significantly higher energies. Niobium-based superconductors are the crucial enablers of present accelerators. The Nb-Ti LHC dipole and quadrupole wires, with transition temperature T{sub c} of 9 K and upper critical field H{sub c2} of 15 T, represent the highest form of superconductor strand art: massive, quarter-ton conductor billets are drawn from 300 mm diameter to {approx}1 mm as a single, multi-kilometer-long piece, while retaining uniformity of the several thousand Nb-Ti filaments to within 5% at the scale of a few micrometers. Strands are twisted into fully transposed cables with virtually no loss, preserving a carefully tuned nanostructure that generates the high flux-pinning forces and high current densities to enable high magnetic fields. Nb{sub 3}Sn, with twice the T{sub c} and H{sub c2}, is now approaching this level of conductor art, where over the last 5 years the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the Next European Dipole (NED) program have demonstrated that Nb{sub 3}Sn can be made into 4 meter long quadrupoles with 12 T fields and 250 T/m gradients. Linear accelerators at TJNAF, ORNL (SNS), and under construction for the European XFEL exploit niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology, with gradients at {approx}20 MV/m. Tremendous research and development is underway to realize high-power goals for Project X at FNAL and for a possible ILC at 35 MV/m gradients. Despite these impressive achievements, the very maturity of these

  9. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  10. SATIF-2 shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last 50 years from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged, such as increased particle beams intensities, higher flexibility, etc., giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These proceedings review recent progress in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities, and evaluate advancements with respect to international co-operation in this field.

  11. A Bridge for Accelerating Materials by Design

    DOE PAGES

    Sumpter, Bobby G.; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Potok, Thomas E.; ...

    2015-11-25

    Recent technical advances in the area of nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and scattering/diffraction have led to unprecedented capabilities for investigating materials structural, dynamical and functional characteristics. In addition, recent advances in computational algorithms and computer capacities that are orders of magnitude larger/faster have enabled large-scale simulations of materials properties starting with nothing but the identity of the atomic species and the basic principles of quantum- and statistical-mechanics and thermodynamics. Along with these advances, an explosion of high-resolution data has emerged. This confluence of capabilities and rise of big data offer grand opportunities for advancing materials sciences but also introduce several challenges.more » In this editorial we identify challenges impeding progress towards advancing materials by design (e.g., the design/discovery of materials with improved properties/performance), possible solutions, and provide examples of scientific issues that can be addressed by using a tightly integrated approach where theory and experiments are linked through big-deep data.« less

  12. A Bridge for Accelerating Materials by Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G.; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Potok, Thomas E.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-11-25

    Recent technical advances in the area of nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and scattering/diffraction have led to unprecedented capabilities for investigating materials structural, dynamical and functional characteristics. In addition, recent advances in computational algorithms and computer capacities that are orders of magnitude larger/faster have enabled large-scale simulations of materials properties starting with nothing but the identity of the atomic species and the basic principles of quantum- and statistical-mechanics and thermodynamics. Along with these advances, an explosion of high-resolution data has emerged. This confluence of capabilities and rise of big data offer grand opportunities for advancing materials sciences but also introduce several challenges. In this editorial we identify challenges impeding progress towards advancing materials by design (e.g., the design/discovery of materials with improved properties/performance), possible solutions, and provide examples of scientific issues that can be addressed by using a tightly integrated approach where theory and experiments are linked through big-deep data.

  13. A bridge for accelerating materials by design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumpter, Bobby G.; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Potok, Thomas; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-11-01

    Recent technical advances in the area of nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy and scattering/diffraction have led to unprecedented capabilities for investigating materials structural, dynamical and functional characteristics. In addition, recent advances in computational algorithms and computer capacities that are orders of magnitude larger/faster have enabled large-scale simulations of materials properties starting with nothing but the identity of the atomic species and the basic principles of quantum and statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Along with these advances, an explosion of high-resolution data has emerged. This confluence of capabilities and rise of big data offer grand opportunities for advancing materials sciences but also introduce several challenges. In this perspective, we identify challenges impeding progress towards advancing materials by design (e.g., the design/discovery of materials with improved properties/performance), possible solutions and provide examples of scientific issues that can be addressed using a tightly integrated approach where theory and experiments are linked through big-deep data.

  14. Genesis Concentrator Target Particle Contamination Mapping and Material Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of surface particles were found to be < 5 microns in diameter with increasing numbers close to the optical resolution limit of 0.3 microns. Acceleration grid EDS results show that the majority of materials appear to be from the SRC shell and SLA materials which include carbon-carbon fibers and Si-rich microspheres in a possible silicone binder. Other major debris material from the SRC included white paint, kapton, collector array fragments, and Al. Image analysis also revealed that SRC materials were also found mixed with the Utah mud and salt deposits. The EDS analysis of the acceleration grid showed that particles < 1 m where generally carbon based particles. Chemical cleaning techniques with Xylene and HF in an ultrasonic bath are currently being investigated for removal of small particles by the Genesis science team as well as ultra-pure water megasonic cleaning by the JSC team [4]. Removal of organic contamination from target materials is also being investigated by the science team with the use of UV-ozone cleaning devices at JSC and Open University [5]. In preparation for solar wind oxygen analyses at UCLA and Open University [1, 2], surface particle contamination on three Genesis concentrator targets was closely examined to evaluate cleaning strategies. Two silicon carbide (Genesis sample # 60001 and 60003) and one chemical vapor deposited (CVD) 13C concentrator target (60002) were imaged and mosaic mapped with optical microscopes. The resulting full target mosaic images and particle feature maps were subsequently compared with non-flight, but flight-like, concentrator targets and sample return capsule (SRC) materials. Contamination found on the flown concentrator acceleration grid was further examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle identification was subsequently compared with the optical images from the flown targets. Figure 1 show that all three targets imaged in this report

  15. Minimization of target positioning error in accelerator-based radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Low, D A; Li, Z; Drzymala, R E

    1995-04-01

    The stereotactic radiosurgery system used at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology is patterned after that developed at the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, MA) and uses the Brown-Roberts-Wells computed tomography (CT) stereotactic system. The patient's head is attached to a stand that rotates with the treatment couch. The irradiation is conducted using a set of converging arcs of irradiation. Because of mechanical limitations, no accelerator or treatment couch is capable of placing the center of the radiation beam at precisely the same point for all gantry and couch angles and a compromise must be made when locating the nominal isocenter. The stand settings are checked by placing a radiopaque QA sphere at the desired target location. The QA sphere is imaged using a series of eight films exposed at a set of couch and gantry angles that encompass the treatment angles. The distances between the QA sphere image and the center of the radiation field indicate if the correct coordinates were set on the stand and if the radiation beam converges to a sufficiently small region (< 0.1-cm diameter) for treatment. A mathematical procedure has been developed to use the film-measured position errors to determine a stand offset that will minimize the distance between the accelerator isocenter and the target. The technique is capable of reducing the average placement error, as measured by imaging the QA sphere, to 0.035 cm with a maximum deviation of 0.07 cm.

  16. Prospects of target nanostructuring for laser proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübcke, Andrea; Andreev, Alexander A.; Höhm, Sandra; Grunwald, Ruediger; Ehrentraut, Lutz; Schnürer, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    In laser-based proton acceleration, nanostructured targets hold the promise to allow for significantly boosted proton energies due to strong increase of laser absorption. We used laser-induced periodic surface structures generated in-situ as a very fast and economic way to produce nanostructured targets capable of high-repetition rate applications. Both in experiment and theory, we investigate the impact of nanostructuring on the proton spectrum for different laser–plasma conditions. Our experimental data show that the nanostructures lead to a significant enhancement of absorption over the entire range of laser plasma conditions investigated. At conditions that do not allow for efficient laser absorption by plane targets, i.e. too steep plasma gradients, nanostructuring is found to significantly enhance the proton cutoff energy and conversion efficiency. In contrast, if the plasma gradient is optimized for laser absorption of the plane target, the nanostructure-induced absorption increase is not reflected in higher cutoff energies. Both, simulation and experiment point towards the energy transfer from the laser to the hot electrons as bottleneck.

  17. Prospects of target nanostructuring for laser proton acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Lübcke, Andrea; Andreev, Alexander A.; Höhm, Sandra; Grunwald, Ruediger; Ehrentraut, Lutz; Schnürer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In laser-based proton acceleration, nanostructured targets hold the promise to allow for significantly boosted proton energies due to strong increase of laser absorption. We used laser-induced periodic surface structures generated in-situ as a very fast and economic way to produce nanostructured targets capable of high-repetition rate applications. Both in experiment and theory, we investigate the impact of nanostructuring on the proton spectrum for different laser–plasma conditions. Our experimental data show that the nanostructures lead to a significant enhancement of absorption over the entire range of laser plasma conditions investigated. At conditions that do not allow for efficient laser absorption by plane targets, i.e. too steep plasma gradients, nanostructuring is found to significantly enhance the proton cutoff energy and conversion efficiency. In contrast, if the plasma gradient is optimized for laser absorption of the plane target, the nanostructure-induced absorption increase is not reflected in higher cutoff energies. Both, simulation and experiment point towards the energy transfer from the laser to the hot electrons as bottleneck. PMID:28290479

  18. Enhancing Target Normal Sheath Accelerated Ions with Micro-structured Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kevin; Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Rubin, Trevor; Handler, Abraham; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Daskalova, Rebecca; Cochran, Ginevra; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) of ions has been widely studied due to its fundamental importance, use as a probe, and for possible applications such as cancer therapy and neutron generation. Much of this work has been conducted on thin foils with peak ion energy and yield optimized using laser parameters such as energy and spot size. Micro-structured targets, however, have demonstrated increased peak ion energy and yield by controlling and enhancing mechanisms preferential to TNSA. Novel micro-structured targets were developed using optical lithography techniques on thin substrates at the OSU NanoSystem Laboratory. Variable structure height (0.5-2 micron) and transverse patterning (up to 1 micron resolution) permit the survey of a range of structured target variables in the study of ion acceleration. We describe the development of these targets and an experiment investigating the enhancement of TNSA ions from lithography produced micro-structured targets conducted at the Scarlet Laser Facility. Experimental results show increased proton and Carbon yield >2 MeV and higher peak Carbon energy from structured targets. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  19. Investigation of Lead Target Nuclei Used on Accelerator-Driven Systems for Tritium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Aydin, A.

    2012-02-01

    High-current proton accelerators are being researched at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other laboratories for accelerator production of tritium, transmuting long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived products, converting excess plutonium, and producing energy. These technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. Through ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions, neutrons are produced and are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial fusion power plant. Rubbia succeeded in a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier. This plant is to be known the accelerator-driven system (ADS). The ADS can be used for production of neutrons in spallation neutron source and they can act as an intense neutron source in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, capable of incinerating nuclear waste and of producing energy. Thorium and Uranium are nuclear fuels and Lead, Bismuth, Tungsten are the target nuclei in these reactor systems. The spallation targets can be Pb, Bi, W, etc. isotopes and these target material can be liquid or solid. Naturally Lead includes the 204Pb (%1.42), 206Pb (%24.1), 207Pb (%22.1) and 208Pb (%52.3) isotopes. The design of ADS systems and also a fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems require the knowledge of a wide range of better data. In this study, by using Hartree-Fock method with an effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions rms nuclear charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, neutron radii and neutron skin thickness were calculated for the 204, 206, 208Pb isotopes . The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental and theoretical values of other studies.

  20. Crystal growth of energetic materials during high acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzerotti, M.Y.D.; Autera, J.; Borne, L.; Sharma, J.

    1996-07-01

    Studies of the growth of crystals of energetic materials under conditions of high acceleration in an ultracentrifuge are reported. When a saturated solution is accelerated in an ultracentrifuge, the solute molecules move individually through the solvent molecules to form a crystal at the outer edge of the tube if the solute is more dense than the solvent. Since there is no evaporation or temperature variation, convection currents caused by simultaneous movement of solvent and solute are minimized and crystal defects are potentially minimized. Crystal growth is controlled by the g-level of the acceleration. In addition, solution inclusions and bubbles migrate out of the saturated solution as a result of the pressure gradient induced by the g-force. The authors present results of TNT, RDX, and TNAZ grown at high g from various solutions.

  1. A Fast, Electromagnetically Driven Supersonic Gas Jet Target For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Wright, Jason; Ma, Timothy

    2009-01-22

    Laser-Wakefield acceleration (LWFA) promises electron accelerators with unprecedented electric field gradients. Gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for LWFA. Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4x10{sup 19} /cm{sup 3}, sufficient for self-trapping and acceleration to energies up to {approx}150 MeV. While 3 cm capillary structures have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV, gas jets require a well-collimated beam that is {>=}10 mm in length and <500 {mu}m in width, with a tunable gas density profile to optimize the LWFA process. This paper describes the design of an electromagnetically driven, fast supersonic gas valve that opens in <100 {mu}s, closes in <500 {mu}s and can operate at pressures beyond 1000 psia. The motion of the valve seat (flyer plate) is measured using a laser probe and compared with predictions of a model. The valve design is based on an optimization of many parameters: flyer plate mass and durability, driver bank speed and stored energy for high rep-rate (>10 Hz) operation, return spring non-linearity and materials selection for various components. Optimization of the valve dynamics and preliminary designs of the supersonic flow patterns are described.

  2. Progress report on the accelerator production of tritium materials irradiation program

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Brown, R.D.; Roberts, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project is developing an accelerator and a spoliation neutron source capable of producing tritium through neutron capture on He-3. A high atomic weight target is used to produce neutrons that are then multiplied and moderated in a blanket prior to capture. Materials used in the target and blanket region of an APT facility will be subjected to several different and mixed particle radiation environments; high energy protons (1-2 GeV), protons in the 20 MeV range, high energy neutrons, and low energy neutrons, depending on position in the target and blanket. Flux levels exceed 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}s in some areas. The APT project is sponsoring an irradiation damage effects program that will generate the first data-base for materials exposed to high energy particles typical of spallation neutron sources. The program includes a number of candidate materials in small specimen and model component form and uses the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the 800 MeV, Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator.

  3. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2005-06-14

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  4. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  5. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  6. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-state simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.

  7. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  8. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  9. Electrochemical migration technique to accelerate ageing of cementitious materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaahmadi, A.; Tang, L.; Abbas, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Durability assessment of concrete structures for constructions in nuclear waste repositories requires long term service life predictions. As deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) takes up to 100 000 years, it is necessary to analyze the service life of cementitious materials in this time perspective. Using acceleration methods producing aged specimens would decrease the need of extrapolating short term data sets. Laboratory methods are therefore, needed for accelerating the ageing process without making any influencing distortion in the properties of the materials. This paper presents an electro-chemical migration method to increase the rate of calcium leaching from cementitious specimens. This method is developed based on the fact that major long term deterioration process of hardened cement paste in concrete structures for deposition of LILW is due to slow diffusion of calcium ions. In this method the cementitious specimen is placed in an electrochemical cell as a porous path way through which ions can migrate at a rate far higher than diffusion process. The electrical field is applied to the cell in a way to accelerate the ion migration without making destructions in the specimen's micro and macroscopic properties. The anolyte and catholyte solutions are designed favoring dissolution of calcium hydroxide and compensating for the leached calcium ions with another ion like lithium.

  10. High heat flux accelerator targets cooling with liquid-metal jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, I.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.

    2005-12-01

    Accelerator targets for radioisotope production generate very high density of thermal energy in the target material, which absorbs the particles beam. The design of these targets requires efficient heat removal techniques in order to preserve the integrity of the target. Normal average heat fluxes from these targets are around 1 kW/cm2 and may reach order of magnitude higher values at hot spots. Few techniques exist to deal with such high heat fluxes. One of them is jet impingement that has been proved to be able to deal with heat fluxes as high as 40 kW/cm2 using water as coolant. However, this requires very high jet velocities of more than 100 m/s. A few theoretical and experimental studies indicate that liquid-metal coolants (e.g., gallium or gallium alloys) can improve the heat transfer efficiency in this configuration. Experimental cooling loops based on water and liquid-metal jet impingement have been designed and built at Soreq to evaluate this method. For the current liquid-metal system an eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (GaIn) is used. Initial experiments demonstrate that the GaIn cooling system can deal with heat flux of about 2 kW/cm2 over an area of 1 cm2. The jet velocity is less than 4 m/s and the required differential pressure from the pump is less than 1 bar.

  11. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  12. Table-top laser-based proton acceleration in nanostructured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, M.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Ruiz, C.; Vranic, M.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of ultrashort, high intensity laser pulses with thin foil targets leads to ion acceleration on the target rear surface. To make this ion source useful for applications, it is important to optimize the transfer of energy from the laser into the accelerated ions. One of the most promising ways to achieve this consists in engineering the target front by introducing periodic nanostructures. In this paper, the effect of these structures on ion acceleration is studied analytically and with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We assessed the role of the structure shape, size, and the angle of laser incidence for obtaining the efficient energy transfer. Local control of electron trajectories is exploited to maximize the energy delivered into the target. Based on our numerical simulations, we propose a precise range of parameters for fabrication of nanostructured targets, which can increase the energy of the accelerated ions without requiring a higher laser intensity.

  13. Mass Limited Target Effects on Proton Acceleration with Femtosecond Laser Plasma Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulick, Calvin; Raymond, A.; McKelvey, A.; Willingale, L.; Chvykov, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments at the HERCULES laser facility have been performed to measure the effect of reduced mass targets on proton acceleration through the use of foil, grid, and wire targets in femtosecond laser plasma interactions. The target thickness was held approximately constant at 12 . 5 μm, while the lateral extent of the target was varied. The electron current density was measured with an imaging Cu Kα crystal. Higher current densities were observed as the target mass was reduced which corresponded to an increase in the temperature of the accelerated proton beam. Additionally, a line focusing feature was observed in the spatial distribution of protons accelerated to from the wire target, believed to be a result of azimuthal magnetic fields generated by electron currents in the wire. Particle-in-cell and Vlasov-Fokker-Plank simulations were performed in order to investigate the focusing magnetic field as well as the complex sheath formation dynamics on the mesh target.

  14. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  15. Optimization of the combined proton acceleration regime with a target composition scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W. P.; Li, B. W.; Zheng, C. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Yan, X. Q.; Qiao, B.

    2016-01-15

    A target composition scheme to optimize the combined proton acceleration regime is presented and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations by using an ultra-intense circularly polarized (CP) laser pulse irradiating an overdense hydrocarbon (CH) target, instead of a pure hydrogen (H) one. The combined acceleration regime is a two-stage proton acceleration scheme combining the radiation pressure dominated acceleration (RPDA) stage and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) stage sequentially together. Protons get pre-accelerated in the first stage when an ultra-intense CP laser pulse irradiating an overdense CH target. The wakefield is driven by the laser pulse after penetrating through the overdense CH target and propagating in the underdense tritium plasma gas. With the pre-accelerate stage, protons can now get trapped in the wakefield and accelerated to much higher energy by LWFA. Finally, protons with higher energies (from about 20 GeV up to about 30 GeV) and lower energy spreads (from about 18% down to about 5% in full-width at half-maximum, or FWHM) are generated, as compared to the use of a pure H target. It is because protons can be more stably pre-accelerated in the first RPDA stage when using CH targets. With the increase of the carbon-to-hydrogen density ratio, the energy spread is lower and the maximum proton energy is higher. It also shows that for the same laser intensity around 10{sup 22} W cm{sup −2}, using the CH target will lead to a higher proton energy, as compared to the use of a pure H target. Additionally, proton energy can be further increased by employing a longitudinally negative gradient of a background plasma density.

  16. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  17. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, K. D.; Huang, T. W.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; Wu, S. Z.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2016-01-15

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case.

  18. Materials irradiation facilities at the high-power Swiss proton accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Werner; Dai, Yong; Glasbrenner, Heike; Aebersold, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-04-01

    Within the Swiss proton accelerator complex at the Paul-Scherrer-Institute (PSI), several irradiation facilities are operated for investigation of materials behavior under high-dose irradiation conditions as well as for neutron activation analysis and isotope production. In LiSoR (liquid solid reaction), a liquid metal loop connected to the 72 MeV proton accelerator Injector 1, steel samples are irradiated while being in contact with flowing lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBE) at elevated temperatures and under tensile stress. In the spallation neutron source SINQ, the STIP program (SINQ Target Irradiation Program) allows materials irradiation under realistic spallation conditions, i.e. in a mixed spectrum of 570 MeV protons and spallation neutrons. Hundreds of samples, mainly austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels such as 316L, T91 or F82H, were irradiated to doses up to 20 dpa as part of STIP. These also included steel samples in contact with liquid Hg and liquid LBE. MEGAPIE (MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment), a liquid metal target employing LBE, operated in SINQ during the second half of 2006, can be taken as a materials irradiation facility on its own. Adjacent to the target position, SINQ houses a neutron irradiation rabbit system serving activation analysis and isotope production.

  19. Carbonate as sputter target material for rapid 14C AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longworth, Brett E.; Robinson, Laura F.; Roberts, Mark L.; Beaupre, Steven R.; Burke, Andrea; Jenkins, William J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for measuring the 14C content of carbonate samples by producing C- ions directly in the negative ion sputter source of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) system. This direct analysis of carbonate material eliminates the time and expense of graphite preparation. Powdered carbonate is mixed with titanium powder, loaded into a target cartridge, and compressed. Beam currents for optimally-sized carbonate targets (0.09-0.15 mg C) are typically 10-20% of those produced by optimally-sized graphite targets (0.5-1 mg C). Modern (>0.8 Fm) samples run by this method have standard deviations of 0.009 Fm or less, and near-modern samples run as unknowns agree with values from traditional hydrolysis/graphite to better than 2%. Targets with as little as 0.06 mg carbonate produce useable ion currents and results, albeit with increased error and larger blank. In its current state, direct sputtering is best applied to problems where a large number of analyses with lower precision are required. These applications could include age surveys of deep-sea corals for determination of historic population dynamics, to identify samples that would benefit from high precision analysis, and for growth rate studies of organisms forming carbonate skeletons.

  20. Accelerated Nuclear Energy Materials Development with Multiple Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M J; Bench, G

    2009-08-19

    A fundamental issue in nuclear energy is the changes in material properties as a consequence of time, temperature, and neutron fluence. Usually, candidate materials for nuclear energy applications are tested in nuclear reactors to understand and model the changes that arise from a combination of atomic displacements, helium and hydrogen production, and other nuclear transmutations (e.g. fission and the production of fission products). Experiments may be carried out under neutron irradiation conditions in existing nuclear materials test reactors (at rates of 10 to 20 displacements per atom (DPA) per year or burn-up rates of a few percent per year for fertile fuels), but such an approach takes much too long for many high neutron fluence scenarios (300 DPA for example) expected in reactors of the next generation. Indeed it is reasonable to say that there are no neutron sources available today to accomplish sufficiently rapid accelerated aging let alone also provide the temperature and spectral characteristics of future fast spectrum nuclear energy systems (fusion and fission both). Consequently, materials research and development progress continues to be severely limited by this bottleneck.

  1. Efficient ion acceleration by relativistic self-induced transparency in subwavelength targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Shivani; Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of target thickness on relativistic self-induced transparency (RSIT) and observed that, for subwavelength targets, the corresponding threshold target density (beyond which the target is opaque to an incident laser pulse of given intensity) increases. The accelerating longitudinal electrostatic field created by RSIT from the subwavelength target is then used to accelerate the ions from a thin, low density layer behind the main target to 100 MeV using a 6 cycle flat-top (with rise and fall of one cycle each) circularly polarized laser with peak dimensionless amplitude of 20. A suitable scaling law for optimum laser and target conditions is also deduced. We observed that, as far as energy spectrum is concerned, an extra low density layer is more advantageous than relying on target ions alone.

  2. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  3. Investigation on target normal sheath acceleration through measurements of ions energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Tudisco, S. Cirrone, G. A. P.; Mascali, D.; Schillaci, F.; Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Muoio, A.; Brandi, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A.; and others

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming at investigating the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain has been carried out at the Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory facility with a laser intensity of up to 2 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A Thomson parabola spectrometer was used to obtain the spectra of the ions of the different species accelerated. Here, we show the energy spectra of light-ions and we discuss their dependence on structural characteristics of the target and the role of surface and target bulk in the acceleration process.

  4. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-15

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C{sup 6+}-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}.

  5. Accelerated discovery of materials for solar fuel cells at JCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Slobodan; Cornell, Earl; Gregoire, John; Haber, Joel; Kan, Kevin; Lin, Sean; Liu, Xiaonao; Marcin, Martin; Soedarmadji, Edward; Suram, Santosh; Xiang, Chengxiang; Jin, Jian

    2013-03-01

    High-Throughput Experimentation group at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis has a formidable mission: provide accelerated discovery of new photon absorbers and heterogeneous (photo)catalysts for solar fuel cells at the rate far beyond anything attempted in material science to date. The HTE pipeline includes material synthesis, screening and characterization. Within the first year of operations, our fabrication capabilities have risen to 100,000 samples per day using combinatorial inkjet-printing. Such high rate of sample production is setting daunting requirements on screening methods. We are developing and testing methods for fast bandgap measurements, using colorimetry and uv-vis spectroscopy. Material thickness and roughness is determined by confocal chromatic spectroscopy. Catalytic activity is screen through a massively parallel bubble screen and a fast scanning droplet (photo)electrochemical cell. Concurrently, we are developing protocols for high-throughput determination of phase and structure (XRD), surface composition and chemistry (XPS), surface area measurement, etc. on the characterization side of the pipeline. This work was performed at Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award No. DE-SC0004993

  6. Accelerating the design of biomimetic materials by integrating RNA-seq with proteomics and materials science.

    PubMed

    Guerette, Paul A; Hoon, Shawn; Seow, Yiqi; Raida, Manfred; Masic, Admir; Wong, Fong T; Ho, Vincent H B; Kong, Kiat Whye; Demirel, Melik C; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Amini, Shahrouz; Tay, Gavin Z; Ding, Dawei; Miserez, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Efforts to engineer new materials inspired by biological structures are hampered by the lack of genomic data from many model organisms studied in biomimetic research. Here we show that biomimetic engineering can be accelerated by integrating high-throughput RNA-seq with proteomics and advanced materials characterization. This approach can be applied to a broad range of systems, as we illustrate by investigating diverse high-performance biological materials involved in embryo protection, adhesion and predation. In one example, we rapidly engineer recombinant squid sucker ring teeth proteins into a range of structural and functional materials, including nanopatterned surfaces and photo-cross-linked films that exceed the mechanical properties of most natural and synthetic polymers. Integrating RNA-seq with proteomics and materials science facilitates the molecular characterization of natural materials and the effective translation of their molecular designs into a wide range of bio-inspired materials.

  7. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-15

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  8. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  9. Increased laser-accelerated proton energies via direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons in microcone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Gall, B.; Lockard, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.

    2011-05-15

    We present experimental results showing a laser-accelerated proton beam maximum energy cutoff of 67.5 MeV, with more than 5 x 10{sup 6} protons per MeV at that energy, using flat-top hollow microcone targets. This result was obtained with a modest laser energy of {approx}80 J, on the high-contrast Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 2D particle-in-cell simulations, we attribute the source of these enhanced proton energies to direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons along the inner cone wall surface, where the laser light wave accelerates electrons just outside the surface critical density, in a potential well created by a shift of the electrostatic field maximum with respect to that of the magnetic field maximum. Simulations show that for an increasing acceleration length, the continuous loading of electrons into the accelerating phase of the laser field yields an increase in high-energy electrons.

  10. Multistage ion acceleration in the interaction of intense short laser pulse with ultrathin target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzanejhad, Saeed; Joulaei, Atefeh; Babaei, Javad

    2016-12-01

    New analytical formalism is invented in the description of ion acceleration in the interaction of intense high-contrast short laser pulse with ultrathin target. The electrostatic shock wave acceleration is our fundamental point of view, but different criteria are obtained for description of various acceleration phenomenon. Acceleration condition for an ion with a definite charge to mass ratio ( z / m ) and initial velocity β0 is obtained in the electrostatic shock (ES) field in front side of the foil. According to this point of view, self organized multistage ion acceleration formalism is proposed and confirmed by the 1D3V particle in cell simulation results. In this formalism, ions may be re-accelerated repeatedly in the developing ES field.

  11. Target design for materials processing very far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Local heating and electronic excitations can trigger phase transitions or novel material states that can be stabilized by rapid quenching. An example on the few nanometer scale are phase transitions induced by the passage of swift heavy ions in solids where nitrogen-vacancy color centers form locally in diamonds when ions heat the diamond matrix to warm dense matter conditions at 0.5 eV. We optimize mask geometries for target materials such as silicon and diamond to induce phase transitions by intense ion pulses (e. g. from NDCX-II or from laser-plasma acceleration). The goal is to rapidly heat a solid target volumetrically and to trigger a phase transition or local lattice reconstruction followed by rapid cooling. The stabilized phase can then be studied ex situ. We performed HYDRA simulations that calculate peak temperatures for a series of excitation conditions and cooling rates of crystal targets with micro-structured masks. A simple analytical model, that includes ion heating and radial, diffusive cooling, was developed that agrees closely with the HYDRA simulations. The model gives scaling laws that can guide the design of targets over a wide range of parameters including those for NDCX-II and the proposed BELLA-i. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-697271.

  12. HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Plum, Michael A; Peters, Charles C; Brown, David L; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Satisfying operational procedures and limits for the beam target interface is a critical concern for high power operation at spallation neutron sources. At the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) a number of protective measures are instituted to ensure that the beam position, beam size and peak intensity are within acceptable limits at the target and high power Ring Injection Dump (RID). The high power beam dump typically handles up to 50 100 kW of beam power and its setup is complicated by the fact that there are two separate beam components simultaneously directed to the dump. The beam on target is typically in the 800-1000 kW average power level, delivered in sub- s 60 Hz pulses. Setup techniques using beam measurements to quantify the beam parameters at the target and dump will be described. However, not all the instrumentation used for the setup and initial qualification is available during high power operation. Additional techniques are used to monitor the beam during high power operation to ensure the setup conditions are maintained, and these are also described.

  13. Resistively enhanced proton acceleration via high-intensity laser interactions with cold foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The acceleration of MeV protons by high-intensity laser interaction with foil targets is studied using a recently developed plasma simulation technique. Based on a hierarchical N-body tree algorithm, this method provides a natural means of treating three-dimensional, collisional transport effects hitherto neglected in conventional explicit particle-in-cell simulations. For targets with finite resistivity, hot electron transport is strongly inhibited, even at temperatures in the MeV range. This leads to suppression of ion acceleration from the rear of the target and an enhancement in energies and numbers of protons originating from the front.

  14. The analytic model of a laser-accelerated plasma target and its stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2014-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic theory of a laser-accelerated plasma target with distributed electron/ion densities is developed. The simplified model assumes that after an initial transition period the bulk of cold ions are uniformly accelerated by the self-consistent electric field generated by hot electrons trapped in combined ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. Several distinct target regions (non-neutral ion tail, non-neutral electron sheath, and neutral plasma bulk) are identified and analytically described. It is shown analytically that such laser-accelerated finite-thickness target is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. Particle-in-cell simulations of the seeded perturbations of the plasma target reveal that, for ultra-relativistic laser intensities, the growth rate of the RT instability is depressed from the analytic estimates.

  15. The analytic model of a laser-accelerated plasma target and its stability

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V. Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2014-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic theory of a laser-accelerated plasma target with distributed electron/ion densities is developed. The simplified model assumes that after an initial transition period the bulk of cold ions are uniformly accelerated by the self-consistent electric field generated by hot electrons trapped in combined ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. Several distinct target regions (non-neutral ion tail, non-neutral electron sheath, and neutral plasma bulk) are identified and analytically described. It is shown analytically that such laser-accelerated finite-thickness target is susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. Particle-in-cell simulations of the seeded perturbations of the plasma target reveal that, for ultra-relativistic laser intensities, the growth rate of the RT instability is depressed from the analytic estimates.

  16. Slow positron target concepts for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.; Lessner, E.

    1997-09-01

    The APS linear accelerator (linac) system consists of a 200-MeV, 2856-MHz S-band electron linac, followed by a 450-Mev positron linac. The linac is available for other uses upon completion of the storage ring injection cycle. Nominal linac beam power is 480 W but the power can be increased substantially, making it suitable for production of slow positrons. Simulation studies for the design of a slow-positron target-moderator system that is optimized for operation with the APS linac are presented. Results of simulations of various target configurations indicate that a suitably designed multilayer target can result in a higher positron yield than a single-block target. Use of an integrated, multilayer target moderator is suggested. Some possibilities for extracting slow positrons between target layers by means of electromagnetic fields are discussed. First results from recent accelerator studies aimed at increasing the linac beam power are also presented.

  17. Plasma block acceleration via double targets driven by an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Jiaxiang; Qi, Xin; Li, Meng; Xing, Yifan; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, plasma block acceleration via radiation pressure from an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity I ≈ 10 22 W / cm 2 is investigated based on a double-target scheme, in which the targets are composed of a pre-target with a relatively low plasma density and a main target with a high plasma density. It has been demonstrated that an appropriately selected pre-target can help to greatly enhance the charge separation field in the main target, which then leads to generation of a strongly accelerated and well directed plasma block with proton energy in GeV magnitude. This result can have potential applications in the plasma block ignition of proton-born fusion.

  18. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  19. Accelerated commercialization program for materials and components. Solar sheet glass: an example of materials commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.; Butler, B.

    1980-03-01

    The SERI Accelerated Commercialization Program for Materials and Components is designed to serve as a catalyst in promoting technological change through the introduction of new materials into solar technologies. This report focuses on technological diffusion of advances in materials technology from the developer to the manufacturers of solar equipment. It provides an overview and understanding of the problems encountered in the private sector in trying to advance technological change and discusses a program designed to facilitate this change. Using as example of solar sheet glass, this report describes the process by which sample quantities of new materials are sent to solar equipment manufacturers for appliations testing. It also describes other materials that might undergo testing in a similar way. The entire program is an example of how government and industry can work together to accomplish common goals.

  20. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Li, D. Z.; Aeschlimann, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  1. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-01

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  2. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-28

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  3. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Drew Pitney

    2013-01-01

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Con nement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the rst time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of K x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an e ective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser at Los

  4. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  5. Studies of Ion Acceleration from Thin Solid-Density Targets on High-Intensity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Christopher R.

    Over the past two decades, a number of experiments have been performed demonstrating the acceleration of ions from the interaction of an intense laser pulse with a thin, solid density target. These ions are accelerated by quasi-static electric fields generated by energetic electrons produced at the front of the target, resulting in ion energies up to tens of MeV. These ions have been widely studied for a variety of potential applications ranging from treatment of cancer to the production of neutrons for advanced radiography techniques. However, realization of these applications will require further optimization of the maximum energy, spectrum, or species of the accelerated ions, which has been a primary focus of research to date. This thesis presents two experiments designed to optimize several characteristics of the accelerated ion beam. The first of these experiments took place on the GHOST laser system at the University of Texas at Austin, and was designed to demonstrate reliable acceleration of deuterium ions, as needed for the most efficient methods of neutron generation from accelerated ions. This experiment leveraged cryogenically cooled targets coated in D2 O ice to suppress the protons which typically dominate the accelerated ions, producing as many as 2 x 1010 deuterium ions per 1 J laser shot, exceeding the proton yield by an average ratio of 5:1. The second major experiment in this work was performed on the Scarlet laser system at The Ohio State University, and studied the accelerated ion energy, yield, and spatial distribution as a function of the target thickness. In principle, the peak energy increases with decreasing target thickness, with the thinnest targets accessing additional acceleration mechanisms which provide favorable scaling with the laser intensity. However, laser prepulse characteristics provide a lower bound for the target thickness, yielding an optimum target thickness for ion acceleration which is dependent on the laser system. This

  6. Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Yousry; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

  7. Target optimization for desired X-ray spectra produced by laser plasma accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobok, Maxim; Brantov, Andrey; Bychenkov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Different regimes of electron acceleration from low-density targets are investigated using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Multiple spatial target density profiles were examined, including laser pre-pulse modified targets. The size of the plasma corona is shown to be one of the main parameters characterizing the temperature and number of hot electrons, which determine the yield of X-ray radiation and its hardness. The generation of X-ray radiation by laser accelerated electrons, which impact the converter target located behind the laser target, was studied. The X-ray spectra were computed using Monte-Carlo simulations. This work was partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-02-00088-a.

  8. Physics of Double Pulse Irradiation of Targets For Proton Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M.; Masud, R.; Manzoor, L.; Tiedje, H.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have been carried out on double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets with varying preplasma conditions. Our experiment at the Titan Laser facility utilized two 700 fs, 1054 nm pulses, separated by 1 to 5 ps with a total energy of 100 J, and with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. The proton spectra were measured with radiochromic film stacks and magnetic spectrometers. The prepulse energy was on the order of 10 mJ, which appears to have a moderating effect on the double pulse enhancement of proton beam. We have performed LSP PIC simulations to understand the double pulse enhancement mechanism, as well as the role of preplasma in modifying the interaction. A 1D parameter study was done to isolate various aspects of the interaction, while 2D simulations provide more detailed physical insight and a better comparison with experimental data. Work by the Univ. of Alberta was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Sequence Heterogeneity Accelerates Protein Search for Targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey; Kolomeisky, Anatoly

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry and heterogeneity of a genome. The work was supported by the Welch Foundation (Grant C-1559), by the NSF (Grant CHE-1360979), and by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  10. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  11. Spectral control of laser accelerated ions via deuterium vapour deposition onto cryogenically cooled targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Graeme

    2016-10-01

    A widely perceived criticism of the best understood laser driven ion acceleration mechanism, TNSA, is that the energy spectra routinely obtained are Maxwellian in nature, and are non-ideal for some of the long term envisaged applications of a laser accelerated ion source such as ion driven fast ignition or hadrontherapy. We, however, demonstrate a novel method to accelerate a quasi-monoenergetic deuterium beam in the TNSA regime of ion acceleration. This is made possible by recent developments in cryogenic targetry at the Central Laser Facility, and is achieved by cooling a gold target to approximately 7-8 K and introducing overcoats of isotopic deuterium layers on top of the hydrogen contaminant layer present on the original target. The presence of a lower charge to mass ion on top of the high charge to mass hydrogen, alters the sheath dynamics during the acceleration such that the high energy portion of the deuterium beam exhibits a full width at half maximum energy spread of δɛ / ɛ 0.3-0.5. Experimental results and multidimensional numerical modelling will be presented describing this effect. Further than this, experimental results show that the accelerated deuterium beam is found to significantly enhance the number of neutrons produced when fielded in a pitcher/catcher configuration, and provides avenues for investigation on the production of a high brightness neutron source.

  12. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.; Carius, S.; Daemen, L.; DeVolder, B.; Frehaut, J.; Goulding, C.; Grace, R.; Green, R.; Lisowski, P.; Littleton, P.; King, J.; King, N.; Prael, R.; Stratton, T.; Turner, S.; Ullmann, J.; Venneri, F.; Yates, M.

    1995-09-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.

  13. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Kopczewski, Michael R.; Schwarz, Alfred C.

    1986-01-01

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives.

  14. Miniature plasma accelerating detonator and method of detonating insensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Kopczewski, M.R.; Schwarz, A.C.

    1985-01-04

    The invention is a detonator for use with high explosives. The detonator comprises a pair of parallel rail electrodes connected to a power supply. By shorting the electrodes at one end, a plasma is generated and accelerated toward the other end to impact against explosives. A projectile can be arranged between the rails to be accelerated by the plasma. An alternative arrangement is to a coaxial electrode construction. The invention also relates to a method of detonating explosives. 3 figs.

  15. Ultraintense laser interaction with nanoscale target: a simple model for layer expansion and ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Brian J; Yin, Lin; Hegelich, Bjoorn M; Bowers, Kevin J; Huang, Chengkun; Fernandez, Juan C; Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine; Kwan, Thomas J T; Henig, Andreas; Yan, Xue Q; Tajima, Toshi; Habs, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    A simple model has been derived for the expansion of a thin (up to 100s of nm thickness), solid-density target driven by an u.ltraintense laser. In this regime, new ion acceleration mechanisms, such as the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) [1], emerge with the potential to dramatically improve energy, efficiency, and energy spread of laser-driven ion beams. Such beams have been proposed [2] as drivers for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion [3]. Analysis of kinetic simulations of the BOA shows two dislinct times that bound the period of enhanced acceleration: t{sub 1}, when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, and t{sub 2}, when the target becomes classically underdense and the enhanced acceleration terminates. A silllple dynamical model for target expansion has been derived that contains both the early, one-dimensional (lD) expansion of the target as well as three-dimensional (3D) expansion of the plasma at late times, The model assumes that expansion is slab-like at the instantaneous ion sound speed and requires as input target composition, laser intensity, laser spot area, and the efficiency of laser absorption into electron thermal energy.

  16. Laser acceleration of protons with an optically shaped, near-critical hydrogen gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-hsin; Helle, Michael; Ting, Antonio; Gordon, Daniel; Dover, Nicholas; Ettlinger, Oliver; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    We report our recent experimental results on CO2 laser acceleration of protons, with a near-critical hydrogen gas target tailored by a Nd:YAG laser-produced blast wave. Monoenergetic protons with energies up to 2.5 MeV were observed.

  17. Composition and methods of preparation of target material for producing radionuclides

    DOEpatents

    Seropeghin, Yurii D; Zhuikov, Boris L

    2013-05-28

    A composition suitable for use as a target containing antimony to be irradiated by accelerated charged particles (e.g., by protons to produce tin-117m) comprises an intermetallic compound of antimony and titanium which is synthesized at high-temperature, for example, in an arc furnace. The formed material is powdered and melted in an induction furnace, or heated at high gas pressure in gas static camera. The obtained product has a density, temperature stability, and heat conductivity sufficient to provide an appropriate target material.

