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Sample records for accelerator treatment head

  1. Assessment of leakage doses around the treatment heads of different linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Lonski, P; Taylor, M L; Franich, R D; Harty, P; Kron, T

    2012-12-01

    Out-of-field doses to untargeted organs may have long-term detrimental health effects for patients treated with radiotherapy. It has been observed that equivalent treatments delivered to patients with different accelerators may result in significant differences in the out-of-field dose. In this work, the points of leakage dose are identified about the gantry of several treatment units. The origin of the observed higher doses is investigated. LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimetry has been employed to quantify the dose at a several points around the linac head of various linear accelerators (linacs): a Varian 600C, Varian 21-iX, Siemens Primus and Elekta Synergy-II. Comparisons are also made between different energy modes, collimator rotations and field sizes. Significant differences in leaked photon doses were identified when comparing the various linac models. The isocentric-waveguide 600C generally exhibits the lowest leakage directed towards the patient. The Siemens and Elekta models generally produce a greater leakage than the Varian models. The leakage 'hotspots' are evident on the gantry section housing the waveguide on the 21-iX. For all machines, there are significant differences in the x and y directions. Larger field sizes result in a greater leakage at the interface plate. There is a greater leakage around the waveguide when operating in a low-energy mode, but a greater leakage for the high-energy mode at the linac face. Of the vendors investigated, the Varian 600C showed the lowest average leakage dose. The Varian 21-iX showed double the dose of the 600C. The Elekta Synergy-II had on average four times the dose leakage than the 600C, and the Siemens Primus showed an average of five times that of the 600C. All vendors show strong differences in the x and y directions. The results offer the potential for patient-positioning strategies, linac choice and shielding strategies to reduce the leakage dose to patients. PMID:22511732

  2. Treatment of head lice.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Stephanie A; Morrell, Dean S; Burkhart, Craig N

    2009-01-01

    Pediculosis capitis, or head lice, is a common infestation among children worldwide. Multiple therapies exist for the treatment of this condition, including topical pediculicides and oral medications. When used in combination with environmental decontamination, these drugs can be very effective in eradicating head lice infestation without significant adverse events. The present study discusses the use of available over-the-counter and prescription treatments, including pyrethroids and permethrin, lindane, malathion, ivermectin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, in the treatment of head lice. PMID:19580574

  3. Resonance of human brain under head acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Laksari, Kaveh; Wu, Lyndia C.; Kurt, Mehmet; Kuo, Calvin; Camarillo, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Although safety standards have reduced fatal head trauma due to single severe head impacts, mild trauma from repeated head exposures may carry risks of long-term chronic changes in the brain's function and structure. To study the physical sensitivities of the brain to mild head impacts, we developed the first dynamic model of the skull–brain based on in vivo MRI data. We showed that the motion of the brain can be described by a rigid-body with constrained kinematics. We further demonstrated that skull–brain dynamics can be approximated by an under-damped system with a low-frequency resonance at around 15 Hz. Furthermore, from our previous field measurements, we found that head motions in a variety of activities, including contact sports, show a primary frequency of less than 20 Hz. This implies that typical head exposures may drive the brain dangerously close to its mechanical resonance and lead to amplified brain–skull relative motions. Our results suggest a possible cause for mild brain trauma, which could occur due to repetitive low-acceleration head oscillations in a variety of recreational and occupational activities. PMID:26063824

  4. Resonance of human brain under head acceleration.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Wu, Lyndia C; Kurt, Mehmet; Kuo, Calvin; Camarillo, David C

    2015-07-01

    Although safety standards have reduced fatal head trauma due to single severe head impacts, mild trauma from repeated head exposures may carry risks of long-term chronic changes in the brain's function and structure. To study the physical sensitivities of the brain to mild head impacts, we developed the first dynamic model of the skull-brain based on in vivo MRI data. We showed that the motion of the brain can be described by a rigid-body with constrained kinematics. We further demonstrated that skull-brain dynamics can be approximated by an under-damped system with a low-frequency resonance at around 15 Hz. Furthermore, from our previous field measurements, we found that head motions in a variety of activities, including contact sports, show a primary frequency of less than 20 Hz. This implies that typical head exposures may drive the brain dangerously close to its mechanical resonance and lead to amplified brain-skull relative motions. Our results suggest a possible cause for mild brain trauma, which could occur due to repetitive low-acceleration head oscillations in a variety of recreational and occupational activities. PMID:26063824

  5. Head Lice: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... it may be necessary to use a second bottle. Pay special attention to instructions on the label ... or printed on the label. Nit (head lice egg) combs, often found in lice medicine packages, should ...

  6. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... the patient (usually by a linear accelerator for photon/x-ray and cyclotron or synchrotron for proton ... and the treatment course will start one to two days after the initial treatment-planning session. Typically, ...

  7. Modeling polyethylene wear acceleration due to femoral head dislocation damage.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Karen M; Tikekar, Nishant M; Heiner, Anneliese D; Lannutti, John J; Callaghan, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2014-08-01

    Scratching, scraping, and metal transfer to femoral heads commonly accompany acetabular shell contact during dislocation and closed reduction maneuvers. While head damage conceptually leads to accelerated wear, reports on this subject are mainly anecdotal, and differ widely on the potency of such effect. Towards better understanding this relationship, a physically validated finite element (FE) model was used to compute polyethylene wear acceleration propensity of specific head damage patterns on thirteen retrievals. These FE models estimated wear increases averaging half an order of magnitude when compared to simulations for undamaged heads. There was no correlation between the number of dislocations sustained and wear acceleration. These results underscore the importance of implant-gentle closed reduction, and heightened wear monitoring of successfully reduced dislocation patients. PMID:24851789

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry of the head and neck: A comparison of treatment plans using linear accelerator-based IMRT and helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Ke . E-mail: ks2mc@virginia.edu; Molloy, Janelle A.; Read, Paul W.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To date, most intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery has occurred using linear accelerators (linacs), although helical tomotherapy has become commercially available. To quantify the dosimetric difference, we compared linac-based and helical tomotherapy-based treatment plans for IMRT of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: We compared the dosimetry findings of 10 patients who had oropharyngeal carcinoma. Five patients each had cancers in the base of the tongue and tonsil. Each plan was independently optimized using either the CORVUS planning system (Nomos Corporation, Sewickly, PA), commissioned for a Varian 2300 CD linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 1-cm multileaf collimator leaves, or helical tomotherapy. The resulting treatment plans were evaluated by comparing the dose-volume histograms, equivalent uniform dose (EUD), dose uniformity, and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: Helical tomotherapy plans showed improvement of critical structure avoidance and target dose uniformity for all patients. The average equivalent uniform dose reduction for organs at risk (OARs) surrounding the base of tongue and the tonsil were 17.4% and 27.14% respectively. An 80% reduction in normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid glands was observed in the tomotherapy plans relative to the linac-based plans. The standard deviation of the planning target volume dose was reduced by 71%. In our clinic, we use the combined dose-volume histograms for each class of plans as a reference goal for helical tomotherapy treatment planning optimization. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy provides improved dose homogeneity and normal structure dose compared with linac-based IMRT in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma resulting in a reduced risk for complications from focal hotspots within the planning target volume and for the adjacent parotid glands.

  9. Effect of clenching with a mouthguard on head acceleration during heading of a soccer ball.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Keishiro; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Konno, Michiyo; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Concussions are acceleration-deceleration injuries that occur when biomechanical forces are transmitted to the cerebral tissues. By limiting acceleration of the head, enhanced cervical muscle activity derived from clenching with a mouthguard (MG) may reduce the incidence or severity of concussions following impact. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of voluntary clenching with a proper MG on acceleration of the head during "heading" of a soccer ball. Eleven male high school soccer players (mean age, 16.8 years) participated in the study. Each player was given a customized MG. An automated soccer machine was used to project the ball at the participants at a constant speed. The participants headed the ball under 3 different oral conditions: drill 1, heading freely performed without instruction and without the MG; drill 2, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench the masseter muscles tightly while not wearing the MG; drill 3, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench tightly while wearing the MG. Each participant repeated each drill 5 times. Linear acceleration of the head was measured with a 3-axis accelerometer. Activity of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles was measured by wireless electromyography. Weak masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity was observed during drill 1. After the soccer players had been instructed to clench their masseter muscles (drills 2 and 3), statistically significant decreases in head acceleration and increases in masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity were observed (P < 0.05; paired t test). The effect was stronger when the players wore the MG. Dentists should encourage soccer players to habitually clench while wearing a proper mouthguard to strengthen cervical muscle resistance as a way to mitigate the damage caused by heading. PMID:26545274

  10. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Ruetten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  11. Treatment Alternatives Following Mild Head Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novack, Thomas A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses treatment alternatives which may alleviate problems in recovery following mild head injury, including providing education, cognitive stimulation, stress management training, individual counseling, group discussion, and physical activity in a day treatment setting. (Author/ABL)

  12. Space acceleration measurement system triaxial sensor head error budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John E.; Peters, Rex B.; Finley, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) is to measure and record the microgravity environment for a given experiment aboard the Space Shuttle. To accomplish this, SAMS uses remote triaxial sensor heads (TSH) that can be mounted directly on or near an experiment. The errors of the TSH are reduced by calibrating it before and after each flight. The associated error budget for the calibration procedure is discussed here.

  13. Predicting brain acceleration during heading of soccer ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Zahari; Hasnun Arif Hassan, Mohd; Azri Aris, Mohd; Anuar, Zulfika

    2013-12-01

    There has been a long debate whether purposeful heading could cause harm to the brain. Studies have shown that repetitive heading could lead to degeneration of brain cells, which is similarly found in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. A two-degree of freedom linear mathematical model was developed to study the impact of soccer ball to the brain during ball-to-head impact in soccer. From the model, the acceleration of the brain upon impact can be obtained. The model is a mass-spring-damper system, in which the skull is modelled as a mass and the neck is modelled as a spring-damper system. The brain is a mass with suspension characteristics that are also defined by a spring and a damper. The model was validated by experiment, in which a ball was dropped from different heights onto an instrumented dummy skull. The validation shows that the results obtained from the model are in a good agreement with the brain acceleration measured from the experiment. This findings show that a simple linear mathematical model can be useful in giving a preliminary insight on what human brain endures during a ball-to-head impact.

  14. Beam Head Erosion in Self-Ionized Plasma Wakefield Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28

    In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon--beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by {beta}*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. It is observed that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A simple theoretical model is used to estimate the upper limit of the erosion rate for a bi-gaussian beam by assuming free expansion of the beam head before the ionization front. Comparison with simulations suggests that half this maximum value can serve as an estimate for the erosion rate. Critical parameters to the erosion rate are discussed.

  15. Beam head erosion in self-ionized plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Clayton, Chris; Huang, Chengkun; Joshi, Chan; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Ken; Mori, Warren; Katsouleas, Tom; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Berry, Melissa; Blumenfeld, Ian; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Kirby, Neil; Siemman, Robert; Walz, Dieter

    2007-11-01

    In the recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments at SLAC, the energy of the particles in the tail of the 42 GeV electron beam were doubled in less than one meter [1]. Simulations suggest that the acceleration length was limited by a new phenomenon -- beam head erosion in self-ionized plasmas. In vacuum, a particle beam expands transversely in a distance given by beta*. In the blowout regime of a plasma wakefield [2], the majority of the beam is focused by the ion channel, while the beam head slowly spreads since it takes a finite time for the ion channel to form. Beam/plasma parameter scan in a large range using simulations shows that in self-ionized plasmas, the head spreading is exacerbated compared to that in pre-ionized plasmas, causing the ionization front to move backward (erode). A theoretical analysis on the erosion rate dependence on beam/plasma parameters and its implications on future afterburner relevant experiments will be provided. [1] I. Blumenfeld et al., Nature 445, 741(2007) [2] J. B. Rosenzweig et al., Phys. Rev. A 44, R6189 (1991)

  16. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running

    PubMed Central

    Busa, Michael A.; Lim, Jongil; van Emmerik, Richard E. A.; Hamill, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred) in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation). The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (p<0.01) during early stance and at the head (p<0.01) during early and late stance; however, for the impact portion the increase in head acceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (p<0.01) and integrated power spectral density in the frequency domain (p<0.01) in late stance, as well as overall of head-gaze motion (p<0.01). When running at preferred speed individuals were able to stabilize head acceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability. PMID:27271850

  17. A Porcine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury via Head Rotational Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Harris, James P; Browne, Kevin D; Wolf, John A; Duda, John E; Meaney, David F; Margulies, Susan S; Smith, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Unique from other brain disorders, traumatic brain injury (TBI) generally results from a discrete biomechanical event that induces rapid head movement. The large size and high organization of the human brain makes it particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury from rotational accelerations that can cause dynamic deformation of the brain tissue. Therefore, replicating the injury biomechanics of human TBI in animal models presents a substantial challenge, particularly with regard to addressing brain size and injury parameters. Here we present the historical development and use of a porcine model of head rotational acceleration. By scaling up the rotational forces to account for difference in brain mass between swine and humans, this model has been shown to produce the same tissue deformations and identical neuropathologies found in human TBI. The parameters of scaled rapid angular accelerations applied for the model reproduce inertial forces generated when the human head suddenly accelerates or decelerates in falls, collisions, or blunt impacts. The model uses custom-built linkage assemblies and a powerful linear actuator designed to produce purely impulsive non-impact head rotation in different angular planes at controlled rotational acceleration levels. Through a range of head rotational kinematics, this model can produce functional and neuropathological changes across the spectrum from concussion to severe TBI. Notably, however, the model is very difficult to employ, requiring a highly skilled team for medical management, biomechanics, neurological recovery, and specialized outcome measures including neuromonitoring, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and neuropathology. Nonetheless, while challenging, this clinically relevant model has proven valuable for identifying mechanisms of acute and progressive neuropathologies as well as for the evaluation of noninvasive diagnostic techniques and potential neuroprotective treatments following TBI. PMID:27604725

  18. Encoding of head acceleration in vestibular neurons. I. Spatiotemporal response properties to linear acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, G. A.; Perachio, A. A.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Extracellular recordings were made in and around the medial vestibular nuclei in decerebrated rats. Neurons were functionally identified according to their semicircular canal input on the basis of their responses to angular head rotations around the yaw, pitch, and roll head axes. Those cells responding to angular acceleration were classified as either horizontal semicircular canal-related (HC) or vertical semicircular canal-related (VC) neurons. The HC neurons were further characterized as either type I or type II, depending on the direction of rotation producing excitation. Cells that lacked a response to angular head acceleration, but exhibited sensitivity to a change in head position, were classified as purely otolith organ-related (OTO) neurons. All vestibular neurons were then tested for their response to sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. 2. Convergence of macular and canal inputs onto central vestibular nuclei neurons occurred in 73% of the type I HC, 79% of the type II HC, and 86% of the VC neurons. Out of the 223 neurons identified as receiving macular input, 94 neurons were further studied, and their spatiotemporal response properties to sinusoidal stimulation with pure linear acceleration were quantified. Data were obtained from 33 type I HC, 22 type II HC, 22 VC, and 17 OTO neurons. 3. For each neuron the angle of the translational stimulus vector was varied by 15, 30, or 45 degrees increments in the horizontal head plane. In all tested neurons, a direction of maximum sensitivity was identified. An interesting difference among neurons was their response to translation along the direction perpendicular to that that produced the maximum response ("null" direction). For the majority of neurons tested, it was possible to evoke a nonzero response during stimulation along the null direction always had response phases that varied as a function of stimulus direction. 4. These spatiotemporal response properties were quantified in two

  19. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  20. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-20

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  1. Accelerated Life Structural Benchmark Testing for a Stirling Convertor Heater Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2006-01-01

    For proposed long-duration NASA Space Science missions, the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Infinia Corporation, and NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency, 110 W Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110). A structurally significant limit state for the SRG110 heater head component is creep deformation induced at high material temperature and low stress level. Conventional investigations of creep behavior adequately rely on experimental results from uniaxial creep specimens, and a wealth of creep data is available for the Inconel 718 material of construction. However, the specified atypical thin heater head material is fine-grained with a heat treatment that limits precipitate growth, and little creep property data for this microstructure is available in the literature. In addition, the geometry and loading conditions apply a multiaxial stress state on the component, far from the conditions of uniaxial testing. For these reasons, an extensive experimental investigation is ongoing to aid in accurately assessing the durability of the SRG110 heater head. This investigation supplements uniaxial creep testing with pneumatic testing of heater head-like pressure vessels at design temperature with stress levels ranging from approximately the design stress to several times that. This paper presents experimental results, post-test microstructural analyses, and conclusions for four higher-stress, accelerated life tests. Analysts are using these results to calibrate deterministic and probabilistic analytical creep models of the SRG110 heater head.

  2. Monte Carlo radiotherapy simulations of accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harriss-Phillips, W M; Bezak, E; Yeoh, E K

    2011-01-01

    Objective A temporal Monte Carlo tumour growth and radiotherapy effect model (HYP-RT) simulating hypoxia in head and neck cancer has been developed and used to analyse parameters influencing cell kill during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The model was designed to simulate individual cell division up to 108 cells, while incorporating radiobiological effects, including accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation during treatment. Method Reoxygenation of hypoxic tumours has been modelled using randomised increments of oxygen to tumour cells after each treatment fraction. The process of accelerated repopulation has been modelled by increasing the symmetrical stem cell division probability. Both phenomena were onset immediately or after a number of weeks of simulated treatment. Results The extra dose required to control (total cell kill) hypoxic vs oxic tumours was 15–25% (8–20 Gy for 5×2 Gy per week) depending on the timing of accelerated repopulation onset. Reoxygenation of hypoxic tumours resulted in resensitisation and reduction in total dose required by approximately 10%, depending on the time of onset. When modelled simultaneously, accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation affected cell kill in hypoxic tumours in a similar manner to when the phenomena were modelled individually; however, the degree was altered, with non-additive results. Simulation results were in good agreement with standard linear quadratic theory; however, differed for more complex comparisons where hypoxia, reoxygenation as well as accelerated repopulation effects were considered. Conclusion Simulations have quantitatively confirmed the need for patient individualisation in radiotherapy for hypoxic head and neck tumours, and have shown the benefits of modelling complex and dynamic processes using Monte Carlo methods. PMID:21933980

  3. Transmission of acceleration from a synchronous vibration exercise platform to the head.

    PubMed

    Caryn, R C; Hazell, T J; Dickey, J P

    2014-04-01

    Exercise vibration platforms are becoming commonplace in homes and fitness centers. However, excessive mechanical energy transferred to the head and eye can cause injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how changes in platform frequency and knee flexion angle affect acceleration transmission to the head. Participants (N=12) stood on a whole-body vibration platform with knee flexion angles of 0°, 20°, and 40° to evaluate how changes in knee flexion affected head acceleration. 7 specific platform frequencies were tested between 20-50 Hz at 2 peak-to-peak displacement settings (1 and 2 mm nominal). Accelerations were measured with triaxial accelerometers at the platform and head to generate transmissibility ratios. Platform-to-head transmissibility was not significantly different between the 2 platform peak-to-peak amplitudes (P>0.05). Transmissibility measures varied depending on platform frequency and knee angle (P < 0.05). Flexing the knees resulted in reduced head transmissibility at all frequencies (P<0.05). Platform-to-head transmissibility values exceeded 1.0 at both 20 and 25 Hz platform vibration frequencies with the knees in full extension. To reduce the risk of injury to structures of the head during vibration exercise, using platforms frequencies below 30 Hz with small knee flexion angles (< 40°) should be avoided. PMID:24081617

  4. Accelerated fractionation radiation therapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Giri, P.G.; Gemer, L.S. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors treated 14 patients who had advanced head and neck cancer with an accelerated fractionation schedule of irradiation consisting of two fractions given 6 hours apart. In the morning a volume of 1.7 Gy was given to an area that encompassed the entire tumor, enlarged lymph nodes, and all areas at risk for microscopic disease. Six hours later, 1.1 Gy was given to an area that included only the tumor and any enlarged lymph nodes, with a 2-cm margin. The treatment was well tolerated; of the 13 patients who completed therapy, six did not require a break in therapy, and seven patients did. The median rest period was 2 days. There was no grade 4 toxicity. Grade 3 toxicity included skin changes (one case), mucositis (two), dysphagia (two), weight loss (three), and a decrease in the hemoglobin level (one case). The response rate in the 13 who completed therapy was 13/13 (100%); 11 of the 13 (83%) had a complete response. Only one of the 11 who achieved a complete response had failure at the primary site. At a median follow-up of 24 months, the absolute survival was 7/13 (54%) and the corrected survival was 7/10 (70%). This technique permits radiation therapy to be given on an accelerated schedule without a planned break in treatment. The overall response rate and survival at 2 years was excellent.

  5. Relationship between head orientation and torsional eye movements in goldfish during linear acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabayashi, A.; Ohmura, T.; Mori, S.

    We analyzed torsional eye movements of normal goldfish during sinusoidal linear acceleration, altering the orientation of the fish on the linear accelerator in the yaw plane over a range of 90 degrees and in the pitch plane up to 30 degrees. We video-recorded changes of torsional eye movements associated with a body rotation in the yaw and pitch plane and analyzed them frame by frame. In normal fish, we observed clear torsional eye movements for stimuli of 0.1G linear accelerations along the body axis in the horizontal position. Torsion occurred in the opposite direction of resultant force produced by linear acceleration and gravity. Though the amplitude of these compensatory responses increased with increasing magnitude of acceleration up to 0.5 G, the torsion angle did not fully compensate the angle calculated from gravity and linear acceleration. Furthermore, the torsion angle decreased as the longitudinal body axis deviated from the direction of linear acceleration. For the body axis perpendicular to the direction of acceleration, torsional eye movement was still observed. When we tilted the fish in the pitch plane, compensatory eye torsion occurred. The response amplitude to acceleration decreased for both head-up and head-down up to 30 degrees. These results suggested the existence of specific connections between the otolith organ and ocular muscles.

  6. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery: The Contemporary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gil Chai; Holsinger, Floyd Christopher; Li, Ryan J

    2015-12-01

    Traditional open surgical approaches are indicated for treatment of select tumor subsites of head and neck cancer, but can also result in major cosmetic and functional morbidity. Transoral surgical approaches have been used for head and neck cancer since the 1960s, with their application continuing to evolve with the changing landscape of this disease and recent innovations in surgical instrumentation. The potential to further reduce treatment morbidity with transoral surgery, while optimizing oncologic outcomes, continues to be investigated. This review examines current literature evaluating oncologic and quality-of-life outcomes achieved through transoral head and neck surgery. PMID:26568549

  7. The rate of change of acceleration: implications to head kinematics during rear-end impacts.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Loriann M; Dickey, James P

    2008-05-01

    Whiplash is a mechanism of injury commonly associated with rear-impact vehicle collisions. To date, research has focused primarily on changes in velocity and acceleration as key factors for determining injuries due to whiplash mechanisms, but other characteristics of the acceleration pulse may be important. This study assessed whether the head acceleration response to whiplash-like perturbation profiles were affected by a change in the rate of the applied acceleration, or jerk. Twenty-one subjects were exposed to different low-velocity rear-impact whiplash-like perturbations using a precisely controlled robotic platform. The perturbations were divided into two groupings of peak acceleration (approximately 10 (high) and 5.7 (low) m/s2) and three groupings of jerk (approximately 260, 310, and 360 m/s3). These six profiles were repeated twice. Results demonstrated that the jerk magnitude significantly affected forehead acceleration in the vertical and horizontal directions. Increasing the magnitude of the platform acceleration also differentially affected the horizontal and vertical forehead accelerations. This indicates that the level of jerk influences the resulting head kinematics and should be considered when designing or interpreting experiments that are attempting to predict injury from whiplash-like perturbations. PMID:18460374

  8. Bicycle helmets are highly effective at preventing head injury during head impact: head-form accelerations and injury criteria for helmeted and unhelmeted impacts.

    PubMed

    Cripton, Peter A; Dressler, Daniel M; Stuart, Cameron A; Dennison, Christopher R; Richards, Darrin

    2014-09-01

    Cycling is a popular form of recreation and method of commuting with clear health benefits. However, cycling is not without risk. In Canada, cycling injuries are more common than in any other summer sport; and according to the US National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration, 52,000 cyclists were injured in the US in 2010. Head injuries account for approximately two-thirds of hospital admissions and three-quarters of fatal injuries among injured cyclists. In many jurisdictions and across all age levels, helmets have been adopted to mitigate risk of serious head injuries among cyclists and the majority of epidemiological literature suggests that helmets effectively reduce risk of injury. Critics have raised questions over the actual efficacy of helmets by pointing to weaknesses in existing helmet epidemiology including selection bias and lack of appropriate control for the type of impact sustained by the cyclist and the severity of the head impact. These criticisms demonstrate the difficulty in conducting epidemiology studies that will be regarded as definitive and the need for complementary biomechanical studies where confounding factors can be adequately controlled. In the bicycle helmet context, there is a paucity of biomechanical data comparing helmeted to unhelmeted head impacts and, to our knowledge, there is no data of this type available with contemporary helmets. In this research, our objective was to perform biomechanical testing of paired helmeted and unhelmeted head impacts using a validated anthropomorphic test headform and a range of drop heights between 0.5m and 3.0m, while measuring headform acceleration and Head Injury Criterion (HIC). In the 2m (6.3m/s) drops, the middle of our drop height range, the helmet reduced peak accelerations from 824g (unhelmeted) to 181g (helmeted) and HIC was reduced from 9667 (unhelmeted) to 1250 (helmeted). At realistic impact speeds of 5.4m/s (1.5m drop) and 6.3m/s (2.0m drop), bicycle helmets changed the

  9. Untangling the Effect of Head Acceleration on Brain Responses to Blast Waves.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haojie; Unnikrishnan, Ginu; Rakesh, Vineet; Reifman, Jaques

    2015-12-01

    Multiple injury-causing mechanisms, such as wave propagation, skull flexure, cavitation, and head acceleration, have been proposed to explain blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). An accurate, quantitative description of the individual contribution of each of these mechanisms may be necessary to develop preventive strategies against bTBI. However, to date, despite numerous experimental and computational studies of bTBI, this question remains elusive. In this study, using a two-dimensional (2D) rat head model, we quantified the contribution of head acceleration to the biomechanical response of brain tissues when exposed to blast waves in a shock tube. We compared brain pressure at the coup, middle, and contre-coup regions between a 2D rat head model capable of simulating all mechanisms (i.e., the all-effects model) and an acceleration-only model. From our simulations, we determined that head acceleration contributed 36-45% of the maximum brain pressure at the coup region, had a negligible effect on the pressure at the middle region, and was responsible for the low pressure at the contre-coup region. Our findings also demonstrate that the current practice of measuring rat brain pressures close to the center of the brain would record only two-thirds of the maximum pressure observed at the coup region. Therefore, to accurately capture the effects of acceleration in experiments, we recommend placing a pressure sensor near the coup region, especially when investigating the acceleration mechanism using different experimental setups. PMID:26458125

  10. Head Lice: Treatment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  11. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, S.C.

    1995-12-19

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 15 figs.

  12. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Brown, Ian G.; Wei, Bo; Anders, Simone; Anders, Andre; Bhatia, C. Singh

    1998-01-01

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances.

  13. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, K.; Brown, I.G.; Wei, B.; Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Bhatia, C.S.

    1998-11-17

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances. 22 figs.

  14. Surface treatment of magnetic recording heads

    DOEpatents

    Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Brown, Ian G.; Wei, Bo; Anders, Simone; Anders, Andre; Bhatia, Singh C.

    1995-01-01

    Surface modification of magnetic recording heads using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is disclosed. This method may be carried out using a vacuum arc deposition system with a metallic or carbon cathode. By operating a plasma gun in a long-pulse mode and biasing the substrate holder with short pulses of a high negative voltage, direct ion implantation, recoil implantation, and surface deposition are combined to modify the near-surface regions of the head or substrate in processing times which may be less than 5 min. The modified regions are atomically mixed into the substrate. This surface modification improves the surface smoothness and hardness and enhances the tribological characteristics under conditions of contact-start-stop and continuous sliding. These results are obtained while maintaining original tolerances.

