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Sample records for accelerator test stand

  1. Test stands for testing serial XFEL accelerator modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhko, Yury; Anashin, Vadim; Belova, Lyudmila; Boeckmann, Torsten Axel; Kholopov, Michail; Konstantinov, Valeriy; Petersen, Bernd; Pivovarov, Sergey; Pyata, Eugeny; Sellmann, Detlef; Wang, Xilong; Zhirnov, Anatoly; Zolotov, Anatoly

    2012-06-01

    The superconducting accelerator module is the key component of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) project to be built at DESY Hamburg. The XFEL linear accelerator will consist of 100 accelerator modules in order to produce pulsed electron beam with the energy of 17.5 GeV. All accelerator modules have to be tested after the assembly and before being installed in the accelerator tunnel. The tests will take place in the Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) being constructed at DESY. Besides test stands for testing superconducting cavities and magnets constituting the accelerator modules, AMTF will come with three test stands for testing the completed accelerator modules. This paper describes layout of the test stands within the AMTF, cryogenic design of the test stand, design issues of principal components and schedule.

  2. High-voltage terminal test of a test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2015-10-01

    The Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex has been developing a 300-kV test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator ion source. The ion source and accelerating tube will be installed in a high-pressure vessel. The ion source in the high-pressure vessel is required to have a high reliability. The test stand has been proposed and developed to confirm the stable operating conditions of the ion source. The ion source will be tested at the test stand to verify the long-time operating conditions. The test stand comprises a 300-kV high-voltage terminal, a battery for the ion-source power, a 60-Hz inverter, 200-MHz radio-frequency power supply, a 5-kV extraction power supply, a 300-kV accelerating tube, and a vacuum system. The results of the 300-kV high-voltage terminal tests are presented in this paper.

  3. Cold test results of a side-coupled standing-wave electron-accelerating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ki Baek; Li, Yonggui; Lee, Sanghyun; Lee, Byeong-No; Park, Hyung Dal; Cha, Sung-Su; Lee, Byung Cheol

    2013-07-01

    The radio-frequency (RF) cavity for the dual-energy S-band electron linear accelerator (LINAC) is designed for a cargo inspection system (CIS) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The cold test results of the electron accelerator structure, which has a side-coupled standing-wave interlaced-pulse dual-energy mode, are described. The design concept, basic structure, microwave-tuning method, and cold-test procedure are described as well. The measured dispersion curve, spectrum characteristics, ρ-f relation of the power coupler, and axial field distribution of the accelerating gradient are provided.

  4. High Brightness Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Boyd, J.K.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-08-07

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements.

  5. Beam property measurement of a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Yu-Seok

    2016-09-01

    The KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300-kV ion source test stand for a 1-MV electrostatic accelerator for industrial purposes. A RF ion source was operated at 200 MHz with its matching circuit. The beam profile and emittance were measured behind an accelerating column to confirm the beam property from the RF ion source. The beam profile was measured at the end of the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using a beam profile monitor (BPM) and wire scanner. An Allison-type emittance scanner was installed behind the beam profile monitor (BPM) to measure the beam density in phase space. The measurement results for the beam profile and emittance are presented in this paper.

  6. Design and operation of a gas scattering energy spectrometer for the ISIS RFQ accelerator test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, J. P.; Findlay, D. J. S.; Letchford, A. P.; Murdoch, G. R.; Thomason, J. W. G.

    2005-02-01

    The design and operation of an apparatus to measure the beam energy of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) particle accelerator, based on multiple scattering of H - ions in xenon gas, is described. The purpose of the apparatus is to confirm the mean energy and energy spread of the nominal 665 keV beam of H - ions from the ISIS RFQ. This RFQ, after comprehensive testing, is intended to replace the existing Cockcroft-Walton pre-injector on the ISIS spallation neutron source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The basis of the apparatus is a set of two cascaded assemblies each consisting of a gas scattering cell, a drift length and three small apertures, which together reduce the peak intensity of the beam current sufficiently to allow a semiconductor charged particle detector to be used to detect individual H - ions and measure their energies.

  7. Planter unit test stand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A planter test stand was developed to evaluate individual row-crop metering units in early 2013. This test stand provided the ability to quantify actual seed metering in terms of population, seed spacing, skips, and multiples over a range of meter RPMs and vacuum pressures. Preliminary data has been...

  8. NEO Test Stand Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Cody J.

    2015-01-01

    A project within SwampWorks is building a test stand to hold regolith to study how dust is ejected when exposed to the hot exhaust plume of a rocket engine. The test stand needs to be analyzed, finalized, and fabrication drawings generated to move forward. Modifications of the test stand assembly were made with Creo 2 modeling software. Structural analysis calculations were developed by hand to confirm if the structure will hold the expected loads while optimizing support positions. These calculations when iterated through MatLab demonstrated the optimized position of the vertical support to be 98'' from the far end of the stand. All remaining deflections were shown to be under the 0.6'' requirement and internal stresses to meet NASA Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Safety Standards. Though at the time of writing, fabrication drawings have yet to be generated, but are expected shortly after.

  9. Looking northeast from Test Stand 'A' superstructure towards Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northeast from Test Stand 'A' superstructure towards Test Stand 'D' tower (4223/E-24, left background), Test Stand 'C' tower (4217/E-18, center), and Test Stand 'B' (4215/E-16, right foreground). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Environmental Systems Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, D.; Young, J.; Ewert, M.; Lee, S.; Wells, P.; Fortson, R.; Castillo, J.

    A test stand has been developed for the evaluation of prototype lighting, environmental control and crop cultivation technologies for plant production within an advanced life support system. Design of the test stand was based on preliminary designs of the center growth bay of the Biomass Production Chamber, one of several modules of the Bioregenerative Planetary Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO- Plex). It consists of two controlled-environment shelves, each with 4.7 m2 of area for crop growth (150 cm width, 315 cm length). There are two chilled water loops, one for operation at conventional temperatures (5-10C) for air temperature and humidity control and one for operation at higher temperatures (15-50C) for waste heat acquisition and heating. Modular light boxes, utilizing either air-cooled or water- jacketed HPS lamps, have been developed. This modular design will allow for easy replacement of new lighting technologies within the light banks. An advanced data acquisition and control system has been developed utilizing localized, networked- based data acquisition modules and programmed with object-based control software.

  11. The ESS Cryomodule Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, W.; Arnold, P.; Fydrych, J.; Spoelstra, H.; Wang, X. L.; Weisend, J. G., II

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is an intergovernmental project building a multidisciplinary research laboratory based upon the world's most powerful neutron source to be built in Lund, Sweden. The ESS will use a linear accelerator which will deliver protons with 5 MW of power to the target at 2.0 GeV with a nominal current of 62.5 mA. The superconducting part of the linac consists of around 150 niobium cavities cooled with superfluid helium at 2 K. The majority of these cavities are of the elliptical type. They are grouped in cryomodules that hold 4 cavities each, with beam correction optics located between the cryomodules. A dedicated cryoplant will supply the cryomodules with single phase helium through an external cryogenic distribution line. Each of the 30 cryomodules containing elliptical cavities will undergo their site acceptance tests at the ESS cryomodule test stand in Lund. This test stand will use a dedicated 4.5 K cryoplant and warm sub-atmospheric compression to supply the 2 K helium as well as the 40/50 K shield cooling. A test bunker will accommodate one elliptical cavity cryomodule at a time and provide test capacities during both the installation phase as well as later during operation.

  12. EUV Engineering Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Replogle, W.C.; Klebanoff, L.E.; Wronosky, J.B.; Hale, L.C.; Chapman, H.N.; Taylor, J.S.; Folta, J.A.; Montcalm, C.; Hudyma, R.M.

    2000-02-14

    The Engineering Test Stand (ETS) is an EUV laboratory lithography tool. The purpose of the ETS is to demonstrate EUV full-field imaging and provide data required to support production-tool development. The ETS is configured to separate the imaging system and stages from the illumination system. Environmental conditions can be controlled independently in the two modules to maximize EUV throughput and environmental control. A source of 13.4 nm radiation is provided by a laser plasma source in which a YAG laser beam is focused onto a xenon-cluster target. A condenser system, comprised of multilayer-coated mirrors and grazing-incidence mirrors, collects the EUV radiation and directs it onto a-reflecting reticle. A four-mirror, ring-field optical system, having a numerical aperture of 0.1, projects a 4x-reduction image onto the wafer plane. This design corresponds to a resolution of 70nm at a k{sub 1} of 0.52. The ETS is designed to produce full-field images in step: and-scan mode using vacuum-compatible, one-dimension-long-travel magnetically levitated stages for both reticle and wafer. Reticle protection is incorporated into the ETS design. This paper provides a system overview of the ETS design and specifications.

  13. Crush Test Abuse Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jacob; Jeevarajan, Judith; Salinas, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this system is to simulate an internal short on battery cells by causing deformation (a crushing force) in a cell without penetration. This is performed by activating a hydraulic cylinder on one side of a blast wall with a hydraulic pump located on the other. The operator can control the rate of the crush by monitoring a local pressure gauge connected to the hydraulic cylinder or a load cell digital display located at the hydraulic pump control area. The internal short simulated would be considered a worst-case scenario of a manufacturer fs defect. This is a catastrophic failure of a cell and could be a very destructive event. Fully charged cells are to have an internal short simulated at the center of the length of the cell (away from terminals). The crush can be performed with a .- to 1-in. (.0.6- to 2.5-cm) rod placed crossways to the cell axis, causing deformation of the cell without penetration. The OCV (open-circuit voltage) and temperature of the cells, as well as the pressure and crushing force, are recorded during the operation. Occurrence of an internal short accompanied by any visible physical changes such as venting, fires, or explosions is reported. Typical analytical data examined after the test would be plots of voltage, temperature, and pressure or force versus time. The rate of crushing force can be increased or decreased based on how fast the operator pumps the hydraulic pump. The size of cylinder used to compress the battery cell can be easily changed by adding larger or smaller fittings onto the end of the hydraulic cylinder based on the battery/cell size being tested. The cell is crushed remotely and videotaped, allowing the operator to closely monitor the situation from a safe distance.

  14. Simulating ion beam extraction from a single aperture triode acceleration column: A comparison of the beam transport codes IGUN and PBGUNS with test stand data

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Wills, J. S. C.; Diamond, W. T.

    2008-04-15

    Ion beam extraction from two different ion sources with single aperture triode extraction columns was simulated with the particle beam transport codes PBGUNS and IGUN. For each ion source, the simulation results are compared to experimental data generated on well-equipped test stands. Both codes reproduced the qualitative behavior of the extracted ion beams to incremental and scaled changes to the extraction electrode geometry observed on the test stands. Numerical values of optimum beam currents and beam emittance generated by the simulations also agree well with test stand data.

  15. SSRL photocathode RF gun test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M.; Baltay, M.; Boyce, A.

    1995-12-31

    A photocathode RF gun test stand designed for the production and study of high brightness electron beams will be constructed at SSRL. The beam will be generated from a laser driven third generation photocathode RF gun being developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL, and UCLA. The 3-5 [MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section, in order to achieve the desired low emittance beam, emittance compensation with solenoidal focusing will be employed.

  16. 2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST STAND REMNANTS OF BUILDING-BLANK WHITE WALL ONLY ORIGINAL REMAINS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  17. NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand Safety Note

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J W

    1998-05-21

    The NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand is to be used in the building 432. Building 432 is being used to test components and processes for NIF. The test stand is to be bolted to the floor. The test stand provides a platform from which the PEPC kinematic repeatability and vibrational characteristics of the PEPC LRU can be tested. The test stand will allow user access to the LRU to install instrumentation and to make adjustments to the kinematics. The mechanical test stand is designed to hold the 1700 lb. PEPC LRU.

  18. Solid Propellant Test Article (SPTA) Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Solid Propellant Test Article (SPTA) test stand with the Modified Nasa Motor (M-NASA) test article at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The SPTA test stand, 12-feet wide by 12-feet long by 24-feet high, was built in 1989 to provide comparative performance data on nozzle and case insulation material and to verify thermostructural analysis models. A modified NASA 48-inch solid motor (M-NASA motor) with a 12-foot blast tube and 10-inch throat makes up the SPTA. The M-NASA motor is being used to evaluate solid rocket motor internal non-asbestos insulation materials, nozzle designs, materials, and new inspection techniques. New internal motor case instrumentation techniques are also being evaluated.

  19. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  20. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees maneuver a new thrust measurement system in preparation for its installation on the A-1 Test Stand on March 3. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois and represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment used on the stand for more than 40 years. The A-1 Test Stand is being upgraded to provide testing for the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program.

  1. Automated Test Stand for HEV Capacitor Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Seiber, Larry Eugene; Armstrong, Gary

    2007-01-01

    As capacitor manufacturers race to meet the needs of the hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) of the future, many trade-offs at the system level as well as the component level must be considered. Even though the ultra-capacitor has the spot light for recent research and development (R&D) for HEVs, the electrostatic capacitor is also the subject of R&D (for HEVs as well as wireless communications). The Department of Energy has funded the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Power Electronic and Electric Machinery Research Center to develop an automated test to aid in the independent testing of prototype electrostatic capacitors. This paper describes the design and development of such a stand.

  2. 9. WEST SIDE, TEST STAND AND SUPERSTRUCTURE. TEST STAND 1B ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. WEST SIDE, TEST STAND AND SUPERSTRUCTURE. TEST STAND 1-B IN DISTANCE. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE HIGH-POWER PROTECTION MODULE TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Crofford, Mark T; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Jones, Stacey L; Hardek, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) High-Power Protection Module (HPM) provides interlocks and fast shutdown for the radio frequency (RF) system to protect the accelerating structures and high power RF (HPRF) Distribution System. The HPM has required some functional upgrades since the start of beam operations and an upgrade to the HPM test stand was required to support these added features. The HPM test stand currently verifies functionality, RF channel calibration, and measurement of the speed of shutdown to ensure the specifications are met. The upgraded test stand was implemented in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to allow for future growth and flexibility. Work is currently progressing on automation of the test stand to better perform the required module calibration schedule.

  4. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Workers erect the first fabricated steel girders to arrive at the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Steel work began at the construction site Oct. 29 and is scheduled to continue into next spring.

  5. Chirped-Standing-Wave Acceleration of Ions with Intense Lasers.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, F; Gonoskov, A; Marklund, M

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for ion acceleration based on the guided motion of electrons from a thin layer. The electron motion is locked to the moving nodes of a standing wave formed by a chirped laser pulse reflected from a mirror behind the layer. This provides a stable longitudinal field of charge separation, thus giving rise to chirped-standing-wave acceleration of the residual ions of the layer. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that stable proton beams, with energy spectra peaked around 100 MeV, are feasible for pulse energies at the level of 10 J. Moreover, a scaling law for higher laser intensities and layer densities is presented, indicating stable GeV-level energy gains of dense ion bunches, for soon-to-be-available laser intensities. PMID:27636480

  6. Chirped-Standing-Wave Acceleration of Ions with Intense Lasers.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, F; Gonoskov, A; Marklund, M

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for ion acceleration based on the guided motion of electrons from a thin layer. The electron motion is locked to the moving nodes of a standing wave formed by a chirped laser pulse reflected from a mirror behind the layer. This provides a stable longitudinal field of charge separation, thus giving rise to chirped-standing-wave acceleration of the residual ions of the layer. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that stable proton beams, with energy spectra peaked around 100 MeV, are feasible for pulse energies at the level of 10 J. Moreover, a scaling law for higher laser intensities and layer densities is presented, indicating stable GeV-level energy gains of dense ion bunches, for soon-to-be-available laser intensities.

  7. Chirped-Standing-Wave Acceleration of Ions with Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenroth, F.; Gonoskov, A.; Marklund, M.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for ion acceleration based on the guided motion of electrons from a thin layer. The electron motion is locked to the moving nodes of a standing wave formed by a chirped laser pulse reflected from a mirror behind the layer. This provides a stable longitudinal field of charge separation, thus giving rise to chirped-standing-wave acceleration of the residual ions of the layer. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that stable proton beams, with energy spectra peaked around 100 MeV, are feasible for pulse energies at the level of 10 J. Moreover, a scaling law for higher laser intensities and layer densities is presented, indicating stable GeV-level energy gains of dense ion bunches, for soon-to-be-available laser intensities.

  8. TMS delivered for A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A state-of-the-art thrust measurement system for the A-3 Test Stand under construction at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was delivered March 17. Once completed, the A-3 stand (seen in background) will allow simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program. Work on the stand began in 2007, with activation scheduled for 2012. The stand is the first major test structure to be built at Stennis since the 1960s. The recently delivered TMS was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with an accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds.

  9. SLS Test Stand Site Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Kathryn; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Test site selection is a critical element of the design, development and production of a new system. With the advent of the new Space Launch System (SLS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had a number of test site selection decisions that needed to be made early enough in the Program to support the planned Launch Readiness Date (LRD). This case study focuses on decisions that needed to be made in 2011 and 2012 in preparation for the April 2013 DPMC decision about where to execute the Main Propulsion Test that is commonly referred to as "Green Run." Those decisions relied upon cooperative analysis between the Program, the Test Lab and Center Operations. The SLS is a human spaceflight vehicle designed to carry a crew farther into space than humans have previously flown. The vehicle consists of four parts: the crew capsule, the upper stage, the core stage, and the first stage solid rocket boosters. The crew capsule carries the astronauts, while the upper stage, the core stage, and solid rocket boosters provide thrust for the vehicle. In other words, the stages provide the "lift" part of the lift vehicle. In conjunction with the solid rocket boosters, the core stage provides the initial "get-off-the-ground" thrust to the vehicle. The ignition of the four core stage engines and two solid rocket boosters is the first step in the launch portion of the mission. The solid rocket boosters burn out after about 2 minutes of flight, and are then jettisoned. The core stage provides thrust until the vehicle reaches a specific altitude and speed, at which point the core stage is shut off and jettisoned, and the upper stage provides vehicle thrust for subsequent mission trajectories. The integrated core stage primarily consists of a liquid oxygen tank, a liquid hydrogen tank, and the four core stage engines. For the SLS program, four RS-25 engines were selected as the four core stage engines. The RS-25 engine is the same engine that was used for Space

  10. 24. SATURN V Fl ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. SATURN V F-l ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND 1A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 10. "TEST STAND 15, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STAND 1-5, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. 1958. Test Area 1-115. Original is a color print, showing Test Stand 1-5 from below, also showing the superstructure of TS1-4 at left. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 31. HISTORIC VIEW OF TEST STAND NO. 1 AT PEENEMUENDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. HISTORIC VIEW OF TEST STAND NO. 1 AT PEENEMUENDE A-4 ENGINE AND ROCKET PROPULSION TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Fabricated steel began arriving by truck Oct. 24 for construction of the A-3 Test Stand that will be used to test the engine for the nation's next generation of moon rockets. Within days workers from Lafayette Steel Erector Inc. began assembling the 16 steel stages needed on the foundation and footings poured in the previous year.

  14. Study of acceleration of center of mass during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Na, Eunjin; Hwang, Hyesun; Woo, Youngkeun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the center of mass during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activities in the timed up and go test between healthy subjects and patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy participants and thirty patients with stroke volunteered for this study. Acceleration of the center of mass was measured using a wireless tri-axial accelerometer during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activities in the timed up and go test. Accelerometer data were analyzed using BTS G-studio software. [Results] The phase duration was significantly longer and the anterior-posterior, mediolateral, and vertical acceleration ranges were significantly lower during sit-to-stand for patients with stroke than for healthy controls. Further, phase duration and the mediolateral acceleration range during stand-to-sit differed significantly between healthy controls and subjects with stroke. [Conclusions] During training for the sit-to-stand activity, the focus should be all three balance dimensions, but during training for the stand-to-sit activity, the focus should be on improving mediolateral balance and asymmetrical foot positioning should be recommended. PMID:27799669

  15. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A new thrust measurement system is lifted onto the A-1 Test Stand deck at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in preparation for its installation. The new system is a state-of-the-art upgrade for the testing structure, which is being prepared for testing of next-generation rocket engines. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois at a cost of about $3.5 million.

  16. Airvolt Aircraft Electric Propulsion Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuel, Aamod; Lin, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Development of an electric propulsion test stand that collects high-fidelity data of motor, inverter, and battery system efficiencies; thermal dynamics; and acoustics independent of manufacturer reported values will improve understanding of electric propulsion systems to be used in future aircraft. A buildup approach to this development reveals new areas of research and best practices in testing, and attempts to establish a standard for testing these systems.

  17. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center complete installation of the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand. The new TMS is a state-of-the-art upgrade from the previous system, which was installed when the testing structure was built in the 1960s. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds. It also will allow engineers to measure thrust as they gimbal (or tilt) engines during tests. The new TMS is part of upgrades for the A-1 Test Stand in preparation for testing the next generation of American space program rocket engines.

  18. PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT THE TEST STAND, NOTE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT THE TEST STAND, NOTE THE SERVICE AND SUPPORT BUILDINGS TO THE LEFT AND RIGHT OF THE TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Evaluation of standing vertical jump by ankles acceleration measurement.

    PubMed

    Quagliarella, Livio; Sasanelli, Nicola; Belgiovine, Giuseppe; Moretti, Lorenzo; Moretti, Biagio

    2010-05-01

    The use of accelerometers is discussed to evaluate standing vertical jump. Two accelerometers, mounted on each ankle and connected to a wearable system, were used for signal acquisition, and a piezoelectric platform was used to verify the results. Fifty-one subjects were enrolled, subdivided into a group of healthy subjects and 2 groups who had different surgery for Achilles tendon rupture. Each subject performed 5 countermovement and 5 squat jumps; 11 subjects also performed 5 countermovement jumps with voluntary leg rotations during the flight phase. A training set was used to assess signal processing, and a validation set was used to verify its accuracy. A peak detection algorithm was developed to quantify flight time from the acceleration modulus, and its results were compared with platform data. The Pearson correlation coefficient of ankle accelerations and the integral of each signal were adopted to describe, respectively, the movement coordination and the limbs rotation during the flight time. The flight times obtained from the accelerometers and force plate were highly correlated (Spearman's coefficient >0.95); they were compared, for each jump, and the maximum mean error, for subject, was 4.8%. The movement coordination was in good agreement with subjects' clinical features and with the different jump phases. The signal integral presented significant differences, among jumps, related to leg rotations (p < 0.0005). The method proposed allows the monitoring of standing vertical jump using the fight time and gives information on the legs coordination and on the motor strategies of the lower limbs. Therefore, it can be used to obtain performance reference also outside labs, both in clinical and sport settings.

  20. Center of pressure velocity reflects body acceleration rather than body velocity during quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Abe, Masaki O; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the center of pressure (COP) velocity reflects the center of mass (COM) acceleration due to a large derivative gain in the neural control system during quiet standing. Twenty-seven young (27.2±4.5 years) and twenty-three elderly (66.2±5.0 years) subjects participated in this study. Each subject was requested to stand quietly on a force plate for five trials, each 90 s long. The COP and COM displacements, the COP and COM velocities, and the COM acceleration were acquired via a force plate and a laser displacement sensor. The amount of fluctuation of each variable was quantified using the root mean square. Following the experimental study, a simulation study was executed to investigate the experimental findings. The experimental results revealed that the COP velocity was correlated with the COM velocity, but more highly correlated with the COM acceleration. The equation of motion of the inverted pendulum model, however, accounts only for the correlation between the COP and COM velocities. These experimental results can be meaningfully explained by the simulation study, which indicated that the neural motor command presumably contains a significant portion that is proportional to body velocity. In conclusion, the COP velocity fluctuation reflects the COM acceleration fluctuation rather than the COM velocity fluctuation, implying that the neural motor command controlling quiet standing posture contains a significant portion that is proportional to body velocity.

  1. 5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST SIDE, TEST STAND AND ITS SUPERSTRUCTURE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 22. DETAIL, TWO LIGHTING TYPES AT REAR OF TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL, TWO LIGHTING TYPES AT REAR OF TEST STAND 1-A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 43. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH A REDSTONE ROCKET BEING FUELED AND PREPARED FOR TESTING. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  4. 51. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH THE MERCURY REDSTONE ROCKET FULLY ASSEMBLED AND BEING PREPARED FOR TESTING. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. 1. VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT TO RIGHT COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHEAST, LEFT TO RIGHT COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND COLD CALIBRATION BLOCKHOUSE IN FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  6. 13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photographic copy of site plan displaying Test Stand 'C' (4217/E-18), Test Stand 'D' (4223/E-24), and Control and Recording Center (4221/E-22) with ancillary structures, and connecting roads and services. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Facilities Engineering and Construction Office 'Repairs to Test Stand 'C,' Edwards Test Station, Legend & Site Plan M-1,' drawing no. ESP/115, August 14, 1987. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of site plan for proposed Test Stand "D" in 1958. The contemporary site plans of test stands "A," "B," and "C" are also visible, along with the interconnecting tunnel system. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering "Site Plan for Proposed Test Stand "D" - Edwards Test Station," drawing no. ESP/22-0, 14 November 1958 - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 1. Photographic copy of original engineering drawing for Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of original engineering drawing for Test Stand 'C.' California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Plant Engineering 'New Test Stand Plan -- Edwards Test Station' drawing no. E18/2-3, 18 January 1957. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand C, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 38. HISTORIC CLOSER VIEW LOOKING WEST OF THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. HISTORIC CLOSER VIEW LOOKING WEST OF THE TEST STAND AND ROCKET DURING TEST FIRING NUMBER 10. NOTE THE NUMBER ALONG THE TOP RAIL OF THE STAND JUST TO THE RIGHT OF THE ROCKET, THIS NUMBER INDICATES WHAT NUMBER TEST IS BEING CONDUCTED. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. View looking northeast at Test Stand 'A' complex from road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking northeast at Test Stand 'A' complex from road, showing Test Stand 'A' test tower (Building 4202/E-3) in left background, Monitor Building 4203/E-4 in right foreground, and barrier (Building 4216/E-17) behind 4203/E-4. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. View east northeast at Test Stand 'A' complex from road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east northeast at Test Stand 'A' complex from road, showing Test Stand 'C' test tower in left background (Building 4217/E-18). Curved I-beam labeled '3-ton' is for small traveling hoist. Fuel tanks, propellant lines, and control panels have been removed from tower. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 45. HISTORIC AERIAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. HISTORIC AERIAL VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND AND THE SURROUNDING ELECTRONICS AND EQUIPMENT TRAILERS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. 2. View looking west southwest at Test Stand 'A' complex. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View looking west southwest at Test Stand 'A' complex. Monitor Building 4203/E-4 is hidden behind barrier (4216/E-17). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Control Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down into vertical flame channel of Test Stand 'A' from superstructure. Wooden platform open side faces west. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fernow, R.C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.; Jialin, Xie; Kirk, H.G.; Parsa, Z.; Palmer, R.B.; Rao, T.; Rogers, J.; Sheehan, J.; Tsang, T.Y.F.; Ulc, S.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Woodle, M.; Zhang, R.S. ); McDonald, K.T.; Russell, D.P. ); Jiang, Z.Y. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (Un

    1990-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), presently under construction at Brookhaven National laboratory, is described. It consists of a 50-MeV electron beam synchronizable to a high-peak power CO{sub 2} laser. The interaction of electrons with the laser field will be probed, with some emphasis on exploring laser-based acceleration techniques. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  16. View looking west at Test Stand 'A' complex in morning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking west at Test Stand 'A' complex in morning sun. View shows Monitor Building 4203/E-4 at left, barrier (Building 4216/E-17) to right of 4203/E-4, and Test Stand 'A' tower. Attached structure to lower left of tower is Test Stand 'A' machine room which contained refrigeration equipment. Building in right background with Test Stand 'A' tower shadow on it is Assembly Building 4288/E-89, built in 1984. Row of ground-mounted brackets in foreground was used to carry electrical cable and/or fuel lines. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. F-15B ACTIVE test stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This November 13, 1995, photograph of the underside of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept. The twin-engine F-15 research aircraft is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. They give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. Ground testing during the first two weeks of November 1995 went well, and flight tests began in March 1996. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.

  18. Accelerated testing of space batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, J.; Thomas, R. E.; Waite, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    An accelerated life test program for space batteries is presented that fully satisfies empirical, statistical, and physical criteria for validity. The program includes thermal and other nonmechanical stress analyses as well as mechanical stress, strain, and rate of strain measurements.

  19. Commercialization of an S-band standing-wave electron accelerator for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jin-Hyeok; Kwak, Gyeong-Il; Han, Jae-Ik; Lee, Gyu-Baek; Jeon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Young; Hwang, Cheol-Bin; Lee, Gi-Yong; Kim, Young-Man; Park, Sung-Ju

    2016-09-01

    An electron accelerator system has been developed for use in industrial, as well as possible medical, applications. Based on our experiences achieved during prototype system development and various electron beam acceleration tests, we have built a stable and compact system for sales purposes. We have integrated a self-developed accelerating cavity, an E-gun pulse driver, a radio-frequency (RF) power system, a vacuum system, a cooling system, etc. into a frame with a size of 1800 × 1000 × 1500 mm3. The accelerating structure is a side-coupled standing-wave type operating in the π/2 mode (tuned to~3 GHz). The RF power is provided by using a magnetron driven by a solid-state modulator. The electron gun is a triode type with a dispenser cathode (diameter of 11 mm). The system is capable of delivering a maximum 900-W average electron beam power with tight focusing at the target. Until now, we have performed various electron beam tests and X-ray beam tests after having built the system, have completed the beam assessment for commercializations, and have been preparing full-fledged sales activity. This article reports on our system development processes and on some of our early test results for commercializations.

  20. Accelerated Test Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Ralph

    1995-01-01

    Neural network systems were evaluated for use in predicting wear of mechanical systems. Three different neural network software simulation packages were utilized in order to create models of tribological wear tests. Representative simple, medium, and high complexity simulation packages were selected. Pin-on-disk, rub shoe, and four-ball tribological test data was used for training, testing, and verification of the neural network models. Results showed mixed success. The neural networks were able to predict results with some accuracy if the number of input variables was low or the amount of training data was high. Increased neural network complexity resulted in more accurate results, however there was a point of diminishing return. Medium complexity models were the best trade off between accuracy and computing time requirements. A NASA Technical Memorandum and a Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers paper are being published which detail the work.

  1. Credit BG. View looking southwest at Test Stand "D" complex. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. View looking southwest at Test Stand "D" complex. In the background at left is the Steam Generator Plant 4280/E-81 built in 1972 to house four gas-fired Clayton flash boilers. The boilers were later supplemented by the electrically heated steam accumulator (sphere) to supply steam to the various ejectors at Test Stand "D" vacuum test cells - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  3. 1. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST ¼ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST ¼ OF THE X-15 ENGINE TEST COMPLEX. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. CLOSEUP VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE SATURN I TEST STAND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE SATURN I TEST STAND, NOTE THE INTERPRETIVE SIGN EXPLAINING THE HISTORIC NATURE OF THE SATURN I TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand "D" from Test Stand "A" while a rocket engine test is in progress. Cloud of steam is from partly from water created by propellant reaction and from water sprayed by flame bucket into engine exhaust for cooling purposes. A portion of Test Stand "C" is visible at the far right. (JPL negative no. 384-2082-B, 23 October 1959) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Accelerated Testing Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; James, Greg; Davey, John; Langlois, David; Torraco, Dennis; Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z; Borup, Rodney L.

    2011-07-01

    The DOE Fuel Cell technical team recommended ASTs were performed on 2 different MEAs (designated P5 and HD6) from Ballard Power Systems. These MEAs were also incorporated into stacks and operated in fuel cell bus modules that were either operated in the field (three P5 buses) in Hamburg, or on an Orange county transit authority drive cycle in the laboratory (HD6 bus module). Qualitative agreement was found in the degradation mechanisms and rates observed in the AST and in the field. The HD6 based MEAs exhibited lower voltage degradation rates (due to catalyst corrosion) and slower membrane degradation rates in the field as reflected by their superior performance in the high potential hold and open-circuit potential AST tests. The quantitative correlation of the degradation rates will have to take into account the various stressors in the field including temperature, relative humidity, start/stops and voltage cycles.

  7. 40. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST STAND DURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT THE STATIC TEST STAND DURING A TEST OF AN F-1 ENGINE, DATE AND PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN, MSFC PHOTO LAB. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. Three-dimensional simulation analysis of the standing-wave free- electron laser two beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Sessler, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have modified a two-dimensional relativistic klystron code, developed by Ryne and Yu, to simulate both the standing-wave free- electron laser two-beam accelerator and the relativistic klystron two- beam accelerator. In this paper, the code is used to study a standing-wave free-electron laser with three cavities. The effect of the radius of the electron beam on the RF output power; namely, a three-dimensional effect is examined.

  9. Detail of north side of Test Stand 'A' base, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of north side of Test Stand 'A' base, showing tanks for distilled water (left), fuel (center), and gaseous nitrogen (right). Other tanks present for tests were removed before this image was taken. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. 9. BUILDING 8769, EAST REAR AND NORTH SIDE, TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BUILDING 8769, EAST REAR AND NORTH SIDE, TEST STAND AT RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 3. BUILDING 8767, NORTH REAR AND WEST SIDE, TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. BUILDING 8767, NORTH REAR AND WEST SIDE, TEST STAND 1-A AT FAR RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 5. BUILDING 8768, SOUTH SIDE AND EAST REAR. TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. BUILDING 8768, SOUTH SIDE AND EAST REAR. TEST STAND 1A AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 8. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE POWER PLANT TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE POWER PLANT TEST STAND DURING AN ENGINE FIRING. DATE UNKNOWN, FRED ORDWAY COLLECTION, U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER, HUNTSVILLE, AL. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. 2. SOUTH REAR. TEST STAND 15 DECK AT LEFT; COVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTH REAR. TEST STAND 1-5 DECK AT LEFT; COVERED TANKS (BUILDING 8649) AT RIGHT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Shop Building for Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  15. 44. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND AND ROCKET BEING PREPARED FOR TESTING. NOTE THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS ABOVE THE ROCKET AND THE EQUIPMENT PLATFORM TO THE LEFT OF THE LOAD CELL HAVE BEEN ENCLOSED FOR PROTECTION FROM THE CLIMATE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  16. Credit BG. View looking west down into Test Stand "D" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. View looking west down into Test Stand "D" vertical vacuum cell with top removed. Access to cell is normally through large round port seen in view. Piping and cradling toward bottom of cell was last used in tests of Viking space probe engines - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 7. ROCKET SLED ON DECK OF TEST STAND 15. Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ROCKET SLED ON DECK OF TEST STAND 1-5. Photo no. "6085, G-EAFB-16 SEP 52." Looking south to machine shop. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 2. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, SHOWING TANK (BUILDING 1929) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ROCKET ENGINE TEST STAND, SHOWING TANK (BUILDING 1929) AND GARAGE (BUILDING 1930) AT LEFT REAR. Looking to west. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 37. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST OF TEST STAND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING WEST OF TEST STAND AND ROCKET DURING TEST FIRING NUMBER 2. NOTE THE FLAME BEING EMITTED FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE ROCKET. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  20. 3. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'B' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'B' during setup for an engine test, looking northwest. (JPL negative no. 384-9432, 1 May 1972) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand B, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 49. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. HISTORIC GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT THE TEST STAND IN ITS CONFIGURATION FOR THE MERCURY-REDSTONE TESTING PROGRAM. NOTE THE MERCURY CAPSULE BEING ASSEMBLED IN THE FOREGROUND, ALSO NOTE THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS ON THE GROUND IN THE RIGHT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. 21. Building 202, underside of test stand A, detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Building 202, underside of test stand A, detail of junction of scrubber structure and test stand with water pipes and valves visible. View looking southeast. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Designing Accelerated Tests Of Electromigration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.