  18. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Spentzouris, Linda

    2016-07-07

    The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

  19. Accelerating the Design of Solar Thermal Fuel Materials through High Throughput Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y; Grossman, JC

    2014-12-01

    Solar thermal fuels (STF) store the energy of sunlight, which can then be released later in the form of heat, offering an emission-free and renewable solution for both solar energy conversion and storage. However, this approach is currently limited by the lack of low-cost materials with high energy density and high stability. In this Letter, we present an ab initio high-throughput computational approach to accelerate the design process and allow for searches over a broad class of materials. The high-throughput screening platform we have developed can run through large numbers of molecules composed of earth-abundant elements and identifies possible metastable structures of a given material. Corresponding isomerization enthalpies associated with the metastable structures are then computed. Using this high-throughput simulation approach, we have discovered molecular structures with high isomerization enthalpies that have the potential to be new candidates for high-energy density STF. We have also discovered physical principles to guide further STF materials design through structural analysis. More broadly, our results illustrate the potential of using high-throughput ab initio simulations to design materials that undergo targeted structural transitions.

  20. Accelerating the design of solar thermal fuel materials through high throughput simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2014-12-10

    Solar thermal fuels (STF) store the energy of sunlight, which can then be released later in the form of heat, offering an emission-free and renewable solution for both solar energy conversion and storage. However, this approach is currently limited by the lack of low-cost materials with high energy density and high stability. In this Letter, we present an ab initio high-throughput computational approach to accelerate the design process and allow for searches over a broad class of materials. The high-throughput screening platform we have developed can run through large numbers of molecules composed of earth-abundant elements and identifies possible metastable structures of a given material. Corresponding isomerization enthalpies associated with the metastable structures are then computed. Using this high-throughput simulation approach, we have discovered molecular structures with high isomerization enthalpies that have the potential to be new candidates for high-energy density STF. We have also discovered physical principles to guide further STF materials design through structural analysis. More broadly, our results illustrate the potential of using high-throughput ab initio simulations to design materials that undergo targeted structural transitions.

  1. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nürnberg, F.; Blažević, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernández, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geißel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.; Roth, M.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50μm Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10μm) show large source sizes of over 100μm diameter for 5MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  2. Laser beam-profile impression and target thickness impact on laser-accelerated protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, M.; Harres, K.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.; Blazevic, A.; Audebert, P.; Brambrink, E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Schreiber, J.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results on the influence of the laser focal spot shape onto the beam profile of laser-accelerated protons from gold foils are reported. The targets' microgrooved rear side, together with a stack of radiochromic films, allowed us to deduce the energy-dependent proton source-shape and size, respectively. The experiments show, that shape and size of the proton source depend only weakly on target thickness as well as shape of the laser focus, although they strongly influence the proton's intensity distribution. It was shown that the laser creates an electron beam that closely follows the laser beam topology, which is maintained during the propagation through the target. Protons are then accelerated from the rear side with an electron created electric field of a similar shape. Simulations with the Sheath-Accelerated Beam Ray-tracing for IoN Analysis code SABRINA, which calculates the proton distribution in the detector for a given laser-beam profile, show that the electron distribution during the transport through a thick target (50 {mu}m Au) is only modified due to multiple small angle scattering. Thin targets (10 {mu}m) show large source sizes of over 100 {mu}m diameter for 5 MeV protons, which cannot be explained by multiple scattering only and are most likely the result of refluxing electrons.

  3. Intrafractional Target Motions and Uncertainties of Treatment Setup Reference Systems in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Goyal, Sharad; Zhou Jinghao; Khan, Atif J.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the magnitude of intrafractional motion and level of accuracy of various setup strategies in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: At lumpectomy, gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surrounding walls of the cavity. Weekly fluoroscopy imaging was conducted at treatment to investigate the respiration-induced target motions. Daily pre- and post-RT kV imaging was performed, and images were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion magnitudes over the course of treatment. The positioning differences of the laser tattoo- and the bony anatomy-based setups compared with those of the marker-based setup (benchmark) were also determined. The study included 21 patients. Results: Although lung exhibited significant motion, the average marker motion amplitude on the fluoroscopic image was about 1 mm. Over a typical treatment time period, average intrafractional motion magnitude was 4.2 mm and 2.6 mm based on the marker and bony anatomy matching, respectively. The bony anatomy- and laser tattoo-based interfractional setup errors, with respect to the fiducial marker-based setup, were 7.1 and 9.0 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Respiration has limited effects on the target motion during APBI. Bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy relative to that of the laser tattoo-based setup approach. Since fiducial markers are sutured directly to the surgical cavity, the marker-based approach can further improve the interfractional setup accuracy. On average, a seroma cavity exhibits intrafractional motion of more than 4 mm, a magnitude that is larger than that which is otherwise derived based on bony anatomy matching. A seroma-specific marker-based approach has the potential to improve treatment accuracy by taking the true inter

  4. Control of target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons from a guiding cone

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Shao, F. Q.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations that target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons can be well controlled by using a guiding cone. Compared to a conventional planar target, both the collimation and number density of proton beams are substantially improved, giving a high-quality proton beam which maintained for a longer distance without degradation. The effect is attributed to the radial electric field resulting from the charge due to the hot target electrons propagating along the cone surface. This electric field can effectively suppress the spatial spread of the protons after the expansion of the hot electrons.

  5. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2007-05-15

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ''laser breakout afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100 s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of {approx}2 GeV.

  6. Laser-driven shock acceleration of ion beams from spherical mass-limited targets.

    PubMed

    Henig, A; Kiefer, D; Geissler, M; Rykovanov, S G; Ramis, R; Hörlein, R; Osterhoff, J; Major, Zs; Veisz, L; Karsch, S; Krausz, F; Habs, D; Schreiber, J

    2009-03-06

    We report on experimental studies of ion acceleration from spherical targets of diameter 15 microm irradiated by ultraintense (1x10(20) W/cm2) pulses from a 20-TW Ti:sapphire laser system. A highly directed proton beam with plateau-shaped spectrum extending to energies up to 8 MeV is observed in the laser propagation direction. This beam arises from acceleration in a converging shock launched by the laser, which is confirmed by 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The temporal evolution of the shock-front curvature shows excellent agreement with a two-dimensional radiation pressure model.

  7. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, Drew Pitney

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the first time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of Kalpha x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an effective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser

  8. Robust energy enhancement of ultrashort pulse laser accelerated protons from reduced mass targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, K.; Metzkes, J.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Kraft, S. D.; Sauerbrey, R.; Schmidt, B.; Zier, M.; Schramm, U.

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports on a systematic investigation of the ultrashort pulse laser driven acceleration of protons from thin targets of finite size, so-called reduced mass targets (RMTs). Reproducible series of targets, manufactured with lithographic techniques, and varying in size, thickness, and mounting geometry, were irradiated with ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses of intensities of about 8 × 1020 W cm-2. A robust maximum energy enhancement of almost a factor of two was found when comparing gold RMTs to reference irradiations of plain gold foils of the same thickness. Furthermore, a change of the thickness of these targets has less influence on the measured maximum proton energy when compared to standard foils, which, based on detailed particle-in-cell simulations, can be explained by the influence of the RMT geometry on the electron sheath. The performance gain was, however, restricted to lateral target sizes of greater than 50 µm, which can be attributed to edge and mounting structure influences.

  9. Tomographic characterisation of gas-jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couperus, J. P.; Köhler, A.; Wolterink, T. A. W.; Jochmann, A.; Zarini, O.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. The acceleration medium is provided by a target that creates a local well-defined gas-density profile inside a vacuum vessel. Target development and analysis of the resulting gas-density profiles is an important aspect in the further development of LWFA. Gas-jet targets are widely used in regimes where relatively high electron densities over short interaction lengths are required (up to several millimetres interaction length, plasma densities down to 1018cm-3). In this paper we report a precise characterisation of such gas-jet targets by a laser interferometry technique. We show that phase shifts down to 4 mrad can be resolved. Tomographic phase reconstruction enables detection of non-axisymmetrical gas-density profiles which indicates defects in cylindrical nozzles, analysis of slit-nozzles and nozzles with an induced shock-wave density step. In a direct comparison between argon and helium jets we show that it cannot automatically be assumed, as is often done, that a nozzle measured with argon will provide the same gas density with helium.

  10. Creation of Pure Frozen Gas Targets for Ion Acceleration using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; Jiao, Xuejing; Quevedo, Hernan; Franke, Philip; Agustsson, Ronald; Oshea, Finn; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Woods, Kayley; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Sam; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas targets was developed at the University of Texas and will be tested at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which can hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consist of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice are frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. Frozen gas targets comprised of simple molecules like methane and single element gasses like hydrogen and deuterium will provide novel target configuations that will be compared with laser plasma interaction simulations. The targets will be shot with the ultra-intense short-pulse Trident laser. Accelerated ion spectra will be characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92T and electric field strength of 30kV. Hydrogen targets will be additionally characterized using stacks of copper which become activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal which be imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Details of target creation and pre-shot characterization will be presented.

  11. Monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil by circularly polarized laser pulse in RPA regime without thermal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Khudik, V.; Yi, S. A.; Siemon, C.; Shvets, G.

    2012-12-21

    A kinetic model of the monoenergetic acceleration of a target foil irradiated by the circularly polarized laser pulse is developed. The target moves without thermal heating with constant acceleration which is provided by chirping the frequency of the laser pulse and correspondingly increasing its intensity. In the accelerated reference frame, bulk plasma in the target is neutral and its parameters are stationary: cold ions are immobile while nonrelativistic electrons bounce back and forth inside the potential well formed by ponderomotive and electrostatic potentials. It is shown that a positive charge left behind of the moving target in the ion tail and a negative charge in front of the target in the electron sheath form a capacitor whose constant electric field accelerates the ions of the target. The charge separation is maintained by the radiation pressure pushing electrons forward. The scalings of the target thickness and electromagnetic radiation with the electron temperature are found.

  12. Target material collection for High-Energy Imaging Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Maryum F.; Mcnaney, James M.; Vignes, Ryan M.; Smith, Cal A.; Masters, Nathan; Bailey, Chris; Petre, Robert B.

    2014-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses the world's largest and most energetic laser system to explore Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy-Density (HED) physics, with the potential of creating pressure and density conditions normally found in the cores of stars or large planets. During NIF experiments, the laser energy is directed to the target, driving the desired physics conditions, and the breakup of the target. During this breakup there is the potential to generate debris fields with both vaporized and solid target material, traveling at extremely high velocities (~10 km/s). For future shots, it is desirable to minimize distribution of the certain target materials within NIF. The High Energy Imaging Diagnostic (HEIDI), which comes within 8 cm of the target, will be modified to minimize the distribution of the ejected material. An external cone will be added to HEIDI which will block a larger angle than the existing hardware. Internal shielding will be added to isolate target material within the front portion of the diagnostic. A thin aluminum bumper will slow low-density vaporized material and contribute to the breakup of high velocity particles, while a thicker wall will block solid chunks. After the shot, an external cover will be installed, to contain any stray material that might be disturbed by regular operations. The target material will be retrieved from the various shielding mechanisms and assayed.

  13. Summary of SLAC's SEY Measurement On Flat Accelerator Wall Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen /SLAC

    2007-06-08

    The electron cloud effect (ECE) causes beam instabilities in accelerator structures with intense positively charged bunched beams. Reduction of the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the beam pipe inner wall is effective in controlling cloud formation. We summarize SEY results obtained from flat TiN, TiZrV and Al surfaces carried out in a laboratory environment. SEY was measured after thermal conditioning, as well as after low energy, less than 300 eV, particle exposure.

  14. Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using a hydrodynamically shaped gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Tresca, O.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Maharjan, C.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.

    2015-08-28

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ=10 μm CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I≲1014 W cm–2) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I>1016 W cm–2) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μm), broadband beams of He+ and H+ were routinely produced, whilst for shorter gradients (≲20 μm), quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.

  15. Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using a hydrodynamically shaped gas target

    DOE PAGES

    Tresca, O.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Dover, N. P.; ...

    2015-08-28

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ=10 μm CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I≲1014 W cm–2) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I>1016 W cm–2) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μm), broadband beams of He+ and H+ were routinely produced, whilst for shorter gradients (≲20 μm),more » quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.« less

  16. Quasi-mono-energetic ion acceleration from a homogeneous composite target by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Brantov, A. V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Klimo, O.; Romanov, D. V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Nickles, P. V.

    2006-12-15

    The paper presents an analytical model and particle-in-cell simulations of the quasi-mono-energetic ion acceleration by an intense laser pulse in a multispecies target and the corresponding experimental observations. Homogeneous and heterogeneous targets are considered, and it is shown that the formation of the energy spectrum proceeds in three stages: (1) the initial light ion acceleration in the sheath electric field, (2) the ion species separation followed by the electrostatic shock formation, and (3) the interaction of spatially separated ion bunches accompanied by electron cooling. The field ionization of heavy ions and interaction between the heavy and light species play an important role in the formation and preservation of the energy spectrum of light ions. The simulation results are compared with the theoretical predictions and the experiments.

  17. Laser irradiations of advanced targets promoting absorption resonance for ion acceleration in TNSA regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Calcagno, L.; Giulietti, D.; Cutroneo, M.; Zimbone, M.; Skala, J.

    2015-07-01

    Advanced targets based on Au nanoparticles embedded in polymers films show high absorption coefficient in the UV-visible and infrared region. They can be employed to enhance the proton and ion acceleration from the laser-generated plasma in TNSA regime. In conditions of "p" polarized laser irradiations at 1015 W/cm2 intensity, in these films can be induced resonant absorption due to plasma wave excitation. Plasma on-line diagnostics is based on SiC detectors, Thomson spectrometry and X-ray streak camera imaging. Measurements of kinetic energy of accelerated ions indicate a significant increment using polymer targets containing gold nanoparticles and "p" polarized laser light with respect to pure polymers and unpolarized light irradiation.

  18. Transient Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of the Windowless Target System for the Lead Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Accelerator Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Fosco; Ferri, Roberta; Moreau, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    The target system, whose function is to supply an external neutron source to the ADS sub-critical core to sustain the neutron chain reaction, is the most critical part of an ADS being subject to severe thermo-mechanical loading and material damage due to accelerator protons and fission neutrons. A windowless option was chosen as reference configuration for the target system of the LBE-cooled ADS within the European PDS-XADS project in order to reduce the material damage and to increase its life. This document deals with the thermo-hydraulic results of the calculations performed with STAR-CD and RELAP5 codes for studying the behaviour of the windowless target system during off-normal operating conditions. It also reports a description of modifications properly implemented in the codes needed for this analysis. The windowless target system shows a satisfactory thermo-hydraulic behaviour for the analysed accidents, except for the loss of both pumps without proton beam shut-off and the beam trips lasting more than one second. (authors)

  19. Nonlinear surface plasma wave induced target normal sheath acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K. Shao, Xi; Liu, T. C.

    2015-02-15

    The mode structure of a large amplitude surface plasma wave (SPW) over a vacuum–plasma interface, including relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, is deduced. It is shown that the SPW excited by a p-polarized laser on a rippled thin foil target can have larger amplitude than the transmitted laser amplitude and cause stronger target normal sheath acceleration of protons as reported in a recent experiment. Substantial enhancement in proton number also occurs due to the larger surface area covered by the SPW.

  20. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications.

  1. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  2. Neutron Generation from Laser-Accelerated Ion Beams: Use of Alternative Deuteron-Rich Targets for Improved Neutron Yield and Control of Neutron Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Favalli, A.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-ion-beam generation in the break-out afterburner (BOA) acceleration regime has been modeled for several deuteron-rich solid-density targets using the VPIC particle-in-cell code. Monte Carlo modeling of the transport of these beams in a beryllium converter in a pitcher-catcher neutron source configuration shows significant increases in neutron yields may be achievable through judicious choices of laser target material. Additionally, species-separation dynamics in some target materials during the BOA ion acceleration phase can be exploited to control the shapes of the neutron spectra. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  3. Differences in Effective Target Volume Between Various Techniques of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Vicini, Frank A.; Grills, Inga S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Yan Di; Kim, Leonard H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Different cavity expansions are used to define the clinical target volume (CTV) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) delivered via balloon brachytherapy (1 cm) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) (1.5 cm). Previous studies have argued that the CTVs generated by these different margins are effectively equivalent. In this study, we use deformable registration to assess the effective CTV treated by balloon brachytherapy on clinically representative 3D-CRT planning images. Methods and Materials: Ten patients previously treated with the MammoSite were studied. Each patient had two computed tomography (CT) scans, one acquired before and one after balloon implantation. In-house deformable registration software was used to deform the MammoSite CTV onto the balloonless CT set. The deformed CTV was validated using anatomical landmarks common to both CT scans. Results: The effective CTV treated by the MammoSite was on average 7% {+-} 10% larger and 38% {+-} 4% smaller than 3D-CRT CTVs created using uniform expansions of 1 and 1.5 cm, respectively. The average effective CTV margin was 1.0 cm, the same as the actual MammoSite CTV margin. However, the effective CTV margin was nonuniform and could range from 5 to 15 mm in any given direction. Effective margins <1 cm were attributable to poor cavity-balloon conformance. Balloon size relative to the cavity did not significantly correlate with the effective margin. Conclusion: In this study, the 1.0-cm MammoSite CTV margin treated an effective volume that was significantly smaller than the 3D-CRT CTV based on a 1.5-cm margin.

  4. Waveguides in three-dimensional photonic bandgap materials for particle-accelerator on a chip architectures.

    PubMed

    Staude, Isabelle; McGuinness, Christopher; Frölich, Andreas; Byer, Robert L; Colby, Eric; Wegener, Martin

    2012-02-27

    The quest for less costly and more compact high-energy particle accelerators makes research on alternative acceleration mechanisms an important enterprise. From the multitude of suggested concepts, the photonic accelerator design by B. M. Cowan [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 011301 (2008)] stands out by its distinct potential of creating an accelerator on a chip [Proposal E-163, SLAC (2001)]. Herein, electrons are accelerated by the axial electric field of a strongly confined optical mode of an air waveguide within a silicon-based three-dimensional photonic band-gap material. Using a combination of direct laser writing and silicon double inversion, we here present the first experimental realization of this complex structure. Optical spectroscopy provides unambiguous evidence for the existence of an accelerating waveguide mode with axial polarization.

  5. Implementation of the Polarized HD target at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali; David Tedeschi

    2007-01-30

    The original goal of this proposal was to study frozen spin polarized targets (HD target and other technologies) and produce a conceptual design report for the implementation of such a target in the HALL B detector of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). During the first two years of the proposal, we came to the conclusion that the best suited target for JLab was a frozen spin target and helped with the design of such a target. We have not only achieved our original goal but have exceeded it by being involved in the actual building and testing of parts the target. The main reason for this success has been the hiring of a senior research associate, Dr. Oleksandr Dzyubak, who had more than 10 years of experience in the field of frozen spin polarized targets. The current grant has allowed the USC nuclear physics group to strengthen its role in the JLab collaboration and make important contribution to both the detector development and the scientific program.

  6. Processing and Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials - 13138

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Patton, Brad D.; Allender, Jeffrey S.

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) manages an inventory of materials that contains a range of long-lived radioactive isotopes that were produced from the 1960's through the 1980's by irradiating targets in high-flux reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to produce special heavy isotopes for DOE programmatic use, scientific research, and industrial and medical applications. Among the products were californium-252, heavy curium (including Cm-246 through Cm-248), and plutonium-242 and -244. Many of the isotopes are still in demand today, and they can be recovered from the remaining targets previously irradiated at SRS or produced from the recovered isotopes. Should the existing target materials be discarded, the plutonium (Pu) and curium (Cm) isotopes cannot be replaced readily with existing production sources. Some of these targets are stored at SRS, while other target material is stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at several stages of processing. The materials cannot be stored in their present form indefinitely. Their long-term management involves processing items for beneficial use and/or for disposition, using storage and process facilities at SRS and ORNL. Evaluations are under way for disposition options for these materials, and demonstrations of improved flow sheets to process the materials are being conducted at ORNL and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The disposition options and a management evaluation process have been developed. Processing demonstrations and evaluations for these unique materials are under way. (authors)

  7. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future.

  8. Density characterization of tapered super-sonic gas jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Gregory; Grace, Emily; Banerjee, Sudeep; Petersen, Chad; Brown, Kevin; Mills, Jared; Chen, Shouyuan; Liu, Cheng; Umstadter, Donald

    2012-10-01

    Phase slippage between plasma wave and electron bunch limits maximum energy gain in laser-wakefield acceleration. Plasma-density spatial tailoring has been proposed as a way to overcome this dephasing problem [1]. In practice, such tailoring can be achieved in super-sonic gas jets by use of a nozzle with a tapered orifice. We have developed a 3-D temporally-resolved interferometric tomography technique to characterize dynamical density distribution of such gas jets. The SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique) algorithm [2] was implemented. We also present preliminarily results on laser wakefield acceleration in the tailored gradient density profiles resulting from use of the characterized jets as targets. [4pt] [1] W. Rittershofer, C. B. Schroeder, E. Esarey, F. J. Gr"uner, and W. P. Leemans, ``Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators,'' Physics of Plasmas 17, 063104, (2010). [0pt] [2] P. Gilbert, ``Iterative methods for the three-dimensional reconstruction of an object from projections,'' Journal of Theoretical Biology 36, 105 (1972).

  9. Thermal-hydraulic design of the target/blanket for the accelerator production of tritium conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Willcutt, G.J.E. Jr.; Kapernick, R.J.

    1997-11-01

    A conceptual design was developed for the target/blanket system of an accelerator-based system to produce tritium. The target/blanket system uses clad tungsten rods for a spallation target and clad lead rods as a neutron multiplier in a blanket surrounding the target. The neutrons produce tritium in {sup 3}He, which is contained in aluminum tubes located in the decoupler and blanket regions. This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic design of the target, decoupler, and blanket developed for the conceptual design of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project, and demonstrates there is adequate margin in the design at full power operation.

  10. Effects of acceleration rate on Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arindam; Polavarapu, Rinosh

    2016-11-01

    The effect of acceleration rate in the elastic-plastic transition stage of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an accelerated non-Newtonian material is investigated experimentally using a rotating wheel experiment. A non-Newtonian material (mayonnaise) was accelerated at different rates by varying the angular acceleration of a rotating wheel and growth patterns of single mode perturbations with different combinations of amplitude and wavelength were analyzed. Experiments were run at two different acceleration rates to compare with experiments presented in prior years at APS DFD meetings and the peak amplitude responses are captured using a high-speed camera. Similar to the instability acceleration, the elastic-plastic transition acceleration is found to be increasing with increase in acceleration rate for a given amplitude and wavelength. The experimental results will be compared to various analytical strength models and prior experimental studies using Newtonian fluids. Authors acknowledge funding support from Los Alamos National Lab subcontract(370333) and DOE-SSAA Grant (DE-NA0001975).

  11. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  12. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  13. Simulations of ion acceleration from ultrathin targets with the VEGA petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2015-05-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 : 1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022Wcm-2 impinging normally on 5 - 40 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  14. Critical Density Target Design for Ion Acceleration on the T-Cubed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordell, Peter; Campbell, Paul; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Willingale, Louise; Krushelnick, Karl

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse with a critical density target can form a high Mach number electrostatic shock. Recent experiments on CO2 lasers have demonstrated that such shocks can be used to produce directional, quasi-monoenergetic proton beams. PIC simulations indicate that the our single pulse system, the T-Cubed laser (1.053 μm, 6J in 400fs), is both capable of both producing these shocks and accelerating protons to MeV energies. Shock formation and propagation with our system has challenging target peak density and density gradient requirements. We present our target design, an interferometric characterization of its density profile and preliminary experiments on T-Cubed.

  15. ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS MODIFICATIONS FOR A SECOND TARGET STATION AT THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Plum, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets added to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.

  16. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Kim, J B; Curry, C B; Aurand, B; Gamboa, E J; Göde, S; Goyon, C; Hazi, A; Kerr, S; Pak, A; Propp, A; Ramakrishna, B; Ruby, J; Willi, O; Williams, G J; Rödel, C; Glenzer, S H

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  17. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  18. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    DOE PAGES

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; ...

    2016-08-24

    Here, we report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetitionmore » rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.« less

  19. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-08-24

    Here, we report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  20. Research and development on materials for the SPES target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, Stefano; Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesus; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-03-01

    The SPES project at INFN-LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) is focused on the production of radioactive ion beams. The core of the SPES facility is constituted by the target, which will be irradiated with a 40 MeV, 200 µA proton beam in order to produce radioactive species. In order to efficiently produce and release isotopes, the material constituting the target should be able to work under extreme conditions (high vacuum and temperatures up to 2000 °C). Both neutron-rich and proton-rich isotopes will be produced; in the first case, carbon dispersed uranium carbide (UCx) will be used as a target, whereas to produce p-rich isotopes, several types of targets will have to be irradiated. The synthesis and characterization of different types of material will be reported. Moreover, the results of irradiation and isotopes release tests on different uranium carbide target prototypes will be discussed.

  1. Accelerated discovery of OLED materials through atomic-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Giesen, David J.; Hughes, Thomas F.; Goldberg, Alexander; Cao, Yixiang; Kwak, H. Shaun; Mustard, Thomas J.; Gavartin, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices are under widespread investigation to displace or complement inorganic optoelectronic devices for solid-state lighting and active displays. The materials in these devices are selected or designed according to their intrinsic and extrinsic electronic properties with concern for efficient charge injection and transport, and desired stability and light emission characteristics. The chemical design space for OLED materials is enormous and there is need for the development of computational approaches to help identify the most promising solutions for experimental development. In this work we will present examples of simulation approaches available to efficiently screen libraries of potential OLED materials; including first-principles prediction of key intrinsic properties, and classical simulation of amorphous morphology and stability. Also, an alternative to exhaustive computational screening is introduced based on a biomimetic evolutionary framework; evolving the molecular structure in the calculated OLED property design space.

  2. Study of underwater laser propulsion using different target materials.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Hao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2014-07-14

    In order to investigate the influence of target materials, including aluminum (Al), titanium (Ti) and copper (Cu), on underwater laser propulsion, the analytical formula of the target momentum IT is deduced from the enhanced coupling theory of laser propulsion in atmosphere with transparent overlay metal target. The high-speed photography method and numerical simulation are employed to verify the IT model. It is shown that the enhanced coupling theory, which was developed originally for laser propulsion in atmosphere, is also applicable to underwater laser propulsion with metal targets.

  3. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  4. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Luis

    2010-09-10

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  5. Electromagnetic acceleration of material from a plate hit by a pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1998-04-16

    An intense pulsed electron beam traversing a thin metal plate creates a volume of dense plasma. Current flows in this plasma as a result of the charge and magnetic field introduced by the relativistic electrons. A magnetic field may linger after the electron beam pulse because of the conductivity of the material. This field decays by both diffusing out of the conducting matter and causing it to expand. If the magnetized matter is of low density and high conductivity it may expand quickly. Scaling laws for this acceleration are sought by analyzing the idealization of a steady axisymmetric flow. This case simplifies a general formulation based on both Euler`s and Maxwell`s equations. As an example, fluid with conductivity {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 4} Siemens/m, density {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -3} kg/m{sup 3}, and initially magnetized to B = 1 Tesla can accelerate to v = 10{sup 4} m/s within a distance comparable to L = 1 mm and a time comparable to {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 100 ns, which is the magnetic diffusion time. If instead, {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 3} Siemens/m and {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -5} kg/m{sup 3} then v = 10{sup 5} m/s with a magnetic diffusion time {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 10 ns. These idealized flows have R{sub M} = {sigma}{mu}vL = 1, where R{sub M} is the magnetic Reynolds number. The target magnetizes by a thermal electric effect.

  6. Effects of TEA·HCl hardening accelerator on the workability of cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wenhao; Ding, Zhaoyang; Chen, Yanwen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the test is to research the influence rules of TEA·HCl on the workability of cement paste and concrete. Based on the features of the new hardening accelerator, an experimental analysis system were established through different dosages of hardening accelerator, and the feasibility of such accelerator to satisfy the need of practical engineering was verified. The results show that adding of the hardening accelerator can accelerate the cement hydration, and what’s more, when the dosage was 0.04%, the setting time was the shortest while the initial setting time and final setting time were 130 min and 180 min, respectively. The initial fluidity of cement paste of adding accelerator was roughly equivalent compared with that of blank. After 30 min, fluidity loss would decrease with the dosage increasing, but fluidity may increase. The application of the hardening accelerator can make the early workability of concrete enhance, especially the slump loss of 30 min can improve more significantly. The bleeding rate of concrete significantly decreases after adding TEA·HCl. The conclusion is that the new hardening accelerator can meet the need of the workability of cement-based materials in the optimum dosage range.

  7. Accelerating materials discovery through the development of polymer databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audus, Debra

    In our line of business we create chemical solutions for a wide range of applications, such as home and personal care, printing and packaging, automotive and structural coatings, and structural plastics and foams applications. In this environment, stable and highly automated workflows suitable to handle complex systems are a must. By satisfying these prerequisites, efficiency for the development of new materials can be significantly improved by combining modeling and experimental approaches. This is in fact in line with recent Materials Genome Initiative efforts sponsored by the US administration. From our experience, we know, that valuable contributions to product development are possible today by combining existing modeling techniques in an intelligent fashion, provided modeling and experiment work closely together. In my presentation I intend to review approaches to build and parameterize soft matter systems. As an example of our standard workflow, I will show a few applications, which include the design of a stabilizer molecule for dispersing polymer particles and the simulation of polystyrene dispersions.

  8. Target/Blanket Design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cappiello, M. W.

    1997-12-31

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium Target/Blanket (T/B) system is comprised of the T/B assembly and the attendant heat removal systems. The T/B assembly produces tritium using a high energy proton beam, and a spallation neutron source. The supporting heat removal systems safely remove the heat deposited by the proton beam during both normal and off-normal conditions. All systems reside within the T/B building, which is located at the end of a linear accelerator. Protons are accelerated to an energy of 1700 MeV at a current of 100 mA and are directed onto the T/B assembly. The protons interact with tungsten and lead nuclei to produce neutrons through the process of nuclear spallation. Neutron capture in {sup 3}He gas produces tritium which is removed on a continual basis in an adjacent Tritium Separation Facility (TSF). The T/B assembly is modular to allow for replacement of spent components and minimization of waste. Systems and components are designed with safety as a primary consideration to minimize risk to the workers and the public.

  9. Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Plasma Micro-Channel Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zou, D. B.; Pukhov, A.; Yi, L. Q.; Zhou, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.

    2017-01-01

    Efficient energy boost of the laser-accelerated ions is critical for their applications in biomedical and hadron research. Achiev-able energies continue to rise, with currently highest energies, allowing access to medical therapy energy windows. Here, a new regime of simultaneous acceleration of ~100 MeV protons and multi-100 MeV carbon-ions from plasma micro-channel targets is proposed by using a ~1020 W/cm2 modest intensity laser pulse. It is found that two trains of overdense electron bunches are dragged out from the micro-channel and effectively accelerated by the longitudinal electric-field excited in the plasma channel. With the optimized channel size, these “superponderomotive” energetic electrons can be focused on the front surface of the attached plastic substrate. The much intense sheath electric-field is formed on the rear side, leading to up to ~10-fold ionic energy increase compared to the simple planar geometry. The analytical prediction of the optimal channel size and ion maximum energies is derived, which shows good agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:28218247

  10. Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Plasma Micro-Channel Targets.

    PubMed

    Zou, D B; Pukhov, A; Yi, L Q; Zhou, H B; Yu, T P; Yin, Y; Shao, F Q

    2017-02-20

    Efficient energy boost of the laser-accelerated ions is critical for their applications in biomedical and hadron research. Achiev-able energies continue to rise, with currently highest energies, allowing access to medical therapy energy windows. Here, a new regime of simultaneous acceleration of ~100 MeV protons and multi-100 MeV carbon-ions from plasma micro-channel targets is proposed by using a ~10(20) W/cm(2) modest intensity laser pulse. It is found that two trains of overdense electron bunches are dragged out from the micro-channel and effectively accelerated by the longitudinal electric-field excited in the plasma channel. With the optimized channel size, these "superponderomotive" energetic electrons can be focused on the front surface of the attached plastic substrate. The much intense sheath electric-field is formed on the rear side, leading to up to ~10-fold ionic energy increase compared to the simple planar geometry. The analytical prediction of the optimal channel size and ion maximum energies is derived, which shows good agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Plasma Micro-Channel Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, D. B.; Pukhov, A.; Yi, L. Q.; Zhou, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient energy boost of the laser-accelerated ions is critical for their applications in biomedical and hadron research. Achiev-able energies continue to rise, with currently highest energies, allowing access to medical therapy energy windows. Here, a new regime of simultaneous acceleration of ~100 MeV protons and multi-100 MeV carbon-ions from plasma micro-channel targets is proposed by using a ~1020 W/cm2 modest intensity laser pulse. It is found that two trains of overdense electron bunches are dragged out from the micro-channel and effectively accelerated by the longitudinal electric-field excited in the plasma channel. With the optimized channel size, these “superponderomotive” energetic electrons can be focused on the front surface of the attached plastic substrate. The much intense sheath electric-field is formed on the rear side, leading to up to ~10-fold ionic energy increase compared to the simple planar geometry. The analytical prediction of the optimal channel size and ion maximum energies is derived, which shows good agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Optimization of radiation acceleration regime and the target structure in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikova, Galina; Lui, Chuan; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Sagdeev, Roald; Zigler, Ari

    2009-11-01

    Recent work [1,2] indicates that under proper conditions the interaction of ultra-short, high power lasers with thin foils can generate ion beams in the 100-200 MeV energy range with relatively low velocity dispersion. This technology can have major implications to medical ion proton cancer therapy since it can provide a relatively inexpensive table-top alternative to the current used traditional cyclotrons. This paper presents a simulation trade-off study of laser driven generation of quasi-monochromatic ion beams in the thin-foil Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) regime. The radiation pressure accelerates the electron cloud, which in its turn transfers accelerates the ions due to the induced longitudinal charge separation fields. A series of two and three-dimensional PIC simulations are presented with emphasis on stabilizing the target plasma against Raleigh-Taylor and modulational instabilities. Such instabilities are known as the main obstacles in achieving monochromatic beams. [4pt] [1] B. Eliasson, C. Lui, et al. New Jour. Phys., 11, 2009.[0pt] [2] F. Pegoraro, S.V. Bulanov. Laser Phys., v19, N 2, 2009.

  13. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-01

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  14. MS/MS similarity networking accelerated target profiling of triterpene saponins in Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yue-Wei; Zhu, Shu; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2017-07-15

    The targeted mass information of compounds accelerated their discovery in a large volume of untargeted MS data. An MS/MS similarity networking is advanced in clustering the structural analogues, which benefits the collection of mass information of similar compounds. The triterpene saponins extracted from Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves (ESL), a kind of functional tea, have shown promise in the relief of Alzheimer's disease. In this work, a target-precursor list (TPL) generated using MS/MS similarity networking was employed to rapidly trace 106 triterpene saponins from the aqueous extracts of ESL, of which 49 were tentatively identified as potentially new triterpene saponins. Moreover, a compound database of triterpene saponins was established and successfully applied to uncover their distribution features in ESL samples collected from different areas.

  15. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M.; Yan, X. Q.

    2014-06-15

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  16. Gadolinium-148 and other spallation production cross section measurements for accelerator target facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Karen Corzine

    At the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center accelerator complex, protons are accelerated to 800 MeV and directed to two tungsten targets, Target 4 at the Weapons Neutron Research facility and the 1L target at the Lujan Center. The Department of Energy requires hazard classification analyses to be performed on these targets and places limits on certain radionuclide inventories in the targets to avoid characterizing the facilities as "nuclear facilities." Gadolinium-148 is a radionuclide created from the spallation of tungsten. Allowed isotopic inventories are particularly low for this isotope because it is an alpha-particle emitter with a 75-year half-life. The activity level of Gadolinium-148 is low, but it encompasses almost two-thirds of the total dose burden for the two tungsten targets based on present yield estimates. From a hazard classification standpoint, this severely limits the lifetime of these tungsten targets. The cross section is not well-established experimentally and this is the motivation for measuring the Gadolinium-148 production cross section from tungsten. In a series of experiments at the Weapons Neutron Research facility, Gadolinium-148 production was measured for 600- and 800-MeV protons on tungsten, tantalum, and gold. These experiments used 3 mum thin tungsten, tantalum, and gold foils and 10 mum thin aluminum activation foils. In addition, spallation yields were determined for many short-lived and long-lived spallation products with these foils using gamma and alpha spectroscopy and compared with predictions of the Los Alamos National Laboratory codes CEM2k+GEM2 and MCNPX. The cumulative Gadolinium-148 production cross section measured from tantalum, tungsten, and gold for incident 600-MeV protons were 15.2 +/- 4.0, 8.31 +/- 0.92, and 0.591 +/- 0.155, respectively. The average production cross sections measured at 800 MeV were 28.6 +/- 3.5, 19.4 +/- 1.8, and 3.69 +/- 0.50 for tantalum, tungsten, and gold, respectively. These cumulative

  17. Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Holger

    2012-08-15

    Relativistic electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, travel through the target and form a space charge sheath at the rear surface which can be used to accelerate ions to high energies. If the laser pulse duration is comparable or shorter than the time needed for the electrons to travel through the target, the electrons will not have the chance to form an equilibrium distribution but must be described by a non-equilibrium distribution. We present a kinetic theory of the rear sheath for arbitrary electron distribution function f(E), where E is the electron energy, and evaluate it for different shapes of f(E). We find that the far field is mainly determined by the high energy tail of the distribution, a steep decay of f(E) for high energies results in a small electric field and vice versa. The model is extended to account for electrons escaping the sheath region thereby allowing a finite potential drop over the sheath. The consequences of the model for the acceleration of ions are discussed.

  18. Targeting of prion-infected lymphoid cells to the central nervous system accelerates prion infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prions, composed of a misfolded protein designated PrPSc, are infectious agents causing fatal neurodegenerative diseases. We have shown previously that, following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, prion-infected mice succumb to disease significantly earlier than controls, concomitant with the deposition of PrPSc aggregates in inflamed white matter areas. In the present work, we asked whether prion disease acceleration by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis results from infiltration of viable prion-infected immune cells into the central nervous system. Methods C57Bl/6 J mice underwent intraperitoneal inoculation with scrapie brain homogenates and were later induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inoculation of MOG35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant supplemented with pertussis toxin. Spleen and lymph node cells from the co-induced animals were reactivated and subsequently injected into naïve mice as viable cells or as cell homogenates. Control groups were infected with viable and homogenized scrapie immune cells only with complete Freund's adjuvant. Prion disease incubation times as well as levels and sites of PrPSc deposition were next evaluated. Results We first show that acceleration of prion disease by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis requires the presence of high levels of spleen PrPSc. Next, we present evidence that mice infected with activated prion-experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis viable cells succumb to prion disease considerably faster than do mice infected with equivalent cell extracts or other controls, concomitant with the deposition of PrPSc aggregates in white matter areas in brains and spinal cords. Conclusions Our results indicate that inflammatory targeting of viable prion-infected immune cells to the central nervous system accelerates prion disease propagation. We also show that in the absence of such targeting it is the load of PrPSc in the inoculum that determines the

  19. Materials considerations for the National Spallation Neutron Source target

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; DiStefano, J.R.; Farrell, K.; Lee, E.H.; Pawel, S.J.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1997-08-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), in which neutrons are generated by bombarding a liquid mercury target with 1 GeV protons, will place extraordinary demands on materials performance. The target structural material will operate in an aggressive environment, subject to intense fluxes of high energy protons, neutrons, and other particles, while exposed to liquid mercury and to water. Components that require special consideration include the Hg liquid target container and protective shroud, beam windows, support structures, moderator containers, and beam tubes. In response to these demands a materials R and D program has been developed for the NSNS that includes: selection of materials; calculations of radiation damage; irradiations, post irradiation testing, and characterization; compatibility testing and characterization; design and implementation of a plan for monitoring of materials performance in service; and materials engineering and technical support to the project. Irradiations are being carried out in actual and simulated spallation environments. Compatibility experiments in Hg are underway to ascertain whether the phenomena of liquid metal embrittlement and temperature gradient mass transfer will be significant. Results available to date are assessed in terms of the design and operational performance of the facility.

  20. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  1. Theory and numerical modeling of the accelerated expansion of laser-ablated materials near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. R.; King, T. C.; Hes, J. H.; Leboeuf, J. N.; Geohegan, D. B.; Wood, R. F.; Puretzky, A. A.; Donato, J. M.