  15. Head and neck control varies with perturbation acceleration but not jerk: implications for whiplash injuries

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed that a high rate of acceleration onset, i.e. high jerk, during a low-speed vehicle collision increases the risk of whiplash injury by triggering inappropriate muscle responses and/or increasing peak head acceleration. Our goal was to test these proposed mechanisms at realistic jerk levels and then to determine how collision jerk affects the potential for whiplash injuries. Twenty-three seated volunteers (8 F, 15 M) were exposed to multiple experiments involving perturbations simulating the onset of a vehicle collision in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. In the first experiment, subjects experienced five forward and five rearward perturbations to look for the inappropriate muscle responses and ‘floppy’ head kinematics previously attributed to high jerk perturbations. In the second experiment, we independently varied the jerk (∼125 to 3 000 m s−3) and acceleration (∼0.65 to 2.6 g) of the perturbation to assess their effect on the electromyographic (EMG) responses of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), scalene (SCAL) and cervical paraspinal (PARA) muscles and the kinematic responses of the head and neck. In the first experiment, we found neither inappropriate muscle responses nor floppy head kinematics when subjects had their eyes open, but observed two subjects with floppy head kinematics with eyes closed. In the second experiment, we found that about 70% of the variations in the SCM and SCAL responses and about 95% of the variations in head/neck kinematics were explained by changes in perturbation acceleration in both the eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Less than 2% of the variation in the muscle and kinematic responses was explained by changes in perturbation jerk and, where significant, response amplitudes diminished with increasing jerk. Based on these findings, collision jerk appears to have little or no role in the genesis of whiplash injuries in low-speed vehicle crashes. PMID:19237420

  16. A 32-Channel Head Coil Array with Circularly Symmetric Geometry for Accelerated Human Brain Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ying-Hua; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Keil, Boris; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to optimize a 32-channel head coil array for accelerated 3T human brain proton MRI using either a Cartesian or a radial k-space trajectory. Coils had curved trapezoidal shapes and were arranged in a circular symmetry (CS) geometry. Coils were optimally overlapped to reduce mutual inductance. Low-noise pre-amplifiers were used to further decouple between coils. The SNR and noise amplification in accelerated imaging were compared to results from a head coil array with a soccer-ball (SB) geometry. The maximal SNR in the CS array was about 120% (1070 vs. 892) and 62% (303 vs. 488) of the SB array at the periphery and the center of the FOV on a transverse plane, respectively. In one-dimensional 4-fold acceleration, the CS array has higher averaged SNR than the SB array across the whole FOV. Compared to the SB array, the CS array has a smaller g-factor at head periphery in all accelerated acquisitions. Reconstructed images using a radial k-space trajectory show that the CS array has a smaller error than the SB array in 2- to 5-fold accelerations. PMID:26909652

  17. Estimation of neutron production from accelerator head assembly of 15 MV medical LINAC using FLUKA simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, B. J.; Chavan, S. T.; Pethe, S. N.; Krishnan, R.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2011-12-01

    For the production of a clinical 15 MeV photon beam, the design of accelerator head assembly has been optimized using Monte Carlo based FLUKA code. The accelerator head assembly consists of e-γ target, flattening filter, primary collimator and an adjustable rectangular secondary collimator. The accelerators used for radiation therapy generate continuous energy gamma rays called Bremsstrahlung (BR) by impinging high energy electrons on high Z materials. The electron accelerators operating above 10 MeV can result in the production of neutrons, mainly due to photo nuclear reaction (γ, n) induced by high energy photons in the accelerator head materials. These neutrons contaminate the therapeutic beam and give a non-negligible contribution to patient dose. The gamma dose and neutron dose equivalent at the patient plane (SSD = 100 cm) were obtained at different field sizes of 0 × 0, 10 × 10, 20 × 20, 30 × 30 and 40 × 40 cm 2, respectively. The maximum neutron dose equivalent is observed near the central axis of 30 × 30 cm 2 field size. This is 0.71% of the central axis photon dose rate of 0.34 Gy/min at 1 μA electron beam current.

  18. A 32-Channel Head Coil Array with Circularly Symmetric Geometry for Accelerated Human Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ying-Hua; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Keil, Boris; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to optimize a 32-channel head coil array for accelerated 3T human brain proton MRI using either a Cartesian or a radial k-space trajectory. Coils had curved trapezoidal shapes and were arranged in a circular symmetry (CS) geometry. Coils were optimally overlapped to reduce mutual inductance. Low-noise pre-amplifiers were used to further decouple between coils. The SNR and noise amplification in accelerated imaging were compared to results from a head coil array with a soccer-ball (SB) geometry. The maximal SNR in the CS array was about 120% (1070 vs. 892) and 62% (303 vs. 488) of the SB array at the periphery and the center of the FOV on a transverse plane, respectively. In one-dimensional 4-fold acceleration, the CS array has higher averaged SNR than the SB array across the whole FOV. Compared to the SB array, the CS array has a smaller g-factor at head periphery in all accelerated acquisitions. Reconstructed images using a radial k-space trajectory show that the CS array has a smaller error than the SB array in 2- to 5-fold accelerations. PMID:26909652

  19. Mechanism of head and neck response to -Gx impact acceleration: a math modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Frisch, G D; D'Aulerio, L; O'Rourke, J

    1977-03-01

    Mathematical modeling has attained wider acceptance in recent years. In particular, the use of computer programs to simulate the dynamic response of a human in a crash situation has become an attractive alternative to full-scale experimental testing. This paper analyzes data on the dynamic response of the living human head and neck to -Gx impact acceleration, where the motion of the subject's head and neck in the midsagittal plane was monitored with inertial instrumentation and high-speed photography for confirmation. The Calspan "3D Computer Simulator of Motor Vehicle Crash Victims" was used to predict expected responses for the deceleration pulses employed. These estimates were compared to the fully instrumented human test runs. The standard 15-segment and 14-joint representation of the occupant was modified to include two sternoclavicular joints, increasing the articulation in the upper torso. Analysis of the data indicated that muscular activity in the head and neck seemed to be evident and does influence motion of the head, even at relatively high (10-G peak, 530 G/s onset) acceleration levels. Simulation of muscular contraction, using a spring-damper arrangement, improved the results significantly. Additionally, possible limitations to head-to-neck motion, such as ligament restrictions, were also modeled. PMID:856153

  20. Impact of Schedule Duration on Head and Neck Radiotherapy: Accelerated Tumor Repopulation Versus Compensatory Mucosal Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, John D.; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Nahum, Alan E.; Malik, Zafar I.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine how modelled maximum tumor control rates, achievable without exceeding mucositis tolerance (tcp{sub max-early}) vary with schedule duration for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and materials: Using maximum-likelihood techniques, we have fitted a range of tcp models to two HNSCC datasets (Withers' and British Institute of Radiology [BIR]), characterizing the dependence of tcp on duration and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Models likely to best describe future data have been selected using the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and its quasi-AIC extension to overdispersed data. Setting EQD{sub 2}s in the selected tcp models to levels just tolerable for mucositis, we have plotted tcp{sub max-early} against schedule duration. Results: While BIR dataset tcp fits describe dose levels isoeffective for tumor control as rising significantly with schedule protraction, indicative of accelerated tumor repopulation, repopulation terms in fits to Withers' dataset do not reach significance after accounting for overdispersion of the data. The tcp{sub max-early} curves calculated from tcp fits to the overall Withers' and BIR datasets rise by 8% and 0-4%, respectively, between 20 and 50 days duration; likewise, tcp{sub max-early} curves calculated for stage-specific cohorts also generally rise slowly with increasing duration. However none of the increases in tcp{sub max-early} calculated from the overall or stage-specific fits reach significance. Conclusions: Local control rates modeled for treatments which lie just within mucosal tolerance rise slowly but insignificantly with increasing schedule length. This finding suggests that whereas useful gains may be made by accelerating unnecessarily slow schedules until they approach early reaction tolerance, little is achieved by shortening schedules further while reducing doses to remain within mucosal tolerance, an approach that may slightly worsen outcomes.

  1. Outcomes of Postoperative Simultaneous Modulated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Sung Ho; Jung, Yuh-Seog; Ryu, Jun Sun; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment efficacy and toxicity of postoperative simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) for patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2008, 51 patients with histologically confirmed HNSCC received postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (N = 33) or helical tomotherapy (N = 18) using SMART after curative surgical resection. The sites included were the oral cavity (OC), oropharynx (OP), larynx, and hypopharynx in 23, 20, 5, and 3 patients, respectively. Results: The median follow-up duration of all patients and surviving patients were 32 (range, 5-78 months) and 39 months (range, 9-77 months), respectively. The 3-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, disease-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in all patients were 71%, 77%, 75%, 85%, and 82%, respectively. Although no significant difference in 3-year LRRFS were found between OC (82%) and OP (82%) carcinomas, the 3-year DMFS was worse in cases of OC (66%) carcinoma compared with OP carcinoma (95%; p = 0.0414). Acute Grade 3 dermatitis, mucositis, and esophagitis occurred in 10%, 10%, and 2% of patients, respectively. At the last follow-up, Grade 3 xerostomia was documented in 10% of the patients. Young age ({<=}40 years) (p < 0.001) and OC carcinoma primary (p = 0.0142) were poor risk factors on univariate analysis for DMFS. Conclusion: Postoperative SMART was observed to be effective and safe in patients with HNSCC.

  2. A Heading and Flight-Path Angle Control of Aircraft Based on Required Acceleration Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitani, Naoharu

    This paper describes a control of heading and flight-path angles of aircraft to time-varying command angles. The controller first calculates an acceleration command vector (acV), which is vertical to the velocity vector. acV consists of two components; the one is feedforward acceleration obtained from the rates of command angles, and the other is feedback acceleration obtained from angle deviations by using PID control law. A bank angle command around the velocity vector and commands of pitch and yaw rates are then obtained to generate the required acceleration. A roll rate command is calculated from bank angle deviation. Roll, pitch and yaw rate commands are put into the attitude controller, which can be composed of any suitable control laws such as PID control. The control requires neither aerodynamic coefficients nor online calculation of the inverse dynamics of the aircraft. A numerical simulation illustrates the effects of the control.

  3. Head rotational acceleration characteristics influence behavioral and diffusion tensor imaging outcomes following concussion.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Shah, Alok S; Pintar, Frank A; McCrea, Michael; Kurpad, Shekar N; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra; Olsen, Christopher; Budde, Matthew D

    2015-05-01

    A majority of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in motor vehicle crashes and sporting environments are mild and caused by high-rate acceleration of the head. For injuries caused by rotational acceleration, both magnitude and duration of the acceleration pulse were shown to influence injury outcomes. This study incorporated a unique rodent model of rotational acceleration-induced mild TBI (mTBI) to quantify independent effects of magnitude and duration on behavioral and neuroimaging outcomes. Ninety-two Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to head rotational acceleration at peak magnitudes of 214 or 350 krad/s(2) and acceleration pulse durations of 1.6 or 3.4 ms in a full factorial design. Rats underwent a series of behavioral tests including the Composite Neuroscore (CN), Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), and Morris Water Maze (MWM). Ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the fixed brains was conducted to assess the effects of rotational injury on brain microstructure as revealed by the parameter fractional anisotropy (FA). While the injury did not cause significant locomotor or cognitive deficits measured with the CN and MWM, respectively, a main effect of duration was consistently observed for the EPM. Increased duration caused significantly greater activity and exploratory behaviors measured as open arm time and number of arm changes. DTI demonstrated significant effects of both magnitude and duration, with the FA of the amygdala related to both the magnitude and duration. Increased duration also caused FA changes at the interface of gray and white matter. Collectively, the findings demonstrate that the consequences of rotational acceleration mTBI were more closely associated with duration of the rotational acceleration impulse, which is often neglected as an independent factor, and highlight the need for animal models of TBI with strong biomechanical foundations to associate behavioral outcomes with brain microstructure. PMID:25344352

  4. Head Rotational Acceleration Characteristics Influence Behavioral and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Outcomes Following Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Stemper, Brian D.; Shah, Alok S.; Pintar, Frank A.; McCrea, Michael; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra; Olsen, Christopher; Budde, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    A majority of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in motor vehicle crashes and sporting environments are mild and caused by high-rate acceleration of the head. For injuries caused by rotational acceleration, both magnitude and duration of the acceleration pulse were shown to influence injury outcomes. This study incorporated a unique rodent model of rotational acceleration-induced mild TBI (mTBI) to quantify independent effects of magnitude and duration on behavioral and neuroimaging outcomes. Ninety-two Sprague– Dawley rats were exposed to head rotational acceleration at peak magnitudes of 214 or 350 krad/s2 and acceleration pulse durations of 1.6 or 3.4 ms in a full factorial design. Rats underwent a series of behavioral tests including the Composite Neuroscore (CN), Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), and Morris Water Maze (MWM). Ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the fixed brains was conducted to assess the effects of rotational injury on brain microstructure as revealed by the parameter fractional anisotropy (FA). While the injury did not cause significant locomotor or cognitive deficits measured with the CN and MWM, respectively, a main effect of duration was consistently observed for the EPM. Increased duration caused significantly greater activity and exploratory behaviors measured as open arm time and number of arm changes. DTI demonstrated significant effects of both magnitude and duration, with the FA of the amygdala related to both the magnitude and duration. Increased duration also caused FA changes at the interface of gray and white matter. Collectively, the findings demonstrate that the consequences of rotational acceleration mTBI were more closely associated with duration of the rotational acceleration impulse, which is often neglected as an independent factor, and highlight the need for animal models of TBI with strong biomechanical foundations to associate behavioral outcomes with brain microstructure. PMID:25344352

  5. Malathion for head lice and scabies: treatment and safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Idriss, Shereene; Levitt, Jacob

    2009-08-01

    Malathion is an under-recognized and under-utilized therapy for head lice and scabies largely due to misperceptions about its safety profile. Specifically, its pure form as it exists in pharmaceutical preparations is non-toxic to humans in the low doses available. While labeled for ages six and up, recent studies showed no cholinesterase inhibition in head lice patients aged two-to-six treated with malathion. Flammability of malathion in isopropyl alcohol has reportedly resulted in human injury once in over one million prescriptions filled. Recent efficacy studies of malathion in United States (U.S.) head lice demonstrate efficacy rates of 97-98%. In the present era of permethrin and lindane resistance to head lice, malathion is a first-line option. For scabies, it is a reasonable alternative to permethrin 5% cream, especially when treatment of the scalp or hairy areas is desired. PMID:19663108

  6. VMC++ versus BEAMnrc: A comparison of simulated linear accelerator heads for photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenbalg, F.; Fix, M. K.; Born, E. J.; Mini, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2008-04-15

    BEAMnrc, a code for simulating medical linear accelerators based on EGSnrc, has been benchmarked and used extensively in the scientific literature and is therefore often considered to be the gold standard for Monte Carlo simulations for radiotherapy applications. However, its long computation times make it too slow for the clinical routine and often even for research purposes without a large investment in computing resources. VMC++ is a much faster code thanks to the intensive use of variance reduction techniques and a much faster implementation of the condensed history technique for charged particle transport. A research version of this code is also capable of simulating the full head of linear accelerators operated in photon mode (excluding multileaf collimators, hard and dynamic wedges). In this work, a validation of the full head simulation at 6 and 18 MV is performed, simulating with VMC++ and BEAMnrc the addition of one head component at a time and comparing the resulting phase space files. For the comparison, photon and electron fluence, photon energy fluence, mean energy, and photon spectra are considered. The largest absolute differences are found in the energy fluences. For all the simulations of the different head components, a very good agreement (differences in energy fluences between VMC++ and BEAMnrc <1%) is obtained. Only a particular case at 6 MV shows a somewhat larger energy fluence difference of 1.4%. Dosimetrically, these phase space differences imply an agreement between both codes at the <1% level, making VMC++ head module suitable for full head simulations with considerable gain in efficiency and without loss of accuracy.

  7. [Treatment of early stage avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Zhu, He-Yu; Zhu, Bing

    2012-07-01

    Avascular necrosis is a progressively devastating disease and primarily affects weight-bearing joints. The hip is the most commonly affected joint. In early stage, nonoperative (including pharmacologic intervention and biophysical treatments) and operative modalities for protecting hip joint have become the main therapeutic methods. However there is still no satisfied mothod with reasonable effect. According to the treatment of the avascular necrosis of the femoral head of the pre-collapse stage, core decompression with modification of technique is still one of the safest and most commonly employed procedures. Recently there have been attempts to enhance the effect of core decompression with use of various growth and differentiation factors. Which is the hot spot of current research. Early diagnosis is the key to the treatment of the avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Comprehensive treatment which is based on the core decompression is still the main treatment of today. PMID:23116002

  8. Multidisciplinary Team Treatment of Penetrating Head and Neck Trauma.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Li, Hongxing; Yang, Kongbin

    2016-09-01

    Penetrating head and neck trauma could cause significant mortality because of many important structures located in the brain and neck. Although high-velocity penetrating brain injury is often reported, reports of low-velocity, combined head and neck penetrating injury are rare. Hereby, the authors present a case of an old man who had encountered a serious accident, a 29-cm iron fork penetrated into his neck, through the skull base and into brain. After treatment by multidisciplinary team, the patient was in rehabilitation. The multidisciplinary team assists rapid diagnosis and treatment of penetrating neck and head injury is the key to ensure a good outcome. Therefore, as the authors face such patients again, a multidisciplinary team is needed. PMID:27428914

  9. Quantitative Relationship between Axonal Injury and Mechanical Response in a Rodent Head Impact Acceleration Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was developed to study the mechanical responses induced by this model and their correlation to traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was induced in 31 anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 g) by a custom-made 450-g impactor from heights of 1.25 m or 2.25 m. An accelerometer and angular rate sensor measured the linear and angular responses of the head, while the impact event was captured by a high-speed video camera. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction, as well as across the left and right hemispheres, was determined using β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry, and detailed TAI injury maps were constructed for the entire corpus callosum. Peak linear acceleration 1.25 m and 2.25 m impacts were 666±165 g and 907±501 g, respectively. Peak angular velocities were 95±24 rad/sec and 124±48 rad/sec, respectively. Compared to the 2.25-m group, the observed TAI counts in the 1.25-m impact group were significantly lower. Average linear acceleration, peak angular velocity, average angular acceleration, and surface righting time were also significantly different between the two groups. A positive correlation was observed between normalized total TAI counts and average linear acceleration (R2=0.612, p<0.05), and time to surface right (R2=0.545, p<0.05). Our study suggested that a 2.25-m drop in the Marmarou model may not always result in a severe injury, and TAI level is related to the linear and angular acceleration response of the rat head during impact, not necessarily the drop height. PMID:21895482

  10. Advancements in the treatment of head lice in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Eisenhower, Christine; Farrington, Elizabeth Anne

    2012-01-01

    Head lice infestations occur commonly each year in children of all socioeconomic statuses. However, head lice have become more of a nuisance as resistance to first-line agents, such as permethrin 1% and pyrethrins, has increased. Newer topical products provide unique mechanisms of action without current signs of resistance. As with older agents, proper application of products must be emphasized to ensure that treatment is effective. In addition, nonpharmacologic measures should be taken to avoid reinfestation in the patient and to prevent the spread of lice to close personal contacts. PMID:23099312

  11. Angular Impact Mitigation system for bicycle helmets to reduce head acceleration and risk of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p<0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p<0.001), and a 22-32% reduction in neck loading (p<0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  12. Angular Impact Mitigation System for Bicycle Helmets to Reduce Head Acceleration and Risk of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kirk; Dau, Nathan; Feist, Florian; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Madey, Steven M.; Bottlang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Angular acceleration of the head is a known cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but contemporary bicycle helmets lack dedicated mechanisms to mitigate angular acceleration. A novel Angular Impact Mitigation (AIM) system for bicycle helmets has been developed that employs an elastically suspended aluminum honeycomb liner to absorb linear acceleration in normal impacts as well as angular acceleration in oblique impacts. This study tested bicycle helmets with and without AIM technology to comparatively assess impact mitigation. Normal impact tests were performed to measure linear head acceleration. Oblique impact tests were performed to measure angular head acceleration and neck loading. Furthermore, acceleration histories of oblique impacts were analyzed in a computational head model to predict the resulting risk of TBI in the form of concussion and diffuse axonal injury (DAI). Compared to standard helmets, AIM helmets resulted in a 14% reduction in peak linear acceleration (p < 0.001), a 34% reduction in peak angular acceleration (p < 0.001), and a 22% to 32% reduction in neck loading (p < 0.001). Computational results predicted that AIM helmets reduced the risk of concussion and DAI by 27% and 44%, respectively. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AIM technology could effectively improve impact mitigation compared to a contemporary expanded polystyrene-based bicycle helmet, and may enhance prevention of bicycle-related TBI. Further research is required. PMID:23770518

  13. Spinosad for the treatment of head lice infestations.

    PubMed

    Villegas, S C

    2012-09-01

    Head lice infestations continue to be an issue in today's society, with an increase in economic cost and resistance. Spinosad 0.9% topical suspension was recently introduced in the U.S. market as a novel agent with both pediculicidal and ovicidal activity, approved in children 4 years of age and older for the treatment of head lice infestations. In clinical trials, it has demonstrated effectiveness against head lice with permethrin resistance. In two clinical trials comparing spinosad to permethrin, efficacy was observed in the spinosad-treated groups at 84.6% and 86.7%, respectively, when compared to the permethrin-treated groups (respective values of 44.9% and 42.9%; P < 0.001). Overall, spinosad was well tolerated in clinical trials. PMID:23032800

  14. Injury predictors for traumatic axonal injury in a rodent head impact acceleration model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Zhou, Runzhou; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-11-01

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration injury model was developed to study the kinematics of the rat head to quantify traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the corpus callosum (CC) and brainstem pyramidal tract (Py), to determine injury predictors and to establish injury thresholds for severe TAI. Thirty-one anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (392±13 grams) were impacted using a modified impact acceleration injury device from 2.25 m and 1.25 m heights. Beta-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP) immunocytochemistry was used to assess and quantify axonal changes in CC and Py. Over 600 injury maps in CC and Py were constructed in the 31 impacted rats. TAI distribution along the rostro-caudal direction in CC and Py was determined. Linear and angular responses of the rat head were monitored and measured in vivo with an attached accelerometer and angular rate sensor, and were correlated to TAI data. Logistic regression analysis suggested that the occurrence of severe TAI in CC was best predicted by average linear acceleration, followed by power and time to surface righting. The combination of average linear acceleration and time to surface righting showed an improved predictive result. In Py, severe TAI was best predicted by time to surface righting, followed by peak and average angular velocity. When both CC and Py were combined, power was the best predictor, and the combined average linear acceleration and average angular velocity was also found to have good injury predictive ability. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to assess the predictive power of individual and paired injury predictors. TAI tolerance curves were also proposed in this study. PMID:22869303

  15. Guidelines for the treatment of head and neck venous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Mai, Hua Ming; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Su, Li Xin; Qin, Zhong Ping; Yang, Yao Wu; Jiang, Yin Hua; Zhao, Yi Fang; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Venous malformation is one of the most common benign vascular lesions, with approximately 40% of cases appearing in the head and neck. They can affect a patient’s appearance and functionality and even cause life-threatening bleeding or respiratory tract obstruction. The current methods of treatment include surgery, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, or a combined. The treatment of small and superficial venous malformations is relatively simple and effective; however, the treatment of deep and extensive lesions involving multiple anatomical sites remains a challenge for the physicians. For complex cases, the outcomes achieved with one single treatment approach are poor; therefore, individualized treatment modalities must be formulated based on the patient’s condition and the techniques available. Comprehensive multidisciplinary treatments have been adapted to achieve the most effective results. In this paper, based on the national and international literature, we formulated the treatment guidelines for head and neck venous malformations to standardize clinical practice. The guideline will be renewed and updated in a timely manner to reflect cutting-edge knowledge and to provide the best treatment modalities for patients. PMID:23724158

  16. Photodynamic therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, V G

    1990-03-01

    Since 1975, photodynamic therapy has reportedly been effective in a variety of head and neck malignancies that failed traditional (conventional) therapy, including surgery, cryotherapy, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, and radiation therapy. Photodynamic therapy consists of the intravenous administration of (di)hematoporphyrin ether, a chemosensitizing drug selectively retained by neoplastic and reticuloendothelial tissues which, when exposed to a 630-nm argon laser, catalyzes a photochemical reaction to release free oxygen radicals, "the cytotoxic" agents responsible for cell death and tumor necrosis. Preliminary investigations have assessed the efficacy of photodynamic therapy in treatment of: (1) superficial "condemned mucosa" or "field cancerization" of the oral cavity and (2) stage III and IV head and neck carcinomas that had unsuccessful conventional therapy. Complete and/or partial remissions were obtained in 11 of 12 patients (16 treatments) with a variety of carcinomas of the nasopharynx, palate and uvula, retromolar trigone, temporal bone, cervical esophagus, and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the oral cavity. PMID:2108409

  17. Functional Data Analysis of Spaceflight-Induced Changes in Coordination and Phase in Head Pitch Acceleration During Treadmill Walking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher; Peters, Brian; Feiveson, Alan; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts returning from spaceflight experience neurovestibular disturbances during head movements and attempt to mitigate them by limiting head motion. Analyses to date of the head movements made during walking have concentrated on amplitude and variability measures extracted from ensemble averages of individual gait cycles. Phase shifts within each gait cycle can be determined by functional data analysis through the computation of time-warping functions. Large, localized variations in the timing of peaks in head kinematics may indicate changes in coordination. The purpose of this study was to determine timing changes in head pitch acceleration of astronauts during treadmill walking before and after flight. Six astronauts (5M/1F; age = 43.5+/-6.4yr) participated in the study. Subjects walked at 1.8 m/sec (4 mph) on a motorized treadmill while reading optotypes displayed on a computer screen 4 m in front of their eyes. Three-dimensional motion of the subject s head was recorded with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) device. Data were recorded twice before flight and four times after landing. The head pitch acceleration was calculated by taking the time derivative of the pitch velocity data from the IMU. Data for each session with each subject were time-normalized into gait cycles, then registered to align significant features and create a mean curve. The mean curves of each postflight session for each subject were re-registered based on their preflight mean curve to create time-warping functions. The root mean squares (RMS) of these warping functions were calculated to assess the deviation of head pitch acceleration mean curves in each postflight session from the preflight mean curve. After landing, most crewmembers exhibited localized shifts within their head pitch acceleration regimes, with the greatest deviations in RMS occurring on landing day or 1 day after landing. These results show that the alteration of head pitch coordination due to spaceflight may be

  18. Long head of biceps: from anatomy to treatment.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, M

    2015-01-01

    The long head of the biceps (LHB), tendinous structure of the proximal brachial biceps, has its well-known anatomy, which contrasts with its current functional characterization. Various forms of proximal anchor and intra-articular route, important for the correct interpretation of its contribution to the pathology of the shoulder as well as the treatment methodology, are described. Knowledge of its biomechanics results mainly from cadaveric studies that contradict each other. Already the few studies in vivo indicate a depressant and stabilizing action, anterior, for the humeral head. Its pathology is rarely isolated because it is almost always correlated with rotator cuff or labrum pathology. It can be divided into 3 major groups (inflammatory, instability and traumatic) and subdivided according to its location. The anterior shoulder pain is the initial symptom of pathology of LHB Its perfect characterization is dependent on the associated injuries. Clinical tests are multiple and only their combination allows better sensitivity and specificity for LHB pathology. The arthro-MRI and dynamic ultrasound are able to increase proper diagnostic of the pathology of LHB. Treatment ranges from conservative and surgical. The latter includes the repair, tenotomy and tenodesis of LHB which can be performed by open or arthroscopic methodology. The author intends to review existing literature on all aspects related to the long head of the biceps from anatomy to treatment, presenting the latest results. PMID:25351662

  19. Analysis of walking variability through simultaneous evaluation of the head, lumbar, and lower-extremity acceleration in healthy youth

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Haruki; Nagano, Akinori; Luo, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify whether walking speed affects acceleration variability of the head, lumbar, and lower extremity by simultaneously evaluating of acceleration. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty young individuals recruited from among the staff at Kurashiki Heisei Hospital participated in this study. Eight accelerometers were used to measure the head, lumbar and lower extremity accelerations. The participants were instructed to walk at five walking speeds prescribed by a metronome. Acceleration variability was assessed by a cross-correlation analysis normalized using z-transform in order to evaluate stride-to-stride variability. [Results] Vertical acceleration variability was the smallest in all body parts, and walking speed effect had laterality. Antero-posterior acceleration variability was significantly associated with walking speed at sites other than the head. Medio-lateral acceleration variability of the bilateral hip alone was smaller than the antero-posterior variability. [Conclusion] The findings of this study suggest that the effect of walking speed changes on the stride-to-stride acceleration variability was individual for each body parts, and differs among directions. PMID:27390419

  20. Brain injury prediction: assessing the combined probability of concussion using linear and rotational head acceleration.