    1991-01-01

    Method for design of accelerated tests of electromigration (as in microscopic conductors in integrated circuits) based partly on simplified mathematical model of electromigration and partly on error analysis. Objective to determine quickly operating life of tested components under normal operating conditions by extrapolation from lifetime measurements at operating stresses greater than normal. Involves compromise between reducing testing time by increasing stresses and reducing uncertainty in extrapolated lifetime by decreasing stresses.

  4. 25. STATIC TEST TOWER WEST SIDE STANDING ON FLAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. STATIC TEST TOWER WEST SIDE - STANDING ON FLAME DEFLECTOR GRILL LOOKING UP TOWARDS F-1 ENGINE SET UP. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Credit BG. View west of Test Stand "D" complex, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. View west of Test Stand "D" complex, with ends of Dd (left) and Dy (right) station ejectors in view. Steam piping from accumulator (sphere) to ejectors is apparent; long horizontal loops in the pipes permit expansion and contraction without special joints. The small platform straddling the Dd ejector (near the accumulator) was originally constructed for a "Hyprox" steam generator which supplied steam to the Dd ejector before the accumulator and Dy stand were built. Note ejectors on top of interstage condenser in Test Stand "D" tower. Metal shed in far right background is for storage - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Stand for testing the electrical race car engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, M.; Franiasz, J.; Mierzwa, P.; Wylenzek, D.

    2015-11-01

    An engine test stand created especially for research of electrical race car is described in the paper. The car is an aim of Silesian Greenpower project whose participants build and test electrical vehicles to take part in international races in Great Britain. The engine test stand is used to test and measure the characteristics of vehicles and their engines. It has been designed particularly to test the electric cars engineered by students of Silesian Greenpower project. The article contains a description how the test stand works and shows its versatility in many areas. The paper presents both construction of the test stand, control system and sample results of conducted research. The engine test stand was designed and modified using PLM Siemens NX 8.5. The construction of the test stand is highly modular, which means it can be used both for testing the vehicle itself or for tests without the vehicle. The test stand has its own wheel, motor, powertrain and braking system with second engine. Such solution enables verifying various concepts without changing the construction of the vehicle. The control system and measurement system are realized by enabling National Instruments product myRIO (RIO - Reconfigurable Input/Output). This controller in combination with powerful LabVIEW environment performs as an advanced tool to control torque and speed simultaneously. It is crucial as far as the test stand is equipped in two motors - the one being tested and the braking one. The feedback loop is realized by an optical encoder cooperating with the rotor mounted on the wheel. The results of tests are shown live on the screen both as a chart and as single values. After performing several tests there is a report generated. The engine test stand is widely used during process of the Silesian Greenpower vehicle design. Its versatility enables powertrain testing, wheels and tires tests, thermal analysis and more.

  7. Membrane Degradation Accelerated Stress Test

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.

    2015-01-21

    These are a set of slides that deal with membrane degradation accelerated stress test. Specifically, the following topics are covered: membrane degradation FCTT drive cycle; membrane ASTs; current membrane ASTs damage mechanisms; proposed membrane AST, RH cycling in H2/Air; current proposed AST; 2min/2min AST damage mechanism; 30sec/45sec RH cycling at OCV.

  8. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  9. 39. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND WITH THE COLD CALIBRATION TOWER CONSTRUCTED TO THE LEFT OF THE ROCKET AND AN ACCESS PLATFORM BUILT TO REACH THE TOP OF THE ROCKET MORE EASILY. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. 1. Credit GE. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'A' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Credit GE. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'A' reinforced concrete foundation under construction as seen from the southeast. Formwork is being removed as refractory brick lining is being laid in flame pit at the center. (JPL negative no. 383-763, 8 March 1945) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 22. HISTORIC VIEW OF EARLY TEST STAND IN GERMANY PERHAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. HISTORIC VIEW OF EARLY TEST STAND IN GERMANY PERHAPS THE ENGINE IS FOR THE VFR'S (VEREIN FUER RAUMSCHIFFAHRT) 4 STICK REPULSOR. ENGINE IN PHOTOS IS BEING TANKED WITH LOX (NOTICE THE FROST FORMING AT THE BOTTOM OF THE TANK BEHIND THE LADDER. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  12. 4. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'B' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, test Stand 'B' set up for shock tube and research on ship-to-ship fueling problems for the U.S. Coast Guard. (JPL negative no. 344-3743-A, October or November 1980) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand B, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. A cryogenic test stand for large superconducting solenoid magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Nogiec, J.; Orris, D.; Soyars, W.; Sylvester, C.

    2014-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) has been designed, installed, and operated. This test stand is being used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab μ2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  14. A Cryogenic Test Stand for Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Nogiec, J.; Orris, D.; Soyars, W.; Sylvester, C.

    2013-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquifier (CHL) has been designed, and operated. This test stand has been used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab mu2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  15. Down force calibration stand test report

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-08-13

    The Down Force Calibration Stand was developed to provide an improved means of calibrating equipment used to apply, display and record Core Sample Truck (CST) down force. Originally, four springs were used in parallel to provide a system of resistance that allowed increasing force over increasing displacement. This spring system, though originally deemed adequate, was eventually found to be unstable laterally. For this reason, it was determined that a new method for resisting down force was needed.

  16. 10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  17. 7. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  18. 5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING PROPELLER TEST STAND AND BOMB BAYS. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  19. Credit BG. Test Stand "D" tower as seen looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Test Stand "D" tower as seen looking northeast (See caption for CA-163-F-18). To the right of the view is the stainless steel dome top for Dv Cell (see CA-163-F-22 for view into cell), behind which rests a spherical accumulator--an electrically heated steam generator for powering the vacuum system at "C" and Test Stand "D." Part of the ejector system can be seen on the right corner of the tower, other connections include electrical ducts (thin, flat metal members) and fire protection systems. Note the stand in the foreground with lights used to indicate safety status of the stand during tests - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. Testing the stand-alone microbeam at Columbia University.

    PubMed

    Garty, G; Ross, G J; Bigelow, A W; Randers-Pehrson, G; Brenner, D J

    2006-01-01

    The stand-alone microbeam at Columbia University presents a novel approach to biological microbeam irradiation studies. Foregoing a conventional accelerator as a source of energetic ions, a small, high-specific-activity, alpha emitter is used. Alpha particles emitted from this source are focused using a compound magnetic lens consisting of 24 permanent magnets arranged in two quadrupole triplets. Using a 'home made' 6.5 mCi polonium source, a 1 alpha particle s(-1), 10 microm diameter microbeam can, in principle, be realised. As the alpha source energy is constant, once the microbeam has been set up, no further adjustments are necessary apart from a periodic replacement of the source. The use of permanent magnets eliminates the need for bulky power supplies and cooling systems required by other types of ion lenses and greatly simplifies operation. It also makes the microbeam simple and cheap enough to be realised in any large lab. The Microbeam design as well as first tests of its performance, using an accelerator-based beam are presented here.

  1. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view of Test Stand "D" from the south with tower ejector system in operation during a 1972 engine test. Note steam evolving from Z-stage ejectors atop the interstage condenser in the tower. Note also the "Hyprox" steam generator straddling the Dd ejector train to the right. The new Dy horizontal train has not been erected as of this date. In the distance is Test Stand "E." (JPL negative no. 384-9766-AC, 28 November 1972) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. Cold test results of a standing wave muffin-tin structure at X-band

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.J.; Hanna, S.M.; Henke, H.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.; Whittum, D.

    1996-11-01

    A muffin-tin structure is chosen to study high gradient acceleration in the millimeter wavelength range. In order to understand the electromagnetic field characteristics, a standing wave structure operating at a frequency around 11.4 GHz was built. Cold test measurements were performed and results are presented. Comparisons with theoretical predictions based on computer simulation are shown.

  3. 27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL FRAMING ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. ENG-04353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 27 of 148; file no. 1320/78. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, Rev. B; date: 15 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. OC1-55-72-(Rev.); Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 43 of 148; file no. AF 1320/94, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 41 of 148; file no. 1320/92, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 11. "INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, EQUIPMENT LOCATION, TEST STAND TERMINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, EQUIPMENT LOCATION, TEST STAND TERMINAL ROOM, PLANS AND SECTION." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 106 of 148; file no. 1321/57. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 8. "TEST STAND, ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANS AND SCHEDULES." Specifications No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. "TEST STAND, ARCHITECTURAL, FLOOR PLANS AND SCHEDULES." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 22 of 148; file no. 1320/73. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. 40. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. HISTORIC VIEW LOOKING WEST AT THE TEST STAND. NOTE THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS LOCATED ABOVE THE ROCKET. THE SPACE BETWEEN THE BOTTOM OF THE LOAD CELL APPARATUS AND THE TOP OF THE ROCKET IS THE DIFFERENCE IN SIZE BETWEEN THE REDSTONE ROCKET AND ITS DECEDENT THE JUPITER C ROCKET. THE GAP IS FILLED WITH A SPACER WHEN THEY TEST A REDSTONE ROCKET. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. Water tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A water tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen water, liquid oxygen (LOX) and isopropyl alcohol (IPA) tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  10. Liquid oxygen tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    A liquid oxygen (LOX) tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen LOX, isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and water tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  11. 3. "TEST STAND NO. 13, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-0906; no sheet number within title block; D.O. SERIES 1109/10. Stamped: AS BUILT. No revisions or revision dates. Last work date on this drawing "Checked by EAG, 1/31/49." Though this drawing is specific to Test Stand 1-3, it also illustrates the general methods used for excavation design and retaining wall construction at Test Stand 1-5. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Isopropyl alcohol tank installed at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    An isopropyl alcohol (IPA) tank is lifted into place at the A-3 Test Stand being built at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Fourteen IPA, water and liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks are being installed to support the chemical steam generators to be used on the A-3 Test Stand. The IPA and LOX tanks will provide fuel for the generators. The water will allow the generators to produce steam that will be used to reduce pressure inside the stand's test cell diffuser, enabling operators to simulate altitudes up to 100,000 feet. In that way, operators can perform the tests needed on rocket engines being built to carry humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. The A-3 Test Stand is set for completion and activation in 2011.

  13. 1. TEST STAND 1A ENVIRONS, SHOWING WEST SIDE OF TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TEST STAND 1-A ENVIRONS, SHOWING WEST SIDE OF TEST STAND 1-A, RP1 COMBINED FUEL STORAGE TANK FARM BELOW WATER TANKS ON HILLSIDE TO LEFT, AND TEST STAND 1-B IN DISTANCE AT RIGHT. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 24. Photocopy of engineering drawing. CAPTIVE TEST STANDS AT PADS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of engineering drawing. CAPTIVE TEST STANDS AT PADS 17A AND 17B-FLAME DEFLECTOR PIPING, MAY 1956. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. 6. VIEW OF FLAME DEFLECTOR DIRECTLY UNDER CAPTIVE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF FLAME DEFLECTOR DIRECTLY UNDER CAPTIVE TEST STAND WITH MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE IN BACKGROUND; VIEW TO WEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. Engineers conduct key water test for A-3 stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Water cascades from the A-2 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center as engineers challenge the limits of the high-pressure water system as part of the preparation process for the A-3 Test Stand under construction. Jeff Henderson, test director for Stennis' A Complex, led a series of tests Nov. 16-20, flowing water simultaneously on the A-1 and A-2 stands, followed by the A-1 and B-1 stands, to determine if the high-pressure industrial water facility pumps and the existing pipe system can support the needs of the A-3 stand. The stand is being built to test rocket engines that will carry astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit and will need about 300,000 gallons of water per minute when operating, but the Stennis system never had been tested to that level. The recent tests were successful in showing the water facility pumps can operate at that capacity - reaching 318,000 gallons per minute in one instance. However, officials continue to analyze data to determine if the system can provide the necessary pressure at that capacity and if the delivery system piping is adequate. 'We just think if there's a problem, it's better to identify and address it now rather than when A-3 is finished and it has to be dealt with,' Henderson said.

  17. Credit BG. West elevation of Test Stand "D" tower, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. West elevation of Test Stand "D" tower, with workshop on left, and tunnel entrance at right. Tower is accessed by exterior steel stairway; the vertical vacuum cell (Dv Cell) is obscured behind large square sunscreen. Below the sunscreen can be seen the end of the horizontal vacuum duct leading from the vacuum cell - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AWAY FROM THE SATURN I TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING NORTH AWAY FROM THE SATURN I TEST STAND LOOKING AT THE OBSERVATION AND CONTROL BUNKER. NOTE THE SATURN V AND SATURN I STRUCTURAL TEST FACILITIES IN THE BACKGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. Diagnosis: genetic testing cannot stand alone.

    PubMed

    Morales-Peralta, Estela

    2014-01-01

    Genetic testing uses advanced laboratory techniques to identify protein alterations, certain metabolites, chromosomes, or nucleic acids by which a genotype is determined or inferred. These tests provide insights into the molecular basis and physiopathology of genetic diseases, information which is critical for prevention, treatment and genetic counseling. Initiated in 1982, Cuba's National Program for Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of Birth Defects and Hereditary Diseases ensures availability of genetic tests to all Cubans who need them, free of charge, assisting physician-patient decisions. The tests may be used to confirm diagnoses, point to hereditary diseases and potential congenital problems during pregnancy or in pre-symptomatic stages, and diagnose carriers of recessive diseases.

  20. An overview of the new test stand for H⁻ ion sources at FNAL.

    PubMed

    Sosa, A; Bollinger, D S; Duel, K; Karns, P R; Pellico, W; Tan, C Y

    2016-02-01

    A new test stand at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is being constructed to carry out experiments to develop and upgrade the present magnetron-type sources of H(-) ions of up to 80 mA at 35 keV in the context of the Proton Improvement Plan. The aim of this plan is to provide high-power proton beams for the experiments at FNAL. The technical details of the construction and layout of this test stand are presented, along with a prospective set of diagnostics to monitor the sources. PMID:26931987

  1. Accelerated life testing of spacecraft subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiksten, D.; Swanson, J.

    1972-01-01

    The rationale and requirements for conducting accelerated life tests on electronic subsystems of spacecraft are presented. A method for applying data on the reliability and temperature sensitivity of the parts contained in a sybsystem to the selection of accelerated life test parameters is described. Additional considerations affecting the formulation of test requirements are identified, and practical limitations of accelerated aging are described.

  2. Accelerated testing of space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, S. Frank; Heshmat, Hooshang

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of various existing life prediction techniques used for a wide range of space mechanisms. Life prediction techniques utilized in other non-space fields such as turbine engine design are also reviewed for applicability to many space mechanism issues. The development of new concepts on how various tribological processes are involved in the life of the complex mechanisms used for space applications are examined. A 'roadmap' for the complete implementation of a tribological prediction approach for complex mechanical systems including standard procedures for test planning, analytical models for life prediction and experimental verification of the life prediction and accelerated testing techniques are discussed. A plan is presented to demonstrate a method for predicting the life and/or performance of a selected space mechanism mechanical component.

  3. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph taken April 17, 1963, gives a look at the four tower legs of the S-IC test stand at their completed height.

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken from ground level on May 7, 1963, gives a close look at one of the four towers legs of the S-IC test stand nearing its completed height.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photograph, taken April 4, 1963, gives a close up look at the ever-growing four towers of the S-IC Test Stand.

  6. 1. BUILDING 8698, TEST STAND 13, WEST ELEVATION. NOTE TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. BUILDING 8698, TEST STAND 1-3, WEST ELEVATION. NOTE TUNNEL BETWEEN BLDG. 8668 AND TEST STAND 1-3. TEST AREA 1-120 IN THE MIDDLE DISTANCE, AND TEST AREA 1-125 ON THE HORIZON. Looking northeast from the roof of Building 8668, Instrumentation and Control Center. Note: Photograph CA-236-F-2 is an 8" x 10" enlargement from a 4" x 5" negative. This view is a photocopy of a recent resin coated print made from a print held at the Main Base History Office, Edwards Air Force Base, California. Photographer unknown. Date and file number unknown. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Jeffrey; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery

    2010-11-04

    We are investigating a standing wave structure with an rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  8. Relationship between joint motion and acceleration during single-leg standing in healthy male adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yota; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Nakazawa, Rie; Shirakura, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between acceleration and joint movement by synchronizing accelerometers and a three-dimensional motion analysis system, and to show the utility of an accelerometer as a postural control assessment tool. [Subjects and Methods] Head, lumbar, shank accelerations and various joint angles during single-leg standing were measured of 20 healthy males. Root mean squares of acceleration and joint angle were calculated. Fast Fourier transform analysis was performed for head, lumbar, and shank accelerations, and the median frequencies were calculated. Then, principal component analysis was performed for the median frequency of each acceleration. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was also used to examine the relationship between joint angle and acceleration. [Results] The score of the first principal component was highest for shank acceleration, while that of the second principal component was highest for lumbar and head accelerations. In multiple regression analysis, hip flexion/extension and adduction/abduction were identified as variables associated with head acceleration. [Conclusion] We were able to confirm the aggregation of acceleration into two components, which we interpreted as postural control strategies using primarily the ankle and hip joints. Furthermore, though multiple regression analysis, we were able to clarify the joint movement indicated by acceleration of each segment. PMID:25995600

  9. 35. Historic photo of Building 202 test stand with damage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Historic photo of Building 202 test stand with damage to twenty-thousand-pound-thrust rocket engine related to failure during testing, September 16, 1958. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-48704. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. 29. Historic view of twentythousandpound rocket test stand with engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Historic view of twenty-thousand-pound rocket test stand with engine installation in test cell of Building 202, September 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45870. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. 30. Historic view of twentythousandpound rocket test stand with engine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Historic view of twenty-thousand-pound rocket test stand with engine installation in test cell of Building 202, looking down from elevated location, September 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-45872. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. 30. SKETCH OF THE PROPOSED TEST STAND FOR THE ORDNANCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. SKETCH OF THE PROPOSED TEST STAND FOR THE ORDNANCE GUIDED MISSILE CENTER AT REDSTONE ARSENAL (PRE-DATING NASA). JUNE, 1951, HANS LUEHRSEN COLLECTION, MSFC MASTER PLANNING OFFICE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  14. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  15. Construction Progress of S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast east was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. This photograph of the Pump House area was taken August 13, 1963. The massive round water storage tanks can be seen to the left of

  16. 12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/16, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 14. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; MISCELLANEOUS DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/22, Rev. D. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. D, no change; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/18, Rev. D. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. D, no change; Date: 18 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/14, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/15, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG 04-35350-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/13. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, no change; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. 16. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/35, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. A; Date: 29 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 6. "TEST STAND NO. 13, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS & ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/20, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 4. "TEST STAND NO. 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/12 REV. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 15. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; STRUCTURAL STEEL; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; STRUCTURAL STEEL; PLAN & DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/34, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. A, no change; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 31. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with rocket engine, November 19, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA GRC photo number C-46491. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. 32. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Historic view of Building 202 test stand A with rocket engine, close-up detail of engine, November 19, 1957. On file at NASA Plumbrook Research Center, Sandusky, Ohio. NASA photo number C-46492. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. 25. "TEST STAND 1A UTILIZED TO TEST THE ATLAS ICBM", ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. "TEST STAND 1-A UTILIZED TO TEST THE ATLAS ICBM", CROPPED OUT: "DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB." Photo no. 11,371 57; G-AFFTC 15 OCT 57. Looking southwest from below the stand. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Interjoint dynamic interaction during constrained human quiet standing examined by induced acceleration analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Shun; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that human quiet standing is a multijoint movement, whereby the central nervous system (CNS) is required to deal with dynamic interactions among the joints to achieve optimal motor performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the CNS deals with such interjoint interaction during quiet standing by examining the relationship between the kinetics (torque) and kinematics (angular acceleration) within the multi-degree of freedom system. We modeled quiet standing as a double-link inverted pendulum involving both ankle and hip joints and conducted an "induced acceleration analysis." We found that the net ankle and hip torques induced angular accelerations of comparable magnitudes to the ankle (3.8 ± 1.4°/s(2) and 3.3 ± 1.2°/s(2)) and hip (9.1 ± 3.2°/s(2) and 10.5 ± 3.5°/s(2)) joints, respectively. Angular accelerations induced by the net ankle and hip torques were modulated in a temporally antiphase pattern to one another in each of the two joints. These quantitative and temporal relationships allowed the angular accelerations induced by the two net torques to countercompensate one another, thereby substantially (∼70%) reducing the resultant angular accelerations of the individual joints. These results suggest that, by taking advantage of the interjoint interaction, the CNS prevents the net torques from producing large amplitudes of the resultant angular accelerations when combined with the kinematic effects of all other torques in the chain.

  10. Interjoint dynamic interaction during constrained human quiet standing examined by induced acceleration analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Shun; Shinya, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that human quiet standing is a multijoint movement, whereby the central nervous system (CNS) is required to deal with dynamic interactions among the joints to achieve optimal motor performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the CNS deals with such interjoint interaction during quiet standing by examining the relationship between the kinetics (torque) and kinematics (angular acceleration) within the multi-degree of freedom system. We modeled quiet standing as a double-link inverted pendulum involving both ankle and hip joints and conducted an "induced acceleration analysis." We found that the net ankle and hip torques induced angular accelerations of comparable magnitudes to the ankle (3.8 ± 1.4°/s(2) and 3.3 ± 1.2°/s(2)) and hip (9.1 ± 3.2°/s(2) and 10.5 ± 3.5°/s(2)) joints, respectively. Angular accelerations induced by the net ankle and hip torques were modulated in a temporally antiphase pattern to one another in each of the two joints. These quantitative and temporal relationships allowed the angular accelerations induced by the two net torques to countercompensate one another, thereby substantially (∼70%) reducing the resultant angular accelerations of the individual joints. These results suggest that, by taking advantage of the interjoint interaction, the CNS prevents the net torques from producing large amplitudes of the resultant angular accelerations when combined with the kinematic effects of all other torques in the chain. PMID:24089399

  11. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes > 1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa ("displacement-per-atom", the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  12. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  13. Inflight exercise affects stand test responses after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M.; Moore, A. D. Jr; Fritsch-Yelle, J. M.; Greenisen, M. C.; Schneider, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crew members during short-duration space flights (9-16 d) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 h of landing. METHODS: Thirty crew members performed self-selected inflight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. Two subjects participated in this investigation during two different flights. A 10-min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10-15 d before launch (PRE) and within 4 h of landing (POST). Based upon their inflight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: > or = 3 times/week, HR > or = 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 11), medium (MEDex: > or = 3 times/week, HR < 70% HRmax, > or = 20 min/session, N = 10), or low (LOex: < or = 3 times/week, HR and duration variable, N = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, P < or = 0.05). RESULTS: There were no PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared with PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36 +/- 5 bpm) compared with HIex or MEDex groups (25 +/- 1 bpm; 22 +/- 2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after space flight in the MEDex and HIex groups but was significantly greater in the LOex group (PRE: -9 +/- 3; POST: -19 +/- 4 mm Hg). CONCLUSIONS: Thus, moderate to high levels of inflight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after space flight.

  14. Performance Studies of the Vibration Wire Monitor on the Test Stand with Low Energy Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Kota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro; Kinsho, Michikazu

    In the high intensity proton accelerator as the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) accelerators, serious radiation and residual dose is induced by a small beam loss such a beam halo. Therefore, diagnostics of the beam halo formation is one of the most important issues to control the beam loss. For the beam halo monitor, the vibration wire monitor (VWM) has a potential for investigating the beam halo and weak beam scanning. The VWM has a wide dynamic range, high resolution and the VWM is not susceptible to secondary electrons and electric noises. We have studied the VWM features as a new beam-halo monitor on the test stand with low energy electron gun. The frequency shift of the irradiated vibration wire was confirmed about wire material and the electron beam profile measured by using the VWM was consistent with the results of the Faraday cup measurement. Also we calculated a temperature distribution on the vibration wire which is irradiated by the electron beam with the numerical simulation. The simulations have been fairly successful in reproducing the transient of the irradiated vibration wire frequency measured by test stand experiments. In this paper, we will report a result of performance evaluation for the VWM on the test stands and discuss the VWM for beam halo diagnostic

  15. 25. Photocopy of engineering drawing. CAPTIVE TEST STANDS AT PADS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of engineering drawing. CAPTIVE TEST STANDS AT PADS 17A AND 17B-PLANS AND SECTIONS OF MISSILE SERVICE PIPING, APRIL 1956. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. 2. GENERAL VIEW DOWN TO CAPTIVE TEST STAND. STEEL SERVICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW DOWN TO CAPTIVE TEST STAND. STEEL SERVICE DECK REMOVED. BASE OF UMBILICAL TOWER AT RIGHT AND FLUME LEADING TO DELUGE BASIN AT CENTER; VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. Falls classification using tri-axial accelerometers during the five-times-sit-to-stand test.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; Walsh, Cathal; Foran, Timothy; Greene, Barry R; Fan, Chie Wei; Cunningham, Clodagh; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-09-01

    The five-times-sit-to-stand test (FTSS) is an established assessment of lower limb strength, balance dysfunction and falls risk. Clinically, the time taken to complete the task is recorded with longer times indicating increased falls risk. Quantifying the movement using tri-axial accelerometers may provide a more objective and potentially more accurate falls risk estimate. 39 older adults, 19 with a history of falls, performed four repetitions of the FTSS in their homes. A tri-axial accelerometer was attached to the lateral thigh and used to identify each sit-stand-sit phase and sit-stand and stand-sit transitions. A second tri-axial accelerometer, attached to the sternum, captured torso acceleration. The mean and variation of the root-mean-squared amplitude, jerk and spectral edge frequency of the acceleration during each section of the assessment were examined. The test-retest reliability of each feature was examined using intra-class correlation analysis, ICC(2,k). A model was developed to classify participants according to falls status. Only features with ICC>0.7 were considered during feature selection. Sequential forward feature selection within leave-one-out cross-validation resulted in a model including four reliable accelerometer-derived features, providing 74.4% classification accuracy, 80.0% specificity and 68.7% sensitivity. An alternative model using FTSS time alone resulted in significantly reduced classification performance. Results suggest that the described methodology could provide a robust and accurate falls risk assessment.

  18. Thrust Stand Measurements Using Alternative Propellants in the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    -pinch coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil also serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT). In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to evaluate the specific impulse and thrust efficiency of the MAD-IPA for a variety of propellants. Propellants tested include both widely-used, non-reactive noble gases like argon, and rarely-used propellants such as water, hydrazine and ammonia. Dependencies of impulse data on propellant species are discussed in the context of the current sheet formation and electromagnetic plasma acceleration processes.

  19. Ion source test stand for radioactive beams (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolen, J. A.; Decrock, P.; Portillo, M.; Mullen, T. P.; Geraci, A. A.; Barlow, T. A.; Greene, J. P.; Gomes, I.; Batson, C. H.; Saremba, S. E.

    1998-02-01

    A test stand for development of ion sources for radioactive beams is currently being commissioned at Argonne. It is located at the Physics Division's Dynamitron accelerator which will be used as a neutron generator with a flux of up to 1011 neutrons per second created by reactions of 4 MeV deuterons on various targets with beam currents of up to 100 μA. The primary targets will be located adjacent to heated secondary targets inside an on-line ion source. With this neutron-generator facility it will be possible to produce radioactive beams of various isotopes, such as 6He, 24Na, and neutron-rich fission fragments. For example, with a secondary target of uranium carbide containing 25 g of natural or depleted uranium the yields of individual isotopes in the target will be about 107/s for isotopes such as 132Sn, 140Xe, and 142Cs, near the peak of the fission distribution. The ion sources to be evaluated will be located within a shielded cave with walls consisting of 30 cm of steel plus 60 cm of concrete to attenuate the prompt neutron radiation by a factor of about 104. Secondary beams of radioactive fission fragments with intensities on the order of 106/s per isotope will be extracted in the 1+ charge state at energies of 20 keV and mass separated with a Danfysik mass separator. Light isotopes, such as 6He and 24Na, can be produced via (n,α) and (n,p) reactions on appropriate target materials. Commissioning began with measurements of fission yields from primary targets of C, Be, BeO, and BN. A surface ionization source which is a variation of the one used in the TRISTAN on-line mass seperator facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been installed and tested with stable Rb and Cs beams. The isotope separator was also commissioned with these beams. The development program will include emittance measurements and source optimization, initially with stable beams, and target-delay-time and release-efficiency measurements for various target/secondary-beam systems.

  20. Accelerator Test of an Imaging Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Binns, R. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Kippen, R. M.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) utilizes a thin sampling calorimeter concept for direct measurements of high-energy cosmic rays. The ICA design uses arrays of small scintillating fibers to measure the energy and trajectory of the produced cascades. A test instrument has been developed to study the performance of this concept at accelerator energies and for comparison with simulations. Two test exposures have been completed using a CERN test beam. Some results from the accelerator tests are presented.

  1. 28. HISTORIC VIEW OF A3 ROCKET IN TEST STAND NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. HISTORIC VIEW OF A-3 ROCKET IN TEST STAND NO. 3 AT KUMMERSDORF (THE LARGEST TEST STAND AT KUMMERSDORF). THE STAND WAS MOBILE, SINCE IT MOVED ALONG RAILS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  3. THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE CRYOMODULE TEST STAND RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Crofford, Mark T; Ball, Jeffrey Allen; Davidson Jr, Taylor L; Hardek, Thomas W; Heidenreich, Dale A; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kang, Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has recently commissioned a cryomodule test facility for the repair and testing of the super-conducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. This facility utilizes the original 402.5/805 MHz Radio Frequency (RF) Klystron Test Stand as its power source along with dual Low Level RF (LLRF) control systems. One control system is based on the standard SNS Linac LLRF controls with a second system for open-loop only control. The system is designed to allow simultaneous testing of devices in the test cave and other devices which can be tested outside of the enclosure. Initial tests have shown good results; some improvements are yet to be implemented.

  4. RHIC sextant test: Accelerator systems and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Trbojevic, D.; Ahrens, L.

    1997-08-01

    One sextant of the RHIC Collider was commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the performance of the accelerator systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. We also describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems performance and their impact on the planning for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  5. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-11-01

    Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable - maximal energy of the scattered photons - would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  6. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Sharp, W.M.; Makowski, M.A.

    1991-02-01

    A free-electron laser (FEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) is proposed, in which the FEL interaction takes place in a series of drive cavities, rather than in a waveguide. Each drive cavity is 'beat-coupled' to a section of the accelerating structure. This standing-wave TBA is investigated theoretically and numerically, with analyses included of microwave extraction, growth of the FEL signal through saturation, equilibrium longitudinal beam dynamics following saturation, and sensitivity of the microwave amplitude and phase to errors in current and energy. It is found that phase errors due to current jitter are substantially reduced from previous versions of the TBA. Analytic scalings and numerical simulations are used to obtain an illustrative TBA parameter set.

  7. The cathode test stand for the DARHT second-axis

    SciTech Connect

    Fortgang, C.; Monroe, M.; Prono, D.; Hudson, C.; Macy, D.; Moy, K.

    1998-12-31

    The injector for the DARHT second-axis injector will use an 8-in. thermionic dispenser cathode. Because the cathode is relatively large and requires a large amount of heat (5 kW) there are certain engineering issues that need to be addressed, before the DARHT injector reaches the final design stage. The Cathode Test Stand (CTS) will be used to address those concerns. The CTS is a new facility, presently under construction. The CTS will consist of a high-voltage pulse modulator, a high-vacuum diode test-chamber, and a short beam-transport section with diagnostics. This paper discusses the status of the project.

  8. 9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (H-1) FROM LEFT TO RIGHT - WORK BENCH, CONTROL PANEL, CHEMICAL TANK. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Cold Calibration Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  9. 5. VIEW NORTH/NORTHEAST OBSERVATION BUNKER FOR POWER PLANT TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTH/NORTHEAST OBSERVATION BUNKER FOR POWER PLANT TEST STAND (LATER VERSION) INTERIOR AND PARTIAL EXTERIOR. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. Particle accelerators test cosmological theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.; Steigman, G.

    1988-06-01

    Over the past decade two subfields of science, cosmology and elementary-particle physics, have become married in a symbiotic relationship that has produced a number of exciting offspring. These offspring are beginning to yield insights on the creation of spacetime and matter at epochs as early as 10 to the minus 43 to 10 to the minus 35 second after the birth of the universe in the primordial explosion known as the big bang. Important clues to the nature of the big bang itself may even come from a theory currently under development, known as the ultimate theory of everything (T.E.O.). A T.E.O. would describe all the interactions among the fundamental particles in a single bold stroke. Now that cosmology ahs begun to make predictions about elementary-particle physics, it has become conceivable that those cosmological predictions could be checked with carefully controlled accelerator experiments. It has taken more than 10 years for accelerators to reach the point where they can do the appropriate experiments, but the experiments are now in fact in progress. The preliminary results confirm the predictions of cosmology. The cosmological prediction the authors have been concerned with pertains to setting limits on the number of fundamental particles of matter. It appears that there are 12 fundamental particles, as well as their corresponding antiparticles. Six of the fundamental particles are quarks. The other six are leptons. The 12 particles are grouped in three families, each family consisting of four members. Cosmology suggests there must be a finite number of families and, further limits the possible range of to small values: only three or at most four families exist. 7 figs.

  11. Larger center of pressure minus center of gravity in the elderly induces larger body acceleration during quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Masani, Kei; Vette, Albert H; Kouzaki, Motoki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Popovic, Milos R

    2007-07-18

    When an inverted pendulum approximates quiet standing, it is assumed that the distance between the center of pressure and the vertical projection of the center of mass on the ground (COP-COG) reflects the relationship between the controlling and controlled variables of the balance control mechanism, and that the center of mass acceleration (ACC) is proportional to COP-COG. As aging affects the control mechanism of balance during quiet standing, COP-COG must be influenced by aging and, as a result, ACC is influenced by aging as well. The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that aging results in an increased COP-COG amplitude and, as a consequence, that ACC becomes larger in the elderly than the young. Fifteen elderly and 11 young subjects stood quietly on a force platform with their eyes open or closed. We found that (1) the standard deviations of COP-COG and ACC were larger in the elderly than in the young, irrespective of the eye condition; (2) COP-COG is proportional to ACC in both age groups, i.e., the inverted pendulum assumption holds true for quiet standing. The results suggest that a change in the control strategy that is due to aging causes a larger COP-COG in the elderly and, as a consequence, that ACC becomes larger as well.