    1999-09-01

    A self-similar theory and numerical hydrodynamic modeling is developed to investigate the effects of dynamic source and partial ionization on the acceleration of the unsteady expansion of laser-ablated material near a solid target surface. The dynamic source effect accelerates the expansion in the direction perpendicular to the target surface, while the dynamic partial ionization effect accelerates the expansion in all directions. The vaporized material during laser ablation provides a nonadiabatic dynamic source at the target surface into the unsteady expanding fluid. For studying the dynamic source effect, the self-similar theory begins with an assumed profile of plume velocity, u=v/vm=α+(1-α)ξ, where vm is the maximum expansion velocity, α is a constant, and ξ=x/vmt. The resultant profiles of plume density and plume temperature are derived. The relations obtained from the conservations of mass, momentum, and energy, respectively, all show that the maximum expansion velocity is inversely proportional to α, where 1-α is the slope of plume velocity profile. The numerical hydrodynamic simulation is performed with the Rusanov method and the Newton Raphson method. The profiles and scalings obtained from numerical hydrodynamic modeling are in good agreement with the theory. The dynamic partial ionization requires ionization energy from the heat at the expansion front, and thus reduces the increase of front temperature. The reduction of thermal motion would increase the flow velocity to conserve the momentum. This dynamic partial ionization effect is studied with the numerical hydrodynamic simulation including the Saha equation. With these effects, α is reduced from its value of conventional free expansion. This reduction on α increases the flow velocity slope, decreases the flow velocity near the surface, and reduces the thermal motion of plume, such that the maximum expansion velocity is significantly increased over that found from conventional models. The

  2. Aluminum/Silicon Carbide Matrix Material for Targeting System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-21

    most common MMC is cast aluminum reinforced with various amounts of silicon carbide . LMMFC is currently machining very high precision components for...targeting systems from cast aluminum/ silicon carbide (AISiC) matrix material (with a very high SiC content) and are experiencing difficulty achieving the

  3. Aluminum / Silicon Carbide Matrix Material Machining for Targeting Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-21

    most common (MMC) is cast aluminum reinforced with various amounts of silicon carbide . (LMMFC) is currently machining very high precision components for...targeting systems made from cast aluminum/ silicon carbide (AISiC) matrix material (with a very high SiC content) and is experiencing difficulty

  4. Thin liquid sheet target capabilities for ultra-intense laser acceleration of ions at a kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klim, Adam; Morrison, J. T.; Orban, C.; Feister, S.; Ngirmang, G. K.; Smith, J.; Frische, K.; Peterson, A. C.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Freeman, R. R.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2016-10-01

    The success of laser-accelerated ion experiments depends crucially on a number of factors including how thin the targets can be created. We present experimental results demonstrating extremely thin (under 200 nm) water sheet targets that can be used for ultra-intense laser-accelerated ion experiments conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Importantly, these experiments operate at a kHz repetition rate and the recovery time of the liquid targets is fast enough to allow the laser to interact with a refreshed, thin target on every shot. We present results from liquid water targets which are useful for proton acceleration experiments via the mechanism of Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). In future work, we will create thin sheets from deuterated water in order to perform laser-accelerated deuteron experiments. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the AFOSR, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra, and support from the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  5. Exposure of Polymeric Glazing Materials Using NREL's Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C.; Jorgensen, G.; Wylie, A.

    2010-01-01

    NREL's Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) selectively reflects and concentrates natural sunlight ultraviolet irradiance below 475 nm onto exposed samples to provide accelerated weathering of materials while keeping samples within realistic temperature limits. This paper will explain the design and implementation of the UAWS which allow it to simulate the effect of years of weathering in weeks of exposure. Exposure chamber design and instrumentation will be discussed for both a prototype UAWS used to test glazing samples as well as a commercial version of UAWS. Candidate polymeric glazing materials have been subjected to accelerated exposure testing at a light intensity level of up to 50 UV suns for an equivalent outdoor exposure in Miami, FL exceeding 15 years. Samples include an impact modified acrylic, fiberglass, and polycarbonate having several thin UV-screening coatings. Concurrent exposure is carried out for identical sample sets at two different temperatures to allow thermal effects to be quantified along with resistance to UV.

  6. A targeted controlled force injection of genetic material in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ahlén, Gustaf; Frelin, Lars; Holmström, Fredrik; Smetham, Grant; Augustyn, Steve; Sällberg, Matti

    2016-01-01

    A general limitation in gene delivery is the cellular uptake in lager animals including humans. Several approaches have been tested including liposomes, micro-needles, in vivo electro-transfer, ballistic delivery, and needle-free delivery. All these techniques have individual limitations. One approach reproducibly delivering genetic material in muscle tissue in nonhuman primates is hydrodynamic injection, a forced injection of a volume equaling the volume of the tissue to be transfected thereby causing an increased local pressure resulting in an improved uptake of genetic material. We transferred the principle of hydrodynamic injection to a device, where a small injection volume can be delivered to a targeted tissue volume, termed in vivo intracellular injection (IVIN). The device is based on needle(s) with apertures along the needle shafts, where multiple needles can fix the tissue volume to be transfected. The apertures direct the injection from a central needle outward or inward to the centroid of a geometric arrangement thereby targeting the tissue to be transfected. With a controlled force, this results in a targeted injection with increased transfection efficiency. We here show that the IVIN technology reproducibly improved plasmid uptake and expression and the immunogenicity. The IVIN technology can be generally applied to a targeted delivery of genetic materials. PMID:27069951

  7. Experimental characterization of magnetic materials for the magnetic shielding of cryomodules in particle accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sah, Sanjay; Myneni, Ganapati; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2015-10-26

    The magnetic properties of two important passive magnetic shielding materials (A4K and Amumetal) for accelerator applications, subjected to various processing and heat treatment conditions are studied comprehensively over a wide range of temperatures: from cryogenic to room temperature. Furthermore, we analyze the effect of processing on the extent of degradation of the magnetic properties of both materials and investigate the possibility of restoring these properties by re-annealing.

  8. Target normal sheath acceleration of foil ions by laser-trapped hot electrons from a long subcritical-density preplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, S. X.; Yu, Wei; Shen, B. F.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Xu, Han; Wong, A. Y.; Wang, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    In a long subcritical density plasma, an ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse can self-organize into a fast but sub-relativistic propagating structure consisting of the modulated laser light and a large number of trapped electrons from the plasma. Upon impact of the structure with a solid foil target placed in the latter, the remaining laser light is reflected, but the dense and hot trapped electrons pass through the foil, together with the impact-generated target-frontsurface electrons to form a dense hot electron cloud at the back of the target suitable for enhancing target normal sheath acceleration of the target-backsurface ions. The accelerated ions are well collimated and of high charge and energy densities, with peak energies a full order of magnitude higher than that from target normal sheath acceleration without the subcritical density plasma. In the latter case, the space-charge field accelerating the ions is limited since they are formed only by the target-frontsurface electrons during the very short instant of laser reflection.

  9. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L.; Velyhan, A.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Vassura, L.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of the oligomeric surface structures on polyamide materials formed during accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Chernev, Boril S; Eder, Gabriele C

    2011-10-01

    Crystalline surface species were observed at the surface of polyamide 12 materials upon accelerated aging. After detection of the depositions with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the crystalline surface precipitations were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman imaging microscopy. These surface species were supposed to be cyclic oligomers (dimer and trimer) of the PA12 monomer laurolactam, which are usually present in polyamide materials and tend to migrate to the surface when the material is subjected to accelerated aging. The evidence for the chemical identity of the crystalline surface structures to be mainly the cyclic dimer and trimer of laurolactam was given by melting-point identification and mass spectroscopic analysis of the methanol eluate of the surface. The Raman and FT-IR spectra of the mixture were extracted from the recorded images.

  11. Target and Projectile: Material Effects on Crater Excavation and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L. B.; Burleson, T.; Cintala, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling relationships allow the initial conditions of an impact to be related to the excavation flow and final crater size and have proven useful in understanding the various processes that lead to the formation of a planetary-scale crater. In addition, they can be examined and tested through laboratory experiments in which the initial conditions of the impact are known and ejecta kinematics and final crater morphometry are measured directly. Current scaling relationships are based on a point-source assumption and treat the target material as a continuous medium; however, in planetary-scale impacts, this may not always be the case. Fragments buried in a megaregolith, for instance, could easily approach or exceed the dimensions of the impactor; rubble-pile asteroids could present similar, if not greater, structural complexity. Experiments allow exploration into the effects of target material properties and projectile deformation style on crater excavation and dimensions. This contribution examines two of these properties: (1) the deformation style of the projectile, ductile (aluminum) or brittle (soda-lime glass) and (2) the grain size of the target material, 0.5-1 mm vs. 1-3 mm sand.

  12. Cavitation erosion: Using the target material as a pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Samir Chandra; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Fivel, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Numerical prediction of mass loss due to cavitation erosion requires the knowledge of the hydrodynamic impact loads generated by cavitation bubble collapses. Experimental measurements of such impact loads using conventional pressure sensors are not reliable (if not impossible) due to the micron size and the very small duration of the loading. In this paper, a new method to estimate these loading conditions is proposed based on cavitation pitting tests and an iterative inverse finite element modeling. The principle of the method is as follows. First, numerous pits corresponding to localized plastically deformed regions are identified from a cavitation test performed in a dedicated tunnel. Then each pit is numerically reproduced by finite element simulations of the material response to a representative Gaussian pressure field supposed to mimic a single bubble collapse. This gives the size and pressure distribution of the bubble impacts. The prime objective of this study is to find out if the target material itself could be used as a pressure sensor or not, i.e., if the cavitation pits left on the surface of the tested specimen could provide the characteristics of the cavitating flow in terms of pressure fields independently of the target material. Pitting tests were done on three materials, namely, 7075 Aluminum alloy (Al-7075), 2205 duplex stainless steel (A-2205), and Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) at three different flow conditions and the impact loads have been estimated for each identified pit. Very interestingly, a statistical analysis shows that the estimated impact loads are material independent at all flow conditions, provided the material properties are characterized properly. It is also shown that for some materials, the constitutive parameters obtained from compression tests are not satisfactory.

  13. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Accelerated lifetime test of vibration isolator made of Metal Rubber material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Hongrui; Ma, Yong; Wang, Xianbiao; Chen, Jianye; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-01-01

    The Metal Rubber material (MR) is a kind of material with nonlinear damping characteristics for its application in the field of aerospace, petrochemical industry and so on. The study on the lifetime of MR material is impendent to its application in engineering. Based on the dynamic characteristic of MR, the accelerated lifetime experiments of vibration isolators made of MR working under random vibration load were conducted. The effects of structural parameters of MR components on the lifetime of isolators were studied and modelled with the fitting curves of degradation data. The lifetime prediction methods were proposed based on the models.

  15. Prompt nuclear analytical techniques for material research in accelerator driven transmutation technologies: Prospects and quantitative analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Červená, J.; Peřina, V.; Mach, R.; Peka, I.

    1998-04-01

    Accelerator driven transmutation technology (ADTT) is a promissing way toward liquidation of spent nuclear fuel, nuclear wastes and weapon grade Pu. The ADTT facility comprises a high current (proton) accelerator supplying a subcritical reactor assembly with spallation neutrons. The reactor part is supposed to be cooled by molten fluorides or metals which serve, at the same time, as a carrier of nuclear fuel. Assumed high working temperature (400-600°C) and high radiation load in the subcritical reactor and spallation neutron source put forward the problem of optimal choice of ADTT construction materials, especially from the point of their radiation and corrosion resistance when in contact with liquid working media. The use of prompt nuclear analytical techniques in ADTT related material research is considered and examples of preliminary analytical results obtained using neutron depth profiling method are shown for illustration.

  16. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  17. On the Use of Accelerated Aging Methods for Screening High Temperature Polymeric Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Grayson, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A rational approach to the problem of accelerated testing of high temperature polymeric composites is discussed. The methods provided are considered tools useful in the screening of new materials systems for long-term application to extreme environments that include elevated temperature, moisture, oxygen, and mechanical load. The need for reproducible mechanisms, indicator properties, and real-time data are outlined as well as the methodologies for specific aging mechanisms.

  18. Predictive Simulation and Design of Materials by Quasicontinuum and Accelerated Dynamics Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luskin, Mitchell; James, Richard; Tadmor, Ellad

    2014-03-30

    This project developed the hyper-QC multiscale method to make possible the computation of previously inaccessible space and time scales for materials with thermally activated defects. The hyper-QC method combines the spatial coarse-graining feature of a finite temperature extension of the quasicontinuum (QC) method (aka “hot-QC”) with the accelerated dynamics feature of hyperdynamics. The hyper-QC method was developed, optimized, and tested from a rigorous mathematical foundation.

  19. Heavy-ion inertial fusion: influence of target gain on accelerator parameters for vacuum-propagation regimes in reaction chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.; Bangerter, R.O.; Barletta, W.A.; Fawley, W.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1982-03-04

    Target physics imposes requirements on the design of inertial fusion drivers. The influence of beam propagation in near vacuum fusion reaction chambers is evaluated for the relation between target gain and the phase-space requirements of heavy-ion accelerators. Initial results suggest that neutralization of the ion beam has a much greater positive effect than the deleterious one of beam stripping provided that the fusion chamber pressure is < 10/sup -3/ torr (of Li vapor or equivalent).

  20. Acceleration of deuterons with suppression of electronic conductance in a vacuum diode with a laser target on the anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Kozlovskii, K. I.; Shatokhin, V. L.

    2016-12-01

    We report new experimental results on the acceleration of deuterons in a compact coaxial diode with the suppression of electronic conductance by a constant longitudinal magnetic field. Plasma containing deuterons is created on a laser TiD target located on the anode. The pulse of accelerating voltage is formed by means of the Arkad'ev-Marx generator. The cathode symmetrically surrounds the anode and comprises a hollow permanent ring magnet with an inner radius of no more than 0.02 m and an on-axis induction of up to 0.4 T, which provides the magnetic insulation of the accelerating gap. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of obtaining accelerated deuterons with energy of up to 300 keV and a current of up to 0.5 kA with a pulse duration of 0.2 μs.

  1. Accelerated materials design of fast oxygen ionic conductors based on first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xingfeng; Mo, Yifei

    Over the past decades, significant research efforts have been dedicated to seeking fast oxygen ion conductor materials, which have important technological applications in electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen separation membranes, and sensors. Recently, Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 (NBT) was reported as a new family of fast oxygen ionic conductor. We will present our first principles computation study aims to understand the O diffusion mechanisms in the NBT material and to design this material with enhanced oxygen ionic conductivity. Using the NBT materials as an example, we demonstrate the computation capability to evaluate the phase stability, chemical stability, and ionic diffusion of the ionic conductor materials. We reveal the effects of local atomistic configurations and dopants on oxygen diffusion and identify the intrinsic limiting factors in increasing the ionic conductivity of the NBT materials. Novel doping strategies were predicted and demonstrated by the first principles calculations. In particular, the K doped NBT compound achieved good phase stability and an order of magnitude increase in oxygen ionic conductivity of up to 0.1 S cm-1 at 900 K compared to the experimental Mg doped compositions. Our results provide new avenues for the future design of the NBT materials and demonstrate the accelerated design of new ionic conductor materials based on first principles techniques. This computation methodology and workflow can be applied to the materials design of any (e.g. Li +, Na +) fast ion-conducting materials.

  2. Acceleration of protons to above 6 MeV using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pomerantz, I.; Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Gordon, D.; Sprangel, P.; Zigler, A.

    2012-07-09

    A scheme is presented for using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets for the generation of fast protons. This novel method may relax the requirements for very high laser intensities, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based ion acceleration system.

  3. Acceleration factors for oxidative aging of polymeric materials by oxygen detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, Roger Alan; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Skutnik, Julie Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Three methods that were used to measure the chemical changes associated with oxidative degradation of polymeric materials are presented. The first method is based on the nuclear activation of {sup 18}O in an elastomer that was thermally aged in an {sup 18}O{sub 2} atmosphere. Second, the alcohol groups in a thermally aged elastomer were derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and their concentration measured via {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy. Finally, a respirometer was used to directly measure the oxidative rates of a polyurethane foam as a function of aging temperature. The measurement of the oxidation rates enabled acceleration factors for oxidative degradation of these materials to be calculated.

  4. Synchronized chaotic targeting and acceleration of surface chemistry in prebiotic hydrothermal microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Priye, Aashish; Yu, Yuncheng; Hassan, Yassin A.; Ugaz, Victor M.

    2017-01-01

    Porous mineral formations near subsea alkaline hydrothermal vents embed microenvironments that make them potential hot spots for prebiotic biochemistry. But, synthesis of long-chain macromolecules needed to support higher-order functions in living systems (e.g., polypeptides, proteins, and nucleic acids) cannot occur without enrichment of chemical precursors before initiating polymerization, and identifying a suitable mechanism has become a key unanswered question in the origin of life. Here, we apply simulations and in situ experiments to show how 3D chaotic thermal convection—flows that naturally permeate hydrothermal pore networks—supplies a robust mechanism for focused accumulation at discrete targeted surface sites. This interfacial enrichment is synchronized with bulk homogenization of chemical species, yielding two distinct processes that are seemingly opposed yet synergistically combine to accelerate surface reaction kinetics by several orders of magnitude. Our results suggest that chaotic thermal convection may play a previously unappreciated role in mediating surface-catalyzed synthesis in the prebiotic milieu. PMID:28119504

  5. Targeting dendritic cells to accelerate T-cell activation overcomes a bottleneck in tuberculosis vaccine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kristin L.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Das, Shibali; Gopal, Radha; Horne, William; Connell, Terry D.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Kolls, Jay K.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine that induces sterilizing immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been elusive. Absence of sterilizing immunity induced by TB vaccines may be due to delayed activation of mucosal dendritic cells (DCs), and subsequent delay in antigen presentation and activation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. Here we show that pulmonary delivery of activated M. tuberculosis antigen-primed DCs into vaccinated mice, at the time of M. tuberculosis exposure, can overcome the delay in accumulation of vaccine-induced CD4+ T-cell responses. In addition, activating endogenous host CD103+ DCs and the CD40–CD40L pathway can similarly induce rapid accumulation of vaccine-induced lung CD4+ T-cell responses and limit early M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, our study provides proof of concept that targeting mucosal DCs can accelerate vaccine-induced T-cell responses on M. tuberculosis infection, and provide insights to overcome bottlenecks in TB vaccine efficacy. PMID:28004802

  6. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  7. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; ...

    2014-12-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. The large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities mademore » from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.« less

  8. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. The large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  9. Biological/biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry targets. 2. Physical, morphological, and structural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2008-10-15

    The number of biological/biomedical applications that require AMS to achieve their goals is increasing, and so is the need for a better understanding of the physical, morphological, and structural traits of high quality of AMS targets. The metrics of quality included color, hardness/texture, and appearance (photo and SEM), along with FT-IR, Raman, and powder X-ray diffraction spectra that correlate positively with reliable and intense ion currents and accuracy, precision, and sensitivity of fraction modern ( F m). Our previous method produced AMS targets of gray-colored iron-carbon materials (ICM) 20% of the time and of graphite-coated iron (GCI) 80% of the time. The ICM was hard, its FT-IR spectra lacked the sp (2) bond, its Raman spectra had no detectable G' band at 2700 cm (-1), and it had more iron carbide (Fe 3C) crystal than nanocrystalline graphite or graphitizable carbon (g-C). ICM produced low and variable ion current whereas the opposite was true for the graphitic GCI. Our optimized method produced AMS targets of graphite-coated iron powder (GCIP) 100% of the time. The GCIP shared some of the same properties as GCI in that both were black in color, both produced robust ion current consistently, their FT-IR spectra had the sp (2) bond, their Raman spectra had matching D, G, G', D +G, and D '' bands, and their XRD spectra showed matching crystal size. GCIP was a powder that was easy to tamp into AMS target holders that also facilitated high throughput. We concluded that AMS targets of GCIP were a mix of graphitizable carbon and Fe 3C crystal, because none of their spectra, FT-IR, Raman, or XRD, matched exactly those of the graphite standard. Nevertheless, AMS targets of GCIP consistently produced the strong, reliable, and reproducible ion currents for high-throughput AMS analysis (270 targets per skilled analyst/day) along with accurate and precise F m values.

  10. Engineering tumor cell targeting in nanoscale amyloidal materials.

    PubMed

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Saccardo, Paolo; Cortés, Francisco; Rueda, Fabián; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramon; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-01-06

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are non-toxic, mechanically stable and functional protein amyloids within the nanoscale size range that are able to naturally penetrate into mammalian cells, where they deliver the embedded protein in a functional form. The potential use of inclusion bodies in protein delivery or protein replacement therapies is strongly impaired by the absence of specificity in cell binding and penetration, thus preventing targeting. To address this issue, we have here explored whether the genetic fusion of two tumor-homing peptides, the CXCR4 ligands R9 and T22, to an inclusion body-forming green fluorescent protein (GFP), would keep the interaction potential and the functionality of the fused peptides and then confer CXCR4 specificity in cell binding and further uptake of the materials. The fusion proteins have been well produced in Escherichia coli in their full-length form, keeping the potential for fluorescence emission of the partner GFP. By using specific inhibitors of CXCR4 binding, we have demonstrated that the engineered protein particles are able to penetrate CXCR4(+) cells, in a receptor-mediated way, without toxicity or visible cytopathic effects, proving the availability of the peptide ligands on the surface of inclusion bodies. Since no further modification is required upon their purification, the biological production of genetically targeted inclusion bodies opens a plethora of cost-effective possibilities in the tissue-specific intracellular transfer of functional proteins through the use of structurally and functionally tailored soft materials.

  11. Engineering tumor cell targeting in nanoscale amyloidal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Virtudes Céspedes, María; Saccardo, Paolo; Cortés, Francisco; Rueda, Fabián; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramon; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are non-toxic, mechanically stable and functional protein amyloids within the nanoscale size range that are able to naturally penetrate into mammalian cells, where they deliver the embedded protein in a functional form. The potential use of inclusion bodies in protein delivery or protein replacement therapies is strongly impaired by the absence of specificity in cell binding and penetration, thus preventing targeting. To address this issue, we have here explored whether the genetic fusion of two tumor-homing peptides, the CXCR4 ligands R9 and T22, to an inclusion body-forming green fluorescent protein (GFP), would keep the interaction potential and the functionality of the fused peptides and then confer CXCR4 specificity in cell binding and further uptake of the materials. The fusion proteins have been well produced in Escherichia coli in their full-length form, keeping the potential for fluorescence emission of the partner GFP. By using specific inhibitors of CXCR4 binding, we have demonstrated that the engineered protein particles are able to penetrate CXCR4+ cells, in a receptor-mediated way, without toxicity or visible cytopathic effects, proving the availability of the peptide ligands on the surface of inclusion bodies. Since no further modification is required upon their purification, the biological production of genetically targeted inclusion bodies opens a plethora of cost-effective possibilities in the tissue-specific intracellular transfer of functional proteins through the use of structurally and functionally tailored soft materials.

  12. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  13. Measurements and effects of backstreaming ions produced at bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Haijun; Zhu Jun; Chen Nan; Xie Yutong; Jiang Xiaoguo; Jian Cheng

    2010-04-15

    Positive ions released from x-ray converter target impacted by electron beam of millimeter spot size can be trapped and accelerated in the incident beam's potential well. As the ions move upstream, the beam will be pinched first and then defocused at the target. Four Faraday cups are used to collect backstreaming ions produced at the bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator (LIA). Experimental and theoretical results show that the backstreaming positive ions density and velocity are about 10{sup 21}/m{sup 3} and 2-3 mm/{mu}s, respectively. The theoretical and experimental results of electron beam envelope with ions and without ions are also presented. The discussions show that the backstreaming positive ions will not affect the electron beam focusing and envelope radius in Dragon-I LIA.

  14. Measurements and effects of backstreaming ions produced at bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijun; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Nan; Xie, Yutong; Jiang, Xiaoguo; Jian, Cheng

    2010-04-01

    Positive ions released from x-ray converter target impacted by electron beam of millimeter spot size can be trapped and accelerated in the incident beam's potential well. As the ions move upstream, the beam will be pinched first and then defocused at the target. Four Faraday cups are used to collect backstreaming ions produced at the bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator (LIA). Experimental and theoretical results show that the backstreaming positive ions density and velocity are about 1021/m3 and 2-3 mm/μs, respectively. The theoretical and experimental results of electron beam envelope with ions and without ions are also presented. The discussions show that the backstreaming positive ions will not affect the electron beam focusing and envelope radius in Dragon-I LIA.

  15. Measurements and effects of backstreaming ions produced at bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijun; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Nan; Xie, Yutong; Jiang, Xiaoguo; Jian, Cheng

    2010-04-01

    Positive ions released from x-ray converter target impacted by electron beam of millimeter spot size can be trapped and accelerated in the incident beam's potential well. As the ions move upstream, the beam will be pinched first and then defocused at the target. Four Faraday cups are used to collect backstreaming ions produced at the bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator (LIA). Experimental and theoretical results show that the backstreaming positive ions density and velocity are about 10(21)/m(3) and 2-3 mm/micros, respectively. The theoretical and experimental results of electron beam envelope with ions and without ions are also presented. The discussions show that the backstreaming positive ions will not affect the electron beam focusing and envelope radius in Dragon-I LIA.

  16. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  17. Radiation Field Forming for Industrial Electron Accelerators Using Rare-Earth Magnetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, A. N.; Khankin, V. V.; Shvedunov, N. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Yurov, D. S.

    2016-09-01

    The article describes the radiation field forming system for industrial electron accelerators, which would have uniform distribution of linear charge density at the surface of an item being irradiated perpendicular to the direction of its motion. Its main element is non-linear quadrupole lens made with the use of rare-earth magnetic materials. The proposed system has a number of advantages over traditional beam scanning systems that use electromagnets, including easier product irradiation planning, lower instantaneous local dose rate, smaller size, lower cost. Provided are the calculation results for a 10 MeV industrial electron accelerator, as well as measurement results for current distribution in the prototype build based on calculations.

  18. The accelerated characterization of viscoelastic composite materials. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Necessary fundamentals relative to composite materials and viscoelasticity are reviewed. The accelerated characterization techniques of time temperature superposition and time temperature stress superposition are described. An experimental procedure for applying the latter to composites is given along with results obtained on a particular T300/934 graphite/epoxy. The accelerated characterization predictions are found in good agreement with actual long term tests. A postcuring phenomenon is discussed that necessitates thermal conditioning of the specimen prior to testing. A closely related phenomenon of physical aging is described as well as the effect of each on the glass transition temperature and strength. Creep rupture results are provided for a variety of geometries and temperatures for T300/934 graphite/epoxy. The results are found to compare reasonably with a modified kinetic rate theory.

  19. Energetic Particles Accelerated by Shocks in the Heliosphere: What is the Source Material?

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.M.; Desai, M.I.; Mazur, J.E.; Dwyer, J.R.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical studies of particle acceleration by shocks have successfully modeled many observed features of the particle energy spectra and temporal variations; however, spectral slopes do not agree with in situ observations, and intensities show huge variations not explained by the models. Recent observations have shown that trace ions in the solar wind, such as 3He and He+, are present in the accelerated particles with enhanced abundances. The average heavy ion composition is also found to differ significantly from the solar wind. It is observed that these features correlate significantly with ambient suprathermal material abundances, giving evidence that the suprathermals are the seed population that is actually energized. This raises important new questions such as why the suprathermals are favored over the much more abundant solar wind. Since the suprathermal ion population has many more contributors, and much larger variability than the solar wind, this population needs much more detailed study to allow a closure of theory and observations in interplanetary space.

  20. Acceleration of protons in plasma produced from a thin plastic or aluminum target by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Ryc, L.; Torrisi, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Makowski, J.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration of protons in plasma produced from thin mylar (3.5 μ m) and aluminum (2 μm) targets by a 45-fs laser pulses with the energy of 400 mJ and the intensity of up to 1019 W/cm2 was investigated. Characteristics of forward-accelerated protons were measured by the time-of-flight method. In the measurements, special attention was paid to the dependence of proton beam parameters on the laser focus position (FP) in relation to the target surface which resulted in the intensity change within a factor of ~ 10. It was observed that in the case of using the Mylar target, the dependence of both the maximum (Epmax) and the mean (langleEprangle) proton energy on |Δx| is clearly non-symmetric with regard to the point where FP = 0 (the focal plane on the target surface) and highest proton energies are achieved when the focal plane is situated in front of the target. In particular, for the target with the thickness of 3.5 μ m Epmax reached 2.2 MeV for FP = +50 μm while for FP = 0 and FP = -100 μm the maximum proton energies reached only 1.6 MeV and 1.3 MeV, respectively. For the aluminum target of 2 μm thickness Ep changed only within ~ 40% and the highest proton energies reached 2.4 MeV.

  1. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Jung, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-07-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  2. A tool for accelerating material calculations through the generation of highly efficient k-point grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Tim; Wisesa, Pandu

    The calculation of many material properties requires the evaluation of an integral over the Brillouin zone, which is commonly approximated by sampling a regular grid of points, known as k-points, in reciprocal space. We have developed an automated tool for generating k-point grids that significantly accelerates the calculation of material properties compared to commonly used methods. Our tool, which is being made freely available to the public, is capable of generating highly efficient k-point grids in a fraction of a second for any crystalline material. We present an overview of our method, benchmark results, and a discussion of how it can be integrated into a high-throughput computing environment.

  3. Computational Materials Science and Chemistry: Accelerating Discovery and Innovation through Simulation-Based Engineering and Science

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, George; Glotzer, Sharon; McCurdy, Bill; Roberto, Jim

    2010-07-26

    This report is based on a SC Workshop on Computational Materials Science and Chemistry for Innovation on July 26-27, 2010, to assess the potential of state-of-the-art computer simulations to accelerate understanding and discovery in materials science and chemistry, with a focus on potential impacts in energy technologies and innovation. The urgent demand for new energy technologies has greatly exceeded the capabilities of today's materials and chemical processes. To convert sunlight to fuel, efficiently store energy, or enable a new generation of energy production and utilization technologies requires the development of new materials and processes of unprecedented functionality and performance. New materials and processes are critical pacing elements for progress in advanced energy systems and virtually all industrial technologies. Over the past two decades, the United States has developed and deployed the world's most powerful collection of tools for the synthesis, processing, characterization, and simulation and modeling of materials and chemical systems at the nanoscale, dimensions of a few atoms to a few hundred atoms across. These tools, which include world-leading x-ray and neutron sources, nanoscale science facilities, and high-performance computers, provide an unprecedented view of the atomic-scale structure and dynamics of materials and the molecular-scale basis of chemical processes. For the first time in history, we are able to synthesize, characterize, and model materials and chemical behavior at the length scale where this behavior is controlled. This ability is transformational for the discovery process and, as a result, confers a significant competitive advantage. Perhaps the most spectacular increase in capability has been demonstrated in high performance computing. Over the past decade, computational power has increased by a factor of a million due to advances in hardware and software. This rate of improvement, which shows no sign of abating, has

  4. Shock ion acceleration by an ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse via relativistic transparency in an exploded target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Cho, Myung-Hoon; Song, Hyung Seon; Kang, Teyoun; Park, Hyung Ju; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2015-10-01

    We investigated ion acceleration by an electrostatic shock in an exploded target irradiated by an ultrashort, circularly polarized laser pulse by means of one- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We discovered that the laser field penetrating via relativistic transparency (RT) rapidly heated the upstream electron plasma to enable the formation of a high-speed electrostatic shock. Owing to the RT-based rapid heating and the fast compression of the initial density spike by a circularly polarized pulse, a new regime of the shock ion acceleration driven by an ultrashort (20-40 fs), moderately intense (1-1.4 PW) laser pulse is envisaged. This regime enables more efficient shock ion acceleration under a limited total pulse energy than a linearly polarized pulse with crystal laser systems of λ ˜1 μ m .

  5. Shock ion acceleration by an ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse via relativistic transparency in an exploded target.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Cho, Myung-Hoon; Song, Hyung Seon; Kang, Teyoun; Park, Hyung Ju; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2015-10-01

    We investigated ion acceleration by an electrostatic shock in an exploded target irradiated by an ultrashort, circularly polarized laser pulse by means of one- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We discovered that the laser field penetrating via relativistic transparency (RT) rapidly heated the upstream electron plasma to enable the formation of a high-speed electrostatic shock. Owing to the RT-based rapid heating and the fast compression of the initial density spike by a circularly polarized pulse, a new regime of the shock ion acceleration driven by an ultrashort (20-40 fs), moderately intense (1-1.4 PW) laser pulse is envisaged. This regime enables more efficient shock ion acceleration under a limited total pulse energy than a linearly polarized pulse with crystal laser systems of λ∼1μm.

  6. Research of the optical properties of solar-reflective materials subjected to accelerated and nonaccelerated exposure tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rausch, R A

    1980-10-01

    Research on candidate reflective materials for use in solar thermal power applications is reported. The candidate materials have been subjected to exposure tests conducted previously at the Phoenix, Arizona test site. The samples have been exposed to each of three test conditions - one non-accelerated and two different accelerated tests (nominally 8 suns). Post-exposure optical measurements of spectral reflectance were then conducted for the exposure test samples. Reflectance specularity data for the subject materials are obtained from optical measurements performed by Battelle-PNL. Summarized is an investigation of the accumulated reflectance data for correlations using three of the various materials included in the exposure test sample set. (LEW)

  7. On the Use of Accelerated Test Methods for Characterization of Advanced Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    2003-01-01

    A rational approach to the problem of accelerated testing for material characterization of advanced polymer matrix composites is discussed. The experimental and analytical methods provided should be viewed as a set of tools useful in the screening of material systems for long-term engineering properties in aerospace applications. Consideration is given to long-term exposure in extreme environments that include elevated temperature, reduced temperature, moisture, oxygen, and mechanical load. Analytical formulations useful for predictive models that are based on the principles of time-based superposition are presented. The need for reproducible mechanisms, indicator properties, and real-time data are outlined as well as the methodologies for determining specific aging mechanisms.

  8. Accelerator-Based PIXE and STIM Analysis of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerman, W.A.; Stanaland, T.L.; Boudreaux, P.; Elberson, L.; Fontenot, J.; Gates, E.; Greco, R.; McBride, M.; Woodward, A.; Edwards, D.

    2003-08-26

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. A totally reflective sail experiences a pressure of 9.1 {mu}Pa at a distance of 1 AU from the Sun. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. One of the current challenges is to develop strong, lightweight, and radiation resistant sail materials. This paper will discuss initial results from a Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) analysis of candidate solar sail materials.

  9. RF Surface Impedance Characterization of Potential New Materials for SRF-based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Binping; Eremeev, Grigory V.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. Lawrence; Kelley, Michael J.

    2012-09-01

    In the development of new superconducting materials for possible use in SRF-based accelerators, it is useful to work with small candidate samples rather than complete resonant cavities. The recently commissioned Jefferson Lab RF Surface Impedance Characterization (SIC) system can presently characterize the central region of 50 mm diameter disk samples of various materials from 2 to 40 K exposed to RF magnetic fields up to 14 mT at 7.4 GHz. We report the recent measurement results of bulk Nb, thin film Nb on Cu and sapphire substrates, Nb{sub 3}Sn sample, and thin film MgB{sub 2} on sapphire substrate provided by colleagues at JLab and Temple University.

  10. Ion irradiation studies of construction materials for high-power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafin, E.; Seidl, T.; Plotnikov, A.; Strašík, I.; Pavlović, M.; Miglierini, M.; Stanćek, S.; Fertman, A.; Lanćok, A.

    The paper reviews the activities and reports the current results of GSI-INTAS projects that are dealing with investigations of construction materials for high-power accelerators and their components. Three types of materials have been investigated, namely metals (stainless steel and copper), metallic glasses (Nanoperm, Finemet and Vitrovac) and organic materials (polyimide insulators and glass fiber reinforced plastics/GFRP). The materials were irradiated by different ion beams with various fluencies and energies. The influence of radiation on selected physical properties of these materials has been investigated with the aid of gamma-ray spectroscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), conversion electrons Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), optical spectroscopy (IR and UV/VIS) and other analytical methods. Some experiments were accompanied with computer simulations by FLUKA, SHIELD and SRIM codes. Validity of the codes was verified by comparison of the simulation results with experiments. After the validation, the codes were used to complete the data that could not be obtained experimentally.

  11. Modifications of thick-target model: re-acceleration of electron beams by static and stochastic electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M.; Karlický, M.; Moravec, Z.; Kašparová, J.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The collisional thick-target model (CTTM) of the impulsive phase of solar flares, together with the famous Carmichael, Sturrock, Hirayama, and Kopp-Pneuman (CSHKP) model, presented for many years a "standard" model, which straightforwardly explained many observational aspects of flares. On the other hand, many critical issues appear when the concept is scrutinised theoretically or with the new generation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations. The famous "electron number problem" or problems related to transport of enormous particle fluxes though the corona represent only two of them. To resolve the discrepancies, several modifications of the CTTM appeared. Aims: We study two of them based on the global and local re-acceleration of non-thermal electrons by static and stochastic electric fields during their transport from the coronal acceleration site to the thick-target region in the chromosphere. We concentrate on a comparison of the non-thermal electron distribution functions, chromospheric energy deposits, and HXR spectra obtained for both considered modifications with the CTTM itself. Methods: The results were obtained using a relativistic test-particle approach. We simulated the transport of non-thermal electrons with a power-law spectrum including the influence of scattering, energy losses, magnetic mirroring, and also the effects of the electric fields corresponding to both modifications of the CTTM. Results: We show that both modifications of the CTTM change the outcome of the chromospheric bombardment in several aspects. The modifications lead to an increase in chromospheric energy deposit, change of its spatial distribution, and a substantial increase in the corresponding HXR spectrum intensity. Conclusions: The re-acceleration in both models reduces the demands on the efficiency of the primary coronal accelerator, on the electron fluxes transported from the corona downwards, and on the total number of accelerated coronal electrons during flares.

  12. Accelerated Sorption Diffusion for Cu(II) Retention by Anchorage of Nano-zirconium Dioxide onto Highly charged Polystyrene Material

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingrui; Du, Qing; Jiao, Tifeng; Teng, Jie; Sun, Qina; Peng, Qiuming; Chen, Xinqing; Gao, Faming

    2015-01-01

    The development of nanocomposite with strong adsorption ability exhibits great potential applications for environmental remediation. However, the pore blocking in preparation frequently constrains sorption diffusion, resulting in low utilization efficiency. Here we synthesized a new nano-ZrO2/Polystyrene (NZO-PS) material tailored with a specific fixed SO3-Na group to enhance Cu(II) removal. The NZO-PS exhibits efficient Cu(II) sequestration in a wide pH range (3.0–6.5) and preferential sorption performances. The efficient kinetic behavior and column applicability suggest the blocked pore channel is not a matter when presence of negatively charged moiety, which accelerates Cu(II) sorption diffusion and enrichment toward target active site. Moreover, the exhausted NZO-PS can be readily regenerated through HCl-NaCl binary solution. The preparation route can be extended to synthesize other functional composited materials. Simultaneously, the characteristics of simplicity, high-yield and regeneration provide some promising industrial merits. PMID:26184921

  13. DOE accelerated strategic computing initiative: challenges and opportunities for predictive materials simulation capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mailhiot, C.

    1997-10-01

    In response to the unprecedented national security challenges derived from the end of nuclear testing, the Defense Programs of the Department of Energy has developed a long-term strategic plan based on a vigorous Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program. The main objective of the SBSS program is to ensure confidence in the performance, safety, and reliability of the stockpile on the basis of a fundamental science-based approach. A central element of this approach is the development of predictive, full-physics, full-scale computer simulation tools. As a critical component of the SBSS program, the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) was established to provide the required advances in computer platforms and to enable predictive, physics-based simulation technologies. Foremost among the key elements needed to develop predictive simulation capabilities, the development of improved physics-based materials models has been universally identified as one of the highest-priority, highest-leverage activity. We indicate some of the materials modeling issues of relevance to stockpile materials and illustrate how the ASCI program will enable the tools necessary to advance the state-of-the-art in the field of computational condensed matter and materials physics.

  14. Shock-isolation material selection for electronic packages in hard-target environment

    SciTech Connect

    Stotts, Jarrett Eugene

    2016-11-01

    High velocity munitions and kinetic penetrators experience monumental external forces, impulses, and accelerations. The hard target environment is immensely taxing on sophisticated electronic components and recorders designed to retrieve valuable data related to the systems performance and characteristics in the periods of flight, impact, and post-impact. Such electronic systems have upper limits of overall shock intensity which, if exceeded, will either shorten the operating life of the parts or risk destruction resulting in loss of both the data and the principal value of the recorder. The focus of this project was to refine the categorization of leading material types for encapsulation and passive shock isolation and implement them in a method useable for a wide variety of environments. Namely, a design methodology capable of being tailored to the specific impact conditions to maximize the lively hood of sensitive electronics and the information recorded. The results of the study concluded that the materials observed under consistent dynamic high strain rate tests, which include Conathane® EN-4/9, Slygard®-184, and Stycast™-2651, behaved well in certain aspects of energy transmission and shock when considering the frequency environment or package coupled with the isolation material’s application. Key points about the implementation of the materials in extreme shock environments is discussed with the connection to energy analysis, loss attributes, and pulse transmissibility modeling. However, attempts to model the materials solely based on energy transmissibility in the frequency domain using only external experimental data and simplified boundary conditions was not found to be consistent with that acquired from the pressure bar experiments. Further work will include the addition of further material experimentation of the encapsulants in other frequency and temperature states, confined and pre-load boundary states, and composite constructions.

  15. Dynamics of high-energy proton beam acceleration and focusing from hemisphere-cone targets by high-intensity lasers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Foord, M E; Wei, M S; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; McLean, H; Patel, P K; Beg, F N

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration and focusing of high-energy proton beams from fast-ignition (FI) -related hemisphere-cone assembled targets have been numerically studied by hybrid particle-in-cell simulations and compared with those from planar-foil and open-hemisphere targets. The whole physical process including the laser-plasma interaction has been self-consistently modeled for 15 ps, at which time the protons reach asymptotic motion. It is found that the achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradients in the co-moving hot electrons, which induce a transverse defocusing electric field that bends proton trajectories near the axis. For the advanced hemisphere-cone target, the flow of hot electrons along the cone wall induces a local transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement in proton focusing; however, it leads to a significant loss of longitudinal sheath potential, reducing the total conversion efficiency from laser to protons.