    PubMed

    Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2013-05-01

    Recent research has suggested possible long term effects due to repetitive concussions, highlighting the importance of developing methods to accurately quantify concussion risk. This study introduces a new injury metric, the combined probability of concussion, which computes the overall risk of concussion based on the peak linear and rotational accelerations experienced by the head during impact. The combined probability of concussion is unique in that it determines the likelihood of sustaining a concussion for a given impact, regardless of whether the injury would be reported or not. The risk curve was derived from data collected from instrumented football players (63,011 impacts including 37 concussions), which was adjusted to account for the underreporting of concussion. The predictive capability of this new metric is compared to that of single biomechanical parameters. The capabilities of these parameters to accurately predict concussion incidence were evaluated using two separate datasets: the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS) data and National Football League (NFL) data collected from impact reconstructions using dummies (58 impacts including 25 concussions). Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated, and all parameters were significantly better at predicting injury than random guessing. The combined probability of concussion had the greatest area under the curve for all datasets. In the HITS dataset, the combined probability of concussion and linear acceleration were significantly better predictors of concussion than rotational acceleration alone, but not different from each other. In the NFL dataset, there were no significant differences between parameters. The combined probability of concussion is a valuable method to assess concussion risk in a laboratory setting for evaluating product safety. PMID:23299827

  1. Mechanism of chlorogenic acid treatment on femoral head necrosis and its protection of osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MINGJUAN; HU, XIANDA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of chlorogenic acid on hormonal femoral head necrosis and its protection of osteoblasts. The study established a femoral head necrosis model in Wistar rats using Escherichia coli endotoxin and prednisolone acetate. The rats were divided into five groups and were treated with different concentrations of chlorogenic acid (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg). The main detected indicators were the blood rheology, bone mineral density, and the hydroxyproline and hexosamine (HOM) contents. At a cellular level, osteoblasts were cultured and treated by drug-containing serum. Subsequently, cell proliferation and the osteoblast cycle were measured using flow cytometry, and the protein expression levels of Bax and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were detected using western blotting. Chlorogenic acid at a concentration of 20 mg/kg (high-dose) enhanced the bone mineral density of the femoral head and femoral neck following ischemia. Simultaneously, blood flow following the injection of prednisolone acetate was significantly improved, and the HOM contents of the high-dose chlorogenic acid group were significantly different. The results from the flow cytometry analysis indicated that chlorogenic acid can efficiently ameliorate hormone-induced necrosis. The osteoblasts were isolated and cultured. The MTT colorimetric assay showed that chlorogenic acid at different densities can increase the proliferation capabilities of osteoblasts and accelerate the transition process of G0/G1 phase to S phase, as well as enhance mitosis and the regeneration of osteoblasts. Western blotting detection indicated that chlorogenic acid may prohibit the decrease of Bcl-2 and the increase of Bax during apoptosis, thereby inhibiting osteoblast apoptosis and preventing the deterioration of femoral head necrosis. In conclusion, chlorogenic acid at the density of 20 mg/kg is effective in the treatment of hormonal femoral head necrosis, which may be

  2. Split hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy and concomitant cisplatin for locally advanced head and neck carcinomas: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, F.; Dominguez, M.A.; Illarramendi, J.J.

    1995-10-15

    The feasibility and activity of an intensive chemoradiotherapeutic scheme for patients with locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancers were tested in a single institution Phase II pilot study. Between January 1990 and February 1992, 40 patients were entered into this trial. The treatment protocol consisted of split hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (SHART), 1.6 Gy per fraction given twice per day to a total dose of 64-67.2 Gy for a total of 6 weeks with a 2-week gap, and cisplatin (20 mg/sqm/Days 1 to 5, in continuous perfusion) concomitantly. All of the 40 patients are evaluable for response and survival. Toxicity was significant, but tolerable. A complete tumor response to this treatment was achieved by 37 patients (92.5%). With a minimal follow-up of 22 months (median 30 months) there have been 16 local relapses and 19 patients have died, 2 without tumor. The projected 2- and 3-year overall survival rates are 64% (confidence interval (CI) 95%, 49-79%) and 47%, respectively. The 2-year local control probability has been 56% (CI 95, 39-73%). This treatment obtains a high rate of complete responses with increased acute toxicity but tolerable late effects. Preliminary results are encouraging for laryngeal neoplasms. A longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the impact of this treatment on patient survival. 47 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Advances in the Understanding and Treatment of Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Joseph P.

    1966-01-01

    The author describes his personal involvement in head injury prevention and management over the past 40 years. He reviews the evolution of knowledge concerning the role of increased intracranial pressure, and considers the importance of cerebral vasoparalysis in the production of signs and symptoms following head injury, and the development of methods of recording intracranial pressure continuously, over hours and days. The development of an experimental compression model has led to a fuller understanding of edema of the brain and has provided a means of studying, by light and electron microscopy, the histological changes that result from edema. More recently, analyses of biochemical changes and disturbed membrane function have opened up a new avenue of potential treatment. Moreover, it is now clear that cerebral vascular dilatation and abrupt pressure increase can be produced in the monkey, in over 50% of cases, by lesions in the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Similar lesions may occur in the human and this suggests other therapeutic approaches. There is, then, a genuine hope of a breakthrough in the management of head injuries. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 16Fig. 21 PMID:5928533

  4. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  5. Cetuximab: its unique place in head and neck cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Specenier, Pol; Vermorken, Jan B

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. At present, globally about 650,000 new cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are diagnosed each year. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is almost invariably expressed in SCCHN. Overexpression of the EGFR is a strong and independent unfavorable prognostic factor in SCCHN. Cetuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody, which binds with high affinity to the extracellular domain of the human EGFR, blocking ligand binding, resulting in inhibition of the receptor function. It also targets cytotoxic immune effector cells towards EGFR-expressing tumor cells (antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity). The addition of cetuximab to radiotherapy (RT) improves locoregional control and survival when compared to RT alone. The addition of cetuximab to platinum-based chemoradiation (CRT) is feasible but does not lead to an improved outcome. Cetuximab plus RT has never been compared prospectively to CRT, which therefore remains the standard treatment for patients with locoregionally advanced SCCHN for whom surgery is not considered the optimal treatment, provided they can tolerate CRT. The addition of cetuximab to platinum-based chemotherapy prolongs survival in patients with recurrent or metastatic SCCHN. The combination of a platinum-based regimen and cetuximab should be considered as the standard first line regimen for patients who can tolerate this treatment. PMID:23723688

  6. 77 FR 28614 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Chemopreventive Treatments for Head and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... Chemopreventive Treatments for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public... thereof entitled ``Chemopreventive of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma'' (HHS Ref. No. E-302-2008/0... use of the Licensed Patent Rights for the prevention and treatment of head and neck cancers....

  7. Continuous accelerated 7-days-a-week radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Long-term results of Phase III clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Skladowski, Krzysztof . E-mail: skladowski@io.gliwice.pl; Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Golen, Maria; Tarnawski, Rafal; Slosarek, Krzysztof; Suwinski, Rafal; Sygula, Mariusz; Wygoda, Andrzej

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To update 5-year results of a previously published study on special 7-days-a-week fractionation continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR) for head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck in Stage T{sub 2-4}N{sub 0-1}M were randomized between two definitive radiation treatments: accelerated fractionation 7 days a week including weekends (CAIR) and conventional 5 days a week (control). Hence the overall treatment time was 2 weeks shorter in CAIR. Results: Five-year local tumor control was 75% in the CAIR group and 33% in the control arm (p < 0.00004). Tumor-cure benefit corresponded with significant improvement in disease-free survival and overall survival rates. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with the incidence significantly higher in CAIR patients than in control (respectively, 94% vs. 53%). When 2.0-Gy fractions were used, radiation necrosis developed in 5 patients (22%) in the CAIR group as a consequential late effect (CLE), but when fraction size was reduced to 1.8 Gy no more CLE occurred. Actuarial 5-year morbidity-free survival rate was similar for both treatments. Conclusions: Selected head-and-neck cancer patients could be treated very effectively with 7-days-a-week radiation schedule with no compromise of total dose and with slight 10% reduction of fraction dose (2 Gy-1.8 Gy), which article gives 1 week reduction of overall treatment time compared with standard 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 47-49 days. Although this report is based on the relatively small group of patients, its results have encouraged us to use CAIR fractionation in a standard radiation treatment for moderately advanced head-and-neck cancer patients.

  8. [ENT emergency treatment and alcohol related head and neck injuries].

    PubMed

    Teudt, I; Grundmann, T; Pueschel, K; Hogan, B; Leventli, B

    2013-08-01

    The spectrum of ENT-diseases can differ widely among emergency departments (ED) of different geographic regions. Especially in terms of head and neck trauma a higher number of injuries can be expected in large cities due to alcohol related violence.The ED of a large hospital situated in the center of Hamburg Germany was analysed for ENT-emergency treatments in 2011 retrospectively. Beside usual patient statistics, the study focused on alcohol related injuries with an ENT-surgeon involved. All data were compared to reports by other EDs in Germany and alcohol related costs were approximated for initiation of prevention programs in the future.2 339 ENT-patients were admitted to the ED. 19% of all patients used an ambulance whereas 80% reached the ED by private transportation. The majority of patients were between 21 and 30 years of age. For 143 of all trauma cases alcohol involvement was documented. Subanalysis revealed male dominance and a high use of ambulance transportation.The high number of traumata differs considerably from other ENT studies. One reason is the hospital's close proximity to all time party districts like "Reeperbahn" and the "Port of Hamburg". In those areas high amounts of alcohol ingestion takes place leading to more injuries at the head- and neck region. Theoretically financial resources would be plenty after the initiation of those programs as the severe costs for alcohol related medical treatment would decline. PMID:23568584

  9. Prevention and treatment of head lice in children.

    PubMed

    Mumcuoglu, K Y

    1999-01-01

    Head louse infestations (pediculosis) are prevalent worldwide. In developed countries, the infestation rate of 4- to 13-year-old children remains high despite preventive efforts. This is due to the existence of numerous ineffective pediculicides, the incorrect use of the effective agents, toxicological concerns and the development of louse strains resistant to insecticides. One of the most effective tools for the prevention and control of lice is the louse comb, which should be used regularly for the detection of living lice at an early stage of infestation, and as an accessory to any treatment method to remove living and dead lice. The louse comb can also be used systematically for the treatment of infestations, for confirmation that treatment with pediculicides has been successful, and for the removal of nits (dead eggs or egg shells). Most pediculicides are only partially ovicidal. Therefore, 10 days after beginning treatment with any antilouse product, the scalp of the child should be examined. If no living lice are found, the treatment should be discontinued. If living lice are still present, treatment should be continued with a product containing a different active ingredient. Suffocating agents such as olive, soya, sunflower and corn oils, hair gels and mayonnaise are able to kill a significant number of lice only if they are applied in liberal quantities for more than 12 hours. However, they lubricate the hair and therefore may facilitate combing and removing lice and eggs from the scalp. Nits may remain glued on the hair for at least 6 months, even after a successful treatment, and lead to a false positive diagnosis of louse infestation. If nits are seen on the hair, the child should be examined, but treatment should be initiated only if living lice are found. Formulations containing 5% acetic acid or 8% formic acid, as well as acid shampoos (pH 4.5 to 5.5) and conditioners, in combination with a louse comb, can be helpful for removing nits. There is no

  10. [Combined treatment of arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Galich, S P; Dabizha, A Iu; Gindich, O A; Ogorodnik, Ia P; Al'tman, I V; Gomoliako, I V; Guch, A A

    2015-01-01

    An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a vascular developmental abnormality conditioned by impaired embryonic morphogenesis and characterized by the development of an abnormal connection between arteries and veins. More than 50% of the total number of patients suffering from this pathology are those having the pathological foci localizing in the area of the head and neck. At present, a combined method is both a generally accepted and the most radical one used for treatment for AVM. However, in the majority of cases, excision of the malformation leaves an extensive and complicated defect of tissues, whose direct closure leads to coarse cicatricious deformities. Over the period from 2004 to 2012, we followed up a total of 37 patients presenting with arteriovenous malformations of the head and neck. At admission the patients underwent preoperative examination including clinical tests, ultrasound duplex scanning, arteriography, MRT, and computed tomography. 24-72 hours prior to the operative intervention the patients were subjected to embolisation of the main vessels supplying the vascular malformation. Excision of the AVM was in 8 cases followed by primary closure of the postoperative wound, in 17 patients the defect was closed by transposition of the axial flaps, and 12 subjects underwent free transplantation of composite complexes of tissues. Relapse of the disease was revealed in 17 patients. In the majority of cases, relapses developed during the first year after the operative intervention (10 cases). The control of the disease's course was obtained in 20 patients. In 8 of the 12 patients with free transplantation of flaps we managed to obtain long-term control over the disease's course (more than 5 years). Hence, free microsurgical transplantation of compound complexes of tissues may be considered as a method of choice for closing the defect after excising an AVM in the area of the head and neck. Replacement of the defect with a well-vascularized tissue complex

  11. Transoral treatment strategies for head and neck tumors

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of transoral endoscopic surgery has initiated a fundamental change in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The endoscopic approach minimizes the intraoperative trauma. Due to the lower burden for the patient and the savings potential these methods have gained wide acceptance. These transoral accesses routes allow experienced surgeons to reduce the morbidity of surgical resection with no deterioration of oncologic results. This suggests a further extension of the indication spectrum and a high growth potential for these techniques and equipment in the coming years. For selected patients with selected tumors the minimally invasive transoral surgery offers improved oncological and functional results. In the present paper, different surgical access routes are presented and their indications discussed. PMID:23320057

  12. Impact of Adding Concomitant Chemotherapy to Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy for Advanced Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuyts, Sandra Dirix, Piet; Clement, Paul M.J.; Poorten, Vincent Vander; Delaere, Pierre; Schoenaers, Joseph; Hermans, Robert; Bogaert, Walter van den

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule combined with concomitant chemotherapy (Cx) in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a total of 90 patients with locoregionally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma underwent irradiation according to a hybrid fractionation schedule consisting of 20 fractions of 2 Gy (once daily) followed by 20 fractions of 1.6 Gy (twice daily) to a total dose of 72 Gy. Concomitant Cx (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered at the start of Weeks 1 and 4. Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with a previous patient group (n = 73) treated with the same schedule, but without concomitant Cx, between 2001 and 2004. Results: The locoregional control (LRC) rate was 70% after 2 years. Two-year overall and 2-year disease-free survival rates were 74% and 60%, respectively. In comparison with the RT-only group, an improvement of 15% in both LRC (p = 0.03) and overall survival (p = 0.09) was observed. All patients were treated to full radiation dose according to protocol, although the Cx schedule had to be adjusted in 12 patients. No acute Grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen, but incidences of Grade 3 acute mucositis (74.5% vs. 50.7%; p = 0.002) and dysphagia (82.2% vs. 47.9%; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in the chemoradiotherapy group compared with patients treated with RT alone. Conclusion: With this chemoradiotherapy regimen, excellent LRC and survival rates were achieved, with acceptable acute toxicity.

  13. How soccer players head the ball: A test of optic acceleration cancellation theory with virtual reality

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Peter; Reed, Nick; Gilson, Stuart; Glennerster, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We measured the movements of soccer players heading a football in a fully immersive virtual reality environment. In mid-flight the ball’s trajectory was altered from its normal quasi-parabolic path to a linear one, producing a jump in the rate of change of the angle of elevation of gaze (α) from player to ball. One reation time later the players adjusted their speed so that the rate of change of α increased when it had been reduced and reduced it when it had been increased. Since the result of the player’s movement was to regain a value of the rate of change close to that before the disturbance, the data suggest that the players have an expectation of, and memory for, the pattern that the rate of change of α will follow during the flight. The results support the general claim that players intercepting balls use servo control strategies and are consistent with the particular claim of Optic Acceleration Cancellation theory that the servo strategy is to allow α to increase at a steadily decreasing rate. PMID:18472123

  14. Accelerated versus conventional fractionated postoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: Results of a multicenter Phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Richetti, Antonella; Bignardi, Mario; Corvo, Renzo; Gabriele, Pietro; Sormani, Maria Pia; Antognoni, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether, in the postoperative setting, accelerated fractionation (AF) radiotherapy (RT) yields a superior locoregional control rate compared with conventional fractionation (CF) RT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx. Methods and materials: Patients from four institutions with one or more high-risk features (pT4, positive resection margins, pN >1, perineural/lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, subglottic extension) after surgery were randomly assigned to either RT with one daily session of 2 Gy up to 60 Gy in 6 weeks or AF. Accelerated fractionation consisted of a 'biphasic concomitant boost' schedule, with the boost delivered during the first and last weeks of treatment, to deliver 64 Gy in 5 weeks. Informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of the study was locoregional control. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: From March 1994 to August 2000, 226 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 30.6 months (range, 0-110 months), 2-year locoregional control estimates were 80% {+-} 4% for CF and 78% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.52), and 2-year overall survival estimates were 67% {+-} 5% for CF and 64% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.84). The lack of difference in outcome between the two treatment arms was confirmed by multivariate analysis. However, interaction analysis with median values as cut-offs showed a trend for improved locoregional control for those patients who had a delay in starting RT and who were treated with AF compared with those with a similar delay but who were treated with CF (hazard ratio = 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.1). Fifty percent of patients treated with AF developed confluent mucositis, compared with only 27% of those treated with CF (p = 0.006). However, mucositis duration was not different between arms. Although preliminary, actuarial Grade 3+ late toxicity estimates at 2 years were 18% {+-} 4% and 27% {+-} 6% for CF

  15. Comparison of the extent of hippocampal sparing according to the tilt of a patient's head during WBRT using linear accelerator-based IMRT and VMAT.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sun Young; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Mijoo; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation into whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) using linear accelerator-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in lung cancer patients with a high risk of metastasis to the brain. Specifically, we assessed the absorbed dose and the rate of adverse effects for several organs at risk (OAR), including the hippocampus, according to the tilt of a patient's head. We arbitrarily selected five cases where measurements were made with the patients' heads tilted forward and five cases without such tilt. We set the entire brain as the planning target volume (PTV), and the hippocampi, the lenses, the eyes, and the cochleae as the main OAR, and formulated new plans for IMRT (coplanar, non-coplanar) and VMAT (coplanar, non-coplanar). Using the dose-volume histogram (DVH), we calculated and compared the effective uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the OAR and the mean and the maximum doses of hippocampus. As a result, if the patient tilted the head forward when receiving the Linac-based treatment, for the same treatment effect in the PTV, we confirmed that a lower dose entered the OAR, such as the hippocampus, eye, lens, and cochlea. Moreover, the damage to the hippocampus was expected to be the least when receiving coplanar VMAT with the head tilted forward. Accordingly, if patients tilt their heads forward when undergoing Linac-based WBRT, we anticipate that a smaller dose would be transmitted to the OAR, resulting in better quality of life following treatment. PMID:27133139

  16. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, W.; Zhou, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Litos, M.; Li, S.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Walz, D.; England, J.; Delahaye, J. P.; Muggli, P.

    2013-10-01

    Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head) of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame) of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided) causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy) and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs) for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  17. Theoretical treatment of fluid flow for accelerating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Irvy M. A.; Roohani, Hamed; Forsberg, Karl; Eliasson, Peter; Skews, Beric W.; Nordström, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Most computational fluid dynamics simulations are, at present, performed in a body-fixed frame, for aeronautical purposes. With the advent of sharp manoeuvre, which may lead to transient effects originating in the acceleration of the centre of mass, there is a need to have a consistent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrarily moving frame. These expressions should be in a form that allows terms to be transformed between non-inertial and inertial frames and includes gravity, viscous terms, and linear and angular acceleration. Since no effects of body acceleration appear in the inertial frame Navier-Stokes equations themselves, but only in their boundary conditions, it is useful to investigate acceleration source terms in the non-inertial frame. In this paper, a derivation of the energy equation is provided in addition to the continuity and momentum equations previously published. Relevant dimensionless constants are derived which can be used to obtain an indication of the relative significance of acceleration effects. The necessity for using computational fluid dynamics to capture nonlinear effects remains, and various implementation schemes for accelerating bodies are discussed. This theoretical treatment is intended to provide a foundation for interpretation of aerodynamic effects observed in manoeuvre, particularly for accelerating missiles.

  18. Photoneutron contamination from an 18 MV Saturne medical linear accelerator in the treatment room.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Mostafa; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Jabbari, Keyvan; Nasri-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Siavashpour, Zahra; Gheisari, Ruhollah; Amiri, Behnam

    2013-09-01

    Dose escalation with high-energy X rays of medical linear accelerators (linacs) in radiotherapy offers several distinct advantages over the lower energy photons. However, owing to photoneutron reactions, interaction of high-energy photons (>8 MV) with various high-Z nuclei of the materials in the linac head components produces unavoidable neutrons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the photoneutron dose equivalent per unit therapeutic X-ray dose of 18 MV, GE Saturne 20 linac in the treatment room using Monte Carlo (MC) MCNP linac head full simulation as well as thermoluminescence dosemeter measurements. This machine is one of the old linac models manufactured by General Electric Company; however, it is widely used in the developing countries because of low cost and simple maintenance for radiotherapy applications. The results showed a significant photoneutron dose from Saturne 20 linac head components especially at distances near the linac head (<150 cm). Results of this work could be used in several applications, especially designing bunker and entrance door shielding against neutrons produced by photoneutron reactions in GE Saturne 20. However, a detailed cost optimisation for a specific room would require a dedicated calculation. PMID:23538892

  19. Mature Results of a Randomized Trial of Accelerated Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Michele I.; Rojas, Ana M.; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Dische, Stanley

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term late adverse events and treatment outcome of a randomized, multicenter Phase III trial of continuous, hyperfractionated, accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in 918 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Survival estimates were obtained for locoregional relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, overall survival, disease-specific survival, disease-free survival and for late adverse events. Results: The 10-year estimates (+-1 standard error) for locoregional relapse-free survival, overall survival, disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival were 43% +- 2% for CHART and 50% +- 3% with CRT (log-rank p = 0.2); 26% +- 2% and 29% +- 3% (p = 0.4), respectively; 41% +- 2% and 46% +- 3% (p = 0.3), respectively; and 56% +- 3% and 58% +- 3% (p = 0.5), respectively. There was a small but significant reduction in the incidence of slight or worse and moderate or worse epidermal adverse events with CHART (p = 0.002 to 0.05). Severe xerostomia, laryngeal edema, and mucosal necrosis were also significantly lower with CHART (p = 0.02 to 0.05). Conclusions: Despite the reduction in total dose from 66 Gy to 54 Gy, control of locoregional disease and survival with CHART were similar to those with CRT. These findings, together with the low incidence of long-term severe adverse events, suggest that CHART is a treatment option for patients with low-risk disease and for those unable to withstand the toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  20. Clinical effectiveness of a Pilates treatment for forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Myung; Lee, Chang-Hyung; O’Sullivan, David; Jung, Joo-Ha; Park, Jung-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of pilates and an exercise program on the craniovertebral angle, cervical range of motion, pain, and muscle fatigue in subjects with a forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 28 sedentary females (age 20 to 39 years) with FHP were randomly assigned to pilates (n=14) and combined (n=14) exercise groups. The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind study with the two groups performing exercise 50 min/day, 3 days/week, with an intensity of 11–15 rating of perceived exertion (RPE) for ten weeks. The main outcome measures were craniovertebral angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), pain levels assessed by visual analog scale (VAS), and neck disability index (NDI). Surface electromyography was also used to measure muscle fatigue. [Results] There were significant increases in craniovertebral angle and cervical ROM in the pilates group, but none in the control group. The only significant differences in muscle activity were recorded in the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the pilates group. Both exercise programs had positive effects on pain measures, as VAS and NDI were significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pilates could be recommended as an appropriate exercise for treatment of FHP in sedentary individuals. PMID:27512253

  1. Clinical effectiveness of a Pilates treatment for forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Myung; Lee, Chang-Hyung; O'Sullivan, David; Jung, Joo-Ha; Park, Jung-Jun

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of pilates and an exercise program on the craniovertebral angle, cervical range of motion, pain, and muscle fatigue in subjects with a forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 28 sedentary females (age 20 to 39 years) with FHP were randomly assigned to pilates (n=14) and combined (n=14) exercise groups. The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind study with the two groups performing exercise 50 min/day, 3 days/week, with an intensity of 11-15 rating of perceived exertion (RPE) for ten weeks. The main outcome measures were craniovertebral angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), pain levels assessed by visual analog scale (VAS), and neck disability index (NDI). Surface electromyography was also used to measure muscle fatigue. [Results] There were significant increases in craniovertebral angle and cervical ROM in the pilates group, but none in the control group. The only significant differences in muscle activity were recorded in the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the pilates group. Both exercise programs had positive effects on pain measures, as VAS and NDI were significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pilates could be recommended as an appropriate exercise for treatment of FHP in sedentary individuals. PMID:27512253

  2. Biomechanical based image registration for head and neck radiation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Velec, Mike; Chau, Lily; Breen, Stephen; Brock, Kristy

    2010-02-01

    Deformable image registration of four head and neck cancer patients was conducted using biomechanical based model. Patient specific 3D finite element models have been developed using CT and cone beam CT image data of the planning and a radiation treatment session. The model consists of seven vertebrae (C1 to C7), mandible, larynx, left and right parotid glands, tumor and body. Different combinations of boundary conditions are applied in the model in order to find the configuration with a minimum registration error. Each vertebra in the planning session is individually aligned with its correspondence in the treatment session. Rigid alignment is used for each individual vertebra and to the mandible since deformation is not expected in the bones. In addition, the effect of morphological differences in external body between the two image sessions is investigated. The accuracy of the registration is evaluated using the tumor, and left and right parotid glands by comparing the calculated Dice similarity index of these structures following deformation in relation to their true surface defined in the image of the second session. The registration improves when the vertebrae and mandible are aligned in the two sessions with the highest Dice index of 0.86+/-0.08, 0.84+/-0.11, and 0.89+/-0.04 for the tumor, left and right parotid glands, respectively. The accuracy of the center of mass location of tumor and parotid glands is also improved by deformable image registration where the error in the tumor and parotid glands decreases from 4.0+/-1.1, 3.4+/-1.5, and 3.8+/-0.9 mm using rigid registration to 2.3+/-1.0, 2.5+/-0.8 and 2.0+/-0.9 mm in the deformable image registration when alignment of vertebrae and mandible is conducted in addition to the surface projection of the body.

  3. Head Lice to Dead Lice: Safe Solutions for Frantic Families. A New Treatment Program To Address Persistent Head Lice Infestations. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer Mac Productions, Weston, MA.