  12. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  13. A Statistical Perspective on Highly Accelerated Testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward V.

    2015-02-01

    Highly accelerated life testing has been heavily promoted at Sandia (and elsewhere) as a means to rapidly identify product weaknesses caused by flaws in the product's design or manufacturing process. During product development, a small number of units are forced to fail at high stress. The failed units are then examined to determine the root causes of failure. The identification of the root causes of product failures exposed by highly accelerated life testing can instigate changes to the product's design and/or manufacturing process that result in a product with increased reliability. It is widely viewed that this qualitative use of highly accelerated life testing (often associated with the acronym HALT) can be useful. However, highly accelerated life testing has also been proposed as a quantitative means for "demonstrating" the reliability of a product where unreliability is associated with loss of margin via an identified and dominating failure mechanism. It is assumed that the dominant failure mechanism can be accelerated by changing the level of a stress factor that is assumed to be related to the dominant failure mode. In extreme cases, a minimal number of units (often from a pre-production lot) are subjected to a single highly accelerated stress relative to normal use. If no (or, sufficiently few) units fail at this high stress level, some might claim that a certain level of reliability has been demonstrated (relative to normal use conditions). Underlying this claim are assumptions regarding the level of knowledge associated with the relationship between the stress level and the probability of failure. The primary purpose of this document is to discuss (from a statistical perspective) the efficacy of using accelerated life testing protocols (and, in particular, "highly accelerated" protocols) to make quantitative inferences concerning the performance of a product (e.g., reliability) when in fact there is lack-of-knowledge and uncertainty concerning the

  14. The Cold Dark Matter Search test stand warm electronics card

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, Bruce; Hansen, Sten; Huber, Martin; Kiper, Terry; Rau, Wolfgang; Saab, Tarek; Seitz, Dennis; Sundqvist, Kyle; Mandic, Vuk; /Minnesota U.

    2010-11-01

    A card which does the signal processing for four SQUID amplifiers and two charge sensitive channels is described. The card performs the same functions as is presently done with two custom 9U x 280mm Eurocard modules, a commercial multi-channel VME digitizer, a PCI to GPIB interface, a PCI to VME interface and a custom built linear power supply. By integrating these functions onto a single card and using the power over Ethernet standard, the infrastructure requirements for instrumenting a Cold Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector test stand are significantly reduced.

  15. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  16. 11. "NIGHT SCENE OF TEST AREA WITH TEST STAND 1A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "NIGHT SCENE OF TEST AREA WITH TEST STAND 1-A IN FOREGROUND. LIGHTS OF MAIN BASE, EDWARDS AFB, IN THE BACKGROUND. EDWARDS AFB." Test Area 1-120. Looking west past Test Stand 1-A to Test Area 1-115 and Test Area 1-110. Photo no. "12,401 57; G-AFFTC 12 DEC 57; TS 1-A Aux #1". - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM) acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS), and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Results Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Conclusions Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its superior robustness and small

  18. 4. Interior view of Test Stand 'D' workshop 4222/E23 looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Interior view of Test Stand 'D' workshop 4222/E-23 looking southwest. Many tools and machines have been removed in process of dismantling Test Stand 'D.' - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Workshop, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Test results of the solid state stand alone development calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Renz, D.P.; Breakall, K.L.; Fultz, R.L.; Wetzel, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    Radiometric heat flow calorimeters have been used to determine the heat output of radioactive materials for over 40 years. EG and G Mound Applied Technologies has developed a stand alone developmental calorimeter which utilizes solid state sensor technology. The sample size was increased to 8 in. high by 4 in. diameter in the system under test from 3 in. high by 5/8 in. diameter in the previous prototype. The calorimeter system uses an air bath for environmental stability which further reduces weight and assay time. Tests in the developmental system have produced excellent servo control results over the 0.5 to 5 watt range, with one sigma precision errors ranging from 1.3% at 0.5 watts to 0.1% at 4 watts. The average run time of these samples was approximately 90 minutes with no preconditioning used.

  20. View looking due west at Test Stand 'A' (Building 4202/E3) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking due west at Test Stand 'A' (Building 4202/E-3) along centerline of flame pit. Rocket engines were fired downward in test stand; flames were directed horizontally into the pit to the east via a deflector in the bottom of the stand. Pit contained a small pond and sump, now filled in by silt (See CA-163-A-4 for historical view). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand A, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. Assembly and installation of the large coil test facility test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, C.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) was built to test six tokamak-type superconducting coils, with three to be designed and built by US industrial teams and three provided by Japan, Switzerland, and Euratom under an international agreement. The facility is designed to test these coils in an environment which simulates that of a tokamak. The heart of this facility is the test stand, which is made up of four major assemblies: the Gravity Base Assembly, the Bucking Post Assembly, the Torque Ring Assembly, and the Pulse Coil Assembly. This paper provides a detailed review of the assembly and installation of the test stand components and the handling and installation of the first coil into the test stand.

  2. RHIC Sextant Test - Accelerator Systems and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, F.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Connolly, R.; dell, G. F.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; Mackay, W.; Mane, V.; Peggs, S.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Thompson, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Wei, J.

    1997-05-01

    One sextant of the RHIC collider and the full AtR (AGS to RHIC) transfer line have been commissioned in early 1997 with beam. We describe here the design and performance of the accelerator systems during the test, such as the magnet and power supply systems, instrumentation subsystems and application software. After reviewing the main milestones of the commissioning we describe a ramping test without beam that took place after the commissioning with beam. Finally, we analyze the implications of accelerator systems preformance and their impact on the plannig for RHIC installation and commissioning.

  3. HESTIA Commodities Exchange Pallet and Sounding Rocket Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Javier

    2013-01-01

    During my Spring 2016 internship, my two major contributions were the design of the Commodities Exchange Pallet and the design of a test stand for a 100 pounds-thrust sounding rocket. The Commodities Exchange Pallet is a prototype developed for the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program. Under the HESTIA initiative the Commodities Exchange Pallet was developed as a method for demonstrating multi-system integration thru the transportation of In-Situ Resource Utilization produced oxygen and water to a human habitat. Ultimately, this prototype's performance will allow for future evaluation of integration, which may lead to the development of a flight capable pallet for future deep-space exploration missions. For HESTIA, my main task was to design the Commodities Exchange Pallet system to be used for completing an integration demonstration. Under the guidance of my mentor, I designed, both, the structural frame and fluid delivery system for the commodities pallet. The fluid delivery system includes a liquid-oxygen to gaseous-oxygen system, a water delivery system, and a carbon-dioxide compressors system. The structural frame is designed to meet safety and transportation requirements, as well as the ability to interface with the ER division's Portable Utility Pallet. The commodities pallet structure also includes independent instrumentation oxygen/water panels for operation and system monitoring. My major accomplishments for the commodities exchange pallet were the completion of the fluid delivery systems and the structural frame designs. In addition, parts selection was completed in order to expedite construction of the prototype, scheduled to begin in May of 2016. Once the commodities pallet is assembled and tested it is expected to complete a fully integrated transfer demonstration with the ISRU unit and the Environmental Control and Life Support System test chamber in September of 2016. In addition to the development of

  4. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility control system

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.; Bottke, I.; Fernow, R.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-01-01

    Described is the VAX/CAMAC-based control system for Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility, a laser/linac research complex. Details of hardware and software configurations are presented along with experiences of using Vsystem, a commercial control system package.

  5. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. This type of pulsed thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Dis- charge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA), shown in Fig. 1, is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta-pinch coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil also serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [1, 2]. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance (specific impulse, thrust efficiency) of the MAD-IPA thruster. Impulse data are obtained at various pulse energies, mass flow rates and inductive coil geometries. Dependencies on these experimental parameters are discussed in the context of the current sheet formation and electromagnetic plasma

  6. 4. "TEST CONDUCTORS PANEL AT TEST STAND 1A, DIRECTORATE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "TEST CONDUCTORS PANEL AT TEST STAND 1-A, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB, 15 JAN 58, 3098.58." A photograph of the control room, with seven men watching monitors and instrument panels. Photo no. "3098 58; G-AFFTC 15 JAN 58; Test Conductors Panel T.S. 1-A". - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Testing of Composite Fan Vanes With Erosion-Resistant Coating Accelerated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Sutter, James K.; Otten, Kim D.; Samorezov, Sergey; Perusek, Gail P.

    2004-01-01

    The high-cycle fatigue of composite stator vanes provided an accelerated life-state prior to insertion in a test stand engine. The accelerated testing was performed in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center under the guidance of Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch personnel. Previous research on fixturing and test procedures developed at Glenn determined that engine vibratory conditions could be simulated for polymer matrix composite vanes by using the excitation of a combined slip table and electrodynamic shaker in Glenn's Structural Dynamics Laboratory. Bench-top testing gave researchers the confidence to test the coated vanes in a full-scale engine test.

  8. A Test Stand for Ion Sources of Ultimate Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Enparantza, R.; Uriarte, L.; Romano, P.; Alonso, J.; Ariz, I.; Egiraun, M.; Bermejo, F. J.; Etxebarria, V.; Lucas, J.; Del Rio, J. M.; Letchford, A.; Faircloth, D.; Stockli, M.

    2009-03-12

    The rationale behind the ITUR project is to perform a comparison between different kinds of H{sup -} ion sources using the same beam diagnostics setup. In particular, a direct comparison will be made in terms of the emittance characteristics of Penning Type sources such as those currently in use in the injector for the ISIS (UK) Pulsed Neutron Source and those of volumetric type such as that driving the injector for the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (TN, U.S.A.). The endeavour here pursued is thus to build an Ion Source Test Stand where virtually any type of source can be tested and its features measured and, thus compared to the results of other sources under the same gauge. It would be possible then to establish a common ground for effectively comparing different ion sources. The long term objectives are thus to contribute towards building compact sources of minimum emittance, maximum performance, high reliability-availability, high percentage of desired particle production, stability and high brightness. The project consortium is lead by Tekniker-IK4 research centre and partners are companies Elytt Energy and Jema Group. The technical viability is guaranteed by the collaboration between the project consortium and several scientific institutions, such the CSIC (Spain), the University of the Basque Country (Spain), ISIS (STFC-UK), SNS (ORNL-USA) and CEA in Saclay (France)

  9. Shake test results of the MDHC test stand in the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Benton H.; Peterson, Randall

    1994-01-01

    A shake test was conducted to determine the modal properties of the MDHC (McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company) test stand installed in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The shake test was conducted for three wind-tunnel balance configurations with and without balance dampers, and with the snubber engagement to lock the balance frame. A hydraulic shaker was used to apply random excitation at the rotor hub in the longitudinal and lateral directions. A GenRad 2515 computer-aided test system computed the frequency response functions at the rotor hub and support struts. From these response functions, the modal properties, including the natural frequency, damping ratio, and mode shape were calculated. The critical modes with low damping ratios are identified as the test-stand second longitudinal mode for the dampers-off configuration, the test-stand yaw mode for the dampers-on configuration, and the test stand first longitudinal mode for the balance-frame locked configuration.

  10. Accelerated aging test on LEDs life estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yi; Zhang, Shu-sheng; Du, Jiang-qi

    2011-11-01

    Light-emitting diodes(LEDs) have become very attractive in different application field such as Solid State Lighting, automotive and street lights, due to their long operative lifetime, lower energy consumption etc. This paper mainly introduces the accelerated aging test, we focus our attention on the study of a life model for LEDs by relating the time to failure with the supplying condition. The constant accelerated aging experiments were firstly performed on LED samples. Process the experiment data by exploiting the degradation of LED optical power formula and degradation coefficient. Finally, the average lifetime of the samples under normal conditions was calculated via using numerical analytical method. According to data, analysis the test result and the failure mechanism of LED, provide the technical basis to improve product design and quality assurance.

  11. 3. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN SOUTHEAST ¼ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, LOCATED IN SOUTHEAST ¼ OF X-15 ENGINE TEST COMPLEX. Looking northeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 7. BUILDING 604F, INTERIOR OF BULL PEN SHOWING TESTING STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. BUILDING 604-F, INTERIOR OF BULL PEN SHOWING TESTING STAND AND HEAVY WOOD LINING ON CONCRETE WALLS. STEEL PLATE ABOVE TEST STAND DEFLECTS SHRAPNEL, SCREEN FURTHER HELPS TO CONTAIN PARTICLES. ONLY SMALL EXPLOSIVES WERE TESTED HERE (GRENADES, MINES, BOMB FUZES, ETC.). - Picatinny Arsenal, 600 Area, Test Areas District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  13. BNL ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY CONTROL SYSTEM UPGRADE.

    SciTech Connect

    MALONE,R.; BEN-ZVI,I.; WANG,X.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    2001-06-18

    Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) has embarked on a complete upgrade of its decade old computer system. The planned improvements affect every major component: processors (Intel Pentium replaces VAXes), operating system (Linux/Real-Time Linux supplants OpenVMS), and data acquisition equipment (fast Ethernet equipment replaces CAMAC serial highway.) This paper summarizes the strategies and progress of the upgrade along with plans for future expansion.

  14. A high voltage test stand for electron gun qualification for LINACs

    SciTech Connect

    Wanmode, Yashwant D.; Mulchandani, J.; Acharya, M.; Bhisikar, A.; Singh, H.G.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2011-07-01

    An electron gun lest stand has been developed at RRCAT. The test stand consists of a high voltage pulsed power supply, electron gun filament supply, grid supply, UHV system and electron gun current measurement system. Several electron guns developed indigenously were evaluated on this test stand. The shielding is provided for the electron gun set up. Electron gun tests can be tested upto 55 kV with pulse width of 15 microsecs and pulse repetition rates up to 200 Hz. The technical details of the subsystems are furnished and results of performance of the test stand have been reported in this paper. (author)

  15. System integration and performance of the EUV engineering test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Replogle, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Rockett, Paul D.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Jefferson, Karen L.; Leung, Alvin H.; Wronosky, John B.; Hale, Layton C.; Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.; Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Soufli, Regina; Spiller, Eberhard; Blaedel, Kenneth; Sommargren, Gary E.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Batson, Phillip J.; Attwood, David T.; Jackson, Keith H.; Hector, Scott D.; Gwyn, Charles W.; Yan, Pei-Yang; Yan, P.

    2001-03-01

    The Engineering Test Stand (ETS) is a developmental lithography tool designed to demonstrate full-field EUV imaging and provide data for commercial-tool development. In the first phase of integration, currently in progress, the ETS is configured using a developmental projection system, while fabrication of an improved projection system proceeds in parallel. The optics in the second projection system have been fabricated to tighter specifications for improved resolution and reduced flare. The projection system is a 4-mirror, 4x-reduction, ring-field design having a numeral aperture of 0.1, which supports 70 nm resolution at a k{sub 1} of 0.52. The illuminator produces 13.4 nm radiation from a laser-produced plasma, directs the radiation onto an arc-shaped field of view, and provides an effective fill factor at the pupil plane of 0.7. The ETS is designed for full-field images in step-and-scan mode using vacuum-compatible, magnetically levitated, scanning stages. This paper describes system performance observed during the first phase of integration, including static resist images of 100 nm isolated and dense features.

  16. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  17. Comments on cathode contaminants and the LBNL test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.; Baca, D.; Greenway, W.; Leitner, M.; Kwan, J.W.

    2006-11-13

    This report collects information on cathode contaminants we have gathered in the process of operating the LBNL DARHT cathode test stand. Information on contaminants is compiled from several sources. The attachment, ''Practical Aspects of Modern Dispenser Cathodes'', is from Heat Wave Corp. (TB-134) and was originally published in Microwave Journal, September 1979. Cathode contamination depends on both material choices and residual gases. Table 1 of TB-134 lists materials that can poison dispenser cathodes. These include reactive residual gases or vapors such as oxygen, water vapor, benzene, chlorine, fluorine, sulfur, silicon, and most metals other than molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten, and copper. The metals interact with the cathode surface through their vapor pressure. A paper by Nexsen and Turner, J. Appl. Phys. 68, 298-303 (1990) shows the threshold effects of some common residual gases or vapors on cathode performance. The book by Walter H. Kohl, Handbook of Materials and Techniques for Vacuum Devices, also contains useful information on cathodes and poisoning agents. A plot of the vapor pressures and poisoning effect of certain metals (from Kohl) is shown below. Note that the vapor pressure of zinc is 1.1 x 10{sup -8} Torr at 400 K = 127 C, and 2.7 x 10{sup -5} at 500 K = 227 C. By contrast iron reaches a vapor pressure 1 x 10{sup -8} between 800 and 900 C. Therefore it is important to eliminate any brass parts that could exceed a temperature of 100 C. Many structural components of the cathode assembly contain steel. At 500-600 C in an oxygen atmosphere chromium oxide may outgas from the steel. [Cho, et.al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 19, p. 998 (2001)]. Steel may also contain silicon, and sulfur at low concentrations. Therefore use of steel should be limited or avoided at high temperature near the cathode. Materials that should be avoided in the vicinity of the cathode include brass, silver, zinc, non-OFHC copper, silicates, and sulfur-containing lubricants such

  18. Non-actively controlled double-inverted-pendulum-like dynamics can minimize center of mass acceleration during human quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Morimoto, Hiroki; Kiyono, Ken; Morasso, Pietro; Nomura, Taishin

    2015-08-01

    Multiple joint movements during human quiet standing exhibit characteristic inter-joint coordination, shortly referred to as reciprocal relationship, in which angular acceleration of the hip joint is linearly and negatively correlated with that of the ankle joint (antiphase coordination) and, moreover, acceleration of the center of mass (CoM) of the double-inverted-pendulum (DIP) model of the human body is close to zero constantly. A question considered in this study is whether the reciprocal relationship is established by active neural control of the posture, or rather it is a biomechanical consequence of non-actively controlled body dynamics. To answer this question, we consider a DIP model of quiet standing, and show that the reciprocal relationship always holds by Newton's second law applied to the DIP model with human anthropometric dimensions, regardless of passive and active joint torque patterns acting on the ankle and hip joints. We then show that characteristic frequencies included in experimental sway trajectories with the reciprocal relationship match with harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the stable antiphase eigenmode of the non-actively controlled DIP-like unstable body dynamics. The results suggest that non-actively controlled DIP-like mechanical dynamics is a major cause of the minimization of the CoM acceleration during quiet standing, which is consistent with a type of control strategy that allows switching off active neural control intermittently for suitable periods of time during quiet standing.

  19. Non-actively controlled double-inverted-pendulum-like dynamics can minimize center of mass acceleration during human quiet standing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Morimoto, Hiroki; Kiyono, Ken; Morasso, Pietro; Nomura, Taishin

    2015-08-01

    Multiple joint movements during human quiet standing exhibit characteristic inter-joint coordination, shortly referred to as reciprocal relationship, in which angular acceleration of the hip joint is linearly and negatively correlated with that of the ankle joint (antiphase coordination) and, moreover, acceleration of the center of mass (CoM) of the double-inverted-pendulum (DIP) model of the human body is close to zero constantly. A question considered in this study is whether the reciprocal relationship is established by active neural control of the posture, or rather it is a biomechanical consequence of non-actively controlled body dynamics. To answer this question, we consider a DIP model of quiet standing, and show that the reciprocal relationship always holds by Newton's second law applied to the DIP model with human anthropometric dimensions, regardless of passive and active joint torque patterns acting on the ankle and hip joints. We then show that characteristic frequencies included in experimental sway trajectories with the reciprocal relationship match with harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the stable antiphase eigenmode of the non-actively controlled DIP-like unstable body dynamics. The results suggest that non-actively controlled DIP-like mechanical dynamics is a major cause of the minimization of the CoM acceleration during quiet standing, which is consistent with a type of control strategy that allows switching off active neural control intermittently for suitable periods of time during quiet standing. PMID:26736538

  20. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Gary J.; Bingham, Carl; Goggin, Rita; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Netter, Judy C.

    2000-06-13

    Process and apparatus for providing ultra accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing of samples under controlled weathering without introducing unrealistic failure mechanisms in exposed materials and without breaking reciprocity relationships between flux exposure levels and cumulative dose that includes multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity at high levels of natural sunlight comprising: a) concentrating solar flux uniformly; b) directing the controlled uniform sunlight onto sample materials in a chamber enclosing multiple concurrent levels of temperature and relative humidity to allow the sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a sufficient period of time in days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth of representative weathering of the sample materials.

  1. 5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  2. RP1 (KEROSENE) STORAGE TANKS ON HILLSIDE EAST OF TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RP1 (KEROSENE) STORAGE TANKS ON HILLSIDE EAST OF TEST STAND 1-B. THIS TANK FARM SERVES BOTH TEST STANDS 1-A AND 1-B - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. 6. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. Looking south from north wall of terminal room. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 7. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CABLE RACK, MEZZANINE LEVEL, INTERIOR OF TEST STAND 1A. Looking north from north end of the cable tunnel leading toward Control Center. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 10. OBSERVATION POST NO. 3, WEST OF TEST STAND 1A. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. OBSERVATION POST NO. 3, WEST OF TEST STAND 1-A. SOUTH SIDE AND EAST FRONT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. 4. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING STRUCTURE AT ENGINE END OF PLANE. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 7. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND AFTER AN ENGINE FIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND AFTER AN ENGINE FIRE OR EXPLOSION. Wreckage of engine is still fixed in its clamp; X-15 vehicle lies on the ground detached from engine. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. A new laser test stand for simulating charged-particle tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unno, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Kohriki, T.; Kondo, T.; Terada, S.; Iwasaki, H.; Yamada, Y.

    1996-02-01

    We report on the construction of a new laser test stand equipped with a 1064 nm pulsed infrared YAG laser for simulating the passage of a charged particle in a silicon detector. The standard semiconductor repairing tool, the so-called laser-cutter, has been modified to have a newly developed optics which has the ability to reduce the light by the order of 10 6-10 8 and to adjust the spot size to several microns. As an application we measured the position dependence of the induced signals in a silicon-strip detector when the laser light hits in the region between the strips. The measurement has show that this device is very effective in evaluating the detailed response of a silicon detector without using charged particles generated by accelerators.

  9. Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics (HISTRAP) vacuum test stand for pressures of 10/sup -12/ Torr

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Atkins, W.H.; Dowling, D.T.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-05-01

    HISTRAP (Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics) is a proposed synchrotron/cooler/storage ring accelerator optimized for advanced atomic physics research. The ring has a circumference of 46.8 m, a bore diameter of /similar to/15 cm, and requires a vacuum of 10/sup -12/ Torr to decelerate highly charged, very heavy ions down to low energies. To be able to test components and procedures to achieve this pressure, a test stand approximately modeling 1/16 of the ring vacuum chamber has been built. The 3.5-m-long test stand has been fabricated from 10-cm-diam components, with 316LN stainless-steel flanges. Prior to assembly, these components were vacuum fired at 950 /sup 0/C at a pressure of 10/sup -4/ Torr. The test stand is bakable in situ at 300 /sup 0/C. Pumping is achieved with two 750 l/s titanium sublimator pumps and one 60 l/s ion pump. Pressure is measured with two extractor ion gauges and a 10/sup -4/ partial pressure residual gas analyser. The roughing for the test stand consists of cryosorption pumps followed by a cryopump. A pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr has been achieved.

  10. HISTRAP (Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics) vacuum test stand for pressures of 10/sup -12/ Torr

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Atkins, W.H.; Dowling, D.T.; McConnell, J.W.; Milner, W.T.; Olsen, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    HISTRAP, Heavy Ion Storage Ring for Atomic Physics, is a proposed synchrotron/cooler/storage ring accelerator optimized for advanced atomic physics research. The ring has a circumference of 46.8 m, a bore diameter of about 15 cm, and requires a vacuum of 10/sup -12/ Torr in order to decelerate highly-charged very-heavy ions down to low energies. To be able to test components and procedures to achieve this pressure, a test stand approximately modeling one-sixteenth of the ring vacuum chamber has been built. The 3.5-m-long test stand has been fabricated from 10-cm-diameter components, with 316LN stainless steel flanges. Prior to assembly, these components were vacuum fired at 950/degree/C at a pressure of 10/sup -4/ Torr. The test stand is bakeable in situ at 300/degree/C. Pumping is achieved with two 750-L/s titanium sublimator pumps and one 60-L/s ion pump. Pressure is measured with two extractor ion gauges and a 10/sup -14/ PP RGA. The roughing for the test stand consists of cryosorption pumps followed by a cryopump. A pressure of 4 x 10/sup -12/ Torr has been achieved. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1986-09-01

    A computerized data base of LLW leaching data has been developed. Long-term tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms containing simulated wastes are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms.

  12. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated aging test design

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, R L; Gillen, K T

    1985-01-01

    The fundamental mechanisms underlying the chemical degradation of polymers can change as a function of environmental stress level. When this occurs, it greatly complicates any attempt to use accelerated tests for predicting long-term material degradation behaviors. Understanding how degradation mechanisms can change at different stress levels facilitates both the design and the interpretation of aging tests. Oxidative degradation is a predominant mechanism for many polymers exposed to a variety of different environments in the presence of air, and there are two mechanistic considerations which are widely applicable to material oxidation. One involves a physical process, oxygen diffusion, as a rate-limiting step. This mechanism can predominate at high stress levels. The second is a chemical process, the time-dependent decomposition of peroxide species. This leads to chain branching and can become a rate-controlling factor at lower stress levels involving time-scales applicable to use environments. The authors describe methods for identifying the operation of these mechanisms and illustrate the dramatic influence they can have on the degradation behaviors of a number of polymer types. Several commonly used approaches to accelerated aging tests are discussed in light of the behaviors which result from changes in degradation mechanisms. 9 references, 4 figures.

  13. Common analysis of the relativistic klystron and the standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, J.S.; Whittum, D.H.; Sessler, A.M.

    1992-07-01

    This paper summarizes a new formalism which makes the analysis and understanding of both the relativistic klystron (RK) and the standing-wave free-electron laser (SWFEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) available to a wide audience of accelerator physicists. A ``coupling impedance`` for both the RK and SWFEL is introduced, which can include realistic cavity features, such as beam and vacuum ports, in a simple manner. The RK and SWFEL macroparticle equations, which govern the energy and phase evolution of successive bunches in the beam, are of identical form, differing only by multiplicative factors. The analysis allows, for the first time, a relative comparison of the RF and SWFEL TBAs.

  14. Laboratory Test of Newton's Second Law for Small Accelerations

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, J. H.; Schlamminger, S.; Spitzer, C. D.; Choi, K.-Y.; Woodahl, B. A.; Coy, J. J.; Fischbach, E.

    2007-04-13

    We have tested the proportionality of force and acceleration in Newton's second law, F=ma, in the limit of small forces and accelerations. Our tests reach well below the acceleration scales relevant to understanding several current astrophysical puzzles such as the flatness of galactic rotation curves, the Pioneer anomaly, and the Hubble acceleration. We find good agreement with Newton's second law at accelerations as small as 5x10{sup -14} m/s{sup 2}.

  15. Laboratory test of Newton's second law for small accelerations.

    PubMed

    Gundlach, J H; Schlamminger, S; Spitzer, C D; Choi, K-Y; Woodahl, B A; Coy, J J; Fischbach, E

    2007-04-13

    We have tested the proportionality of force and acceleration in Newton's second law, F=ma, in the limit of small forces and accelerations. Our tests reach well below the acceleration scales relevant to understanding several current astrophysical puzzles such as the flatness of galactic rotation curves, the Pioneer anomaly, and the Hubble acceleration. We find good agreement with Newton's second law at accelerations as small as 5 x 10(-14) m/s(2).

  16. Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

  17. Induction accelerator test module for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Faltens, A.

    1991-04-01

    An induction linac test module suitable for investigating the drive requirements and the longitudinal coupling impedance of a high-power ion induction linac has been constructed by the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) group at LBL. The induction linac heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as presently envisioned uses multiple parallel beams which are transported in separate focusing channels but accelerated together in the induction modules. The resulting induction modules consequently have large beam apertures-1--2 meters in diameter- and correspondingly large outside diameters. The module geometry is related to a low-frequency gap capacity'' and high-frequency structural resonances, which are affected by the magnetic core loading and the module pulser impedance. A description of the test module and preliminary results are presented. 3 figs.

  18. Calibration of Virtual Testing Stand of the Car Cabin using climatic chamber tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, Jan; Fiser, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    The aim of our research is to calibrate and verify of the software Virtual Testing Stand of the Car Cabin using climatic chamber tests. The Virtual Testing Stand is standalone executable software developed in Matlab for prediction of the cabin environment and thermal heat load by using the time-efficient heat balance model. The main limitation of the simulation method is a simplified convection scheme inside a cabin using the empirical correlations instead of the CFD simulations. In this paper we present the first preliminary tests of the calibration process and verification of the simulation results. Tests were carried out for the car Skoda Octavia Combi with the silver metallic paint. The material composition of the test car was deeply explored and the material properties of the cabin were identified as accurate as possible. The car was exposed to the various environments inside a climate chamber. In this paper we report about two performed tests: summer solar soak test and winter heat-up test with the defined heat source.

  19. The stand for research and testing of layout of ultraviolet photo-polarimeter (UPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorochynskyi, R. R.; Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Herayimchuk, M. D.; Ivakhiv, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    For debugging, research and testing as a model of UPP in the complex and its individual parts we created a special stand with a complex set of equipment. The stand consists of: radiation block with variable sources of radiation; detector block with a set of measuring equipment; block of registration and analysis of radiation polarization; block with a set of different power supplies; block of variable high voltage. To use this stand we have also developed the corresponding software and more

  20. DELUGE AND WATER RECLAMATION BASIN BELOW TEST STAND 1A. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DELUGE AND WATER RECLAMATION BASIN BELOW TEST STAND 1-A. Looking north northwest - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Flame Deflector Water System, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 6. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF PROPELLER TEST STAND. WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF PROPELLER TEST STAND. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building No. 20A, Propeller Test Complex, Seventh Street, from E to G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. Report of independent consultants reviewing Integrated Test Stands (ITS) performance and readiness of DARHT for construction start

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Independent consultants met at Los Alamos, June 15 and 16, 1993, to review progress on the commissioning of the Integrated Test Stand (ITS) for DARHT and to provide DOE with technical input on readiness for construction of the first radiographic arm of DARHT. The consultants concluded that all milestones necessary for demonstrating the performance of the DARHT accelerator have been met and that the project is ready for construction to resume. The experimental program using ITS should be continued to quantify the comparison of experiment and theory, to test improvements on the injector insulator, and to better evaluate the interaction of the beam and the target.

  3. Hurricane Isabel gives accelerators a severe test

    SciTech Connect

    Swapan Chattopadhyay

    2004-01-01

    Hurricane Isabel was at category five--the most violent on the Saffir-Simpson scale of hurricane strength--when it began threatening the central Atlantic seaboard of the US. Over the course of several days, precautions against the extreme weather conditions were taken across the Jefferson Lab site in south-east Virginia. On 18 September 2003, when Isabel struck North Carolina's Outer Banks and moved northward, directly across the region around the laboratory, the storm was still quite destructive, albeit considerably reduced in strength. The flood surge and trees felled by wind substantially damaged or even devastated buildings and homes, including many belonging to Jefferson Lab staff members. For the laboratory itself, Isabel delivered an unplanned and severe challenge in another form: a power outage that lasted nearly three-and-a-half days, and which severely tested the robustness of Jefferson Lab's two superconducting machines, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and the superconducting radiofrequency ''driver'' accelerator of the laboratory's free-electron laser. Robustness matters greatly for science at a time when microwave superconducting linear accelerators (linacs) are not only being considered, but in some cases already being built for projects such as neutron sources, rare-isotope accelerators, innovative light sources and TeV-scale electron-positron linear colliders. Hurricane Isabel interrupted a several-week-long maintenance shutdown of CEBAF, which serves nuclear and particle physics and represents the world's pioneering large-scale implementation of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology. The racetrack-shaped machine is actually a pair of 500-600 MeV SRF linacs interconnected by recirculation arc beamlines. CEBAF delivers simultaneous beams at up to 6 GeV to three experimental halls. An imminent upgrade will double the energy to 12 GeV and add an extra hall for ''quark confinement'' studies. On a smaller scale

  4. Accelerated Strength Testing of Thermoplastic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    Constant ramp strength tests on unidirectional thermoplastic composite specimens oriented in the 90 deg. direction were conducted at constant temperatures ranging from 149 C to 232 C. Ramp rates spanning 5 orders of magnitude were tested so that failures occurred in the range from 0.5 sec. to 24 hrs. (0.5 to 100,000 MPa/sec). Below 204 C, time-temperature superposition held allowing strength at longer times to be estimated from strength tests at shorter times but higher temperatures. The data indicated that a 50% drop in strength might be expected for this material when the test time is increased by 9 orders of magnitude. The shift factors derived from compliance data applied well to the strength results. To explain the link between compliance and strength, a viscoelastic fracture model was investigated. The model, which used compliance as input, was found to fit the strength data only if the critical fracture energy was allowed to vary with temperature reduced stress rate. This variation in the critical parameter severely limits its use in developing a robust time-dependent strength model. The significance of this research is therefore seen as providing both the indication that a more versatile acceleration method for strength can be developed and the evidence that such a method is needed.

  5. Planck Scale Gravity Test with Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharibyan, V.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space-time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around 10-35m, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. However, this hypothesis remains uncheckable for any direct measurement since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about 10-19m at the LHC. Here I propose a laboratory test to measure the space refractivity and birefringence induced by gravity. A sensitivity from 10-31m down to the Planck length could be reached at existent GeV and future TeV energy lepton accelerators using laser Compton scattering. There are already experimental hints for gravity signature at distances approaching the Planck length by 5-7 orders of magnitude, derived from SLC and HERA data.

  6. Testing Planck-scale gravity with accelerators.

    PubMed

    Gharibyan, Vahagn

    2012-10-01

    Quantum or torsion gravity models predict unusual properties of space-time at very short distances. In particular, near the Planck length, around 10(-35)  m, empty space may behave as a crystal, singly or doubly refractive. However, this hypothesis remains uncheckable for any direct measurement, since the smallest distance accessible in experiment is about 10(-19)  m at the LHC. Here I propose a laboratory test to measure the space refractivity and birefringence induced by gravity. A sensitivity from 10(-31)  m down to the Planck length could be reached at existent GeV and future TeV energy lepton accelerators using laser Compton scattering. There are already experimental hints for gravity signature at distances approaching the Planck length by 5-7 orders of magnitude, derived from SLC and HERA data.