  16. The electrical performance of polymeric insulating materials under accelerated aging in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S.; Cherney, E.A.; Hackam, R. ); Orbeck, T. )

    1988-07-01

    A comparative study of the ac (60 Hz) surface aging in a fog chamber is reported on cylindrical rod samples of high temperature vulcanized (HTV) silicone rubber and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber containing various amounts of alumina trihydrate (ATH) and/or silica fillers. In low conductivity (250 ..mu..S/cm) fog, silicone rubber performed better than EPDM samples whereas in high conductivity (1000 ..mu..S/cm) fog, the order of performance was reversed. The mechanisms by which fillers impart tracking and erosion resistance to materials is discussed as influenced by the experimental conditions of the accelerated aging tests. Surface studies by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) demonstrate that the hydrophobicity of silicone rubber, despite the accumulation of surface contamination, can be attributed to migration of low molecular weight polymer chains and/or mobile fluids, such as silicone oil.

  17. Combining computation and experiment to accelerate the discovery of new hydrogen storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Donald

    2009-03-01

    The potential of emerging technologies such as fuel cells (FCs) and photovoltaics for environmentally-benign power generation has sparked renewed interest in the development of novel materials for high density energy storage. For applications in the transportation sector, the demands placed upon energy storage media are especially stringent, as a potential replacement for fossil-fuel-powered internal combustion engines -- namely, the proton exchange membrane FC -- utilizes hydrogen as a fuel. Although hydrogen has about three times the energy density of gasoline by weight, its volumetric energy density (even at 700 bar) is roughly a factor of six smaller. Consequently, the safe and efficient storage of hydrogen has been identified as one of the key materials-based challenges to realizing a transition to FC vehicles. This talk will present an overview of recent efforts at Ford aimed at developing new materials for reversible, solid state hydrogen storage. A tight coupling between first-principles modeling and experiments has greatly accelerated our efforts, and several examples illustrating the benefits of this approach will be presented.

  18. Detection of Fast Moving and Accelerating Targets Compensating Range and Doppler Migration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Radon -Fourier transform has been introduced to realize long- term coherent integration of the moving targets with range migration [8, 9]. Radon ...2010) Long-time coherent integration for radar target detection base on Radon -Fourier transform, in Proceedings of the IEEE Radar Conference, pp...432–436. 9. Xu, J., Yu, J., Peng, Y. & Xia, X. (2011) Radon -Fourier transform for radar target detection, I: Generalized Doppler filter bank, IEEE

  19. Quality of graphite target for biological/biomedical/environmental applications of 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Ortalan, Volkan; Browning, Nigel D; Clifford, Andrew J

    2010-03-15

    Catalytic graphitization for (14)C-accelerator mass spectrometry ((14)C-AMS) produced various forms of elemental carbon. Our high-throughput Zn reduction method (C/Fe = 1:5, 500 degrees C, 3 h) produced the AMS target of graphite-coated iron powder (GCIP), a mix of nongraphitic carbon and Fe(3)C. Crystallinity of the AMS targets of GCIP (nongraphitic carbon) was increased to turbostratic carbon by raising the C/Fe ratio from 1:5 to 1:1 and the graphitization temperature from 500 to 585 degrees C. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon had a large isotopic fractionation and a low AMS ion current. The AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon also yielded less accurate/precise (14)C-AMS measurements because of the lower graphitization yield and lower thermal conductivity that were caused by the higher C/Fe ratio of 1:1. On the other hand, the AMS target of GCIP containing nongraphitic carbon had higher graphitization yield and better thermal conductivity over the AMS target of GCIP containing turbostratic carbon due to optimal surface area provided by the iron powder. Finally, graphitization yield and thermal conductivity were stronger determinants (over graphite crystallinity) for accurate/precise/high-throughput biological, biomedical, and environmental (14)C-AMS applications such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination (ADME), and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) of nutrients, drugs, phytochemicals, and environmental chemicals.

  20. Toward a physics design for NDCX-II, an ion accelerator for warm dense matter and HIF target physics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Briggs, R.J.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Grote, D.P.; Henestroza, E.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.

    2008-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL), a collaborationof LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, has achieved 60-fold pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In NDCX, a ramped voltage pulse from an induction cell imparts a velocity"tilt" to the beam; the beam's tail then catches up with its head in a plasma environment that provides neutralization. The HIFS-VNL's mission is to carry out studies of Warm Dense Matter (WDM) physics using ion beams as the energy source; an emerging thrust is basic target physics for heavy ion-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). These goals require an improved platform, labeled NDCX-II. Development of NDCX-II at modest cost was recently enabled by the availability of induction cells and associated hardware from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) facility at LLNL. Our initial physics design concept accelerates a ~;;30 nC pulse of Li+ ions to ~;;3 MeV, then compresses it to ~;;1 ns while focusing it onto a mm-scale spot. It uses the ATA cells themselves (with waveforms shaped by passive circuits) to impart the final velocity tilt; smart pulsers provide small corrections. The ATA accelerated electrons; acceleration of non-relativistic ions involves more complex beam dynamics both transversely and longitudinally. We are using analysis, an interactive one-dimensional kinetic simulation model, and multidimensional Warp-code simulations to develop the NDCX-II accelerator section. Both LSP and Warp codes are being applied to the beam dynamics in the neutralized drift and final focus regions, and the plasma injection process. The status of this effort is described.

  1. Toward a physics design for NDCX II, an ion accelerator for warm dense matter and HIF target physics studies

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Briggs, R J; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Grote, D P; Henestroza, E; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Sefkow, A B; Sharp, W M; Waldron, W L; Welch, D R; Yu, S S

    2008-07-30

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL), a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, has achieved 60-fold pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In NDCX, a ramped voltage pulse from an induction cell imparts a velocity 'tilt' to the beam; the beam's tail then catches up with its head in a plasma environment that provides neutralization. The HIFS-VNL's mission is to carry out studies of warm dense matter (WDM) physics using ion beams as the energy source; an emerging thrust is basic target physics for heavy ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE). These goals require an improved platform, labeled NDCX-II. Development of NDCX-II at modest cost was recently enabled by the availability of induction cells and associated hardware from the decommissioned advanced test accelerator (ATA) facility at LLNL. Our initial physics design concept accelerates an {approx} 30 nC pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 3 MeV, then compresses it to {approx} 1 ns while focusing it onto a mm-scale spot. It uses the ATA cells themselves (with waveforms shaped by passive circuits) to impart the final velocity tilt; smart pulsers provide small corrections. The ATA accelerated electrons; acceleration of non-relativistic ions involves more complex beam dynamics both transversely and longitudinally. We are using an interactive one-dimensional kinetic simulation model and multidimensional Warp-code simulations to develop the NDCX-II accelerator section. Both LSP and Warp codes are being applied to the beam dynamics in the neutralized drift and final focus regions, and the plasma injection process. The status of this effort is described.

  2. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  3. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams from nanofoil targets: the leaky light-sail regime.

    PubMed

    Qiao, B; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Dromey, B; Geissler, M; Karmakar, A; Gibbon, P

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the "leaky light sail," is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10¹⁹  W/cm². 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2 × 10²⁰  W/cm².

  5. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-08-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  6. Targeting electrostatic interactions in accelerated molecular dynamics with application to protein partial unfolding.

    PubMed

    Flores-Canales, Jose C; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-06-09

    Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) is a promising sampling method to generate an ensemble of conformations and to explore the free energy landscape of proteins in explicit solvent. Its success resides in its ability to reduce barriers in the dihedral and the total potential energy space. However, aMD simulations of large proteins can generate large fluctuations of the dihedral and total potential energy with little conformational changes in the protein structure. To facilitate wider conformational sampling of large proteins in explicit solvent, we developed a direct intrasolute electrostatic interactions accelerated MD (DISEI-aMD) approach. This method aims to reduce energy barriers within rapidly changing electrostatic interactions between solute atoms at short-range distances. It also results in improved reconstruction quality of the original statistical ensemble of the system. Recently, we characterized a pH-dependent partial unfolding of diphtheria toxin translocation domain (T-domain) using microsecond long MD simulations. In this work, we focus on the study of conformational changes of a low-pH T-domain model in explicit solvent using DISEI-aMD. On the basis of the simulations of the low-pH T-domain model, we show that the proposed sampling method accelerates conformational rearrangement significantly faster than multiple standard aMD simulations and microsecond long conventional MD simulations.

  7. Synchronized ion acceleration by ultraintense slow light and electron source for x-ray production from low-density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantov, A. V.; Bychenkov, V. Yu

    2017-03-01

    Synchronized proton acceleration by ultraintense slow light in a low-density target Brantov et al (2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 085004) is studied for a circularly polarized laser pulse. This study demonstrates the advantage of circularly polarized light compared with linearly polarized light used for high-energy proton generation. At the same time, high-energy electron production for gamma-ray generation is not sensitive to the polarization of the laser pulse. Both the proton and the electron sources are considered in application to petawatt-class lasers.

  8. Comparison of graphite materials for targets of laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Fuwa, Y; Ikeda, S; Kumaki, M; Sekine, M; Munemoto, N; Cinquegrani, D; Romanelli, M; Kanesue, T; Okamura, M; Iwashita, Y

    2014-02-01

    To investigate efficient graphite material for carbon ion production in laser ion source, the plasma properties produced from these materials are measured. Comparing acquired current profile and charge state distribution, the distributions of ions in laser induced plasma from isotropic graphite and single crystal of graphite are different. The produced quantity of C(6+) from isotropic materials is larger than that from single crystal.

  9. Accelerated materials property predictions and design using motif-based fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Tran Doan; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2015-07-01

    Data-driven approaches are particularly useful for computational materials discovery and design as they can be used for rapidly screening over a very large number of materials, thus suggesting lead candidates for further in-depth investigations. A central challenge of such approaches is to develop a numerical representation, often referred to as a fingerprint, of the materials. Inspired by recent developments in cheminformatics, we propose a class of hierarchical motif-based topological fingerprints for materials composed of elements such as C, O, H, N, F, etc., whose coordination preferences are well understood. We show that these fingerprints, when representing either molecules or crystals, may be effectively mapped onto a variety of properties using a similarity-based learning model and hence can be used to predict the relevant properties of a material, given that its fingerprint can be defined. Two simple machine-learning-based procedures are introduced to demonstrate that the learning model can be inverted to identify the desired fingerprints and then to reconstruct molecules which possess a set of targeted properties.

  10. Simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate of laser accelerated plant target. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bel`kov, S.A.; Bondarenko, S.V.; Vinokurov, O.A.; Kochemasov, G.G.; Mkhitarian, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the research results for the time point when the Rayleigh-Taylor instability converts to the nonlinear stage as well as the computational results for the interaction of two modes of Rayleigh-Taylor instability when initial perturbations are concentrated at the ablation front (problem (a)) and on the rear side (problem (b)) of the plane target. As was shown in the report for the first phase, for a target of 3 {mu}m thick the existence time of the nonlinear stage is extremely low and does not allow to track the evolution pattern. In it was shown that the plane target with {Delta}{sub 0}=5 {mu}m is more preferable for this goal. Therefore all the computations presented here relate to the target with the indicated thickness. The laser pulse parameters are remained unchanged J{sub L}=10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, {lambda}=0.35 {mu}m.

  11. Favorable target positions for intense laser acceleration of electrons in hydrogen-like, highly-charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, Liang-Wen; Starace, Anthony F.; Hu, S. X.

    2015-09-15

    Classical relativistic Monte Carlo simulations of petawatt laser acceleration of electrons bound initially in hydrogen-like, highly-charged ions show that both the angles and energies of the laser-accelerated electrons depend on the initial ion positions with respect to the laser focus. Electrons bound in ions located after the laser focus generally acquire higher (≈GeV) energies and are ejected at smaller angles with respect to the laser beam. Our simulations assume a tightly-focused linearly-polarized laser pulse with intensity approaching 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2}. Up to fifth order corrections to the paraxial approximation of the laser field in the focal region are taken into account. In addition to the laser intensity, the Rayleigh length in the focal region is shown to play a significant role in maximizing the final energy of the accelerated electrons. Results are presented for both Ne{sup 9+} and Ar{sup 17+} target ions.

  12. Accelerated Weathering of Fluidized Bed Steam Reformation Material Under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.

    2007-09-16

    To predict the long-term fate of low- and high-level waste forms in the subsurface over geologic time scales, it is important to understand the behavior of the corroding waste forms under conditions the mimic to the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository. Fluidized bed steam reformation (FBSR), a supplemental treatment technology option, is being considered as a waste form for the immobilization of low-activity tank waste. To obtain the fundamental information needed to evaluate the behavior of the FBSR waste form under repository relevant conditions and to monitor the long-term behavior of this material, an accelerated weathering experiment is being conducted with the pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) apparatus. Unlike other accelerated weathering test methods (product consistency test, vapor hydration test, and drip test), PUF experiments are conducted under hydraulically unsaturated conditions. These experiments are unique because they mimic the vadose zone environment and allow the corroding waste form to achieve its final reaction state. Results from this on-going experiment suggest the volumetric water content varied as a function of time and reached steady state after 160 days of testing. Unlike the volumetric water content, periodic excursions in the solution pH and electrical conductivity have been occurring consistently during the test. Release of elements from the column illustrates a general trend of decreasing concentration with increasing reaction time. Normalized concentrations of K, Na, P, Re (a chemical analogue for 99Tc), and S are as much as 1 × 104 times greater than Al, Cr, Si, and Ti. After more than 600 days of testing, the solution chemistry data collected to-date illustrate the importance of understanding the long-term behavior of the FBSR product under conditions that mimic the open flow and transport properties of a subsurface repository.

  13. Effects of nanosecond-scale prepulse on generation of high-energy protons in target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, H.; Xu, Y.; Li, Y. Y.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Shi, Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Lu, J. X.; Wang, N. Y.

    2013-06-03

    A pulse cleaner based on noncollinear optical-parametric amplification and second-harmonic generation processes is used to improve the contrast of a laser of peak intensity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} to {approx}10{sup 11} at 100 ps before the peak of the main pulse. A 7 MeV proton beam is observed when a 2.5 {mu}m-thick Al foil is irradiated by this high-contrast laser. The maximum proton energy decreases to 2.9 MeV when a low-contrast ({approx}10{sup 8}) laser is used. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations combined with MULTI simulations show that the maximum proton energy sensitively relies on the detecting direction. The ns-time-scale prepulse can bend a thin target before the main pulse arrives, which reduces maximum proton energy in the target normal sheath acceleration.

  14. Efficient and stable proton acceleration by irradiating a two-layer target with a linearly polarized laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; He, X. T.; Ma, W. J.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D.

    2013-01-15

    We report an efficient and stable scheme to generate {approx}200 MeV proton bunch by irradiating a two-layer targets (near-critical density layer+solid density layer with heavy ions and protons) with a linearly polarized Gaussian pulse at intensity of 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Due to self-focusing of laser and directly accelerated electrons in the near-critical density layer, the proton energy is enhanced by a factor of 3 compared to single-layer solid targets. The energy spread of proton is also remarkably reduced. Such scheme is attractive for applications relevant to tumor therapy.

  15. Open Access Target Validation Is a More Efficient Way to Accelerate Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Hwa

    2015-01-01

    There is a scarcity of novel treatments to address many unmet medical needs. Industry and academia are finally coming to terms with the fact that the prevalent models and incentives for innovation in early stage drug discovery are failing to promote progress quickly enough. Here we will examine how an open model of precompetitive public–private research partnership is enabling efficient derisking and acceleration in the early stages of drug discovery, whilst also widening the range of communities participating in the process, such as patient and disease foundations. PMID:26042736

  16. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S.; Muoio, A.

    2016-02-15

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  17. Lessons from shielding retrofits at the LAMPF/LANSCE/PSR accelerator, beam lines and target facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The experience in the past 7 years to improve the shielding and radiation control systems at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) provides important lessons for the design of radiation control systems at future, high beam power proton accelerator facilities. Major issues confronted and insight gained in developing shielding criteria and in the use of radiation interlocks are discussed. For accelerators and beam lines requiring hands-on-maintenance, our experience suggests that shielding criteria based on accident scenarios will be more demanding than criteria based on routinely encountered beam losses. Specification and analysis of the appropriate design basis accident become all important. Mitigation by active protection systems of the consequences of potential, but severe, prompt radiation accidents has been advocated as an alternate choice to shielding retrofits for risk management at both facilities. Acceptance of active protection systems has proven elusive primarily because of the difficulty in providing convincing proof that failure of active systems (to mitigate the accident) is incredible. Results from extensive shielding assessment studies are presented including data from experimental beam spill tests, comparisons with model estimates, and evidence bearing on the limitations of line-of-sight attenuation models in complex geometries. The scope and significant characteristics of major shielding retrofit projects at the LAMPF site are illustrated by the project to improve the shielding beneath a road over a multiuse, high-intensity beam line (Line D).

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Fu, Yunchong

    2015-05-01

    Separation of carrier-free iodine from low-level iodine samples and accurate measurement of ultra-low-level (129)I in microgram iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geology and environment research using naturally produced (129)I. This article presents a detection technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for accurate determination of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets. Copper instead of aluminum was selected as the suitable sample holder material to avoid the reaction of AgI-AgCl powder with aluminum. Niobium powder was selected as thermally and electrically conductive matrix to be mixed with AgI-AgCl powder, in order to obtain and maintain a stable and high iodine ion current intensity, as well as less memory effect and low background level of (129)I. The most optimal ratio of the Nb matrix to the AgI-AgCl powder was found to be 5:1 by mass. The typical current of (127)I(5+) using AgI-AgCl targets with iodine content from 5 to 80 μg was measured to be 5 to 100 nA. Four-year AMS measurements of the (129)I/(127)I ratios in standards of low iodine content and the machine blanks showed a good repeatability and stability.

  19. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  20. Acceleration and localization of subcritical crack growth in a natural composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz-Sassinek, S.; Main, I. G.; Zaiser, M.; Graham, C. C.

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic failure of natural and engineered materials is often preceded by an acceleration and localization of damage that can be observed indirectly from acoustic emissions (AE) generated by the nucleation and growth of microcracks. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of the statistical properties and spatiotemporal characteristics of AE signals generated during triaxial compression of a sandstone sample. We demonstrate that the AE event amplitudes and interevent times are characterized by scaling distributions with shapes that remain invariant during most of the loading sequence. Localization of the AE activity on an incipient fault plane is associated with growth in AE rate in the form of a time-reversed Omori law with an exponent near 1. The experimental findings are interpreted using a model that assumes scale-invariant growth of the dominating crack or fault zone, consistent with the Dugdale-Barenblatt "process zone" model. We determine formal relationships between fault size, fault growth rate, and AE event rate, which are found to be consistent with the experimental observations. From these relations, we conclude that relatively slow growth of a subcritical fault may be associated with a significantly more rapid increase of the AE rate and that monitoring AE rate may therefore provide more reliable predictors of incipient failure than direct monitoring of the growing fault.

  1. Stability of ethyl glucuronide in hair reference materials after accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Ammann, D; Becker, R; Nehls, I

    2015-12-01

    Two different hair reference materials, one produced from authentic hair displaying an ethyl glucuronide (EtG) content of about 25 pg/mg and one obtained by fortification of blank hair to an EtG level of 85 pg/mg were submitted to accelerated aging between 4 °C and 60 °C for periods between one and 24 months. Subsequently, the EtG content was determined in the aged samples and untreated reference samples stored at -22 °C under repeatability conditions following the so-called isochronous approach. The EtG content remained stable even at 40 °C for 24 months and at 60 °C over six months. This is in contrast to many organic analytes contained in trace concentrations in diverse matrices. A slight but significant increase of the recovered EtG in case of authentic hair samples having been exposed for 24 months between 4 °C and 60 °C may be due to a temperature-driven process that allows increased recoveries of the physiologically embedded EtG.

  2. DNASU plasmid and PSI:Biology-Materials repositories: resources to accelerate biological research.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Catherine Y; Park, Jin G; Sharma, Amit; Hunter, Preston; Surapaneni, Padmini; Sedillo, Casey; Field, James; Algar, Rhys; Price, Andrea; Steel, Jason; Throop, Andrea; Fiacco, Michael; LaBaer, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    The mission of the DNASU Plasmid Repository is to accelerate research by providing high-quality, annotated plasmid samples and online plasmid resources to the research community through the curated DNASU database, website and repository (http://dnasu.asu.edu or http://dnasu.org). The collection includes plasmids from grant-funded, high-throughput cloning projects performed in our laboratory, plasmids from external researchers, and large collections from consortia such as the ORFeome Collaboration and the NIGMS-funded Protein Structure Initiative: Biology (PSI:Biology). Through DNASU, researchers can search for and access detailed information about each plasmid such as the full length gene insert sequence, vector information, associated publications, and links to external resources that provide additional protein annotations and experimental protocols. Plasmids can be requested directly through the DNASU website. DNASU and the PSI:Biology-Materials Repositories were previously described in the 2010 NAR Database Issue (Cormier, C.Y., Mohr, S.E., Zuo, D., Hu, Y., Rolfs, A., Kramer, J., Taycher, E., Kelley, F., Fiacco, M., Turnbull, G. et al. (2010) Protein Structure Initiative Material Repository: an open shared public resource of structural genomics plasmids for the biological community. Nucleic Acids Res., 38, D743-D749.). In this update we will describe the plasmid collection and highlight the new features in the website redesign, including new browse/search options, plasmid annotations and a dynamic vector mapping feature that was developed in collaboration with LabGenius. Overall, these plasmid resources continue to enable research with the goal of elucidating the role of proteins in both normal biological processes and disease.

  3. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-10-15

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets.

  4. Targeted disruption of fibrinogen like protein-1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma development

    PubMed Central

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamed; Desai, Anal; Demchev, Valeriy; Bronson, Roderick T.; Hornick, Jason L.; Cohen, David E.; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen like protein-1 (Fgl1) is a predominantly liver expressed protein that has been implicated as both a hepatoprotectant and a hepatocyte mitogen. Fgl1 expression is decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its loss correlates with a poorly differentiated phenotype. To better elucidate the role of Fgl1 in hepatocarcinogenesis, we treated mice wild type or null for Fgl1 with diethyl nitrosamine and monitored for incidence of hepatocellular cancer. We find that mice lacking Fgl1 develop HCC at more than twice the rate of wild type mice. We show that hepatocellular cancers from Fgl1 null mice are molecularly distinct from those of the wild type mice. In tumors from Fgl1 null mice there is enhanced activation of Akt and downstream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In addition, there is paradoxical up regulation of putative hepatocellular cancer tumor suppressors; tripartite motif-containing protein 35 (Trim35) and tumor necrosis factor super family 10b (Tnfrsf10b). Taken together, these findings suggest that Fgl1 acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular cancer through an Akt dependent mechanism and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:26225745

  5. Materials processing in space: ICF target fabrication implications

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-04-28

    During the last quarter of 1982, the Novette laser will become operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary characteristics of the Novette laser are shown. In many ways, the new laser will serve as a proving ground and test bed for the Nova laser which is also under construction and should be operational in early 1985. Tables provide the Nova operational characteristics. The advent of the two new lasers, Novette and Nova, will make it possible to study many new and exciting aspects of laser-target interactions and of many implosion physics experiments which have previously not been possible. Some of the most interesting and exciting work will be the exploration of the parameters critical to the ignition of a significant thermonuclear burn in the deuterium-tritium fuel in the targets.

  6. Targeted disruption of fibrinogen like protein-1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma development

    SciTech Connect

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamed; Desai, Anal; Demchev, Valeriy; Bronson, Roderick T.; Hornick, Jason L.; Cohen, David E.; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2015-09-18

    Fibrinogen like protein-1 (Fgl1) is a predominantly liver expressed protein that has been implicated as both a hepatoprotectant and a hepatocyte mitogen. Fgl1 expression is decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its loss correlates with a poorly differentiated phenotype. To better elucidate the role of Fgl1 in hepatocarcinogenesis, we treated mice wild type or null for Fgl1 with diethyl nitrosamine and monitored for incidence of hepatocellular cancer. We find that mice lacking Fgl1 develop HCC at more than twice the rate of wild type mice. We show that hepatocellular cancers from Fgl1 null mice are molecularly distinct from those of the wild type mice. In tumors from Fgl1 null mice there is enhanced activation of Akt and downstream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In addition, there is paradoxical up regulation of putative hepatocellular cancer tumor suppressors; tripartite motif-containing protein 35 (Trim35) and tumor necrosis factor super family 10b (Tnfrsf10b). Taken together, these findings suggest that Fgl1 acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular cancer through an Akt dependent mechanism and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target in HCC. - Highlights: • Fgl1 knockout mice (Fgl1KO) are more prone to carcinogen-induced liver cancer compared to wild type (WT) mates. • Tumors from the Fgl1KO are molecularly distinct with enhanced Akt and mTOR activity in comparison with Fgl1WT tumors. • Tumors from the Fgl1KO have enhanced expression of Trim35 and Tnfrsf10b, putative HCC tumor suppressors.

  7. Large-Scale Calculations for Material Sciences Using Accelerators to Improve Time- and Energy-to-Solution

    DOE PAGES

    Eisenbach, Markus

    2017-01-01

    A major impediment to deploying next-generation high-performance computational systems is the required electrical power, often measured in units of megawatts. The solution to this problem is driving the introduction of novel machine architectures, such as those employing many-core processors and specialized accelerators. In this article, we describe the use of a hybrid accelerated architecture to achieve both reduced time to solution and the associated reduction in the electrical cost for a state-of-the-art materials science computation.

  8. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Cikhardt, J.; Rezac, K.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Sila, O.

    2015-09-15

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 8 }n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 10{sup 14} deuterons in the 0.5–2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 10{sup 9} at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 10{sup 6 }n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  9. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-K.; Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Wu, H.-C.; Bowers, K. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Fernández, J. C.

    2011-03-01

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of hundreds of MeV energy and <10% energy spread. The break-out afterburner (BOA) is one mechanism proposed to generate such beams; however, the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the comoving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread, leading to ion beams of energy hundreds of MeV and 6% energy spread.

  10. (International Panel on 14 MeV Intense Neutron Source Based on Accelerators for Fusion Materials Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Thoms, K.R.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1991-02-14

    Both travelers were members of a nine-person US delegation that participated in an international workshop on accelerator-based 14 MeV neutron sources for fusion materials research hosted by the University of Tokyo. Presentations made at the workshop reviewed the technology developed by the FMIT Project, advances in accelerator technology, and proposed concepts for neutron sources. One traveler then participated in the initial meeting of the IEA Working Group on High Energy, High Flux Neutron Sources in which efforts were begun to evaluate and compare proposed neutron sources; the Fourth FFTF/MOTA Experimenters' Workshop which covered planning and coordination of the US-Japan collaboration using the FFTF reactor to irradiate fusion reactor materials; and held discussions with several JAERI personnel on the US-Japan collaboration on fusion reactor materials.

  11. A small interfering RNA targeting Lnk accelerates bone fracture healing with early neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yohei; Ii, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Shoji, Taro; Fukui, Tomoaki; Asahi, Michio; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    Lnk, an intracellular adapter protein, is expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages, which has recently been proved as an essential inhibitory signaling molecule for stem cell self-renewal in the stem cell factor-c-Kit signaling pathway with enhanced hematopoietic and osteogenic reconstitution in Lnk-deficient mice. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem/endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for fracture healing has been demonstrated with mechanistic insight into vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis enhancement in the fracture sites. We report here, Lnk siRNA-transfected endothelial commitment of c-kit+/Sca-1+/lineage- subpopulations of bone marrow cells have high EPC colony-forming capacity exhibiting endothelial markers, VE-Cad, VEGF and Ang-1. Lnk siRNA-transfected osteoblasts also show highly osteoblastic capacity. In vivo, locally transfected Lnk siRNA could successfully downregulate the expression of Lnk at the fracture site up to 1 week, and radiological and histological examination showed extremely accelerated fracture healing in Lnk siRNA-transfected mice. Moreover, Lnk siRNA-transfected mice exhibited sufficient therapeutic outcomes with intrinstic enhancement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis, specifically, the mice demonstrated better blood flow recovery in the sites of fracture. In our series of experiments, we clarified that a negatively regulated Lnk system contributed to a favorable circumstance for fracture healing by enhancing vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis. These findings suggest that downregulation of Lnk system may have the clinical potential for faster fracture healing, which contributes to the reduction of delayed unions or non-unions.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry targets of submilligram carbonaceous samples using the high-throughput Zn reduction method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2009-07-15

    The high-throughput Zn reduction method was developed and optimized for various biological/biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) applications of mg of C size samples. However, high levels of background carbon from the high-throughput Zn reduction method were not suitable for sub-mg of C size samples in environmental, geochronology, and biological/biomedical AMS applications. This study investigated the effect of background carbon mass (mc) and background 14C level (Fc) from the high-throughput Zn reduction method. Background mc was 0.011 mg of C and background Fc was 1.5445. Background subtraction, two-component mixing, and expanded formulas were used for background correction. All three formulas accurately corrected for backgrounds to 0.025 mg of C in the aerosol standard (NIST SRM 1648a). Only the background subtraction and the two-component mixing formulas accurately corrected for backgrounds to 0.1 mg of C in the IAEA-C6 and -C7 standards. After the background corrections, our high-throughput Zn reduction method was suitable for biological (diet)/biomedical (drug) and environmental (fine particulate matter) applications of sub-mg of C samples (> or = 0.1 mg of C) in keeping with a balance between throughput (270 samples/day/analyst) and sensitivity/accuracy/precision of AMS measurement. The development of a high-throughput method for examination of > or = 0.1 mg of C size samples opens up a range of applications for 14C AMS studies. While other methods do exist for > or = 0.1 mg of C size samples, the low throughput has made them cost prohibitive for many applications.

  13. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  14. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-01

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  15. Accelerating Genome Editing in CHO Cells Using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a Web-Based Target Finding Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named “CRISPy” for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014; 111: 1604–1616. © 2014 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24827782

  16. Accelerating genome editing in CHO cells using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a web-based target finding tool.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named "CRISPy" for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells.

  17. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  18. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; Festa, G.; Gorini, G.; Loong, C. -K.; Senesi, R.

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10² MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.

  19. Applications of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources: An updated assessment from the perspective of materials research in Italy

    DOE PAGES

    Andreani, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Carpenter, J. M.; ...

    2014-12-24

    In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna published a report [1] on ‘Development Opportunities of Small and Medium Scale Accelerator Driven Neutron Sources’ which summarized the prospect of smaller sources in supporting the large spallation neutron sources for materials characterization and instrumentation, a theme advocated by Bauer, Clausen, Mank, and Mulhauser in previous publications [2-4]. In 2010 the Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources (UCANS) was established [5], galvanizing cross-disciplinary collaborations on new source and neutronics development and expanded applications based on both slow-neutron scattering and other neutron-matter interactions of neutron energies ranging from 10⁻⁶ to 10²more » MeV [6]. Here, we first cover the recent development of ongoing and prospective projects of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) but concentrate on prospective accelerators currently proposed in Italy. Two active R&D topics, irradiation effects on electronics and cultural heritage studies, are chosen to illustrate the impact of state-of-the-art CANS on these programs with respect to the characteristics and complementarity of the accelerator and neutronics systems as well as instrumentation development.« less

  20. Enabling Desktop Nanofabrication with the Targeted Use of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel James

    This thesis focuses on the application of soft materials to scanning probe-based molecular printing techniques, such as dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The selective incorporation of soft materials in place of hard materials in traditional cantilever-based scanning probe lithography (SPL) systems not only enables the deposition of a broader range of materials, but also dramatically lowers the cost while simultaneously increasing the throughput of SPL. Chapter 1 introduces SPL and DPN, and highlights a few recent advances in using DPN to control surface chemical functionality at the nanoscale. In addition to introducing the material deposition capabilities of DPN, Chapter 1 introduces the development of the cantilever-free architecture, a relatively recent paradigm shift in high-throughput SPL. Furthermore, an in-depth synthetic methodology for making the most widely used cantilever-free tip arrays, consisting of elastomeric nanoscale pens adhered to an elastomeric backing layer on a glass slide, is included as an appendix. Chapter 2 discusses the synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles at specified locations by using DPN to deposit the precursors dispersed in a polymer matrix; after deposition, the precursors are annealed to form single nanoparticles. This work builds on previous soft material-based advances in DPN by utilizing the polymer as a "nanoreactor" to synthesize the desired nanoparticles, where the precursors can diffuse and coalesce into a single nanoparticle within each spot. The process of precursor aggregation and single nanoparticle formation is studied, and it is found that metal precursors follow one of three pathways based upon their reduction potential. Chapter 3 is the first of three chapters that highlights the power of soft materials in the cantilever-free architecture. In particular, Chapter 3 examines the role of the elastomeric backing layer as a compliant spring whose stiffness (as measured by the spring constant, k) can be tuned

  1. High-contrast laser acceleration of relativistic electrons in solid cone-wire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Sawada, H.; Wilks, S. C.; Chawla, S. R.; Chen, C. D.; Jarrott, L. C.; Flippo, K. A.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Perez, F.; Beg, F. N.; Bartal, T.; Wei, M. S.

    2015-12-31

    Optimization of electron coupling into small solid angles is of extreme importance to applications, such as Fast Ignition, that require maximum electron energy deposition within a small volume. To optimize this coupling, we use the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser, which remains below intensity of 1011 W/cm2 until < 0.1 ns before the main pulse, while still attaining high-energy, 75 J, and peak intensity of 5 x 1019 W/cm2. Using a cone-wire target, we find that the coupling into the 40 μm diameter wire is increased by a factor of 2.7x over the low-contrast Titan laser at similar peak intensity. Full-scale simulations are used to model the laser interaction and quantitatively reproduce the experimental results. These show that increase in coupling is due to both a closer interaction, as well as the reduction of laser filamentation and self-focusing.

  2. Biological/biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry targets. 1. optimizing the CO2 reduction step using zinc dust.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2008-10-15

    Biological and biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) use isotope ratio mass spectrometry to quantify minute amounts of long-lived radioisotopes such as (14)C. AMS target preparation involves first the oxidation of carbon (in sample of interest) to CO 2 and second the reduction of CO 2 to filamentous, fluffy, fuzzy, or firm graphite-like substances that coat a -400-mesh spherical iron powder (-400MSIP) catalyst. Until now, the quality of AMS targets has been variable; consequently, they often failed to produce robust ion currents that are required for reliable, accurate, precise, and high-throughput AMS for biological/biomedical applications. Therefore, we described our optimized method for reduction of CO 2 to high-quality uniform AMS targets whose morphology we visualized using scanning electron microscope pictures. Key features of our optimized method were to reduce CO 2 (from a sample of interest that provided 1 mg of C) using 100 +/- 1.3 mg of Zn dust, 5 +/- 0.4 mg of -400MSIP, and a reduction temperature of 500 degrees C for 3 h. The thermodynamics of our optimized method were more favorable for production of graphite-coated iron powders (GCIP) than those of previous methods. All AMS targets from our optimized method were of 100% GCIP, the graphitization yield exceeded 90%, and delta (13)C was -17.9 +/- 0.3 per thousand. The GCIP reliably produced strong (12)C (-) currents and accurate and precise F m values. The observed F m value for oxalic acid II NIST SRM deviated from its accepted F m value of 1.3407 by only 0.0003 +/- 0.0027 (mean +/- SE, n = 32), limit of detection of (14)C was 0.04 amol, and limit of quantification was 0.07 amol, and a skilled analyst can prepare as many as 270 AMS targets per day. More information on the physical (hardness/color), morphological (SEMs), and structural (FT-IR, Raman, XRD spectra) characteristics of our AMS targets that determine accurate, precise, and high-hroughput AMS measurement are in the

  3. MicroRNA-21 accelerates hepatocyte proliferation in vitro via PI3K/Akt signaling by targeting PTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Yan-nan, Bai; Zhao-yan, Yu; Li-xi, Luo; Jiang, Yi; Qing-jie, Xia

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •miRNAs-expression patterns of primary hepatocytes under proliferative status. •miR-21 expression level peaked at 12 h after stimulated by EGF. •miR-21 drive rapid S phase entry of primary hepatocytes. •PI3K/Akt signaling was modulated via targeting PTEN by miR-21. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in controlling hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. In this study, we established the miRNAs-expression patterns of primary hepatocytes in vitro under stimulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF), and found that microRNA-21 (miR-21) was appreciably up-regulated and peaked at 12 h. In addition, we further presented evidences indicating that miR-21 promotes primary hepatocyte proliferation through in vitro transfecting with miR-21 mimics or inhibitor. We further demonstrated that phosphatidylinositol 3′-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling was altered accordingly, it is, by targeting phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10, PI3K/Akt signaling is activated by miR-21 to accelerate hepatocyte rapid S-phase entry and proliferation in vitro.

  4. Summary of recent experiments on focusing of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam with a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; Alexander, N.; Barnard, J. J.; Lund, S. M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a summary of recent experiments on focusing of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated (TNSA) proton beam with a stack of thin conducting foils. The experiments were performed using the Phelix laser (GSI-Darmstadt) and the Titan laser, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of TNSA protons were experimentally observed for the first time at the Phelix laser user facility, in a specially engineered structure ('lens') consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. Follow up experiments using the Titan laser obtained results consistent with the collimation/focusing observed in the initial experiments using the Phelix. The Titan experiments employed improved, 25 μm- and 50 μm-gap targets and the new fine mesh diagnostic. All the experiments were carried out in a “passive environment,” i.e., no external fields were applied, and no neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. A plausible interpretation of the observed phenomena is that the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the conducting foils inhibits radial expansion of the beam.

  5. Targeted Alpha Therapy: The US DOE Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an emerging discipline of cancer therapy that exploits the biochemical differences between normal cells and cancer cells to selectively deliver a lethal dose of radiation to cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells relatively unperturbed. A broad overview of targeted alpha therapy including isotope production methods, and associated isotope production facility needs, will be provided. A more general overview of the US Department of Energy Isotope Program's Tri-Lab (ORNL, BNL, LANL) Research Effort to Provide Accelerator-Produced 225Ac for Radiotherapy will also be presented focusing on the accelerator-production of 225Ac and final product isolation methodologies for medical applications.

  6. Debris Cloud Material Characterization for Hypervelocity Impacts of Single- and Multi-Material Projectiles on Thin Target Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    FATEPEN2 [3-6], PEN-4 [7,8], and KAPP-II [10-12] are discrete particle lethality assessment models which can be modified to include the effects of non ...target materials are heated adiabatically and non -isentropically. The release of the shber,- pressures occurs isentropically through the action of...affected by the impact. For the projectile and target geometries con - sidered in this study, the shock waves can be considered to be initially planar. This

  7. Stochastic Analysis and Forecasts of the Patterns of Speed, Acceleration, and Levels of Material Stock Accumulation in Society.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Tomer; Schandl, Heinz; Tanikawa, Hiroki

    2016-04-05

    The recent acceleration of urbanization and industrialization of many parts of the developing world, most notably in Asia, has resulted in a fast-increasing demand for and accumulation of construction materials in society. Despite the importance of physical stocks in society, the empirical assessment of total material stock of buildings and infrastructure and reasons for its growth have been underexplored in the sustainability literature. We propose an innovative approach for explaining material stock dynamics in society and create a country typology for stock accumulation trajectories using the ARIMA (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average) methodology, a stochastic approach commonly used in business studies and economics to inspect and forecast time series. This enables us to create scenarios for future demand and accumulation of building materials in society, including uncertainty estimates. We find that the so-far overlooked aspect of acceleration trends of material stock accumulation holds the key to explaining material stock growth, and that despite tremendous variability in country characteristics, stock accumulation is limited to only four archetypal growth patterns. The ability of nations to change their pattern will be a determining factor for global sustainability.

  8. Preliminary Mark-18A (Mk-18A) Target Material Recovery Program Product Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Patton, Bradley D.

    2016-09-01

    The Mk-18A Target Material Recovery Program (MTMRP) was established in 2015 to preserve the unique materials, e.g. 244Pu, in 65 previously irradiated Mk-18A targets for future use. This program utilizes existing capabilities at SRS and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to process targets, recover materials from them, and to package the recovered materials for shipping to ORNL. It also utilizes existing capabilities at ORNL to receive and store the recovered materials, and to provide any additional processing of the recovered materials or residuals required to prepare them for future beneficial use. The MTMRP is presently preparing for the processing of these valuable targets which is expected to begin in ~2019. As part of the preparations for operations, this report documents the preliminary acceptance criteria for the plutonium and heavy curium materials to be recovered from the Mk-18A targets at SRNL for transport and storage at ORNL. These acceptance criteria were developed based on preliminary concepts developed for processing, transporting, and storing the recovered Mk-18A materials. They will need to be refined as these concepts are developed in more detail.

  9. Comparison of Target and Non-target Mortality Rates from Residual Pesticide on HESCO Material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a series of tests to determine if pesticides applied as persistent treatments (residual pesticides) to militarily relevant textile materials to kill mosquitoes, flies, and other disease and nuisance pests might also impact populations of beneficial insects. We exposed samples of pestic...

  10. Modernization of electron accelerator with a large cross section beam for radiation effects on materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, M. S.; Denisov, V. V.; Koval, N. N.; Sulakshin, S. A.; Shugurov, V. V.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the work on the creation of an automated wide-aperture electron accelerator with a grid plasma cathode based on the low-pressure arc discharge and outputting of a large section beam (750×150 mm) in the atmosphere through a outlet foil window. The distinctive feature of such electron accelerator is a weak correlation of beam parameters, as well as a high current beam extraction efficiency to air, reaching ≈ (80 ÷ 90)% of the current in the accelerating gap at an accelerating voltage of 200 kV, beam current amplitude in the atmosphere up to 30A, frequency and pulse duration up to 50 s-1 and 100 μs, respectively. The electron source provides a stable continuous operation for tens of hours in a repetitively pulsed modes at the maximum average beam power in the atmosphere is ≈5 kW. Examples of applications of such accelerator in the radiation-stimulated technology are given, showing the prospects of its using in scientific and technological purposes.