    Head lice affect over 10 million Americans each year. Noting that head lice are becoming resistant to conventional pediculicide (insecticide) treatments, this video combines live action and animation to education parents, children, and health professionals about the use of olive oil for successfully preventing and getting rid of head lice. The…

  4. Treatment with a position feedback-controlled head stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Harris, F A

    1979-08-01

    A position feedback-controlled head stabilizer has been developed to provide cerebral palsied individuals with resistive exercise to strengthen the neck musculature. This apparatus detects "involuntary" head motion and stabilizes the head by applying opposing forces; it also can be used to facilitate muscular contraction by resisting the subject's voluntary movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether voluntary head control in cerebral palsied individuals can be improved through systematic exercise using the stabilizer to strengthen the muscles of the neck and improve their balance of action. The findings support the author's contention that this is possible. The apparatus consists of a helmet and shoulder pads, interconnected so that the head is supported in the helmet by a manipulator arm. At its lower end, the manipulator arm is attached to the shoulder pad mounting frame via a gimbal assembly which allows head movement in two planes of tilt (pitch, or forward-and back, and roll, or side-to-side). Feedback control circuitry is so arranged that any deviation of the head from the desired position leads to actuation of pneumatic cylinders, which apply torques to the manipulator gimbal axes so as to oppose or conteract the incipient head movement. It is particularly significant that none of these patients participating in these experiments were at all apprehensive about or resisted being placed in the apparatus. (Even the youngest subject to use the apparatus--five year old-- did not mind being restrained by the shoulder pads or having his head gripped by helment.) While JG utilized the safety release valve quite often during the first few head control training sessions, he soon became confident enough in the action of the stabilizer that he did not even bother to grip the handle of the release valve. While DA had the action of safety valve explained and demonstrated for her, she never bothered to use it even from the outset of her experience

  5. Multidisciplinary teamwork in the treatment and rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient.

    PubMed

    King, G E; Lemon, J C; Martin, J W

    1992-06-01

    The advantages of multidisciplinary treatment planning of head and neck cancer patients is described. Planning rehabilitation concurrently with curing the malignancy results in the most effective application of treatment modalities coordinated with rehabilitative care. Concentrated multidisciplinary treatment reduces post treatment morbidity by shortening recovery and rehabilitation time. PMID:1631776

  6. Complications of Head and Neck Reconstruction and Their Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bien-Keem; Por, Yong-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck reconstruction is an intensive multistep process that requires attention to detail to achieve a successful result. The knowledge and prevention of complications as well as their management is an essential part of the training of the surgeon participating in head and neck reconstruction. This article explores the general complications, including free flap failure, carotid artery blowout, hardware exposure, and ectropion, as well as regional complications relating to operations of the scalp, cranium, base of skull, midface, mandible, and pharyngoesophagus. PMID:22550450

  7. A budesonide prodrug accelerates treatment of colitis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cui, N; Friend, D R; Fedorak, R N

    1994-01-01

    Although oral glucocorticoids are the treatment of choice for moderate to severe ulcerative pancolitis, their systemic side effects and adrenal suppression account for considerable morbidity. An oral glucocorticoid-conjugate (prodrug), budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide, which is not absorbed in the small intestine but is hydrolysed by colonic bacterial and mucosal beta-glucuronidase to release free budesonide into the colon was synthesised. The objective of this study was to compare treatment with budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide with treatment with free budesonide by examining: (1) the healing of experimental colitis and (2) the extent of adrenal suppression. Pancolitis was induced with 4% acetic acid. Animals were then randomised to receive oral therapy for 72 hours with (1) budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide, (2) free budesonide, or (3) vehicle. Drug efficacy and colitic healing was determined by measuring gross colonic ulceration, myeloperoxidase activity, and in vivo colonic fluid absorption. Adrenal suppression was determined by measuring plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone and serum corticosterone. Vehicle-treated colitis animals had gross ulceration, increased myeloperoxidase activity, and net colonic fluid secretion. Treatment with oral budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide accelerated all measures of colitis healing at a fourfold lower dose than did free budesonide. Furthermore, treatment with budesonide-beta-D-glucuronide did not result in adrenal suppression whereas free budesonide treatment did. A newly synthesised orally administered glucocorticoid-conjugate accelerates colitis healing with limited adrenal suppression. Development of an orally administered colon-specific steroid delivery system represents a novel approach to inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:7959202

  8. Complications of hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of head and neck disease

    SciTech Connect

    Giebfried, J.W.; Lawson, W.; Biller, H.F.

    1986-04-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen has been advocated in the treatment of many head and neck diseases. Reports of such treatments have described eustachian tube dysfunction as the only complication. A review of patients receiving hyperbaric oxygen for head and neck diseases at The Mount Sinai Medical Center revealed serious complications, which included seizure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. In addition, follow-up study of these patients demonstrated that 11 patients treated for radiation-induced necrosis had an undiagnosed recurrence of cancer.

  9. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  10. Head lice treatments: Searching for the path of least resistance.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Warren R

    2009-08-01

    Based on the dialogue "Head lice" between Drs Kimberly D. Morel and Stephen Stone. Dialogues in Dermatology, a monthly audio program from the American Academy of Dermatology, contains discussions between dermatologists on timely topics. Commentaries from Dialogues Editor-in-Chief Warren R. Heymann, MD, are provided after each discussion as a topic summary and are provided here as a special service to readers of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. PMID:19615542

  11. A study of light ion accelerators for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Prelec, K.

    1997-07-01

    This review addresses several issues, such as possible advantages of light ion therapy compared to protons and conventional radiation, the complexity of such a system and its possible adaptation to a hospital environment, and the question of cost-effectiveness compared to other modalities for cancer treatment or to other life saving procedures. Characteristics and effects of different types of radiation on cells and organisms will be briefly described; this will include conventional radiation, protons and light ions. The status of proton and light ion cancer therapy will then be described, with more emphasis on the latter; on the basis of existing experience the criteria for the use of light ions will be listed and areas of possible medical applications suggested. Requirements and parameters of ion beams for cancer treatment will then be defined, including ion species, energy and intensity, as well as parameters of the beam when delivered to the target (scanning, time structure, energy spread). Possible accelerator designs for light ions will be considered, including linear accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons and their basic features given; this will be followed by a review of existing and planned facilities for light ions. On the basis of these considerations a tentative design for a dedicated light ion facility will be suggested, a facility that would be hospital based, satisfying the clinical requirements, simple to operate and reliable, concluding with its cost-effectiveness in comparison with other modalities for treatment of cancer.

  12. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  13. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  14. A whole body vibration perception map and associated acceleration loads at the lower leg, hip and head.

    PubMed

    Sonza, Anelise; Völkel, Nina; Zaro, Milton A; Achaval, Matilde; Hennig, Ewald M

    2015-07-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) training has become popular in recent years. However, WBV may be harmful to the human body. The goal of this study was to determine the acceleration magnitudes at different body segments for different frequencies of WBV. Additionally, vibration sensation ratings by subjects served to create perception vibration magnitude and discomfort maps of the human body. In the first of two experiments, 65 young adults mean (± SD) age range of 23 (± 3.0) years, participated in WBV severity perception ratings, based on a Borg scale. Measurements were performed at 12 different frequencies, two intensities (3 and 5 mm amplitudes) of rotational mode WBV. On a separate day, a second experiment (n = 40) included vertical accelerometry of the head, hip and lower leg with the same WBV settings. The highest lower limb vibration magnitude perception based on the Borg scale was extremely intense for the frequencies between 21 and 25 Hz; somewhat hard for the trunk region (11-25 Hz) and fairly light for the head (13-25 Hz). The highest vertical accelerations were found at a frequency of 23 Hz at the tibia, 9 Hz at the hip and 13 Hz at the head. At 5 mm amplitude, 61.5% of the subjects reported discomfort in the foot region (21-25 Hz), 46.2% for the lower back (17, 19 and 21 Hz) and 23% for the abdominal region (9-13 Hz). The range of 3-7 Hz represents the safest frequency range with magnitudes less than 1 g(*)sec for all studied regions. PMID:25962379

  15. Current Opinions on Surgical Treatment of Fractures of the Condylar Head

    PubMed Central

    Boffano, Paolo; Benech, Rodolfo; Gallesio, Cesare; Arcuri, Francesco; Benech, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of mandibular condyle fractures is still controversial, with surgical treatment slowly becoming the preferred option. However, fractures of the condylar head (diacapitular fractures) are still treated conservatively at many institutions. Recently, more and more surgeons have begun to perform open treatment for diacapitular fractures because it allows to restore the anatomical position of the fragments and disc, it allows an immediate functional movement of the jaw, and avoid the ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint induced by the trauma. Several techniques have been proposed to reduce and fix fractures of the condylar head, such as standard bone screws, resorbable screws, resorbable pins, and cannulated lag screws. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the literature about the surgical treatment of fractures of the condylar head to resume the current knowledge about open treatment of such fractures. PMID:25050145

  16. Similar head impact acceleration measured using instrumented ear patches in a junior rugby union team during matches in comparison with other sports.

    PubMed

    King, Doug A; Hume, Patria A; Gissane, Conor; Clark, Trevor N

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Direct impact with the head and the inertial loading of the head have been postulated as major mechanisms of head-related injuries, such as concussion. METHODS This descriptive observational study was conducted to quantify the head impact acceleration characteristics in under-9-year-old junior rugby union players in New Zealand. The impact magnitude, frequency, and location were collected with a wireless head impact sensor that was worn by 14 junior rugby players who participated in 4 matches. RESULTS A total of 721 impacts > 10g were recorded. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of impacts per player was 46 (IQR 37-58), resulting in 10 (IQR 4-18) impacts to the head per player per match. The median impact magnitudes recorded were 15g (IQR 12g-21g) for linear acceleration and 2296 rad/sec(2) (IQR 1352-4152 rad/sec(2)) for rotational acceleration. CONCLUSIONS There were 121 impacts (16.8%) above the rotational injury risk limit and 1 (0.1%) impact above the linear injury risk limit. The acceleration magnitude and number of head impacts in junior rugby union players were higher than those previously reported in similar age-group sports participants. The median linear acceleration for the under-9-year-old rugby players were similar to 7- to 8-year-old American football players, but lower than 9- to 12-year-old youth American football players. The median rotational accelerations measured were higher than the median and 95th percentiles in youth, high school, and collegiate American football players. PMID:26942267

  17. Experimental study on cheng zai wan for treatment of necrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanping; Huang, Keqin; Lang, Fengping; Huang, Yongxun; Huang, Hui; Huang, Hong; Zhou, Chongguang; Zhang, Wanqiang

    2003-12-01

    Cheng Zai Wan ([symbol: see text]), a Chinese herbal preparation was administrated in the two-leg rat model of aseptic necrosis of the femoral head established by taking prednisone acetate for a long period and the osteoporosis model rat by castration in order to explore the effects of the prescription on necrosis of the femoral head. The results showed that after treatment, the pitting on the surface of the femoral head disappeared, the reticular structure with filling cells was restored; the fat droplets in bone cells or cartilage cells of the femoral head were significantly reduced; sparse capillaries were improved, density and width of the bone trabecula were increased somewhat; bone mineral density, bone weight, bone strength and rigidity were significantly increased; and the low level of estrin was improved. It is suggested that Cheng Zai Wan has definite therapeutic effects on aseptic necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:14719304

  18. Treatment of chronic radial head dislocations in children.

    PubMed

    Belangero, W D; Livani, B; Zogaib, R K

    2007-04-01

    From 1990 to 2005 our department treated nine patients with chronic radial head dislocation by an ulnar osteotomy and indirect reduction by interosseous membrane. The patients varied in age from 2 years and 8 months to 10 years, and the time from the injury to operation ranged from 40 days to 3 years. The range of functional motion and carrying angle was restored in all nine patients, and no complications, such as recurrent dislocation, infection, or neurovascular injury were observed. This technique has proven to be a successful approach to treating such cases, with a low range of complications and good functional results. PMID:16741732

  19. Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

  20. Adult Head and Neck Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Treatment and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rabindra P.; Grimer, Robert J.; Bhujel, Nabina; Carter, Simon R.; Tillman, Roger M.; Abudu, Adesegun

    2008-01-01

    We have retrospectively analysed the experience of a musculoskeletal oncological unit in the management of adult head and neck soft tissue sarcomas from 1990 to 2005. Thirty-six patients were seen, of whom 24 were treated at this unit, the remainder only receiving advice. The median age of the patients was 46 years. Most of the sarcomas were deep and of high or intermediate grade with a median size of 5.5 cm. Eleven different histological subtypes were identified. Wide excision was possible only in 21% of the cases. 42% of the patients developed local recurrence and 42% developed metastatic disease usually in the lungs. Overall survival was 49% at 5 years. Tumour size was the most important prognostic factor. Adult head and neck soft tissue sarcomas have a high mortality rate with a high risk of local recurrence and metastatic disease. The rarity of the disease would suggest that centralisation of care could lead to increased expertise and better outcomes. PMID:18382622

  1. [Severe apathy following head injury: improvement with Selegiline treatment].

    PubMed

    Moutaouakil, F; El Otmani, H; Fadel, H; Slassi, I

    2009-12-01

    Apathy is defined as reduced goal-directed behavior due to lack of motivation. Traumatic brain injury is a frequent cause. Drugs activating the dopaminergic system provide variable benefit. A 30-year-old patient was the victim of a severe head injury with frontal bruise at the age of 15. At the request of his family, he consulted for a 7-year history that included a lack of initiative and the inability to generate behavior spontaneously, contrasting with the ability to execute behaviors on command. He also presented indifference, major emotional disruption without sadness, pessimism, and other depressive signs. The examination found a severe apathetic syndrome confirmed by specific scales with a mild impairment of executive functions and without depressive syndrome. Encephalic MRI showed atrophy of the whole prefrontal cerebral cortex. The patient was treated with bromocriptine, which he did not tolerate, then with Selegiline at 15 mg per day, which dramatically improved his symptoms. Apathy occurs frequently after traumatic brain injury, in 23-71% of patients according to the authors. The pathophysiology of apathy has been described in anatomical terms as related to disruption of frontal-subcortical pathways. The biochemical hypothesis postulates a disruption in dopaminergic activity. The use of dopaminergic agents usually improves cases similar to our patient. Apathy is frequent following head injury, warranting a search for systematic causes. Since it increases dopaminergic activity, Selegiline is well worth trying in these patients. PMID:19084243

  2. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy For Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghera, Paul; McConkey, Chris; Ho, Kean-Fatt; Glaholm, John; Hartley, Andrew . E-mail: andrew.hartley@uhb.nhs.uk

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tumor control rates in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from patients with squamous cell cancer of the larynx, oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx (International Union Against Cancer Stage II-IV), who received accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy between January 1, 1998, and April 1, 2005, were retrospectively analyzed. Two different chemotherapy schedules were used, carboplatin and methotrexate, both single agents administered on an outpatient basis. The endpoints were overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival. Results: A total of 81 patients were analyzed. The 2-year overall survival rate was 71.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.5-81.8%). The 2-year disease-free survival rate was 68.6% (95% CI, 58.4-78.8%). The 2-year local control rate was 75.4% (95% CI, 65.6-85.1%). When excluding patients with Stage II oral cavity, larynx, and hypopharynx tumors, 68 patients remained. For these patients, the 2-year overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival rate was 67.6% (95% CI, 56.0-79.2%), 72.0% (95% CI, 61.0-83.0%), and 64.1% (95% CI, 52.6-75.7%), respectively. Conclusion: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy and synchronous chemotherapy can achieve high tumor control rates while being resource sparing and should be the subject of prospective evaluation.

  3. Treatment of chronic radial head dislocations in children

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, W. D.; Zogaib, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    From 1990 to 2005 our department treated nine patients with chronic radial head dislocation by an ulnar osteotomy and indirect reduction by interosseous membrane. The patients varied in age from 2 years and 8 months to 10 years, and the time from the injury to operation ranged from 40 days to 3 years. The range of functional motion and carrying angle was restored in all nine patients, and no complications, such as recurrent dislocation, infection, or neurovascular injury were observed. This technique has proven to be a successful approach to treating such cases, with a low range of complications and good functional results. PMID:16741732

  4. Head-and-neck IMRT treatments assessed with a Monte Carlo dose calculation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, J.; Adams, E.; Bidmead, M.; Partridge, M.; Verhaegen, F.

    2005-03-01

    IMRT is frequently used in the head-and-neck region, which contains materials of widely differing densities (soft tissue, bone, air-cavities). Conventional methods of dose computation for these complex, inhomogeneous IMRT cases involve significant approximations. In the present work, a methodology for the development, commissioning and implementation of a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation engine for intensity modulated radiotherapy (MC-IMRT) is proposed which can be used by radiotherapy centres interested in developing MC-IMRT capabilities for research or clinical evaluations. The method proposes three levels for developing, commissioning and maintaining a MC-IMRT dose calculation engine: (a) development of a MC model of the linear accelerator, (b) validation of MC model for IMRT and (c) periodic quality assurance (QA) of the MC-IMRT system. The first step, level (a), in developing an MC-IMRT system is to build a model of the linac that correctly predicts standard open field measurements for percentage depth-dose and off-axis ratios. Validation of MC-IMRT, level (b), can be performed in a rando phantom and in a homogeneous water equivalent phantom. Ultimately, periodic quality assurance of the MC-IMRT system is needed to verify the MC-IMRT dose calculation system, level (c). Once the MC-IMRT dose calculation system is commissioned it can be applied to more complex clinical IMRT treatments. The MC-IMRT system implemented at the Royal Marsden Hospital was used for IMRT calculations for a patient undergoing treatment for primary disease with nodal involvement in the head-and-neck region (primary treated to 65 Gy and nodes to 54 Gy), while sparing the spinal cord, brain stem and parotid glands. Preliminary MC results predict a decrease of approximately 1-2 Gy in the median dose of both the primary tumour and nodal volumes (compared with both pencil beam and collapsed cone). This is possibly due to the large air-cavity (the larynx of the patient) situated in the centre

  5. Pinnacle3 modeling and end-to-end dosimetric testing of a Versa HD linear accelerator with the Agility head and flattening filter-free modes.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Daniel L; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Cruz, Wilbert; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2016-01-01

    The Elekta Versa HD incorporates a variety of upgrades to the line of Elekta linear accelerators, primarily including the Agility head and flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beam delivery. The completely distinct dosimetric output of the head from its predecessors, combined with the FFF beams, requires a new investigation of modeling in treatment planning systems. A model was created in Pinnacle3 v9.8 with the commissioned beam data. A phantom consisting of several plastic water and Styrofoam slabs was scanned and imported into Pinnacle3, where beams of different field sizes, source-to-surface distances (SSDs), wedges, and gantry angles were devised. Beams included all of the available photon energies (6, 10, 18, 6FFF, and 10 FFF MV), as well as the four electron energies commissioned for clinical use (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV). The plans were verified at calculation points by measurement with a calibrated ionization chamber. Homogeneous and hetero-geneous point-dose measurements agreed within 2% relative to maximum dose for all photon and electron beams. AP photon open field measurements along the central axis at 100 cm SSD passed within 1%. In addition, IMRT testing was also performed with three standard plans (step and shoot IMRT, as well as a small- and large-field VMAT plan). The IMRT plans were delivered on the Delta4 IMRT QA phantom, for which a gamma passing rate was > 99.5% for all plans with a 3% dose deviation, 3 mm distance-to-agreement, and 10% dose threshold. The IMRT QA results for the first 23 patients yielded gamma passing rates of 97.4% ± 2.3%. Such testing ensures confidence in the ability of Pinnacle3 to model photon and electron beams with the Agility head. PMID:26894352

  6. Conservative surgery for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: current options

    PubMed Central

    Gasbarra, Elena; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Baldi, Jacopo; Bilotta, Vincenzo; Moretti, Antimo; Tarantino, Umbertto

    2015-01-01

    Summary The prevention of femoral head collapse and the maintenance of hip function would represent a substantial achievement in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head; however it is difficult to identify appropriate treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis in order to obtain a successful outcome in joint preserving procedures. Conservative treatments, including pharmacological management and biophysical modalities, are not supported by any evidence and require further investigation. The appropriate therapeutic approach has not been identified. The choice of surgical procedures is based on patient clinical conditions and anatomopathological features; preservation of the femoral head by core decompression may be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Biological factors, such as bone morphogenetic proteins and bone marrow stem cells, would improve the outcome of core decompression. Another surgical procedure proposed for the treatment of avascular necrosis consists of large vascularized cortical bone grafts, but its use is not yet common due to surgical technical issues. Use of other surgical technique, such as osteotomies, is controversial, since arthroplasty is considered as the first option in case of severe femoral head collapse without previous intervention. PMID:27134632

  7. Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Update on Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Marur, Shanthi; Forastiere, Arlene A

    2016-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma arises from multiple anatomic subsites in the head and neck region. The risk factors for development of cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx include tobacco exposure and alcohol dependence, and infection with oncogenic viruses is associated with cancers developing in the nasopharynx, palatine, and lingual tonsils of the oropharynx. The incidence of human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal cancer is increasing in developed countries, and by 2020, the annual incidence could surpass that of cervical cancer. The treatment for early-stage squamous cell cancers of the head and neck is generally single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy. The treatment for locally advanced head and neck cancers is multimodal, with either surgery followed by adjuvant radiation or chemoradiation as indicated by pathologic features or definitive chemoradiation. For recurrent disease that is not amenable to a salvage local or regional approach and for metastatic disease, chemotherapy with or without a biological agent is indicated. To date, molecular testing has not influenced treatment selection in head and neck cancer. This review will focus on the changing epidemiology, advances in diagnosis, and treatment options for squamous cell cancers of the head and neck, along with data on risk stratification specific to oropharyngeal cancer, and will highlight the direction of current trials. PMID:26944243

  8. Steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in immune thrombocytopenia treatment with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios Ch; Mouzopoulos, George; Floros, Themistoklis; Tzurbakis, Matthaios

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a devastating complication of steroid administration and has rarely been observed in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia. The treatment of osteochondral defects in advanced stages of avascular necrosis (AVN), characterized by collapse of the subchondral bone, remains an unsolved burden in orthopedic surgery. In this report, we present a case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted in the Emergency Department with walking disability and painful hip joint movement due to steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis. Two years before she was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia, for which she received pulse steroid therapy with high dose of dexamethasone and underwent a splenectomy. This case report is the first to describe the use of osteochondral autograft transplantation as a treatment of steroid-induced AVN of the femoral head due to immune thrombocytopenia at the age of 19 years with very good clinical and radiological results 3 years postoperatively. PMID:25173503

  9. Progress and challenges in the vaccine-based treatment of head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Venuti, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Head and neck (HN) cancer represents one of the most challenging diseases because the mortality remains high despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment. Although vaccine-based approaches for the treatment of advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have achieved limited clinical success, advances in cancer immunology provide a strong foundation and powerful new tools to guide current attempts to develop effective cancer vaccines. This article reviews what has to be rather what has been done in the field for the development of future vaccines in HN tumours. PMID:19473517

  10. Eradication of head lice with a single treatment.

    PubMed

    DiNapoli, J B; Austin, R D; Englender, S J; Gomez, M P; Barrett, J F

    1988-08-01

    Single application of Nix (permethrin 1% creme rinse) and Rid were compared as treatments for Pediculosis capitis in 435 patients, the majority of whom were children. Seven days after the treatment, 98 per cent of the permethrin-treated and 85 per cent of the Rid-treated patients were free of lice. At 14 days, prior to nit removal, 96 per cent of the permethrin-treated and 62 per cent of the Rid-treated patients were still lice free. Seventeen (7 per cent) permethrin-treated and 32 (16 per cent) Rid-treated patients were reported to have adverse experiences. PMID:3291623

  11. Conservative Treatment for Bilateral Displaced Proximal Humerus Head Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Velutini-Becker, Ricardo; Aguilar-Alcalá, Luis D

    2016-01-01

    Proximal humerus fracture represents five to eight percent of all fractures and is twice as common in women than in men. Most cases of displaced fracture of the proximal humerus are treated surgically; it is probable that more cases are preferred to be treated surgically greater than required. The optimal treatment for these fractures remains controversial, but physicians have a tendency to treat via open reduction and fixation with angular locking plates or glenohumeral arthroplasty.  We present a case of a 71-year-old woman with bilateral displaced proximal humeral fracture. Conservative treatment was initiated with two hanging casts, achieving radiological reduction on week one. After two additional weeks of casting, treatment continued with radiologic control and home physical therapy, ultimately an excellent functional outcome and adequate radiological reduction was obtained.    Even in bilaterally displaced proximal humerus fractures, conservative treatment can be an efficient option, reducing complications, reaching adequate functional results and acceptable radiographic reduction.​ PMID:27489750

  12. Predicting the Effect of Accelerated Fractionation in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer Based on Molecular Marker Profiles: Data From a Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Suwinski, Rafal; Jaworska, Magdalena; Nikiel, Barbara; Grzegorz, Wozniak; Bankowska-Wozniak, Magdalena; Wojciech, Majewski; Krzysztof, Skladowski; Dariusz, Lange

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic and predictive values of molecular marker expression profiles based on data from a randomized clinical trial of postoperative conventional fractionation (p-CF) therapy versus 7-day-per-week postoperative continuous accelerated irradiation (p-CAIR) therapy for squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Tumor samples from 148 patients (72 p-CF and 76 p-CAIR patients) were available for molecular studies. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess levels of EGFR, nm23, Ki-67, p-53, and cyclin D1 expression. To evaluate the effect of fractionation relative to the expression profiles, data for locoregional tumor control (LRC) were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Survival curves were compared using the Cox f test. Results: Patients who had tumors with low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression levels and oral cavity/oropharyngeal primary cancer sites tended to benefit from p-CAIR. A joint score for the gain in LRC from p-CAIR based of these features was used to separate the patients into two groups: those who benefited significantly from p-CAIR with respect to LRC (n = 49 patients; 5-year LRC of 28% vs. 68%; p = 0.01) and those who did not benefit from p-CAIR (n = 99 patients; 5-year LRC of 72% vs. 66%; p = 0.38). The nm23 expression level appeared useful as a prognostic factor but not as a predictor of fractionation effect. Conclusions: These results support the studies that demonstrate the potential of molecular profiles to predict the benefit from accelerated radiotherapy. The molecular profile that favored accelerated treatment (low Ki-67, low p-53, and high EGFR expression) was in a good accordance with results provided by other investigators. Combining individual predictors in a joint score may improve their predictive potential.

  13. Spatiotemporal Pattern of Neuroinflammation After Impact-Acceleration Closed Head Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rooker, Servan; Jander, Sebastian; Reempts, Jos Van; Stoll, Guido; Jorens, Philippe G.; Borgers, Marcel; Verlooy, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory processes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain damage. We analyzed the spatiotemporal expression pattern of the proinflammatory key molecules: interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in a rat closed head injury (CHI) paradigm. 51 rats were used for RT-PCR analysis after CHI, and 18 for immunocytochemistry. We found an early upregulation of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNA between 1 h and 7 h after injury; the expression of iNOS mRNA only revealed a significant increase at 4 h. After 24 h, the expression decreased towards baseline levels, and remained low until 7 d after injury. Immunocytochemically, IL-1β induction was localized to ramified microglia in areas surrounding the primary impact place as well as deeper brain structures. Our study shows rapid induction of inflammatory gene expression that exceeds by far the primary impact site and might therefore contribute to tissue damage at remote sites. PMID:16864909

  14. The Accelerated Intake: A Method for Increasing Initial Attendance to Outpatient Cocaine Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Festinger, David S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The effectiveness of offering same day appointments at an outpatient cocaine treatment program to increase intake attendance was examined. Seventy-eight clients were given standard or accelerated intake appointments. Significantly more clients who were given accelerated appointments attended the program. An accelerated intake procedure appears to…

  15. Uncertainties and correction methods when modeling passive scattering proton therapy treatment heads with Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Bryan; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Engelsman, Martijn; Paganetti, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo models of proton therapy treatment heads are being used to improve beam delivery systems and to calculate the radiation field for patient dose calculations. The achievable accuracy of the model depends on the exact knowledge of the treatment head geometry and time structure, the material characteristics, and the underlying physics. This work aimed at studying the uncertainties in treatment head simulations for passive scattering proton therapy. The sensitivities of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose distributions on material densities, mean ionization potentials, initial proton beam energy spread and spot size were investigated. An improved understanding of the nature of these parameters may help to improve agreement between calculated and measured SOBP dose distributions and to ensure that the range, modulation width, and uniformity are within clinical tolerance levels. Furthermore, we present a method to make small corrections to the uniformity of spread-out Bragg peaks by utilizing the time structure of the beam delivery. In addition, we re-commissioned the models of the two proton treatment heads located at our facility using the aforementioned correction methods presented in this paper. PMID:21478569

  16. Effects of high fat diet and prednisolone treatment on femoral head separation in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of high fat diets or transient treatment with cholesterol or a synthetic glucocorticoid, prednisolone, on femoral head fragility of broiler chickens was examined along with other production parameters such as growth, feed conversion, and blood chemistry. Three groups of broiler chicks co...