  7. Small-scale accelerated pavement testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Hugo, F.; Roesset, J.M.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted to explore the use of small-scale models of accelerated pavement testing (APT) devices to evaluate the performance of pavements in conjunction with full-scale tests. The motivation for the study was the availability of a model mobile load simulator (MMLS), which had been built originally to illustrate the operation of the full-scale mobile load simulator (MLS) under design at the time. The scaling requirements will be different depending on whether dynamic (inertia), viscous, or gravity effects are important. One must thus decide which one of these effects controls the behavior to try to reproduce it exactly. In the preliminary tests conducted with the MMLS, emphasis had been placed in reproducing accurately the viscoelastic behavior of the asphalt layer. The possibility of obtaining valid results, even if similitude is not maintained in relation to inertia forces, is explored in this paper. The effects of load frequency or velocity and the effects of layer thicknesses are studied. The total thickness of the model pavement, which must be finite, and its effects on displacements and strains are also considered. It is concluded that even when full similitude is not satisfied it is possible to obtain valid results that can be extrapolated to predict prototype performance if one were interested primarily in the behavior of the asphalt layer. Preliminary analyses should be conducted, however, to guide on the selection of the model dimensions.

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Complex Bunker House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the S-IC stand, additional related facilities were built during this time frame. Built to the east of the S-IC stand, the block house served as the control room. To the south of the blockhouse was a newly constructed pump house used for delivering water to the S-IC stand during testing. North of the massive test stand, the F-1 Engine test stand was built for testing a single F-1 engine. Just southeast of the S-IC stand a concrete bunker house was constructed. The bunker housed

  10. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  11. Advanced beamline design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Christopher R.

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  12. 26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG043535572; Drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "TEST STAND, STRUCTURAL, FOUNDATION PLAN." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 25 of 148; file no. 1320/76. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Crane Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo, taken at the S-IC test stand on October 2, 1963, is of a crane control. It was from here that the massive cranes were operated. Seen in the background is the F-1 Test Stand. Designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine, the F-1 test stand is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base. Capability was provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. Like the S-IC stand

  14. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand- Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  15. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House Waterline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  16. Integration Test of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator System Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a 4 kilowatt-class Hall propulsion system for implementation in NASA science missions. NASA science mission performance analysis was completed using the latest high voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAc) and Aerojet-Rocketdyne's state-of-the-art BPT-4000 Hall thruster performance curves. Mission analysis results indicated that the HiVHAc thruster out performs the BPT-4000 thruster for all but one of the missions studied. Tests of the HiVHAc system major components were performed. Performance evaluation of the HiVHAc thruster at NASA Glenn's vacuum facility 5 indicated that thruster performance was lower than performance levels attained during tests in vacuum facility 12 due to the lower background pressures attained during vacuum facility 5 tests when compared to vacuum facility 12. Voltage-Current characterization of the HiVHAc thruster in vacuum facility 5 showed that the HiVHAc thruster can operate stably for a wide range of anode flow rates for discharge voltages between 250 and 600 volts. A Colorado Power Electronics enhanced brassboard power processing unit was tested in vacuum for 1,500 hours and the unit demonstrated discharge module efficiency of 96.3% at 3.9 kilowatts and 650 volts. Stand-alone open and closed loop tests of a VACCO TRL 6 xenon flow control module were also performed. An integrated test of the HiVHAc thruster, brassboard power processing unit, and xenon flow control module was performed and confirmed that integrated operation of the HiVHAc system major components. Future plans include continuing the maturation of the HiVHAc system major components and the performance of a single-string integration test.

  17. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  18. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  19. 3. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING JET ENGINE TEST STAND. WrightPatterson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING JET ENGINE TEST STAND. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71A, Propulsion Research Laboratory, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  20. Comparison of Test Stand and Helicopter Oil Cooler Bearing Condition Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Branning, Jeremy; Wade, Damiel R.; Bolander, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this paper was to compare the performance of HUMS condition indicators (CI) when detecting a bearing fault in a test stand or on a helicopter. This study compared data from two sources: first, CI data collected from accelerometers installed on two UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters when oil cooler bearing faults occurred, along with data from helicopters with no bearing faults; and second, CI data that was collected from ten cooler bearings, healthy and faulted, that were removed from fielded helicopters and installed in a test stand. A method using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves to compare CI performance was demonstrated. Results indicated the bearing energy CI responded differently for the helicopter and the test stand. Future research is required if test stand data is to be used validate condition indicator performance on a helicopter.

  1. VALIDITY OF THE STANDING SPIKE TEST AS A MONITORING PROTOCOL FOR FEMALE VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Valadés, D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was: a) to provide reference values for the standing spike test for female volleyball players and b) to study whether the standing spike test is valid for assessing the theoretical differences between female volleyball players. The sample included 83 players from the first nine teams of the Spanish women's first volleyball division (52 Spanish players and 31 from other nationalities). The variables studied were the ball speed of the standing spike test, the age of the players, the player's role (outside hitter, opposite, middle-blocker, libero, or setter), height, and nationality of the players (Spanish or foreign). The results demonstrate the ranges for the standing spike among female performance volleyball players (70-82 km · h−1). The differences regarding nationality, player role, height, and age seem to indicate that the test is a valid instrument for monitoring the performance of female volleyball players. PMID:24868119

  2. Preliminary tests of the electrostatic plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G.; Acker, T.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of a program to verify an electrostatic plasma acceleration concept and to identify those parameters most important in optimizing an Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) thruster based upon this thrust mechanism. Preliminary performance measurements of thrust, specific impulse and efficiency were obtained using a unique plasma exhaust momentum probe. Reliable EPA thruster operation was achieved using one power supply.

  3. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House Water Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand-Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through

  8. RESULTS OF BEAM TESTS ON A HIGH CURRENT EBIS TEST STAND.

    SciTech Connect

    BEEBE,E.; ALESSI,J.; BELLAVIA,S.; HERSHCOVITCH,A.; KPONOU,A.; LOCKEY,R.; PIKIN,A.; PRELEC,K.; KUZNETSOV,G.; TIUNOV,M.

    1999-03-29

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory there is an R&D program to design an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) for use in a compact ion injector to be developed for the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC). The BNL effort is directed at developing an EBIS with intensities of 3 x 10{sup 9} particles/pulse of ions such as Au{sup 35+} and U{sup 45+}, and requires an electron beam on the order of 10A. The construction of a test stand (EBTS) with the full electron beam power and 1/3 the length of the EBIS for RHIC is nearing completion. Initial commissioning of the EBTS was made with pulsed electron beams of duration < 1ms and current up to 13 A. Details of the EBTS construction, results of the pulse tests, and preparations for DC electron beam tests are presented.

  9. Status and Plans for a Superconducting RF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfritz, J.; Andrews, R.; Baffes, C.M.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Church, M.D.; Harms, E.R.; Klebaner, A.L.; Kucera, M.; Martinez, A.; Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) is being constructed at Fermilab. The existing New Muon Lab (NML) building is being converted for this facility. The accelerator will consist of an electron gun, injector, beam acceleration section consisting of 3 TTF-type or ILC-type cryomodules, multiple downstream beam lines for testing diagnostics and conducting various beam tests, and a high power beam dump. When completed, it is envisioned that this facility will initially be capable of generating a 750 MeV electron beam with ILC beam intensity. An expansion of this facility was recently completed that will provide the capability to upgrade the accelerator to a total beam energy of 1.5 GeV. Two new buildings were also constructed adjacent to the ASTA facility to house a new cryogenic plant and multiple superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule test stands. In addition to testing accelerator components, this facility will be used to test RF power systems, instrumentation, and control systems for future SRF accelerators such as the ILC and Project-X. This paper describes the current status and overall plans for this facility.

  10. PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

    2012-05-20

    The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

  11. 46 CFR 160.072-5 - Accelerated weathering test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accelerated weathering test. 160.072-5 Section 160.072-5... weathering test. (a) Condition the flag, folded to 1/16th its size or as packaged, whichever is smaller, by... less than 24 hours. (d) The flag fails the accelerated weathering test if (1) After conditioning,...

  12. 46 CFR 160.072-5 - Accelerated weathering test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accelerated weathering test. 160.072-5 Section 160.072-5... weathering test. (a) Condition the flag, folded to 1/16th its size or as packaged, whichever is smaller, by... less than 24 hours. (d) The flag fails the accelerated weathering test if (1) After conditioning,...

  13. 46 CFR 160.072-5 - Accelerated weathering test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accelerated weathering test. 160.072-5 Section 160.072-5... weathering test. (a) Condition the flag, folded to 1/16th its size or as packaged, whichever is smaller, by... less than 24 hours. (d) The flag fails the accelerated weathering test if (1) After conditioning,...

  14. 46 CFR 160.072-5 - Accelerated weathering test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accelerated weathering test. 160.072-5 Section 160.072-5... weathering test. (a) Condition the flag, folded to 1/16th its size or as packaged, whichever is smaller, by... less than 24 hours. (d) The flag fails the accelerated weathering test if (1) After conditioning,...

  15. 46 CFR 160.072-5 - Accelerated weathering test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accelerated weathering test. 160.072-5 Section 160.072-5... weathering test. (a) Condition the flag, folded to 1/16th its size or as packaged, whichever is smaller, by... less than 24 hours. (d) The flag fails the accelerated weathering test if (1) After conditioning,...

  16. Next linear collider test accelerator injector design and status

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) being built at SLAC will integrate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures and RF systems for the Next Linear Collider, demonstrate multibunch beam-loading energy compensation and suppression of higher-order deflecting modes, measure transverse components of the accelerating field, and measure the dark current generated by RF field emission in the accelerator Injector design and simulation results for the NLCTA injector are discussed.

  17. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  18. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  19. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  20. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  1. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  2. Coarse-coal hydrotransport studies using the separate effects test stand: FY 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.B.

    1981-09-01

    The Separate Effects Test Stand (SETS) was built to evaluate the rotating pipe-wheel stand concept for hydrotransport testing and to obtain hydrotransport data in support of the US Department of Energy's Hydraulic Transport Research Facility (HTRF). The SETS program involved three phases of testing. The first phase was to evaluate the wheel test stand as an adequate mechanism for testing the hydrotransport of coarse-particle coal through pipe. The second phase was to obtain preliminary data on coal head loss (flow pressure drop) during hydrotransport. The third phase was to determine the effects of coal hydrotransport on water quality. Other data obtained during the program included pipe wear and the size degradation of coal particles. The SETS was tested with water only and the resultant head loss data were compared with head loss values recorded for water flow in staight pipe. These tests were run to determine how well the SETS modeled straight pipe flow.

  3. The Instrumented Sit-to-Stand Test (iSTS) Has Greater Clinical Relevance than the Manually Recorded Sit-to-Stand Test in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    van Lummel, Rob C.; Walgaard, Stefan; Maier, Andrea B.; Ainsworth, Erik; Beek, Peter J.; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability to rise from sitting to standing is critical to an individual’s quality of life, as it is a prerequisite for functional independence. The purpose of the current study was to examine the hypothesis that test durations as assessed with the instrumented repeated Sit-To-Stand (STS) show stronger associations with health status, functional status and daily physical activity of older adults than manually recorded test durations. Methods In 63 older participants (mean age 83 ±6.9 years, 51 female), health status was assessed using the European Quality of Life questionnaire and functional status was assessed using the physical function index of the of the RAND-36. Physical performance was measured using a wearable sensor-based STS test. From this test, durations, sub-durations and kinematics of the STS movements were estimated and analysed. In addition, physical activity was measured for one week using an activity monitor and episodes of lying, sitting, standing and locomotion were identified. Associations between STS parameters with health status, functional status and daily physical activity were assessed. Results The manually recorded STS times were not significantly associated with health status (p = 0.457) and functional status (p = 0.055), whereas the instrumented STS times were (both p = 0.009). The manually recorded STS durations showed a significant association to daily physical activity for mean sitting durations (p = 0.042), but not for mean standing durations (p = 0.230) and mean number of locomotion periods (p = 0.218). Furthermore, durations of the dynamic sit-to-stand phase of the instrumented STS showed more significant associations with health status, functional status and daily physical activity (all p = 0.001) than the static phases standing and sitting (p = 0.043–0.422). Conclusions As hypothesized, instrumented STS durations were more strongly associated with participant health status, functional status and physical activity

  4. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Water Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photograph, a construction worker demonstrates the size of the massive water valve that was used in the testing cooling

  5. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Fenni Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-15

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  6. A test stand for off-line laser ion source development at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Lavoie, J. P.; Li, R.; Bricault, P.; Lassen, J.; Chachkova, O.; Teigelhoefer, A.

    2013-01-15

    A test stand for ion source development and laser resonance ionization spectroscopy was built and commissioned at TRIUMF. The test stand is needed to develop efficient ion sources that can function reliably in the hostile, high temperature, high radiation environment of TRIUMF's isotope separator on-line (ISOL) production target ion source. In addition, it enables laser resonance ionization spectroscopy to develop laser excitation schemes suitable for the solid-state laser systems used with TRIUMF's resonant ionization laser ion source . Also, it allows for possible improvement of current ion sources and validation of new designs. The test stand employs a copy of the ion optics used on-line, so that results can be transferred directly to radioactive ion beam production. Due to space restrictions and the need for rapid mass scans, a quadrupole mass spectrometer is used as a mass separator. One of the first experiments conducted on the laser ion source test stand (LIS STAND) was resonant ionization spectroscopy of gallium to improve on the ionization scheme previously used on-line, so that low yield isotopes (e.g., {sup 62}Ga) become available for experiments. Different Rydberg series in gallium were observed and autoionizing states were searched for. The overall LIS STAND system performance, characteristics, and the first resonant ionization spectroscopy are described.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Pump House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. This photograph, taken September 25, 1963, depicts the construction progress of the Pump House and massive round water

  8. Aggression Replacement Training[R] Stands the Test of Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amendola, Mark; Oliver, Robert

    2010-01-01

    There have been longstanding debates in the scientific community regarding what qualifies as evidence for programs that work with challenging youth. There are also a variety of levels of evidence on a continuum from promising to proven. Aggression Replacement Training[R] has stood the test of time in terms of its scientific underpinning and…

  9. Field Testing Stand-Alone Courseware: A Proven Practical Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westgaard, Odin

    1979-01-01

    Describes procedure to measure a new course's ability to meet standards in three areas: student acceptance, student gains, and student comprehension. It has been used over three years to test the acceptability of 31 courses which contain more than 200 videotape presentations, and thousands of pages of print materials. (Author/JEG)

  10. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  11. Inter-rater reliability of a clinical test of standing function.

    PubMed

    Triolo, R J; Bevelheimer, T; Eisenhower, G; Wormser, D

    1995-01-01

    The Functional Standing Test (FST) has been proposed and described as an evaluative tool to assess a person's ability to perform one-handed reaching tasks while standing. The test items, several of which are identical to those in the Jebson Test of Hand Function, require the manipulation of objects on a counter top and on simulated kitchen shelves while the person is standing. The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability of FST when it is administered to adolescents with spinal cord injuries who stand with braces, and to able-bodied young adults. Two testers administered the FST separately to three individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) below T-2 who stood with knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) and to 10 able-bodied people who stood unassisted. The order in which the testers operated was randomized and the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC (2,1)) was used to analyze inter-rater reliability. Eighty percent of the subtests were found to be moderately to very reliable when applied to either group on the same day. Half of the test items were categorized as having the same level of inter-rater reliability between the two sample populations. A modified version of the test eliminating unreliable components could serve as a valuable and inexpensive means of evaluating the effectiveness of various therapies and technologies to provide or assist standing function. Validity and specificity of the test remain the focus of future research.

  12. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The 250 C, 200C and 125C accelerated tests are described. The wear-out distributions from the 250 and 200 C tests were used to estimate the activation energy between the two test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear-out region. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three devices types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment is assessed. Guidlines for the development of accelerated life-test conditions are proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life-test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits is described.

  13. Terrestrial Photovoltaic Module Accelerated Test-To-Failure Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    This technical report documents a test-to-failure protocol that may be used to obtain quantitative information about the reliability of photovoltaic modules using accelerated testing in environmental temperature-humidity chambers.

  14. Ground test accelerator control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Burczyk, L.; Dalesio, R.; Dingler, R.; Hill, J.; Howell, J.A.; Kerstiens, D.; King, R.; Kozubal, A.; Little, C.; Martz, V.; Rothrock, R.; Sutton, J.

    1988-01-01

    The GTA control system provides an environment in which the automation of a state-of-the-art accelerator can be developed. It makes use of commercially available computers, workstations, computer networks, industrial I/O equipment, and software. This system has built-in supervisory control (like most accelerator control systems), tools to support continuous control (like the process control industry), and sequential control for automatic startup and fault recovery (like few other accelerator control systems). Several software tools support these levels of control: a real-time operating system (VxWorks) with a real-time kernel (VRTX), a configuration database, a sequencer, and a graphics editor. VxWorks supports multitasking, fast context-switching, and preemptive scheduling. VxWorks/VRTX is a network-based development environment specifically designed to work in partnership with the UNIX operating system. A database provides the interface to the accelerator components. It consists of a run time library and a database configuration and editing tool. A sequencer initiates and controls the operation of all sequence programs (expressed as state programs). A graphics editor gives the user the ability to create color graphic displays showing the state of the machine in either text or graphics form. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Accelerating Corrosion in Solar-Cell Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalaby, H. M.

    1986-01-01

    In simple electrochemical cell, two silicon solar cells serve as anode and cathode, respectively. Electrolytic medium and voltage between them accelerate corrosion and migration interactions between cell metal contacts and plastic encapsulant. Degradation of metal contacts becomes evident in few hours. Although developed specifically for cells with Ti/Pd/Ag contacts, technique readily adapted to other metal combinations.

  16. MARS--does it stand the test of time?

    PubMed

    Mullen, Kevin D; Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2004-12-01

    Artificial liver support systems have been tested for decades in the management of liver failure. Generally, after some promising results published as case series, the device either disappears or fails to show significant benefit in controlled trials. Recently, the molecular absorbent recycling systems (MARS) or extracorporeal albumin dialysis (ECAD) technique appears to have broken this trend. Responding to the title one could summarize by saying this technique so far has stood the test of time. Data in support of its use in acute liver failure (ALF) is still scant and difficult to assess. However, in a well known but not very well defined entity of acute on chronic liver failure (AOCLF) the ECAD technique has been shown to improve survival compared to a similar randomized control group receiving standard supportive therapy. This well tolerated liver support system has real potential for widespread application if further well designed multicenter clinical trials continue to support its effectiveness. Its future lies probably in the management of the moribund hospitalized patient on the transplant list awaiting a donor liver.

  17. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  18. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell...

  19. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell...

  20. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell...

  1. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell...

  2. 40 CFR 201.16 - Standard for locomotive load cell test stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for locomotive load cell test... Interstate Rail Carrier Operations Standards § 201.16 Standard for locomotive load cell test stands. (a) Effective January 15, 1984, no carrier subject to this reguation shall operate locomotive load cell...

  3. Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of the Constellation Program A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2007-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a test stand for use in testing the J-2X rocket engine at simulated altitude conditions in support of NASA's Constellation Program.

  4. Ares Launch Vehicles Development Awakens Historic Test Stands at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Burt, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper chronicles the rebirth of two national rocket testing assets located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: the Dynamic Test Stand (also known as the Ground Vibration Test Stand) and the Static Test Stand (also known as the Main Propulsion Test Stand). It will touch on the historical significance of these special facilities, while introducing the requirements driving modifications for testing a new generation space transportation system, which is set to come on line after the Space Shuttle is retired in 2010. In many ways, America's journey to explore the Moon begins at the Marshall Center, which is developing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, along with managing the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program and leading the Lunar Lander descent stage work, among other Constellation Program assignments. An important component of this work is housed in Marshall's Engineering Directorate, which manages more than 40 facilities capable of a full spectrum of rocket and space transportation technology testing - from small components to full-up engine systems. The engineers and technicians who operate these test facilities have more than a thousand years of combined experience in this highly specialized field. Marshall has one of the few government test groups in the United States with responsibility for the overall performance of a test program from conception to completion. The Test Laboratory has facilities dating back to the early 1960s, when the test stands needed for the Apollo Program and other scientific endeavors were commissioned and built along the Marshall Center's southern boundary, with logistics access by air, railroad, and barge or boat on the Tennessee River. NASA and its industry partners are designing and developing a new human-rated system based on the requirements for safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation solutions. Given below are summaries of the Dynamic Test Stand and the Static Test Stand capabilities

  5. Testing general relativity with laser accelerated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gergely, L. A.; Harko, T.

    2012-07-09

    Electron accelerations of the order of 10{sup 21} g obtained by laser fields open up the possibility of experimentally testing one of the cornerstones of general relativity, the weak equivalence principle, which states that the local effects of a gravitational field are indistinguishable from those sensed by a properly accelerated observer in flat space-time. We illustrate how this can be done by solving the Einstein equations in vacuum and integrating the geodesic equations of motion for a uniformly accelerated particle.

  6. Difference in Postural Control during Quiet Standing between Young Children and Adults: Assessment with Center of Mass Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Naoko; Sasagawa, Shun; Yamamoto, Akio; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The development of upright postural control has often been investigated using time series of center of foot pressure (COP), which is proportional to the ankle joint torque (i.e., the motor output of a single joint). However, the center of body mass acceleration (COMacc), which can reflect joint motions throughout the body as well as multi-joint coordination, is useful for the assessment of the postural control strategy at the whole-body level. The purpose of the present study was to investigate children’s postural control during quiet standing by using the COMacc. Ten healthy children and 15 healthy young adults were instructed to stand upright quietly on a force platform with their eyes open or closed. The COMacc as well as the COP in the anterior–posterior direction was obtained from ground reaction force measurement. We found that both the COMacc and COP could clearly distinguish the difference between age groups and visual conditions. We also found that the sway frequency of COMacc in children was higher than that in adults, for which differences in biomechanical and/or neural factors between age groups may be responsible. Our results imply that the COMacc can be an alternative force platform measure for assessing developmental changes in upright postural control. PMID:26447883

  7. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerone C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of metal-based structures has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites to determine corrosion resistance in marine environments. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions of the corrosive environment. Their success for correlation to atmospheric exposure is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated laboratory testing, which often focuses on the electrochemical reactions that occur during corrosion conditions, has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long term service life of a metal despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard and their use is imperative, a method that correlates timescales from atmospheric exposure to accelerated testing would be very valuable. This work uses surface chemistry to interpret the chemical changes occurring on low carbon steel during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions with the objective of finding a correlation between its accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The current results of correlating data from marine atmospheric exposure conditions at the Kennedy Space Center beachside corrosion test site, alternating seawater spray, and immersion in typical electrochemical laboratory conditions, will be presented. Key words: atmospheric exposure, accelerated corrosion testing, alternating seawater spray, marine, correlation, seawater, carbon steel, long-term corrosion performance prediction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  8. Effect of In-Flight Exercise and Extravehicular Activity on Postflight Stand Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice; Greenisen, Michael; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Foster, Philip P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercise performed by Space Shuttle crewmembers during short-duration spaceflights (9-16 days) affects the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to standing within 2-4 hr of landing. Thirty crewmembers performed self-selected in-flight exercise and maintained exercise logs to monitor their exercise intensity and duration. A 10min stand test, preceded by at least 6 min of quiet supine rest, was completed 10- 15 d before launch (PRE) and within four hours of landing (POST). Based upon their in-flight exercise records, subjects were grouped as either high (HIex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% ,HRMax, = 20 min/session, n = 11), medium (MEDex: = 3x/week, HR = 70% HRmax, = 20 min/session, n = 10), or low (LOex: = 3x/week, HR and duration variable, n = 11) exercisers. HR and BP responses to standing were compared between groups (ANOVA, or analysis of variance, P < 0.05). There were no PRE differences between the groups in supine or standing HR and BP. Although POST supine HR was similar to PRE, all groups had an increased standing HR compared to PRE. The increase in HR upon standing was significantly greater after flight in the LOex group (36+/-5 bpm) compared to HIex or MEDex groups (25+/-1bpm; 22+/-2 bpm). Similarly, the decrease in pulse pressure (PP) from supine to standing was unchanged after spaceflight in the MEDex and HIex groups, but was significantly less in the LOex group (PRE: -9+/- 3, POST: -19+/- 4 mmHg). Thus, moderate to high levels of in-flight exercise attenuated HR and PP responses to standing after spaceflight compared.

  9. New Accelerated Testing and Lifetime Modeling Methods Promise Faster Development of More Durable MEAs

    SciTech Connect

    Pierpont, D. M.; Hicks, M. T.; Turner, P. L.; Watschke, T. M.

    2005-11-01

    For the successful commercialization of fuel cell technology, it is imperative that membrane electrode assembly (MEA) durability is understood and quantified. MEA lifetimes of 40,000 hours remain a key target for stationary power applications. Since it is impractical to wait 40,000 hours for durability results, it is critical to learn as much information as possible in as short a time period as possible to determine if an MEA sample will survive past its lifetime target. Consequently, 3M has utilized accelerated testing and statistical lifetime modeling tools to develop a methodology for evaluating MEA lifetime. Construction and implementation of a multi-cell test stand have allowed for multiple accelerated tests and stronger statistical data for learning about durability.

  10. Integrated System Health Management: Pilot Operational Implementation in a Rocket Engine Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John L.; Morris, Jonathan A.; Turowski, Mark P.; Franzl, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a credible implementation of integrated system health management (ISHM) capability, as a pilot operational system. Important core elements that make possible fielding and evolution of ISHM capability have been validated in a rocket engine test stand, encompassing all phases of operation: stand-by, pre-test, test, and post-test. The core elements include an architecture (hardware/software) for ISHM, gateways for streaming real-time data from the data acquisition system into the ISHM system, automated configuration management employing transducer electronic data sheets (TEDS?s) adhering to the IEEE 1451.4 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators, broadcasting and capture of sensor measurements and health information adhering to the IEEE 1451.1 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators, user interfaces for management of redlines/bluelines, and establishment of a health assessment database system (HADS) and browser for extensive post-test analysis. The ISHM system was installed in the Test Control Room, where test operators were exposed to the capability. All functionalities of the pilot implementation were validated during testing and in post-test data streaming through the ISHM system. The implementation enabled significant improvements in awareness about the status of the test stand, and events and their causes/consequences. The architecture and software elements embody a systems engineering, knowledge-based approach; in conjunction with object-oriented environments. These qualities are permitting systematic augmentation of the capability and scaling to encompass other subsystems.

  11. 5. "UNDERGROUND CONTROL ROOM AT TEST STAND 1A, DIRECTORATE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "UNDERGROUND CONTROL ROOM AT TEST STAND 1-A, DIRECTORATE OF MISSILE CAPTIVE TEST, EDWARDS AFB, 15 JAN 58, 3097.58." Two men working in the control room. Photo no. "3097 58; G-AFFTC 15 JAN 58, T.S. 1-A Control". - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Electronic accelerator pedal optimal design of intelligent test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quailing; Lin, Min; Guo, Bin; Luo, Zai

    2010-12-01

    Developed an intelligent test system for the electronic accelerator pedal, and optimized it. The system uses the three-dimensional motion platform driven by servo motor to realize to control the movement of the electronic accelerator pedal automatically and uses the least squares method to optimize the data for the electronic accelerator pedal which is integrated with linear Hall sensors. Carried on the test experiment to the double electric potential signal output electron accelerator pedal and the results show that the system has excellent dynamic and static performance, and the change of motor parameters and load disturbances has strong robustness. Performance indicators have reached the Euro III emission standard configuration of the electronic accelerator pedal and the new technical requirements.

  13. Reliability and sensitivity to change of the timed standing balance test in children with down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aranha, Vencita Priyanka; Samuel, Asir John; Saxena, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the reliability and sensitivity to change of the timed standing balance test in children with Down syndrome (DS). Methods: It was a nonblinded, comparison study with a convenience sample of subjects consisting of children with DS (n = 9) aged 8–17 years. The main outcome measure was standing balance which was assessed using timed standing balance test, the time required to maintain in four conditions, eyes open static, eyes closed static, eyes open dynamic, and eyes closed dynamic. Results: Relative reliability was excellent for all four conditions with an Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) ranging from 0.91 to 0.93. The variation between repeated measurements for each condition was minimal with standard error of measurement (SEM) of 0.21–0.59 s, suggestive of excellent absolute reliability. The sensitivity to change as measured by smallest real change (SRC) was 1.27 s for eyes open static, 1.63 s for eyes closed static, 0.58 s for eyes open dynamic, and 0.61 s for eyes closed static. Conclusions: Timed standing balance test is an easy to administer test and sensitive to change with strong absolute and relative reliabilities, an important first step in establishing its utility as a clinical balance measure in children with DS. PMID:26933350

  14. Accelerator Tests of the KLEM Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Baranova, N.; Christl, M.; Chilingarian, A.; Chupin, I.; Derrickson, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.

    2003-01-01

    The Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter (KLEM) device is planned for direct measurement of the elemental energy spectra of high-energy (10(exp 11)-10(exp 16) eV) cosmic rays. The first KLEM prototype has been tested at CERN with 180 GeV pion beam in 2001. A modified KLEM prototype will be tested in proton and heavy ion beams to give more experimental data on energy resolution and charge resolution with KLEM method. The first test results are presented and compared with simulations.

  15. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerated life tests were performed on CMOS microcircuits to predict their long term reliability. The consistency of the CMOS microcircuit activation energy between the range of 125 C to 200 C and the range 200 C to 250 C was determined. Results indicate CMOS complexity and the amount of moisture detected inside the devices after testing influences time to failure of tested CMOS devices.

  16. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  17. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions. PMID

  18. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  19. Z-2 Suit Support Stand and MKIII Suit Center of Gravity Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tuan Q.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's next generation spacesuits are the Z-Series suits, made for a range of possible exploration missions in the near future. The prototype Z-1 suit has been developed and assembled to incorporate new technologies that has never been utilized before in the Apollo suits and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). NASA engineers tested the Z-1 suit extensively in order to developed design requirements for the new Z-2 suit. At the end of 2014, NASA will be receiving the new Z-2 suit to perform more testing and to further develop the new technologies of the suit. In order to do so, a suit support stand will be designed and fabricated to support the Z-2 suit during maintenance, sizing, and structural leakage testing. The Z-2 Suit Support Stand (Z2SSS) will be utilized for these purposes in the early testing stages of the Z-2 suit.

  20. The test stand system for the PHENIX iFVTX silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Ryan A.; Turqueti, Marcos A.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    PHENIX is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and the iFVTX is a new pixel tracker which will be installed in the forward tracker region of PHENIX. Fermilab has developed a complete test stand system for the examination of FPix2.1 modules, hybrids, and pixel chips that will be installed in the iFVTX. The system is currently in use for chip, module, and wafer testing at Fermilab. The test stand architecture is flexible and can be adapted to new requirements. In this paper, the software and hardware integration will be discussed followed by an analysis of the advantages of choosing a modular approach for the system. Finally, a selection of tests supported by the system, along with sample results, will be presented and explained.

  1. Macroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Takayama, K.; Govil, R.; Sessler, Andrew M.

    1992-02-01

    Free-electron laser operation is formulated using a macroparticle approach based on a universal gain equation. Microwave excitation in a single cavity is derived analytically and is given in the form of analytic recursion equations for a multicavity system driven by a sequence of electron bunches. Qualitative and quantitative insights into the basic excitation and saturation mechanisms are provided. Stability analysis on a test particle moving around a macroparticle shows the importance of precise control of bunch spacing.

  2. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the time period from May 1976 to December 1979 and encompasses the three phases of accelerated testing: Phase 1, the 250 C testing; Phase 2, the 200 C testing; and Phase 3, the 125 C testing. The duration of the test in Phase 1 and Phase 2 was sufficient to take the devices into the wear out region. The wear out distributions were used to estimate the activation energy between the 250 C and the 200 C test temperatures. The duration of the 125 C test, 20,000 hours, was not sufficient to bring the test devices into the wear out region; consequently the third data point at 125 C for determining the consistency of activation energy could not be obtained. It was estimated that, for the most complex of the three device types, the activation energy between 200 C and 125 C should be at least as high as that between 250 C and 200 C. The practicality of the use of high temperature for the accelerated life tests from the point of view of durability of equipment was assessed. Guidelines for the development of accelerated life test conditions were proposed. The use of the silicon nitride overcoat to improve the high temperature accelerated life test characteristics of CMOS microcircuits was explored in Phase 4 of this study and is attached as an appendix to this report.

  3. Operational evaluation of a proppeller test stand in the quiet flow facility at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Operational proof tests of a propeller test stand (PTS) in a quiet flow facility (QFF) are presented. The PTS is an experimental test bed for acoustic propeller research in the quiet flow environment of the QFF. These proof tests validate thrust and torque predictions, examine the repeatability of measurements on the PTS, and determine the effect of applying artificial roughness to the propeller blades. Since a thrusting propeller causes an open jet to contract, the potential flow core was surveyed to examine the magnitude of the contraction. These measurements are compared with predicted values. The predictions are used to determine operational limitations for testing a given propeller design in the QFF.

  4. Sensitivity and alternative operating point studies on a high charge CW FEL injector test stand at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Kehne, D.; Benson, S.

    1995-12-31

    A high charge CW FEL injector test stand is being built at CEBAF based on a 500 kV DC laser gun, a 1500 MHz room-temperature buncher, and a high-gradient ({approx}10 MV/m) CEBAF cryounit containing two 1500 MHz CEBAF SRF cavities. Space-charge-dominated beam dynamics simulations show that this injector should be an excellent high-brightness electron beam source for CW UV FELs if the nominal parameters assigned to each component of the system are experimentally achieved. Extensive sensitivity and alternative operating point studies have been conducted numerically to establish tolerances on the parameters of various injector system components. The consequences of degraded injector performance, due to failure to establish and/or maintain the nominal system design parameters, on the performance of the main accelerator and the FEL itself are discussed.

  5. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  6. Testing of a high current dc ESQ accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Ackerman, G.D.; Ackerman, O.A.; Chan, C.F.; Cooper, W.S.; deVries, G.J.; Kunkel, W.B.; Soroka, L.; Steele, W.F.; Wells, R.P.

    1991-05-01

    A high current dc electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator is being developed for negative-ion-based neutral beam heating and current drive on the next generation tokamak. Beam energy and current will eventually be in the MeV and multiampere range.l This CCVV (constant- current variable-voltage) accelerator uses a series of identical ESQ modules. We have successfully tested a prototype CCVV accelerator up to 200 keV with a 100 mA He{sub +} beam (with space charge equivalence of 140 mA of D{sup {minus}}) for a pulse length of 1 s. Testing was also done with a 42 mA H{sup {minus}} beam (H{sup {minus}} beam current was limited by source performance). There was almost no beam loss in the ESQ accelerator. no emittance growth was found in the beam injected from the preaccelerator into the ESQ accelerator had low aberration. We are presently designing a proof-of- principle one-channel CCVV accelerator that would accelerate 1.0 A of D{sup {minus}} 1.3 MeV energy. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  7. The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab: Science Program

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; Harms, Elvin; Henderson, Stuart; Leibfritz, Jerry; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Valishev, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) currently in commissioning phase at Fermilab is foreseen to support a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop novel approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation. ASTA incorporates a superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) linac coupled to a flexible high-brightness photoinjector. The facility also includes a small-circumference storage ring capable of storing electrons or protons. This report summarizes the facility capabilities, and provide an overview of the accelerator-science researches to be enabled.