  11. Graph-based and statistical approaches for detecting spectrally variable target materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.; Theiler, James

    2016-05-01

    In discriminating target materials from background clutter in hyperspectral imagery, one must contend with variability in both. Most algorithms focus on the clutter variability, but for some materials there is considerable variability in the spectral signatures of the target. This is especially the case for solid target materials, whose signatures depend on morphological properties (particle size, packing density, etc.) that are rarely known a priori. In this paper, we investigate detection algorithms that explicitly take into account the diversity of signatures for a given target. In particular, we investigate variable target detectors when applied to new representations of the hyperspectral data: a manifold learning based approach, and a residual based approach. The graph theory and manifold learning based approach incorporates multiple spectral signatures of the target material of interest; this is built upon previous work that used a single target spectrum. In this approach, we first build an adaptive nearest neighbors (ANN) graph on the data and target spectra, and use a biased locally linear embedding (LLE) transformation to perform nonlinear dimensionality reduction. This biased transformation results in a lower-dimensional representation of the data that better separates the targets from the background. The residual approach uses an annulus based computation to represent each pixel after an estimate of the local background is removed, which suppresses local backgrounds and emphasizes the target-containing pixels. We will show detection results in the original spectral space, the dimensionality-reduced space, and the residual space, all using subspace detectors: ranked spectral angle mapper (rSAM), subspace adaptive matched filter (ssAMF), and subspace adaptive cosine/coherence estimator (ssACE). Results of this exploratory study will be shown on a ground-truthed hyperspectral image with variable target spectra and both full and mixed pixel targets.

  12. A Randomized Trial of Targeted Educational Materials for Smoking Cessation in African Americans Using Transdermal Nicotine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nollen, Nicole; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Richter, Kim; Choi, Won S.; Okuyemi, Kolawole S.; Resnicow, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the efficacy of targeted versus standard care smoking cessation materials among urban African American smokers. Five hundred smokers (250 to each group) are randomized to receive a culturally targeted or standard care videotape and print guide. Both groups receive 8 weeks of nicotine patches and reminder telephone calls at…

  13. Initial experimental evidence of self-collimation of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam in a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Logan, B. G.; Lund, S. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bellei, C.; Cohen, R. H.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Kim, J.; Alexander, N.; Aurand, B.; Brabetz, C.; Neumayer, P.; Roth, M.

    2013-08-15

    Phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons was experimentally observed for the first time, in a specially engineered structure (“lens”) consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. The experiments were carried out in a “passive environment,” i.e., no external fields applied, neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. Experiments were performed at the petawatt “PHELIX” laser user facility (E = 100 J, Δt = 400 fs, λ = 1062 nm) at the “Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung–GSI” in Darmstadt, Germany. The observed rms beam spot reduction depends inversely on energy, with a focusing degree decreasing monotonically from 2 at 5.4 MeV to 1.5 at 18.7 MeV. The physics inside the lens is complex, resulting in a number of different mechanisms that can potentially affect the particle dynamics within the structure. We present a plausible simple interpretation of the experiment in which the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the foils are the dominant mechanisms responsible for the observed focusing/collimation. This focusing technique could be applied to a wide variety of space-charge dominated proton and heavy ion beams and impact fields and applications, such as HEDP science, inertial confinement fusion in both fast ignition and heavy ion fusion approaches, compact laser-driven injectors for a Linear Accelerator (LINAC) or synchrotron, medical therapy, materials processing, etc.

  14. Initial experimental evidence of self-collimation of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam in a stack of conducting foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, P. A.; Lund, S. M.; McGuffey, C.; Alexander, N.; Aurand, B.; Barnard, J. J.; Beg, F. N.; Bellei, C.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Brabetz, C.; Cohen, R. H.; Kim, J.; Neumayer, P.; Roth, M.; Logan, B. G.

    2013-08-01

    Phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons was experimentally observed for the first time, in a specially engineered structure ("lens") consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. The experiments were carried out in a "passive environment," i.e., no external fields applied, neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. Experiments were performed at the petawatt "PHELIX" laser user facility (E = 100 J, Δt = 400 fs, λ = 1062 nm) at the "Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung-GSI" in Darmstadt, Germany. The observed rms beam spot reduction depends inversely on energy, with a focusing degree decreasing monotonically from 2 at 5.4 MeV to 1.5 at 18.7 MeV. The physics inside the lens is complex, resulting in a number of different mechanisms that can potentially affect the particle dynamics within the structure. We present a plausible simple interpretation of the experiment in which the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the foils are the dominant mechanisms responsible for the observed focusing/collimation. This focusing technique could be applied to a wide variety of space-charge dominated proton and heavy ion beams and impact fields and applications, such as HEDP science, inertial confinement fusion in both fast ignition and heavy ion fusion approaches, compact laser-driven injectors for a Linear Accelerator (LINAC) or synchrotron, medical therapy, materials processing, etc.

  15. High quality ion acceleration from a double-layer target dominated by the radiation pressure of a transversely Gaussian laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Xueren; Xie Baisong; Wu Haicheng; Zhao Xueyan; Zhang Shan; Aimidula, Aimierding; Liu Mingping

    2010-10-15

    The ion acceleration from a double-layer target irradiated by a transversely Gaussian laser pulse is investigated by theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations. The main idea of the double-layer target is to match the transverse areal mass density of the target with the laser intensity profile by single ion specie with two densities or by two ion species. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the target deformation and the transverse instability are efficiently suppressed in the double-layer scheme, ions within the laser spot are uniformly accelerated and are well collimated in the forward direction, GeV/u monoenergetic ion beams with very low divergency are observed.

  16. Theory of laser acceleration of light-ion beams from interaction of ultrahigh-intensity lasers with layered targets.

    PubMed

    Albright, B J; Yin, L; Hegelich, B M; Bowers, Kevin J; Kwan, T J T; Fernández, J C

    2006-09-15

    Experiments at the LANL Trident facility demonstrated the production of monoenergetic ion beams from the interaction of an ultraintense laser with a target comprising a heavy ion substrate and thin layer of light ions. An analytic model is obtained that predicts how the mean energy and quality of monoenergetic ion beams and the energy of substrate ions vary with substrate material and light-ion layer composition and thickness. Dimensionless parameters controlling the dynamics are derived and the model is validated with particle-in-cell simulations and experimental data.

  17. Versatile gas gun target assembly for studying blast wave mitigation in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartyczak, S.; Mock, W., Jr.

    2012-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a serious problem for military personnel returning from recent conflicts. This has increased interest in investigating blast mitigating materials for use in helmets. In this paper we describe a new versatile target assembly that is used with an existing gas gun for studying these materials.

  18. Accelerating the domestication of a bioenergy crop: identifying and modelling morphological targets for sustainable yield increase in Miscanthus

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Kerrie

    2013-01-01

    To accelerate domestication of Miscanthus, an important energy crop, 244 replicated genotypes, including two different species and their hybrids, were analysed for morphological traits and biomass yield over three growing seasons following an establishment phase of 2 years in the largest Miscanthus diversity trial described to date. Stem and leaf traits were selected that contributed both directly and indirectly to total harvested biomass yield, and there was variation in all traits measured. Morphological diversity within the population was correlated with dry matter yield (DMY) both as individual traits and in combination, in order to determine the respective contributions of the traits to biomass accumulation and to identify breeding targets for yield improvement. Predictive morphometric analysis was possible at year 3 within Miscanthus sinensis genotypes but not between M. sinensis, Miscanthus sacchariflorus, and interspecific hybrids. Yield is a complex trait, and no single simple trait explained more than 33% of DMY, which varied from 1 to 5297g among genotypes within this trial. Associating simple traits increased the power of the morphological data to predict yield to 60%. Trait variety, in combination, enabled multiple ideotypes, thereby increasing the potential diversity of the crop for multiple growth locations and end uses. Both triploids and interspecific hybrids produced the highest mature yields, indicating that there is significant heterosis to be exploited within Miscanthus that might be overlooked in early selection screens within years 1–3. The potential for optimizing biomass yield by selecting on the basis of morphology is discussed. PMID:24064927

  19. Inoculation of Pichia kudriavzevii RB1 degrades the organic acids present in raw compost material and accelerates composting.

    PubMed

    Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Araya, Shogo; Mimoto, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the yeast strain Pichia kudriavzevii RB1 was used as an inoculum to accelerate organic matter degradation of rabbit food with added organic acids, which was used as a model food waste for composting. The RB1 strain rapidly degraded the organic acids present in the raw compost material, leading to an increase in pH beyond the neutral level, within 2 days. Both mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria proliferated faster in the compost with RB1 inoculation than in that without inoculation. Although the yeast died with the increase in compost temperature, it affected the early stages of composting prior to the thermophilic stage and accelerated the composting process by 2 days by eliminating the initial lag phase seen in the growth of other microorganisms. Moreover, populations of Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Bacillus foraminis, and Bacillus coagulans became dominant during the thermophilic stages of both composting with and without RB1 inoculation.

  20. The accelerating effect of chitosan-silica hybrid dressing materials on the early phase of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Ung; Jung, Hyun-Do; Song, Eun-Ho; Choi, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Song, Juha; Kim, Sukwha

    2016-05-24

    Commercialized dressing materials with or without silver have played a passive role in early-phase wound healing, protecting the skin defects from infections, absorbing exudate, and preventing dehydration. Chitosan (CTS)-based sponges have been developed in pure or hybrid forms for accelerating wound healing, but their wound-healing capabilities have not been extensively compared with widely used commercial dressing materials, providing limited information in a practical aspect. In this study, we have developed CTS-silica (CTS-Si) hybrid sponges with water absorption, flexibility, and mechanical behavior similar to those of CTS sponges. In vitro and in vivo tests were performed to compare the CTS-Si sponges with three commercial dressing materials [gauze, polyurethane (PU), and silver-containing hydrofiber (HF-Ag)] in addition to CTS sponges. Both in vitro and in vivo tests showed that CTS-Si sponges promoted fibroblast proliferation, leading to accelerated collagen synthesis, whereas the CTS sponges did not exhibit significant differences in fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis from gauze, PU, and HF-Ag sponges. In case of CTS-Si, the inflammatory cells were actively recruited to the wound by the influence of the released silicon ions from CTS-Si sponges, which, in return, led to an enhanced secretion of growth factors, particularly TGF-β during the early stage. The higher level of TGF-β likely improved the proliferation of fibroblasts, and as a result, collagen synthesis by fibroblasts became remarkably productive, thereby increasing collagen density at the wound site. Therefore, the CTS-Si hybrid sponges have considerable potential as a wound-dressing material for accelerating wound healing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  1. Uranium fluoride and metallic uranium as target materials for heavy-element experiments at SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindler, Birgit; Ackermann, Dieter; Hartmann, Willi; Heßberger, Fritz Peter; Hofmann, Sigurd; Hübner, Annett; Lommel, Bettina; Mann, Rido; Steiner, Jutta

    2008-06-01

    In this contribution we describe the production and application of uranium targets for synthesis of heavy elements. The targets are prepared from uranium fluoride (UF 4) and from metallic uranium with thin carbon foils as backing. Targets of UF 4 were produced by thermal evaporation in a similar way as the frequently applied targets out of Bi, Bi 2O 3, Pb, PbS, SmF 3, and NdF 3, prepared mostly from isotopically enriched material [Birgit Kindler, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 107; Bettina Lommel, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 100]. In order to use more intensive beams and to avoid scattering of the reaction products in the target, metallic uranium is favorable. However, evaporation of metallic uranium is not feasible at a sustainable yield. Therefore, we established magnetron sputtering of metallic uranium. We describe production and properties of these targets. First irradiation tests show promising results.

  2. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  3. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Steinberg, D; Nagler, A; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Polacheck, I; Srebnik, M

    2009-07-01

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  4. Conceptual design of a 1013 -W pulsed-power accelerator for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Ao, T.; Benage, J. F.; Breden, E. W.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Davis, J.-P.; Ennis, J. B.; Gard, P. D.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Haill, T. A.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jones, P. A.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Lucero, D. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moore, J. K.; Mulville, T. D.; Muron, D. J.; Root, S.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Spielman, R. B.; Waisman, E. M.; Wisher, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a conceptual design of a next-generation pulsed-power accelerator that is optimized for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments. Sufficient electrical energy is delivered by the accelerator to a physics load to achieve—within centimeter-scale samples—material pressures as high as 1 TPa. The accelerator design is based on an architecture that is founded on three concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression, impedance matching, and transit-time-isolated drive circuits. The prime power source of the accelerator consists of 600 independent impedance-matched Marx generators. Each Marx comprises eight 5.8-GW bricks connected electrically in series, and generates a 100-ns 46-GW electrical-power pulse. A 450-ns-long water-insulated coaxial-transmission-line impedance transformer transports the power generated by each Marx to a system of twelve 2.5-m-radius water-insulated conical transmission lines. The conical lines are connected electrically in parallel at a 66-cm radius by a water-insulated 45-post sextuple-post-hole convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the conical lines, and delivers the combined current to a single solid-dielectric-insulated radial transmission line. The radial line in turn transmits the combined current to the load. Since much of the accelerator is water insulated, we refer to it as Neptune. Neptune is 40 m in diameter, stores 4.8 MJ of electrical energy in its Marx capacitors, and generates 28 TW of peak electrical power. Since the Marxes are transit-time isolated from each other for 900 ns, they can be triggered at different times to construct-over an interval as long as 1 μ s -the specific load-current time history required for a given experiment. Neptune delivers 1 MJ and 20 MA in a 380-ns current pulse to an 18 -m Ω load; hence Neptune is a megajoule-class 20-MA arbitrary waveform generator. Neptune will allow the international scientific community to conduct dynamic

  5. Accelerating the Understanding and Development of Hydrogen Storage Materials: A Review of the Five-Year Efforts of the Three DOE Hydrogen Storage Materials Centers of Excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Ott, Kevin C.; Simpson, Lin J.; O'Malley, Kathleen; Stetson, Ned T.

    2014-06-01

    A technical review of the progress achieved in hydrogen storage materials development through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the three Hydrogen Storage Materials Centers of Excellence (CoEs), which ran from 2005 to 2010 is presented. The three CoEs were created to develop reversible metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage materials, and high-specific-surface-area (SSA) hydrogen sorbents. For each CoE, the approach taken is specified, key outcomes and accomplishments identified, and recommendations for future work are suggested. The Metal Hydride Center of Excellence addresses work on destabilized hydrides, including the LiBH/Mg2NiH4 system, borohydrides, amides, and alanes; and compares the best materials to DOE targets. The Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence discusses the classes of materials studied for chemical hydrogen storage, focusing on ammonia borane and examines the progress in developing efficient regeneration schemes. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence describes the progress in developing high-SSA sorbents and pathways for developing improved materials capable of achieving DOE targets. The phenomenon of spillover is also observed and its importance to ensuring improved measurements is discussed. Through the five-year effort of the Hydrogen Storage Materials Centers of Excellence, significant progress was achieved in developing and understanding hydrogen storage materials.

  6. Post-Irradiation Properties of Candidate Materials for High-Power Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, H.G.; Ludewig, H.; Mausner, L.F.; Simos, N.; Thieberger, P.; Hayato, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; McDonald, K.T.; Sheppard, J.; Trung, L.P.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-03-15

    The desire of the high-energy-physics community for more intense secondary particle beams motivates the development of multi-megawatt, pulsed proton sources. The targets needed to produce these secondary particle beams must be sufficiently robust to withstand the intense pressure waves arising from the high peak-energy deposition which an intense pulsed beam will deliver. In addition, the materials used for the targets must continue to perform in a severe radiation environment. The effect of the beam induced pressure waves can be mitigated by use of target materials with high-yield strength and/or low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). We report here first results of an expanded study of the effects of irradiation on several additional candidate materials with high strength (AlBeMet, beryllium, Ti-V6-Al4) or low CTE (a carbon-carbon composite, a new Toyota ''gum'' metal alloy, Super-Invar).

  7. The Qualification of Target Materials Using the Integral Theory of Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    corresponds to V* and is shown to be a function of depth of penetration. The work performed to date and reported upcn here consists of two parts : -4. (1...kinetic energy of a nondeforming pene- trator is absorbed by the target in three different forms * i (Eq. (16)). Part of the energy, given by KDRAG... tensometer , which is capable of applying up to a 2-ton compressive load, a tungsten carbide ball was Yressed into several target materials and the elastic

  8. Estimating dynamic external hand forces during manual materials handling based on ground reaction forces and body segment accelerations.

    PubMed

    Faber, Gert S; Chang, Chien-Chi; Kingma, Idsart; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-10-18

    Direct measurement of hand forces during assessment of manual materials handling is infeasible in most field studies and some laboratory studies (e.g., during patient handling). Therefore, this study proposed and evaluated the performance of a novel hand force estimation method based on ground reaction forces (GRFs) and body segment accelerations. Ten male subjects performed a manual lifting/carrying task while an optoelectronic motion tracking system measured 3D full body kinematics, a force plate measured 3D GRFs and an instrumented box measured 3D hand forces. The estimated 3D hand forces were calculated by taking the measured GRF vector and subtracting the force vectors due to weight and acceleration of all body segments. Root-mean-square difference (RMSD) between estimated and measured hand forces ranged from 11 to 27N. When ignoring the segment accelerations (just subtracting body weight from the GRFs), the hand force estimation errors were much higher, with RMSDs ranging from 21 to 101N. Future studies should verify the performance of the proposed hand force estimation method when using an ambulatory field measurement system.

  9. Material considerations in the microfabrication of grating microstructures for use in a laser-powered linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.B.

    1986-12-01

    Collaborative work between Brookhaven and Los Alamos National Laboratories is developing a new type of linear accelerator that uses a high-power, picosecond pulse CO/sub 2/ laser to irradiate a specialized form of grating with a pitch of 10.6 microns. The electromagnetic field that results can be used to accelerate electrons at field gradients of several GeV/m with potential efficiencies much better than current accelerators. The grating must be conductive to minimize resistive losses, be able to withstand high fields without damage, and requires dimensional tolerances in the sub-micron range. These requirements focus attention on grating material selection, microfabrication methods, and metrological methods used for quality control. At present, several types of gratings have been manufactured by reactive ion etching of fused silica in CHF/sub 3//Ar or etching silicon with KOH/H/sub 2/O or ethylenediamine-pyrocatechol solutions. Metrological analysis of the gratings has begun with a Tracor Northern 5700 digital image analyzer.

  10. Acceleration of osteogenesis by using barium titanate piezoelectric ceramic as an implant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, K.; Morita, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Katayama, T.; Nakamachi, E.

    2011-04-01

    As bone has piezoelectric properties, it is expected that activity of bone cells and bone formation can be accelerated by applying piezoelectric ceramics to implants. Since lead ions, included in ordinary piezoelectric ceramics, are harmful, a barium titanate (BTO) ceramic, which is a lead-free piezoelectric ceramic, was used in this study. The purpose of this study was to investigate piezoelectric effects of surface charge of BTO on cell differentiation under dynamic loading in vitro. Rat bone marrow cells seeded on surfaces of BTO ceramics were cultured in culture medium supplemented with dexamethasone, β-glycerophosphate and ascorbic acid while a dynamic load was applied to the BTO ceramics. After 10 days of cultivation, the cell layer and synthesized matrix on the BTO surfaces were scraped off, and then DNA content, alkaline phosphtase (ALP) activity and calcium content were measured, to evaluate osteogenic differentiation. ALP activity on the charged BTO surface was slightly higher than that on the non-charged BTO surface. The amount of calcium on the charged BTO surface was also higher than that on the non-charged BTO surface. These results showed that the electric charged BTO surface accelerated osteogenesis.

  11. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Tension-Tension Fatigue of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, in D3479/D3479M – 96, A. International, Editor. 2007. [12] ASTM, Standard Test Method...for Tensile Properties of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, in D3039/D3039M - 08. 2008, ASTM International: Pennsylvania. [13] Larossa, C., et al

  12. Implications of acceleration environments on scaling materials processing in space to production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demel, Ken

    1990-01-01

    Some considerations regarding materials processing in space are covered from a commercial perspective. Key areas include power, proprietary data, operational requirements (including logistics), and also the center of gravity location, and control of that location with respect to materials processing payloads.

  13. Search for Defocusing During a Single Pulse of a 2 kA Relativistic Electron Beam Due to Ions Accelerated from a Target

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, E J; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Chen, Y-J; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; McCarrick, J; Richardson, R; Sampayan, S; Weir, J

    2002-09-05

    The DARHT accelerator will deliver several intense relativistic electron beam pulses to an x-ray conversion target during a few microseconds. Plasma from the target can cause a partial neutralization of the vacuum self-Er field resulting in an unacceptably large beam radius at the target. The Livermore group has been developing barrier foils to block the plasma from moving upstream. Positive ions accelerated upstream from the foil in the self-Ez field during a single pulse could defocus the beam. In May, 2001 LANL used a sensitive ''two foil'' experiment to search for such effects. They measured significant time dependent effects using conducting foils (1). In January, 2002, the Livermore group repeated the experiment using the ETA II accelerator. We expected to see similar effects and planned to collect data that we could model. We saw no significant effect from conducting foils unless the beam radius was small enough to damage the foil. The reason for the different results has not been explained and is still being investigated. Possibilities have to do with the longer pulse length at LANL, (60 ns compared to 40) or with the higher energy at LANL, (20 Mev compared to 5.7) We also did some tests on dielectric targets where there is a strong effect to test our techniques.

  14. A Monte Carlo studies of the entrance foil material in a target assembly for FDG production

    SciTech Connect

    Merouani, A.; El Khayati, N.; EL Ghayour, A.; El Alamy, H.; Zoubir, B.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed for different entrance foil Materials in the target assembly for [{sup 18}F] FDG production, to investigate the neutron generations in the entrance foil. However, the objective is to study a materials that has the more or less similar mechanical properties as the Havar{sup R} foil with less generation of secondary particles and without affecting, the yield of FDG production. (authors)

  15. IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

    2009-06-30

    Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

  16. Polydopamine as a new modification material to accelerate startup and promote anode performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qing; An, Jingkun; Li, Junhui; Zhou, Lean; Li, Nan; Wang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    The bacterial anode material is important to the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) because its characteristics affect the biofilm formation and extracellular electron transfer. Here we find that a superhydrophilic semiconductor, polydopamine (PDA), is an effective modification material for the anode to accelerate startup and improve power density. When the activated carbon anode is added with 50% (wt.) PDA, the startup time is 14% shorter than the control (from 88 h to 76 h), with a 31% increase in maximum power density from 613 ± 9 to 803 ± 6 mW m-2, and the Columbic efficiency increases from 19% to 48%. These can be primarily attributed to the abundant functional groups (such as amino group, and catechol functions) introduced by PDA that improve hydrophilicity and extracellular electron transfer. PDA also increases proportions of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes families, indicating that PDA has a selective effect on anode microbial community. Our findings provide a new approach to accelerate anode biofilm formation and enhance MFC power output by modification of biocompatible PDA.

  17. An efficient algorithm to accelerate the discovery of complex material formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brell, George; Li, Genyuan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-05-01

    The identification of complex multicomponent material formulations that possess specific optimal properties is a challenging task in materials discovery. The high dimensional composition space needs to be adequately sampled and the properties measured with the goal of efficiently identifying effective formulations. This task must also take into account mass fraction and possibly other constraints placed on the material components. Either combinatorial or noncombinatorial sampling of the composition space may be employed in practice. This paper introduces random sampling-high dimensional model representation (RS-HDMR) as an algorithmic tool to facilitate these nonlinear multivariate problems. RS-HDMR serves as a means to accurately interpolate over sampled materials, and simulations of the technique show that it can be very efficient. A variety of simulations is carried out modeling multicomponent→property relationships, and the results show that the number of sampled materials to attain a given level of accuracy for a predicted property does not significantly depend on the number of components in the formulation. Although RS-HDMR best operates in the laboratory by guided iterative rounds of random sampling of the composition space along with property observation, the technique was tested successfully on two existing databases of a seven component phosphor material and a four component deNOx catalyst for reduction of NO with C3H6.

  18. X-ray Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography of ICF and HEDP Materials, Subassemblies and Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W D; Martz Jr., H E

    2006-05-31

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) research are being conducted at large laser facilities, such as the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). At such facilities, millimeter-sized targets with micrometer structures are studied in a variety of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, equation-of-state, inertial confinement fusion and high-energy density experiments. The extreme temperatures and pressures achieved in these experiments make the results susceptible to imperfections in the fabricated targets. Targets include materials varying widely in composition ({approx}3 < Z < {approx}82), density ({approx}0.03 to {approx}20 g/cm{sup 3}), geometry (planar to spherical) and embedded structures (joints to subassemblies). Fabricating these targets with structures to the tolerances required is a challenging engineering problem the ICF and HEDP community are currently undertaking. Nondestructive characterization (NDC) provides a valuable tool in material selection, component inspection, and the final pre-shot assemblies inspection. X-rays are a key method used to NDC these targets. In this paper we discuss X-ray attenuation, X-ray phase effects, and the X-ray system used, its performance and application to characterize low-temperature Raleigh-Taylor and non-cryogenic double-shell targets.

  19. Effect upon the Sputtering Threshold Due to Accumulation of Projectiles in Target Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi; Hyakutake, Toru; Nishiyama, Masaki; Muramoto, Tetsuya; Nishida, Michio

    In order to quantify the accumulation effect of projectiles in target material for sputtering, sputtering yields of carbon for pure graphite and the projectile retaining carbon target material bombarded by xenon and helium ions are calculated with a Monte Carlo code ACAT. The ACAT results have indicated that the threshold energy for sputtering is reduced due to the accumulation of the xenon atoms in graphite. Meanwhile, the threshold energy for carbon sputtering is not largely influenced by the retained helium atoms in graphite. Mass ratio of the projectile to the target atom is the important factor for the low energy sputtering yield. An empirical formula for sputtering yields for graphite retaining xenon atoms has been proposed.

  20. Target material dependence of positron generation from high intensity laser-matter interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, G. J.; Barnak, D.; Fiksel, G.; ...

    2016-12-06

    Here, the effective scaling of positron-electron pair production by direct, ultraintense laser-matter interaction is investigated for a range of target materials and thicknesses. An axial magnetic field, acting as a focusing lens, was employed to measure positron signals for targets with atomic numbers as low as copper (Z – 29). The pair production yield was found to be consistent with the Bethe-Heitler mechanism, where the number of positrons emitted into a 1 steradian cone angle from the target rear was found to be proportional to Z2. The unexpectedly low scaling results from Coulomb collisions that act to stop or scattermore » positrons into high angles. Monte Carlo simulations support the experimental results, providing a comprehensive power-law scaling relationship for all elemental materials and densities.« less

  1. Target material dependence of positron generation from high intensity laser-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. J.; Barnak, D.; Fiksel, G.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Krauland, C.; Link, A.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Peebles, J.; Pollock, B. B.; Beg, F. N.; Betti, R.; Chen, Hui

    2016-12-01

    The effective scaling of positron-electron pair production by direct, ultraintense laser-matter interaction is investigated for a range of target materials and thicknesses. An axial magnetic field, acting as a focusing lens, was employed to measure positron signals for targets with atomic numbers as low as copper (Z = 29). The pair production yield was found to be consistent with the Bethe-Heitler mechanism, where the number of positrons emitted into a 1 steradian cone angle from the target rear was found to be proportional to Z2. The unexpectedly low scaling results from Coulomb collisions that act to stop or scatter positrons into high angles. Monte Carlo simulations support the experimental results, providing a comprehensive power-law scaling relationship for all elemental materials and densities.

  2. Target material dependence of positron generation from high intensity laser-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. J.; Barnak, D.; Fiksel, G.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Krauland, C.; Link, A.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Peebles, J.; Pollock, B. B.; Beg, F. N.; Betti, R.; Chen, Hui

    2016-12-06

    Here, the effective scaling of positron-electron pair production by direct, ultraintense laser-matter interaction is investigated for a range of target materials and thicknesses. An axial magnetic field, acting as a focusing lens, was employed to measure positron signals for targets with atomic numbers as low as copper (Z – 29). The pair production yield was found to be consistent with the Bethe-Heitler mechanism, where the number of positrons emitted into a 1 steradian cone angle from the target rear was found to be proportional to Z2. The unexpectedly low scaling results from Coulomb collisions that act to stop or scatter positrons into high angles. Monte Carlo simulations support the experimental results, providing a comprehensive power-law scaling relationship for all elemental materials and densities.

  3. Engineering aspects of the application of structural materials in the 5 MW-ESS-mercury-target

    SciTech Connect

    Guttek, B.

    1996-06-01

    A main problem of the ESS-Hg-target development and the design of the components of its primary Hg-circuit is the choice of structural materials. As designing, calculations and experiments with elected materials take time and are very costy, a preview on their successful application has to be done before as detailed as possible. One aspect on this is to have the knowledge of characteristics values of the structural material candidates under the occuring mechanical and thermal loads, irradiation, corrosion and erosion. Another point is the technology of engineering concerning the manufacturing, welding, surface treatment, and quality control of such parts and components under the demand to reach maximum lifetime.

  4. The ac and dc performance of polymeric insulating materials under accelerated aging in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S. ); Cherney, E.A. ); Hackam, R. )

    1988-10-01

    The paper presents the results of the dc performance of polymeric insulating materials in a fog chamber. The materials evaluated in fog produced from low (250 ..mu..S/cm) and high (1000 ..mu..S/cm) conductivity water include cylindrical rod samples of high temperature vulcanized (HTV) silicone rubber and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber containing various amounts of either alumina trihydrate (ATH) or silica fillers, or both. Comparison is made of material performance obtained with ac which was reported in an earlier study. In both low and high conductivity fog, the time to failure with ac and +dc was very similar, but a reduction by a factor of about four was observed in the time to failure with -dc. For both ac and dc, silicone rubber performed better than EPDM samples in low conductivity fog, while the order of performance was reversed in high conductivity fog. A theoretical model to determine the effect of dry band discharges on material is presented. Good agreement of the predicted behavior of materials with the experimental findings is shown.

  5. TARDIS-C: A target diagnostic for measuring material structure at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignes, R. M.; Ahmed, M. F.; Eggert, J. H.; Fisher, A. C.; Kalantar, D. H.; Masters, N. D.; Smith, C. A.; Smith, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    A goal of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to better understand solid matter behavior at extreme conditions. Diagnostic tools such as the Target Diffraction In-Situ (TARDIS) have been designed to record data of solid material compressed to tens of Mbars over short time scales. NIF drive beams (∼120 kJ) heat a carefully designed ablator to ramp compress the target to high pressure. A backlighter produces an x-ray source which is diffracted onto image plates through the compressed target. An unimpeded optical path allows Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measurements to be recorded as the compression wave progresses through the target. To reduce the VISAR blast shield's exposure to debris and minimize contamination of the NIF chamber, a transparent barrier has been designed to contain debris within the TARDIS body.

  6. Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

  7. Final Report: MATERIALS, STRANDS, AND CABLES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS [Grant Number DE-SC0010312

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike D.; Collings, Edward W.

    2014-10-29

    Our program consisted of the two components: Strand Research and Cable Research, with a focus on Nb3Sn, Bi2212, and YBCO for accelerator magnet applications. We demonstrated a method to refine the grains in Nb3Sn by a factor of two, reaching 45 nm grain sizes, and layer Jcs of 6 kA/mm2 at 12 T. W also measured conductor magnetization for field quality. This has been done both with Nb3Sn conductor, as well as Bi:2212 strand. Work in support of quench studies of YBCO coils was also performed. Cable loss studies in Nb3Sn focused on connecting and comparing persistent magnetization and coupling magnetization for considering their relative impact on HEP machines. In the area of HTS cables, we have investigated both the quench in multistrand YBCO CORC cables, as well as the magnetization of these cables for use in high field magnets. In addition, we examined the magnetic and thermal properties of large (50 T) solenoids.

  8. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  9. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  10. Accelerator-based tests of radiation shielding properties of materials used in human space infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Lobascio, C; Briccarello, M; Destefanis, R; Faraud, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Guarnieri, V; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Rusek, A; Scampoli, P; Durante, M

    2008-03-01

    Shielding is the only practical countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during space travel. It is well known that light, hydrogenated materials, such as water and polyethylene, provide the best shielding against space radiation. Kevlar and Nextel are two materials of great interest for spacecraft shielding because of their known ability to protect human space infrastructures from meteoroids and debris. We measured the response to simulated heavy-ion cosmic radiation of these shielding materials and compared it to polyethylene, Lucite (PMMA), and aluminum. As proxy to galactic nuclei we used 1 GeV n iron or titanium ions. Both physics and biology tests were performed. The results show that Kevlar, which is rich in carbon atoms (about 50% in number), is an excellent space radiation shielding material. Physics tests show that its effectiveness is close (80-90%) to that of polyethylene, and biology data suggest that it can reduce the chromosomal damage more efficiently than PMMA. Nextel is less efficient as a radiation shield, and the expected reduction on dose is roughly half that provided by the same mass of polyethylene. Both Kevlar and Nextel are more effective than aluminum in the attenuation of heavy-ion dose.

  11. Feasibility study of heavy-ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jae Bum; Lee, Ju Hahn; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as targets for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite material and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C), were considered as muon production targets, and their muon production rates for a 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For the thermal analysis, the total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with the MCNPX code; then, the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using the ANSYS code with consideration of heat transfer mechanisms such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy-ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with the rates experimentally-obtained for a proton beam.

  12. Spectroscopy of reactive species produced by low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma on conductive target material surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Sakakita, Hajime; Kato, Susumu; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Okazaki, Toshiya; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2016-10-01

    A method for blood coagulation using low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma (LEAPP) is confirmed as an alternative procedure to reduce tissue damage caused by heat. Blood coagulation using LEAPP behaves differently depending on working gas species; helium is more effective than argon in promoting fast coagulation. To analyse the difference in reactive species produced by helium and argon plasma, spectroscopic measurements were conducted without and with a target material. To compare emissions, blood coagulation experiments using LEAPP for both plasmas were performed under almost identical conditions. Although many kinds of reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals and excited nitrogen molecules were observed with similar intensity in both plasmas, intensities of nitrogen ion molecules and nitric oxide molecules were extremely strong in the helium plasma. It is considered that nitrogen ion molecules were mainly produced by penning ionization by helium metastable. Near the target, a significant increase in the emissions of reactive species is observed. There is a possibility that electron acceleration was induced in a local electric field formed on the surface. However, in argon plasma, emissions from nitrogen ion were not measured even near the target surface. These differences between the two plasmas may be producing the difference in blood coagulation behaviour. To control the surrounding gas of the plasma, a gas-component-controllable chamber was assembled. Filling the chamber with O2/He or N2/He gas mixtures selectively produces either reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species. Through selective treatments, this chamber would be useful in studying the effects of specific reactive species on blood coagulation.

  13. Investigation of alternative materials for impregnation of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Deepak Reddy Chichili, Jay Hoffman and Alexander Zlobin

    2003-11-17

    Insulation is one of the most important elements of magnet design, which determines the electrical, mechanical, and thermal performance as well as lifetime of the magnet. The exposure to high radiation loads especially for the proposed LHC second-generation interaction region Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles further limits the choices of the insulation materials. Traditionally Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets were impregnated with epoxy to improve both the mechanical and electrical properties. However, the acceptable radiation limit for epoxy is low which reduces the lifetime of the magnet. The paper presents the results of the feasibility study to replace epoxy with high radiation-resistant material during vacuum impregnation. The mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of samples impregnated with Matrimid were measured and compared with epoxy-impregnated samples.

  14. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Rare Earth Substitutes: A Test-bed for Accelerated Materials Development

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, Lorin X.

    2015-10-26

    Hard permanent magnets in wide use typically involve expensive Rare Earth elements. In this effort, we investigated candidate permanent magnet materials which contain no Rare Earths, while simultaneously exploring improvements in theoretical methodology which enable the better prediction of magnetic properties relevant for the future design and optimization of permanent magnets. This included a detailed study of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies, and the use of advanced simulation tools to better describe magnetic properties at elevated temperatures.

  15. Design and analysis of a piezoelectric material based touch screen with additional pressure and its acceleration measurement functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Cheng; Liu, Jia-Yi; Gao, Ren-Long; Chang, Jie; Li, Long-Tu

    2013-12-01

    Touch screens are becoming more and more prevalent in everyday environments due to their convenience and humanized operation. In this paper, a piezoelectric material based touch screen is developed and investigated. Piezoelectric ceramics arrayed under the touch panel at the edges or corners are used as tactile sensors to measure the touch positioning point similarly to conventional touch screens. However, additional touch pressure and its acceleration performance can also be obtained to obtain a higher-level human-machine interface. The piezoelectric ceramics can also be added to a traditional touch screen structure, or they can be used independently to construct a novel touch screen with a high light transmittance approach to a transparent glass. The piezoelectric ceramics were processed from PZT piezoelectric ceramic powder into a round or rectangular shape. According to the varied touch position and physical press strength of a finger, or even a gloved hand or fingernail, the piezoelectric tactile sensors will have different output voltage responses. By calculating the ratio of different piezoelectric tactile sensors’ responses and summing up all piezoelectric tactile sensors’ output voltages, the touch point position, touch pressure and touch force acceleration can be detected. A prototype of such a touch screen is manufactured and its position accuracy, touch pressure and response speed are measured in detail. The experimental results show that the prototype has many advantages such as high light transmittance, low energy cost and high durability.

  16. Bremsstrahlung production at 50 MeV in different target materials and configurations.

    PubMed

    Sätherberg, A; Andreo, P; Karlsson, M

    1996-04-01

    A combination of Monte Carlo, convolution, and experimental techniques have been used to investigate bremsstrahlung production at 50 MeV in full-range targets to produce narrow elementary photon beams for scanning. Calculations using the ITS 3.0 Monte Carlo system for various target designs, including particle transport through the treatment head of an MM5O racetrack microtron and a water phantom, have been compared to experimental dose profiles from narrow photon beams at 10-cm depth in water. A reduction in the ITS 3.0 default substep size has been found necessary even for incomplete agreement, in consistency with the findings of Faddegon and Rogers [Nucl. Instrum. Meth. A 327, 556-565 (1993)] for a different experimental setup and energy using the previous version of ITS. Results show that the calculated shape of the tail of dose distributions from narrow photon beams agrees well with measurements, but CYLTRAN/ITS 3.0 fails to reproduce the central part of the distribution. The discrepancy at small angles, reported previously for EGS4 and ITS 2.1 simulations, possess a limitation to Monte Carlo simulations of narrow photon beams used in scanned systems of clinical accelerators. Radial dose profiles have been calculated by convolution of the energy fluence at the exit of the target with one polyenergetic Monte Carlo calculated dose kernel and also a database consisting of ten different dose kernels corresponding to different monoenergetic photon pencil beams for comparison. The agreement with the much slower fully detailed Monte Carlo calculations was better when using the database kernels than the polyenergetic kernel. Results for the mean energy, mean polar angle, and energy fluence at different depths within various targets have been obtained. These are discussed in the context of the design characteristics of bremsstrahlung targets with emphasis on their utilization for scanning photon beam techniques.

  17. Power deposition measurements at 800 MeV-direct proton beam heating of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, D.L.; Langenbrunner, J.; Morgan, G.

    1999-07-01

    A slug calorimetric sensor with several novel design features was developed to measure the power deposition in a cylindrical test article with lead, aluminum, polyethylene and tungsten components. A small, solid slug (volume = 347.5 mm{sup 3}) was suspended by Kevlar fibers and surrounded by an adiabatic enclosure in an insulating vacuum canister of stainless steel construction. A small, calibrated, 100-kOhm thermistor was placed in the slug to monitor the temperature. Power deposition caused by the passage of radiation through the slug was measured from the rate of temperature rise. Lead, tungsten, and Inconel-718 slugs were placed on the beam axis of the test article and were irradiated with an 800 MeV proton beam. The data from these sensors will provide an accurate determination of thermal power density and energy deposition from proton beams incident on target/blanket components of accelerator-based systems, such as the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  18. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Eatherly, W.P.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    A Molten-Salt Reactor Program for power applications was initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1956. In 1965 the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) went critical and was successfully operated for several years. Operation of the MSRE revealed two deficiencies in the Hastelloy N alloy that had been developed specifically for molten-salt systems. The alloy embrittled at elevated temperatures as a result of exposure to thermal neutrons (radiation damage) and grain boundary embrittlement occurred in materials to fuel salt. Intergranular cracking was found to be associated with fission products, viz. tellurium. An improved Hastelloy N composition was subsequently developed that had better resistance to both of these problems. However, the discovery that fission product cracking could be significantly decreased by making the salt sufficiently reducing offers the prospect of improved compatibility with molten salts containing fission products and resistance to radiation damage in ABC applications. Recommendations are made regarding the types of corrosion tests and mechanistic studies needed to qualify materials for operation with PuF{sub 3}-containing molten salts.

  19. Safety Issues of HG and PB as IFE Target Materials: Radiological Versus Chemical Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Cadwallader, L C; Moir, R W; Rio, G. D; Sanz, J

    2002-11-11

    We have performed a safety assessment of mercury and lead as possible hohlraum materials for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) targets, including for the first time a comparative analysis of the radiological and toxicological consequences of an accidental release. In order to calculate accident doses to the public, we have distinguished between accidents at the target fabrication facility and accidents at other areas of the power plant. Regarding the chemical toxicity assessment, we have used the USDOE regulations to determine the maximum allowable release in order to protect the public from adverse health effects. Opposite to common belief, it has been found that the chemical safety requirements for these materials appear to be more stringent than the concentrations that would result in an acceptable radiological dose.