  17. Assessment of the efficacy and safety of a new treatment for head lice.

    PubMed

    Mac-Mary, Sophie; Messikh, Rafat; Jeudy, Adeline; Lihoreau, Thomas; Sainthillier, Jean-Marie; Gabard, Bernard; Schneider, Catherine; Auderset, Philippe; Humbert, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Infestation with head lice is a widespread, persistent, and recurring issue leading to serious health problems if untreated. We are facing resistance phenomena to usual pediculicides and questions about their direct or cumulative toxicity. The aim of this trial was to assess the efficacy of a new product, free of chemical insecticides but with a physical effect. This product contains components whose antilice efficacy has already been demonstrated, as well as Andiroba oil which asphyxiates the lice and Quassia vinegar which dissolves the chitin of the nits (they are then inactivated). 30 patients with head lice infestation, aged 3-39 years, applied the treatment one to three times, 5 days apart. Cure was defined as the absence of live lice after 5, 10, or 14 days, and symptoms are usually associated with infestation. Easiness and safety of the treatment were assessed by the patients and/or their parents. Overall cure rates were 20% on D5 after one treatment, 37% on D10 after two treatments, and 90% on D14 after three treatments. Symptoms such as itch, scalp dryness, redness, and flakiness rapidly diminished. This treatment seems to be a beneficial addition or a valuable alternative to existing treatments, considering the total absence of chemical insecticides, the absence of drug-resistance induction in head lice, the absence of major toxicological risks compared with usual pediculicides, and the favourable patient use instructions. PMID:23209928

  18. Assessment of the Efficacy and Safety of a New Treatment for Head Lice

    PubMed Central

    Mac-Mary, Sophie; Messikh, Rafat; Jeudy, Adeline; Lihoreau, Thomas; Sainthillier, Jean-Marie; Gabard, Bernard; Schneider, Catherine; Auderset, Philippe; Humbert, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Infestation with head lice is a widespread, persistent, and recurring issue leading to serious health problems if untreated. We are facing resistance phenomena to usual pediculicides and questions about their direct or cumulative toxicity. The aim of this trial was to assess the efficacy of a new product, free of chemical insecticides but with a physical effect. This product contains components whose antilice efficacy has already been demonstrated, as well as Andiroba oil which asphyxiates the lice and Quassia vinegar which dissolves the chitin of the nits (they are then inactivated). 30 patients with head lice infestation, aged 3–39 years, applied the treatment one to three times, 5 days apart. Cure was defined as the absence of live lice after 5, 10, or 14 days, and symptoms are usually associated with infestation. Easiness and safety of the treatment were assessed by the patients and/or their parents. Overall cure rates were 20% on D5 after one treatment, 37% on D10 after two treatments, and 90% on D14 after three treatments. Symptoms such as itch, scalp dryness, redness, and flakiness rapidly diminished. This treatment seems to be a beneficial addition or a valuable alternative to existing treatments, considering the total absence of chemical insecticides, the absence of drug-resistance induction in head lice, the absence of major toxicological risks compared with usual pediculicides, and the favourable patient use instructions. PMID:23209928

  19. Analysis of peripheral doses for base of tongue treatment by linear accelerator and helical TomoTherapy IMRT.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian Richard; Lamba, Michael A S; Elson, Howard R

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral doses to various organs from a typical head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment delivered by linear accelerator (linac) and helical TomoTherapy. Multiple human CT data sets were used to segment critical structures and organs at risk, fused and adjusted to an anthropomorphic phantom. Eighteen contours were designated for thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) placement. Following the RTOG IMRT Protocol 0522, treatment of the primary tumor and involved nodes (PTV70) and subclinical disease sites (PTV56) was planned utilizing IMRT to 70Gy and 56 Gy. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were produced for linac and TomoTherapy treatments. TLDs were placed and each treatment plan was delivered to the anthropomorphic phantom four times. Within 2.5 cm (one helical TomoTherapy field width) superior and inferior to the field edges, normal tissue doses were on average 45% lower using linear accelerator. Beyond 2.5 cm, the helical TomoTherapy normal tissue dose was an average of 52% lower. The majority of points proved to be statistically different using the Student's t-test with p > 0.05. Using one method of calculation, probability of a secondary malignancy was 5.88% for the linear accelerator and 4.08% for helical TomoTherapy. Helical TomoTherapy delivers more dose than a linac immediately above and below the treatment field, contributing to the higher peripheral doses adjacent to the field. At distances beyond one field width (where leakage is dominant), helical TomoTherapy doses are lower than linear accelerator doses. PMID:20717081

  20. [Modern technology in the surgical treatment of head injury sequelae].

    PubMed

    Potapov, A A; Kornienko, V N; Kravchuk, A D; Likhterman, L B; Okhlopkov, V A; Eolchiian, S A; Gavrilov, A G; Zakharova, N E; Iakovlev, S B; Shurkhaĭ, V A

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents main types of surgically relevant posttraumatic lesions in 4136 patients with skull vault as well as skull base defects, craniofacial deformities, recurrent CSF leaks, arterio-venous fistulas, aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms etc. Classification of TBI sequelae and complications as well as its clinical course grading is presented. The use of modern neuroimaging techniques for studying pathophysiologic mechanisms and complications of TBI has been demonstrated. Special emphasis was given to minimally invasive and reconstructive surgery; computer modeling with subsequent full-copy stereolitographic laser implant setup was shown which is of great importance in cases of large and complex skull base and craniofacial deformities. Patient selection for transcranial and endonasal CSF leak closure techniques was justified. Treatment of post-traumatic vascular injuries using Serbinenko balloon-catheters as well as modern techniques such as stents, coils and embolization has been demonstrated. PMID:23210170

  1. Efficacy of ivermectin for the treatment of head lice (Pediculosis capitis).

    PubMed

    Glaziou, P; Nyguyen, L N; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Cartel, J L; Martin, P M

    1994-09-01

    Twenty six male and female patients aged 5 to 17 years who had head lice infestation confirmed by eggs presence and received treatments with a single 200 mu/kg oral dose of ivermectin in open fashion. At day 14 after treatment, 20 responded to the treatment (77%), and 6 patients (23%) presented with a complete disappearance of eggs and all clinical symptoms. At day 28, 7 patients were healed (27%), but 4 patients of the 6 healed at day 14 presented with signs of reinfestation. This study suggests that ivermectin is a promising treatment of head lice, and a second dose at day 10 should be appropriate for a further comparative trial. PMID:7899799

  2. Oral Health Status of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran; Killough, Simon; Markey, Neill; Winning, Lewis; McKenna, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to collect data on the oral health status of patients undergoing treatment for head and neck oncology across Northern Ireland. Data were collected on all patients referred to the Northern Ireland Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Oncology Team for discussion and treatment planning. Each patient underwent pre-treatment dental assessment in the Centre for Dentistry, Queen's University Belfast, between June 2013 and November 2014. Data were collected from clinical oral examinations supplemented with intra-oral radiographs. During the course of the study 96 patients were assessed and the levels of dental disease observed in this cohort were high. On clinical examination 43% were diagnosed with caries and 46% with periodontal disease. Ten patients were completely edentate. The disease profile of this patient group presents significant challenges to dental services tasked with rendering patients dentally fit prior to undergoing oncology treatment. PMID:27424336

  3. The Painful Long Head of the Biceps Brachii: Nonoperative Treatment Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E; Hooks, Todd R

    2016-01-01

    The long head of the biceps has garnered increased attention and interest due to the high prevalence of pain that can be a primary condition or occur secondary to shoulder dysfunction. The successful treatment of biceps tendinopathy is dependent on an accurate diagnosis and recognizing all causative factors. The treatment program will be individualized with a rehabilitation program designed to restore strength and flexibility and restore normal tendon mechanics. PMID:26614470

  4. Fistulae After Successful Free Tissue Transfer to Head and Neck: Its Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Al Deek, Nidal Farhan; Wei, Fu-Chan; Tsao, Chung-Kan

    2016-10-01

    Fistulas, either between oral cavity and external face or between oral and nasal cavity, are major complications after microsurgical head and neck reconstruction. Any flaw in surgical planning, design, and execution may lead to this untoward outcome. Once fistula develops, it may interface with oncologic treatment, endanger the reconstruction, and increase overall patient suffering. This article analyzes individual factors involved in development of fistulas in spite of successful transfer of a free flap and proposes treatment guideline. PMID:27601397

  5. Treatment of advanced head and neck carcinoma with synchronous irradiation and methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Pointon, R.C.; Askill, C.S.; Hunter, R.D.; Wilkinson, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated by synchronous radiotherapy and methotrexate (MTX) (100 mg/m2). Complete resolution of disease was obtained in 18 patients, the median remission of patients being 17 months. In general, treatment was well tolerated, although mucosal reaction was prolonged in 50% of patients. Drug-induced hematological toxicity was observed in six patients (18%) and one patient died. As a result of these findings, a random clinical trial to compare X-ray therapy with X-ray therapy and MTX in advanced head and neck cancer has been commenced.

  6. Dosimetric Comparison of Helical Tomotherapy and Linac-IMRT Treatment Plans for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xin; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo G.; Corry, Peter M.; Yan Yulong; Ratanatharathorn, Vaneerat

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development and clinical implementation of external beam radiation treatment technologies continues. The existence of various commercially available technologies for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has stimulated interest in exploring the differential potential advantage one may have compared with another. Two such technologies, Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (HT) and conventional medical linear accelerator-based IMRT (LIMRT) have been shown to be particularly suitable for the treatment of head and neck cancers. In this study, 23 patients who were diagnosed with stages 3 or 4 head and neck cancers, without evidence of distance metastatic disease, were treated in our clinic. Treatment plans were developed for all patients simultaneously on the HT planning station and on the Pinnacle treatment planning system for step-and-shoot IMRT. Patients were treated only on the HT unit, with the LIMRT plan serving as a backup in case the HT system might not be available. All plans were approved for clinical use by a physician. The prescription was that patients receive at least 95% of the planning target volume (PTV), which is 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy per fraction. Several dosimetric parameters were computed: PTV dose coverage; PTV volume conformity index; the normalized total dose (NTD), where doses were converted to 2 Gy per fraction to organs at risk (OAR); and PTV dose homogeneity. Both planning systems satisfied our clinic's PTV prescription requirements. The results suggest that HT plans had, in general, slightly better dosimetric characteristics, especially regarding PTV dose homogeneity and normal tissue sparing. However, for both techniques, doses to OAR were well below the currently accepted normal tissue tolerances. Consequently, factors other than the dosimetric parameters studied here may have to be considered when making a choice between IMRT techniques.

  7. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Devore, Cynthia D; Schutze, Gordon E

    2015-05-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with limited morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. Since the 2010 clinical report on head lice was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, newer medications have been approved for the treatment of head lice. This revised clinical report clarifies current diagnosis and treatment protocols and provides guidance for the management of children with head lice in the school setting. PMID:25917986

  8. Chloride content of Rocky Flats scrub alloy eleventh campaign solution following head end treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1988-06-30

    A single batch of dissolver solution from the eleventh Rocky Flats Scrub Alloy (RFSA) campaign has been analyzed for chloride content following head end treatment to reduce its concentration. Scrub alloy buttons were dissolved in Tank 6.4D during May. In subsequent head end processing, chloride was precipitated with mercurous ion added as the nitrate. The precipitate, Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, was concurrently removed with the gelatin floc via centrifugation. Duplicate samples from Tank 11.2, containing the head end product, produced excellent agreement between their density measurements, acid analyses, and gross alpha activities, indicating them to be truly representative of the tank`s contents. Duplicate aliquots from each of these solutions were analyzed using the turbidimetric chloride method developed in the Separations Technology Laboratory. These resulted in an average chloride value of 41 ppm ({micro}g/mL) chloride for the head end product. Relative standard deviation of the measurement was {+-}4 ppm (n = 4), a precision of {+-}10%. Such a variance is normal at this low chloride level. Since initial chloride values prior to head end averaged 1455 ppm (0.041M), as analyzed by Laboratories Department, a chloride DF of approximately 35 was obtained. Such a reduced chloride level (to less than 100 ppm) in the treated solution will permit further canyon processing with minimal corrosion.

  9. Effects of Treatment Intensification on Acute Local Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Prospective Observational Study Validating CTCAE, Version 3.0, Scoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, Mauro Tomatis, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Guzzo, Marco; Sangalli, Claudia; Potepan, Paolo; Fantini, Simona; Bergamini, Cristiana; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Licitra, Lisa; Scaramellini, Gabriele; Cantu', Giulio; Olmi, Patrizia

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify the incidence and severity of acute local toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy (RT), with or without chemotherapy (CHT), using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE v3.0), scoring system. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2006, 149 patients with head and neck cancer treated with RT at our center were prospectively evaluated for local toxicity during treatment. On a weekly basis, patients were monitored and eight toxicity items were recorded according to the CTCAE v3.0 scoring system. Of the 149 patients, 48 (32%) were treated with RT alone (conventional fractionation), 82 (55%) with concomitant CHT and conventional fractionation RT, and 20 (13%) with accelerated-fractionation RT and CHT. Results: Severe (Grade 3-4) adverse events were recorded in 28% (mucositis), 33% (dysphagia), 40% (pain), and 12% (skin) of patients. Multivariate analysis showed CHT to be the most relevant factor independently predicting for worse toxicity (mucositis, dysphagia, weight loss, salivary changes). In contrast, previous surgery, RT acceleration and older age, female gender, and younger age, respectively, predicted for a worse outcome of mucositis, weight loss, pain, and dermatitis. The T-score method confirmed that conventional RT alone is in the 'low-burden' class (T-score = 0.6) and suggests that concurrent CHT and conventional fractionation RT is in the 'high-burden' class (T-score = 1.15). Combined CHT and accelerated-fractionation RT had the highest T-score at 1.9. Conclusions: The CTCAE v3.0 proved to be a reliable tool to quantify acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients treated with various treatment intensities. The effect of CHT and RT acceleration on the acute toxicity burden was clinically relevant.

  10. The effect of head and neck cancer treatment on whole salivary flow.

    PubMed

    Marunick, M T; Seyedsadr, M; Ahmad, K; Klein, B

    1991-10-01

    The effects of multimodality therapy for head and neck cancer on whole salivary flow were evaluated. Eighteen subjects with head and neck cancer were studied. Resting and stimulated whole salivary flow rates were recorded, pretreatment, after individual modality therapy, and posttreatment. Twenty-four subjects with no history of head and neck cancer matched for age, and sex distribution, served as controls. Primary site, stage, major salivary glands resected, radiation fields, and dose to major salivary glands are reported. The average salivary flow rates for 18 subjects following treatment was reduced 83% for resting and 86% for stimulated saliva from pretreatment levels. The null hypothesis that the overall resting and stimulated whole salivary flow rates are unaffected by treatment (surgery and radiation) of the head and neck cancer was rejected (P values at 0.05 level of significance). Stage and location of primary, total dose delivered to and volume of gland exposure are important factors when predicting xerostomia following multimodality therapy. PMID:1921403

  11. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC) for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Peter; Putnik, Kurt; Kreimeyer, Thore; Sprague, Lisa D; Koelbl, Oliver; Schäfer, Christof

    2006-01-01

    Background The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. Methods From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III) were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %), one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 %) and one fifth (19 %) suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion). This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy). All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Results Forty patients (63 %) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d) and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d), respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 %) had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 %) suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient < 1.0 g/nl) and the mean hemoglobin value decreased from 13.2 to 10.5 g/dl. Univariate analysis of survival showed a better outcome for patients with a hemoglobin nadir >10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. Conclusion The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head

  12. Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation Technique for Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies: A Dosimetric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yeginer, Mete; Roeske, John C.; Radosevich, James A.; Aydogan, Bulent

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric feasibility of linear accelerator-based intensity-modulated total marrow irradiation (IM-TMI) in patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Linear accelerator-based IM-TMI treatment planning was performed for 9 patients using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, except for the forearms and hands. Organs at risk (OAR) to be spared included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, eyes, oral cavity, and bowel and were contoured by a physician on the axial computed tomography images. The three-isocenter technique previously developed by our group was used for treatment planning. We developed and used a common dose-volume objective method to reduce the planning time and planner subjectivity in the treatment planning process. Results: A 95% PTV coverage with the 99% of the prescribed dose of 12 Gy was achieved for all nine patients. The average dose reduction in OAR ranged from 19% for the lungs to 68% for the lenses. The common dose-volume objective method decreased the planning time by an average of 35% and reduced the inter- and intra- planner subjectivity. Conclusion: The results from the present study suggest that the linear accelerator-based IM-TMI technique is clinically feasible. We have demonstrated that linear accelerator-based IM-TMI plans with good PTV coverage and improved OAR sparing can be obtained within a clinically reasonable time using the common dose-volume objective method proposed in the present study.

  13. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-15

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mmx0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-I{sub b} (mA)x0.00808 (MeV/mA), where I{sub b} is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1.

  14. Development of an ultrasmall C-band linear accelerator guide for a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head.

    PubMed

    Kamino, Yuichiro; Miura, Sadao; Kokubo, Masaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Hirai, Etsuro; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2007-05-01

    We are developing a four-dimensional image-guided radiotherapy system with a gimbaled x-ray head. It is capable of pursuing irradiation and delivering irradiation precisely with the help of an agile moving x-ray head on the gimbals. Requirements for the accelerator guide were established, system design was developed, and detailed design was conducted. An accelerator guide was manufactured and basic beam performance and leakage radiation from the accelerator guide were evaluated at a low pulse repetition rate. The accelerator guide including the electron gun is 38 cm long and weighs about 10 kg. The length of the accelerating structure is 24.4 cm. The accelerating structure is a standing wave type and is composed of the axial-coupled injector section and the side-coupled acceleration cavity section. The injector section is composed of one prebuncher cavity, one buncher cavity, one side-coupled half cavity, and two axial coupling cavities. The acceleration cavity section is composed of eight side-coupled nose reentrant cavities and eight coupling cavities. The electron gun is a diode-type gun with a cerium hexaboride (CeB6) direct heating cathode. The accelerator guide can be operated without any magnetic focusing device. Output beam current was 75 mA with a transmission efficiency of 58%, and the average energy was 5.24 MeV. Beam energy was distributed from 4.95 to 5.6 MeV. The beam profile, measured 88 mm from the beam output hole on the axis of the accelerator guide, was 0.7 mm X 0.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) width. The beam loading line was 5.925 (MeV)-Ib (mA) X 0.00808 (MeV/mA), where Ib is output beam current. The maximum radiation leakage of the accelerator guide at 100 cm from the axis of the accelerator guide was calculated as 0.33 cGy/min at the rated x-ray output of 500 cGy/min from the measured value. This leakage requires no radiation shielding for the accelerator guide itself per IEC 60601-2-1. PMID:17555261

  15. A practical guide to treatment of infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Qin; Mai, Hua Ming; Wang, Yan An; Fan, Xin Dong; Qin, Zhong Ping; Wang, Xv Kai; Zhao, Yi Fang

    2013-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas are the most common benign vascular tumors in infancy and childhood. As hemangioma could regress spontaneously, it generally does not require treatment unless proliferation interferes with normal function or gives rise to risk of serious disfigurement and complications unlikely to resolve without treatment. Various methods for treating infant hemangiomas have been documented, including wait and see policy, laser therapy, drug therapy, sclerotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery and so on, but none of these therapies can be used for all hemangiomas. To obtain the best treatment outcomes, the treatment protocol should be individualized and comprehensive as well as sequential. Based on published literature and clinical experiences, we established a treatment guideline in order to provide criteria for the management of head and neck hemangiomas. This protocol will be renewed and updated to include and reflect any cutting-edge medical knowledge, and provide the newest treatment modalities which will benefit our patients. PMID:24260591

  16. Assessment of topical versus oral ivermectin as a treatment for head lice.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hesham M; Abdel-Azim, Eman S; Abdel-Aziz, Rasha T

    2014-01-01

    Many medications are available for treatment of pediculosis capitis including ivermectin. Our aim is to compare the efficacy and safety of topical versus oral ivermectin in treatment of pediculosis capitis. Sixty-two patients with proved head lice infestation were included and divided into group I (31 patients; received single topical application of 1% ivermectin) and group II (31 patients; received single dose of oral ivermectin). Treatment was repeated after 1 week for nonresponders. At 1 week after treatment, the eradication rates and improvement of pruritus were significantly higher among patients who received topical than oral ivermectin. When a second treatment, topical or oral, was given to nonresponders, the cure rates of infestation and pruritus was 100% and 97% among patients treated with topical and oral ivermectin, respectively with no significant difference between the two groups. This study suggests that both topical and oral ivermectin demonstrate high efficacy and tolerability in treatment of pediculosis capitis. However, a single treatment with topical ivermectin provides significantly higher cure of infestation and faster relief of pruritus than oral ivermectin. In addition, whether topical or oral ivermectin is used to treat head lice, a second dose is required in some cases to ensure complete eradication. PMID:25041547

  17. What's bugging you? An update on the treatment of head lice infestation.

    PubMed

    Tebruegge, Marc; Pantazidou, Anastasia; Curtis, Nigel

    2011-02-01

    Head lice infestation (pediculosis capitis) is a common problem in paediatric practice. It can cause considerable distress to children and their families and may lead to bullying and social stigmatisation. Therapy with "conventional" topical pediculicides with neurotoxic mode of action-such as malathion, permethrin, phenothrin and carbaryl-is increasingly associated with treatment failure as a result of the emergence of resistance within the parasite population. This review provides an overview of the natural history, clinical symptoms and diagnosis of head lice infestation. It also discusses general management principles and summarises the current data on novel treatment strategies, including wet combing, dimeticone, isopropyl myristate, benzyl alcohol, plant-based compounds and oral medication. PMID:20688849

  18. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of malignancies of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1995-05-01

    Sixty-five patients with neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, and skin have been treated with PDT with followup to 56 months. Patients with carcinoma in situ and T1 carcinomas obtained a complete response after one PDT treatment. All but two have remained free of disease. Eight patients with T2 and T3 carcinomas treated with PDT obtained a complete response, but they all recurred locally. This is due to the inability to adequately deliver laser light to the depths of the tumor bed. five patients with massive neck recurrences of squamous cell carcinomas were treated with intraoperative adjuvant PDT following tumor resection. Only one developed recurrence with 24- month followup. PDT is highly effective for the curative treatment of early carcinomas (CIS, T1) of the head and neck. Also, intraoperative adjuvant PDT may increase cure rates of large infiltrating carcinomas of the head and neck.

  19. Carotid resection and reconstruction associated with treatment of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kroeker, Teresa R.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer may experience carotid artery involvement. We present a series of 10 patients, all with stage IVB disease, who required carotid resection and reconstruction to achieve a complete resection. Nine of the 10 patients had previous radiation treatment to the neck. Six died of distant disease, and three died of other causes with no local or regional recurrences. Carotid resection and reconstruction can be done safely, achieving local and regional control. PMID:22046061

  20. Exploiting thermochromic materials for the rapid quality assurance of physiotherapy ultrasound treatment heads.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Ian; Barrie, Jill; Zeqiri, Bajram; Žauhar, Gordana; Parisot, Benjamin

    2012-05-01

    Significant nonuniformities in the acoustic intensity distribution generated by physiotherapy ultrasound treatment heads are not uncommon, potentially leading to significant localised temperature rises and tissue damage. An acoustic absorber tile containing a thermochromic pigment has been developed to provide rapid quality assurance of physiotherapy ultrasound treatment heads by virtue of a thermochromic colour change, indicating the time-averaged intensity distributions generated by these devices. As a bench-top device, the use of the tile is designed to mimic the nature of the physiotherapeutic application, requiring minimal training. Two designs where thermochromic pigments are added to the various polymeric layers of the tile are presented. Testing has been conducted with two physiotherapy treatment heads of differing performance, one of them notably exhibiting a strong "hot-spot" in localised acoustic time-averaged intensity. Findings show good qualitative agreement with classical hydrophone scans. Techniques are explored for the correction of nonlinearities in the thermochromic relationship, to enhance the accuracy of quantitative assessment. PMID:22425374

  1. Radiation dose measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for neutron and photon reactions in a human head phantom for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo

    Dose measurements and radiation transport calculations were investigated for the interactions within the human brain of fast neutrons, slow neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons associated with accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT). To estimate the overall dose to the human brain, it is necessary to distinguish the doses from the different radiation sources. Using organic scintillators, human head phantom and detector assemblies were designed, constructed, and tested to determine the most appropriate dose estimation system to discriminate dose due to the different radiation sources that will ultimately be incorporated into a human head phantom to be used for dose measurements in ABNCT. Monoenergetic and continuous energy neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target near the reaction threshold using the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. A human head phantom was built to measure and to distinguish the doses which result from proton recoils induced by fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium nuclei from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction, and photons generated in the 7Li accelerator target as well as those generated inside the head phantom through various nuclear reactions at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures. The phantom consists of two main parts to estimate dose to tumor and dose to healthy tissue as well: a 3.22 cm3 boron loaded plastic scintillator which simulates a boron containing tumor inside the brain and a 2664 cm3 cylindrical liquid scintillator which represents the surrounding healthy tissue in the head. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX(TM) was used for the simulation of radiation transport due to neutrons and photons and extended to investigate the effects of neutrons and other radiation on the brain at various depths.

  2. Pattern Analysis of Acute Mucosal Reactions in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Conventional and Accelerated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wygoda, Andrzej Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Skladowski, Krzysztof; Hutnik, Marcin; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Golen, Maria; Rutkowski, Tomasz

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate severity of acute mucosal reactions (AMR) caused by conventional (CF) and accelerated fractionation (AF) regimens using a modified Dische system and to analyze differences in incidence and severity of AMR according to frequency and regularity of scoring. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six consecutive patients (33 CF, 33 AF) with head and neck cancer irradiated with 5 fractions in 5 days per week (CF) or with 7 fractions in 7 days (AF) to a total dose of 70 Gy. A modified Dische system was used for daily quantitation of AMR during radiotherapy until complete healing. Results: Confluent mucositis (CM) was noted in 79% of patients in the CF group and 85% in the AF group. In 24% of the CF group and 18% of the AF group the CM presented a wave-like pattern. In 55% of CF and 67% of AF a classic triphasic pattern was noted. In 12 patients acute reactions did not transgress the level of spotted mucositis. The present study clearly shows that quantitation of the incidence and severity of acute mucosal effects strongly depends on frequent and regular scoring. A significant difference in the incidence of CM between the CF and AF groups was noted, mainly in weeks 4-6 of irradiation. When once-weekly irregular instead of daily scoring was evaluated, the incidence of CM was underestimated by approximately 20-36%. Conclusions: Acute mucosal reactions occur as a complex of morphologic and functional disorders with individual intensity, even among patients treated with the same fractionation regimen. In some cases they present a 'wave-like' pattern during irradiation. Therefore, precise quantitation of acute effects requires regular and frequent scoring.

  3. Oxygen-modifying treatment with ARCON reduces the prognostic significance of hemoglobin in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J. . E-mail: i.hoogsteen@rther.umcn.nl; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of hemoglobin (Hb) levels measured before and during treatment with accelerated radiotherapy with carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON). Methods and Materials: Two hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced tumors of the head and neck were included in a phase II trial of ARCON. This treatment regimen combines accelerated radiotherapy for reduction of repopulation with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide to reduce hypoxia. In these patients, Hb levels were measured before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: Preirradiation and postirradiation Hb levels were available for 206 and 195 patients respectively. Hb levels below normal were most frequently seen among patients with T4 (p < 0.001) and N2 (p < 0.01) disease. Patients with a larynx tumor had significantly higher Hb levels (p < 0.01) than other tumor sites. During radiotherapy, 69 patients experienced a decrease in Hb level. In a multivariate analysis there was no prognostic impact of Hb level on locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Primary tumor site was independently prognostic for locoregional control (p = 0.018), and gender was the only prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival (p < 0.05). High locoregional control rates were obtained for tumors of the larynx (77%) and oropharynx (72%). Conclusion: Hemoglobin level was not found to be of prognostic significance for outcome in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after oxygen-modifying treatment with ARCON.

  4. Physical and Psychological Effects of Head Treatment in the Supine Position Using Specialized Ayurveda-Based Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Iwawaki, Yoko; Uebaba, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Yoko; Takishita, Yukie; Harada, Kiyomi; Shibata, Akemi; Narumoto, Jin; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To clarify the physical and psychological effects of head massage performed in the supine position using Ayurveda-based techniques (head treatment). Design: Twenty-four healthy female students were included in the study. Using a crossover study design, the same participants were enrolled in both the head treatment intervention group and control group. There was an interval of 1 week or more between measurements. Outcome measures: The physiologic indices measured included blood pressure and heart rate fluctuations (high frequency and low frequency/high frequency). The psychological markers measured included liveliness, depression, and boredom using the visual analogue scale method. State anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory method. Results: The parasympathetic nerve activity increased immediately after head treatment. Upon completion of head treatment, the parasympathetic nerve predominance tended to gradually ease. Head treatment boosted freshness and relieved anxiety. Conclusions: The results suggest that head treatment has a relaxing and refreshing effect and may be used to provide comfort. PMID:27163344

  5. Assessing lymphatic response to treatments in head and neck cancer using near-infrared fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, I.-Chih; Karni, Ron J.; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-05-01

    Care for head and neck (HN) cancer could be improved with better mapping of lymphatic drainage pathways in HN region as well as understanding the effect of the cancer treatments on lymphatics. In this study, near-infrared fluorescence imaging is being used to visualize the lymphatics in human subjects diagnosed with HN cancer before and after treatments. Imaging results show the lymphatic architecture and contractile function in HN. Reformation of lymphatics during the course of cancer care was also seen in the longitudinal imaging. This allows us to better understand the lymphatics in HN cancer patients.