  8. Backward-propagating MeV electrons in ultra-intense laser interactions: Standing wave acceleration and coupling to the reflected laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, Chris Feister, Scott; Morrison, John T.; Chowdhury, Enam A.; Nees, John A.; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, W. M.

    2015-02-15

    Laser-accelerated electron beams have been created at a kHz repetition rate from the reflection of intense (∼10{sup 18 }W/cm{sup 2}), ∼40 fs laser pulses focused on a continuous water-jet in an experiment at the Air Force Research Laboratory. This paper investigates Particle-in-Cell simulations of the laser-target interaction to identify the physical mechanisms of electron acceleration in this experiment. We find that the standing-wave pattern created by the overlap of the incident and reflected laser is particularly important because this standing wave can “inject” electrons into the reflected laser pulse where the electrons are further accelerated. We identify two regimes of standing wave acceleration: a highly relativistic case (a{sub 0} ≥ 1), and a moderately relativistic case (a{sub 0} ∼ 0.5) which operates over a larger fraction of the laser period. In previous studies, other groups have investigated the highly relativistic case for its usefulness in launching electrons in the forward direction. We extend this by investigating electron acceleration in the specular (back reflection) direction and over a wide range of intensities (10{sup 17}–10{sup 19 }W cm{sup −2})

  9. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  10. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, T. L.

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by x-band klystrons with RF pulse compression. The design of the linac RF system is based on x-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of RF pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by RF phase modulation, intrapulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  11. Evaluation of an Accelerated ELDRS Test Using Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, Ronald L.; Adell, Philippe C.; Rax, Bernard; McClure, Steven; Barnaby, Hugh J.; Kruckmeyer, Kirby; Triggs, B.

    2011-01-01

    An accelerated total ionizing dose (TID) hardness assurance test for enhanced low dose rate sensitive (ELDRS) bipolar linear circuits, using high dose rate tests on parts that have been exposed to molecular hydrogen, has been proposed and demonstrated on several ELDRS part types. In this study several radiation-hardened "ELDRS-free" part types have been tested using this same approach to see if the test is overly conservative.

  12. Credit BG. Looking southeast at Test Stand "D" (Building 4223/E24). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Looking southeast at Test Stand "D" (Building 4223/E-24). Left foreground contains six high-pressure nitrogen tanks which supplied nitrogen for operation of propellant valves. Several tanks for other substances have been removed from the base of the tower as part of decontamination and dismantling program. The vertical vacuum test cell can be seen in the tower behind the western sunscreen. At the top of the tower in the northeast corner is the interstage condenser used in the series of vacuum ejectors; at the top of the condenser is one of two Z-stage ejectors used to evacuate the condenser. The hoist beam for lifting/lowering rocket engines can be clearly seen projecting to the west over the pavement. In the distance on the right are Clayton water-tube steam generators from Building 4280/E-81, and the towers for Test Stand "C" and its scrubber-condenser - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand D, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Presyncopal/Non-Presyncopal Outcomes of Post Spaceflight Stand Tests are Consistent from Flight to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. S.; Meck, J. V.

    2004-01-01

    The overall prevalence of orthostatic hypotension after short duration (6-18 d) spaceflight is 20% with existing countermeasures. However, it is not known if the outcomes of stand tests for orthostatic tolerance are consistent within individuals on subsequent flights, or if first time fliers are more (or less) likely to experience orthostatic hypotension and presyncope than are veteran astronauts. Fifty astronauts were studied retrospectively. Stand test data, which had been collected before and after spaceflight, were compared from at least two flights for each astronaut. For twenty-five of these astronauts, their first flight in this database was also their first time to fly into space. For the remaining 25, their first flight in this database was their second, third or fourth flight, as data were available. No subject became presyncopal during preflight testing. Of the 50 subjects, 45 (90%) had the same outcome on their first and second fligh ts of this study. Of 14 subjects on whom we had data from a third mission, 12 had the same stand test outcome on all three flights (86% same outcome across three flights). There was no correlation between flight duration and orthostatic tolerance (r = 0.39). These data support the idea that astronauts are predisposed to orthostatic tolerance/intolerance after spaceflight and that this predisposition is not altered by subsequent flights. Flight durations within this data set did not alter the likelihood of orthostatic intolerance and rookie fliers were no more likely to experience orthostatic intolerance than were veteran astronauts.

  14. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... coupling operations, and retarders shall be performed in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR part... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement...

  15. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... coupling operations, and retarders shall be performed in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR part... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement...

  16. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... coupling operations, and retarders shall be performed in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR part... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement...

  17. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... coupling operations, and retarders shall be performed in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR part... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement...

  18. 49 CFR 210.33 - Operation standards (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... coupling operations, and retarders shall be performed in accordance with the requirements of 40 CFR part... cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). 210.33 Section 210.33 Transportation Other... (switcher locomotives, load cell test stands, car coupling operations, and retarders). (a) Measurement...

  19. Guidance on the Stand Down, Mothball, and Reactivation of Ground Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkman, Gregrey T.; Dunn, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of aerospace and aeronautics products typically requires three distinct types of testing resources across research, development, test, and evaluation: experimental ground testing, computational "testing" and development, and flight testing. Over the last twenty plus years, computational methods have replaced some physical experiments and this trend is continuing. The result is decreased utilization of ground test capabilities and, along with market forces, industry consolidation, and other factors, has resulted in the stand down and oftentimes closure of many ground test facilities. Ground test capabilities are (and very likely will continue to be for many years) required to verify computational results and to provide information for regimes where computational methods remain immature. Ground test capabilities are very costly to build and to maintain, so once constructed and operational it may be desirable to retain access to those capabilities even if not currently needed. One means of doing this while reducing ongoing sustainment costs is to stand down the facility into a "mothball" status - keeping it alive to bring it back when needed. Both NASA and the US Department of Defense have policies to accomplish the mothball of a facility, but with little detail. This paper offers a generic process to follow that can be tailored based on the needs of the owner and the applicable facility.

  20. A quick screening test of competency to stand trial for defendants with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Smith, S A; Hudson, R L

    1995-02-01

    19 terms and concepts from evaluations of competency to stand trial of 55 defendants with mental retardation were rated to examine whether a quick screening test could be devised that would differentiate those who were judged competent or not competent. A multiple regression and discriminant analysis gave four items that yielded maximum predictability (R = .84): court strategy, plead, testify, and jury. Guilty, trial, and prosecutor were also significantly more difficult for those who were not competent than those who were.

  1. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is presented including the design goals and computational results. The heart of the system is a radiofrequency electron gun utilizing a photo-excited metal cathode followed by a conventional electron linac. The Nd:YAG laser used to drive the cathode with 6 ps long pulses can be synchronized to a high peak power CO{sub 2} laser in order to study laser acceleration of electrons. Current operational status of the project will be presented along with early beam tests.

  2. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximow, B.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerated life test of sufficient duration to generate a minimum of 50% cumulative failures in lots of CMOS devices was conducted to provide a basis for determining the consistency of activation energy at 250 C. An investigation was made to determine whether any thresholds were exceeded during the high temperature testing, which could trigger failure mechanisms unique to that temperature. The usefulness of the 250 C temperature test as a predictor of long term reliability was evaluated.

  3. Quick setup of unit test for accelerator controls system

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-03-28

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  4. Reliability and validity of a talent identification test battery for seated and standing Paralympic throws.

    PubMed

    Spathis, Jemima Grace; Connick, Mark James; Beckman, Emma Maree; Newcombe, Peter Anthony; Tweedy, Sean Michael

    2015-01-01

    Paralympic throwing events for athletes with physical impairments comprise seated and standing javelin, shot put, discus and seated club throwing. Identification of talented throwers would enable prediction of future success and promote participation; however, a valid and reliable talent identification battery for Paralympic throwing has not been reported. This study evaluates the reliability and validity of a talent identification battery for Paralympic throws. Participants were non-disabled so that impairment would not confound analyses, and results would provide an indication of normative performance. Twenty-eight non-disabled participants (13 M; 15 F) aged 23.6 years (±5.44) performed five kinematically distinct criterion throws (three seated, two standing) and nine talent identification tests (three anthropometric, six motor); 23 were tested a second time to evaluate test-retest reliability. Talent identification test-retest reliability was evaluated using Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots (Limits of Agreement). Spearman's correlation assessed strength of association between criterion throws and talent identification tests. Reliability was generally acceptable (mean ICC = 0.89), but two seated talent identification tests require more extensive familiarisation. Correlation strength (mean rs = 0.76) indicated that the talent identification tests can be used to validly identify individuals with competitively advantageous attributes for each of the five kinematically distinct throwing activities. Results facilitate further research in this understudied area.

  5. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. |

    1992-09-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users` facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF`s experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  6. The BNL Accelerator Test Facility and experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL is a users' facility for experiments in Accelerator and Beam Physics. The ATF provides high brightness electron beams and high-power laser pulses synchronized to the electron beam, suitable for studies of new methods of high-gradient acceleration and state-of-the-art Free-Electron Lasers. The electrons are produced by a laser photocathode rf gun and accelerated to 50 MeV by two traveling wave accelerator sections. The lasers include a 10 mJ, 10 ps ND:YAG laser and a 500 mJ, 10 to 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser. A number of users from National Laboratories, universities and industry take part in experiments at the ATF. The experimental program includes various laser acceleration schemes, Free-Electron Laser experiments and a program on the development of high-brightness electron beams. The ATF's experimental program commenced in early 1991 at an energy of about 4 MeV. The full program, with 50 MeV and the high-power laser will begin operation this year.

  7. 3. SOUTH TEST STAND WITH X15 IN PLACE. A color ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH TEST STAND WITH X-15 IN PLACE. A color photograph taken from a lift boom or from atop a truck, looking northwest to NASA hangars in the far distance. Also shows the shop building at left, and two observation bunkers with hatches open; one at right (Bldg. 1933) and the other in front of Liquid Oxygen tank truck at left (Bldg. 1934). - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Paxton K; Parsons, Michael S; Unz, Ronald J; Waggoner, Charles A

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m(3)/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome.

  9. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Unz, Ronald J.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m3/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome.

  10. rf breakdown tests of mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-01-01

    We are exploring the physics and frequency-scaling of vacuum rf breakdowns at sub-THz frequencies. We present the experimental results of rf tests performed in metallic mm-wave accelerating structures. These experiments were carried out at the facility for advanced accelerator experimental tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. We compared the performances of metal structures made with copper and stainless steel. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode, propagating in the structures at the speed of light, varies from 115 to 140 GHz. The traveling wave structures are 0.1 m long and composed of 125 coupled cavities each. We determined the peak electric field and pulse length where the structures were not damaged by rf breakdowns. We calculated the electric and magnetic field correlated with the rf breakdowns using the FACET bunch parameters. The wakefields were calculated by a frequency domain method using periodic eigensolutions. Such a method takes into account wall losses and is applicable to a large variety of geometries. The maximum achieved accelerating gradient is 0.3 GV /m with a peak surface electric field of 1.5 GV /m and a pulse length of about 2.4 ns.

  11. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  12. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing.

  13. Pilot Field Test: Use of a Compression Garment During a Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Cerisano, J.; Kofman, I.; Reschke, M.

    2016-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a concern for astronauts returning from long-duration space flight. One countermeasure that has been used to protect against OI after short-duration bed rest and space flight is the use of lower body and abdominal compression garments. However, since the end of the Space Shuttle era we have not been able to test crewmembers during the first 24 hours after landing on Earth. NASA's Pilot Field Test provided us the opportunity to test cardiovascular responses of crewmembers wearing the Russian Kentavr compression garment during a stand test at multiple time points throughout the first 24 hours after landing. HYPOTHESIS We hypothesized that the Kentavr compression garment would prevent an increase in heart rate (HR) >15 bpm during a 3.5-min stand test. METHODS: The Pilot Field Test was conducted up to 3 times during the first 24 hours after crewmembers returned to Earth: (1) either in a tent adjacent to the Soyuz landing site in Kazakhstan (approx.1 hr) or after transportation to the Karaganda airport (approx. 4 hr); (2) during a refueling stop in Scotland (approx.12 hr); and (3) upon return to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) (approx.24 hr). We measured HR and arterial pressure (finger photoplethysmography) for 2 min while the crewmember was prone and throughout 3.5 min of quiet standing. Eleven crewmembers consented to participate; however, 2 felt too ill to start the test and 1 stopped 30 sec into the stand portion of the test. Of the remaining 8 crewmembers, 2 did not wear the Russian Kentavr compression garment. Because of inclement weather at the landing site, 5 crewmembers were flown by helicopter to the Karaganda airport before initial testing and received intravenous saline before completing the stand test. One of these crewmembers wore only the portion of the Russian Kentavr compression garment that covered the lower leg and thus lacked thigh and abdominal compression. All crewmembers continued wearing the Russian Kentavr

  14. Application of the Life Safety Code to a Historic Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Lemke, Paul R.; Lewis, William L.; Covell, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    NASA has conducted a study to assess alternatives to refurbishing existing launch vehicle modal test facilities as opposed to developing new test facilities to meet the demands of a very fiscally constrained test and evaluation environment. The results of this study showed that Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Test Stand (TS) 4550 could be made compliant, within reasonable cost and schedule impacts, if safety processes and operational limitations were put in place to meet the safety codes and concerns of the Fire Marshall. Trades were performed with key selection criteria to ensure that appropriate levels of occupant safety are incorporated into test facility design modifications. In preparation for the ground vibration tests that were to be performed on the Ares I launch vehicle, the Ares Flight and Integrated Test Office (FITO) organization evaluated the available test facility options, which included the existing mothballed structural dynamic TS4550 used by Apollo and Shuttle, alternative ground vibration test facilities at other locations, and construction of a new dynamic test stand. After an exhaustive assessment of the alternatives, the results favored modifying the TS4550 because it was the lowest cost option and presented the least schedule risk to the NASA Constellation Program for Ares Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT). As the renovation design plans and drawings were being developed for TS4550, a safety concern was discovered the original design for the construction of the test stand, originally built for the Apollo Program and renovated for the Shuttle Program, was completed before NASA s adoption of the currently imposed safety and building codes per National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code [NFPA 101] and International Building Codes. The initial FITO assessment of the design changes, required to make TS4550 compliant with current safety and building standards, identified a significant cost increase and schedule impact

  15. Analysis of Flame Deflector Spray Nozzles in Rocket Engine Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachdev, Jai S.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Allgood, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a unified tightly coupled multi-phase computational framework is described for the analysis and design of cooling spray nozzle configurations on the flame deflector in rocket engine test stands. An Eulerian formulation is used to model the disperse phase and is coupled to the gas-phase equations through momentum and heat transfer as well as phase change. The phase change formulation is modeled according to a modified form of the Hertz-Knudsen equation. Various simple test cases are presented to verify the validity of the numerical framework. The ability of the methodology to accurately predict the temperature load on the flame deflector is demonstrated though application to an actual sub-scale test facility. The CFD simulation was able to reproduce the result of the test-firing, showing that the spray nozzle configuration provided insufficient amount of cooling.

  16. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  17. Lightning Protection and Structural Bonding for the B2 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    With the privatization of the space industry, NASA has entered a new era. To explore deeper parts of the solar system, NASA is developing a new spacecraft, the Space Launch System (SLS), capable of reaching these destinations, such as an asteroid or Mars. However, the test stand that is capable of testing the stage has been unused for many years. In addition to the updating/repair of the stand, more steel is being added to fully support the SLS. With all these modifications, the lightning protection system must be brought up to code to assure the protection of all personnel and assets. Structural bonding is a part of the lightning protection system. The focus of this project was to assure proper structural bonding. To begin, all relevant technical standards and the construction specifications were reviewed. This included both the specifications for the lightning protection and for general construction. The drawings were reviewed as well. From the drawings, bolted structural joints were reviewed to determine whether bonding was necessary. Several bolted joints were determined to need bonding according to the notes in the drawings. This exceeds the industry standards. The bolted joints are an electrically continuous joint. During tests, the stand experiences heavy vibration that may weaken the continuity of the bolted joint. Therefore, the secondary bonding is implemented to ensure that the structural joint has low resistance. If the structural joint has a high resistance because of corrosion, a potential gradient can occur that can cause a side flash. Damage, injury, or death can occur from a side flash so they are to be prevented. A list of the identified structural joints was compiled and sent to the contractor to be bonded. That covers the scope of this project.

  18. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.; Joshi, J.; Qian, X.; Diwan, M.; Kettell, S.; Morse, W.; Rao, T.; Stewart, J.; Tsang, T.; Zhang, L.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). This system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. A gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  19. A 20-liter test stand with gas purification for liquid argon research

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Y.; Thorn, C.; Tang, W.; Joshi, J.; Qian, X.; Diwan, M.; Kettell, S.; Morse, W.; Rao, T.; Stewart, J.; et al

    2016-06-06

    Here, we describe the design of a 20-liter test stand constructed to study fundamental properties of liquid argon (LAr). Moreover, this system utilizes a simple, cost-effective gas argon (GAr) purification to achieve high purity, which is necessary to study electron transport properties in LAr. An electron drift stack with up to 25 cm length is constructed to study electron drift, diffusion, and attachment at various electric fields. Finally, a gold photocathode and a pulsed laser are used as a bright electron source. The operational performance of this system is reported.

  20. Fluorescent screens and image processing for the APS linac test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, W.; Ko, K.

    1992-12-01

    A fluorescent screen was used to monitor relative beam position and spot size of a 56-MeV electron beam in the linac test stand. A chromium doped alumina ceramic screen inserted into the beam was monitored by a video camera. The resulting image was captured using a frame grabber and stored into memory. Reconstruction and analysis of the stored image was performed using PV-WAVE. This paper will discuss the hardware and software implementation of the fluorescent screen and imaging system. Proposed improvements for the APS linac fluorescent screens and image processing will also be discussed.

  1. The front end test stand high performance H- ion source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, D C; Lawrie, S; Letchford, A P; Gabor, C; Wise, P; Whitehead, M; Wood, T; Westall, M; Findlay, D; Perkins, M; Savage, P J; Lee, D A; Pozimski, J K

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the front end test stand (FETS) project is to demonstrate that chopped low energy beams of high quality can be produced. FETS consists of a 60 mA Penning Surface Plasma Ion Source, a three solenoid low energy beam transport, a 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole, a chopper, and a comprehensive suite of diagnostics. This paper details the design and initial performance of the ion source and the laser profile measurement system. Beam current, profile, and emittance measurements are shown for different operating conditions.

  2. A test stand for the evaluation of high efficiency mist eliminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-10-01

    High efficiency mist eliminators (HEME) are airstream filtering elements primarily used to remove liquid and solid aerosols. HEME elements are designed to reduce aerosol load on downstream high efficiency particulate air filters and to have a liquid particle removal efficiency of 99.5% for aerosols as small as 1 μm in size. The test stand described herein is designed to evaluate the loading capacity and filtering efficiency of a single HEME element. The loading capacity was determined with or without use of a water spray cleaning system to wash the interior surface of the element. The HEME element is challenged with a liquid waste surrogate using Laskin nozzles and large dispersion nozzles. The waste surrogate used was a highly caustic solution with both suspended and dissolved solids representative of actual exposures at mixed, hazardous, and radiological, waste treatment facilities. The filtering efficiency performance was determined by challenging the element with a dried waste surrogate aerosol and di-octyl phthalate intermittently during the loading process. Capabilities of the test stand and representative results obtained during testing are presented.

  3. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  4. Prototypes and system test stands for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, S.

    2016-09-01

    The CMS pixel phase-1 upgrade project replaces the current pixel detector with an upgraded system with faster readout electronics during the extended year-end technical stop of 2016/2017. New electronics prototypes for the system have been developed, and tests in a realistic environment for a comprehensive evaluation are needed. A full readout test stand with either the same hardware as used in the current CMS pixel detector or the latest prototypes of upgrade electronics has been built. The setup enables the observation and investigation of a jitter increase in the data line associated with trigger rate increases. This effect is due to the way in which the clock and trigger distribution is implemented in CMS. A new prototype of the electronics with a PLL based on a voltage controlled quartz crystal oscillator (QPLL), which works as jitter filter, in the clock distribution path was produced. With the test stand, it was confirmed that the jitter increase is not seen with the prototype, and also good performance was confirmed at the expected detector operation temperature (-20 °C).

  5. Reproduction of natural corrosion by accelerated laboratory testing methods

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, J.S.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Mazer, J.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-05-01

    Various laboratory corrosion tests have been developed to study the behavior of glass waste forms under conditions similar to those expected in an engineered repository. The data generated by laboratory experiments are useful for understanding corrosion mechanisms and for developing chemical models to predict the long-term behavior of glass. However, it is challenging to demonstrate that these test methods produce results that can be directly related to projecting the behavior of glass waste forms over time periods of thousands of years. One method to build confidence in the applicability of the test methods is to study the natural processes that have been taking place over very long periods in environments similar to those of the repository. In this paper, we discuss whether accelerated testing methods alter the fundamental mechanisms of glass corrosion by comparing the alteration patterns that occur in naturally altered glasses with those that occur in accelerated laboratory environments. This comparison is done by (1) describing the alteration of glasses reacted in nature over long periods of time and in accelerated laboratory environments and (2) establishing the reaction kinetics of naturally altered glass and laboratory reacted glass waste forms.

  6. The use of an aircraft test stand for VTOL handling qualities studies. [pilot evaluation of flight controllability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauli, F. A.; Corliss, L. D.; Selan, S. D.; Gerdes, R. M.; Gossett, T. D.

    1974-01-01

    The VTOL flight tests stand for testing control concepts on the X-14B VSS aircraft in hover, is described. This stand permits realistic and safe piloted evaluation and checkout of various control systems and of parameter variations within each system to determine acceptability to the pilot. Pilots can use it as a practical training tool to practice procedures and flying techniques and become familiar with the aircraft characteristics. Some examples of test experience are given. The test stand allows the X14B to maneuver in hover from centered position + or - 9.7 deg in roll and + or - 9.3 deg in pitch, about + or - 6 deg in yaw, and + or - 15 cm in vertical translation. The unique vertical free flight freedom enables study of liftoffs and landings with power conditions duplicated. The response on the stand agrees well with that measured in free hovering flight, and pilot comments confirm this.

  7. Superconducting Focusing Lenses for the SSR1 Cryomodule of PXIE Test Stand at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Terechkine, I.

    2016-01-01

    Five solenoid-based focusing lenses designed for use inside the SSR1 cryomodule of the PXIE test stand at Fermilab have been fabricated and tested. In addition to a focusing solenoid, each lens is equipped with a set of windings that generate magnetic field in the transverse plane and can be used in the steering dipole mode or as a skew quadrupole corrector. The lenses will be installed between superconducting cavities in the cryomodule, so getting sufficiently low fringe magnetic field was one of the main design requirements. Beam dynamics simulations indicated a need for high accuracy positioning of the lenses in the cryomodule, which triggered a study towards understanding uncertainties of the magnetic axis position relative to the geometric features of the lens. This report summarizes the efforts towards certification of the lenses, including results of performance tests, fringe field data, and uncertainty of the magnetic axis position.

  8. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavine, Theodore L.

    1995-07-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test—the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA)—which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy.

  9. Accelerated aging test results for aerospace wire insulation constructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, William G.

    1995-01-01

    Several wire insulation constructions were evaluated with and without continuous glow discharges at low pressure and high temperature to determine the aging characteristics of acceptable wire insulation constructions. It was known at the beginning of the test program that insulation aging takes several years when operated at normal ambient temperature and pressure of 20 C and 760 torr. Likewise, it was known that the accelerated aging process decreases insulation life by approximately 50% for each 10 C temperature rise. Therefore, the first phases of the program, not reported in these test results, were to select wire insulation constructions that could operate at high temperature and low pressure for over 10,000 hours with negligible shrinkage and little materials' deterioration.The final phase of the program was to determine accelerated aging characteristics. When an insulation construction is subjected to partial discharges the insulation is locally heated by the bombardment of the discharges, the insulation is also subjected to ozone and other deteriorating gas particles that may significantly increase the aging process. Several insulation systems using either a single material or combinations of teflon, kapton, and glass insulation constructions were tested. All constructions were rated to be partial discharge and/or corona-free at 240 volts, 400 Hz and 260 C (500 F) for 50, 000 hours at altitudes equivalent to the Paschen law. Minimum partial discharge aging tests were preceded by screening tests lasting 20 hours at 260 C. The aging process was accelerated by subjecting the test articles to temperatures up to 370 C (700 F) with and without partial discharges. After one month operation with continuous glow discharges surrounding the test articles, most insulation systems were either destroyed or became brittle, cracked, and unsafe for use. Time with space radiation as with partial discharges is accumulative.

  10. The study of fix composite panel and steel plates on testing stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, A.; Płaczek, M.; Wachna, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the practical possibilities of strength verification analysis of composite materials used in the manufacture of selected components of railway wagons are presented. Real laboratory stand for measurements in a scale controlled by PLC controller were made. The study of different types of connections of composite materials with sheet metal is presented. In one of the chapter of this paper principles construction of testing stand with pneumatic cylinder were presented. Mainly checking of displacements and stresses generated on the sheet as a result of pneumatic actuators load for composite boards was carried out. The use of the controller with operating panel allows to easy programming testing cycle. The user can define the force generated by the actuator by change of air pressure in cylinder. Additionally the location of acting cylinders and their jump can be changed by operator. The examination of the volume displacements was done by displacement sensor, and the tensile strain gauge. All parameters are written in CatmanEasy - data acquisition software. This article presents the study of stresses and displacements in the composite plates joined with sheet metal, in summary of this article, the authors compare the obtained results with the computer simulation results in the article: "Simulation of stresses in an innovative combination of composite with sheet".

  11. Simulated stand tests and centrifuge training to prevent orthostatic intolerance on Earth, moon, and Mars.

    PubMed

    Coats, Brandon W; Sharp, M Keith

    2010-03-01

    One proposed method to overcome postflight orthostatic intolerance is for astronauts to undergo inflight centrifugation. Cardiovascular responses were compared between centrifuge and gravitational conditions using a seven-compartment cardiovascular model. Vascular resistance, heart rate, and stroke volume values were adopted from literature, while compartmental volumes and compliances were derived from impedance plethysmography of subjects (n=8) riding on a centrifuge. Three different models were developed to represent the typical male subject who completed a 10-min postflight stand test ("male finisher"), "non-finishing male" and "female" (all non-finishers). A sensitivity analysis found that both cardiac output and arterial pressure were most sensitive to total blood volume. Simulated stand tests showed that female astronauts were more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance due to lower initial blood pressure and higher pressure threshold for presyncope. Rates of blood volume loss by capillary filtration were found to be equivalent in female and male non-finishers, but four times smaller in male finishers. For equivalent times to presyncope during centrifugation as those during constant gravity, lower G forces at the level of the heart were required. Centrifuge G levels to match other cardiovascular parameters varied depending on the parameter, centrifuge arm length, and the gravity level being matched. PMID:20131096

  12. Accelerated Creep Testing of High Strength Aramid Webbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.; Stnfield, Clarence E.; Valverde, Omar

    2012-01-01

    A series of preliminary accelerated creep tests were performed on four variants of 12K and 24K lbf rated Vectran webbing to help develop an accelerated creep test methodology and analysis capability for high strength aramid webbings. The variants included pristine, aged, folded and stitched samples. This class of webbings is used in the restraint layer of habitable, inflatable space structures, for which the lifetime properties are currently not well characterized. The Stepped Isothermal Method was used to accelerate the creep life of the webbings and a novel stereo photogrammetry system was used to measure the full-field strains. A custom MATLAB code is described, and used to reduce the strain data to produce master creep curves for the test samples. Initial results show good correlation between replicates; however, it is clear that a larger number of samples are needed to build confidence in the consistency of the results. It is noted that local fiber breaks affect the creep response in a similar manner to increasing the load, thus raising the creep rate and reducing the time to creep failure. The stitched webbings produced the highest variance between replicates, due to the combination of higher local stresses and thread-on-fiber damage. Large variability in the strength of the webbings is also shown to have an impact on the range of predicted creep life.

  13. Testing in a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2004-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  14. Pilot Field Test: Performance of a Sit-to-Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; Phillips, T. R.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Kitov, V. V.; Lysova, N. Yu; Lee, S. M. C.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astronauts returning from the International Space Station are met by a team of recovery personnel typically providing physical assistance and medical support immediately upon landing. That is because long-duration spaceflight impacts astronauts' functional abilities. Future expeditions to planets or asteroids beyond the low Earth orbit, however, may require crewmembers to egress the vehicle and perform other types of physical tasks unassisted. It is therefore important to characterize the extent and longevity of functional deficits experienced by astronauts in order to design safe exploration class missions. Pilot Field Test (PFT) experiment conducted with participation of ISS crewmembers traveling on Soyuz expeditions 34S - 41S comprised several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of astronauts during the first 24 hours after landing and beyond. METHODS: The first test in the PFT battery sequence, and also the least demanding one from the sensorimotor perspective, was a Sit-to-Stand test. Test subjects were seated in the chair and had to stand up on command and remain standing for ten seconds. The subjects were instructed to stand up unassisted as quickly as they were able to, while maintaining postural control. Synchronized wireless inertial sensors mounted on the head, chest, lower back, wrists, and ankles were used to continuously log body kinematics. Crewmembers' blood pressure and heart rate were monitored and recorded with the Portapres and Polar systems. Each session was recorded with a digital video camera. During data collections occurring within the 24-hour postflight period, crewmembers were also asked to (1) evaluate their perceived motion sickness symptoms on a 20-point scale before and after completion of the test and (2) estimate how heavy they felt compared to their normal (preflight) body weight. Consent to participate in PFT was obtained from 18 crewmembers (11 US Orbital Segment [USOS] astronauts and 7

  15. Test Sequence for Superconducting XFEL Cavities in the Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffran, J.; Petersen, B.; Reschke, D.; Swierblewski, J.

    The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2016 onwards, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The main part of the superconducting European XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF) at DESY. This paper gives an overview of the test sequences for the superconducting cavities, applied in the preparation area and at the two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall, and describes the complete area. In addition it summarizes the tests and lessons learnt until the middle of 2014.

  16. F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles on test stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the thrust stand being used for ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept involving two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could lead to significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.

  17. F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles on test stand at sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the aircraft on a test stand at sunrise. Not shown in this photograph are the aircraft's two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The aircraft was originally built as an F-15B (Serial #71-0290).

  18. Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and FACET - Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test Beams at SLAC

    ScienceCinema

    Andrei Seryi

    2016-07-12

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.  

  19. Ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing facilities

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2003-08-12

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS to deliver a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in chamber means that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  20. Ultra-Accelerated Natural Sunlight Exposure Testing Facilities

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Jorgensen, Gary J.

    2004-11-23

    A multi-faceted concentrator apparatus for providing ultra-accelerated natural sunlight exposure testing for sample materials under controlled weathering conditions comprising: facets that receive incident natural sunlight, transmits VIS/NIR and reflects UV/VIS onto a secondary reflector that delivers a uniform flux of UV/VIS onto a sample exposure plane located near a center of a facet array in a chamber that provide concurrent levels of temperature and/or relative humidity at high levels of up to 100.times. of natural sunlight that allow sample materials to be subjected to accelerated irradiance exposure factors for a significant period of time of about 3 to 10 days to provide a corresponding time of about at least a years worth representative weathering of sample materials.

  1. Database requirements for the Advanced Test Accelerator project

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F.W.

    1984-11-05

    The database requirements for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) project are outlined. ATA is a state-of-the-art electron accelerator capable of producing energetic (50 million electron volt), high current (10,000 ampere), short pulse (70 billionths of a second) beams of electrons for a wide variety of applications. Databasing is required for two applications. First, the description of the configuration of facility itself requires an extended database. Second, experimental data gathered from the facility must be organized and managed to insure its full utilization. The two applications are intimately related since the acquisition and analysis of experimental data requires knowledge of the system configuration. This report reviews the needs of the ATA program and current implementation, intentions, and desires. These database applications have several unique aspects which are of interest and will be highlighted. The features desired in an ultimate database system are outlined. 3 references, 5 figures.

  2. Test stand for non-uniformity correction of microbolometer focal plane arrays used in thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupiński, Michał; Bareła, Jaroslaw; Firmanty, Krzysztof; Kastek, Mariusz

    2013-10-01

    Uneven response of particular detectors (pixels) to the same incident power of infrared radiation is an inherent feature of microbolometer focal plane arrays. As a result an image degradation occurs, known as Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), which distorts the thermal representation of an observed scene and impairs the parameters of a thermal camera. In order to compensate such non-uniformity, several NUC correction methods are applied in digital data processing modules implemented in thermal cameras. Coefficients required to perform the non-uniformity correction procedure (NUC coefficients) are determined by calibrating the camera against uniform radiation sources (blackbodies). Non-uniformity correction is performed in a digital processing unit in order to remove FPN pattern in the registered thermal images. Relevant correction coefficients are calculated on the basis of recorded detector responses to several values of radiant flux emitted from reference IR radiation sources (blackbodies). The measurement of correction coefficients requires specialized setup, in which uniform, extended radiation sources with high temperature stability are one of key elements. Measurement stand for NUC correction developed in Institute of Optoelectronics, MUT, comprises two integrated extended blackbodies with the following specifications: area 200×200 mm, stabilized absolute temperature range +15 °C÷100 °C, and uniformity of temperature distribution across entire surface +/-0.014 °C. Test stand, method used for the measurement of NUC coefficients and the results obtained during the measurements conducted on a prototype thermal camera will be presented in the paper.

  3. Control System for the SNS H- Source Test Stand Allison Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Cary D; Stockli, Martin P; Gorlov, Timofey V; Han, Baoxi; Pennisi, Terry R; Murray Jr, S N

    2010-01-01

    SNS is currently in progress of a multi-year plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H- ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source test stand to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplying the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial PC to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LabVIEW, and consists of two parts, a data acquisition program to control the hardware, and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

  4. Changes in cerebral blood oxygenation induced by active standing test in children with POTS and NMS.

    PubMed

    Endo, Ayumi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Fuchigami, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Shori; Mugishima, Hideo; Skatani, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic dysregulation (OD) has been classified into subtypes by heart rate and blood pressure; however, the hemodynamics of brains have not yet been revealed. Therefore, we investigated changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygenation during an active standing test to clarify the pathophysiology of two subtypes: postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and neurally mediated syncope (NMS). We studied 31 children (15 boys, 16 girls; mean age, 14.0 ± 1.7 years) who presented with OD at the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Nihon University School of Medicine between 2009 and 2011. OD was diagnosed using the Japanese clinical guidelines for juvenile orthostatic dysregulation. After a 10-min resting period in the supine position, patients were asked to quickly stand up and keep upright for 10 min. Cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation were measured using transcranial Doppler sonography and near-infrared spectroscopy. POTS showed a significant decrease of oxy-Hb and resistance index (RI), suggesting transient ischemia with maintainable cerebral autoregulation. NMS showed a decrease of oxy-Hb and an increase of RI, suggesting ischemia and impairment of autoregulation.