  20. Preliminary results for HIP bonding Ta to W targets for the materials test station

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, David E; Maloy, Stuart A

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten targets for the Materials Test Station (MTS) were clad with thin tantalum cover plates and a tantalum frame using hot isostatic pressing (HIP). A preliminary HIP parameter study showed good bonding and intimate mechanical contact for Ta cover plate thicknesses of 0.25 mm (0.010 inch) and 0.38 mm (0.015 inch). HIP temperatures of full HIP runs were 1500 C (2732 F). HIP pressure was 203 MPa (30 ksi).

  1. ION ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Bell, J.S.

    1959-09-15

    An arrangement for the drift tubes in a linear accelerator is described whereby each drift tube acts to shield the particles from the influence of the accelerating field and focuses the particles passing through the tube. In one embodiment the drift tube is splii longitudinally into quadrants supported along the axis of the accelerator by webs from a yoke, the quadrants. webs, and yoke being of magnetic material. A magnetic focusing action is produced by energizing a winding on each web to set up a magnetic field between adjacent quadrants. In the other embodiment the quadrants are electrically insulated from each other and have opposite polarity voltages on adjacent quadrants to provide an electric focusing fleld for the particles, with the quadrants spaced sufficienily close enough to shield the particles within the tube from the accelerating electric field.

  2. Preparation of silicon target material by adding Al-B master alloy in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengting; Wang, Kai; Ren, Shiqiang; Jiang, Dachuan; Tan, Yi

    2017-03-01

    The silicon target material was prepared by adding Al-6B master alloy in directional solidification. The microstructure was characterized and the resistivity was studied in this work. The results showed that the purity of the silicon target material was more than 99.999% (5N). The resistivity was ranges from 0.002 to 0.030 Ω·cm along the ingot height. It was revealed that the particles of AlB2 in Al-6B master alloy would react spontaneously and generate clusters of [B] and [Al] in molten silicon at 1723 K. After directional solidification, the content of B and Al were increasing gradually with the increase of solidified fraction. The measured values of B were in good agreement with the curve of the Scheil equation below 80% of the ingot height. The mean concentration of B was about 17.20 ppmw and the mean concentration of Al was about 8.07 ppmw after directional solidification. The measured values of Al were fitting well with the curve of values which the effective segregation coefficient was 0.00378. It was observed that B co-doped Al in directional solidification polysilicon could regulate resistivity mutually. This work provides the theoretical basis and technical support for industrial production of the silicon target material.

  3. Proposed double-layer target for the generation of high-quality laser-accelerated ion beams.

    PubMed

    Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S V; Nishihara, K; Tajima, T; Pegoraro, F; Khoroshkov, V S; Mima, K; Daido, H; Kato, Y; Kitagawa, Y; Nagai, K; Sakabe, S

    2002-10-21

    In order to achieve a high-quality, i.e., monoenergetic, intense ion beam, we propose the use of a double-layer target. The first layer, at the target front, consists of high-Z atoms, while the second (rear) layer is a thin coating of low-Z atoms. The generation of high-quality proton beams from the double-layer target, irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse, is demonstrated with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. Accelerating bioelectric functional development of neural stem cells by graphene coupling: Implications for neural interfacing with conductive materials.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rongrong; Zhang, Shasha; Xiao, Miao; Qian, Fuping; He, Zuhong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Li, Huawei; Yang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ming; Chai, Renjie; Tang, Mingliang

    2016-11-01

    In order to govern cell-specific behaviors in tissue engineering for neural repair and regeneration, a better understanding of material-cell interactions, especially the bioelectric functions, is extremely important. Graphene has been reported to be a potential candidate for use as a scaffold and neural interfacing material. However, the bioelectric evolvement of cell membranes on these conductive graphene substrates remains largely uninvestigated. In this study, we used a neural stem cell (NSC) model to explore the possible changes in membrane bioelectric properties - including resting membrane potentials and action potentials - and cell behaviors on graphene films under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. We used a combination of single-cell electrophysiological recordings and traditional cell biology techniques. Graphene did not affect the basic membrane electrical parameters (capacitance and input resistance), but resting membrane potentials of cells on graphene substrates were more strongly negative under both proliferation and differentiation conditions. Also, NSCs and their progeny on graphene substrates exhibited increased firing of action potentials during development compared to controls. However, graphene only slightly affected the electric characterizations of mature NSC progeny. The modulation of passive and active bioelectric properties on the graphene substrate was accompanied by enhanced NSC differentiation. Furthermore, spine density, synapse proteins expressions and synaptic activity were all increased in graphene group. Modeling of the electric field on conductive graphene substrates suggests that the electric field produced by the electronegative cell membrane is much higher on graphene substrates than that on control, and this might explain the observed changes of bioelectric development by graphene coupling. Our results indicate that graphene is able to accelerate NSC maturation during development, especially with regard to

  5. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst. PMID:26365764

  6. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. In conclusion, although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  7. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; ...

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm−2. In conclusion, althoughmore » the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.« less

  8. Accelerating Nanoscale Research with Neutron Total Scattering: Linking Structure and Function in Finite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Katharine

    2012-10-01

    h -abstract-pard In contrast to bulk materials, nanomaterials and nanoparticles, comprised of a few hundred to tens of thousands of atoms, require every atom's position to be located in order to understand their structure-property relationships. New behavior can arise with a constricted, expanded, or distorted lattice, variation in surface termination structure, ligand capping or stabilization, or with the increasingly diverse set of shapes and architectures appearing in nanoscience literature today: tubes, pyramids, stars, core-shell and matrix-confined particles, multilayer films, etc. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis, based on spallation neutron or synchrotron x-ray total scattering data, has emerged as a very promising characterization method for nanomaterials in recent years. Total scattering methods provide information about every pair of atoms probed in a diffraction experiment and thus contain an unexploited wealth of information for finite systems. In this contribution we will present our work establishing the influence of particle size and shape on the nature and correlation of local atomic dipoles in finite ferroelectric systems. We also review current data-driven modeling capabilities and outline the need for evolution of robust computational tools to follow other complex nanoscale phenomena with scattering data. pard-/abstract-

  9. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D; Peters, Aaron W; Kubiak, Cliff P; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-09-14

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm(-2). Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  10. A porous proton-relaying metal-organic framework material that accelerates electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Idan; Deria, Pravas; Bury, Wojciech; Mondloch, Joseph E.; Kung, Chung-Wei; So, Monica; Sampson, Matthew D.; Peters, Aaron W.; Kubiak, Cliff P.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-09-01

    The availability of efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts is of high importance for solar fuel technologies aimed at reducing future carbon emissions. Even though Pt electrodes are excellent HER electrocatalysts, commercialization of large-scale hydrogen production technology requires finding an equally efficient, low-cost, earth-abundant alternative. Here, high porosity, metal-organic framework (MOF) films have been used as scaffolds for the deposition of a Ni-S electrocatalyst. Compared with an MOF-free Ni-S, the resulting hybrid materials exhibit significantly enhanced performance for HER from aqueous acid, decreasing the kinetic overpotential by more than 200 mV at a benchmark current density of 10 mA cm-2. Although the initial aim was to improve electrocatalytic activity by greatly boosting the active area of the Ni-S catalyst, the performance enhancements instead were found to arise primarily from the ability of the proton-conductive MOF to favourably modify the immediate chemical environment of the sulfide-based catalyst.

  11. Effective generation of the spread-out-Bragg peak from the laser accelerated proton beams using a carbon-proton mixed target.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Pae, Ki-Hong; Park, Sung Yong

    2014-12-01

    Conventional laser accelerated proton beam has broad energy spectra. It is not suitable for clinical use directly, so it is necessary for employing energy selection system. However, in the conventional laser accelerated proton system, the intensity of the proton beams in the low energy regime is higher than that in the high energy regime. Thus, to generate spread-out-Bragg peak (SOBP), stronger weighting value to the higher energy proton beams is needed and weaker weighting value to the lower energy proton beams is needed, which results in the wide range of weighting values. The purpose of this research is to investigate a method for efficient generating of the SOBP with varying magnetic field in the energy selection system using a carbon-proton mixture target. Energy spectrum of the laser accelerated proton beams was acquired using Particle-In-Cell simulations. The Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was implemented for energy selection, particle transportation, and dosimetric property measurement. The energy selection collimator hole size of the energy selection system was changed from 1 to 5 mm in order to investigate the effect of hole size on the dosimetric properties for Bragg peak and SOBP. To generate SOBP, magnetic field in the energy selection system was changed during beam irradiation with each beam weighting factor. In this study, our results suggest that carbon-proton mixture target based laser accelerated proton beams can generate quasi-monoenergetic energy distribution and result in the efficient generation of SOBP. A further research is needed to optimize SOBP according to each range and modulated width using an optimized weighting algorithm.

  12. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  13. Investigation of induced radioactivity in the Linac-Adone accelerator complex for the management of the decommissioned material.

    PubMed

    Mora, Juan Carlos; Bedogni, Roberto; Esposito, Adolfo; Cancio, David

    2007-03-01

    The LINAC-ADONE accelerator complex of the INFN-LNF Frascati National Laboratories, operating for 27 y prior to the commissioning of DAPhiNE, was dismantled in 1993. The scraps resulting from the decommissioning of LINAC-ADPhiNE have been temporarily stored in the same Frascati laboratory, waiting for definitive disposal. Relying on recommendations of the IAEA, European Commission and Italian committees, an experimental characterization study of the LNF repository was performed. The main objective was a classification of the scraps on the basis of internationally recognized "clearance levels," which are 0.1 Bq g(-1) for the isotopes of interest for this work. Secondly, a measurement of the materials suspected to be above 0.1 Bq g(-1) was planned. Activation isotopes were expected from the aluminum, copper, steel, and iron of the LINAC and the ADONE ring sections. For screening purposes, the repository area has been divided into zones, where in-situ measurements with a portable HP-Ge detector have been performed. In addition, small samples have been cut from a representative number of pieces, and accurate laboratory measurements have been made with a low background HP-Ge spectrometer. The experimental results are in good agreement with other studies and show that a large part of the material is below the mentioned specific activity level.

  14. Effect of plasma profile on ion acceleration in the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin overdense target

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Duck-Hee; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Sungman; Cha, Hyungki

    2008-06-15

    Energetic ion generation from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin overdense plasma accompanied by a preplasma and a rear side plasma gradient is investigated by particle-in-cell simulations. The dynamics of ion acceleration depending on the maximum density of the preplasma in front of the overdense plasma slab with a smooth density gradient at the rear side are presented and discussed by comparing a sharp rear side boundary case.

  15. Powered by DFT: Screening methods that accelerate materials development for hydrogen in metals applications.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kelly M; Chandrasekhar, Nita; Sholl, David S

    2014-11-18

    , selections of which are described in this Account. To further increase the number of membrane materials that can be studied with DFT, computational costs need to be reduced either through methods development to break bottlenecks in the performance prediction algorithm, particularly related to transition state identification, or through screening techniques that take advantage of correlations to bypass constraints.

  16. The analysis of long-wave infrared polarization signal of typical material targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Shi, Zhi-guang; Chen, Xiao-tian; Song, Shu-li

    2016-09-01

    Infrared polarization imaging is a new kind of infrared detection technology developed in recent ten years. Different from the traditional detection method of infrared imaging, infrared polarization imaging can not only obtain infrared radiation intensity information of targets, but also obtain the infrared radiation polarization information. So the polarization of the target scene is the physical basis of infrared polarization imaging detection. On the basis of the research about infrared polarization imaging theory, the characteristics of long-wave infrared polarization detection was analyzed in this paper. Firstly, the paper studied long-wave infrared polarization state and interaction effect which coming from the spontaneous emission of target and environment, then designed the analysis experiment about long-wave infrared polarization characteristics that coming from spontaneous radiation, further and verified the forming mechanism of long wave infrared polarization. Through the several experiments that the long wave polarization information of different material objects being measured, a physical phenomenon was found that with the long-wave thermal radiation transmitting form high temperature object to low temperature object, the polarization characteristics transfer process had been happened at the same time, and the degree of this transfer was associated with the material and self-temperature of the objects.

  17. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Juergen; Aaron, A. M.; Bell, Gary L.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Ellis, Ronald James; Giuliano, D.; Howard, R.; Kiggans, James O.; Lessard, Timothy L.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Perkins, Dale E.; Varma, Venugopal Koikal

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  18. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  19. Spatially controlled carbon sponge for targeting internalized radioactive materials in human body.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Oh, Wan-Kyu; Shin, Keun-Young; Kwon, Oh Seok; Son, Suim; Jang, Jyongsik

    2012-07-01

    Carbon sponge, an adsorbent with spatially controlled structure is demonstrated for targeting internalized radiocesium and other radionuclides in human body. Three dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) carbons derived from inverse opal replicas of colloidal-crystal template exhibit large surface area and high porosity, resulting in highly efficient adsorbents for radionuclides. It is also possible to enhance binding affinity and selectivity to radionuclide targets by decoration of 3DOM carbon surfaces with Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles, and synthesized PB nanoparticles reveal low toxicity toward macrophage cells with potential advantages over oral administration. It is noteworthy that the maximum (133)Cs adsorption capacity of PB-decorated 3DOM carbons is 40.07 mmol g(-1) which is ca. 30 and 200 times higher than that of commercialized medicine Radiogardase(®) and bulk PB, respectively. Further, adsorption kinetics study indicates that the PB-decorated 3DOM carbons have the homogenous surface for (133)Cs ion adsorption and all sites have equal adsorption energies in terms of ion exchange between the cyano groups of the PB-decorated 3DOM carbons and radionuclides. As a concept of the oral-administrable "carbon sponge", the PB-decorated 3DOM carbons offer useful implications in the separation science of radioactive materials and important insight for designing novel materials for treatment of patients or suspected internal contamination with radioactive materials.

  20. Target Plate Material Influence on Fullerene-C60 Laser Desorption/Ionization Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zeegers, Guido P; Günthardt, Barbara F; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-04-01

    Systematic laser desorption/ionization (LDI) experiments of fullerene-C60 on a wide range of target plate materials were conducted to gain insight into the initial ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The positive and negative ion signal intensities of precursor, fragment, and cluster ions were monitored, varying both the laser fluence (0-3.53 Jcm(-2)) and the ion extraction delay time (0-950 ns). The resulting species-specific ion signal intensities are an indication for the ionization mechanisms that contribute to LDI and the time frames in which they operate, providing insight in the (MA)LDI primary ionization. An increasing electrical resistivity of the target plate material increases the fullerene-C60 precursor and fragment anion signal intensity. Inconel 625 and Ti90/Al6/V4, both highly electrically resistive, provide the highest anion signal intensities, exceeding the cation signal intensity by a factor ~1.4 for the latter. We present a mechanism based on transient electrical field strength reduction to explain this trend. Fullerene-C60 cluster anion formation is negligible, which could be due to the high extraction potential. Cluster cations, however, are readily formed, although for high laser fluences, the preferred channel is formation of precursor and fragment cations. Ion signal intensity depends greatly on the choice of substrate material, and careful substrate selection could, therefore, allow for more sensitive (MA)LDI measurements. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Target Plate Material Influence on Fullerene-C60 Laser Desorption/Ionization Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeegers, Guido P.; Günthardt, Barbara F.; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-04-01

    Systematic laser desorption/ionization (LDI) experiments of fullerene-C60 on a wide range of target plate materials were conducted to gain insight into the initial ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The positive and negative ion signal intensities of precursor, fragment, and cluster ions were monitored, varying both the laser fluence (0-3.53 Jcm-2) and the ion extraction delay time (0-950 ns). The resulting species-specific ion signal intensities are an indication for the ionization mechanisms that contribute to LDI and the time frames in which they operate, providing insight in the (MA)LDI primary ionization. An increasing electrical resistivity of the target plate material increases the fullerene-C60 precursor and fragment anion signal intensity. Inconel 625 and Ti90/Al6/V4, both highly electrically resistive, provide the highest anion signal intensities, exceeding the cation signal intensity by a factor ~1.4 for the latter. We present a mechanism based on transient electrical field strength reduction to explain this trend. Fullerene-C60 cluster anion formation is negligible, which could be due to the high extraction potential. Cluster cations, however, are readily formed, although for high laser fluences, the preferred channel is formation of precursor and fragment cations. Ion signal intensity depends greatly on the choice of substrate material, and careful substrate selection could, therefore, allow for more sensitive (MA)LDI measurements.

  2. Workshop session on pros and cons for different target materials/corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Y.; Mansur, L.K.; Dai, Y.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Two of the originally planned workshop sessions, indicated by the titles on each side of the {open_quotes}/{close_quotes} in the above title were combined. The session was structured into four areas in which target material attributes were considered: nuclear properties; physical properties; compatibility; and liquid metal engineering/safety. Short presentations were either volunteered by participants or requested by the session organizers to help establish a background and stimulate discussion. G. Bauer, J. Takeda, T. Gabriel and S. Wender covered the first two areas; J. DiStefano, Y. Dai and Y. Orlov made presentations in the third area. O. Lielausis and R. Dressler spoke on the fourth area. L.K. Mansur served as moderator for the combined session. Although there was much discussion and some differences of opinion, the overall recommendations, considering all available factors, as distilled by this session`s organizers, are as follows. Choose Hg as the prime candidate target material to which most resources should be devoted. A strong alternate candidate is considered to exist in Pb-Bi eutectic. Other candidate materials such as Pb, Pb-Mg eutectic and Bi are weaker choices for various reasons, with Bi being the weakest.

  3. Enhanced laser-radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration by moving focusing electric-fields in a foil-in-cone target

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B. Yu, T. P.; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yin, Y.; Ge, Z. Y.; Wu, H. C.

    2015-02-15

    A foil-in-cone target is proposed to enhance stable laser-radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration by avoiding the beam degradation in whole stage of acceleration. Two and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the guiding cone can substantially improve the spectral and spatial properties of the ion beam and lead to better preservation of the beam quality. This can be attributed to the focusing effect of the radial sheath electric fields formed on the inner walls of the cone, which co-move with the accelerated foil and effectively suppress the undesirable transverse explosion of the foil. It is shown that, by using a transversely Gaussian laser pulse with intensity of ∼2.74 × 10{sup 22 }W∕cm{sup 2}, a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam with a peak energy of ∼1.5 GeV/u, density ∼10n{sub c}, and transverse size ∼1λ{sub 0} can be obtained.

  4. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-03-22

    Calculations suggest that experiments relating to disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics. In this regard, the low beam emittance of suggested multi-beam designs are very useful. Possibly even higher focal spot brightness could be obtained by plasma lenses which involve external fields on the beam which is stripped to a higher charge state by passing through a plasma cell. Preliminary results suggest that intensities approx. 10/sup 13/ - 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ are achievable. Given these intensities, deposition experiments with heating of disks to greater than a million degrees Kelvin (100 eV) are expected.

  5. Accelerating target discovery using pre-competitive open science—patients need faster innovation more than anyone else

    PubMed Central

    Low, Eric; Bountra, Chas; Lee, Wen Hwa

    2016-01-01

    We are experiencing a new era enabled by unencumbered access to high quality data through the emergence of open science initiatives in the historically challenging area of early stage drug discovery. At the same time, many patient-centric organisations are taking matters into their own hands by participating in, enabling and funding research. Here we present the rationale behind the innovative partnership between the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC)—an open, pre-competitive pre-clinical research consortium and the research-focused patient organisation Myeloma UK to create a new, comprehensive platform to accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments for multiple myeloma. PMID:27594912

  6. Accelerating target discovery using pre-competitive open science-patients need faster innovation more than anyone else.

    PubMed

    Low, Eric; Bountra, Chas; Lee, Wen Hwa

    2016-01-01

    We are experiencing a new era enabled by unencumbered access to high quality data through the emergence of open science initiatives in the historically challenging area of early stage drug discovery. At the same time, many patient-centric organisations are taking matters into their own hands by participating in, enabling and funding research. Here we present the rationale behind the innovative partnership between the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC)-an open, pre-competitive pre-clinical research consortium and the research-focused patient organisation Myeloma UK to create a new, comprehensive platform to accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments for multiple myeloma.

  7. The thyroxine-containing thyroglobulin peptide (aa 2549-2560) is a target epitope in iodide-accelerated spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kolypetri, Panayota; Carayanniotis, Karen; Rahman, Shofiur; Georghiou, Paris E; Magafa, Vassiliki; Cordopatis, Paul; Carayanniotis, George

    2014-07-01

    Enhanced iodide ingestion is known to accelerate the incidence and severity of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis [iodide-accelerated spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (ISAT)] in NOD.H2(h4) mice. CD4+ cells are required for the development and maintenance of ISAT, but their target epitopes remain unknown. In this study, we show that the previously identified thyroglobulin (Tg) T cell epitope p2549-2560 containing thyroxine at position 2553 (T4p2553) induces thyroiditis as well as strong specific T and B cell responses in NOD.H2(h4) mice. In ISAT, activated CD4+ T cells specific for T4p2553 are detected before the disease onset in thyroid-draining cervical lymph nodes only in mice placed on an iodide-rich diet and not in age-matched controls. In addition, selective enrichment of CD4+ IFN-γ+ T4p2553-specific cells is observed among cervical lymph node cells and intrathyroidal lymphocytes. T4p2553 was equally detectable on dendritic cells obtained ex vivo from cervical lymph node cells of NaI-fed or control mice, suggesting that the iodide-rich diet contributes to the activation of autoreactive cells rather than the generation of the autoantigenic epitope. Furthermore, spontaneous T4p2553-specific IgG are not detectable within the strong Tg-specific autoantibody response. To our knowledge, these data identify for the first time a Tg T cell epitope as a spontaneous target in ISAT.

  8. Shelf-life and colour change kinetics of Aloe vera gel powder under accelerated storage in three different packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, C T; Rao, P Srinivasa

    2013-08-01

    Aloe vera gel powder was produced through dehumidified air drying of Aloe vere gel at optimized conditions of temperature, relative humidity and air velocity of 64 °C, 18% and 0.8 m.s(-1), respectively. The powder was packed in three different packaging materials viz., laminated aluminum foil (AF), biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) and polypropylene (PP). The shelf-life of the powder was predicted on the basis of free flowness of product under accelerated storage condition (38 ± 1 °C, 90 ± 1% relative humidity) and was calculated to be 33.87, 42.58 and 51.05 days in BOPP, PP and AF, respectively. The storage stability of powder in terms of colour change was studied. The magnitude of colour change of Aloe vera gel powder during storage suggests that AF was better than BOPP and PP. The colour change of powder during storage followed first order reaction kinetics with a rate constant of 0.0444 per day for AF, 0.075 per day for BOPP and 0.0498 per day for PP.

  9. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam.

  10. Self-vapor cooled targets for production of I-123 at high current accelerators. [using Xe-123 production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, J. W.; Scholz, K. L.; Sodd, V. J.

    1974-01-01

    The basic elements of the vapor cooled target system are shown. This system can be operated as a heat pipe or as a conventional condenser. The choice of target fluid is based on the specific nuclear reaction chosen to produce Xe-123. The reaction using I-127 was studied and shown to have a significant yield for bombarding energies from 47 to 63 MeV. The Cs-133 reaction is also included. Xenon-123 is applied to I-123 production in a purer form for thyroid studies.

  11. A TPD and AR based comparison of accelerator neutron irradiation fields between (7)Li and W targets for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Yonai, Shunsuke; Baba, Mamoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2014-06-01

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension was investigated for the usage of (7)Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.3-2.8MeV protons and W(p,n) neutrons by 50MeV protons. The indexes were the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and advantage depth (AD). Consequently, a configuration for W target with the Fe filter, Fluental moderator, Pb reflector showed the TPD of 5.8cm and AD of 9.3cm. Comparable indexes were found for the Li target in a geometry with the MgF2 moderator and Teflon reflector.

  12. Materials Testing for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Molten Salt Fission System: A look at the Materials Science of Molten Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooby, Elizabeth; Balachandran, Shreyas; Foley, David; Hartwig, Karl; McIntyre, Peter; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Pogue, Nathaniel; Simpson, Michael; Tripathy, Prabhat

    2011-10-01

    For an accelerator-driven subcritical molten salt fission core to survive its 50+ year fuel life, the primary vessel, heat exchanger, and various internal components must be made of materials that resist corrosion and radiation damage in a high-temperature environment, (500-800 C). An experimental study of the corrosion behavior of candidate metals in contact with molten salt is being conducted at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies. Initial experiments have been run on Nb, Ta, Ni, two zirconium alloys, Hastelloy-N, and a series of steel alloys to form a base line for corrosion in both chloride and bromide salt. Metal coupons were immersed in LiCl-KCl or LiBr-KBr at 700 C in an inert-atmosphere. Salt samples were extracted on a time schedule over a 24-hr period. The samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine concentrations of metals from corrosion. Preliminary results will be presented.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of intracellular concentrations of active drug metabolites in human target cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Garner, R C; Lee, L S; Seymour, M; Fuchs, E J; Hubbard, W C; Parsons, T L; Pakes, G E; Fletcher, C V; Flexner, C

    2010-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultrasensitive technique to detect radiolabeled compounds. We administered a microdose (100 µg) of (14)C-labeled zidovudine (ZDV) with or without a standard unlabeled dose (300 mg) to healthy volunteers. Intracellular ZDV-triphosphate (ZDV-TP) concentration was measured using AMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). AMS analysis yielded excellent concordance with LC/MS/MS and was 30,000-fold more sensitive. The kinetics of intracellular ZDV-TP formation changed several-fold over the dose range studied (100 µg-300 mg). AMS holds promise as a tool for quantifying intracellular drug metabolites and other biomediators in vivo.

  14. Analytical and experimental investigation of the feasibility of accelerated lifetime testing of materials exposed to an atomic oxygen beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, Royal; Barnes, Alan; Tolk, Norman

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of atomic particles with surfaces is of both scientific and technological interest. Past work emphasizes the measurement of high-energy sputtering yields. Very little work utilized low-energy beams for which chemical and electronic effects can be important. Even less work has been carried out using well-defined low-energy projectiles. The use of low-energy, reactive projectiles permits one to investigate surface processes that have not been well characterized. As the energy of the projectile decreases, the collisional cascades and spikes, that are common for high-energy projectiles, become less important, and chemical and electronic effects can play a significant role. Aspects of particle-surface interactions are of concern in several areas of technology. For example, the erosion, desorption, and glow of surfaces of spacecraft in orbit are important in the arena of space technology. The materials studied under this contract are of possible use on the exterior portions of the power generation system of Space Station Freedom. Under the original designs, Space Station Freedom's power generation system would generate potential differences on the surface as high as 200 volts. Ions in the plasma that often surround orbiting vehicles would be accelerated by these potentials leading to bombardment and erosion of the exposed surfaces. The major constituent of the atmosphere, approximately 90 percent, in the low earth orbit region is atomic oxygen. Since atomic oxygen is extremely reactive with most materials, chemical effects can arise in addition to the physical sputtering caused by the acceleration of the oxygen ions. Furthermore, the incident oxygen ions can remain embedded in the exposed surfaces, altering the chemical composition of the surfaces. Since the effective binding energy of a chemically altered surface can be quite different from that of the pure substrate, the sputtering yield of a chemically altered surface is usually different also. The low

  15. U. S. -French Cooperative Research Program: U. S. test results for cable insulation and jacket materials at the completion of accelerated aging

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Eight different U.S. insulation and jacket products have been accelerated aged at Sandia. The experimental variables included: (1) sequential versus simultaneous accelerated aging exposures; (2) the order of the sequential exposures; and (3) ambient versus 70/sup 0/C irradiation temperatures during sequential aging exposures. We observed that the irradiation temperature (70/sup 0/C or ambient) was secondary in importance to the choice of sequence for thermal and radiation aging. For most materials studied (except TEFZEL) the irradiation then thermal aging sequence was as severe or more severe than the thermal then irradiation aging sequence.

  16. A Monte Carlo investigation of low-Z target image quality generated in a linear accelerator using Varian's VirtuaLinac

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, David; Robar, James L.; Sawkey, Daren

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work was the demonstration and validation of VirtuaLinac with clinical photon beams and to investigate the implementation of low-Z targets in a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Linac) using Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: VirtuaLinac, a cloud based web application utilizing Geant4 Monte Carlo code, was used to model the Linac treatment head components. Particles were propagated through the lower portion of the treatment head using BEAMnrc. Dose distributions and spectral distributions were calculated using DOSXYZnrc and BEAMdp, respectively. For validation, 6 MV flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams were generated and compared to measurement for square fields, 10 and 40 cm wide and at d{sub max} for diagonal profiles. Two low-Z targets were investigated: a 2.35 MeV carbon target and the proposed 2.50 MeV commercial imaging target for the TrueBeam platform. A 2.35 MeV carbon target was also simulated in a 2100EX Clinac using BEAMnrc. Contrast simulations were made by scoring the dose in the phosphor layer of an IDU20 aSi detector after propagating through a 4 or 20 cm thick phantom composed of water and ICRP bone. Results: Measured and modeled depth dose curves for 6 MV flattened and FFF beams agree within 1% for 98.3% of points at depths greater than 0.85 cm. Ninety three percent or greater of points analyzed for the diagonal profiles had a gamma value less than one for the criteria of 1.5 mm and 1.5%. The two low-Z target photon spectra produced in TrueBeam are harder than that from the carbon target in the Clinac. Percent dose at depth 10 cm is greater by 3.6% and 8.9%; the fraction of photons in the diagnostic energy range (25–150 keV) is lower by 10% and 28%; and contrasts are lower by factors of 1.1 and 1.4 (4 cm thick phantom) and 1.03 and 1.4 (20 cm thick phantom), for the TrueBeam 2.35 MV/carbon and commercial imaging beams, respectively. Conclusions: VirtuaLinac is a promising new tool for Monte Carlo modeling of

  17. Targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    The work reported covers the fifth and final year of the program of targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications. Major achievements include: the development of a physical approach to understanding active composites, leading to the development of several new families of PZT, polymer piezoelectric composites for hydrophone application. These are new advances in the phenomenology and microscopic theory of electrostriction, and the evolution of a new family of high strain ferroelectric relaxor materials for practical application. New basic understanding of the polarization mechanisms in ferroelectric relaxors has been aided by the study of order disorder of the cation arrangement in lead scandium tantalate, and the results correlate well with studies of relaxor behavior, and of shape memory effects in PLZT ceramics. Low temperature studies on pure and doped PZTs have given the first clear indication of the intrinsic (averaged) single domain in response and correlate exceedingly well with earlier phenomenological theory. Crystal growth and ceramic processing studies have developed hand in hand with program needs providing new forms of conventional materials, new grain oriented structures and single crystals.

  18. Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Arild; Grynning, Steinar; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Goudey, Howdy

    2011-03-28

    The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.In high performance windows the frame design and material use is of utmost importance, as the frame performance is usually the limiting factor for reducing the total window U-factor further. This paper describes simulation studies analyzing the effects on frame and edge-of-glass U-factors of different surface emissivities as well as frame material and spacer conductivities. The goal of this work is to define materials research targets for window frame components that will result in better frame thermal performance than is exhibited by the best products available on the market today.

  19. Thick-target PIGE analysis of plant materials preconcentrated by dry ashing.

    PubMed

    Saarela, K E; Harju, L; Lill, J O; Rajander, J; Lindroos, A; Heselius, S J

    2000-04-03

    Plant materials were dry ashed at 550 degrees C and analysed using particle-induced prompt gamma-ray emission (PIGE). The analyses were performed with an external beam of 3 MeV protons incident on the target. Seven biological certified reference materials were analysed and used for the evaluation of the method for Na, Mg, Al, P and Mn. The elemental concentration to detection limit ratios were greatly enhanced by dry ashing of the biological materials. The concentrations of the elements in ashes were clearly above the values at which reliable analyses can be made. The method was applied to samples of spruce and pine. Due to the low ash content of the wood samples, the sensitivity of the method was radically improved. The detection limits for the five elements studied in spruce wood were in the range 0.014-2.5 mug g(-1). The set-up and the beam current used enabled simultaneous particle-induced X-ray emission spectrometry (PIXE) analyses, with the sensitivity optimised for heavier trace elements.

  20. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration for ion-driven fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chengkun; Albright, Brian J

    2010-07-16

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of 100s of MeV energy and < 10% energy spread. An overdense run-scale foil target driven by a high intensity laser pulse can produce an ion beam that has attractive properties for this application. The Break Out Afterburner (BOA) is one laser-ion acceleration mechanism proposed to generate such beams, however the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. The spectral and spatial qualities of the beam quickly evolve as the ion beam and co-moving electrons continue to interact with the laser. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the co-moving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread. Particle-In-Cell simulations reveal the dynamics of the ion beam under control. Optimal conditions for improving the spectral and spatial spread of the ion beam is explored for current laser and target parameters, leading to generation of ion beams of energy 100s of MeV and 6% energy spread, a vital step for realizing ion-driven fast ignition.

  1. Rapid syntheses of a metal-organic framework material Cu3(BTC)2(H2O)3 under microwave: a quantitative analysis of accelerated syntheses.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Haque, Enamul; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2010-03-20

    A typical MOF material, Cu-BTC has been synthesized with microwave and conventional electric heating in various conditions to elucidate, for the first time, the quantitative acceleration in the synthesis of a MOF by microwaves. The acceleration by microwaves is mainly due to rapid nucleation rather than rapid crystal growth, even though both stages are accelerated. The acceleration in the nucleation stage by microwaves is due to the very large pre-exponential factor (about 1.4 x 10(10) times that of conventional synthesis) in the Arrhenius plot. However, the activation energy for the nucleation in the case of microwave synthesis is higher than the activation energy of conventional synthesis. The large acceleration in the nucleation, compared with that in the crystal growth, is observed once again by the syntheses in two-steps (changing heating methods from microwave into conventional heating or from conventional heating into microwave heating just after the nucleation is completed). The crystal size of Cu-BTC obtained by microwave-nucleation is generally smaller than the Cu-BTC made by conventional-nucleation, probably due to rapid nucleation and the small size of nuclei with microwave-nucleation.

  2. Microwave-Accelerated Rapid, Chemical Oxidant-Free, Material-Independent Surface Chemistry of Poly(dopamine).

    PubMed

    Lee, Mihyun; Lee, Si-Hwa; Oh, Il-Kwon; Lee, Haeshin

    2017-01-01

    A simple strategy for the rapid preparation of multifunctional polydopamine (pDA) coatings is demonstrated. Microwave irradiation of the coating solution enables the formation of a ≈18 nm thick, genuine pDA coating in 15 min, which is ≈18 times faster than conventional coating. The acceleration effect results from the radical generation and temperature increase, which facilitate thermally accelerated radical polymerization of dopamine.

  3. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    PubMed

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results.

  4. Extension of Binary-Collision-Approximation-Based Simulation Applicable to Any Structured Target Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Arimichi; Saito, Seiki; Ito, Atsushi M.; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated plasma-surface interactions by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. However, such simulations have a high computation cost and are limited to simulations of materials of nanometer order. In order to overcome this limitation, a complementary model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA) can be established. We employed the BCA-based simulation code ACAT and extended it to handle any crystalline or amorphous structure. The extended code, named “AC∀T”, stores the positions of all projectile and target atoms and the velocities of recoil atoms so that it can be combined with the MD code. It also has the potential to reproduce channeling phenomena. Thus, it is expected to be useful for the evaluation of channeling effects.

  5. A supramolecular material for dual-modal imaging and targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shanyue; Liang, Ruizheng; Li, Chunyang; Wei, Min

    2017-04-01

    Recently, how to design a formulation system with simultaneous diagnosis and therapy toward cancer has attracted tremendous attention. Herein, a supramolecular material was prepared via a facile method by the co-intercalation of folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (DOX) into the gallery of Gd(3+)-doped layered double hydroxides (LDHs), followed by surface adsorption of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). This supramolecular agent was proved to exhibit excellent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging (FI) behavior, as well as chemotherapy toward cancer (KB cell). The co-intercalated FA enables an efficient and selective drug delivery with good specificity. This work provides a facile approach for the fabrication of a drug formulation with dual-modal imaging and targeted therapy, which could be potentially used in the practical chemotherapy and medical imaging.

  6. Present status of the liquid lithium target facility in the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Riccardi, B.; Loginov, N.; Ara, K.; Burgazzi, L.; Cevolani, S.; Dell'Orco, G.; Fazio, C.; Giusti, D.; Horiike, H.; Ida, M.; Ise, H.; Kakui, H.; Matsui, H.; Micciche, G.; Muroga, T.; Nakamura, Hideo; Shimizu, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Suzuki, A.; Takeuchi, H.; Tanaka, S.; Yoneoka, T.

    2004-08-01

    During the three year key element technology phase of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) project, completed at the end of 2002, key technologies have been validated. In this paper, these results are summarized. A water jet experiment simulating Li flow validated stable flow up to 20 m/s with a double reducer nozzle. In addition, a small Li loop experiment validated stable Li flow up to 14 m/s. To control the nitrogen content in Li below 10 wppm will require surface area of a V-Ti alloy getter of 135 m 2. Conceptual designs of diagnostics have been carried out. Moreover, the concept of a remote handling system to replace the back wall based on `cut and reweld' and `bayonet' options has been established. Analysis by FMEA showed safe operation of the target system. Recent activities in the transition phase, started in 2003, and plan for the next phase are also described.

  7. The roles of energy and material efficiency in meeting steel industry CO2 targets.

    PubMed

    Milford, Rachel L; Pauliuk, Stefan; Allwood, Julian M; Müller, Daniel B

    2013-04-02

    Identifying strategies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from steel production requires a comprehensive model of the sector but previous work has either failed to consider the whole supply chain or considered only a subset of possible abatement options. In this work, a global mass flow analysis is combined with process emissions intensities to allow forecasts of future steel sector emissions under all abatement options. Scenario analysis shows that global capacity for primary steel production is already near to a peak and that if sectoral emissions are to be reduced by 50% by 2050, the last required blast furnace will be built by 2020. Emissions reduction targets cannot be met by energy and emissions efficiency alone, but deploying material efficiency provides sufficient extra abatement potential.

  8. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Hasumura, Takashi; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2013-01-01

    The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX) binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4) and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0), which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light-heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy.

  9. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics.

  10. Epigenetic pathway targets for the treatment of disease: accelerating progress in the development of pharmacological tools: IUPHAR Review 11

    PubMed Central

    Tough, David F; Lewis, Huw D; Rioja, Inmaculada; Lindon, Matthew J; Prinjha, Rab K

    2014-01-01

    The properties of a cell are determined both genetically by the DNA sequence of its genes and epigenetically through processes that regulate the pattern, timing and magnitude of expression of its genes. While the genetic basis of disease has been a topic of intense study for decades, recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and a growing appreciation that epigenetic misregulation makes a significant contribution to human disease. Several large protein families have been identified that act in different ways to control the expression of genes through epigenetic mechanisms. Many of these protein families are finally proving tractable for the development of small molecules that modulate their function and represent new target classes for drug discovery. Here, we provide an overview of some of the key epigenetic regulatory proteins and discuss progress towards the development of pharmacological tools for use in research and therapy. PMID:25060293

  11. Salvianolic acid B accelerated ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux by targeting PPAR-γ and LXRα

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Jianmei; Li, Bo; Jing, Qingping; Guan, Qingbo

    2015-07-03

    Objectives: Cholesterol efflux has been thought to be the main and basic mechanism by which free cholesterol is transferred from extra hepatic cells to the liver or intestine for excretion. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) has been widely used for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of Sal B on the cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. Methods: After PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells were exposed to 50 mg/L of oxLDL and [{sup 3}H] cholesterol (1.0 μCi/mL) for another 24 h, the effect of Sal B on cholesterol efflux was evaluated in the presence of apoA-1, HDL{sub 2} or HDL{sub 3}. The expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ), and liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) was detected both at protein and mRNA levels in THP-1 cells after the stimulation of Sal B. Meanwhile, specific inhibition of PPAR-γ and LXRα were performed to investigate the mechanism. Results: The results showed that Sal B significantly accelerated apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, Sal B treatment also enhanced the expression of ABCA1 at both mRNA and protein levels. Then the data demonstrated that Sal B increased the expression of PPAR-γ and LXRα. And the application of specific agonists and inhibitors of further confirmed that Sal exert the function through PPAR-γ and LXRα. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that Sal B promotes cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages through ABCA1/PPAR-γ/LXRα pathway. - Highlights: • Sal B promotes the expression of ABCA1. • Sal B promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages. • Sal B promotes the expression of ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux through PPAR-γ/LXRα signaling pathway.

  12. Threshold Studies of Heated HMX-Based Energetic Material Targets Using the Steven Impact Test

    SciTech Connect

    Switzer, L L; Vandersall, K S; Chidester, S K; Greenwood, D W; Tarver, C M

    2003-07-01

    Impact tests performed at low velocity on heated energetic material samples are of interest when considering the situation of energetic materials involved in a fire. To determine heated reaction thresholds, Steven Test targets containing PBX 9404 or LX-04 samples heated to the range of 150-170 C were impacted at velocities up to 150 m/s by two different projectile head geometries. Comparing these measured thresholds to ambient temperature thresholds revealed that the heated LX-04 thresholds were considerably higher than ambient, whereas the heated PBX 9404 thresholds were only slightly higher than the ambient temperature thresholds. The violence of reaction level of the PBX 9404 was considerably higher than that of the LX-04 as measured with four overpressure gauges. The varying results in these samples with different HMX/binder configurations indicate that friction plays a dominant role in reaction ignition during impact. This work outlines the experimental details, compares the thresholds and violence levels of the heated and ambient temperature experiments, and discusses the dominant mechanisms of the measured thresholds.