  6. Immunological Treatment Options for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Bernardini, Giovanni; Cunha, Nicholas D’; Tijani, Lukman; Nguyen, Diane; Cordero, Joehassin; Jenkins, Marjorie R.; Cobos, Everardo; Kast, W. Martin; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) are usually treated by a multimodal approach with surgery and/or radiochemotherapy as the mainstay of local–regional treatment in cases with advanced disease. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have the disadvantage of causing severe side effects, while the clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with HNSCC has remained essentially unchanged over the last decade. The potential of immunotherapy is still largely unexplored. Here the authors review the current status of the art and discuss the future challenges in HNSCC treatment and prevention. PMID:22251006

  7. Long-acting methylphenidate formulations in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a systematic review of head-to-head studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stimulant methylphenidate (MPH) has been a mainstay of treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for many years. Owing to the short half-life and the issues associated with multiple daily dosing of immediate-release MPH formulations, a new generation of long-acting MPH formulations has emerged. Direct head-to-head studies of these long-acting MPH formulations are important to facilitate an evaluation of their comparative pharmacokinetics and efficacy; however, to date, relatively few head-to-head studies have been performed. The objective of this systematic review was to compare the evidence available from head-to-head studies of long-acting MPH formulations and provide information that can guide treatment selection. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE and PsycINFO in March 2012 using the MeSH terms: attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity/drug therapy; methylphenidate/therapeutic use and All Fields: Concerta; Ritalin LA; OROS and ADHD; Medikinet; Equasym XL and ADHD; long-acting methylphenidate; Diffucaps and ADHD; SODAS and methylphenidate. No filters were applied and no language, publication date or publication status limitations were imposed. Articles were selected if the title indicated a comparison of two or more long-acting MPH preparations in human subjects of any age; non-systematic review articles and unpublished data were not included. Results Of 15,295 references returned in the literature search and screened by title, 34 articles were identified for inclusion: nine articles from pharmacokinetic studies (nine studies); nine articles from laboratory school studies (six studies); two articles from randomized controlled trials (two studies); three articles from switching studies (two studies) and three articles from one observational study. Conclusions Emerging head-to-head studies provide important data on the comparative efficacy of the formulations available. At a group level, efficacy

  8. A Clinical Concept for Interfractional Adaptive Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nill, Simeon; Huber, Peter E.; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Muenter, Marc W.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To present an approach to fast, interfractional adaptive RT in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of head and neck tumors in clinical routine. Ensuring adequate patient position throughout treatment proves challenging in high-precision RT despite elaborate immobilization. Because of weight loss, treatment plans must be adapted to account for requiring supportive therapy incl. feeding tube or parenteral nutrition without treatment breaks. Methods and Materials: In-room CT position checks are used to create adapted IMRT treatment plans by stereotactic correlation to the initial setup, and volumes are adapted to the new geometry. New IMRT treatment plans are prospectively created on the basis of position control scans using the initial optimization parameters in KonRad without requiring complete reoptimization and thus facilitating quick replanning in daily routine. Patients treated for squamous cell head and neck cancer (SCCHN) in 2006-2007 were evaluated as to necessity/number of replannings, weight loss, dose, and plan parameters. Results: Seventy-two patients with SCCHN received IMRT to the primary site and lymph nodes (median dose 70.4 Gy). All patients received concomitant chemotherapy requiring supportive therapy by feeding tube or parenteral nutrition. Median weight loss was 7.8 kg, median volume loss was approximately 7%. Fifteen of 72 patients required adaptation of their treatment plans at least once. Target coverage was improved by up to 10.7% (median dose). The increase of dose to spared parotid without replanning was 11.7%. Replanning including outlining and optimization was feasible within 2 hours for each patient, and treatment could be continued without any interruptions. Conclusion: To preserve high-quality dose application, treatment plans must be adapted to anatomical changes. Replanning based on position control scans therefore presents a practical approach in clinical routine. In the absence of clinically usable online

  9. The role of brachytherapy in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Bartochowska, Anna; Strnad, Vratislav; Strojan, Primož; Mendenhall, William M; Harrison, Louis B; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Sahai, Puja; Wiegand, Susanne; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-02-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of intensive local irradiation, allowing effective protection of surrounding structures with preservation of organ function and results in a favorable therapeutic ratio. It can be used alone, adjuvantly after surgery, and as a local boost in combination with external-beam radiation therapy. This paper is a literature review on the role of brachytherapy in the management of head and neck cancers with a special emphasis on papers published in the last 5 years. Technical details, effectiveness and potential toxicities of brachytherapy when used in different combinations with other therapeutic modalities and tumor sites are presented. Brachytherapy is an attractive treatment option in the management of primary malignancies and recurrent tumors in previously irradiated areas of the head and neck. It is effective and safe, and results in good functional and oncological outcomes. PMID:25338181

  10. The Natural History and Treatment Outcomes of Perineural Spread of Malignancy within the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Warren, Timothy A; Nagle, Christina M; Bowman, James; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the natural history of diseases enables the clinician to better diagnose and treat their patients. Perineural spread of head and neck cancers are poorly understood and often diagnosis is delayed resulting in poorer outcomes and more debilitating treatments. This article reviews a large personal series of head and neck malignancy presenting with perineural spread along almost exclusively the trigeminal and/or facial nerves. A detailed analysis of squamous cell carcinoma of cutaneous origin is presented including an analysis of likely primaries, which most often have occurred months to years prior. The importance of early detection is reinforced by the highly significant (p < 0.0001) differences in disease specific survival, which occur, depending on how far along a cranial nerve the disease has been allowed to spread. PMID:27123386

  11. Short treatment time and excellent treatment outcome in accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Hieda, Yoko; Yoshida, Rika; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Fuchiwaki, Takafumi; Aoi, Noriaki; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryohei; Inomata, Taisuke

    2015-11-01

    Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed as treatment for patients with T1 glottic cancer, and its utility was evaluated based on treatment outcomes and adverse effects. Fifty-eight men who had undergone radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor classification was Tis in 4 patients, T1a in 38, and T1b in 16. Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 55 patients. Travel time from home to hospital was 0-1 hour for 24 patients, 1-2 hours for 9, and >2 hours for 25. Laser vaporization was performed prior to radiotherapy in 38 patients, and 19 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with an agent such as S-1. Patients were irradiated twice daily using an irradiation container. Most patients received a dose of 1.5 Gy/fraction up to a total of 60 Gy. The median overall treatment time was 30 days, with a median observation period of 59.6 months. A complete response was observed in all patients. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 97.2%, 93.2%, and 97.8%, respectively. Although grade 3 pharyngeal mucositis was observed in 2 patients, there were no other grade 3 or higher acute adverse events. As late toxicity, grade 2 laryngeal edema and grade 1 laryngeal hemorrhage were observed in 1 patient each, but no serious events such as laryngeal necrosis or laryngeal stenosis were observed. In conclusion, this treatment method brings excellent outcome and will substantially reduce the treatment duration among patients who need to stay at nearby hotels while undergoing treatment at hospitals in rural areas. PMID:26663937

  12. Short treatment time and excellent treatment outcome in accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Hieda, Yoko; Yoshida, Rika; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Fuchiwaki, Takafumi; Aoi, Noriaki; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryohei; Inomata, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed as treatment for patients with T1 glottic cancer, and its utility was evaluated based on treatment outcomes and adverse effects. Fifty-eight men who had undergone radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor classification was Tis in 4 patients, T1a in 38, and T1b in 16. Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 55 patients. Travel time from home to hospital was 0–1 hour for 24 patients, 1–2 hours for 9, and >2 hours for 25. Laser vaporization was performed prior to radiotherapy in 38 patients, and 19 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with an agent such as S-1. Patients were irradiated twice daily using an irradiation container. Most patients received a dose of 1.5 Gy/fraction up to a total of 60 Gy. The median overall treatment time was 30 days, with a median observation period of 59.6 months. A complete response was observed in all patients. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 97.2%, 93.2%, and 97.8%, respectively. Although grade 3 pharyngeal mucositis was observed in 2 patients, there were no other grade 3 or higher acute adverse events. As late toxicity, grade 2 laryngeal edema and grade 1 laryngeal hemorrhage were observed in 1 patient each, but no serious events such as laryngeal necrosis or laryngeal stenosis were observed. In conclusion, this treatment method brings excellent outcome and will substantially reduce the treatment duration among patients who need to stay at nearby hotels while undergoing treatment at hospitals in rural areas. PMID:26663937

  13. Photodynamic therapy using Photofrin and Foscan and the treatment of malignancies of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1998-05-01

    One hundred thirty patients with neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx and skin have been treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) with follow-up to 79 months. Those patients with primary or recurrent leukoplakia, carcinoma-in- situ (CIS) and T1 carcinomas obtained a complete response after one PDT treatment and 87% remain free of disease. Sixteen patients with deeply invasive T2 and T3 carcinomas were treated with PDT. Of those sixteen, ten obtained a complete response, but six have recurred locally. Although a response can be achieved with PDT in the larger solid tumors, it is not a consistent complete response because of the depth of invasion of the tumor. This is due to the inability to adequately deliver laser light to the depths of the tumor bed. Fourteen patients with massive recurrences of squamous cell carcinomas were treated with intraoperative adjuvant PDT following tumor resection. Two patients developed a local recurrence within the field of treatment. PDT is highly effective for the curative treatment of early carcinomas (CIS, T1) of the head and neck. T2 and T3 superficial carcinomas, with invasion less than 0.5 cm, are also curatively treated with PDT with significantly reduced morbidity compared to conventional modes of treatment. Also, intraoperative adjuvant PDT may increase cure rates of large infiltrating carcinomas of the head and neck.

  14. BNCT treatment planning of recurrent head-and-neck cancer using THORplan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Ting; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Wang, Ling-Wei

    2011-12-01

    A cooperation program on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) between National Tsing Hua University (NTHU) and Taipei Veterans General Hospital (TPEVGH) was established in 2008. Clinical trial of recurrent head-and-neck cancer is the goal of the program. In this study, treatment plannings of two head-and-neck cancer cases are performed using treatment planning system THORplan developed at NTHU of Taiwan. The patients are assumed to be irradiated under current THOR epithermal neutron beam. The prescription dose is 20 Gy-Eq for at least 80% of tumor volume. The irradiation time to reach the target tumor dose can be kept within 1h. The skin dose is within the limiting dose of 11 Gy-Eq. The spinal cord dose is well within the limiting dose of 10 Gy-Eq. The use of an extension collimator for easier patient positioning is helpful in reducing the dose of eye lens to within the dose limit of 5 Gy-Eq. The irradiation time, however, will increase slightly due to the increase of source-to-tumor distance. The CPU time for treatment planning calculation is ~10 h. With the use of user friendly treatment planning system THORplan, dose planning for BNCT at THOR can be easily performed. PMID:21458281

  15. Treatment of Head and Neck Paragangliomas With External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dupin, Charles; Lang, Philippe; Dessard-Diana, Bernadette; Simon, Jean-Marc; Cuenca, Xavier; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Feuvret, Loïc

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the outcomes of radiation therapy in patients with head and neck paragangliomas. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2009, 66 patients with 81 head and neck paragangliomas were treated by conventional external beam radiation therapy in 25 fractions at a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 41.4-68 Gy). One case was malignant. The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 30 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.9-243 cm{sup 3}) and 116 cm{sup 3} (range, 24-731 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Median age was 57.4 years (range, 15-84 years). Eleven patients had multicentric lesions, and 8 had family histories of paraganglioma. Paragangliomas were located in the temporal bone, the carotid body, and the glomus vagal in 51, 18, and 10 patients, respectively. Forty-six patients had exclusive radiation therapy, and 20 had salvage radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 4.1 years (range, 0.1-21.2 years). Results: One patient had a recurrence of temporal bone paraganglioma 8 years after treatment. The actuarial local control rates were 100% at 5 years and 98.7% at 10 years. Patients with multifocal tumors and family histories were significantly younger (42 years vs 58 years [P=.002] and 37 years vs 58 years [P=.0003], respectively). The association between family predisposition and multifocality was significant (P<.001). Two patients had cause-specific death within the 6 months after irradiation. During radiation therapy, 9 patients required hospitalization for weight loss, nausea, mucositis, or ophthalmic zoster. Two late vascular complications occurred (middle cerebral artery and carotid stenosis), and 2 late radiation-related meningiomas appeared 15 and 18 years after treatment. Conclusion: Conventional external beam radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment option that achieves excellent local control; it should be considered as a first-line treatment of choice for head and neck paragangliomas.

  16. Phase I trial of tirapazamine, cisplatin, and concurrent accelerated boost reirradiation in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Loh, Elwyn; Shen, Liji; Lusinchi, Antoine; Vokes, Everett E.; Bourhis, Jean

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation (re-RT) with concurrent chemotherapy offers a therapeutic option in patients who have locoregional recurrence of head and neck cancer (HNC). The hypoxic cell sensitizer, tirapazamine (TPZ), has demonstrated promising results in first-line therapy for HNC. This phase I trial was designed to test the feasibility of giving TPZ in the re-RT setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with recurrent HNC who received prior radiotherapy (RT) were enrolled and received TPZ (260 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) Weeks 1, 3, and 5 concurrently with RT (72 Gy, 42 fractions over 6 weeks). TPZ (160 mg/m{sup 2}) alone was added on Days 1, 3, and 5 of Week 2 (cohort 1) or Weeks 2 and 4 (cohort 2). Results: Twenty-five subjects were enrolled, 7 and 18 on cohorts 1 and 2, respectively. Significant toxicities included Grade 3 dermatitis (20%) and Grade 3 mucositis (40%). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed on cohort 2 (1 patient with aspiration pneumonia). Four deaths occurred during treatment. Two fatalities occurred after completing therapy as a result of carotid artery rupture. With a minimum and median follow-up of 14 and 24 months, respectively, median overall survival was 14 months with actuarial 1-year and 2-year survival of 56% and 27%, respectively. Conclusion: Reirradiation with concomitant chemotherapy including TPZ in patients with unresectable recurrent HNC is feasible and results in long-term survival in a significant proportion of patients.

  17. Volume analysis of treatment response of head and neck lesions using 3D level set segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Street, Ethan; Sahiner, Berkman; Gujar, Sachin; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Chan, Heang-Ping; Mukherji, Suresh K.

    2008-03-01

    A computerized system for segmenting lesions in head and neck CT scans was developed to assist radiologists in estimation of the response to treatment of malignant lesions. The system performs 3D segmentations based on a level set model and uses as input an approximate bounding box for the lesion of interest. In this preliminary study, CT scans from a pre-treatment exam and a post one-cycle chemotherapy exam of 13 patients containing head and neck neoplasms were used. A radiologist marked 35 temporal pairs of lesions. 13 pairs were primary site cancers and 22 pairs were metastatic lymph nodes. For all lesions, a radiologist outlined a contour on the best slice on both the pre- and post treatment scans. For the 13 primary lesion pairs, full 3D contours were also extracted by a radiologist. The average pre- and post-treatment areas on the best slices for all lesions were 4.5 and 2.1 cm2, respectively. For the 13 primary site pairs the average pre- and post-treatment primary lesions volumes were 15.4 and 6.7 cm 3 respectively. The correlation between the automatic and manual estimates for the pre-to-post-treatment change in area for all 35 pairs was r=0.97, while the correlation for the percent change in area was r=0.80. The correlation for the change in volume for the 13 primary site pairs was r=0.89, while the correlation for the percent change in volume was r=0.79. The average signed percent error between the automatic and manual areas for all 70 lesions was 11.0+/-20.6%. The average signed percent error between the automatic and manual volumes for all 26 primary lesions was 37.8+/-42.1%. The preliminary results indicate that the automated segmentation system can reliably estimate tumor size change in response to treatment relative to radiologist's hand segmentation.

  18. Thermal treatment planning for SonoKnife focused-ultrasound thermal treatment of head and neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Duo; Xia, Rongmin; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose is to develop a patient-specific treatment planning method for a cylindrically-focused (i.e., SonoKnife) ultrasound thermal therapy system to optimize the thermal treatment of locally-advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and/or positive lymph nodes. To achieve a more efficient and effective treatment, a temperature-based treatment planning was devised, which was composed of : (1) a 3D acoustic-thermal model has been developed to simulate the acoustic field, temperature distribution, and thermal dose coverage induced by the SonoKnife applicator. (2) A 3D relevant anatomical structures (e.g. the H&N tumors, bones and cavities) were reconstructed based on multislice CT scans. A step-and-shoot strategy was devised to perform the treatment, in which the initial applied power levels, placement of the transducers, and sonication times per scan were determined by conducting a temperature-based forward simulation. The maximum temperature, thermal dose coverage of target, and thermal exposure to surrounding tissue were analyzed. For performance evaluation, the treatment planning was applied on representative examples obtained from the clinical radiation therapy of HNSCC and positive lymph nodes. This treatment planning platforms can be used to guide applicator placement, set-up configurations, and applied power levels prior to delivery of a treatment or for post-procedure analysis of temperature distributions.

  19. HPV Positive Head and Neck Cancers: Molecular Pathogenesis and Evolving Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dok, Rüveyda; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease that is the result of tobacco and/or alcohol abuse or infection with high-risk Human papillomaviruses. Despite the fact that HPV positive HNSCC cancers form a distinct clinical entity with better treatment outcome, all HNSCC are currently treated uniformly with the same treatment modality. At present, biologic basis of these different outcomes and their therapeutic influence are areas of intense investigation. In this review, we will summarize the molecular basis for this different outcome, novel treatment opportunities and possible biomarkers for HPV positive HNSCC. In particular, the focus will be on several molecular targeted strategies that can improve the chemoradiation response by influencing DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:27043631

  20. HPV Positive Head and Neck Cancers: Molecular Pathogenesis and Evolving Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Dok, Rüveyda; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a highly heterogeneous disease that is the result of tobacco and/or alcohol abuse or infection with high-risk Human papillomaviruses. Despite the fact that HPV positive HNSCC cancers form a distinct clinical entity with better treatment outcome, all HNSCC are currently treated uniformly with the same treatment modality. At present, biologic basis of these different outcomes and their therapeutic influence are areas of intense investigation. In this review, we will summarize the molecular basis for this different outcome, novel treatment opportunities and possible biomarkers for HPV positive HNSCC. In particular, the focus will be on several molecular targeted strategies that can improve the chemoradiation response by influencing DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:27043631

  1. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Head and neck carcinomas that recur locally after conventional irradiation pose a difficult therapeutic problem. We evaluated safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of such cancers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with inoperable, recurred, locally advanced (rT3, rT4, or rN2) head and neck cancer were treated with BNCT in a prospective, single-center Phase I-II study. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 56-74 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed using the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria and adverse effects using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity grading v3.0. Intravenously administered boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F, 400 mg/kg) was used as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Ten patients received BNCT twice; 2 were treated once. Ten (83%) patients responded to BNCT, and 2 (17%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.5 and 7.6 months. The median duration of response was 12.1 months; six responses were ongoing at the time of analysis or death (range, 4.9-19.2 months). Four (33%) patients were alive without recurrence with a median follow-up of 14.0 months (range, 12.8-19.2 months). The most common acute adverse effects were mucositis, fatigue, and local pain; 2 patients had a severe (Grade 3) late adverse effect (xerostomia, 1; dysphagia, 1). Conclusions: Boron neutron capture therapy is effective and safe in the treatment of inoperable, locally advanced head and neck carcinomas that recur at previously irradiated sites.

  2. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of malignancies of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.; Boss, Ellen E.

    1996-04-01

    Seventy-nine patients with neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, and skin have been treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) with follow-up to 65 months. Patients with carcinoma-in-situ (CIS) and T1 carcinomas obtained a complete response after one PDT treatment. All but two patients remain free of disease. Four patients with T2 and T3 superficial carcinomas were treated with PDT. One patient developed recurrence with 51- month follow-up. Eleven patients with deeply invasive T2, T3, and T4 carcinomas were treated with PDT. Of those eleven, eight obtained a complete response, but five have recurred locally. A response can be achieved with PDT, although not a consistent complete response because of the depth of invasion of the tumor. This is due to the inability to adequately deliver laser light to the depths of the tumor bed. Eight patients with massive neck recurrences of squamous cell carcinomas were treated with intraoperative adjuvant PDT following tumor resection. Only one patient developed recurrence with 30-month follow-up. PDT is highly effective for the curative treatment of early carcinomas (CIS, T1) of the head and neck. T2 and T3 superficial carcinomas, with invasion less than 0.5 cm, are also curatively treated with PDT with significantly reduced morbidity compared to conventional modes of treatment. Also, intraoperative adjuvant PDT may increase cure rates of large infiltrating carcinomas of the head and neck.

  3. Radiation-Free Weekend Rescued! Continuous Accelerated Irradiation of 7-Days per Week Is Equal to Accelerated Fractionation With Concomitant Boost of 7 Fractions in 5-Days per Week: Report on Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Skladowski, Krzysztof; Hutnik, Marcin; Wygoda, Andrzej; Golen, Maria; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Przeorek, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Lukaszczyk-Widel, Beata; Heyda, Alicja; Suwinski, Rafal; Tarnawski, Rafal; Maciejewski, Boguslaw

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of randomized trial comparing 2 accelerated fractionations of definitive radiation therapy assessing the need to irradiate during weekend in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 345 patients with SCC of the oral cavity, larynx, and oro- or hypo-pharynx, stage T2-4N0-1M0, were randomized to receive continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR: once per day, 7 days per week) or concomitant accelerated boost (CB: once per day, 3 days per week, and twice per day, 2 days per week). Total dose ranged from 66.6-72 Gy, dose per fraction was 1.8 Gy, number of fractions ranged from 37-40 fractions, and overall treatment time ranged from 37-40 days. Results: No differences for all trial end-points were noted. At 5 and 10 years, the actuarial rates of local-regional control were 63% and 60% for CAIR vs 65% and 60% for CB, and the corresponding overall survival were 40% and 25% vs 44% and 25%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with an incidence of 89% in CAIR and 86% in CB patients. The 5-year rate of grade 3-4 late radiation morbidity was 6% for both regimens. Conclusions: Results of this trial indicate that the effects of accelerated fractionation can be achieve by delivering twice-per-day irradiation on weekday(s). This trial has also confirmed that an accelerated, 6-weeks schedule is a reasonable option for patients with intermediate-stage head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma because of the associated high cure rate and minimal severe late toxicity.

  4. Coupling treatment planning with navigation system: a new technological approach in treatment of head and neck tumors by electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy provides highly effective local treatment for a variety of tumors. In deep-seated tumors of the head and neck, due to complex anatomy of the region or inability to cover the whole tumor with standard electrodes, the use of long single needle electrodes is mandatory. In such cases, a treatment plan provides the information on the optimal configuration of the electrodes to adequately cover the tumor with electric field, while the accurate placement of the electrodes in the surgical room in patients can remain a problem. Therefore, during electrochemotherapy of two head and neck lymph-node metastases of squamous cell carcinoma origin, a navigation system for placement of electrodes was used. Patient and methods Electrochemotherapy of two lymph-node metastases of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, one in the left parotid gland and the other in the neck just behind the left mandibular angle, was performed using intravenous administration of bleomycin and long single needle electrodes. The tumors were treated according to the prepared treatment plan, and executed with the use of navigation system. Results Coupling of treatment plan with the navigation system aided to an accurate placement of the electrodes. The navigation system helped the surgeon to identify the exact location of the tumors, and helped with the positioning of the long needle electrodes during their insertion, according to treatment plan. Five electrodes were inserted for each metastasis, one centrally in the tumor and four in the periphery of the tumor. Five weeks after electrochemotherapy, computed tomography images demonstrated partial response of the first metastasis and complete response of the second one. Six weeks after electrochemotherapy, fine-needle aspiration biopsy specimen obtained from the treated lesions revealed necrosis and inflammatory cells, without any viable tumor cells. Conclusion We describe a new technological approach for electrochemotherapy of deep

  5. Optical Metabolic Imaging of Treatment Response in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amy T.; Demory Beckler, Michelle; Walsh, Alex J.; Jones, William P.; Pohlmann, Paula R.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Optical metabolic imaging measures fluorescence intensity and lifetimes from metabolic cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). These molecular level measurements provide unique biomarkers for early cellular responses to cancer treatments. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an attractive target for optical imaging because of easy access to the site using fiber optic probes. Two HNSCC cell lines, SCC25 and SCC61, were treated with Cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody), BGT226 (PI3K/mTOR inhibitor), or cisplatin (chemotherapy) for 24 hours. Results show increased redox ratio, NADH α1 (contribution from free NADH), and FAD α1 (contribution from protein-bound FAD) for malignant cells compared with the nonmalignant cell line OKF6 (p<0.05). In SCC25 and SCC61 cells, the redox ratio is unaffected by cetuximab treatment and decreases with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment (p<0.05), and these results agree with standard measurements of proliferation rates after treatment. For SCC25, NADH α1 is reduced with BGT226 and cisplatin treatment. For SCC61, NADH α1 is reduced with cetuximab, BGT226, and cisplatin treatment. Trends in NADH α1 are statistically similar to changes in standard measurements of glycolytic rates after treatment. FAD α1 is reduced with cisplatin treatment (p<0.05). These shifts in optical endpoints reflect early metabolic changes induced by drug treatment. Overall, these results indicate that optical metabolic imaging has potential to detect early response to cancer treatment in HNSCC, enabling optimal treatment regimens and improved patient outcomes. PMID:24595244

  6. Neutron dosimetry in linear electron accelerator during radiotherapy treatment: simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, Claudio; Nastasi, U.; Ongaro, C.; Stasi, E.; Zanini, Alessandro

    1995-03-01

    In the electron linear accelerators used for radiotherapy by high energy electrons or gamma rays, there is a non negligible production of neutrons by photodisintegration or electrodisintegration reactions on the high Z components of the head machine (target, flattening filter, collimators). At the Experimental Physics Department of Torino University, Torino, Italy an experimental and theoretical evaluation has been performed on the undesired neutron production in the MD Class Mevatron Siemens accelerator used at the Radiotherapy Department of S. Giovanni Battista A.S. Hospital for cancer therapy by a 15 MV gamma ray beam. A simulation of the total process has been carried out, using EGS4 MonteCarlo computer code for the evaluation of photoneutron spectra and MCNP code for the neutron transport in the patient's body. The geometrical description both of the accelerator head in EGS4 and of the anthropomorphous phantom in MCNP have been highly optimized. Experimental measurements have been carried out by bubble detectors BD 100R appropriately allocated inside a new phantom in polyetylene and plexiglass, especially designed for this purpose.

  7. Spindle cell carcinoma of the head and neck region: treatment and outcomes of 15 patients

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Shahid; Paleri, Vinidh; Brown, Jolene; Greystoke, Alastair; Dobrowsky, Werner; Kelly, Charles; Kovarik, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spindle cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a rare entity and the evidence of optimal management is lacking. The objective of our study was to report the treatment and outcomes of 15 patients treated in a single institution over a seven year period. Materials and Methods A total of 15 patients (12 males and 3 females) with spindle cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated between July 2007 to June 2014. In six patients the disease developed after previous radiotherapy. Of the 15 patients, five patients had their primary in the tongue, four in the paranasal sinuses, two in the hypopharynx, two in the vocal cords, and one each in the soft palate and the floor of mouth. Eleven patients were treated with radical intent (seven patients required surgery only and four were treated with combined modality). The remaining four patients were treated with palliative intent. Results Among 11 patients treated with radical intent eight are alive or died of non-oncological causes. The disease recurred locally in three patients and they died of the disease (two patients with locally advanced disease in the tongue and one patient with T1N0 tumour in the hypopharynx). Median overall survival (OS) was 18 months. Conclusion Surgery or surgery combined with radiotherapy has a real impact on the natural cause of spindle cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. Even locally advanced tumours can be controlled with aggressive treatment. The worst outcome is seen with the tongue as the primary site because of a high local recurrence rate. PMID:26635898

  8. Photodynamic therapy and the treatment of neoplastic diseases of the head and neck: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, Merrill A.