  5. Universal computer test stand (recommended computer test requirements). [for space shuttle computer evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Techniques are considered which would be used to characterize areospace computers with the space shuttle application as end usage. The system level digital problems which have been encountered and documented are surveyed. From the large cross section of tests, an optimum set is recommended that has a high probability of discovering documented system level digital problems within laboratory environments. Defined is a baseline hardware, software system which is required as a laboratory tool to test aerospace computers. Hardware and software baselines and additions necessary to interface the UTE to aerospace computers for test purposes are outlined.

  6. Acceleration of degradation by highly accelerated stress test and air-included highly accelerated stress test in crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soh; Tanahashi, Tadanori; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of hyper-hygrothermal stresses with or without air on the degradation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules, to shorten the required duration of a conventional hygrothermal-stress test [i.e., the “damp heat (DH) stress test”, which is conducted at 85 °C/85% relative humidity for 1,000 h]. Interestingly, the encapsulant within a PV module becomes discolored under the air-included hygrothermal conditions achieved using DH stress test equipment and an air-included highly accelerated stress test (air-HAST) apparatus, but not under the air-excluded hygrothermal conditions realized using a highly accelerated stress test (HAST) machine. In contrast, the reduction in the output power of the PV module is accelerated irrespective of air inclusion in hyper-hygrothermal test atmosphere. From these findings, we conclude that the required duration of the DH stress test will at least be significantly shortened using air-HAST, but not HAST.

  7. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) for Test Stand and J-2X Engine: Core Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Jorge F.; Schmalzel, John L.; Aguilar, Robert; Shwabacher, Mark; Morris, Jon

    2008-01-01

    ISHM capability enables a system to detect anomalies, determine causes and effects, predict future anomalies, and provides an integrated awareness of the health of the system to users (operators, customers, management, etc.). NASA Stennis Space Center, NASA Ames Research Center, and Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne have implemented a core ISHM capability that encompasses the A1 Test Stand and the J-2X Engine. The implementation incorporates all aspects of ISHM; from anomaly detection (e.g. leaks) to root-cause-analysis based on failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), to a user interface for an integrated visualization of the health of the system (Test Stand and Engine). The implementation provides a low functional capability level (FCL) in that it is populated with few algorithms and approaches for anomaly detection, and root-cause trees from a limited FMEA effort. However, it is a demonstration of a credible ISHM capability, and it is inherently designed for continuous and systematic augmentation of the capability. The ISHM capability is grounded on an integrating software environment used to create an ISHM model of the system. The ISHM model follows an object-oriented approach: includes all elements of the system (from schematics) and provides for compartmentalized storage of information associated with each element. For instance, a sensor object contains a transducer electronic data sheet (TEDS) with information that might be used by algorithms and approaches for anomaly detection, diagnostics, etc. Similarly, a component, such as a tank, contains a Component Electronic Data Sheet (CEDS). Each element also includes a Health Electronic Data Sheet (HEDS) that contains health-related information such as anomalies and health state. Some practical aspects of the implementation include: (1) near real-time data flow from the test stand data acquisition system through the ISHM model, for near real-time detection of anomalies and diagnostics, (2) insertion of the J-2X

  8. Instrumentation for accelerated life tests of concentrator solar cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez, N; Vázquez, M; González, J R; Jiménez, F J; Bautista, J

    2011-02-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic is an emergent technology that may be a good economical and efficient alternative for the generation of electricity at a competitive cost. However, the reliability of these new solar cells and systems is still an open issue due to the high-irradiation level they are subjected to as well as the electrical and thermal stresses that they are expected to endure. To evaluate the reliability in a short period of time, accelerated aging tests are essential. Thermal aging tests for concentrator photovoltaic solar cells and systems under illumination are not available because no technical solution to the problem of reaching the working concentration inside a climatic chamber has been available. This work presents an automatic instrumentation system that overcomes the aforementioned limitation. Working conditions have been simulated by forward biasing the solar cells to the current they would handle at the working concentration (in this case, 700 and 1050 times the irradiance at one standard sun). The instrumentation system has been deployed for more than 10 000 h in a thermal aging test for III-V concentrator solar cells, in which the generated power evolution at different temperatures has been monitored. As a result of this test, the acceleration factor has been calculated, thus allowing for the degradation evolution at any temperature in addition to normal working conditions to be obtained. PMID:21361622

  9. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy; Motupally, Sathya

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  10. Proton Injection into the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Prebys, Eric; Antipov, Sergey; Piekarz, Henryk; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an experimental synchrotron being built at Fermilab to test the concept of non-linear "integrable optics". These optics are based on a lattice including non-linear elements that satisfies particular conditions on the Hamiltonian. The resulting particle motion is predicted to be stable but without a unique tune. The system is therefore insensitive to resonant instabilities and can in principle store very intense beams, with space charge tune shifts larger than those which are possible in conventional linear synchrotrons. The ring will initially be tested with pencil electron beams, but this poster describes the ultimate plan to install a 2.5 MeV RFQ to inject protons, which will produce tune shifts on the order of unity. Technical details will be presented, as well as simulations of protons in the ring.

  11. Small-Scale Hybrid Rocket Test Stand & Characterization of Swirl Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Matt H.

    Derived from the necessity to increase testing capabilities of hybrid rocket motor (HRM) propulsion systems for Daedalus Astronautics at Arizona State University, a small-scale motor and test stand were designed and developed to characterize all components of the system. The motor is designed for simple integration and setup, such that both the forward-end enclosure and end cap can be easily removed for rapid integration of components during testing. Each of the components of the motor is removable allowing for a broad range of testing capabilities. While examining injectors and their potential it is thought ideal to obtain the highest regression rates and overall motor performance possible. The oxidizer and fuel are N2O and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), respectively, due to previous experience and simplicity. The injector designs, selected for the same reasons, are designed such that they vary only in the swirl angle. This system provides the platform for characterizing the effects of varying said swirl angle on HRM performance.

  12. Initial results for a 170 GHz high power ITER waveguide component test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Dukes, Carl; Killough, Stephen; Kaufman, Michael; White, John; Bell, Gary; Hanson, Greg; Rasmussen, Dave

    2014-10-01

    A high power microwave test stand is being setup at ORNL to enable prototype testing of 170 GHz cw waveguide components being developed for the ITER ECH system. The ITER ECH system will utilize 63.5 mm diameter evacuated corrugated waveguide and will have 24 >150 m long runs. A 170 GHz 1 MW class gyrotron is being developed by Communications and Power Industries and is nearing completion. A HVDC power supply, water-cooling and control system has been partially tested in preparation for arrival of the gyrotron. The power supply and water-cooling system are being designed to operate for >3600 second pulses to simulate the operating conditions planned for the ITER ECH system. The gyrotron Gaussian beam output has a single mirror for focusing into a 63.5 mm corrugated waveguide in the vertical plane. The output beam and mirror are enclosed in an evacuated duct with absorber for stray radiation. Beam alignment with the waveguide is a critical task so a combination of mirror tilt adjustments and a bellows for offsets will be provided. Analysis of thermal patterns on thin witness plates will provide gyrotron mode purity and waveguide coupling efficiency data. Pre-prototype waveguide components and two dummy loads are available for initial operational testing of the gyrotron. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  13. Testing and commissioning of the HI-13 tandem accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jiuchang; Yu, Juexian; Yang, Suichun; Du, Xueren; Liu, Zhengying; Wang, Haipeng; Chen, Wenkui; Hu, Yaoming; Zhang, Guilian; Yang, Bingfan; Yu, Yunfeng; Guan, Xialing; Ning, Shulan; Yang, Weimin; Ge, Jiyun; Bi, Decai; Zheng, Zhanyi

    1988-05-01

    In this paper we report the results of the commissioning and the acceptance tests of the HI-13 tandem accelerator in IAE. We have achieved up to now a terminal voltage of 13.4 MV, a proton beam current of 10 μA at 7.5 MV, and we have had a pulsed proton beam on target with a pulse width of 1 ns and a peak current of 1.05 mA at a terminal voltage of 13 MV.

  14. Metal and elastomer seal tests for accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, K.M.; McIntyre, G.T.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; Skelton, R.; Pate, D.J.; Gill, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The vacuum system of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has more than a thousand metal vacuum seals. Also, numerous elastomer seals are used throughout the AGS to seal large beam component chambers. An accelerator upgrade program is being implemented to reduce the AGS operating pressure by x100 and improve the reliability of the vacuum system. This paper describes work in progress on metal and elastomer vacuum seals to help meet those two objectives. Tests are reported on the sealing properties of a variety of metal seals used on different sealing surfaces. Results are also given on reversible sorption properties of certain elastomers. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Numerical modeling of a 2K J-T heat exchanger used in Fermilab Vertical Test Stand VTS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2014-07-01

    Fermilab Vertical Test Stand-1 (VTS-1) is in operation since 2007 for testing the superconducting RF cavities at 2 K. This test stand has single layer coiled finned tubes heat exchanger before J-T valve. A finite difference based thermal model has been developed in Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to study its thermal performance during filling and refilling to maintain the constant liquid level of test stand. The model is also useful to predict its performance under other various operating conditions and will be useful to design the similar kind of heat exchanger for future needs. Present paper discusses the different operational modes of this heat exchanger and its thermal characteristics under these operational modes. Results of this model have also been compared with the experimental data gathered from the VTS-1 heat exchanger and they are in good agreement with the present model.

  16. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  17. The CSU Accelerator and FEL Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedron, Sandra; Milton, Stephen; D'Audney, Alex; Edelen, Jonathan; Einstein, Josh; Harris, John; Hall, Chris; Horovitz, Kahren; Martinez, Jorge; Morin, Auralee; Sipahi, Nihan; Sipahi, Taylan; Williams, Joel

    2014-03-01

    The Colorado State University (CSU) Accelerator Facility will include a 6-MeV L-Band electron linear accelerator (linac) with a free-electron laser (FEL) system capable of producing Terahertz (THz) radiation, a laser laboratory, a microwave test stand, and a magnetic test stand. The photocathode drive linac will be used in conjunction with a hybrid undulator capable of producing THz radiation. Details of the systems used in CSU Accelerator Facility are discussed.

  18. Design and testing of a DC ion injector suitable for accelerator-driven transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. David; Meyer, Earl; Stevens, Ralph R.; Hansborough, Lash; Sherman, Joseph

    1995-09-01

    For a number of years, Los Alamos personnel have collaborated with a team of experimentalists at Chalk River Labs (CRL) near Deep River, Ontario, Canada who were pursuing the development of the front end of a high power cw proton accelerator. At the termination of this program last year, Los Alamos acquired this equipment. With the help of internal Laboratory funding and modest defense conversion funds, we have set up and operated the accelerator at Los Alamos. Operational equipment includes a slightly modified Chalk River Injector Test Stand (CRITS) including a 50 keV proton injector and a 1.25 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with a klystrode rf power system. Substantial upgrading and modification of the ac power system was necessary to provide the required ac voltage (2400 vac) and power (2 MVA) needed for the operation of this equipment. A companion paper describes in detail the first ion source and beam-transport measurements at Los Alamos. Many of the challenges involved in operating an rf linear accelerator to provide neutrons for an accelerator-driven reactor are encountered at the front (low energy) end of this system. The formation of the ion beam, the control of the beam parameters, and the focusing and matching of a highly space-charge-dominated beam are major problems. To address the operating problems in this critical front end, the Accelerator Operations and Technology Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed the APDF (Accelerator Prototype Demonstration Facility). The front end of this facility is a 75 keV, high-current, ion injector which has been assembled and is now being tested. This paper discusses the design modifications required in going from the 50 keV CRITS injector to the higher current, 75 keV injector. Major innovative changes were made in the design of this injector. This design eliminates all the control electronics and most of the ion source equipment at high potential. Also, a new, high-quality, ion

  19. Accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells: Development of test methods and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    If thin film cells are to be considered a viable option for terrestrial power generation their reliability attributes will need to be explored and confidence in their stability obtained through accelerated testing. Development of a thin film accelerated test program will be more difficult than was the case for crystalline cells because of the monolithic construction nature of the cells. Specially constructed test samples will need to be fabricated, requiring committment to the concept of accelerated testing by the manufacturers. A new test schedule appropriate to thin film cells will need to be developed which will be different from that used in connection with crystalline cells. Preliminary work has been started to seek thin film schedule variations to two of the simplest tests: unbiased temperature and unbiased temperature humidity. Still to be examined are tests which involve the passage of current during temperature and/or humidity stress, either by biasing in the forward (or reverse) directions or by the application of light during stress. Investigation of these current (voltage) accelerated tests will involve development of methods of reliably contacting the thin conductive films during stress.

  20. Using Uncertainty Analysis to Guide the Development of Accelerated Stress Tests (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2014-03-01

    Extrapolation of accelerated testing to the long-term results expected in the field has uncertainty associated with the acceleration factors and the range of possible stresses in the field. When multiple stresses (such as temperature and humidity) can be used to increase the acceleration, the uncertainty may be reduced according to which stress factors are used to accelerate the degradation.

  1. Pilot Field Test: Performance of a Sit-to-Stand Test After Long-Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Fisher, E. A.; May-Phillips, T. R.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Kitov, V. V.; Lysova, N. U.; Lee, S. M. C.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts returning from the International Space Station (ISS) are met by a team of recovery personnel who typically provide physical assistance and medical support immediately after landing. This assistance and support are provided because long-duration spaceflight greatly affects astronauts' functional abilities. Future expeditions to planets or asteroids beyond low Earth orbit, however, will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle and perform other types of physical tasks unassisted. It is therefore important to characterize the extent and longevity of functional deficits experienced by astronauts in order to design safe exploration-class missions. A joint US/Russian Pilot Field Test (PFT) study conducted with participation of crewmembers of ISS Expeditions 35-42 comprised several tasks designed to study the recovery of sensorimotor abilities of astronauts during the first 24 hours after landing and beyond. Sit-to-Stand (S2S) was the first task in the PFT battery.

  2. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  3. Using Accelerated Testing To Predict Module Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-07-01

    Long-term reliability is critical to the cost effectiveness and commercial success of photovoltaic (PV) products. Today most PV modules are warranted for 25 years, but there is no accepted test protocol to validate a 25-year lifetime. The qualification tests do an excellent job of identifying design, materials, and process flaws that are likely to lead to premature failure (infant mortality), but they are not designed to test for wear-out mechanisms that limit lifetime. This paper presents a method for evaluating the ability of a new PV module technology to survive long-term exposure to specific stresses. The authors propose the use of baseline technologies with proven long-term field performance as controls in the accelerated stress tests. The performance of new-technology modules can then be evaluated versus that of proven-technology modules. If the new-technology demonstrates equivalent or superior performance to the proven one, there is a high likelihood that they will survive versus the tested stress in the real world.

  4. A new test stand for heavy ion induced gas desorption measurements at TSL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlund, E.; Westerberg, L.; Malyshev, O. B.; Leandersson, M.; Fridén, C.-J.; Edqvist, E.; Kollmus, H.; Bellachioma, M. C.; Reich-Sprenger, H.; Krasnov, A.

    2008-03-01

    In several experiments at CERN, GSI and BNL it has been found that the lifetime of highly energetic heavy ions in synchrotrons decreases with increasing number of injected ions. This phenomenon occurs due to the collisions of beam ions and residual gas molecules leading to the change of charge of the ions and their loss on the vacuum chamber walls, which in turn cause ion-induced gas desorption and further pressure increase. To gain a deeper understanding of the ion-induced desorption process in the energy range 5-45 MeV/u, a dedicated test stand was built at the end of the K beamline at The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, Sweden. The energy range was chosen due to the fact that the injection energy of the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI will be 10 MeV/u, and that there are insufficient data in this energy range. A Test Particle Monte-Carlo model of the experimental set-up was build-up, run and analysed for different sample configurations. An important result is that for the same sample material the desorption yield from a flat sample causes a 1.58 times larger pressure increase than that of a tubular sample. A detailed explanation of the set-up is presented.

  5. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wady, P. T.; Draude, A.; Shubeita, S. M.; Smith, A. D.; Mason, N.; Pimblott, S. M.; Jimenez-Melero, E.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5-6 cm2, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  6. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  7. Power-conditioning system for the Advanced Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.A.; Smith, M.E.; Birx, D.L.; Branum, D.R.; Cook, E.G.; Copp, R.L.; Lee, F.D.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D.; Speckert, G.C.

    1982-06-01

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed, linear induction, electron accelerator currently under construction and nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 near Livermore, California. The ATA is a 50 MeV, 10 kA machine capable of generating electron beam pulses at a 1 kHz rate in a 10 pulse burst, 5 pps average, with a pulse width of 70 ns FWHM. Ten 18 kV power supplies are used to charge 25 capacitor banks with a total energy storage of 8 megajoules. Energy is transferred from the capacitor banks in 500 microsecond pulses through 25 Command Resonant Charge units (CRC) to 233 Thyratron Switch Chassis. Each Thyratron Switch Chassis contains a 2.5 microfarad capacitor and is charged to 25 kV (780 joules) with voltage regulation of +- .05%. These capacitors are switched into 10:1 step-up resonant transformers to charge 233 Blumleins to 250 kV in 20 microseconds. A magnetic modulator is used instead of a Blumlein to drive the grid of the injector.

  8. Developments in Test Facility and Data Networking for the Altitude Test Stand at the John C. Stennis Space Center: A General Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebert, Phillip W.

    2008-01-01

    NASA/SSC's Mission in Rocket Propulsion Testing Is to Acquire Test Performance Data for Verification, Validation and Qualification of Propulsion Systems Hardware: Accurate, Reliable, Comprehensive, and Timely. Data Acquisition in a Rocket Propulsion Test Environment Is Challenging: a) Severe Temporal Transient Dynamic Environments; b) Large Thermal Gradients; c) Vacuum to high pressure regimes. A-3 Test Stand Development is equally challenging with respect to accommodating vacuum environment, operation of a CSG system, and a large quantity of data system and control channels to determine proper engine performance as well as Test Stand operation. SSC is currently in the process of providing modernized DAS, Control Systems, Video, and network systems for the A-3 Test Stand to overcome these challenges.

  9. The use of accelerated radiation testing for avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Heather

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for military and national security applications has been increasing. One possible use of these vehicles is as remote sensing platforms, where the UAV carries several sensors to provide real-time information about biological, chemical or radiological agents that might have been released into the environment. One such UAV, the Global Hawk, has a payload space that can carry nearly one ton of sensing equipment, which makes these platforms significantly larger than many satellites. Given the size of the potential payload and the heightened radiation environment at high altitudes, these systems could be affected by the radiation-induced failure mechanisms from the naturally occurring terrestrial environment. In this paper, we will explore the use of accelerated radiation testing to prepare UAV payloads for deployment.

  10. Radio frequency induction plasma generator 80-kV test stand operation

    SciTech Connect

    Goede, H.; DiVergilio, W.F.; Fosnight, V.V.; Vella, M.C.; Ehlers, K.W.; Kippenhan, D.; Pincosy, P.A.; Pyle, R.V.

    1986-07-01

    Beam extraction tests at energies up to 80 kV were performed using a radio frequency induction (RFI) plasma generator hydrogen ion source. A 7 x 10-cm/sup 2/, long pulse accelerator was operated with a 10 x 10-cm/sup 2/ axial magnetic cusp bucket and a magnetic-filter bucket. Atomic fractions (up to 85% H/sup +/), plasma production efficiencies (roughly-equal0.6 A of beam per kW rf power), and beam divergence were at least as good as with arc plasmas in similar chambers. Potential advantages of the RFI plasma sources for large-scale applications are ease of operation, reliability, and extended service life.

  11. At-wavelength characterization of the extreme ultraviolet Engineering Test Stand Set-2 optic

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.; Batson, Phillip; Denham, Paul E.; Jackson, Keith H.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Rekawa, Senajith; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2001-06-10

    At-wavelength interferometric characterization of a new 4x-reduction lithographic-quality extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical system is described. This state-of-the-art projection optic was fabricated for installation in the EUV lithography Engineering Test Stand (ETS) and is referred to as the ETS Set-2 optic. EUV characterization of the Set-2 optic is performed using the EUV phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. This is the same interferometer previously used for the at-wavelength characterization and alignment of the ETS Set-1 optic. In addition to the PS/PDI-based full-field wavefront characterization, we also present wavefront measurements performed with lateral shearing interferometry, the chromatic dependence of the wavefront error, and the system-level pupil-dependent spectral-bandpass characteristics of the optic; the latter two properties are only measurable using at-wavelength interferometry.

  12. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  13. Wafer and reticle positioning system for the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Engineering Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    WRONOSKY,JOHN B.; SMITH,TONY G.; CRAIG,MARCUS J.; STURGIS,BEVERLY R.; DARNOLD,JOEL R.; WERLING,DAVID K.; KINCY,MARK A.; TICHENOR,DANIEL A.; WILLIAMS,MARK E.; BISCHOFF,PAUL

    2000-01-27

    This paper is an overview of the wafer and reticle positioning system of the Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) Engineering Test Stand (ETS). EUVL represents one of the most promising technologies for supporting the integrated circuit (IC) industry's lithography needs for critical features below 100nm. EUVL research and development includes development of capabilities for demonstrating key EUV technologies. The ETS is under development at the EUV Virtual National Laboratory, to demonstrate EUV full-field imaging and provide data that supports production-tool development. The stages and their associated metrology operated in a vacuum environment and must meet stringent outgassing specifications. A tight tolerance is placed on the stage tracking performance to minimize image distortion and provide high position repeatability. The wafer must track the reticle with less than {+-}3nm of position error and jitter must not exceed 10nm rms. To meet these performance requirements, magnetically levitated positioning stages utilizing a system of sophisticated control electronics will be used. System modeling and experimentation have contributed to the development of the positioning system and results indicate that desired ETS performance is achievable.

  14. Users' guide for the Accelerated Leach Test Computer Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Heiser, J.H.; Pietrzak, R.; Franz, Eena-Mai; Colombo, P.

    1990-11-01

    This report is a step-by-step guide for the Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) Computer Program developed to accompany a new leach test for solidified waste forms. The program is designed to be used as a tool for performing the calculations necessary to analyze leach test data, a modeling program to determine if diffusion is the operating leaching mechanism (and, if not, to indicate other possible mechanisms), and a means to make extrapolations using the diffusion models. The ALT program contains four mathematical models that can be used to represent the data. The leaching mechanisms described by these models are: (1) diffusion through a semi-infinite medium (for low fractional releases), (2) diffusion through a finite cylinder (for high fractional releases), (3) diffusion plus partitioning of the source term, (4) solubility limited leaching. Results are presented as a graph containing the experimental data and the best-fit model curve. Results can also be output as LOTUS 1-2-3 files. 2 refs.

  15. Modelling evapotranspiration at three boreal forest stands using the CLASS: tests of parameterizations for canopy conductance and soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Paul A.; McCaughey, J. Harry; Lafleur, Peter M.; Verseghy, Diana L.

    2003-03-01

    The performance of the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) was evaluated in off-line runs, using data collected at three boreal forest stands located near Thompson, Manitoba: young jack pine, mature jack pine, and mature black spruce. The data were collected in the late spring through autumn of 1994 and 1996, as part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS).The diurnal range in modelled soil heat flux was exaggerated at all sites. Soil evaporation was modelled poorly at the jack pine stands, with overestimation common and a step change to low evaporation as the soil dried. Replacing the soil evaporation algorithm, which was based on the estimation of a surface relative humidity value, with one based on soil moisture in the top soil layer reduced the overestimation and eliminated the step changes. Modelled water movement between soil layers was too slow at the jack pine stands. Modifying the soil hydraulic parameters to match an observed characteristic curve at the young jack pine stand produced a soil water suction that agreed more closely with measurements and improved drainage between soil layers.The latent heat flux was overestimated and the sensible heat flux underestimated at all three stands. New Jarvis-Stewart-type canopy conductance algorithms were developed from stomatal conductance measurements. At the jack pine stands, stomatal conductance scaled by leaf area index reproduced canopy conductance, but a reduction in the scaled stomatal conductance by one half was necessary at the black spruce stand, indicating a nonlinearity in the scaling of stomatal conductance for this ecosystem. The root-mean-squared error for daily average latent heat flux for the control run of the CLASS and for the best test run are 49 W m-2 and 14 W m-2 respectively at the young jack pine stand, 50 W m-2 and 15 W m-2 respectively at the old jack pine stand, and 48 W m-2 and 13 W m-2 respectively at the old black spruce stand.

  16. Beam Test of Multi-Bunch Energy Compensation System in the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Korhonen, Timo; Nakamura, Shogo; Naito, Takashi; Oide, Katsunobu; Takeda, Seishi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji

    2004-08-01

    A beam test of the multi-bunch energy compensation system (ECS) was performed using the Δ F method with the 2856± 4.327 MHz accelerating structures in the accelerator test facility (ATF) at KEK. The 1.54 GeV S-band linac of the ATF was designed to accelerate a multi-bunch beam that consists of 20 bunches with 2.8 ns spacing. The multi-bunch beam with 2.0× 1010 electrons/bunch has an energy deviation of about 8.5% at the end of the linac due to transient beam loading without ECS. The ATF linac is the injector of the ATF damping ring (DR), whose energy acceptance is ± 0.5%. The beam loading compensation system is necessary in the ATF linac for the successful injection of multi-bunch into DR. The rf system of the linac consists of 8 regular rf units with the SLED system and 2 ECS rf units without the SLED system. The accelerating structures of the regular units are driven at 2856 MHz and the 2 ECS structures are operated with slightly different rf frequencies of 2856± 4.327 MHz. In the beam test, we have succeeded in compressing the multi-bunch energy spread within the energy acceptance of the DR using Δ F ECS. The principle of the beam loading compensation system of KEK-ATF and the experimental results are described in this paper.

  17. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-01-01

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To

  18. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  19. Inverse Cherenkov and inverse FEL accelerator experiments at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; vanSteenbergen, A.; Babzien, M.

    1995-12-31

    Status update on the ongoing inverse Cherenkov acceleration experiment and prospects to its 100 MeV short-term upgrade. The first report on 1 MeV electron acceleration with the 0.5 GW CO{sub 2} laser used in the inverse FEL scheme. (author). 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Standing Wave Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Yeremian, Anahid; Higashi, Yasuo; Spataro, Bruno; /INFN, Rome

    2012-06-25

    Our experiments are directed toward the understanding of the physics of rf breakdown in systems that can be used to accelerate electron beams at {approx}11.4 GHz. The structure geometries have apertures, stored energy per cell, and rf pulse duration close to that of the NLC or CLIC. The breakdown rate is the main parameter that we use to compare rf breakdown behavior for different structures at a given set of rf pulse parameters (pulse shape and peak power) at 60 Hz repetition rate. In our experiments, the typical range of the breakdown rate is from one per few hours to {approx}100 per hour. To date we have tested 29 structures. We consistently found that after the initial conditioning, the behavior of the breakdown rate is reproducible for structures of the same geometry and material, and the breakdown rate dependence on peak magnetic fields is stronger than on peak surface electric fields for structures of different geometries. Below we report the main results from tests of seven structures made from hard copper, soft copper alloys and hard-copper alloys. Additional details on these and other structures will be discussed in future publications.

  1. Can defendants with mental retardation successfully fake their performance on a test of competence to stand trial?

    PubMed

    Everington, Caroline; Notario-Smull, Heidi; Horton, Mel L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether criminal defendants with mental retardation can feign poor performance on a test of competence to stand trial. Four groups of adjudicated criminal defendants were given a test of competence to stand trial. In the experimental condition, defendants with mental retardation (MR) and mentally typical defendants (non-MR) were given instructions to fake their performance on the test. In the control, MR defendants and non-MR defendants took the test under standard conditions. The results indicated that both the MR and non-MR fakers scored significantly lower than the MR and non-MR controls. There was no significant difference in the scores of the MR and non-MR fakers. The results suggest that defendants with mental retardation may be able to successfully fake their performance in certain circumstances. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Development of the front end test stand and vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses negative hydrogen ion sources at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Perkins, M.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Gabor, C.; Back, J.

    2014-02-15

    The ISIS pulsed spallation neutron and muon facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK uses a Penning surface plasma negative hydrogen ion source. Upgrade options for the ISIS accelerator system demand a higher current, lower emittance beam with longer pulse lengths from the injector. The Front End Test Stand is being constructed at RAL to meet the upgrade requirements using a modified ISIS ion source. A new 10% duty cycle 25 kV pulsed extraction power supply has been commissioned and the first meter of 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole has been delivered. Simultaneously, a Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analyses is under construction in a new laboratory at RAL. The detailed measurements of the plasma and extracted beam characteristics will allow a radical overhaul of the transport optics, potentially yielding a simpler source configuration with greater output and lifetime.

  3. Reliability and Validity of Standing Back Extension Test for Detecting Motor Control Impairment in Subjects with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P; Eapen, Charu; Mahale, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a chronic health problem with high socioeconomic impact. Specific diagnosis or treatment approach has not yet effectively established to treat chronic low back pain. Standing Back Extension Test is one of the clinical measures to detect the passive extension subgroup of Motor Control Impairment (MCI); which could have an impact on spinal stability leading to recurrent chronic low back pain. Reliability and validity of this test is not fully established. Aim To determine the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability and concurrent validity of the Standing Back Extension Test for detecting MCI of the lumbar spine. Materials and Methods A total of 50 subjects were included in the study, 25 patients with Non Specific Low Back Pain (NSLBP) (12 men, 13 women) and 25 healthy controls (12 men, 13 women) were recruited into the study. All subjects performed the test movement. Two raters blinded to the subjects rated the test performance as either ‘Positive’ or ‘Negative’ based on the predetermined rating protocol. The thickness of Transverse Abdominis (TrA) muscle was assessed using Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging (RUSI). Statistical test used For reliability, the kappa coefficient with percent agreement was calculated and for assessing the validity Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves and Area under the Curve (AUC) were constructed. Results The standing back extension test showed very good intra-rater (k=0.87 with an agreement of 96%) and good inter-rater (k=0.78 with an agreement of 94%) reliability and high AUC for TrA muscle. Conclusion The standing back extension test was found to be a reliable and a valid measure to detect passive extension subgroup for MCI in subjects with low back pain. PMID:26894091

  4. Combined generating-accelerating buncher for compact linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, E. A.; Matsievskiy, S. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Sokolov, I. D.; Zavadtsev, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Described in the previous article [1] method of the power extraction from the modulated electron beam has been applied to the compact standing wave electron linear accelerator feeding system, which doesnt require any connection waveguides between the power source and the accelerator itself [2]. Generating and accelerating bunches meet in the hybrid accelerating cell operating at TM020 mode, thus the accelerating module is placed on the axis of the generating module, which consists from the pulsed high voltage electron sources and electrons dumps. This combination makes the accelerator very compact in size which is very valuable for the modern applications such as portable inspection sources. Simulations and geometry cold tests are presented.

  5. About study of radiation flux carried out on the stand, which is designed for testing of space ultraviolet polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevodovskiy, P. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Geraimchuk, M. D.; Ivahiv, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    In the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine, National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI" and National University "Lviv Polytechnic" over the many years has accumulated considerable experience of work on the design and development of polarimeters, and created a working model of compact an onboard ultraviolet polarimeter (UFP) [1-6]. For debugging, research and testing as the entire layout of UFP and its individual parts we have created a special stand with complex equipment that allows carrying the following works. The structural construction of the stand allows obtaining characteristics as a whole unit, and its individual parts; obtaining spectral dependences and counting characteristics signal of the light radiation, and of dark signal; carry out the polarization measurements and more. For this stand developed a number of special techniques to study various parameters of all UFP appliance and its individual parts. Thus, for control - characteristics and calibration of elements of photo-detector system of electro-optical equipment, must use the reference emitters. But they are complicated and expensive. Therefore for simplified calibration and configuration of optical devices, it is expedient to use cheap and small in size, but specially selected LEDs. For this, developed for testing of UFP stand, has been modernized. Thus, the selection was carried out, and then carefully studied the sources of radiation, that will be used for calibration of polarimeters. More information on this work expounded in the report.

  6. LeRC rail accelerators - Test designs and diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, L. M.; Kerslake, W. R.; Sturman, J. C.; Wang, S. Y.; Terdan, F. F.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of using rail accelerators for various in-space and to-space propulsion applications was investigated. A 1 meter, 24 sq mm bore accelerator was designed with the goal of demonstrating projectile velocities of 15 km/sec using a peak current of 200 kA. A second rail accelerator, 1 meter long with a 156.25 sq mm bore, was designed with clear polycarbonate sidewalls to permit visual observation of the plasma arc. A study of available diagnostic techniques and their application to the rail accelerator is presented. Specific topics of discussion include the use of interferometry and spectroscopy to examine the plasma armature as well as the use of optical sensors to measure rail displacement during acceleration. Standard diagnostics such as current and voltage measurements are also discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N83-35053

  7. Demonstration recommendations for accelerated testing of concrete decontamination methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, K.S.; Ally, M.R.; Brown, C.H.; Morris, M.I.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    A large number of aging US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facilities located throughout the US require deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. Although several technologies are available commercially for concrete decontamination, emerging technologies with potential to reduce secondary waste and minimize the impact and risk to workers and the environment are needed. In response to these needs, the Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods project team described the nature and extent of contaminated concrete within the DOE complex and identified applicable emerging technologies. Existing information used to describe the nature and extent of contaminated concrete indicates that the most frequently occurring radiological contaminants are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and its daughters), {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, and tritium. The total area of radionuclide-contaminated concrete within the DOE complex is estimated to be in the range of 7.9 {times} 10{sup 8} ft{sup 2}or approximately 18,000 acres. Concrete decontamination problems were matched with emerging technologies to recommend demonstrations considered to provide the most benefit to decontamination of concrete within the DOE complex. Emerging technologies with the most potential benefit were biological decontamination, electro-hydraulic scabbling, electrokinetics, and microwave scabbling.

  8. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  9. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  10. Dust accelerator tests of the LDEX laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. W.; Bugiel, S.; Hofmann, B.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Srama, R.

    2015-10-01

    The LDEX (Lunar Dust EXperiment) sensor onboard lunar orbiter LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) was designed to characterize the size and spatial distributions of micron and sub-micron sized dust grains. Recent results of the data analysis showed strong evidence for the existence of a dust cloud around the moon. LDEX performs in situ measurements of dust impacts along the LADEE or-bit. The impact speed of the observed dust grains is close to 1.7 km/s (the speed of the spacecraft), since the dust grains are considered on bound orbits close to the maximum height of their ballistic motion. LDEX is an impact ionization dust detector for in situ measurements. The detection of a dust grains is based on measuring the charge generated by high speed impacts (>1km/s) on a rhodium coated target. The impact charge Q is a function of both the speed v and the mass m of the impacting dust particle. The characteristic values are dependent on the instrument geometry, the impact surface properties (material), the impact geometry (impact angle) and the particle properties (material, density, speed, mass, shape). In our tests we used PPy-coated olivine and PPy-coated ortho-pyroxene with impact speeds around 1.7 km/s. A LDEX laboratory model was designed and manufactured by the University of Stuttgart. The model is used to support calibration activities of the Univ. of Colorado and to perform special tests (impact angle and impact location variations) at the dust accelerator facility at MPI-K (Heidelberg) which is operated by the IRS of the University of Stuttgart.