  13. The Impact Crater as a Habitat: Effects of Impact Processing of Target Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, Charles S.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Lee, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    Impact structures are a rare habitat on Earth. However, where they do occur they can potentially have an important influence on the local ecology. Some of the types of habitat created in the immediate post-impact environment are not specific to the impact phenomenon, such as hydrothermal systems and crater lakes that can be found, for instance, in post-volcanic environments, albeit with different thermal characteristics than those associated with impact. However, some of the habitats created are specifically linked to processes of impact processing. Two examples of how impact processing of target materials has created novel habitats that improve the opportunities for colonization are found in the Haughton impact structure in the Canadian High Arctic. Impact-shocked rocks have become a habitat for endolithic microorganisms, and large, impact-shattered blocks of rock are used as resting sites by avifauna. However, some materials produced by an impact, such as melt sheet rocks, can make craters more biologically depauperate than the area surrounding them. Although there are no recent craters with which to study immediate post-impact colonization, these data yield insights into generalized mechanisms of how impact processing can influence post-impact succession. Because impact events are one of a number of processes that can bring localized destruction to ecosystems, understanding the manner in which impact structures are recolonized is of ecological interest. Impact craters are a universal phenomenon on solid planetary surfaces, and so they are of potential biological relevance on other planetary surfaces, particularly Mars.

  14. The impact crater as a habitat: effects of impact processing of target materials.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S; Osinski, Gordon R; Lee, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    Impact structures are a rare habitat on Earth. However, where they do occur they can potentially have an important influence on the local ecology. Some of the types of habitat created in the immediate post-impact environment are not specific to the impact phenomenon, such as hydrothermal systems and crater lakes that can be found, for instance, in post-volcanic environments, albeit with different thermal characteristics than those associated with impact. However, some of the habitats created are specifically linked to processes of impact processing. Two examples of how impact processing of target materials has created novel habitats that improve the opportunities for colonization are found in the Haughton impact structure in the Canadian High Arctic. Impact-shocked rocks have become a habitat for endolithic microorganisms, and large, impact-shattered blocks of rock are used as resting sites by avifauna. However, some materials produced by an impact, such as melt sheet rocks, can make craters more biologically depauperate than the area surrounding them. Although there are no recent craters with which to study immediate post-impact colonization, these data yield insights into generalized mechanisms of how impact processing can influence post-impact succession. Because impact events are one of a number of processes that can bring localized destruction to ecosystems, understanding the manner in which impact structures are recolonized is of ecological interest. Impact craters are a universal phenomenon on solid planetary surfaces, and so they are of potential biological relevance on other planetary surfaces, particularly Mars.

  15. The impact crater as a habitat: effects of impact processing of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockell, Charles S.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Lee, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    Impact structures are a rare habitat on Earth. However, where they do occur they can potentially have an important influence on the local ecology. Some of the types of habitat created in the immediate post-impact environment are not specific to the impact phenomenon, such as hydrothermal systems and crater lakes that can be found, for instance, in post-volcanic environments, albeit with different thermal characteristics than those associated with impact. However, some of the habitats created are specifically linked to processes of impact processing. Two examples of how impact processing of target materials has created novel habitats that improve the opportunities for colonization are found in the Haughton impact structure in the Canadian High Arctic. Impact-shocked rocks have become a habitat for endolithic microorganisms, and large, impact-shattered blocks of rock are used as resting sites by avifauna. However, some materials produced by an impact, such as melt sheet rocks, can make craters more biologically depauperate than the area surrounding them. Although there are no recent craters with which to study immediate post-impact colonization, these data yield insights into generalized mechanisms of how impact processing can influence post-impact succession. Because impact events are one of a number of processes that can bring localized destruction to ecosystems, understanding the manner in which impact structures are recolonized is of ecological interest. Impact craters are a universal phenomenon on solid planetary surfaces, and so they are of potential biological relevance on other planetary surfaces, particularly Mars.

  16. Segmented targeted least squares estimator for material decomposition in multi bin PCXDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajbhandary, Paurakh L.; Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    We present a fast, noise-efficient, and accurate estimator for material separation using photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) with multiple energy bin capability. The proposed targeted least squares estimator (TLSE) improves a previously proposed A-Table method by incorporating dynamic weighting that allows noise to be closer to the Cramér- Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) throughout the operating range. We explore Cartesian and average-energy segmentation of the basis material space for TLSE, and show that iso-average-energy contours require fewer segments compared to Cartesian segmentation to achieve similar performance. We compare the iso-average-energy TLSE to other proposed estimators - including the gold standard maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) and the A-Table1 - in terms of variance, bias and computational efficiency. The variance and bias of this estimator between 0 to 6 cm of aluminum and 0 to 50 cm of water is simulated with Monte Carlo methods. Iso-average energy TLSE achieves an average variance within 2% of CRLB, and mean of absolute error of (3.68 +/- 0.06) x 10-6 cm. Using the same protocol, MLE showed variance-to- CRLB ratio and average bias of 1.0186 +/- 0.0002 and (3.10 +/- 0.06) x 10-6 cm, respectively, but was 50 times slower in our simulation. Compared to the A-Table method, TLSE gives a more homogenous variance-to-CRLB profile in the operating region. We show that variance-to-CRLB for TLSE is lower by as much as ~36% than A-Table method in the peripheral region of operation (thin or thick objects). The TLSE is a computationally efficient and fast method for implementing material separation technique in PCXDs, with performance parameters comparable to the MLE.

  17. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  18. Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats can be partially retarded with mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, Natalia A; Muraleva, Natalia A; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Kolosova, Nataliya G

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 (plastoquinonyl-decyltriphenylphosphonium) at nanomolar concentrations is capable of preventing and slowing down some cerebral dysfunctions in accelerated-senescence OXYS rats. Here we demonstrate that OXYS rats develop behavior, learning, and memory deficits against a background of neurodegeneration signs detected by magnetic resonance tomography and amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Long-term treatment with SkQ1 (250 nmol/kg body weight daily from the age of 1.5 to 23 months) reduced the age-related alterations in behavior and spatial memory deficit in Morris water maze in OXYS and Wistar rats. Furthermore, this is the first report that SkQ1 treatment slows down pathological accumulation of AβPP, Aβ, and hyperphosphorylation of tau-protein in OXYS rats, as well as age-dependent changes in healthy Wistar rats. Our results support the possibility of using the OXYS strain as a rat model of AD-like pathology. It seems probable that the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 can be a good prophylactic strategy to maintain brain health and to treat AD.

  19. Acceleration of thin flyer foils with a 1 MA pulsed power device for shock-wave experiments in clumpy foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2007-11-01

    The dynamics of shock waves in clumpy media are important for understanding many astrophysical processes, including the triggering of star formation in interstellar gas clouds by passing shock waves. This phenomena can be studied in the laboratory by launching a flyer plate into a low density foam with clumps. Low density foams offer the advantage of relative low sound speeds (a few hundred meters per second) compared to normal solids, thus reducing the flyer speed required to create shock waves. In first experiments aluminum foils with thicknesses between 20 micrometer and 130 micrometer were accelerated to speeds up to 2.3 km/s. In addition, the impact of the flyers on plexiglas targets was studied. Additional measurements will focus on optimizing the flyer properties (thicker flyers, higher velocities) and on characterizing the flyer in more detail (temperature of the flyer and plasma ablation from the flyer). The results of these measurements will be used to design an experiment studying the dynamics of shock waves in clumpy foams, using the 100 TW laser system Leopard for back-lighting the foam target.

  20. Microwave-accelerated surface plasmon-coupled directional luminescence 2: a platform technology for ultra fast and sensitive target DNA detection in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Kadir; Previte, Michael J R; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D

    2008-02-29

    The application of Microwave-Accelerated Surface Plasmon-Coupled Luminescence (MA-SPCL) to fast and sensitive DNA hybridization assays in buffer and whole blood is presented. In this regard, a model DNA hybridization assay whereby a fluorophore-labeled target ssDNA specific to human immunodeficiency, Hepatitis C (Hep C), is probed by an anchor probe immobilized on thin gold films, is driven to completion within 1 min with microwave heating, as compared to an identical assay completed in approximately 4 h at room temperature. Finite-Difference Time-Domain calculations show that gold disks are preferentially heated around the edges creating a temperature gradient along the disks, which in turn results in the larger influx of complementary DNA towards anchor probe-modified surface. Thermal images of the assay platform during microwave heating also provide additional information on the microwave heating pattern in the microwave cavity. Finally, the effects of low power microwave heating on the ability of DNA to re-hybridize with the complimentary target on the surface gold films, which allows the multiple re-use of the gold films, is demonstrated. The MA-SPCL technique offers an alternative approach to current DNA based detection technologies, especially when speed and sensitivity are required, such as in the identification of DNA or even RNA-based diseases using whole blood samples that affect human health.

  1. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  2. Distribution of absorbed doses in the materials irradiated by ''RHODOTRON'' electron accelerator: Experiment and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg E. Krivosheev et al.

    2001-07-02

    This paper describes the experimental setup and presents studies of absorbed doses in different metals and dielectrics along with corresponding Monte Carlo energy deposition simulations. Experiments were conducted using a 5 MeV electron accelerator. We used several Monte Carlo code systems, namely MARS, MCNP, and GEANT to simulate the absorbed doses under the same conditions as in experiment. We compare calculated and measured high and low absorbed doses (from few kGy to hundreds kGy) and discuss the applicability of these computer codes for applied accelerator dosimetry.

  3. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  4. MiR-376c down-regulation accelerates EGF-dependent migration by targeting GRB2 in the HuCCT1 human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Jun; Kikuchi, Kunio; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA miR-376c was expressed in normal intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (HIBEpiC), but was significantly suppressed in the HuCCT1 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) cell line. The biological significance of the down-regulation of miR-376c in HuCCT1 cells is unknown. We hypothesized that miR-376c could function as a tumor suppressor in these cells. To test this hypothesis, we sought the targets of miR-376c, and characterized the effect of its down-regulation on HuCCT1 cells. We performed proteomic analysis of miR-376c-overexpressing HuCCT1 cells to identify candidate targets of miR-376c, and validated these targets by 3'-UTR reporter assay. Transwell migration assays were performed to study the migratory response of HuCCT1 cells to miR-376c overexpression. Furthermore, microarrays were used to identify the signaling that were potentially involved in the miR-376c-modulated migration of HuCCT1. Finally, we assessed epigenetic changes within the potential promoter region of the miR-376c gene in these cells. Proteomic analysis and subsequent validation assays showed that growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) was a direct target of miR-376c. The transwell migration assay revealed that miR-376c significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent cell migration in HuCCT1 cells. DNA microarray and subsequent pathway analysis showed that interleukin 1 beta and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were possible participants in EGF-dependent migration of HuCCT1 cells. Bisulfite sequencing showed higher methylation levels of CpG sites upstream of the miR-376c gene in HuCCT1 relative to HIBEpiC cells. Combined treatment with the DNA-demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A significantly upregulated the expression of miR-376c in HuCCT1 cells. We revealed that epigenetic repression of miR-376c accelerated EGF-dependent cell migration through its target GRB2 in HuCCT1 cells. These findings suggest that miR-376

  5. MiR-376c Down-Regulation Accelerates EGF-Dependent Migration by Targeting GRB2 in the HuCCT1 Human Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA miR-376c was expressed in normal intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells (HIBEpiC), but was significantly suppressed in the HuCCT1 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) cell line. The biological significance of the down-regulation of miR-376c in HuCCT1 cells is unknown. We hypothesized that miR-376c could function as a tumor suppressor in these cells. To test this hypothesis, we sought the targets of miR-376c, and characterized the effect of its down-regulation on HuCCT1 cells. We performed proteomic analysis of miR-376c-overexpressing HuCCT1 cells to identify candidate targets of miR-376c, and validated these targets by 3′-UTR reporter assay. Transwell migration assays were performed to study the migratory response of HuCCT1 cells to miR-376c overexpression. Furthermore, microarrays were used to identify the signaling that were potentially involved in the miR-376c-modulated migration of HuCCT1. Finally, we assessed epigenetic changes within the potential promoter region of the miR-376c gene in these cells. Proteomic analysis and subsequent validation assays showed that growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) was a direct target of miR-376c. The transwell migration assay revealed that miR-376c significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent cell migration in HuCCT1 cells. DNA microarray and subsequent pathway analysis showed that interleukin 1 beta and matrix metallopeptidase 9 were possible participants in EGF-dependent migration of HuCCT1 cells. Bisulfite sequencing showed higher methylation levels of CpG sites upstream of the miR-376c gene in HuCCT1 relative to HIBEpiC cells. Combined treatment with the DNA-demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A significantly upregulated the expression of miR-376c in HuCCT1 cells. We revealed that epigenetic repression of miR-376c accelerated EGF-dependent cell migration through its target GRB2 in HuCCT1 cells. These findings suggest that mi

  6. Systemic treatment with strontium ranelate accelerates the filling of a bone defect and improves the material level properties of the healing bone.

    PubMed

    Zacchetti, Giovanna; Dayer, Romain; Rizzoli, René; Ammann, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Rapid bone defect filling with normal bone is a challenge in orthopaedics and dentistry. Strontium ranelate (SrRan) has been shown to in vitro decrease bone resorption and increase bone formation, and represents a potential agent with the capacity to accelerate bone defect filling. In this study, bone tibial defects of 2.5 mm in diameter were created in 6-month-old female rats orally fed SrRan (625 mg/kg/d; 5/7 days) or vehicle for 4, 8, or 12 weeks (10 rats per group per time point) from the time of surgery. Tibias were removed. Micro-architecture was determined by micro-computed tomography (µCT) and material level properties by nanoindentation analysis. µCT analysis showed that SrRan administration significantly improved microarchitecture of trabecular bone growing into the defect after 8 and 12 weeks of treatment compared to vehicle. SrRan treatment also accelerated the growth of cortical bone over the defect, but with different kinetics compared to trabecular bone, as the effects were already significant after 4 weeks. Nanoindentation analysis demonstrated that SrRan treatment significantly increased material level properties of both trabecular bone and cortical bone filling the defect compared to vehicle. SrRan accelerates the filling of bone defect by improving cortical and trabecular bone microarchitecture both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  7. Systemic Treatment with Strontium Ranelate Accelerates the Filling of a Bone Defect and Improves the Material Level Properties of the Healing Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zacchetti, Giovanna; Rizzoli, René

    2014-01-01

    Rapid bone defect filling with normal bone is a challenge in orthopaedics and dentistry. Strontium ranelate (SrRan) has been shown to in vitro decrease bone resorption and increase bone formation, and represents a potential agent with the capacity to accelerate bone defect filling. In this study, bone tibial defects of 2.5 mm in diameter were created in 6-month-old female rats orally fed SrRan (625 mg/kg/d; 5/7 days) or vehicle for 4, 8, or 12 weeks (10 rats per group per time point) from the time of surgery. Tibias were removed. Micro-architecture was determined by micro-computed tomography (µCT) and material level properties by nanoindentation analysis. µCT analysis showed that SrRan administration significantly improved microarchitecture of trabecular bone growing into the defect after 8 and 12 weeks of treatment compared to vehicle. SrRan treatment also accelerated the growth of cortical bone over the defect, but with different kinetics compared to trabecular bone, as the effects were already significant after 4 weeks. Nanoindentation analysis demonstrated that SrRan treatment significantly increased material level properties of both trabecular bone and cortical bone filling the defect compared to vehicle. SrRan accelerates the filling of bone defect by improving cortical and trabecular bone microarchitecture both quantitatively and qualitatively. PMID:25243150

  8. COMPUTATIONAL NEEDS FOR MUON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG, J.S.

    2004-06-29

    Muon accelerators contain beam lines and components which are unlike any found in existing accelerators. Production of the muons requires targets for beams with powers which are at or beyond what has currently been achieved. Many subsystems use solenoid focusing systems where at any given point, several magnets have a significant influence. The beams that are transported can have energy spreads of {+-}30% or more. The required emittances necessitate accurate tracking of particles with angles of tenths of a radian and which are positioned almost at the edge of the beam pipe. Tracking must be done not only in vacuum, but also in materials; therefore, statistical fluctuations must also be included. Design and simulation of muon accelerators requires software which can: accurately simulate the dynamics of solid and liquid targets under proton bombardment; predict the production of particles from these targets; accurately compute magnetic fields based on either a real magnet design or a model which includes end fields; and accurately design and simulate a beam line where the transported beam satisfies the above specifications and the beam line contains non-standard, overlapping elements. The requirements for computational tools will be discussed, the capabilities of existing tools will be described and compared to what is required.

  9. GPU acceleration of the Locally Selfconsistent Multiple Scattering code for first principles calculation of the ground state and statistical physics of materials

    DOE PAGES

    Eisenbach, Markus; Larkin, Jeff; Lutjens, Justin; ...

    2016-07-12

    The Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) code solves the first principles Density Functional theory Kohn–Sham equation for a wide range of materials with a special focus on metals, alloys and metallic nano-structures. It has traditionally exhibited near perfect scalability on massively parallel high performance computer architectures. In this paper, we present our efforts to exploit GPUs to accelerate the LSMS code to enable first principles calculations of O(100,000) atoms and statistical physics sampling of finite temperature properties. We reimplement the scattering matrix calculation for GPUs with a block matrix inversion algorithm that only uses accelerator memory. Finally, using the Craymore » XK7 system Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility we achieve a sustained performance of 14.5PFlop/s and a speedup of 8.6 compared to the CPU only code.« less

  10. GPU acceleration of the Locally Selfconsistent Multiple Scattering code for first principles calculation of the ground state and statistical physics of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbach, Markus; Larkin, Jeff; Lutjens, Justin; Rennich, Steven; Rogers, James H.

    2016-07-12

    The Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering (LSMS) code solves the first principles Density Functional theory Kohn–Sham equation for a wide range of materials with a special focus on metals, alloys and metallic nano-structures. It has traditionally exhibited near perfect scalability on massively parallel high performance computer architectures. In this paper, we present our efforts to exploit GPUs to accelerate the LSMS code to enable first principles calculations of O(100,000) atoms and statistical physics sampling of finite temperature properties. We reimplement the scattering matrix calculation for GPUs with a block matrix inversion algorithm that only uses accelerator memory. Finally, using the Cray XK7 system Titan at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility we achieve a sustained performance of 14.5PFlop/s and a speedup of 8.6 compared to the CPU only code.

  11. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance – Part II: Development of an accelerated aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley E.; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea V.; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amandine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-01-09

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products₋single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles₋and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. In conclusion, this accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  12. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  13. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  14. Dependence of the ion energy on the parameters of the laser pulse and target in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime of acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Echkina, E. Yu.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pegoraro, F.; Borghesi, M.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2010-01-15

    When the dominant mechanism for ion acceleration is the laser radiation pressure, the conversion efficiency of the laser energy into the energy of relativistic ions may be very high. Stability analysis of a thin plasma layer accelerated by the radiation pressure shows that Raleigh-Taylor instability may enhance plasma inhomogeneity. In the linear stage of instability, the plasma layer decays into separate bunches, which are accelerated by the radiation pressure similarly to clusters accelerated under the action of an electromagnetic wave. The energy and luminosity of an ion beam accelerated in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime are calculated.

  15. Achieving Stable Radiation Pressure Acceleration of Heavy Ions via Successive Electron Replenishment from Ionization of a High-Z Material Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. F.; Qiao, B.; Chang, H. X.; Kar, S.; Zhou, C. T.; Borghesi, M.; He, X. T.

    2016-10-01

    Generation of monoenergetic heavy ion beams aroused more scientific interest in recent years. Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is an ideal mechanism for obtaining high-quality heavy ion beams, in principle. However, to achieve the same energy per nucleon (velocity) as protons, heavy ions undergo much more serious Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability and afterwards much worse Coulomb explosion due to loss of co-moving electrons. This leads to premature acceleration termination of heavy ions and very low energy attained in experiment. The utilization of a high-Z coating in front of the target may suppress the RT instability and Coulomb explosion by continuously replenishing the accelerating heavy ion foil with co-moving electrons due to its successive ionization under laser fields with Gaussian temporal and spatial profiles. Thus stable RPA can be realized. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional particles-in-cell simulations with dynamic ionization show that a monoenergetic Al13+ beam with peak energy 4.0GeV and particle number 1010 (charge > 20nC) can be obtained at intensity 1022 W/cm2. Supported by the NSF, Nos. 11575298 and 1000-Talents Program of China.

  16. Evaluation using m.c.n.p. code of the bremsstrahlung energy spectrum produced by interactions between structural materials and accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderaro, Elio

    2004-09-01

    In order to design the biological shield of industrial accelerator plants, it is needed to have a good knowledge of the bremsstrahlung energy spectrum and the intensity of the bremsstrahlung produced by electron interactions with both products (usually water equivalent) and structural materials such as concrete, iron, aluminium. Using the MCNP code, a normalized bremsstrahlung energy spectrum was obtained for materials with average atomic number lower than or equal to 13 and irradiated with 5 and 10 Mev electrons, respectively; multiplying the spectrum by suitable coefficients, it was possible to obtain the real spectrum for materials such as water, concrete, aluminium and iron. The MCNP results have been obtained with relative error less than 2%.

  17. Laser Ion Acceleration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Nagashima, T.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    An intense femtosecond pulsed laser is employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching, the ion particle energy control, etc. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions are accelerated. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions was improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or by a near critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation was realized by holes behind the solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching were successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. The present study proposed a novel concept for a future compact laser ion accelerator, based on each component study required to control the ion beam quality and parameters. Partly supported by JSPS, MEXT, CORE, Japan/US Cooperation program, ASHULA and ILE/Osaka University.

  18. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Sajo, E; Sinha, N; Bellon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  19. Computational simulation of (nat)UO2, (232)ThO2 and U3O8-Al pills to estimate (p,fission) (99)Mo yield in the modeled targets irradiated by CYCLONE30 accelerator.

    PubMed

    Jozvaziri, Atieh; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Yousefi, Kamran; Mirvakili, Seyed Mohammad; Alizadeh, Masoomeh; Aboudzadeh, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    (99)Mo is important for both therapy and imaging purposes. Accelerator and reactor-based procedures are applied to produce it. Newly proton-fission method has been taken in attention by some research centers. In the present work, computationally investigation of the (99)Mo yield in different fissionable targets irradiated by proton was aimed. The results showed UO2 pill target could be efficiently used to produce 11.12Ci/g-U saturation yield of (99)Mo using 25MeV proton irradiation of the optimized-dimension target with 70µA current.

  20. Measurement of activity distribution using photostimulable phosphor imaging plates in decommissioned 10 MV medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yonai, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sakae, Takeji; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Yoshihisa; Itami, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Photonuclear reactions generate neutrons in the head of the linear accelerator. Therefore, some parts of the linear accelerator can become activated. Such activated materials must be handled as radioactive waste. The authors attempted to investigate the distribution of induced radioactivity using photostimulable phosphor imaging plates. Autoradiographs were produced from some parts of the linear accelerator (the target, upper jaw, multileaf collimator and shielding). The levels of induced radioactivity were confirmed to be non-uniform within each part from the autoradiographs. The method was a simple and highly sensitive approach to evaluating the relative degree of activation of the linear accelerators, so that appropriate materials management procedures can be carried out.

  1. Graphene-based biomimetic materials targeting urine metabolite as potential cancer biomarker: application over different conductive materials for potentiometric transduction

    PubMed Central

    Truta, Liliana A.A.N.A.; Ferreira, Nádia S.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2015-01-01

    This works presents a novel surface Smart Polymer Antibody Material (SPAM) for Carnitine (CRT, a potential biomarker of ovarian cancer), tested for the first time as ionophore in potentiometric electrodes of unconventional configuration. The SPAM material consisted of a 3D polymeric network created by surface imprinting on graphene layers. The polymer was obtained by radical polymerization of (vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride and 4-styrenesulfonic acid (signaling the binding sites), and vinyl pivalate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (surroundings). Non-imprinted material (NIM) was prepared as control, by excluding the template from the procedure. These materials were then used to produce several plasticized PVC membranes, testing the relevance of including the SPAM as ionophore, and the need for a charged lipophilic additive. The membranes were casted over solid conductive supports of graphite or ITO/FTO. The effect of pH upon the potentiometric response was evaluated for different pHs (2-9) with different buffer compositions. Overall, the best performance was achieved for membranes with SPAM ionophore, having a cationic lipophilic additive and tested in HEPES (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) buffer, pH 5.1. Better slopes were achieved when the membrane was casted on conductive glass (−57.4mV/decade), while the best detection limits were obtained for graphite-based conductive supports (3.6×10−5mol/L). Good selectivity was observed against BSA, ascorbic acid, glucose, creatinine and urea, tested for concentrations up to their normal physiologic levels in urine. The application of the devices to the analysis of spiked samples showed recoveries ranging from 91% (± 6.8%) to 118% (± 11.2%). Overall, the combination of the SPAM sensory material with a suitable selective membrane composition and electrode design has lead to a promising tool for point-of-care applications. PMID:26456975

  2. Graphene-based biomimetic materials targeting urine metabolite as potential cancer biomarker: application over different conductive materials for potentiometric transduction.

    PubMed

    Truta, Liliana A A N A; Ferreira, Nádia S; Sales, M Goreti F

    2014-12-20

    This works presents a novel surface Smart Polymer Antibody Material (SPAM) for Carnitine (CRT, a potential biomarker of ovarian cancer), tested for the first time as ionophore in potentiometric electrodes of unconventional configuration. The SPAM material consisted of a 3D polymeric network created by surface imprinting on graphene layers. The polymer was obtained by radical polymerization of (vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride and 4-styrenesulfonic acid (signaling the binding sites), and vinyl pivalate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (surroundings). Non-imprinted material (NIM) was prepared as control, by excluding the template from the procedure. These materials were then used to produce several plasticized PVC membranes, testing the relevance of including the SPAM as ionophore, and the need for a charged lipophilic additive. The membranes were casted over solid conductive supports of graphite or ITO/FTO. The effect of pH upon the potentiometric response was evaluated for different pHs (2-9) with different buffer compositions. Overall, the best performance was achieved for membranes with SPAM ionophore, having a cationic lipophilic additive and tested in HEPES (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) buffer, pH 5.1. Better slopes were achieved when the membrane was casted on conductive glass (-57.4mV/decade), while the best detection limits were obtained for graphite-based conductive supports (3.6×10(-5)mol/L). Good selectivity was observed against BSA, ascorbic acid, glucose, creatinine and urea, tested for concentrations up to their normal physiologic levels in urine. The application of the devices to the analysis of spiked samples showed recoveries ranging from 91% (± 6.8%) to 118% (± 11.2%). Overall, the combination of the SPAM sensory material with a suitable selective membrane composition and electrode design has lead to a promising tool for point-of-care applications.

  3. Cross-correlation of backsheet degradation between real-world exposed modules and accelerated exposures of backsheet materials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckman, Laura S.; French, Roger H.; Wang, Yu; Kempe, Michael D.; Lefebvre, Amy A.; Gu, Xiaohong; Ji, Liang; Wan, Kai-Tak; Flueckiger, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    heets are a key polymeric component of a PV module and understanding its degradation is necessary to be able to predict the lifetime of PV modules. We are developing a backsheet predictive tests and a model based on point- in-time data from analytical techniques and datastreams that are applicable to both outdoor and indoor PV module backsheet studies and are supplemented with meteorology data, climatic and brand/model, and other accessible information. The predictive tests and models will specify indoor and outdoor exposure and evaluation data acquisition criteria, variable selection, and temporal duration and variation so as to be able to predict backsheet performance in various climatic zones. This backsheet performance prediction is based on defined backsheet failures in the field, and is quantified by tracking backsheet degradation in the field so as to determine degradation rates. The backsheet lifetime performance predictive tests and models, will be developed using a Stressor / Mechanism / Response framework in which all data are categorized as stressor, mechanism and performance (response) variables and are represented as discrete points-in-time datasets. We will develop and validate these accelerated indoor exposures and evaluations and models and cross-correlate the outdoor and accelerated indoor exposures and evaluations. The evaluation techniques include nondestructive spectroscopy and microscopy techniques and destructive techniques and will provide data in predefined variables, which are used in the predictive modeling.

  4. Novel tools for accelerated materials discovery in the AFLOWLIB.ORG repository: breakthroughs and challenges in the mapping of the materials genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buongiorno Nardelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    High-Throughput Quantum-Mechanics computation of materials properties by ab initio methods has become the foundation of an effective approach to materials design, discovery and characterization. This data driven approach to materials science currently presents the most promising path to the development of advanced technological materials that could solve or mitigate important social and economic challenges of the 21st century. In particular, the rapid proliferation of computational data on materials properties presents the possibility to complement and extend materials property databases where the experimental data is lacking and difficult to obtain. Enhanced repositories such as AFLOWLIB, open novel opportunities for structure discovery and optimization, including uncovering of unsuspected compounds, metastable structures and correlations between various properties. The practical realization of these opportunities depends on the the design effcient algorithms for electronic structure simulations of realistic material systems, the systematic compilation and classification of the generated data, and its presentation in easily accessed form to the materials science community, the primary mission of the AFLOW consortium. This work was supported by ONR-MURI under Contract N00014-13-1-0635 and the Duke University Center for Materials Genomics.

  5. Accelerated materials design of Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 oxygen ionic conductors based on first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    He, Xingfeng; Mo, Yifei

    2015-07-21

    We perform a first principles computational study of designing the Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 (NBT) perovskite material to increase its oxygen ionic conductivity. In agreement with the previous experiments, our computation results confirm fast oxygen ionic diffusion and good stability of the NBT material. The oxygen diffusion mechanisms in this new material were systematically investigated, and the effects of local atomistic configurations and dopants on oxygen diffusion were revealed. Novel doping strategies focusing on the Na/Bi sublattice were predicted and demonstrated by the first principles calculations. In particular, the K doped NBT compound achieved good phase stability and an order of magnitude increase in oxygen ionic conductivity of up to 0.1 S cm(-1) at 900 K compared to the previous Mg doped compositions. This study demonstrated the advantages of first principles calculations in understanding the fundamental structure-property relationship and in accelerating the materials design of the ionic conductor materials.

  6. Prediction of back-scatter radiations to a beam monitor chamber of medical linear accelerators by use of the digitized target-current-pulse analysis method.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Naoki; Kato, Hideki; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Kawano, Makoto; Nishii, Yoshio; Nakamura, Masaru; Mukouyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In small-field irradiation, the back-scattered radiation (BSR) affects the counts measured with a beam monitor chamber (BMC). In general, the effect of the BSR depends on the opened-jaw size. The effect is significantly large in small-field irradiation. Our purpose in this study was to predict the effect of BSR on LINAC output accurately with an improved target-current-pulse (TCP) technique. The pulse signals were measured with a system consisting of a personal computer and a digitizer. The pulse signals were analyzed with in-house software. The measured parameters were the number of pulses, the change in the waveform and the integrated signal values of the TCPs. The TCPs were measured for various field sizes with four linear accelerators. For comparison, Yu's method in which a universal counter was used was re-examined. The results showed that the variance of the measurements by the new method was reduced to approximately 1/10 of the variance by the previous method. There was no significant variation in the number of pulses due to a change in the field size in the Varian Clinac series. However, a change in the integrated signal value was observed. This tendency was different from the result of other investigations in the past. Our prediction method is able to define the cutoff voltage for the TCP acquired by digitizer. This functionality provides the capability of clearly classifying TCPs into signals and noise. In conclusion, our TCP analysis method can predict the effect of BSR on the BMC even for small-field irradiations.

  7. Targeted Gene Deletion Using DNA-Free RNA-Guided Cas9 Nuclease Accelerates Adaptation of CHO Cells to Suspension Culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Namil; Shin, JongOh; Park, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Gyun Min; Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2016-11-18

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred host for the production of a wide array of biopharmaceuticals. Thus, efficient and rational CHO cell line engineering methods have been in high demand to improve quality and productivity. Here, we provide a novel genome engineering platform for increasing desirable phenotypes of CHO cells based upon the integrative protocol of high-throughput RNA sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein9) nuclease-based genome editing. For commercial production of therapeutic proteins, CHO cells have been adapted for suspension culture in serum-free media, which is highly beneficial with respect to productivity and economics. To engineer CHO cells for rapid adaptation to a suspension culture, we exploited strand-specific RNA-seq to identify genes differentially expressed according to their adaptation trajectory in serum-free media. More than 180 million sequencing reads were generated and mapped to the currently available 109,152 scaffolds of the CHO-K1 genome. We identified significantly downregulated genes according to the adaptation trajectory and then verified their effects using the genome editing method. Growth-based screening and targeted amplicon sequencing revealed that the functional deletions of Igfbp4 and AqpI gene accelerate suspension adaptation of CHO-K1 cells. The availability of this strand-specific transcriptome sequencing and DNA-free RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease mediated genome editing facilitates the rational design of the CHO cell genome for efficient production of high quality therapeutic proteins.

  8. Bringing in the target audience in bystander social marketing materials for communities: suggestions for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Potter, Sharyn J; Stapleton, Jane G

    2011-06-01

    The Know Your Power™ social marketing campaign images model active bystander behaviors that target audience members can use in situations where sexual and relationship violence and stalking are occurring, have occurred, or have the potential to occur. In this practitioner note, we describe strategies that we have used to engage target audience members in the development of the social marketing campaign that we hope can be used by practitioners. We give examples from the development and evaluation of the Know Your Power(TM) social marketing campaign that used focus group and other types of feedback from the target audience to inform the direction of the campaign.

  9. On the importance of target materials interfaces during low speed impact

    SciTech Connect

    Gogolewski, R.P.; Cunningham, B.J.; Riddle, R.; Lesuer, D.; Syn, C.

    1996-07-01

    We are conducting a Cooperative Research and Development Project under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the applicability of aluminum particulate reinforced alloy laminates to aircraft structures and for containment of aircraft engine turbine blades and debris due to catastrophic engine failure. Within this framework, we are studying the terminal interaction of projectiles impacting targets at speeds of 150- to 500 m/s. Our presentation focuses on a special series of experiments and computational physics analyses of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy targets in single plate and laminate form impacted by steel cylindrical projectiles. Four cases are examined, projectile impact into (1) a single plate, (2) three contiguous plates (frictional interfaces), (3) three contiguous plates separated by Teflon layers (frictionless interfaces), and (4) a spaced array of three plates. We found that the ratio of projectile kinetic energies just at target perforation for the highest to lowest critical projectile speeds over the four targets is 1.75. Considering that target areal density is held constant across the four targets, this is a dramatic result. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  10. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors.

  11. Diamagnetic composite material structure for reducing undesired electromagnetic interference and eddy currents in dielectric wall accelerators and other devices

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Poole, Brian R.; Hawkins, Steven A.

    2015-06-30

    The devices, systems and techniques disclosed here can be used to reduce undesired effects by magnetic field induced eddy currents based on a diamagnetic composite material structure including diamagnetic composite sheets that are separated from one another to provide a high impedance composite material structure. In some implementations, each diamagnetic composite sheet includes patterned conductor layers are separated by a dielectric material and each patterned conductor layer includes voids and conductor areas. The voids in the patterned conductor layers of each diamagnetic composite sheet are arranged to be displaced in position from one patterned conductor layer to an adjacent patterned conductor layer while conductor areas of the patterned conductor layers collectively form a contiguous conductor structure in each diamagnetic composite sheet to prevent penetration by a magnetic field.

  12. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Effect of pulsed laser target cleaning on ionisation and acceleration of ions in a plasma produced by a femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Roman V.; Vorobiev, A. A.; Gordienko, Vyacheslav M.; Dzhidzhoev, M. S.; Lachko, I. M.; Mar'in, B. V.; Savel'ev, Andrei B.; Uryupina, D. S.

    2005-10-01

    The impurity layer on the surface of a solid target is shown to exert a significant effect on the characteristics of the ion current of the laser plasma produced under the action of ultrahigh-intensity femtosecond radiation on the surface of this target. The application of pulsed laser cleaning gives rise to an additional high-energy component in the ion spectrum of the target material. It is shown that the ion current parameters of the laser plasma such as the average and highest ion charge, the highest ion energy of the target material, etc., can be controlled by varying the lead time of the cleaning laser radiation.

  13. Advances in material design for regenerative medicine, drug delivery and targeting/imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many of the major breakthroughs and paradigm shifts in medicine to date have occurred due to innovations and materials and/or application/implementation of materials in clinical medicine. Artificial heart valves, implantable cardiac devices, limb prosthesis, cardiovascular stents, orthopedic implan...

  14. Accelerated long-term assessment of thermal and chemical stability of bio-based phase change materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal energy storage (TES) systems incorporated with phase change materials (PCMs) have potential applications to control energy use by building envelopes. However, it is essential to evaluate long term performance of the PCMs and cost effectiveness prior to full scale implementation. For this rea...

  15. Ion acceleration by a double stage accelerating device for laser-induced plasma ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Siciliano, M. V.; Velardi, L.; Nassisi, V.

    2010-10-01

    A new laser ion source configuration was studied and realized in order to generate and accelerate ions of different elements. This ion source consisted of a laser-induced plasma from solid targets where the plume was made to expand before the action of the accelerating field. The accelerating field was reached by the application of two high voltage power supplies of different polarity. Therefore, the ions were made to undergo double acceleration that can imprint a maximum ion energy up to 160 keV per charge state. We analyzed the extracted charge from a Cu target as a function of the accelerating voltage at the laser fluences of 1.7 and 2.3 J/cm2. At 60 kV of total accelerating voltage and higher laser fluence, the maximum ion dose was 1012 ions/cm2. Under this last condition, the maximum output current was 5 mA and the emittance measured by the pepper pot method resulted in 0.22π mm mrad. With this machine, biomedical materials such as polyethylene were implanted with carbon and titanium ions. At doses of 6×1015 ions/cm2, the polyethylene surface increased its micro-hardness by about 3-fold, as measured by the scratch test.

  16. Present status of Accelerator-Based BNCT

    PubMed Central

    Kreiner, Andres Juan; Bergueiro, Javier; Cartelli, Daniel; Baldo, Matias; Castell, Walter; Asoia, Javier Gomez; Padulo, Javier; Suárez Sandín, Juan Carlos; Igarzabal, Marcelo; Erhardt, Julian; Mercuri, Daniel; Valda, Alejandro A.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Debray, Mario E.; Somacal, Hector R.; Capoulat, María Eugenia; Herrera, María S.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Gagetti, Leonardo; Anzorena, Manuel Suarez; Canepa, Nicolas; Real, Nicolas; Gun, Marcelo; Tacca, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Aim This work aims at giving an updated report of the worldwide status of Accelerator-Based BNCT (AB-BNCT). Background There is a generalized perception that the availability of accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of BNCT. Accordingly, in recent years a significant effort has started to develop such machines. Materials and methods A variety of possible charged-particle induced nuclear reactions and the characteristics of the resulting neutron spectra are discussed along with the worldwide activity in suitable accelerator development. Results Endothermic 7Li(p,n)7Be and 9Be(p,n)9B and exothermic 9Be(d,n)10B are compared. In addition to having much better thermo-mechanical properties than Li, Be as a target leads to stable products. This is a significant advantage for a hospital-based facility. 9Be(p,n)9B needs at least 4–5 MeV bombarding energy to have a sufficient yield, while 9Be(d,n)10B can be utilized at about 1.4 MeV, implying the smallest possible accelerator. This reaction operating with a thin target can produce a sufficiently soft spectrum to be viable for AB-BNCT. The machines considered are electrostatic single ended or tandem accelerators or radiofrequency quadrupoles plus drift tube Linacs. Conclusions 7Li(p,n)7Be provides one of the best solutions for the production of epithermal neutron beams for deep-seated tumors. However, a Li-based target poses significant technological challenges. Hence, Be has been considered as an alternative target, both in combination with (p,n) and (d,n) reactions. 9Be(d,n)10B at 1.4 MeV, with a thin target has been shown to be a realistic option for the treatment of deep-seated lesions. PMID:26933390

  17. Microwave effect in the fast synthesis of microporous materials: which stage between nucleation and crystal growth is accelerated by microwave irradiation?

    PubMed

    Jhung, Sung Hwa; Jin, Taihuan; Hwang, Young Kyu; Chang, Jong-San

    2007-01-01

    Microporous materials, such as silicalite-1 and VSB-5 molecular sieves, have been synthesized by both microwave irradiation (MW) and conventional electric heating (CE). The accelerated syntheses by microwave irradiation can be quantitatively investigated by various heating modes conducted in two steps such as MW-MW, MW-CE, CE-MW, and CE-CE (in the order of nucleation-crystal growth). In the case of synthesis by MW-CE or CE-MW, the heating modes were changed for the second step just after the appearance of X-ray diffraction peaks in the first step. We have quantitatively demonstrated that the microwave irradiation accelerates not only the nucleation but also crystal growth. However, the contribution to decrease the synthesis time by microwave irradiation is larger in the nucleation stage than in the step of crystal growth. The crystal size increases in the order of MW-MW

  18. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  19. Measurements of neutron effective doses and attenuation lengths for shielding materials at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Sato, Yukio; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2005-05-01

    The effective doses and attenuation lengths for concrete and iron were measured for the design of heavy ion facilities. Neutrons were produced through the reaction of copper, carbon, and lead bombarded by carbon ions at 230 and 400 MeV.A, neon ions at 400 and 600 MeV.A, and silicon ions at 600 and 800 MeV.A. The detectors used were a Linus and a Andersson-Braun-type rem counter and a detector based on the activation of a plastic scintillator. Representative effective dose rates (in units of 10(-8) microSv h(-1) pps(-1) at 1 m from the incident target surface, where pps means particles per second) and the attenuation lengths (in units of m) were 9.4 x 10(4), 0.46 for carbon ions at 230 MeV.A; 8.9 x 10(5), 0.48 for carbon ions at 400 MeV.A; 9.3 x 10(5), 0.48 for neon ions at 400 MeV.A; 3.8 x 10(6), 0.50 for neon ions at 600 MeV.A; 3.9 x 10(6), 0.50 for silicon ions at 600 MeV.A; and 1.1 x 10(7), 0.51 for silicon ions at 800 MeV.A. The attenuation provided by an iron plate approximately 20 cm thick (nearly equal to the attenuation length) corresponded to that of a 50-cm block of concrete in the present energy range. Miscellaneous results, such as the angular distributions of the neutron effective dose, narrow beam attenuation experiments, decay of gamma-ray doses after the bombardment of targets, doses around an irradiation room, order effects in the multi-layer (concrete and iron) shielding, the doses from different targets, the doses measured with a scintillator activation detector, the gamma-ray doses out of walls and the ratio of the response between the Andersson-Braun-type and the Linus rem counters are also reported.