    1994-07-01

    Forty-nine patients with neoplastic diseases of the larynx, oral cavity, pharynx and tracheobronchial tree have been treated with photodynamic therapy with follow-up to 40 months. Those patients with primary recurrent leukoplakia, carcinoma-in-situ, and T1 carcinomas obtained a complete response after one photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment and remain free of disease. Eight patients with T2 and T3 carcinomas treated with PDT obtained a complete or partial response, but in all cases, the carcinomas recurred locally, many times with overlying normal mucosa. This is due to the inability to adequately deliver laser light to the depths of the tumor bed, despite aggressive use of interstitial implantation. PDT is highly effective for the curative treatment of early carcinomas (CIS, T1) of the head and neck. Further development of devices to measure and deliver light into the depths of a tumor bed are required prior to the use of PDT to effectively treat larger solid tumors of the head and neck.

  9. DCE-MRI for Pre-Treatment Prediction and Post-Treatment Assessment of Treatment Response in Sites of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    King, Ann D.; Chow, Steven Kwok Keung; Yu, Kwok-Hung; Mo, Frankie Kwok Fai; Yeung, David K. W.; Yuan, Jing; Law, Benjamin King Hong; Bhatia, Kunwar S.; Vlantis, Alexander C.; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is important to identify patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) who fail to respond to chemoradiotherapy so that they can undergo post-treatment salvage surgery while the disease is still operable. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic performance of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI using a pharmacokinetic model for pre-treatment predictive imaging, as well as post-treatment diagnosis, of residual SCC at primary and nodal sites in the head and neck. Material and Methods Forty-nine patients with 83 SCC sites (primary and/or nodal) underwent pre-treatment DCE-MRI, and 43 patients underwent post-treatment DCE-MRI, of which 33 SCC sites had a residual mass amenable to analysis. Pre-treatment, post-treatment and % change in the mean Ktrans, kep, ve and AUGC were obtained from SCC sites. Logistic regression was used to correlate DCE parameters at each SCC site with treatment response at the same site, based on clinical outcome at that site at a minimum of two years. Results None of the pre-treatment DCE-MRI parameters showed significant correlations with SCC site failure (SF) (29/83 sites) or site control (SC) (54/83 sites). Post-treatment residual masses with SF (14/33) had significantly higher kep (p = 0.05), higher AUGC (p = 0.02), and lower % reduction in AUGC (p = 0.02), than residual masses with SC (19/33), with the % change in AUGC remaining significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Pre-treatment DCE-MRI did not predict which SCC sites would fail treatment, but post-treatment DCE-MRI showed potential for identifying residual masses that had failed treatment. PMID:26657972

  10. Molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapy for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Azoury, SaÏd C; Gilmore, Richard C; Shukla, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most frequent tumors of the head and neck and often presents at an advanced-stage. Traditionally, treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has included surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy depending on both the site and stage of disease. Although the treatment approach for local disease is often standardized, the management of recurrent and advanced disease is evolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HNSCC has led to numerous promising investigations and the push for the development of novel therapies. Similarly, over the past several decades, growing data supports the notion that an individual's immune system can be manipulated in such a way to help eradicate cancer. The success of immunotherapeutic agents such as interleukin therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitor blockade in cancer, particularly advanced-stage melanoma, has stimulated researchers to uncover similar success stories in HNSCC. Examples of immunotherapeutics that are being studied for the treatment of HNSCC include adoptive T-cell therapy, vaccines, and immune checkpoint inhibitor proteins (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, -PD-1, -PD-L1). Molecularly targeted agents of interest include inhibitors of transmembrane growth factor receptors, angiogenesis, and PI3K/AKT/mTOR and NOTCH signaling pathways. To date, cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is the only targeted agent for HNSCC that was approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the basis that it improves overall survival when combined with chemotherapy or radiation. Herein, the authors provide an up-to-date review of immunotherapeutic and molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:27448787

  11. Evaluation of image-guidance protocols in the treatment of head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidan, Omar A. . E-mail: omar.zeidan@orhs.org; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Manon, Rafael R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Jenkins, D. Wayne; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the residual setup error of different image-guidance (IG) protocols in the alignment of patients with head and neck cancer. The protocols differ in the percentage of treatment fractions that are associated with image guidance. Using data from patients who were treated with daily IG, the residual setup errors for several different protocols are retrospectively calculated. Methods and Materials: Alignment data from 24 patients (802 fractions) treated with daily IG on a helical tomotherapy unit were analyzed. The difference between the daily setup correction and the setup correction that would have been made according to a specific protocol was used to calculate the residual setup errors for each protocol. Results: The different protocols are generally effective in reducing systematic setup errors. Random setup errors are generally not reduced for fractions that are not image guided. As a consequence, if every other treatment is image guided, still about 11% of all treatments (IG and not IG) are subject to three-dimensional setup errors of at least 5 mm. This frequency increases to about 29% if setup errors >3 mm are scored. For various protocols that require 15% to 31% of the treatments to be image guided, from 50% to 60% and from 26% to 31% of all fractions are subject to setup errors >3 mm and >5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Residual setup errors reduce with increasing frequency of IG during the course of external-beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer patients. The inability to reduce random setup errors for fractions that are not image guided results in notable residual setup errors.

  12. Evaluation of the benefit and use of multidisciplinary teams in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Lisa; Keilholz, Ulrich; Tahara, Makoto; Lin, Jin-Ching; Chomette, Pauline; Ceruse, Philippe; Harrington, Kevin; Mesia, Ricard

    2016-08-01

    Given the complexities of multimodality treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, the rationale for the use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) to define individual optimal treatment strategies on a per-patient basis is apparent. Increased use of guideline-directed approaches, reduced time to treatment and improved outcomes, which result from use of an MDT approach in head and neck cancer, have been documented. A discussion of these recent advances, as well as presentation of available country-specific guidance on the roles and responsibilities of team members, supports the creation of similar local-language recommendations for the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. Finally, expert practical advice on the implementation of MDTs may enable the establishment of the MDT approach more universally around the world. PMID:27424185

  13. Poster — Thur Eve — 29: Characterization of Patient Immobilization for Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Courneyea, L; Mullins, J; Howard, M; Beltran, C; Brinkmann, D; Pafundi, D

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Evaluate an immobilization system to determine its adequacy for the reduced margins required for proton therapy. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients were immobilized for conventional photon radiotherapy and imaged with pre- and post-treatment cone beam CTs (CBCTs) for each treatment fraction. To quantify the patient positioning reproducibility, each CBCT was registered to the simulation CT offline. Registrations were performed using auto-match tools and a matching volume-of-interest (VOI) consisting of a 5mm expansion around the mandible, occipital bone, C1/C2 and C7/T1. For each registration, the bony anatomy in the VOI was evaluated for agreement with the simulation position using 3 and 5mm margins. Registrations were initially restricted to translational corrections. If the bony anatomy did not agree with the simulation position to within 3mm or 5mm, the auto-match was repeated with 3 additional rotational corrections. Intrafraction motion was calculated as the difference between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT matches. Results: Pre-treatment patient positioning agreed with the simulation CT to within 3mm/5mm for 62%/86% of fractions using translational matching and 84%/100% of fractions when rotations were included. Intrafraction motion averaged 1.1±0.8mm, with 12% of fractions having >2mm intrafraction motion. Post-treatment positioning accuracy was 57%/84% and 80%/100% for registrations without/with rotations. For the mandible, positioning accuracy dropped from 93% pre-treatment to 82% post-treatment. Conclusion: If rotational corrections are available, the immobilization system studied created reproducible patient positioning to within 3mm for 84% of fractions. However, intrafraction motion caused additional anatomy to fall outside the 3mm margin by the end of treatment.

  14. MAGE-A expression clusters and antineoplastic treatment in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Stefan; Meyer, Till J; Brands, Roman C; Haubitz, Imme R; Linz, Christian; Seher, Axel; Kübler, Alexander C; Müller-Richter, Urs D A

    2015-06-01

    The nonsurgical treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) usually consists of radiation and chemotherapy. In general, the treatment efficacy of chemotherapy in head and neck cancer is limited. Apart from the placenta, testis and fetal keratinocytes, melanoma-associated antigens-A (MAGE-A) are only found in malignancies. Even though their molecular role remains unclear, several subgroups have been found to contribute to resistance to different chemotherapeutic agents. In the present study, established human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were incubated with various concentrations of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, paclitaxel, docetaxel, cetuximab and panitumumab for 5, 10, 20 and 40 h. The treatment efficacy was measured dynamically by real-time cell analysis (RTCA). In addition, we determined the expression of all known MAGE-A subgroups (MAGE-A1 to MAGE-A12, excluding pseudogene MAGE-A7) by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Of note, one cell line showed only a marginal expression of MAGE-A antigens, whereas another cell line showed a distinct expression of almost all the MAGE-A subgroups. The expression pattern varied in the other cell lines. MAGE-A4 was the most highly expressed of all the subgroups, and MAGE-A8 could not be detected. With the exception of MAGE-A6, -A8, -A9 and -A10, the expression levels differed significantly between the cell lines. Factor analysis suggested simplifying the MAGE-A expression level into two groups. Spearman's rank correlation revealed a significant association between MAGE-A expression and treatment efficacy for 20.8% (25/120) of the experiments. In 100% of these cases (25/25), Spearman's Rho revealed a positive correlation between clustered MAGE-A expression and poor treatment efficacy. Our data highlight the fact that higher a MAGE-A expression correlates with a poorer outcome of antineoplastic treatment. Clustered MAGE-A expression analysis may help to identify patients who are at a

  15. Feasibility and limitations of bulk density assignment in MRI for head and neck IMRT treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Chin, Alexander L; Lin, Alexander; Anamalayil, Shibu; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers centered at the base of skull are better visualized on MRI than on CT. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the accuracy of bulk density assignment in head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan optimization. Our study investigates dose calculation differences between density-assigned MRI and CT, and identifies potential limitations related to dental implants and MRI geometrical distortion in the framework of MRI-only-based treatment planning. Bulk density assignment was performed and applied onto MRI to generate three MRI image sets with increasing levels of heterogeneity for seven patients: 1) MRIW: all water-equivalent; 2) MRIW+B: included bone with density of 1.53 g/cm3; and 3) MRIW+B+A: included bone and air. Using identical planning and optimization parameters, MRI-based IMRT plans were generated and compared to corresponding, forward-calculated, CT-based plans on the basis of target coverage, isodose distributions, and dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Phantom studies were performed to assess the magnitude and spatial dependence of MRI geometrical distortion. MRIW-based dose calculations overestimated target coverage by 16.1%. Segmentation of bone reduced differences to within 2% of the coverage area on the CT-based plan. Further segmentation of air improved conformity near air-tissue interfaces. Dental artifacts caused substantial target coverage overestimation even on MRIW+B+A. Geometrical distortion was less than 1 mm in an imaging volume 20 × 20 × 20 cm3 around scanner isocenter, but up to 4 mm at 17 cm lateral to isocenter. Bulk density assignment in the framework of MRI-only IMRT head and neck treatment planning is a feasible method with certain limitations. Bone and teeth account for the majority of density heterogeneity effects. While soft tissue is well visualized on MRI compared to CT, dental implants may not be visible on MRI and must be identified by other means and assigned

  16. Feasibility of Multimodal Deformable Registration for Head and Neck Tumor Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fortunati, Valerio; Verhaart, René F.; Angeloni, Francesco; Lugt, Aad van der; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; Walsum, Theo van

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using deformable registration in clinical practice to fuse MR and CT images of the head and neck for treatment planning. Method and Materials: A state-of-the-art deformable registration algorithm was optimized, evaluated, and compared with rigid registration. The evaluation was based on manually annotated anatomic landmarks and regions of interest in both modalities. We also developed a multiparametric registration approach, which simultaneously aligns T1- and T2-weighted MR sequences to CT. This was evaluated and compared with single-parametric approaches. Results: Our results show that deformable registration yielded a better accuracy than rigid registration, without introducing unrealistic deformations. For deformable registration, an average landmark alignment of approximatively 1.7 mm was obtained. For all the regions of interest excluding the cerebellum and the parotids, deformable registration provided a median modified Hausdorff distance of approximatively 1 mm. Similar accuracies were obtained for the single-parameter and multiparameter approaches. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that deformable registration of head-and-neck CT and MR images is feasible, with overall a significanlty higher accuracy than for rigid registration.

  17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions at the Head-Neck Junction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Herbert J

    2016-07-01

    Modular junctions in total hip arthroplasty are susceptible to mechanically assisted crevice corrosion, leading to the release of metal wear debris. Adverse local tissue reactions result from an immune-mediated biological reaction to this debris and can have a profound effect on the surrounding periarticular soft tissue envelope. Patients often present with pain or muscle weakness and demonstrate elevated serum cobalt and chromium levels. Serum inflammatory markers and synovial fluid tests help distinguish these reactions from deep infection in the majority of cases; however, the presence of amorphous material or fragmented cells can lead to difficulty in some cases. Advanced cross-sectional imaging is essential in establishing the diagnosis. Early revision surgery is generally the treatment of choice for symptomatic adverse local tissue reaction from corrosion at the modular head-neck junction. The existing stem is retained, and a new ceramic head is placed on the existing trunnion whenever possible. This strategy generally leads to short-term improvement of symptoms with reliable clinical outcomes; however, longer term results are presently lacking. PMID:27113943

  18. Hematoporphyrin-mediated photodynamic therapy for treatment of head and neck cancer: clinical update 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1996-04-01

    From 1983 to 1996 Phase II and III clinical studies at Henry Ford Hospital demonstrated complete or partial responses in 55 of 56 patients treated with hematoporphyrin-derivative or PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy (HPD-PDT) for a variety of benign and malignant upper aerodigestive tract disease: (1) superficial 'condemned mucosa' or 'field cancerization' of the oral cavity and larynx (7 cases); (2) Stage III/IV head and neck cancer (25 cases); (3) mucocutaneous AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma of the upper aerodigestive tract and non AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma of the lower extremity (15 cases); (4) recurrent laryngotracheal papillomatosis (3 cases); (5) severe dysplasia/adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (4 cases); (6) partial or completely obstructing terminal esophageal cancer (9 cases). At the time of this report, HPD-PDT produced complete responses in 24 patients (follow up 6 months to 9 years) with 'field cancerization' (CIS, T1N0M0) of the oral cavity and larynx (6 cases), adenocarcinoma in situ in Barrett's esophagus (3 cases), mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (12 cases), obstructing esophageal carcinoma (1 case), and stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx (1 case), and radiation therapy or solar-induced basal cell/squamous cell carcinomas (2 cases). PDT treatment protocols, results, complications, and application as adjunct or primary oncologic therapy for head and neck cancer are reviewed in this article.

  19. Treatment of Advanced Tumours of Head and Neck with Fast Neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, Mary; Vonberg, D. D.

    1974-01-01

    Fast neutrons interact with matter in a different way from x and gamma rays. They have been used at Hammersmith Hospital for the past four years in the treatment of advanced tumours in several sites of the body, and the results of this treatment in the first 100 cases of tumours of the head and neck are described here. Altogether 62 patients who had been referred for fast neutron therapy because it was thought that no other treatment would be effective experienced complete regression of the tumours, and only two recurred. Tumours of the buccal cavity and salivary glands responded particularly well and the relief of pain and ulceration was striking. Side effects were not serious and did not differ from those seen with supervoltage radiation, apart from the reaction of the skin. Follow-up was short, however, owing to deaths from metastases, and out of 76 patients treated more than one year previously only 30 survived. Cases which have not metastasized must therefore be treated so that the effects on tumours and adjacent normal tissues can be observed for several years after treatment. The results obtained so far indicate that it is now justifiable to use neutrons in such cases. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:4210570

  20. Automatic tissue segmentation of head and neck MR images for hyperthermia treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunati, Valerio; Verhaart, René F.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-08-01

    A hyperthermia treatment requires accurate, patient-specific treatment planning. This planning is based on 3D anatomical models which are generally derived from computed tomography. Because of its superior soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) information can be introduced to improve the quality of these 3D patient models and therefore the treatment planning itself. Thus, we present here an automatic atlas-based segmentation algorithm for MR images of the head and neck. Our method combines multiatlas local weighting fusion with intensity modelling. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross validation experiment over a set of 11 patients for which manual delineation were available. The accuracy of the proposed method was high both in terms of the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the 95th percentile Hausdorff surface distance (HSD) with median DSC higher than 0.8 for all tissues except sclera. For all tissues, except the spine tissues, the accuracy was approaching the interobserver agreement/variability both in terms of DSC and HSD. The positive effect of adding the intensity modelling to the multiatlas fusion decreased when a more accurate atlas fusion method was used. Using the proposed approach we improved the performance of the approach previously presented for H&N hyperthermia treatment planning, making the method suitable for clinical application.

  1. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Barbara L; Bocchini, Joseph A

    2010-08-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with limited morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. Since the 2002 clinical report on head lice was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, patterns of resistance to products available over-the-counter and by prescription have changed, and additional mechanical means of removing head lice have been explored. This revised clinical report clarifies current diagnosis and treatment protocols and provides guidance for the management of children with head lice in the school setting. PMID:20660553

  2. SU-E-T-275: Radiobiological Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rekha Reddy, B.; Ravikumar, M.; Tanvir Pasha, C.R; Anil Kumar, M.R; Varatharaj, C.; Pyakuryal, A; Narayanasamy, Ganesh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiobiological outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment (IMRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using HART (Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy; J Appl Clin Med Phys 11(1): 137–157, 2010) program and compare with the clinical outcomes. Methods: We have treated 20 patients of stage III and IV HNSCC Oropharynx and hypopharynx with accelerated IMRT technique and concurrent chemotherapy. Delineation of tumor and normal tissues were done using Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA) contouring guidelines and radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70Gy in 35 fractions to the primary and involved lymph nodes, 63Gy to intermediate risk areas and 56 Gy to lower risk areas, Monday to Saturday, 6 Days/week using 6 MV Photons with an expected overall treatment time of 6 weeks. The TCP and NTCP's were calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics using the Poisson Statistics (PS) and JT Lyman models respectively and the Resultwas correlated with clinical outcomes of the patients with mean follow up of 24 months. Results: Using HART program, the TCP (0.89± 0.01) of primary tumor and the NTCP for parotids (0.20±0.12), spinal cord (0.05±0.01), esophagus (0.30±0.2), mandible (0.35±0.21), Oral cavity (0.37±0.18), Larynx (0.30±0.15) were estimated and correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT with Chemotherapy is a clinical feasible option in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC with encouraging initial tumour response and acceptable acute toxicities. The correlation between the clinical outcomes and radiobiological model estimated parameters using HART programs are found to be satisfactory.

  3. [Clinical studies and treatment of Karposi's sarcoma of the head and neck in AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Bujía, J; Riederer, A; Zietz, C; Vogl, T; Wilmes, E

    1993-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is the major neoplastic disease of HIV-infected patients in the head and neck regions. A clinical study realized at Ludwig-Maximilians University, München, uncover 25 homosexuals with KS out of 135 HIB-positive patients. Six of them showed a KS as initial manifestation of the syndrome. The KS was found principally in the palate (22 cases), oropharynx (12) and skin of the neck (11). Symptoms like swallowing or breathing problems occurred in nodular lesions of the mouth, pharynx or larynx, but no in the maculous type. Local laser and/or systemic (retrovir, interferon, chemotherapy) treatment was performed. CO2 and Nd:YAG laser-therapy showed a regression of the tumors and thus an improvement of quality of life could be achieved. PMID:8317635

  4. Undesirable financial effects of head and neck cancer radiotherapy during the initial treatment period

    PubMed Central

    Egestad, Helen; Nieder, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare cost and reforms are at the forefront of international debates. One of the current discussion themes in oncology is whether and how patients’ life changes due to costs of cancer care. In Norway, the main part of the treatment costs is supported by general taxpayer revenues. Objectives The objective of this study was to clarify whether head and neck cancer patients (n=67) in northern Norway experienced financial health-related quality of life (HRQOL) deterioration due to costs associated with treatment. Design HRQOL was examined by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 in the beginning and in the end of radiation treatment in patients treated at the University Hospital in Northern Norway. Changes in financial HRQOL were calculated and compared by paired sample T-tests. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine correlations among gender, marital status, age and treatment with or without additional chemotherapy and changes in the HRQOL domain of financial difficulties. Results The majority of score results at both time points were in the lower range (mean 15–25), indicating limited financial difficulties. We observed no statistically significant differences by gender, marital status and age. Increasing financial difficulties during treatment were reported by male patients and those younger than 65, that is, patients who were younger than retirement age. The largest effect was seen in singles. However, differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions During the initial phase of the disease trajectory, no significant increase in financial difficulties was found. This is in line with the aims of the Norwegian public healthcare model. However, long-term longitudinal studies should be performed, especially with regard to the trends we observed in single, male and younger patients. PMID:25623815

  5. Outcome after tantalum rod implantation for treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Varitimidis, Sokratis E; Dimitroulias, Apostolos P; Karachalios, Theophilos S; Dailiana, Zoe H

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Tantalum rod implantation has recently been proposed for treatment of early stages of femoral head osteonecrosis. The purpose of our study was to report the early results of its use in pre- and post-collapse stages of the disease. Methods We studied prospectively 27 patients who underwent tantalum rod implantation for treatment of nontraumatic femoral head osteonecrosis between December 2000 and September 2005. Patients were evaluated radiologically and clinically using the Steinberg classification and the Harris hip score (HHS). Disease stage varied between stages II and IV. Mean follow-up time was 38 (15–71) months. Results 1 patient (1 hip) died 15 months after surgery for reasons unrelated to it. 13 of 26 hips remained at the same radiographic stage, and 13 deteriorated. Mean HHS improved from 49 to 85. 6 patients required conversion to total hip arthroplasty. When the procedure was used for stages III and IV, both radiological outcome and revision rates were worse than for the stage II hips. There was, however, no difference in postoperative HHS between patients at pre- and post-collapse stages at the time of initial evaluation. Survivorship, with revision to THA as the endpoint, was 70% at 6 years. Interpretation The disease process does not appear to be interrupted, but there was a significant improvement in hip function initially in most hips. Tantalum rod implantation is a safe “buy-time” technique, especially when other joint salvage procedures are not an option. Appropriate patient selection and careful rod insertion are needed for favorable results. PMID:19297785

  6. SU-E-T-168: Evaluation of Normal Tissue Damage in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer by calculating average survival fraction (SF) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for normal tissue cells. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were generated using EclipseTM treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The average SF for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from dose spectrum acquired from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Finally, EUDs for three types of normal tissue of each structure were calculated from average SF. Results: The EUDs of the brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, brachial plexus and etc were calculated. Our analysis indicated that the brainstem can absorb as much as 14.3% of prescription dose to the tumor if the cell line is radiosensitive. In addition, as much as 16.1% and 18.3% of prescription dose were absorbed by the brainstem for moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant cells, respectively. For the spinal cord, the EUDs reached up to 27.6%, 35.0% and 42.9% of prescribed dose for the three types of radiosensitivities respectively. Three types of normal cells for parotid glands can get up to 65.6%, 71.2% and 78.4% of prescription dose, respectively. The maximum EUDs of brachial plexsus were calculated as 75.4%, 76.4% and 76.7% of prescription for three types of normal cell lines. Conclusion: The results indicated that EUD can be used to quantify and evaluate the radiation damage to surrounding normal tissues. Large variation of normal tissue EUDs may come from variation of target volumes and radiation beam orientations among the patients.

  7. Stabilizing incomplete reduction of the radial head using a hinged splint: conservative treatment for a Monteggia equivalent lesion.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Takaaki; Horii, Emiko; Tatebe, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Michiro; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    Radial head dislocation associated with plastic bowing of the ulna is classified as a Monteggia equivalent lesion. This injury in children can be treated by closed reduction, but manipulative reduction may not completely correct plastic bowing of the ulna. We encountered two cases of incomplete reduction in which the radial head was reduced in a supination position, but redislocated during rotation from neutral to a pronation position. The patients were treated conservatively using an adjustable hinged elbow splint. Plain radiography at 6 weeks after incomplete closed reduction showed that the radial head was reduced in all positions from supination to pronation; thus, both patients had good outcomes. Our method is non-invasive and may be an option for treatment of incomplete reduction of radial head dislocation with acute plastic bowing of the ulna. PMID:23544277

  8. Family Coping Following Traumatic Head Injury: An Exploratory Analysis with Recommendations for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bruce W.; McCormick, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Used intensive interviewing and observation of volunteer sample of six families of victims of head injuries over eight-month period. Results indicated similar experiences and coping responses occurring in families following head injury. Head-injury rehabilitation systems were found to be more client centered than family centered. (Author/NB)

  9. Anti-VEGF antibody treatment accelerates polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Raina, Shagun; Honer, Michael; Krämer, Stefanie D; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xueqi; Segerer, Stephan; Wüthrich, Rudolf P; Serra, Andreas L

    2011-10-01

    Polycystic kidney growth implies expansion of the vasculature, suggesting that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent processes play a critical role and that VEGF is a putative therapeutic target. Whether an anti-VEGF antibody improves renal cystic disease has not been determined. We administrated 5 mg/kg B20.4.1, an anti-VEGF-A antibody, or vehicle intraperitoneally twice weekly to 4-wk-old male normal (+/+) and cystic (Cy/+) Han:SPRD rats for 6 wk. Renal function, urinary protein excretion, organ/body weight ratios, cyst volume, tubular epithelial cell (TEC) proliferation, renal VEGF, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and -2α expression, renal histology, and kidney hypoxia visualized by [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography were assessed. The treated compared with untreated +/+ rats had lower TEC proliferation rates, whereas Cy/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 displayed an increased proximal TEC proliferation rate, causing enhanced cyst and kidney growth. The +/+ and Cy/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 had severe renal failure and extensive glomerular damage. Proteinuria, which was highest in anti-VEGF-treated Cy/+ and lowest in untreated normal littermates, was positively correlated with renal HIF-1α and negatively correlated with VEGF expression. The untreated Cy/+ vs. +/+ rats had higher overall [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole uptake. The +/+ rats receiving B20.4.1 vs. untreated had increased [(18)F]fluoromisonidazole uptake, whereas the uptake was unchanged among treated vs. untreated Cy/+ animals. In conclusion, B20.4.1 caused an exaggerated cystic response of the proximal tubules in cystic rats and severe kidney injury that was associated with low renal VEGF and high HIF-1α levels. Anti-VEGF drug therapy may therefore not be a treatment option for polycystic kidney disease. PMID:21677148

  10. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  11. Effect of patient setup errors on simultaneously integrated boost head and neck IMRT treatment plans

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, Jeffrey V. . E-mail: jsiebers@vcu.edu; Keall, Paul J.; Wu Qiuwen; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine dose delivery errors that could result from random and systematic setup errors for head-and-neck patients treated using the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients who participated in an intramural Phase I/II parotid-sparing IMRT dose-escalation protocol using the SIB treatment technique had their dose distributions reevaluated to assess the impact of random and systematic setup errors. The dosimetric effect of random setup error was simulated by convolving the two-dimensional fluence distribution of each beam with the random setup error probability density distribution. Random setup errors of {sigma} = 1, 3, and 5 mm were simulated. Systematic setup errors were simulated by randomly shifting the patient isocenter along each of the three Cartesian axes, with each shift selected from a normal distribution. Systematic setup error distributions with {sigma} = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis were simulated. Combined systematic and random setup errors were simulated for {sigma} = {sigma} = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis. For each dose calculation, the gross tumor volume (GTV) received by 98% of the volume (D{sub 98}), clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 90}, nodes D{sub 90}, cord D{sub 2}, and parotid D{sub 50} and parotid mean dose were evaluated with respect to the plan used for treatment for the structure dose and for an effective planning target volume (PTV) with a 3-mm margin. Results: Simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT head-and-neck treatment plans were found to be less sensitive to random setup errors than to systematic setup errors. For random-only errors, errors exceeded 3% only when the random setup error {sigma} exceeded 3 mm. Simulated systematic setup errors with {sigma} = 1.5 mm resulted in approximately 10% of plan having more than a 3% dose error, whereas a {sigma} = 3.0 mm resulted in half of the plans having

  12. Applying DTI white matter orientations to finite element head models to examine diffuse TBI under high rotational accelerations.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Niall C; Gilchrist, Michael D; Curran, Kathleen M