  11. Disparity between online and offline tests in accelerated aging tests of LED lamps under electric stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Jing, Lei; Ke, Hong-Liang; Hao, Jian; Gao, Qun; Wang, Xiao-Xun; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Jun

    2016-09-20

    The accelerated aging tests under electric stress for one type of LED lamp are conducted, and the differences between online and offline tests of the degradation of luminous flux are studied in this paper. The transformation of the two test modes is achieved with an adjustable AC voltage stabilized power source. Experimental results show that the exponential fitting of the luminous flux degradation in online tests possesses a higher fitting degree for most lamps, and the degradation rate of the luminous flux by online tests is always lower than that by offline tests. Bayes estimation and Weibull distribution are used to calculate the failure probabilities under the accelerated voltages, and then the reliability of the lamps under rated voltage of 220 V is estimated by use of the inverse power law model. Results show that the relative error of the lifetime estimation by offline tests increases as the failure probability decreases, and it cannot be neglected when the failure probability is less than 1%. The relative errors of lifetime estimation are 7.9%, 5.8%, 4.2%, and 3.5%, at the failure probabilities of 0.1%, 1%, 5%, and 10%, respectively. PMID:27661576

  12. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  13. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... petition the FTA for a waiver allowing the employer to stand down, per 49 CFR Part 40, an employee... CFR 40.21. (c) Each petition for a waiver must be submitted to the Office of Safety and Security... 20590. (d) The Administrator may grant a waiver subject to 49 CFR 40.21(d)....

  14. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... petition the FTA for a waiver allowing the employer to stand down, per 49 CFR Part 40, an employee... CFR 40.21. (c) Each petition for a waiver must be submitted to the Office of Safety and Security... 20590. (d) The Administrator may grant a waiver subject to 49 CFR 40.21(d)....

  15. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... petition the FTA for a waiver allowing the employer to stand down, per 49 CFR Part 40, an employee... CFR 40.21. (c) Each petition for a waiver must be submitted to the Office of Safety and Security... 20590. (d) The Administrator may grant a waiver subject to 49 CFR 40.21(d)....

  16. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... petition the FTA for a waiver allowing the employer to stand down, per 49 CFR Part 40, an employee... CFR 40.21. (c) Each petition for a waiver must be submitted to the Office of Safety and Security... 20590. (d) The Administrator may grant a waiver subject to 49 CFR 40.21(d)....

  17. 49 CFR 655.5 - Stand-down waivers for drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... petition the FTA for a waiver allowing the employer to stand down, per 49 CFR Part 40, an employee... CFR 40.21. (c) Each petition for a waiver must be submitted to the Office of Safety and Security... 20590. (d) The Administrator may grant a waiver subject to 49 CFR 40.21(d)....

  18. Optimal design of multiple stress constant accelerated life test plan on non-rectangle test region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenhua; Gao, Liang; Liu, Juan; Qian, Ping; Pan, Jun

    2012-11-01

    For optimal design of constant stress accelerated life test(CSALT) with two-stress, if the stresses could not reach the highest levels simultaneously, the test region becomes non-rectangular. For optimal CSALT design on non-rectangle test region, the present method is only focused on non-rectangle test region with simple boundary, and the optimization algorithm is based on experience which can not ensure to obtain the optimal plan. In this paper, considering the linear-extreme value model and the optimization goal to minimize the variance of lifetime estimate under normal stress, the optimal design method of two-stress type-I censored CSALT plan on general non-rectangular test region is proposed. First, two properties of optimal test plans are proved and the relationship of all the optimal test plans is determined analytically. Then, on the basis of the two properties, the optimal problem is simplified and the optimal design method of two-stress CSALT plan on general non-rectangular test region is proposed. Finally, a numerical example is used to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the method. The result shows that the proposed method could obtain the optimal test plan on non-rectangular test regions with arbitrary boundaries. This research provides the theory and method for two-stress optimal CSALT planning on non-rectangular test regions.

  19. Simulated Stand Tests on Earth, Moon, and Mars and Centrifuge Parameters to Prevent Cardiovascular Deconditioning During Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Brandon W.; Sharp, M. Keith

    2008-06-01

    Postflight Orthostatic Intolerance (POI) results from cardiovascular adaptation to spaceflight and affects a significant fraction of astronauts returning to earth after missions that are merely a couple of weeks in duration and may be even more prevalent after longer missions, such as those to the moon and Mars. To prevent cardiovascular deconditioning a centrifuge may be utilized to induce gravity-like stresses within the body. The current investigation allows insight into the mechanisms of POI by simulating stand tests on Earth, the moon, and Mars while predicting centrifuge spin rates that sufficiently mimic each constant gravity reference. It was found that the modeled nonfinishing male & female astronaut would become presyncopal in about 4&7min, 32&56min, 104&182min while losing 160&280mL, 512&896mL, 692&1211mL of blood volume (BV) at the onset of presyncope in each case for Earth, Mars, and the moon, respectively. The modeled finishing male astronaut endured the length of the stand test in every case, but lost only 100mL, 320, and 432mL BV by the end of each stand test. Centrifuge speeds for equivalent times to presyncope for female and finishing & nonfinishing male astronauts loaded the body with G loads at heart level for Earth, Mars, and the moon cases consistently less than the constant gravity reference level for both the NASA short & long arm centrifuges.

  20. Effects of a standing and three dynamic workstations on computer task performance and cognitive function tests.

    PubMed

    Commissaris, Dianne A C M; Könemann, Reinier; Hiemstra-van Mastrigt, Suzanne; Burford, Eva-Maria; Botter, Juliane; Douwes, Marjolein; Ellegast, Rolf P

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary work entails health risks. Dynamic (or active) workstations, at which computer tasks can be combined with physical activity, may reduce the risks of sedentary behaviour. The aim of this study was to evaluate short term task performance while working on three dynamic workstations: a treadmill, an elliptical trainer, a bicycle ergometer and a conventional standing workstation. A standard sitting workstation served as control condition. Fifteen Dutch adults performed five standardised but common office tasks in an office-like laboratory setting. Both objective and perceived work performance were measured. With the exception of high precision mouse tasks, short term work performance was not affected by working on a dynamic or a standing workstation. The participant's perception of decreased performance might complicate the acceptance of dynamic workstations, although most participants indicate that they would use a dynamic workstation if available at the workplace.

  1. Framework for a Comparative Accelerated Testing Standard for PV Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Yamamichi, M.; Sample, T.; Miller, D.; Meakin, D.; Monokroussos, C.; TamizhMani, M.; Kempe, M.; Jordan, D.; Bosco, N.; Hacke, P.; Bermudez, V.; Kondo, M.

    2013-08-01

    As the photovoltaic industry has grown, the interest in comparative accelerated testing has also grown. Private test labs offer testing services that apply greater stress than the standard qualification tests as tools for differentiating products and for gaining increased confidence in long-term PV investments. While the value of a single international standard for comparative accelerated testing is widely acknowledged, the development of a consensus is difficult. This paper strives to identify a technical basis for a comparative standard.

  2. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate ('dynamic fatigue') testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rate in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  3. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  4. The Psychometric Properties of a Modified Sit-to-Stand Test With Use of the Upper Extremities in Institutionalized Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, Melanie; Apap, David; Babcock, Jade; Bray, Sarah; Gareau, Esther; Chassé, Kathleen; Lévesque, Nicole; Robbins, Shawn M

    2016-08-01

    Current sit-to-stand protocols do not permit use of upper extremities, limiting the protocols' utility for institutionalized older adults with diminished physical function. The objective of this study was to modify a 30-s sit-to-stand protocol to allow for arm use and to examine test-retest reliability and convergent validity; 54 institutionalized older adult men (age = 91 ± 3 year) performed the 30-s sit-to-stand twice within a span of 3 to 7 days. Results suggest good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .84) and convergent validity with the Timed Up and Go Test (r = -.62). This modified 30-s sit-to-stand can be used to assess physical function performance in institutionalized older adults and will ensure that individuals with lower physical function capacity can complete the test, thus eliminating the floor effect demonstrated with other sit-to-stand protocols.

  5. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.; Kinkead, Allen K.; Gai Wei; Power, John G.; Konecny, Richard; Jing Chunguang; Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, Ralph W.; Bruce, Robert L.; Lewis, David III

    2004-12-07

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the StanFord Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron injector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  6. Development of a 20-MeV Dielectric-Loaded Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.G.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Hu, Y.; Chen, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, Y.; Bruce, R.W.; Bruce, R.L.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lewis, D.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /LET Corp., Washington /Argonne /SLAC /Tsinghua U., Beijing

    2005-06-22

    This paper describes a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) test facility powered by a high-power 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier. The magnicon can presently produce 25 MW of output power in a 250-ns pulse at 10 Hz, and efforts are in progress to increase this to 50 MW. The facility will include a 5 MeV electron inector being developed by the Accelerator Laboratory of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. The DLA test structures are being developed by ANL, and some have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx} 8 MV/m. SLAC is developing a means to combine the two magnicon output arms, and to drive an injector and accelerator with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRl, is developing a means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by ceramic brazing using an intense millimeter-wave beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year. The facility will be used for testing DLA structures using a variety of materials and configurations, and also for testing other X-band accelerator concepts. The initial goal is to produce a compact 20 MeV dielectric-loaded test accelerator.

  7. Experimental test accelerator: description and results of initial experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, T.; Birx, D.; Briggs, R.

    1980-06-02

    The ETA is a high current (10,000 Amp) linear induction accelerator that produces short (30 ns) pulses of electrons at 5 MeV twice per second or in bursts of 5 pulses separated by as little as one millisecond. At this time the machine has operated at 65% of its design current and 90% of the design voltage. This report contains a description of the accelerator and its diagnostics; the results of the initial year of operation; a comparison of design codes with experiments on beam transport; and a discussion of some of the special problems and their status.

  8. A study on special test stand of automatic and manual descent control in presence of simulated g-load effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazkov, Yury; Artjuchin, Yury; Astakhov, Alexander; Vas'kov, Alexander; Malyshev, Veniamin; Mitroshin, Edward; Glinsky, Valery; Moiseenko, Vasily; Makovlev, Vyacheslav

    The development of aircraft-type reusable space vehicles (RSV) involves the problem of complete compatibility of automatic, director and manual control. Task decision is complicated, in particular, due to considerable quantitative and qualitative changes of vehicle dynamic characteristics, little stability margins (and even of unstability) of the RSV, and stringent requirements to control accuracy at some flight phases. Besides, during control a pilot is affected by g-loads which hamper motor activity and deteriorate its accuracy, alter the functional status of the visual analyser, and influence higher nervous activity. A study of g-load effects on the control efficiency, especially in manual and director modes, is of primary importance. The main tools for study of a rational selection of manual and director vehicle control systems and as an aid in formulating recommendations for optimum crew-automatic control system interactions are special complex and functional flight simulator test stands. The proposed simulator stand includes a powerful digital computer complex combined with the control system of the centrifuge. The interior of a pilot's vehicle cabin is imitated. A situation image system, pyscho-physical monitoring system, physician, centrifuge operator, and instructor stations are linked with the test stand.

  9. Optics of the NIFS negative ion source test stand by infrared calorimetry and numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Antoni, V; Agostinetti, P; Brombin, M; Ikeda, K; Kisaki, M; Nakano, H; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Takeiri, Y; Tsumori, K

    2016-02-01

    At National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), a multi-ampere negative ion source is used to support the R&D on H(-) production, extraction, and acceleration. In this contribution, we study the characteristics of the acceleration system of this source, in order to characterize the beam optics at different operational conditions. A dedicated experimental campaign was carried out at NIFS, using as main diagnostic the infra-red imaging of the beam profiles. The experimental measurements are also compared with 3D numerical simulations, in order to validate the codes and to assess their degree of reliability. The simulations show a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Optics of the NIFS negative ion source test stand by infrared calorimetry and numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Antoni, V; Agostinetti, P; Brombin, M; Ikeda, K; Kisaki, M; Nakano, H; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Takeiri, Y; Tsumori, K

    2016-02-01

    At National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), a multi-ampere negative ion source is used to support the R&D on H(-) production, extraction, and acceleration. In this contribution, we study the characteristics of the acceleration system of this source, in order to characterize the beam optics at different operational conditions. A dedicated experimental campaign was carried out at NIFS, using as main diagnostic the infra-red imaging of the beam profiles. The experimental measurements are also compared with 3D numerical simulations, in order to validate the codes and to assess their degree of reliability. The simulations show a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. PMID:26932080

  11. Accelerator Stewardship Test Facility Program - Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, Andrew; Areti, Hari

    2015-08-01

    Funding is being requested pursuant to the proposals entitled Elliptical Twin Cavity for Accelerator Applications that was submitted and reviewed through the Portfolio Analysis and Management System (PAMS). The PAMS proposal identifier number is 0000219731. The proposed new type of superconducting cavity, the Elliptical Twin Cavity, is capable of accelerating or decelerating beams in two separate beam pipes. This configuration is particularly effective for high-current, low energy electron beams that will be used for bunched beam cooling of high-energy protons or ions. Having the accelerated beam physically separated from the decelerated beam, but interacting with the same RF mode, means that the low energy beam from the gun can be injected into to the superconducting cavity without bends enabling a small beam emittance to be maintained. A staff engineer who has been working with non-standard complicated cavity structures replaces the senior engineer (in the original budget) who is moving on to be a project leader. This is reflected in a slightly increased engineer time and in reduced costs. The Indirect costs for FY16 are lower than the previous projection. As a result, there is no scope reduction.

  12. Development of an accelerated leach test(s) for low-level waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1985-01-01

    An accelerated leach test(s) is being developed to predict long-term leaching behavior of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) forms in their disposal environments. As necessary background, a literature survey of reported leaching mechanisms, available mathematical models and factors that affect leaching of LLW forms has been compiled. Mechanisms which have been identified include diffusion, dissolution, ion exchange, corrosion and surface effects. A computerized data base of LLW leaching data and mathematical models is being developed. The data is being used for model evaluation by curve fitting and statistical analysis according to standard procedures of statistical quality control. Long-term leach tests on portland cement, bitumen and vinyl ester-styrene (VES) polymer waste forms are underway which are designed to identify and evaluate factors that accelerate leaching without changing the mechanisms. Initial results on the effect of temperature on leachability indicate that the leach rates of cement and VES waste forms increase with increasing temperature, whereas, the leach rate of bitumen is little affected. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Experimental evaluation of the Battelle accelerated test design for the solar array at Mead, Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frickland, P. O.; Repar, J.

    1982-01-01

    A previously developed test design for accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules was experimentally evaluated. The studies included a review of relevant field experience, environmental chamber cycling of full size modules, and electrical and physical evaluation of the effects of accelerated aging during and after the tests. The test results indicated that thermally induced fatigue of the interconnects was the primary mode of module failure as measured by normalized power output. No chemical change in the silicone encapsulant was detectable after 360 test cycles.

  14. Design and Simulation of IOTA - a Novel Concept of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; Danilov, V.V.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The use of nonlinear lattices with large betatron tune spreads can increase instability and space charge thresholds due to improved Landau damping. Unfortunately, the majority of nonlinear accelerator lattices turn out to be nonintegrable, producing chaotic motion and a complex network of stable and unstable resonances. Recent advances in finding the integrable nonlinear accelerator lattices have led to a proposal to construct at Fermilab a test accelerator with strong nonlinear focusing which avoids resonances and chaotic particle motion. This presentation will outline the main challenges, theoretical design solutions and construction status of the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) underway at Fermilab.

  15. Comparison of online and offline tests in LED accelerated reliability tests under temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hong-Liang; Jing, Lei; Gao, Qun; Wang, Yao; Hao, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-20

    Accelerated aging tests are the main method used in the evaluation of LED reliability, and can be performed in either online or offline modes. The goal of this study is to provide the difference between the two test modes. In the experiments, the sample is attached to different heat sinks to acquire the optical parameters under different junction temperatures of LEDs. By measuring the junction temperature in the aging process (Tj1), and the junction temperature in the testing process (Tj2), we achieve consistency with an online test of Tj1 and Tj2 and a difference with an offline test of Tj1 and Tj2. Experimental results show that the degradation rate of the luminous flux rises as Tj2 increases, which yields a difference of projected life L(70%) of 8% to 13%. For color shifts over 5000 h of aging, the online test shows a larger variation of the distance from the Planckian locus, about 40% to 50% more than the normal test at an ambient temperature of 25°C. PMID:26836556

  16. NASA's Functional Task Test: High Intensity Exercise Improves the Heart Rate Response to a Stand Test Following 70 Days of Bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, Steven S.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Dillon, E. Lichar; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Urban, Randall J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Stenger, Michael B.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular adaptations due to spaceflight are modeled with 6deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR) and result in decreased orthostatic tolerance. We investigated if high-intensity resistive and aerobic exercise with and without testosterone supplementation would improve the heart rate (HR) response to a 3.5-min stand test and how quickly these changes recovered following BR. During 70 days of BR male subjects performed no exercise (Control, n=10), high intensity supine resistive and aerobic exercise (Exercise, n=9), or supine exercise plus supplemental testosterone (Exercise+T, n=8; 100 mg i.m., weekly in 2-week on/off cycles). We measured HR for 2 min while subjects were prone and for 3 min after standing twice before and 0, 1, 6, and 11 days after BR. Mixed-effects linear regression models were used to evaluate group, time, and interaction effects. Compared to pre-bed rest, prone HR was elevated on BR+0 and BR+1 in Control, but not Exercise or Exercise+T groups, and standing HR was greater in all 3 groups. The increase in prone and standing HR in Control subjects was greater than either Exercise or Exercise+T groups and all groups recovered by BR+6. The change in HR from prone to standing more than doubled on BR+0 in all groups, but was significantly less in the Exericse+T group compared to the Control, but not Exercise group. Exercise reduces, but does not prevent the increase in HR observed in response to standing. The significantly lower HR response in the Exercise+T group requires further investigation to determine physiologic significance.

  17. Applications of the ram accelerator to hypervelocity aerothermodynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    A ram accelerator used as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerodynamics research is presented. It is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled down a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Ram accelerator operation has been demonstrated at 39 mm and 90 mm bores, supporting the proposition that this launcher concept can be scaled up to very large bore diameters of the order of 30-60 cm. It is concluded that high quality data obtained from the tube wall and projectile during the aceleration process itself are very useful for understanding aerothermodynamics of hypersonic flow in general, and for providing important CFD validation benchmarks.

  18. Test particle acceleration in a magnetotail reconnection configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Sachsenweger, D.; Scholer, M.; Mobius, E. )

    1989-09-01

    AMPTE/IRM measurements during a period of strong magnetic activity on April 8, 1985 exhibit a significant hardening of the energy spectra of all detected ion species (H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, He{sup +}, O{sup +}) following substorm expansion. In order to explain these observations in the framework of the substorm neutral line model, single-particle trajectories of various ions (H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, O{sup +}) are followed numerically in the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields obtained from a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail reconnection. Current sheet acceleration of a suitable plasma sheet ion distribution can explain the observed ordering of the flux increase of the various species in energy per charge. Starting from a cold lobe population, however, current sheet acceleration cannot account for the differential ion intensities observed after substorm expansion. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  19. Status of DOE and AID stand-alone photovoltaic system field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifano, W. J.; Delombard, R.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Scudder, L. R.

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is managing stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system projects sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID). The DOE project includes village PV power demonstration projects in Gabon (four sites) and the Marshall Islands, and PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in six countries. The AID project includes a large village power system, a farmhouse system and two water pumping-irrigation systems in Tunisia, a water pumping/grain grinding system in Upper Volta, five medical clinic systems in four countries, PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in 18 countries and a PV-powered remote earth station in Indonesia. This paper reviews these PV projects and summarizes significant findings to date.

  20. Status of DOE and AID stand-alone photovoltaic system field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bifano, W. J.; Delombard, R.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Scudder, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) is managing stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system projects sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID). The DOE project includes village PV power demonstration projects in Gabon (four sites) and the Marshall Islands, and PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in six countries. The AID project includes a large village power system, a farmhouse system and two water pumping-irrigation systems in Tunisia, a water pumping/grain grinding system in Upper Volta, five medical clinic systems in four countries, PV-powered vaccine refrigerator systems in 18 countries and a PV-powered remote earth station in Indonesia. This paper reviews these PV projects and summarizes significant findings to date.

  1. Timescale Correlation between Marine Atmospheric Exposure and Accelerated Corrosion Testing - Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Eliza L.; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Jerome C.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of metals to predict service life of metal-based structures in corrosive environments has long relied on atmospheric exposure test sites. Traditional accelerated corrosion testing relies on mimicking the exposure conditions, often incorporating salt spray and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and exposing the metal to continuous or cyclic conditions similar to those of the corrosive environment. Their reliability to correlate to atmospheric exposure test results is often a concern when determining the timescale to which the accelerated tests can be related. Accelerated corrosion testing has yet to be universally accepted as a useful tool in predicting the long-term service life of a metal, despite its ability to rapidly induce corrosion. Although visual and mass loss methods of evaluating corrosion are the standard, and their use is crucial, a method that correlates timescales from accelerated testing to atmospheric exposure would be very valuable. This paper presents work that began with the characterization of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Beachside Corrosion Test Site. The chemical changes that occur on low carbon steel, during atmospheric and accelerated corrosion conditions, were investigated using surface chemistry analytical methods. The corrosion rates and behaviors of panels subjected to long-term and accelerated corrosion conditions, involving neutral salt fog and alternating seawater spray, were compared to identify possible timescale correlations between accelerated and long-term corrosion performance. The results, as well as preliminary findings on the correlation investigation, are presented.

  2. Design, fabrication and first beam tests of the C-band RF acceleration unit at SINAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wencheng; Gu, Qiang; Sheng, Xing; Wang, Chaopeng; Tong, Dechun; Chen, Lifang; Zhong, Shaopeng; Tan, Jianhao; Lin, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhihao; Zhao, Zhentang

    2016-07-01

    C-band RF acceleration is a crucial technology for the compact Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (SINAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. A project focusing on C-band RF acceleration technology was launched in 2008, based on high-gradient accelerating structures powered by klystron and pulse compressor units. The target accelerating gradient is 40 MV/m or higher. Recently one prototype of C-band RF unit, consisting of a 1.8 m accelerating structure and a klystron with a TE0115 mode pulse compressor, has been tested with high-power and electron beam. Stable operation at 40 MV/m was demonstrated and, 50 MV/m approached by the end of the test. This paper introduces the C-band R&D program at SINAP and presents the experiment results of high-power and beam tests.

  3. An analysis of cross-coupling of a multicomponent jet engine test stand using finite element modeling techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Singnoi, W. N.

    1985-01-01

    A two axis thrust measuring system was analyzed by using a finite a element computer program to determine the sensitivities of the thrust vectoring nozzle system to misalignment of the load cells and applied loads, and the stiffness of the structural members. Three models were evaluated: (1) the basic measuring element and its internal calibration load cells; (2) the basic measuring element and its external load calibration equipment; and (3) the basic measuring element, external calibration load frame and the altitude facility support structure. Alignment of calibration loads was the greatest source of error for multiaxis thrust measuring systems. Uniform increases or decreases in stiffness of the members, which might be caused by the selection of the materials, have little effect on the accuracy of the measurements. It is found that the POLO-FINITE program is a viable tool for designing and analyzing multiaxis thrust measurement systems. The response of the test stand to step inputs that might be encountered with thrust vectoring tests was determined. The dynamic analysis show a potential problem for measuring the dynamic response characteristics of thrust vectoring systems because of the inherently light damping of the test stand.

  4. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.; Long, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Fliflet, A.W.; Lombardi, M.; Lewis, D.; Bruce, R.W.; /Unlisted

    2007-04-13

    This paper presents a progress report on a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the magnicon facility at NRL. The accelerator will be powered by an experimental 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that presently produces 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator will include a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate DLA structures up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by ANL, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC has developed components to distribute the power from the two magnicon output arms to the injector and to the DLA accelerating structure with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, has investigated means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by a brazing process using an intense 83-GHz beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  5. Development of a 20 MeV Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Steven H.; Fliflet, Arne W.; Lombardi, Marcie; Kinkead, Allen K.; Gai, Wei; Power, John G.; Konecny, Richard; Long, Jidong; Jing, Chunguang; Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Bruce, Ralph W.; Lewis, David III

    2006-11-27

    This paper presents a progress report on a joint project by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in collaboration with the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to develop a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the magnicon facility at NRL. The accelerator will be powered by an experimental 11.424-GHz magnicon amplifier that presently produces 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator will include a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate DLA structures up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by ANL, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone testing at NRL at gradients up to {approx}8 MV/m. SLAC has developed components to distribute the power from the two magnicon output arms to the injector and to the DLA accelerating structure with separate control of the power ratio and relative phase. RWBruce Associates, Inc., working with NRL, has investigated means to join short ceramic sections into a continuous accelerator tube by a brazing process using an intense 83-GHz beam. The installation and testing of the first dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  6. Accelerated and environmental module stress testing at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C.R.; Basso, T.S.; del Cueto, J.A.; McMahon, T.J.; Pruett, J.; Trudell, D.

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Module Testing and Technology Validation task at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The extensive module testing capabilities at the Outdoor Test Facility are outlined, emphasizing the test facilities, equipment, and analytical services available. Highlights and results of several recent testing efforts are then presented, followed by a list of the external programs supported by the task. The paper concludes with a brief description of the new testing programs that are planned for the near future. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Testing Cosmic-Ray Acceleration in Young, Embedded Stellar Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukri, Komin; Marcowith, Alexandre; Lamanna, Giovanni; Maurin, Gilles; Krayzel, Fabien

    2016-07-01

    Most of the massive stars appear grouped in clusters located in giant molecular clouds. Their strong wind activity generates large structures known as stellar wind bubbles and induces collective effects which could accelerate particles up to high energy and produce gamma-rays. The best objects to observe these effects are young massive star clusters in which no supernova explosion has occurred yet. We model these star clusters as a spherical leaky box (the molecular cloud) surrounding a central cosmic ray source (the stellar cluster). We developed a phenomenological model to estimate the cosmic and gamma-ray production for a set of 8 selected clusters. We compare the predicted gamma-ray emission with data obtained with the Fermi-LAT telescope. No significant emission has been detected from any of the selected cluster. Comparing the upper limit on the gamma-ray flux with the prediction from our phenomenological model indicates that not more than 10% of the stellar wind luminosity of the stellar clusters is converted into cosmic rays. If all O-type stars do not contribute more than 10% of their stellar wind luminosity to cosmic-ray acceleration they do not contribute to more than on percent of the total cosmic-ray luminosity.

  8. Creating an EPICS Based Test Stand Development System for a BPM Digitizer of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is required to deliver a high quality electron beam for producing coherent X-rays. As a result, high resolution beam position monitoring is required. The Beam Position Monitor (BPM) digitizer acquires analog signals from the beam line and digitizes them to obtain beam position data. Although Matlab is currently being used to test the BPM digitizer?s functions and capability, the Controls Department at SLAC prefers to use Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS). This paper discusses the transition of providing similar as well as enhanced functionalities, than those offered by Matlab, to test the digitizer. Altogether, the improved test stand development system can perform mathematical and statistical calculations with the waveform signals acquired from the digitizer and compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the signals. Finally, logging of meaningful data into files has been added.

  9. Development of a Compact Dielectric-Loaded Test Accelerator at 11.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S. H.; Fliflet, A. W.; Kinkead, A. K.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Jing, C.

    2009-01-22

    This paper presents a progress report on the development of a dielectric-loaded test accelerator in the Magnicon Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The accelerator will be powered by an 11.4-GHz magnicon amplifier that provides up to 25 MW of output power in a {approx}250-ns pulse at up to 10 Hz. The accelerator includes a 5-MeV electron injector originally developed at the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, and can incorporate dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures of up to 0.5 m in length. The DLA structures are being developed by Argonne National Laboratory and Euclid Techlabs, and shorter test structures fabricated from a variety of dielectric materials have undergone rf testing at NRL at accelerating gradients up to 15 MV/m. The first stage of the accelerator, including the 5-MeV injector, has recently begun operation, and initial operation of the complete dielectric-loaded test accelerator, including injector, DLA test structure, and spectrometer, should take place within the next year.

  10. Testing a simulation model for reconstruction of prehistoric forest-stand dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.M.; Delcourt, H.R.; West, D.C.; Blasing, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    Three characteristics of the output of a forest-stand simulation model were matched to pollen records of actual vegetation in central Tennessee. Temporal shifts of individual pollen taxon frequencies were compared to shifts of individual plant species frequencies in simulated biomass for the last 16,000 y. Individual pollen profiles (temporally ordered species frequencies) were also compared to simulated biomass profiles during that period. Modern ratios of pollen to vegetation composition (R values) were compared with those calculated from simulated biomass percentages and fossil pollen percentages. The model output was similar to the comparable characteristics of the pollen record. The model output is therefore a plausible description of vegetation characteristics at the site of pollen deposition in central Tennessee. The model produced information unavailable from other sets of prehistoric data. This information describes the invasion and growth of the yellow-poplar which produces no windborne pollen, and of palynologically indistinguishable oak and pine species. These results suggest that many paleoecological questions can be answered through appropriate simulation modeling studies.

  11. Accelerated life testing and temperature dependence of device characteristics in GaAs CHFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, M.; Leon, R.; Vu, D. T.; Okuno, J.; Johnson, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerated life testing of GaAs complementary heterojunction field effect transistors (CHFET) was carried out. Temperature dependence of single and synchronous rectifier CHFET device characteristics were also obtained.

  12. Analysis of Transmitted Optical Spectrum Enabling Accelerated Testing of CPV Designs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Kempe, M. D.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2009-07-01

    Reliability of CPV systems' materials is not well known; methods for accelerated UV testing have not been developed. UV and IR spectra transmitted through representative optical systems are evaluated.

  13. About study of radiation flux carried out on the stand, which is designed for testing of space ultraviolet polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevodovskiy, P. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Geraimchuk, M. D.; Ivahiv, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    In the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine, National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI" and National University "Lviv Polytechnic" over the many years has accumulated considerable experience of work on the design and development of polarimeters, and created a working model of compact an onboard ultraviolet polarimeter (UFP) [1-6]. For debugging, research and testing as the entire layout of UFP and its individual parts we have created a special stand with complex equipment that allows carrying the following works. The structural construction of the stand allows obtaining characteristics as a whole unit, and its individual parts; obtaining spectral dependences and counting characteristics signal of the light radiation, and of dark signal; carry out the polarization measurements and more. For this stand developed a number of special techniques to study various parameters of all UFP appliance and its individual parts. Thus, for control - characteristics and calibration of elements of photo-detector system of electro-optical equipment, must use the reference emitters. But they are complicated and expensive. Therefore for simplified calibration and configuration of optical devices, it is expedient to use cheap and small in size, but specially selected LEDs. For this, developed for testing of UFP stand, has been modernized. Thus, the selection was carried out, and then carefully studied the sources of radiation, that will be used for calibration of polarimeters. More information on this work expounded in the report. References. 1. P. Nevodovskyi, O. Morozhenko, A. Vidmachenko, O. Ivakhiv, M. Geraimchuk, O. Zbrutskyi. Tiny Ultraviolet Polarimeter for Earth Stratosphere from Space Investigation // Proceedings of 8th IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Data Acquisition and Advanced Computing Systems: Technology and Applications (IDAACS'2015). 24-26 September 2015, Proceedings. Warsaw, Poland. Vol.81, p. 28-32. 2. Nevodovsksiy P. V., Morozhenko A. V

  14. Accelerated thermal and mechanical testing of CSP assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, R.

    2000-01-01

    Chip Scale Packages (CSP) are now widely used for many electronic applications including portable and telecommunication products. A test vehicle (TV-1) with eleven package types and pitches was built and tested by the JPL MicrotypeBGA Consortium during 1997 to 1999. Lessons learned by the team were published as a guidelines document for industry use. The finer pitch CSP packages which recently became available were indluded in the next test vehicle of the JPL CSP Consortium.

  15. Validity and Reproducibility of an Incremental Sit-To-Stand Exercise Test for Evaluating Anaerobic Threshold in Young, Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ohira, Masayoshi; Yokokawa, Yoshiharu; Nagasawa, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand exercise (STS) is a common activity of daily living. The objectives of the present study were: 1) to assess the validity of aerobic fitness measurements based on anaerobic thresholds (ATs), during incremental sit-to-stand exercise (ISTS) with and without arm support compared with an incremental cycle-ergometer (CE) test; and 2) to examine the reproducibility of the AT measured during the ISTSs. Twenty-six healthy individuals randomly performed the ISTS and CE test. Oxygen uptakes at the AT (AT-VO2) and heart rate at the AT (AT-HR) were determined during the ISTSs and CE test, and repeated-measures analyses of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used to evaluate the differences between these variables. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the strength of the relationship between AT-VO2 and AT-HR during the ISTSs and CE test. Data analysis yielded the following correlations: AT-VO2 during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.77 (p < 0.05); AT-VO2 during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.70 (p < 0.05); AT-HR during the ISTS with arm support and the CE test, r = 0.80 (p < 0.05); and AT-HR during the ISTS without arm support and the CE test, r = 0.66 (p < 0.05). The AT-VO2 values during the ISTS with arm support (18.5 ± 1.9 mL·min-1·kg-1) and the CE test (18.4 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (16.6 ± 1.8 mL·min-1·kg-1; p < 0.05). The AT-HR values during the ISTS with arm support (126 ± 10 bpm) and the CE test (126 ± 13 bpm) were significantly higher than those during the ISTS without arm support (119 ± 9 bpm; p < 0.05). The ISTS with arm support may provide a cardiopulmonary function load equivalent to the CE test; therefore, it is a potentially valid test for evaluating AT-VO2 and AT-HR in healthy, young adults. Key points The ISTS is a simple test that varies only according to the frequency of standing up, and requires only a small

  16. Introducing Novel Generation of High Accuracy Camera Optical-Testing and Calibration Test-Stands Feasible for Series Production of Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekouei Shahraki, M.; Haala, N.

    2015-12-01

    The recent advances in the field of computer-vision have opened the doors of many opportunities for taking advantage of these techniques and technologies in many fields and applications. Having a high demand for these systems in today and future vehicles implies a high production volume of video cameras. The above criterions imply that it is critical to design test systems which deliver fast and accurate calibration and optical-testing capabilities. In this paper we introduce new generation of test-stands delivering high calibration quality in single-shot calibration of fisheye surround-view cameras. This incorporates important geometric features from bundle-block calibration, delivers very high (sub-pixel) calibration accuracy, makes possible a very fast calibration procedure (few seconds), and realizes autonomous calibration via machines. We have used the geometrical shape of a Spherical Helix (Type: 3D Spherical Spiral) with special geometrical characteristics, having a uniform radius which corresponds to the uniform motion. This geometrical feature was mechanically realized using three dimensional truncated icosahedrons which practically allow the implementation of a spherical helix on multiple surfaces. Furthermore the test-stand enables us to perform many other important optical tests such as stray-light testing, enabling us to evaluate the certain qualities of the camera optical module.