  20. Beam-Material Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N. V.; Cerutti, F.

    2016-01-01

    Th is paper is motivated by the growing importance of better understanding of the phenomena and consequences of high-intensity energetic particle beam interactions with accelerator, generic target, and detector components. It reviews the principal physical processes of fast-particle interactions with matter, effects in materials under irradiation, materials response, related to component lifetime and performance, simulation techniques, and methods of mitigating the impact of radiation on the components and environment in challenging current and future applications.

  1. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  2. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; ...

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MSmore » to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.« less

  3. Report on Workshop on Targeting and Triggering from Molecules to Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-30

    the time scales that molecular and materials level events and transformations provide is a grand challenge for the area of materials chemistry . This...addressing this problem will require advances in supramolecular chemistry for the generation of advanced, responsive assemblies and participation of colloid...Responsive  Nanoassemblies”     S.  “Thai”  Thayumanavan     Department  of   Chemistry ,  University  of  Massachusetts  Amherst     9:30  -­‐‑  10

  4. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    SciTech Connect

    Temkin, Richard

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  5. Design guidelines for the development of digital nutrigenomics learning material for heterogeneous target groups.

    PubMed

    Busstra, Maria C; Hartog, Rob; Kersten, Sander; Müller, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Nutritional genomics, or nutrigenomics, can be considered as the combination of molecular nutrition and genomics. Students who attend courses in nutrigenomics differ with respect to their prior knowledge. This study describes digital nutrigenomics learning material suitable for students from various backgrounds and provides design guidelines for the development of the learning material. These design guidelines, derived from theories on cognitive science and instructional design, describe the selection of interaction types for learning tasks and the timing of information presentation. The learning material supports two learning goals: 1) the formulation of meaningful research questions in the field of nutrigenomics and 2) the development of feasible experiments to answer these questions. The learning material consists of two cases built around important nutrigenomics topics: 1) personalized diets and 2) the role of free fatty acids in the regulation of hepatic gene transcription. Each case consists of several activities to promote active learning by the student. Evaluation of the cases in a realistic academic educational setting indicates that the cases were useful.

  6. Design Guidelines for the Development of Digital Nutrigenomics Learning Material for Heterogeneous Target Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busstra, Maria C.; Hartog, Rob; Kersten, Sander; Muller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Nutritional genomics, or nutrigenomics, can be considered as the combination of molecular nutrition and genomics. Students who attend courses in nutrigenomics differ with respect to their prior knowledge. This study describes digital nutrigenomics learning material suitable for students from various backgrounds and provides design guidelines for…

  7. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  8. Acceleration of the direct identification of Staphylococcus aureus versus coagulase-negative staphylococci from blood culture material: a comparison of six bacterial DNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Loonen, A J M; Jansz, A R; Kreeftenberg, H; Bruggeman, C A; Wolffs, P F G; van den Brule, A J C

    2011-03-01

    To accelerate differentiation between Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), this study aimed to compare six different DNA extraction methods from two commonly used blood culture materials, i.e. BACTEC and BacT/ALERT. Furthermore, we analysed the effect of reduced blood culture incubation for the detection of staphylococci directly from blood culture material. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) duplex assay was used to compare the six different DNA isolation protocols on two different blood culture systems. Negative blood culture material was spiked with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Bacterial DNA was isolated with automated extractor easyMAG (three protocols), automated extractor MagNA Pure LC (LC Microbiology Kit M(Grade)), a manual kit MolYsis Plus and a combination of MolYsis Plus and the easyMAG. The most optimal isolation method was used to evaluate reduced bacterial incubation times. Bacterial DNA isolation with the MolYsis Plus kit in combination with the specific B protocol on the easyMAG resulted in the most sensitive detection of S. aureus, with a detection limit of 10 CFU/ml, in BacT/ALERT material, whereas using BACTEC resulted in a detection limit of 100 CFU/ml. An initial S. aureus or CNS load of 1 CFU/ml blood can be detected after 5 h of incubation in BacT/ALERT 3D by combining the sensitive isolation method and the tuf LightCycler assay.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of frozen soil target materials with a fused interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the performance of artificial frozen soil materials with a fused interface, split tension (or 'Brazilian') tests and unconfined uniaxial compression tests were carried out in a low temperature environmental chamber. Intact and fused specimens were fabricated from four different soil mixtures (962: clay-rich soil with bentonite; DNA1: clay-poor soil; DNA2: clay-poor soil with vermiculite; and DNA3: clay-poor soil with perlite). Based on the 'Brazilian' test results and density measurements, the DNA3 mixture was selected to closely represent the mechanical properties of the Alaskan frozen soil. The healed-interface by the same soil layer sandwiched between two blocks of the same material yielded the highest 'Brazilian' tensile strength of the interface. Based on unconfined uniaxial compression tests, the frictional strength of the fused DNA3 specimens with the same soil appears to exceed the shear strength of the intact specimen.

  10. Identifying target properties for the design of meta-material tank track pads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-05

    properties of tank track pads while eliminating or reducing the hysteresis losses of elastomer. To determine the requirements for linear elastic meta...properties of tank track pads while eliminating or reducing the hysteresis losses of elastomer. To determine the requirements for linear elastic meta...focus of this paper is on a methodology to determine the meta-material requirements for a track pad with low hysteresis loss and high durability

  11. MnZn-ferrites: Targeted Material Design for New Emerging Application Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaspalis, V. T.; Tsakaloudi, V.; Kogias, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this article the main characteristics for emerging MnZn-ferrite applications are described on the basis of the new demands they possess on the ferrite material development. A number of recently developed MnZn-ferrite materials is presented together with the main scientific principles lying behind their development. These include: (i) high saturation flux density MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Bsat=550 mT at 10 kHz, 1200 A/m, 100°C), (ii) low power losses MnZn-ferrites (i.e. Pv~210 mW cm-3 at 100 kHz, 200mT, 100°C), (iii) MnZn-ferrites with broad temperature stability (i.e. PV<375 mW cm-3 for 25°Cmaterial to a large scale industrial production process.

  12. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  13. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation.

  14. Targeted basic studies of ferroelectric and ferroelastic materials for piezoelectric transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Barsch, G. R.; Biggers, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    The report delineates the new progress made in the fifth and final year and discusses the major accomplishments of the full five year program both in the basic science and in the spin off to practical transducer applications. Possible new areas of study which are suggested by the present studies are briefly reported. Major achievements include the development of a physical approach to understanding active composites, leading to the development of several new families of PZT:polymer piezoelectric composites for hydrophone application. New advances in the phenomenology and microscopic theory of electrostriction, and the evolution of a new family of high strain ferroelectric relaxor materials for practical application. New basic understanding of the polarization mechanisms in ferroelectric relaxors has been aided by the study of order-disorder of the cation arrangement in lead scandium tantalate, and the results correlate well with studies of relaxor behavior, and of shape memory effects in PLZT ceramics. Low temperature studies on pure and doped PZTs have given the first clear indication of the intrinsic (averaged) single domain response and correlate exceedingly well with earlier phenomenological theory. Crystal growth and ceramic processing studies have developed hand-in-hand with program needs providing new forms of conventional materials, new grain oriented structures and single crystals.

  15. Characterization of uranium carbide target materials to produce neutron-rich radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tusseau-Nenez, Sandrine; Roussière, Brigitte; Barré-Boscher, Nicole; Gottberg, Alexander; Corradetti, Stefano; Andrighetto, Alberto; Cheikh Mhamed, Maher; Essabaa, Saïd; Franberg-Delahaye, Hanna; Grinyer, Joanna; Joanny, Loïc; Lau, Christophe; Le Lannic, Joseph; Raynaud, Marc; Saïd, Abdelhakim; Stora, Thierry; Tougait, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of a R&D program aiming to develop uranium carbide (UCx) targets for radioactive nuclear beams, the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d'Orsay (IPNO) has developed an experimental setup to characterize the release of various fission fragments from UCx samples at high temperature. The results obtained in a previous study have demonstrated the feasibility of the method and started to correlate the structural properties of the samples and their behavior in terms of nuclear reaction product release. In the present study, seven UCx samples have been systematically characterized in order to better understand the correlation between their physicochemical characteristics and release properties. Two very different samples, the first one composed of dense UC and the second one of highly porous UCx made of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, were provided by the ActILab (ENSAR) collaboration. The others were synthesized at IPNO. The systems for irradiation and heating necessary for the release studies have been improved with respect to those used in previous studies. The results show that the open porosity is hardly the limiting factor for the fission product release. The homogeneity of the microstructure and the pore size distribution contributes significantly to the increase of the release. The use of carbon nanotubes in place of traditional micrometric graphite particles appears to be promising, even if the homogeneity of the microstructure can still be enhanced.

  16. Controllability in Multi-Stage Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper shows a concept for a future laser ion accelerator, which should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers and ion post acceleration devices. Based on the laser ion accelerator components, the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled, and a future compact laser ion accelerator would be designed for ion cancer therapy or for ion material treatment. In this study each component is designed to control the ion beam quality. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. A combination of each component provides a high controllability of the ion beam quality to meet variable requirements in various purposes in the laser ion accelerator. The work was partly supported by MEXT, JSPS, ASHULA project/ ILE, Osaka University, CORE (Center for Optical Research and Education, Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fudan University and CDI (Creative Dept. for Innovation) in CCRD, Utsunomiya University.

  17. Operation of the accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.C.; Batzka, B.; Billquist, P.J.

    1995-08-01

    Fiscal Year 1994 was the first year of seven-day operation since ATLAS became a national user facility in 1985. ATLAS made the most of the opportunity this year by providing 5200 hours of beam on-target to the research program. A record number of 60 experiments were completed and the {open_quotes}facility reliability{close_quotes} remained near the 90% level. Seven-day operation was made possible with the addition to the staff of two operator positions providing single-operator coverage during the weekend period. The normally scheduled coverage was augmented by an on-call list of system experts who respond to emergencies with phone-in advice and return to the Laboratory when necessary. This staffing approach continues but we rearranged our staffing patterns so that we now have one cryogenics engineer working a shift pattern which includes 8-hour daily coverage during the weekend. ATLAS provided a beam mix to users consisting of 26 different isotopic species, 23% of which were for A>100 in FY 1994. Approximately 60% of the beam time was provided by the Positive Ion Injector, slightly less than the usage rate of FY 1993. Experiments using uranium or lead beams accounted for 16.4% of the total beam time. The ECR ion source and high-voltage platform functioned well throughout the year. A new technique for solid material production in the source was developed which uses a sputtering process wherein the sample of material placed near the plasma chamber wall is biased negatively. Plasma ions are accelerated into the sample and material is sputtered from the surface into the plasma. This technique is now used routinely for many elements. Runs of calcium, germanium, nickel, lead, tellurium, and uranium were carried out with this technique.

  18. STATUS OF THE APT MATERIALS HANDBOOK.

    SciTech Connect

    P. RITTENHOUSE

    2000-11-01

    The ''Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Materials Handbook'' has been developed and prepared by the APT project to provide a controlled source of extensively reviewed and quality-qualified materials data and information for use in all phases of the project, from conceptual and preliminary design through construction and operation. As originally planned, the Handbook was to provide data and information on all materials associated with all APT systems and components. This includes the accelerator and its commissioning beam stops, the Target/Blanket (T/B) system (beam window, target and blanket modules, cavity vessel, vessel internals, and shields), the tritium separation plant, the balance-of-plant (BOP), and the site and buildings. The current version of the Handbook (Revision 1) provides relatively complete coverage for T/B and tritium systems materials, and its next issue will give increased attention to data for materials of the accelerator.

  19. Results of the six-and-a-half day electron-accelerator irradiation of enriched Mo-100 targets for the production of Mo-99

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, S.; Bailey, J.; Heltemes, T.; Jonah, C.; Makarashvili, V.; Tkac, P.; Rotsch, D.; Virgo, M.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2016-10-01

    A six-and-a-half day irradiation of enriched Mo-100 target disks was performed by Argonne’s electron linac. This report describes the irradiation conditions and the means used to process the targets for shipment to NorthStar Medical Isotopes, LLC, for feed to their RadioGenixTM technetium generator.

  20. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  1. Topical report on a preconceptual design for the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC) target for the accelerator production of tritium (APT)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Cokinos, D.M.; Czajkowski, C.; Franz, E.M.; Kroeger, P.; Todosow, M.; Youngblood, R.; Zucker, M.

    1993-09-30

    The preconceptual design of the APT Li-Al target system, also referred to as the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC), target system, is summarized in this report. The system has been designed to produce a ``3/8 Goal`` quantity of tritium using the 200-mA, 1.0 GeV proton beam emerging from the LANL-designed LINAC. The SILC target system consists of a beam expander, a heavy-water-cooled lead spallation neutron source assembly surrounded by light-water-cooled Li-Al blankets, a target window, heat removal systems, and related safety systems. The preconceptual design of each of these major components is described. Descriptions are also provided for the target fabrication, tritium extraction, and waste-steam processes. Performance characteristics are presented and discussed.

  2. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  3. Ion source studies for particle beam accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bieg, K.W.; Burns, E.J.T.; Olsen, J.N.; Dorrell, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    High power particle beam accelerators are being developed for use in inertial confinement fusion applications. These pulsed power accelerators require sources of low atomic number ions (e.g., protons, deuterons, carbon, or lithium). The sources must be of high purity for efficient accelerator operation and proper target coupling, must have a rapid ''turn-on,'' and must be compatible with ion diode configurations under development. A particular type of source presently being investigated is the flashover ion source which generates ions by means of the vacuum flashover of an insulating anode material when the high voltage pulse arrives at the diode. We have developed an applied-magnetic-field, extraction ion diode for the 0.03 TW Nereus accelerator specifically to investigate these sources. Extracted ion species are measured by means of a Thomson-parabola ion analyzer, dB/dt current monitors, and Faraday cups. Experiments have been performed to investigate the surface flashover mechanism and the effects of various dielectric source materials, anode preparation methods (including rf glow discharge cleaning), and vacuum conditions on ion species and diode operation.

  4. Large electrostatic accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    The increasing importance of energetic heavy ion beams in the study of atomic physics, nuclear physics, and materials science has partially or wholly motivated the construction of a new generation of large electrostatic accelerators designed to operate at terminal potentials of 20 MV or above. In this paper, the author briefly discusses the status of these new accelerators and also discusses several recent technological advances which may be expected to further improve their performance. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) a discussion of the motivation for the construction of large electrostatic accelerators, (2) a description and discussion of several large electrostatic accelerators which have been recently completed or are under construction, (3) a description of several recent innovations which may be expected to improve the performance of large electrostatic accelerators in the future, and (4) a description of an innovative new large electrostatic accelerator whose construction is scheduled to begin next year. Due to time and space constraints, discussion is restricted to consideration of only tandem accelerators.

  5. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  6. Dynamics of Radiation Pressure Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, A.; Benedetti, C.; Pegoraro, F.; Veghini, S.

    2010-02-02

    We describe recent theoretical results on Radiation Pressure Acceleration of ions by ultraintense, circularly polarized laser pulses, giving an insight on the underlying dynamics and suggestions for the development of applications. In thick targets, we show how few-cycle pulses may generate single ion bunches in inhomogeneous density profiles. In thin targets, we present a refinement of the simple model of the accelerating mirror and a comparison of its predictions with simulation results, solving an apparent paradox.

  7. A polymer dataset for accelerated property prediction and design

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Tran Doan; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Kim, Chiho; Sharma, Vinit; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging computation- and data-driven approaches are particularly useful for rationally designing materials with targeted properties. Generally, these approaches rely on identifying structure-property relationships by learning from a dataset of sufficiently large number of relevant materials. The learned information can then be used to predict the properties of materials not already in the dataset, thus accelerating the materials design. Herein, we develop a dataset of 1,073 polymers and related materials and make it available at http://khazana.uconn.edu/. This dataset is uniformly prepared using first-principles calculations with structures obtained either from other sources or by using structure search methods. Because the immediate target of this work is to assist the design of high dielectric constant polymers, it is initially designed to include the optimized structures, atomization energies, band gaps, and dielectric constants. It will be progressively expanded by accumulating new materials and including additional properties calculated for the optimized structures provided. PMID:26927478

  8. A polymer dataset for accelerated property prediction and design

    SciTech Connect

    Huan, Tran Doan; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Kim, Chiho; Sharma, Vinit; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2016-03-01

    Emerging computation- and data-driven approaches are particularly useful for rationally designing materials with targeted properties. Generally, these approaches rely on identifying structure-property relationships by learning from a dataset of sufficiently large number of relevant materials. The learned information can then be used to predict the properties of materials not already in the dataset, thus accelerating the materials design. Herein, we develop a dataset of 1,073 polymers and related materials and make it available at http://khazana.uconn.edu/. This dataset is uniformly prepared using first-principles calculations with structures obtained either from other sources or by using structure search methods. Because the immediate target of this work is to assist the design of high dielectric constant polymers, it is initially designed to include the optimized structures, atomization energies, band gaps, and dielectric constants. As a result, it will be progressively expanded by accumulating new materials and including additional properties calculated for the optimized structures provided.

  9. A polymer dataset for accelerated property prediction and design.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tran Doan; Mannodi-Kanakkithodi, Arun; Kim, Chiho; Sharma, Vinit; Pilania, Ghanshyam; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2016-03-01

    Emerging computation- and data-driven approaches are particularly useful for rationally designing materials with targeted properties. Generally, these approaches rely on identifying structure-property relationships by learning from a dataset of sufficiently large number of relevant materials. The learned information can then be used to predict the properties of materials not already in the dataset, thus accelerating the materials design. Herein, we develop a dataset of 1,073 polymers and related materials and make it available at http://khazana.uconn.edu/. This dataset is uniformly prepared using first-principles calculations with structures obtained either from other sources or by using structure search methods. Because the immediate target of this work is to assist the design of high dielectric constant polymers, it is initially designed to include the optimized structures, atomization energies, band gaps, and dielectric constants. It will be progressively expanded by accumulating new materials and including additional properties calculated for the optimized structures provided.

  10. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Colgate, S.A.

    1958-05-27

    An improvement is presented in linear accelerators for charged particles with respect to the stable focusing of the particle beam. The improvement consists of providing a radial electric field transverse to the accelerating electric fields and angularly introducing the beam of particles in the field. The results of the foregoing is to achieve a beam which spirals about the axis of the acceleration path. The combination of the electric fields and angular motion of the particles cooperate to provide a stable and focused particle beam.

  11. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, Adrienne

    2015-08-16

    into droplet streams. This type of target should solve our problems with the jet as it will prevent the ow of exocurrent into the nozzle. It is also highly e ective as it is even more mass-limited than standard cryogenic jets. Furthermore, jets break up spontaneously anyway. If we can control the breakup, we can synchronize the droplet emission with the laser pulses. In order to assist the team prepare for an experiment later this year, I familiarized myself with the physics and theory of droplet formation, calculated values for the required parameters, and ordered the required materials for modi cation of the jet. Future experiments will test these droplet streams and continue towards the goal of ion acceleration using cryogenic targets.

  12. 5. Accelerated Fracture Healing Targeting Periosteal Cells: Possibility of Combined Therapy of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS), Bone Graft, and Growth Factor (bFGF).

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kentaro; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Koji; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Inoue, Gen; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the mechanism of fracture healing, and the effect of LIPUS, bone graft and growth factor on accelerating fracture healing. We present here the results of our research. To examine callus formation cells in fracture healing, we made marrow GFP chimera mice and a fracture model of marrow mesenchymal stem cell GFP chimera mice. It was demonstrated that periosteal cells were essential for callus formation. We focused on periosteal cells and examined the effect of LIPUS. In an in vitro experiment using a cultured part of the femur, LIPUS promoted ossification of the periosteal tissue. Further, LIPUS accelerated VEGF expression in the experiment using the femoral fracture model of mice. From these results, it was suggested that activation of periosteal cells might play a role in the fracture healing mechanism of LIPUS. Next, we discussed the possibility of combined therapy of LIPUS, bone graft and growth factor. Therapy involving the topical administration of bFGF using a controlled release system and bone graft could promote callus formation. In addition, LIPUS was able to promote membranaceous ossification after the bone graft. It was suggested that combined therapy of LIPUS, bone graft and bFGF could be a new option for treating fractures.

  13. 'Light Sail' Acceleration Reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for 'optimal' values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple 'light sail' model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  14. "Light sail" acceleration reexamined.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Andrea; Veghini, Silvia; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2009-08-21

    The dynamics of the acceleration of ultrathin foil targets by the radiation pressure of superintense, circularly polarized laser pulses is investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. By addressing self-induced transparency and charge separation effects, it is shown that for "optimal" values of the foil thickness only a thin layer at the rear side is accelerated by radiation pressure. The simple "light sail" model gives a good estimate of the energy per nucleon, but overestimates the conversion efficiency of laser energy into monoenergetic ions.

  15. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  16. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  17. LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Christofilos, N.C.; Polk, I.J.

    1959-02-17

    Improvements in linear particle accelerators are described. A drift tube system for a linear ion accelerator reduces gap capacity between adjacent drift tube ends. This is accomplished by reducing the ratio of the diameter of the drift tube to the diameter of the resonant cavity. Concentration of magnetic field intensity at the longitudinal midpoint of the external sunface of each drift tube is reduced by increasing the external drift tube diameter at the longitudinal center region.

  18. Production of medical radioisotopes with linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Starovoitova, Valeriia N; Tchelidze, Lali; Wells, Douglas P

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we discuss producing radioisotopes using linear electron accelerators and address production and separation issues of photoneutron (γ,n) and photoproton (γ,p) reactions. While (γ,n) reactions typically result in greater yields, separating product nuclides from the target is challenging since the chemical properties of both are the same. Yields of (γ,p) reactions are typically lower than (γ,n) ones, however they have the advantage that target and product nuclides belong to different chemical species so their separation is often not such an intricate problem. In this paper we consider two examples, (100)Mo(γ,n)(99)Mo and (68)Zn(γ,p)(67)Cu, of photonuclear reactions. Monte-Carlo simulations of the yields are benchmarked with experimental data obtained at the Idaho Accelerator Center using a 44MeV linear electron accelerator. We propose using a kinematic recoil method for photoneutron production. This technique requires (100)Mo target material to be in the form of nanoparticles coated with a catcher material. During irradiation, (99)Mo atoms recoil and get trapped in the coating layer. After irradiation, the coating is dissolved and (99)Mo is collected. At the same time, (100)Mo nanoparticles can be reused. For the photoproduction method, (67)Cu can be separated from the target nuclides, (68)Zn, using standard exchange chromatography methods. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed and the (99)Mo activity was predicted to be about 7MBq/(g(⁎)kW(⁎)h) while (67)Cu activity was predicted to be about 1MBq/(g(⁎)kW(⁎)h). Experimental data confirm the predicted activity for both cases which proves that photonuclear reactions can be used to produce radioisotopes. Lists of medical isotopes which might be obtained using photonuclear reactions have been compiled and are included as well.

  19. Neodymium and strontium isotopic study of Australasian tektites - New constraints on the provenance and age of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of Australasian tectites (including two flanged Australian tectites, two low-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites, and three high-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites) and the Nd, Sm, Sr, and Rb concentrations were investigated by isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systematics were used to study the characteristics of the parental material. It is shown that the Nd and Sr isotopic data provide evidence that all Australasian tektites were derived from a single sedimentary formation with a narrow range of stratigraphic ages close to 170 Ma. It is suggested that all of the Australasian tektites were derived from a single impact event and that the australites represent the upper part of a melt sheet ejected at high velocity, whereas the indochinites represent melts formed at a lower level in the target material distributed closer to the area of the impact.

  20. Dengue vector management using insecticide treated materials and targeted interventions on productive breeding-sites in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In view of the epidemiological expansion of dengue worldwide and the availability of new tools and strategies particularly for controlling the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti, an intervention study was set up to test the efficacy, cost and feasibility of a combined approach of insecticide treated materials (ITMs) alone and in combination with appropriate targeted interventions of the most productive vector breeding-sites. Methods The study was conducted as a cluster randomized community trial using “reduction of the vector population” as the main outcome variable. The trial had two arms: 10 intervention clusters (neighborhoods) and 10 control clusters in the town of Poptun Guatemala. Activities included entomological assessments (characteristics of breeding-sites, pupal productivity, Stegomyia indices) at baseline, 6 weeks after the first intervention (coverage of window and exterior doorways made of PermaNet 2.0 netting, factory treated with deltamethrin at 55 mg/m2, and of 200 L drums with similar treated material) and 6 weeks after the second intervention (combination of treated materials and other suitable interventions targeting productive breeding-sites i.e larviciding with Temephos, elimination etc.). The second intervention took place 17 months after the first intervention. The insecticide residual activity and the insecticidal content were also studied at different intervals. Additionally, information about demographic characteristics, cost of the intervention, coverage of houses protected and satisfaction in the population with the interventions was collected. Results At baseline (during the dry season) a variety of productive container types for Aedes pupae were identified: various container types holding >20 L, 200 L drums, washbasins and buckets (producing 83.7% of all pupae). After covering 100% of windows and exterior doorways and a small number of drums (where the commercial cover could be fixed) in 970 study households, tropical

  1. Accelerator-driven subcritical facility:Conceptual design development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry; Bolshinsky, Igor; Naberezhnev, Dmitry; Duo, Jose; Belch, Henry; Bailey, James

    2006-06-01

    A conceptual design development of an accelerator-driven subcritical facility has been carried out in the preparation of a joint activity with Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine. The main functions of the facility are the medical isotope production and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. An electron accelerator is considered to drive the subcritical assembly. The neutron source intensity and spectrum have been studied. The energy deposition, spatial neutron generation, neutron utilization fraction, and target dimensions have been quantified to define the main target performance parameters, and to select the target material and beam parameters. Different target conceptual designs have been developed based the engineering requirements including heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux level with a Keff of 0.98. Different fuel materials, uranium enrichments, and reflector materials are considered in the design process. The possibility of using low enrichment uranium without penalizing the facility performance is carefully evaluated. The mechanical design of the facility has been developed to maximize its utility and minimize the time for replacing the target and the fuel assemblies. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements, upgrades, and new missions. In addition, it has large design margins to accommodate different operating conditions and parameters. In this paper, the conceptual design and the design analyses of the facility will be presented.

  2. Large Scale Accelerator Production of 225Ac: Effective Cross sections for 78-192 MeV Protons Incident on 232Th Targets

    DOE PAGES

    Griswold, Justin R; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Engle, Jonathan W.; ...

    2016-09-28

    Actinium-225 and 213Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of 225Ac. The high energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal target has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of 225Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of Th metal at beam energies between 78 and 200 MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridgemore » National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes as well as for some of the fission products are presented. The cross sections for production of 225Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7 mb in the incident proton energy range of 78 to 192 MeV. Based on these data, production of Curie quantities of 225Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0 g cm-2232Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.« less

  3. Large scale accelerator production of (225)Ac: Effective cross sections for 78-192MeV protons incident on (232)Th targets.

    PubMed

    Griswold, J R; Medvedev, D G; Engle, J W; Copping, R; Fitzsimmons, J M; Radchenko, V; Cooley, J C; Fassbender, M E; Denton, D L; Murphy, K E; Owens, A C; Birnbaum, E R; John, K D; Nortier, F M; Stracener, D W; Heilbronn, L H; Mausner, L F; Mirzadeh, S

    2016-12-01

    Actinium-225 and (213)Bi have been used successfully in targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in preclinical and clinical research. This paper is a continuation of research activities aiming to expand the availability of (225)Ac. The high-energy proton spallation reaction on natural thorium metal targets has been utilized to produce millicurie quantities of (225)Ac. The results of sixteen irradiation experiments of thorium metal at beam energies between 78 and 192MeV are summarized in this work. Irradiations have been conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), while target dissolution and processing was carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Excitation functions for actinium and thorium isotopes, as well as for some of the fission products, are presented. The cross sections for production of (225)Ac range from 3.6 to 16.7mb in the incident proton energy range of 78-192MeV. Based on these data, production of curie quantities of (225)Ac is possible by irradiating a 5.0gcm(-2 232)Th target for 10 days in either BNL or LANL proton irradiation facilities.

  4. Symposium report on frontier applications of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1993-09-28

    This report contains viewgraph material on the following topics: Electron-Positron Linear Colliders; Unconventional Colliders; Prospects for UVFEL; Accelerator Based Intense Spallation; Neutron Sources; and B Physics at Hadron Accelerators with RHIC as an Example.

  5. Accelerator transmutation of sup 129 I

    SciTech Connect

    Attrep, M. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Iodine-129 is one of several long-lived reactor products that is being considered for transmutation by the Los Alamos Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) program. A reasonable rate of transmutation of 1291 is possible in this system because of the anticipated high neutron flux generated from the accelerator. This report summarizes previous papers dealing with the transmutation of 1291 where reactor technologies have been employed for neutron sources. The transmutation process is considered marginal under these conditions. Presented here are additional information concerning the final products that could be formed from the transmutation process in the ATW blanket. The transmutation scheme proposes the use of solid iodine as the target material and the escape of product xenon from the containers after van Dincklange (1981). Additional developmental plans are considered.

  6. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    collider and neutrino factory - summary of working group 2 / J. Galambos, R. Garoby and S. Geer -- Prospects for a very high power CW SRF linac / R. A. Rimmer -- Indian accelerator program for ADS applications / V. C. Sahni and P. Singh -- Ion accelerator activities at VECC (particularly, operating at low temperature) / R. K. Bhandari -- Chinese efforts in high intensity proton accelerators / S. Fu, J. Wang and S. Fang -- ADSR activity in the UK / R. J. Barlow -- ADS development in Japan / K. Kikuchi -- Project-X, SRF, and very large power stations / C. M. Ankenbrandt, R. P. Johnson and M. Popovic -- Power production and ADS / R. Raja -- Experimental neutron source facility based on accelerator driven system / Y. Gohar -- Transmutation mission / W. S. Yang -- Safety performance and issues / J. E. Cahalan -- Spallation target design for accelerator-driven systems / Y. Gohar -- Design considerations for accelerator transmutation of waste system / W. S. Yang -- Japan ADS program / T. Sasa -- Overview of members states' and IAEA activities in the field of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) / A. Stanculescu -- Linac for ADS applications - accelerator technologies / R. W. Garnett and R. L. Sheffield -- SRF linacs and accelerator driven sub-critical systems - summary working groups 3 & 4 / J. Delayen -- Production of Actinium-225 via high energy proton induced spallation of Thorium-232 / J. Harvey ... [et al.] -- Search for the electric dipole moment of Radium-225 / R. J. Holt, Z.-T. Lu and R. Mueller -- SRF linac and material science and medicine - summary of working group 5 / J. Nolen, E. Pitcher and H. Kirk.

  7. Results of four one-day electron-accelerator irradiations of enriched Mo-100 targets for the production of Mo-99

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, S.; Bailey, J.; Heltemes, T.; Jonah, C.; Gromov, R.; Makarashvili, V.; Tkac, P.; Rotsch, D.; Virgo, M.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2016-10-01

    A series of four one-day irradiations was conducted with 100Mo-enriched disk targets. After irradiation, the enriched disks were removed from the target and dissolved. The resulting solution was processed using a NorthStar RadioGenix 99mTc generator either at Argonne National Laboratory or at the NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes facility. Runs on the RadioGenix system produced inconsistent analytical results for 99mTc in the Tc/Mo solution. These inconsistencies were attributed to the impurities in the solution or improper column packing. During the irradiations, the performance of the optic transitional radiation (OTR) and infrared cameras was tested in high radiation field. The OTR cameras survived all irradiations, while the IR cameras failed every time. The addition of X-ray and neutron shielding improved camera survivability and decreased the number of upsets.

  8. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  9. Acceleration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Work to support the NASA MSFC Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) was performed. Four tasks (analysis development, analysis research, analysis documentation, and acceleration analysis) were addressed by parallel projects. Work concentrated on preparation for and implementation of near real-time SAMS data analysis during the USMP-1 mission. User support documents and case specific software documentation and tutorials were developed. Information and results were presented to microgravity users. ACAP computer facilities need to be fully implemented and networked, data resources must be cataloged and accessible, future microgravity missions must be coordinated, and continued Orbiter characterization is necessary.

  10. Accelerators for research and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The newest particle accelerators are almost always built for extending the frontiers of research, at the cutting edge of science and technology. Once these machines are operating and these technologies mature, new applications are always found, many of which touch our lives in profound ways. The evolution of accelerator technologies will be discussed, with descriptions of accelerator types and characteristics. The wide range of applications of accelerators will be discussed, in fields such as nuclear science, medicine, astrophysics and space-sciences, power generation, airport security, materials processing and microcircuit fabrication. 13 figs.

  11. The role of microRNA-1274a in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer: Accelerating cancer cell proliferation and migration via directly targeting FOXO4

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guo-Jun Liu, Guang-Hui; Ye, Yan-Wei; Fu, Yang; Zhang, Xie-Fu

    2015-04-17

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a series of 18–25 nucleotides length non-coding RNAs, which play critical roles in tumorigenesis. Previous study has shown that microRNA-1274a (miR-1274a) is upregulated in human gastric cancer. However, its role in gastric cancer progression remains poorly understood. Therefore, the current study was aimed to examine the effect of miR-1274a on gastric cancer cells. We found that miR-1274a was overexpressed in gastric cancer tissues or gastric cancer cells including HGC27, MGC803, AGS, and SGC-7901 by qRT-PCR analysis. Transfection of miR-1274a markedly promoted gastric cancer cells proliferation and migration as well as induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells. Our further examination identified FOXO4 as a target of miR-1274a, which did not influence FOXO4 mRNA expression but significantly inhibited FOXO4 protein expression. Moreover, miR-1274a overexpression activated PI3K/Akt signaling and upregulated cyclin D1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. With tumor xenografts in mice models, we also showed that miR-1274a promoted tumorigenesis of gastric cancer in vivo. In all, our study demonstrated that miR-1274a prompted gastric cancer cells growth and migration through dampening FOXO4 expression thus provided a potential target for human gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • MiR-1274a expression was augmented in gastric cancer. • MiR-1274a promoted proliferation, migration and induced EMT in cancer cells. • MiR-1274a directly targeted FOXO4 expression. • MiR-1274a triggered PI3K/Akt signaling in cancer cells. • MiR-1274a significantly increased tumor xenografts growth.

  12. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  13. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  14. Accelerated Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the accelerated associate degree program at Ivy Tech Community College (Indiana) in which low-income students will receive an associate degree in one year. The three-year pilot program is funded by a $2.3 million grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education in Indianapolis and a $270,000 grant from the Indiana Commission…

  15. ACCELERATION INTEGRATOR

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-01-01

    This patent relates to an improved acceleration integrator and more particularly to apparatus of this nature which is gyrostabilized. The device may be used to sense the attainment by an airborne vehicle of a predetermined velocitv or distance along a given vector path. In its broad aspects, the acceleration integrator utilizes a magnetized element rotatable driven by a synchronous motor and having a cylin drical flux gap and a restrained eddy- current drag cap deposed to move into the gap. The angular velocity imparted to the rotatable cap shaft is transmitted in a positive manner to the magnetized element through a servo feedback loop. The resultant angular velocity of tae cap is proportional to the acceleration of the housing in this manner and means may be used to measure the velocity and operate switches at a pre-set magnitude. To make the above-described dcvice sensitive to acceleration in only one direction the magnetized element forms the spinning inertia element of a free gyroscope, and the outer housing functions as a gimbal of a gyroscope.

  16. Silencing miR-106b accelerates osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells and rescues against glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis by targeting BMP2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Jing, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Fu, Xuejie; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xichao; Tao, Yunxia; Yang, Huilin; Zhang, Yan; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chenyu; Li, Donghai; Shi, Qin

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious health problem worldwide. MicroRNA is a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression by either promoting mRNA degradation or interfering with mRNA translation of specific target genes. It plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Here, we first demonstrated that miR-106b (miR-106b-5p) negatively regulated osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro. Then, we found that miR-106b expression increased in C57BL/6 mice with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP), and that silencing of miR-106b signaling protected mice against GIOP through promoting bone formation and inhibiting bone resorption. At last, we showed that miR-106b inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation partly through directly targeting bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) both in vitro and in the GIOP model. Together, our findings have identified the role and mechanism of miR-106b in negatively regulating osteogenesis. Inhibition of miR-106b might be a potential new strategy for treating osteoporosis and bone defects.

  17. Accelerator simulation of astrophysical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Phenomena that involve accelerated ions in stellar processes that can be simulated with laboratory accelerators are described. Stellar evolutionary phases, such as the CNO cycle, have been partially explored with accelerators, up to the consumption of He by alpha particle radiative capture reactions. Further experimentation is indicated on reactions featuring N-13(p,gamma)O-14, O-15(alpha, gamma)Ne-19, and O-14(alpha,p)F-17. Accelerated beams interacting with thin foils produce reaction products that permit a determination of possible elemental abundances in stellar objects. Additionally, isotopic ratios observed in chondrites can be duplicated with accelerator beam interactions and thus constraints can be set on the conditions producing the meteorites. Data from isotopic fractionation from sputtering, i.e., blasting surface atoms from a material using a low energy ion beam, leads to possible models for processes occurring in supernova explosions. Finally, molecules can be synthesized with accelerators and compared with spectroscopic observations of stellar winds.

  18. Laser acceleration and its future

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2010-01-01

    Laser acceleration is based on the concept to marshal collective fields that may be induced by laser. In order to exceed the material breakdown field by a large factor, we employ the broken-down matter of plasma. While the generated wakefields resemble with the fields in conventional accelerators in their structure (at least qualitatively), it is their extreme accelerating fields that distinguish the laser wakefield from others, amounting to tiny emittance and compact accelerator. The current research largely falls on how to master the control of acceleration process in spatial and temporal scales several orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional method. The efforts over the last several years have come to a fruition of generating good beam properties with GeV energies on a table top, leading to many applications, such as ultrafast radiolysis, intraoperative radiation therapy, injection to X-ray free electron laser, and a candidate for future high energy accelerators. PMID:20228616

  19. Deep impact craters in the Isidis and southwestern Utopia Planitia regions of Mars: High target material strength as a possible cause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Joseph M.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Garbeil, Harold; Tornabene, Livio L.

    2006-03-01

    Using THEMIS, MOC and MOLA data, we have found 51 craters in the diameter range 6-11.8 km within southwestern Utopia Planitia and Isidis Planitia that are significantly deeper than typical fresh craters in the northern lowlands of Mars. The restricted geographic distribution of these craters, their simple morphology, and data from impact and explosion crater studies suggest that unusually strong target materials (as much as a factor of 2 greater than average materials in the Martian lowlands) are the cause of the excessive crater depth. We propose that the greater target material strength acts to delay gravity-dominated collapse to larger crater sizes. Furthermore, we suggest that a regional, olivine-rich mafic to untramafic rock unit identified by TES and THEMIS is a reasonable candidate for these strong materials. The unit is exposed on the southern edge of Isidis basin and in crater ejecta within the basin, and forms layers that dip toward the Isidis Basin center.

  20. On the existence of low-energy photons (<150 keV) in the unflattened x-ray beam from an ordinary radiotherapeutic target in a medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tsechanski, A; Krutman, Y; Faermann, S

    2005-12-07

    Low-energy photons (<150 keV) are essential for obtaining high quality x-ray radiographs. These photons are usually produced in the accelerator target, but are effectively absorbed by the flattening filter and, at least partially, by the target itself. Experimental proof is presented for the existence of low-energy photons in the unflattened x-ray beam produced by a 6 MeV electron beam normally incident on the thinner of the two existing ports of the all-Cu radiotherapeutic target of a Clinac 18 (Varian Associates) linear accelerator. A number of one-shot absorption measurements were carried out with 12 foils of Pb absorbers with thicknesses varying from 0.25 to 3 mm in steps of 0.25 mm arranged symmetrically around the central axis on a 7.2 cm radius circumference. A Kodak ECL film-screen-cassette combination was used as a detector in the absorption measurements, in which optical density was measured as a function of the thickness of the Pb absorbers. Two sets of absorption measurements were carried out: the first one with the Clinac 18 6 MV unflattened beam and the second one with the Clinac 600C 6 MV therapeutic counterpart beam. There is a striking difference between the two sets: the optical density versus Pb-absorber thickness curve shows a sharp increase in optical density at small absorber thicknesses in the case of the unflattened 6 MV x-ray beam as compared with a gently sloping dependence in the case of the 6 MV therapeutic beam. A semi-quantitative assessment of the low-energy photon contribution to the whole optical density/contrast is presented. A 0.85 mm thick Pb absorber intercepting the 6 MV unflattened x-ray beam eliminates almost totally the sharp peak in the optical density curve at small Pb-absorber thicknesses. This constitutes additional evidence for the existence of low-energy photons (<150 keV) in the unflattened 6 MV beam from the Cu therapeutic target.