  17. Association of Seat Height and Arm Position on the Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test Times of Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S. M.; Cheung, Susanna Y.; Lai, Lauren S. W.; Liu, Ann S. L.; Ieong, Selena H. I.; Fong, Shirley S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate (1) the association of seat height and (2) the association of arm position on the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS) times of individuals with stroke. Design. A cross-sectional study. Setting. University-based rehabilitation centre. Subjects. Patients (n = 43) with chronic stroke. Methods. The times in completing the FTSTS with different seat height (85%, 100%, and 115% knee height) and arm positions (arms across chest, hands on thighs). Results. FTSTS times were significantly different between 85% and 100% seat heights, and between the 85% and 115% seat heights in both arm positions. However, there was no significant difference between the FTSTS times with the two arm positions at any seat height tested. Conclusion. Seat heights lower than the knee height result in longer FTSTS times, whereas arms positions did not significantly affect the FTSTS times. PMID:24106711

  18. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.; Cervaro, V.; Delogu, R.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Molon, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. Tollin, M.; Veltri, P.; De Muri, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Muraro, A.

    2015-04-08

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with the aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 3×5 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.

  19. Design and test of a superconducting magnet in a linear accelerator for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanling; Xu, Fengyu; Wang, Ting; Yang, Xiangchen; Chen, Anbin; Wei, Xiaotao; Gao, Yao; Hou, Zhenhua; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Haoshu

    2014-11-01

    A batch superconducting solenoid magnet for the ADS proton linear accelerator has been designed, fabricated, and tested in a vertical dewar in Sept. 2013. A total of ten superconducting magnets will be installed into two separate cryomodules. Each cryomodule contains six superconducting spoke RF cavities for beam acceleration and five solenoid magnets for beam focusing. The multifunction superconducting magnet contains a solenoid for beam focusing and two correctors for orbit correction. The design current for the solenoid magnet is 182 A. A quench performance test shows that the operating current of the solenoid magnet can reach above 300 A after natural quenching on three occasions during current ramping (260 A, 268 A, 308 A). The integrated field strength and leakage field at the nearby superconducting spoke cavities all meet the design requirements. The vertical test checked the reliability of the test dewar and the quench detection system. This paper presents the physical and mechanical design of the batch magnets, the quench detection technique, field measurements, and a discussion of the residual field resulting from persistent current effects.

  20. 78 FR 76410 - Request for Information on Strategies To Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Strategies to Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success (PFS) Financing Models (78 FR 60998... Request for Information on Strategies To Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay for Success (PFS... period on its request for information on Strategies to Accelerate the Testing and Adoption of Pay...

  1. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 1; Start-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. They are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the first part of the experimental study, i.e. the effects of a centrifugal force on the LHP start-up. Tests were conducted by varying the heat load to the evaporator, sink temperature, magnitude and frequency of centrifugal force, and LHP orientation relative to the direction of the accelerating force. The accelerating force seems to have little effect on the loop start-up in terms of temperature overshoot and superheat at boiling incipience. Changes in these parameters seem to be stochastic with or without centrifugal accelerating forces. The LHP started successfully in all tests.

  2. High power testing of the 402.5 MHZ and 805 MHZ RF windows for the spallation neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, K. A.; De Baca, J. M.; Harrison, J. S.; Rodriguez, M. B.; Torrez, P. A.; Warner, D. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hisorically, Radio Frequency (RF) windows have been a common point of failure in input power couplers; therefore, reliable RF windows are critical to the success of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. The normal conducting part of the SNS accelerator requires six RF windows at 402.5 MHz and eight RF windows at 805 MHz[l]. Each RF window will transmit up to 180 kW of average power and 2.5 MW peak power at 60 Hz with 1.2 millisecond pulses. The RF windows, designed and manufactured by Thales, were tested at the full average power for 4 hours to ensure no problems with the high average power and then tested to an effective forward power level of 10 MW by testing at 2.5 MW forward power into a short and varying the phase of the standing wave. The sliding short was moved from 0 to 180 degrees to ensure no arcing or breakdown problems occur in any part of the window. This paper discusses the results of the high power testing of both the 402.5 MHz and the 805 MHz RF windows. Problems encountered during testing and the solutions for these problems are discussed.

  3. Accelerated aging for testing polymeric biomaterials and medical devices.

    PubMed

    Hukins, D W L; Mahomed, A; Kukureka, S N

    2008-12-01

    Elevated temperature is frequently used to accelerate the aging process in polymers that are associated with medical devices and other applications. A common approach is to assume that the rate of aging is increased by a factor of 2(DeltaT/10), where DeltaT is the temperature increase. This result is a mathematical expression of the empirical observation that increasing the temperature by about 10 degrees C roughly doubles the rate of many polymer reactions. It is equivalent to assuming that the aging process is a first order chemical reaction with an activation energy of 10R/log(e)2, where R is the universal gas constant. A better approach would be to determine the activation energy for the process being considered but this is not always practicable. The simple approach does not depend on the temperature increase, provided that it is not so great that it initiates any physical or chemical process that is unlikely to be involved in normal aging. If a temperature increment theta were to increase a given polymer reaction rate n times, then an elevated temperature would increase the rate of aging by a factor of n(DeltaT/theta).

  4. Effects of maximal oxygen uptake test and prolonged cycle ergometer exercise on the quiet standing control.

    PubMed

    Mello, Roger Gomes Tavares; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Nadal, Jurandir

    2010-06-01

    This work aims at testing the influence of peripheral and central fatigue, after maximal oxygen uptake test (Test1) and prolonged (Test2) cycle ergometer exercises, respectively, on sway density curve (SDC) parameters of postural control. Sixteen healthy male subjects were submitted to stabilometric tests, before and after the exercises. The Test1 was started at 12.5W, with 12.5W/min increments and 50rpm cadence until exhaustion. From the respiratory gas exchange signals, the first ventilatory threshold was obtained by the v-slope method. After a minimum of 72h, the subjects performed the Test2 for 60min, at a power output corresponding to 70% of such threshold. Before and just after these exercises, a set of 10 stabilometric trials of 50s was performed, alternating the eyes open and closed conditions, intercalated by a 10s resting period. The resulting signals were used to obtain the SDC. The Test1 caused decrease of the mean of peaks duration in SDC (p<0.05), decreasing the stability level, with small changes in the rates of central nervous system (CNS) and muscular torque controls. Conversely, Test2 increased the mean of time intervals between peaks in SDC (p<0.05), thus decreasing the CNS commands rate with minor changes in the stability level. Visual privation had a greater effect on body sway than these exercises, which were applied to muscles that are not the main actuators in body sway control. Concluding, this study allowed discriminating the effects of exercise intensities on body sway control.

  5. RF and data acquisition systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF cavity vertical test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Ozelis, Joseph P.; Nehring, Roger; Grenoble, Christiana; Powers, Thomas J.; /Jefferson Lab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of its ILC program. The RF system for this facility is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Comprehensive data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment.

  6. Prototype of a test bench for applied research on Extracted beams of the nuclotron accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Bradnova, V.; Butenko, A. V.; Fedorov, A. N.; Kudashkin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the development and testing of elements of a test bench for investigating the impact of accelerated particle beams on biological objects, electronics, and other targets are presented. The systems for beam monitoring and target positioning were tested on extracted argon beams in the framework of experiments on studying the radiation hardness of electronic components.

  7. Accelerated irradiation test of Gundremmingen reactor vessel trepan material

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    Initial mechanical properties tests of beltline trepanned from the decommissioned KRB-A pressure vessel and archive material irradiated in the UBR test reactor revealed a major anomaly in relative radiation embrittlement sensitivity. Poor correspondence of material behavior in test vs. power reactor environments was observed for the weak test orientation (ASTL C-L) whereas correspondence was good for the strong orientation (ASTM C-L). To resolve the anomaly directly, Charpy-V specimens from a low (essentially-nil) fluence region of the vessel were irradiated together with archive material at 279{degrees}C in the UBR test reactor. Properties tests before UBR irradiation revealed a significant difference in 41-J transition temperature and upper shelf energy level between the materials. However, the materials exhibited essentially the same radiation embrittlement sensitivity (both orientations), proving that the anomaly is not due to a basic difference in material irradiation resistances. Possible causes of the original anomaly and the significance to NRC Regulatory Guide 1.99 are discussed.

  8. High-Power Testing of 11.424-GHz Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Steven; Gai, Wei

    2001-10-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has previously described the design, construction, and bench testing of an X-band traveling-wave accelerating structure loaded with a permittivity=20 dielectric (P. Zou et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2301, 2000.). We describe a new program to build a test accelerator using this structure. The accelerator will be powered by the high-power 11.424-GHz radiation from the magnicon facility at the Naval Research Laboratory ( O.A. Nezhevenko et al., Proc. PAC 2001, in press). The magnicon is expected to provide up to 30 MW from each of two WR-90 output waveguide arms in pulses of up to 1 microsecond duration, permitting tests up to a gradient of 40 MV/m. Still higher power pulses (100-500 MW) may be available at the output of an active pulse compressor driven by the magnicon ( A.L. Vikharev et al., Proc. 9th Workshop on Advanced Accelerator Concepts.).

  9. Testing of a Loop Heat Pipe Subjective to Variable Accelerations. Part 2; Temperature Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Kaya, Taril; Rogers, Paul; Hoff, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The effect of accelerating forces on the performance of loop heat pipes (LHP) is of interest and importance to terrestrial and space applications. LHP's are being considered for cooling of military combat vehicles and for spinning spacecraft. In order to investigate the effect of an accelerating force on LHP operation, a miniature LHP was installed on a spin table. Variable accelerating forces were imposed on the LHP by spinning the table at different angular speeds. Several patterns of accelerating forces were applied, i.e. continuous spin at different speeds and periodic spin at different speeds and frequencies. The resulting accelerations ranged from 1.17 g's to 4.7 g's. This paper presents the second part of the experimental study, i.e. the effect of an accelerating force on the LHP operating temperature. It has been known that in stationary tests the LHP operating temperature is a function of the evaporator power and the condenser sink temperature when the compensation temperature is not actively controlled. Results of this test program indicate that any change in the accelerating force will result in a chance in the LHP operating temperature through its influence on the fluid distribution in the evaporator, condenser and compensation chamber. However, the effect is not universal, rather it is a function of other test conditions. A steady, constant acceleration may result in an increase or decrease of the operating temperature, while a periodic spin will lead to a quasi-steady operating temperature over a sufficient time interval. In addition, an accelerating force may lead to temperature hysteresis and changes in the temperature oscillation. In spite of all these effects, the LHP continued to operate without any problems in all tests.

  10. NWSC nickel cadmium spacecraft cell accelerated life test program data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lander, J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the data leading to a proposed accelerated life test scheme to test a nickel cadmium cell under spacecraft usage conditions is described. The amount and concentration of electrolyte and the amount of precharge in the cell are discussed in relation to the design of the cell and the accelerated test design. A failure analysis of the cell is summarized. The analysis included such environmental test variables as the depth of discharge, the temperature, the amount of recharge and the charge and discharge rate.

  11. F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles on test stand view from rear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This November 13, 1995, photograph of the F-15 Advanced Controls Technology for Integrated Vehicles (ACTIVE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, shows the aircraft's two new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction. These nozzles give the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. This will reduce drag and increase fuel economy or range as compared with conventional aerodynamic controls, which increase the retarding forces (drag) acting upon the aircraft. Ground testing of a new thrust-vectoring concept employing the nozzles took place during the first two weeks of November 1995 and went well, and flight tests began in March 1996. These tests could result in significant performance increases for military and commercial aircraft. The research program is the product of a collaborative effort by NASA, the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Pratt & Whitney, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace.

  12. RF and Data Acquisition Systems for Fermilab's ILC SRF Cavity Vertical Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph P. Ozelis; Roger Nehring; Christiana Grenoble; Thomas J. Powers

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is developing a facility for vertical testing of SRF cavities as part of a program to improve cavity performance reproducibility for the ILC. The RF system for this facility, using the classic combination of oscillator, phase detector/mixer, and loop amplifier to detect the resonant cavity frequency and lock onto the cavity, is based on the proven production cavity test systems used at Jefferson Lab for CEBAF and SNS cavity testing. The design approach is modular in nature, using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components. This yields a system that can be easily debugged and modified, and with ready availability of spares. Data acquisition and control is provided by a PXI-based hardware platform in conjunction with software developed in the LabView programming environment. This software provides for amplitude and phase adjustment of incident RF power, and measures all relevant cavity power levels, cavity thermal environment parameters, as well as field emission-produced radiation. It also calculates the various cavity performance parameters and their associated errors. Performance during system commissioning and initial cavity tests will be presented.

  13. Enabling More than Moore: Accelerated Reliability Testing and Risk Analysis for Advanced Electronics Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza; Evans, John W.

    2014-01-01

    For five decades, the semiconductor industry has distinguished itself by the rapid pace of improvement in miniaturization of electronics products-Moore's Law. Now, scaling hits a brick wall, a paradigm shift. The industry roadmaps recognized the scaling limitation and project that packaging technologies will meet further miniaturization needs or ak.a "More than Moore". This paper presents packaging technology trends and accelerated reliability testing methods currently being practiced. Then, it presents industry status on key advanced electronic packages, factors affecting accelerated solder joint reliability of area array packages, and IPC/JEDEC/Mil specifications for characterizations of assemblies under accelerated thermal and mechanical loading. Finally, it presents an examples demonstrating how Accelerated Testing and Analysis have been effectively employed in the development of complex spacecraft thereby reducing risk. Quantitative assessments necessarily involve the mathematics of probability and statistics. In addition, accelerated tests need to be designed which consider the desired risk posture and schedule for particular project. Such assessments relieve risks without imposing additional costs. and constraints that are not value added for a particular mission. Furthermore, in the course of development of complex systems, variances and defects will inevitably present themselves and require a decision concerning their disposition, necessitating quantitative assessments. In summary, this paper presents a comprehensive view point, from technology to systems, including the benefits and impact of accelerated testing in offsetting risk.

  14. Developing an accelerated test of coking tendencies of alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, M.D.; Bagby, M.O.; Schwab, A.W.; Goering, C.E.; Savage, L.D.

    1988-07-01

    Burning vegetable oils in direct-injected diesel engines leads to nozzle and combustion chamber coking and eventually to engine damage. Because typical durability tests to detect coking tendencies of fuels are expensive, a one-cylinder diesel engine was instrumented and automated to enable external detection of engine coking in only 5 h. The heat release pattern revealed shifts to later burning as coke accumulated in the engine, but exhaust emissions showed little correlation with coke accumulation.

  15. Design and Factory Test of the E /E- Frascati Linear Accelerator for DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Anamkath, H.; Lyons, S.; Nett, D.; Treas, P.; Whitham, K.; Zante, T.; Miller, R.; Boni, R.; Hsieh, H.; Sannibale, F.; Vescovi, M.; Vignola, G.; /Frascati

    2011-11-28

    The electron-positron accelerator for the DAFNE project has been built and is in test at Titan Beta in Dublin, CA. This S-Band RF linac system utilizes four 45 MW sledded klystrons and 16-3 m accelerating structures to achieve the required performance. It delivers a 4 ampere electron beam to the positron converter and accelerates the resulting positrons to 550 MeV. The converter design uses a 4.3T pulsed tapered flux compressor along with a pseudo-adiabatic tapered field to a 5 KG solenoid over the first two positron accelerating sections. Quadrupole focusing is used after 100 MeV. The system performance is given in Table 1. This paper briefly describes the design and development of the various subassemblies in this system and gives the initial factory test data.

  16. Investigation of hypersonic ramjet propulsion cycles using a ram accelerator test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Chew, G.; De Turenne, J. A.; Dunmire, B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental research on hypersonic propulsion using a ram accelerator test facility is presented. The gasdynamics of the ram accelerator has been studied experimentally in a 38-mm bore facility over the Mach number range of 2.5 to 8.5, using methane- and ethylene-based propellant mixtures. Three different propulsive modes, centered on the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed of the combustible gas, have been experimentally observed. Projectiles have been accelerated smoothly from velocities below to above the C-J speed within a single propellant mixture.

  17. Using Globular Clusters to Test Gravity in the Weak Acceleration Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Marconi, Gianni; Gilmozzi, Roberto; Carraro, Giovanni

    2007-06-01

    We report on the results from an ongoing programme aimed at testing Newton's law of gravity in the low acceleration regime using globular clusters. We find that all clusters studied so far behave like galaxies, that is, their velocity dispersion profiles flatten out at large radii where the acceleration of gravity goes below 10 8 cm s 2, instead of following the expected Keplerian fall-off. In galaxies this behaviour is ascribed to the existence of a dark matter halo. Globular clusters, however, are not supposed to contain dark matter, hence this result might indicate that our present understanding of gravity in the weak regime of accelerations is incomplete and possibly incorrect.

  18. GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND CENTER, REDSTONE TEST STAND FOREGROUND RIGHT, SATURN I C TEST STAND BACKGROUND LEFT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. High irradiance UV/condensation testers allow faster accelerated weathering test results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, P.J.; Fedor, G.R.

    1993-12-31

    Because outdoor exposures are so time consuming, accelerated laboratory testing is used extensively by industry. One of the more popular laboratory weathering testers is the ASTM G53 UV/Condensation device, also known as the QUV. This paper examines an enhancement to the G53 weather tester that allows precise control of light output and higher than previous light intensity levels. Data is presented on the accelerating effect of higher irradiance on several common polymers.

  20. Developing A New Test Stand For Lifetime Measurements Using A Narrow Gap Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuitt, Omani; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Morris, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) recently won a proposal "The First Four-Year Physics and Astronomy Degree at the University of the Virgin Islands; A new Era in Caribbean Participation in NASA Science" in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The proposal included building a detector life-test chamber at UVI to support the degree program as well as assist NASA by running tests on detector components and reporting the results.The team at GSFC is developing X-ray polarimeters that can be used in detecting and imaging astrophysical sources such as black holes and neutron stars. The purpose of our research is to understand the effects that the degradation of gas has on the performance of the detectors. The current generation of time projection polarimeter incorporates a narrow gap detector assembled with epoxy. The addition of the epoxy allows a smaller gap with the minimal amount of changes from the original design, enhancing the performance of the detectors.With the use of epoxy, lifetime measurements have to be made to see how the epoxy detectors compared to previous iterations. We have been studying the effects on the narrow gap detector in the Mahaffey chamber in order to determine whether the epoxy affects the cleanliness of the gas. Tests have been conducted with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) in order to monitor the cleanliness of the gas inside of the Mahaffey chamber while being baked out. Results show that the detector is in fact getting cleaner as time progresses. The plan is to recreate a detector that meets the performance criteria for 2 years and has minimal degradation.

  1. High power testing of a fused quartz-based dielectric-loaded accelerating structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gold, S. H.; Kinkead, A.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S. G.; Jing, C.; High Energy Physics; Euclid techlabs, LLC; LET Corp.; SLAC; NRL

    2008-01-01

    We report on the most recent results from a series of high power tests being carried out on rf-driven dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures. The purpose of these tests is to determine the viability of the DLA as a traveling-wave accelerator and is a collaborative effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In this paper, we report on the recent high power tests of a fused quartz-based DLA structure that was carried out at incident powers of up to 12 MW at NRL and 37 MW at SLAC. We also report on test results of a TiN coated quartz structure, that exhibits good multipactor suppression.

  2. High Power Testing of A Fused Quartz-based Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.G.; Konecny, R.; Gai, W.; Yusof, Z.; Gold, S.H.; Kinkead, A.K.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    We report on the most recent results from a series of high power tests being carried out on rf-driven dielectric loaded accelerating (DLA) structures. The purpose of these tests is to determine the viability of the DLA as a traveling-wave accelerator and is a collaborative effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In this paper, we report on the recent high power tests of a fused quartz-based DLA structure that was carried out at incident powers of up to 12 MW at NRL and 37 MW at SLAC. We also report on test results of a TiN coated quartz structure, that exhibits good multipactor suppression.

  3. Liquid-Hydrogen-Cooled 450-hp Electric Motor Test Stand Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    With growing concerns about global warming, there is a need to develop pollution-free aircraft. One approach is to use hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbogenerators to produce electric power to drive the electric motors that turn the aircraft s propulsive fans. Hydrogen fuel would be carried as a liquid, stored at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are too heavy for aircraft propulsion. We need to develop high-power, lightweight electric motors (highpower- density motors). One approach is to increase the conductivity of the wires by cooling them with liquid hydrogen (LH2). This would allow superconducting rotors with an ironless core. In addition, the motor could use very pure aluminum or copper, substances that have low resistances at cryogenic temperatures. A preliminary design of a 450-hp LH2-cooled electric motor was completed and is being manufactured by a contractor. This motor will be tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center and will be used to test different superconducting materials such as magnesium diboride (MgB2). The motor will be able to operate at speeds of up to 6000 rpm.

  4. Mechanical Component Lifetime Estimation Based on Accelerated Life Testing with Singularity Extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Chuckpaiwong, I.; Liang, S. Y.; Seth, B. B.

    2002-07-01

    Life testing under nominal operating conditions of mechanical parts with high mean lifetime between failure (MTBF) often consumes a significant amount of time and resources, rendering such procedures expensive and impractical. As a result, the technology of accelerated life testing (ALT) has been developed for testing at high stress levels (e.g. temperature, voltage, pressure, corrosive media, load, vibration amplitude, etc.) so that it can be extrapolated—through a physically reasonable statistical model—to obtain estimations of life at lower, normal stress levels or even limit stress levels. However, the issue of prediction accuracy associated with extrapolating data outside the range of testing, or even to a singularity level (no stress), has not yet been fully addressed. In this research, an accelerator factor is introduced into an inverse power law model to estimate the life distribution in terms of time and stresses. Also, a generalized Eyring model is set up for singularity extrapolation in handling limit stress level conditions. The procedure to calibrate the associated shape factors based on the maximum likelihood principle is also formulated. The methodology implementation, based on a one-main-step, multiple-step-stress test scheme, is experimentally illustrated with tapered roller bearing under the stress of environmental corrosion as a case study. The experimental results show that the developed accelerated life test model can effectively evaluate the life probability of a bearing based on accelerated testing data when extrapolating to the stress levels within or outside the range of testing.

  5. Accelerated test program for sealed nickel-cadmium spacecraft batteries/cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility was examined of inducing an accelerated test on sealed Nickel-Cadmium batteries or cells as a tool for spacecraft projects and battery users to determine: (1) the prediction of life capability; (2) a method of evaluating the effect of design and component changes in cells; and (3) a means of reducing time and cost of cell testing.

  6. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects.

  7. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects. PMID:26506612

  8. Foot Placement and Arm Position Affect the Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test Time of Individuals with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Patrick W. H.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Chung, Raymond C. K.; Ng, Gabriel Y. F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of two foot placements (normal or posterior placement) and three arm positions (hands on the thighs, arms crossed over chest, and augmented arm position with elbow extended) on the five times sit-to-stand (FTSTS) test times of individuals with chronic stroke. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. University-based rehabilitation clinic. Participants. A convenience sample of community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke (N = 45). Methods. The times in completing the FTSTS with two foot placements and the three arm positions were recorded by stopwatch. Results. Posterior foot placement led to significantly shorter FTSTS times when compared with normal foot placement in all the 3 arm positions (P ≤ 0.001). In addition, hands on thigh position led to significantly longer FTSTS times than the augmented arm position (P = 0.014). Conclusion. Our results showed that foot placement and arm position could influence the FTSTS times of individuals with chronic stroke. Standardizing the foot placement and arm position in the test procedure is essential, if FTSTS test is intended to be used repeatedly on the same subject. PMID:25032220

  9. Where the world stands still: turnaround as a strong test of ΛCDM cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlidou, V.; Tomaras, T.N. E-mail: tomaras@physics.uoc.gr

    2014-09-01

    Our intuitive understanding of cosmic structure formation works best in scales small enough so that isolated, bound, relaxed gravitating systems are no longer adjusting their radius; and large enough so that space and matter follow the average expansion of the Universe. Yet one of the most robust predictions of ΛCDM cosmology concerns the scale that separates these limits: the turnaround radius, which is the non-expanding shell furthest away from the center of a bound structure. We show that the maximum possible value of the turnaround radius within the framework of the ΛCDM model is, for a given mass M, equal to (3GM/Λ c{sup 2}){sup 1/3}, with G Newton's constant and c the speed of light, independently of cosmic epoch, exact nature of dark matter, or baryonic effects. We discuss the possible use of this prediction as an observational test for ΛCDM cosmology. Current data appear to favor ΛCDM over alternatives with local inhomogeneities and no Λ. However there exist several local-universe structures that have, within errors, reached their limiting size. With improved determinations of their turnaround radii and the enclosed mass, these objects may challenge the limit and ΛCDM cosmology.

  10. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease.

  11. Standing of nucleic acid testing strategies in veterinary diagnosis laboratories to uncover Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro; Botelho, Ana; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) designate any molecular approach used for the detection, identification, and characterization of pathogenic microorganisms, enabling the rapid, specific, and sensitive diagnostic of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. These assays have been widely used since the 90s of the last century in human clinical laboratories and, subsequently, also in veterinary diagnostics. Most NAT strategies are based in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its several enhancements and variations. From the conventional PCR, real-time PCR and its combinations, isothermal DNA amplification, to the nanotechnologies, here we review how the NAT assays have been applied to decipher if and which member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is present in a clinical sample. Recent advances in DNA sequencing also brought new challenges and have made possible to generate rapidly and at a low cost, large amounts of sequence data. This revolution with the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies makes whole genome sequencing (WGS) and metagenomics the trendiest NAT strategies, today. The ranking of NAT techniques in the field of clinical diagnostics is rising, and we provide a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis with our view of the use of molecular diagnostics for detecting tuberculosis in veterinary laboratories, notwithstanding the gold standard being still the classical culture of the agent. The complementary use of both classical and molecular diagnostics approaches is recommended to speed the diagnostic, enabling a fast decision by competent authorities and rapid tackling of the disease. PMID:25988157

  12. The Psychometric Properties of a Modified Sit-to-Stand Test With Use of the Upper Extremities in Institutionalized Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, Melanie; Apap, David; Babcock, Jade; Bray, Sarah; Gareau, Esther; Chassé, Kathleen; Lévesque, Nicole; Robbins, Shawn M

    2016-08-01

    Current sit-to-stand protocols do not permit use of upper extremities, limiting the protocols' utility for institutionalized older adults with diminished physical function. The objective of this study was to modify a 30-s sit-to-stand protocol to allow for arm use and to examine test-retest reliability and convergent validity; 54 institutionalized older adult men (age = 91 ± 3 year) performed the 30-s sit-to-stand twice within a span of 3 to 7 days. Results suggest good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .84) and convergent validity with the Timed Up and Go Test (r = -.62). This modified 30-s sit-to-stand can be used to assess physical function performance in institutionalized older adults and will ensure that individuals with lower physical function capacity can complete the test, thus eliminating the floor effect demonstrated with other sit-to-stand protocols. PMID:27280453

  13. Concept, implementation and commissioning of the automation system for the accelerator module test facility AMTF

    SciTech Connect

    Böckmann, Torsten A.; Korth, Olaf; Clausen, Matthias; Schoeneburg, Bernd

    2014-01-29

    The European XFEL project launched on June 5, 2007 will require about 103 accelerator modules as a main part of the XFEL linear accelerator. All superconducting components constituting the accelerator module like cavities and magnets have to be tested before the assembly. For the tests of the individual cavities and the complete modules an XFEL Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) has been erected at DESY. The process control system EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used to control and operate the cryogenic plant and all its subcomponents. A complementary component of EPICS is the Open Source software suit CSS (Control System Studio). CSS is an integrated engineering, maintenance and operating tool for EPICS. CSS enables local and remote operating and monitoring of the complete system and thus represents the human machine interface. More than 250 PROFIBUS nodes work at the accelerator module test facility. DESY installed an extensive diagnostic and condition monitoring system. With these diagnostic tools it is possible to examine the correct installation and configuration of all PROFIBUS nodes in real time. The condition monitoring system based on FDT/DTM technology shows the state of the PROFIBUS devices at a glance. This information can be used for preventive maintenance which is mandatory for continuous operation of the AMTF facility. The poster will describe all steps form engineering to implementation and commissioning.

  14. Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort; J. Argueta; M. Wehrey; D. Karner; L. Tyree

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

  15. 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating 9-cell cavity vertical test results

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Timergali; Cooper, Charles; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Harms, Elvin; Mitchell, Donald; Rowe, Allan; Solyak, Nikolay; Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich; /DESY

    2007-06-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam performance of the FLASH (TTF/DESY) facility [1]. In the frame of a collaborative agreement, Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. In addition, a second cryomodule with one cavity will be fabricated for installation in the Fermilab photo-injector, which will be upgraded for the ILC accelerator test facility. The first 9-cell Nb cavities were tested in a vertical setup and they didn't reach the designed accelerating gradient [2]. The main problem was a multipactor in the HOM couplers, which lead to overheating and quenching of the HOM couplers. New HOM couplers with improved design are integrated in the next 9-cell cavities. In this paper we present all results of the vertical tests.

  16. Globular Clusters as a Test for Gravity in the Weak Acceleration Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Marconi, Gianni; Gilmozzi, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    Non-baryonic Dark Matter (DM) appears in galaxies and other cosmic structures when and only when the acceleration of gravity, as computed considering only baryons, goes below a well defined value a0 = 1.2 × 10-8 cm s-2. This fact is extremely important and suggestive of the possibility of a breakdown of Newton's law of gravity (or inertia) below a0. It is therefore important to verify whether Newton's law of gravity holds in this regime of accelerations. In order to do this, one has to study the dynamics of objects that do not contain significant amounts of DM and therefore should follow Newton's prediction for whatever small accelerations. Globular clusters are believed, even by strong supporters of DM, to contain negligible amounts of DM and therefore are ideal for testing Newtonian dynamics in the low acceleration limit. Here, we discuss the status of an ongoing program aimed to do this test. Compared to other studies of globular clsuters, the novelty is that we trace the velocity dispersion profile of globular clusters far enough from the center to probe gravitational accelerations well below a0. In all three clusters studied so far the velocity dispersion is found to remain constant at large radii rather than follow the Keplerian falloff. On average, the flattening occurs at the radius where the cluster internal acceleration of gravity is 1.8 +/- 0.4 × 10-8 cm s-2, fully consistent with MOND predictions.

  17. Effect of Different Seat Heights during an Incremental Sit-To-Stand Exercise Test on Peak Oxygen Uptake in Young, Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Nagasawa, Yuya; Sawaki, Shoji; Yokokawa, Yoshiharu; Ohira, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    ‘Sit-to-stand’ exercise uses the repetitive motion of standing up and sitting down in a chair, a common activity of daily living. A new assessment using an incremental sit-to-stand exercise test employs an external sound to control the speed of standing-up and allows increases in work rate. The aims of the study were to examine the effect of different seat heights on peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2) during an incremental sit-to-stand exercise and to assess any difference between peak VO2 values during incremental sit-to-stand exercise compared with a cycle ergometer test. Thirteen healthy young women (age: 23.1 ± 2.6 years, height: 1.61 ± 0.06 m, body mass: 51.9 ± 7.4 kg·m-2) participated in four incremental sit-to-stand tests with different seat heights and cycle tests in random order. The seat heights were adjusted to 100%, 80%, 120%, and 140% of knee height distance (100%, 80%, 120%, and 140% incremental sit-to-stand exercise, respectively). The peak VO2 and completion time were measured during incremental sit-to-stand and cycle ergometer tests, and repeated-measures analysis of variance and Student’s paired t-test with Holm’s method were used to evaluate differences between these variables. The peak VO2 values increased by about 10-12 mL·min-1·kg-1 as the seat height on the ISTS decreased over a 60% range of lower leg lengths. The peak VO2 values on the 80%, 100%, 120%, and 140% incremental sit-to-stand tests were about 11%, 25%, 40%, and 50% lower than that on the cycle ergometer test, respectively. The peak VO2 on the incremental sit-to-stand test increased as seat height decreased. These findings are useful to determine which seat height on the incremental sit-to-stand tests test is suitable for different populations. Key points Researchers involved in collecting data in this study have no financial or personal interest in the outcome of results or the sponsor. The ISTS is a simple test that requires only a small space and a chair, and the

  18. Production and test results of SC 3.9-GHz accelerating cavity at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Timergali; Cooper, Charlie; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Gonin, Ivan; Mitchell, Donald; Olis, D.; Rowe, Allan; Salman, Tariq; Solyak, Nikolay; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve beam performances for TTF-FEL facility. In the frame of collaboration Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. In addition, a second cryomodule with one cavity will be fabricated for installation in the Fermilab photo-injector, which will be upgraded for the ILC accelerator test facility. In this paper we discuss the status of the cavity and coupler production and the first result of cavity tests. It is hoped that this project will be completed during the first half of 2007 and the cryomodule delivered to DESY in this time span.

  19. Construction and testing of an 11.4 GHz dielectric structure based travelling wave accelerator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Wong, T.; Zou, P.

    1999-03-26

    One major challenge in constructing a dielectric loaded traveling wave accelerator powered by an external rf power source is the difficulty in achieving efficient coupling. In this paper, we report that we have achieved high efficiency broadband coupling by using a combination of a tapered dielectric section and a carefully adjusted coupling slot. We are currently constructing an 11.4 GHz accelerator structure loaded with a permitivity=20 dielectric. Bench testing has demonstrated a coupling efficiency in excess of 95% with bandwidth of 600 MHz. The final setup will be tested at high power at SLAC using an X-band klystron rf source.

  20. Derivation of the Data Reduction Equations for the Calibration of the Six-component Thrust Stand in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Kin C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the derivation of the data reduction equations for the calibration of the six-component thrust stand located in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility. The purpose of the calibration is to determine the first-order interactions between the axial, lateral, and vertical load cells (second-order interactions are assumed to be negligible). In an ideal system, the measurements made by the thrust stand along the three coordinate axes should be independent. For example, when a test article applies an axial force on the thrust stand, the axial load cells should measure the full magnitude of the force, while the off-axis load cells (lateral and vertical) should read zero. Likewise, if a lateral force is applied, the lateral load cells should measure the entire force, while the axial and vertical load cells should read zero. However, in real-world systems, there may be interactions between the load cells. Through proper design of the thrust stand, these interactions can be minimized, but are hard to eliminate entirely. Therefore, the purpose of the thrust stand calibration is to account for these interactions, so that necessary corrections can be made during testing. These corrections can be expressed in the form of an interaction matrix, and this paper shows the derivation of the equations used to obtain the coefficients in this matrix.