    2010-12-01

    The in-vivo mechanical response of neural tissue during impact loading of the head is simulated using geometrically accurate finite element (FE) head models. However, current FE models do not account for the anisotropic elastic material behaviour of brain tissue. In soft biological tissue, there is a correlation between internal microscopic structure and macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, constitutive equations are important for the numerical analysis of the soft biological tissues. By exploiting diffusion tensor techniques the anisotropic orientation of neural tissue is incorporated into a non-linear viscoelastic material model for brain tissue and implemented in an explicit FE analysis. The viscoelastic material parameters are derived from published data and the viscoelastic model is used to describe the mechanical response of brain tissue. The model is formulated in terms of a large strain viscoelastic framework and considers non-linear viscous deformations in combination with non-linear elastic behaviour. The constitutive model was applied in the University College Dublin brain trauma model (UCDBTM) (i.e. three-dimensional finite element head model) to predict the mechanical response of the intra-cranial contents due to rotational injury. PMID:20869383

  13. Head-to-head comparisons of metabolic side effects of second generation antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Komossa, Katja; Schwarz, Sandra; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Lobos, Claudia Asenjo; Kissling, Werner; Davis, John M; Leucht, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Objective The metabolic side effects of second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) are serious and have not been compared head to head in a meta-analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing the metabolic side effects of the following SGAs head-to-head: amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone, zotepine. Method We searched the register of the Cochrane schizophrenia group (last search May 2007), supplemented by MEDLINE and EMBASE (last search January 2009) for randomized, blinded studies comparing the above mentioned SGA in the treatment of schizophrenia or related disorders. At least three reviewers extracted the data independently. The primary outcome was weight change. We also assessed changes of cholesterol and glucose. The results were combined in a meta-analysis. Results We included 48 studies with 105 relevant arms. Olanzapine produced more weight gain than all other second-generation antipsychotics except for clozapine where no difference was found. Clozapine produced more weight gain than risperidone, risperidone more than amisulpride, and sertindole more than risperidone. Olanzapine produced more cholesterol increase than aripiprazole, risperidone and ziprasidone. (No differences with amisulpride, clozapine and quetiapine were found). Quetiapine produced more cholesterol increase than risperidone and ziprasidone. Olanzapine produced more increase in glucose than amisulpride, aripiprazole, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone; no difference was found with clozapine. Conclusions Some SGAs lead to substantially more metabolic side effects than other SGAs. When choosing an SGA for an individual patient these side effects with their potential cause of secondary diseases must be weighed against efficacy and characteristics of the individual patient. PMID:20692814

  14. Invasive Electromagnetic Field Treatment in Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, C.; Kolb, W.; Röhner, E.; Wagner, M.; Roth, A.; Matziolis, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to compare the surgical treatment of non-ONFH in adulthood by curettage and bone grafting with treatment by curettage and bone grafting in combination with invasive electromagnetic field treatment using Magnetodyn®. This was assessed by examining whether electromagnetic field treatment has a positive additive effect on the clinical parameters modified Harris Hip Score according to Haddad, Cook and Brinker, Merle d'Aubigné hip score and visual analogue scale, and on the subsequent need for treatment by total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methodology : The prospective, non-randomised study included 35 patients with unilateral or bilateral osteonecrosis of the femoral head. These were divided into two groups according to the surgical treatment regime and assessed over a 12-month follow-up period. The study group (Group 1) comprised 19 patients (14 men and 5 women) with a total of 22 non-ONFH, who underwent minimally invasive curettage, bone grafting and electromagnetic field treatment (Magnetodyn®) by implantation of a bipolar induction screw. The control group (Group 2) comprised 16 patients (12 men and 4 women) with a total of 18 non-ONFH, who underwent minimally invasive curettage and bone grafting without Magnetodyn® therapy. At the initial pre-operative examination and the 6 and 12-month follow-up, all patients were assessed by clinical examination and radiological monitoring, and by bilateral hip MRI. The clinical evaluation was based on the modified Harris Hip Score according to Haddad, Cook and Brinker, the Merle d`Aubigné hip score and the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results : At the time of follow-up, total hip arthroplasty (THA) had been performed in four patients in Group 1 (18%). In Group 2, four patients (22%) had received a THA (n.s.). Both procedures led to an improvement in the clinical scores (Harris Hip Score, Merle d`Aubigné score and VAS), although no significant difference

  15. Exploring dendritic cell based vaccines targeting survivin for the treatment of head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New treatment modalities are needed for the treatment of cancers of the head and neck region (HNSCC). Survivin is important for the survival and proliferation of tumor cells and may therefore provide a target for immunotherapy. Here we focused on the ex vivo presence and in vitro induction of survivin specific T cells. Methods Tetramer staining and ELIspot assays were used to document the presence of survivin specific T cells in patient derived material, and to monitor the presence and persistence of survivin specific T cells after repeated in vitro stimulation with autologous dendritic cells. Results Ex vivo analysis showed the presence of survivin-specific T cells in the peripheral blood (by tetramer analysis) and in the draining lymph node (by ELIspot analysis) in a HNSCC and a locally advanced breast cancer patient respectively. However, we were unable to maintain isolated survivin specific T cells for prolonged periods of time. For the in vitro generation of survivin specific T cells, monocyte derived DC were electroporated with mRNA encoding full length survivin or a survivin mini-gene together with either IL21 or IL12 mRNA. Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining of dendritic cell cytospin preparations confirmed translation of the full length survivin protein. After repeated stimulation we observed an increase, followed by a decrease, of the number of survivin specific T cells. FACS sorted or limiting dilution cloned survivin specific T cells could not be maintained on feeder mix for prolonged periods of time. Protein expression analysis subsequently showed that activated, but not resting T cells contain survivin protein. Conclusions Here we have shown that survivin specific T cells can be detected ex vivo in patient derived material. Furthermore, survivin specific T cells can be induced in vitro using autologous dendritic cells with enforced expression of survivin and cytokines. However, we were unable to maintain enriched or cloned

  16. Multi-Case Knowledge-Based IMRT Treatment Planning in Head and Neck Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzetic, Shelby Mariah

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) IMRT treatment planning is a challenging process that relies heavily on the planner's experience. Previously, we used the single, best match from a library of manually planned cases to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for a new patient. The current multi-case Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy (MC-KBRT) study utilized different matching cases for each of six individual organs-at-risk (OARs), then combined those six cases to create the new treatment plan. From a database of 103 patient plans created by experienced planners, MC-KBRT plans were created for 40 (17 unilateral and 23 bilateral) HNC "query" patients. For each case, 2D beam's-eye-view images were used to find similar geometric "match" patients separately for each of 6 OARs. Dose distributions for each OAR from the 6 matching cases were combined and then warped to suit the query case's geometry. The dose-volume constraints were used to create the new query treatment plan without the need for human decision-making throughout the IMRT optimization. The optimized MC-KBRT plans were compared against the clinically approved plans and Version 1 (previous KBRT using only one matching case with dose warping) using the dose metrics: mean, median, and maximum (brainstem and cord+5mm) doses. Compared to Version 1, MC-KBRT had no significant reduction of the dose to any of the OARs in either unilateral or bilateral cases. Compared to the manually planned unilateral cases, there was significant reduction of the oral cavity mean/median dose (>2Gy) at the expense of the contralateral parotid. Compared to the manually planned bilateral cases, reduction of dose was significant in the ipsilateral parotid, larynx, and oral cavity (>3Gy mean/median) while maintaining PTV coverage. MC-KBRT planning in head and neck cancer generates IMRT plans with better dose sparing than manually created plans. MC-KBRT using multiple case matches does not show significant dose reduction compared to using a

  17. [Early-onset radiation complications and tissue damage in the treatment of head and neck tumors].

    PubMed

    Isaev, P A; Medvedev, V S; Pasov, V V; Semin, D Iu; Derbugov, D N; Pol'kin, V V; Terekhov, O V

    2010-01-01

    The report discusses the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of combined radiotherapy in 1,192 cases of head and neck tumors divided into 4 groups: distant radiotherapy in standard fractions of 1.8-2.3 Gy, 5 times a week, TTD of 60 Gy (group 1 - 486 40.8%); radiotherapy + local UHF hyperthermia + regional intraarterial chemotherapy + hyper glycemia + administrations of regional intraarterial chemotherapy + hyperglycemia + local UHF hyperthermia (group 2 - 244 20.5%); accelerated superfractition radiotherapy with variable STD of 1 and 1.5/2 Gy, TTD of 60 Gy, plus neoadjuvant polychemotherapy with cisplatin 100 mg/lm2 + 5-fluorouracil, continuous intravenous infusion of 3,000 mg for 72 h (group 3 - 204 17%1); combined photon-neutron therapy (group 4 - 258 21.6%): neutron beam therapy - 36 (3%); interstitial neutron brachytherapy with 252 Cf sources in combination with external beam gamma-therapy and chemotherapy. Overall radiation injury incidence was 1,087 (91.2%); oral mucositis grade I (WHO) - 110 (9.2%), grade II - 166(13.9%), grade III - 811 (68%), radiation dermatitis - 279 (23.4%), grade I/II - 196 (16.4%), grade III/IV - 83 (7%). Grade III/IV side effects developed in 26.7% after gamma therapy and in 72.2% - in the photon-neutron group (p < or = 0.0001). Skin damage was rare, as expected, in the photon-brachytherapy group (1.8%) (p < or = 0.0001). Hence, Cf252 neutron brachytherapy and radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy appeared to produce the most sparing effects. PMID:21137234

  18. Monte Carlo evaluation of tissue heterogeneities corrections in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Damodar; McClinton, Christopher; Sood, Sumit; Badkul, Rajeev; Saleh, Habeeb; Jiang, Hongyu; Lominska, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate Monte Carlo computed dose distributions with the X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients using stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and compare to heterogeneity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm. This study includes 10 head and neck cancer patients who underwent SRT re-irradiation using heterogene-ity corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm for dose calculation. Prescription dose was 24-40 Gy in 3-5 fractions (treated 3-5 fractions per week) with at least 95% of the PTV volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose. A stereotactic head and neck localization box was attached to the base of the thermoplastic mask fixation for target localization. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) were contoured on the 3D CT images. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the GTV with 0 to 5 mm uniform expansion; PTV ranged from 10.2 to 64.3 cc (average = 35.0±17.5 cc). OARs were contoured on the 3D planning CT and consisted of spinal cord, brainstem, optic structures, parotids, and skin. In the BrainLab treatment planning system (TPS), clinically optimal SRT plans were generated using hybrid planning technique (combination of 3D conformal nonco-planar arcs and nonopposing static beams) for the Novalis-Tx linear accelerator consisting of high-definition multileaf collimators (HD-MLCs: 2.5 mm leaf width at isocenter) and 6 MV-SRS (1000 MU/min) beam. For the purposes of this study, treatment plans were recomputed using XVMC algorithm utilizing identical beam geometry, multileaf positions, and monitor units and compared to the corresponding clinical PB-hete plans. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions show small decreases (< 1.5%) in calculated dose for D99, Dmean, and Dmax of the PTV coverage between the two algorithms. However, the average target volume encompassed by the prescribed percent dose (Vp) was about 2.5% less with XVMC vs. PB-hete and

  19. Psychological Factors Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Treatment and Survivorship : Evidence and Opportunities for Behavioral Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howren, M. Bryant; Christensen, Alan J.; Karnell, Lucy Hynds; Funk, Gerry F.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC) not only face a potentially life-threatening diagnosis but must endure treatment that often results in significant, highly visible disfigurement and disruptions of essential functioning, such as deficits or complications in eating, swallowing, breathing, and speech. Each year, approximately…

  20. Phototheranostic Porphyrin Nanoparticles Enable Visualization and Targeted Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in Clinically Relevant Models

    PubMed Central

    Muhanna, Nidal; Jin, Cheng S; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chan, Harley; Qiu, Yi; Jiang, Wenlei; Cui, Liyang; Burgess, Laura; Akens, Margarete K; Chen, Juan; Irish, Jonathan C; Zheng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the fifth most common type of cancer worldwide and remains challenging for effective treatment due to the proximity to critical anatomical structures in the head and neck region, which increases the probability of toxicity from surgery and radiotherapy, and therefore emphasizes the importance of maximizing the targeted ablation. We have assessed the effectiveness of porphysome nanoparticles to enhance fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of head and neck tumors in rabbit and hamster models. In addition, we evaluated the effectiveness of this agent for localized photothermal ablative therapy of head and neck tumors. We have demonstrated that porphysomes not only enabled fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of buccal and tongue carcinomas, but also allowed for complete targeted ablation of these tumors. The supremacy of porphysome-enabled photothermal therapy over surgery to completely eradicate primary tumors and metastatic regional lymph node while sparing the adjacent critical structures' function has been demonstrated for the first time. This study represents a novel breakthrough that has the potential to revolutionize our approach to tumor diagnosis and treatment in head and neck cancer and beyond. PMID:26681987

  1. The War of Independence: a surgical algorithm for the treatment of head injury in the continental army.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Victor M; Shah, Manan; Yick, Frederick; Gandhi, Chirag D; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    The American Revolution was a gruesome warthat resulted in the independence of the United States of America from the British crown and countless casualties to both belligerents. However, from these desperate times, the treatment of traumatic head injury was elucidated, as were the origins of American neurosurgery in the 18th century. During the war, the surgical manual used by military field surgeons was titled Plain Concise Practical Remarks on the Treatment of Wounds and Fractures, by Dr. John Jones. This manual explains the different types of cranial injuries understood at that time as well as the relevant surgical treatment. This article seeks to review the surgical treatment of head injury in the Revolutionary War as outlined by Dr. Jones's manual. PMID:26274994

  2. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. Methods: The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and

  3. Optimization of targeted two-photon PDT triads for the treatment of head and neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Starkey, Jean R.; Dubinina, Galyna; Fahlstrom, Carl; Shepard, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    Synthesis of new PDT triads that incorporate a tumor-killing porphyrin with large two-photon cross-section for 150 fs laser pulses (2000 GM) in the Near-infrared (NIR) at 840 nm, a NIR imaging agent, and a small peptide that targets over-expressed EGF receptors on the tumor surface. This triad formulation has been optimized over the past year to treat FADU Head and Neck SCC xenograft tumors in SCID mice. Effective PDT triad dose (1-10 mg/Kg) and laser operating parameters (840 nm, 15-45 min, 900 mW) have been established. Light, dark and PDT treatment toxicities were determined, showing no adverse effects. Previous experiments in phantom and mouse models indicate that tumors can be treated directly through the skin to effective depths between 2 and 5 cm. Treated mice demonstrated rapid tumor regression with some complete cures in as little as 15-20 days. No adverse effects were observed in any healthy tissue through which the focused laser beam passed before reaching the tumor site, and excellent healing occurred post treatment including rapid hair re-growth. Not all irradiation protocols lead to complete cures. Since two-photon PDT is carried out by rastering focused irradiation throughout the tumor, there is the possibility that as the treatment depth increases, some parts of the tumor may escape irradiation due to increased scattering, thus raising the possibility that tumor re-growth could be triggered by small islands of untreated cells, especially at the rapidly growing tumor margins, a problem we hope to alleviate by using image-guided two-photon PDT.

  4. Biomechanical-based image registration for head and neck radiation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Velec, Mike; Chau, Lily; Breen, Stephen; Brock, Kristy

    2010-11-01

    Deformable image registration of four head and neck cancer patients has been conducted using a biomechanical-based model. Patient-specific 3D finite element models have been developed using CT and cone-beam CT image data of the planning and a radiation treatment session. The model consists of seven vertebrae (C1 to C7), mandible, larynx, left and right parotid glands, tumor and body. Different combinations of boundary conditions are applied in the model in order to find the configuration with a minimum registration error. Each vertebra in the planning session is individually aligned with its correspondence in the treatment session. Rigid alignment is used for each individual vertebra and the mandible since no deformation is expected in the bones. In addition, the effect of morphological differences in the external body between the two image sessions is investigated. The accuracy of the registration is evaluated using the tumor and both parotid glands by comparing the calculated Dice similarity index of these structures following deformation in relation to their true surface defined in the image of the second session. The registration is improved when the vertebrae and mandible are aligned in the two sessions with the highest average Dice index of 0.86 ± 0.08, 0.84 ± 0.11 and 0.89 ± 0.04 for the tumor, left and right parotid glands, respectively. The accuracy of the center of mass location of tumor and parotid glands is also improved by deformable image registration where the errors in the tumor and parotid glands decrease from 4.0 ± 1.1, 3.4 ± 1.5 and 3.8 ± 0.9 mm using rigid registration to 2.3 ± 1.0, 2.5 ± 0.8 and 2.0 ± 0.9 mm in the deformable image registration when alignment of vertebrae and mandible is conducted in addition to the surface projection of the body. This work was presented at the SPIE conference, California, 2010: Al-Mayah A, Moseley J, Chau L, Breen S, and Brock K 2010 Biomechanical based deformable image registration of head and neck

  5. FDG-PET/CT in the Assessment of Treatment Response after Oncologic Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Keski-Säntti, Harri; Mustonen, Timo; Schildt, Jukka; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In many centers, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is used to monitor treatment response after definitive (chemo)radiotherapy [(C)RT] for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but its usefulness remains somewhat controversial. We aimed at assessing the accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in detecting residual disease after (C)RT. METHOD All HNSCC patients with FDG-PET/CT performed to assess treatment response 10–18 weeks after definitive (C)RT at our institution during 2008–2010 were included. The patient charts were reviewed for FDG-PET/CT findings, histopathologic findings, and follow-up data. The median follow-up time for FDG-PET/CT negative patients was 26 months. RESULTS Eighty-eight eligible patients were identified. The stage distribution was as follows: I, n = 1; II, n = 15; III, n = 17; IV, n = 55. The negative predictive value, positive predictive value, specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of FDG-PET/CT in detecting residual disease were 87%, 81%, 94%, 65%, and 85%, respectively. The corresponding specific figures for the primary tumor site were 91%, 71%, 94%, 59%, and 86% and for the neck 93%, 100%, 100%, 75%, and 94%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS In patients who have received definitive (C)RT for HNSCC, post-treatment FDG-PET/CT has good potential to guide clinical decision-making. Patients with negative scan can safely be followed up clinically only, while positive scan necessitates tissue biopsies or a neck dissection to rule out residual disease. PMID:25210484

  6. The rationale and technique of head exercises in the treatment of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Dix, M R

    1979-01-01

    The central compensation mechanisms for vertigo resulting from vestibular lesions are described together with the scientific basis for head exercises in vestibular rehabilitation. The indications and contra-indications for head exercises are discussed and the Cawthorne-Cooksey regime of exercises illustrated. PMID:314722

  7. Who Benefits Most from Head Start? Using Latent Class Moderation to Examine Differential Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brittany Rhoades; Lanza, Stephanie T.

    2014-01-01

    Head Start (HS) is the largest federally funded preschool program for disadvantaged children. Research has shown relatively small impacts on cognitive and social skills; therefore, some have questioned its effectiveness. Using data from the Head Start Impact Study (3-year-old cohort; N = 2,449), latent class analysis was used to (a) identify…

  8. Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck: pathogenesis, current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Alok T; Miles, Brett A

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a relatively uncommon, neuroendocrine, cutaneous malignancy that often exhibits clinically aggressive features and is associated with a poor prognosis. It typically presents as a painless, rapidly enlarging, dome-shaped red or purplish nodule in a sun-exposed area of the head and neck or upper extremities. Our understanding of MCC has increased dramatically over the last several years and the pathogenesis continues to be an area of active research. The etiology is likely multifactorial with immunosuppression, UV-induced skin damage, and viral factors contributing to the development of MCC. The recent discovery of Merkel cell polyomavirus has allowed for at least one aspect of disease development to be much better understood. In most cases, treatment consists of wide local excision with adjuvant radiation therapy. The role of chemotherapeutics is still being defined. The recent advancement of knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of MCC has led to an explosion research into novel therapeutic agents and strategies. This review seeks to summarize the current body of literature regarding the pathogenesis of MCC and potential targets for future therapies. PMID:26316785

  9. Quality of Life in Swallowing Disorders after Nonsurgical Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Marta Halina; Dedivitis, Rogerio A.; Queija, Débora Santos; Nascimento, Paulo César

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy can result in severe swallowing disorders with potential risk for aspiration and can negatively impact the patient's quality of life (QOL). Objective To assess swallowing-related QOL in patients who underwent radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Methods We interviewed 110 patients (85 men and 25 women) who had undergone exclusive radiotherapy (25.5%) or concomitant chemoradiotherapy (74.5%) from 6 to 12 months before the study. The Quality of Life in Swallowing Disorders (SWAL-QOL) questionnaire was employed to evaluate dysphagia-related QOL. Results The QOL was reduced in all domains for all patients. The scores were worse among men. There was a relationship between oral cavity as the primary cancer site and the fatigue domain and also between advanced cancer stage and the impact of food selection, communication, and social function domains. Chemoradiotherapy association, the presence of nasogastric tube and tracheotomy, and the persistence of alcoholism and smoking had also a negative effect on the QOL. Conclusions According to the SWAL-QOL questionnaire, the dysphagia-related impact on QOL was observed 6 to 12 months after the treatment ended. PMID:25992151

  10. Integration of chemotherapy into a combined modality treatment plan for head and neck cancer: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, J.H.; Taylor, S.G.

    1981-02-01

    This review highlights the most important recent advances in the chemotherapeutic management of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In patients who have recurrent or metastatic disease, methotrexate, platinum, and bleomyc are three active drugs when used as single agents. There is no evidence that high-dose methotrexate therapy is superior to more conventional weekly intravenous methotrexate in the treatment of recurrent disease. Platinum is a new agent that has demonstrated activity against hematogenous as well as regional disease. In the absence of evidence of a dose-response curve for platinum, the lower dosage schedules sould be used that can be given with acceptable toxicity on an outpatient basis. Combination chemotherapy has resulted in a high proportion of objective responders and approximately 20% complete remissions to any of several platinum-containing regimens. However, the median duration of response remains short and none of the combination drug programs has been established as yet as superior to single agent chemotherapy in a randomized trial.

  11. Emerging therapies in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell cancers of head and neck.

    PubMed

    Raza, Shahzad; Kornblum, Noah; Kancharla, Venkat P; Baig, Mahadi A; Singh, Amrit B; Kalavar, Madhumati

    2011-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs) represent 4 to 5% of all solid malignancies. Despite improvements in diagnostic techniques, 60% of patients will present with locally advanced HNSCCs with a median survival of about 12 months and 5-year overall survival of approximately 10-40%. Recent clinical trials have altered the treatment landscape by refining existing forms of radiation, incorporation of IMRT, choice of chemotherapeutic agents, introduction of biological and targeted therapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has recently been approved in combination with RT in patients with locally advanced HNSCCs. Antiangiogenic therapies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (gefitinib and erlotinib) have also shown promise in the clinical trials. Vandetanib, an antagonist of both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the EGFR is currently being tested in phase II trial. New patents on hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor, insulin-like growth factor or the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, farnesyl transferase inhibitors have shown promise in the management of HNSCCs. Nevertheless, identification of predictive biomarkers of resistance or sensitivity to these therapies remains a fundamental challenge in the optimal selection of patients most likely to benefit from them. However, increase in efficacy comes at the cost of increased toxicity. The current review focuses on insight into recent patents and updates on the clinical trials using new investigational agents in the management for HNSCCs. PMID:21247406

  12. Evaluation of Decomposition Treatment for Halogenized Compounds by Acceleration of Electrons from Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaura, Michiteru; Uchida, Shigeaki; Fujita, Masayuki; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    2007-10-01

    A novel decomposition treatment for halogenized compounds using a carbon nanotube (CNT) electron source is proposed [1]. It is observed that high concentrations of chlorophenols can be significantly decreased by using a CNT electron source. The concentration is reduced to a maximum level of less than 1/1000 after only a few minutes of treatment. The input energy required for 1 g of chlorophenol is 46 J when the injection power is 0.5 W. The input energy is only 1/161 times lesser than that required for the treatment using barrier discharge. The proposed treatment using CNTs has a high efficiency because the input energy is provided only by the accelerated electrons. A harmless and high-efficiency decomposition treatment for halogenized compounds using an electron source with carbon nanotubes is discussed. [1] M.Yamaura, et al. Chem. Phys. Lett 435, 148 (2007).

  13. Reactions and moderators for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron capture therapy source for cancer treatment. Final report, October 1900--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, J.F.; Brugger, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been considered for nearly 30 years, and been practiced in Japan since the late 1970`s. Early experiments in the USA were generally nonpromising. However, new boron-containing ligand compounds were developed, which would seek out brain tumors. Concentration levels of the order of 30 micrograms of boron per gram of tissue become possible, and interest in the BNCT technique was revived in the USA beginning about 1985, with research reactors as the obvious source of the neutrons for the treatment. However, the limited number of research reactors in the USA (and the world) would mean that this treatment modality would be quite limited. The goals of this work was: (1) Examine as many as possible reactions of charged particles on various targets of an accelerator, and determine those that would give high neutron yields of a convenient energy. (2) Determine, through calculations (using Monte Carlo stochastic computer codes), the best design for a moderator/reflector assembly which would give high thermal flux at a nominal 5 cm depth in the head of a patient, with minimal radiation dose from gamma rays and fast neutrons. (3) Perform a benchmark experiment using a positive ion accelerator. The Li-7(p,n) reaction was chosen for the benchmark, since it was readily available for most accelerators, and was one of the two highest yielding reactions from Task No. 1. Since the University of Missouri has no accelerator, possible accelerators at other universities were investigated, as to availability and cost. A unit having capability in the 2.5 MeV range was desired.

  14. Curative effects of head γ-SRT for the treatment of functional pituitary macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Wei; Wang, Ren Zhi; Xing, Bing; Yao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the curative effects and proper radiotherapy plan of head γ-stereotactic radiotherapy (γ-SRT) for the treatment of functional pituitary macroadenoma. Clinical samples of 30 patients that underwent γ-SRT (radiotherapy group) and 26 patients that underwent pituitary adenoma resection via single nasal-sphenoidal approach (surgery group) were analyzed retrospectively and their curative effects were compared. The results showed that in the radiotherapy group, 12 cases accepted single fraction irradiation, with an average maximum diameter of tumor body of 1.8±0.6 cm, average volume of 0.6±0.4 cm3, average dose of the central point of 52.6±18.7 Gy, average dose of the peripheral point of 24.7±10.2 mGy, and isodose curve of 50–70%. The remaining 18 cases accepted multiple fraction irradiation, with an average irradiation of 3.7±1.6 times, maximum average diameter of tumor body of 4.3±1.8 cm, average volume of 4.8±2.7 cm3, average dose of the central point of 24.6±12.5 Gy, average dose of the peripheral point of 13.6±7.4 mGy, and isodose curve of 50–70%. Following treatment, the tumor volumes of patients in the radiotherapy group that received single and multiple irradiation were significantly reduced and the visual acuity and visual field were improved (p<0.05). The two groups were followed up for an average of 3.8 years, and the follow-up results showed that differences of the two groups on the tumor control, mortality and hypopituitarism rates were not statistically significant (p>0.05). In addition, the incidence of complications of the radiotherapy group was significantly decreased as compared to that of the surgery group (p<0.05). In conclusion, γ-SRT was safe and effective for the treatment of functional pituitary adenomas. Its curative effects were equivalent to that of the microscopic single nasal-sphenoidal approach with fewer complications. PMID:27446365

  15. Transoral surgery for laryngo-pharyngeal cancer - The paradigm shift of the head and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Tateya, Ichiro; Shiotani, Akihiro; Satou, Yasuo; Tomifuji, Masayuki; Morita, Shuko; Muto, Manabu; Ito, Juichi

    2016-02-01

    Transoral surgery is a less invasive treatment that is becoming a major strategy in the treatment of laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. It is a minimally invasive approach that has no skin incision and limits the extent of tissue dissection, disruption of speech and swallowing muscles, blood loss, damage to major neurovascular structures, and injury to normal tissue. Transoral approaches to the laryngo-pharynx, except for early glottis cancer, had been limited traditionally to tumors that can be observed directly and manipulated with standard instrumentation and lighting. Since the 1990s, transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) has been used as an organ preservation strategy with good oncological control and good functional results, although it has not been widely used because of its technical difficulty. Recently, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is becoming popular as a new treatment modality for laryngo-pharyngeal cancer, and surgical robots are used widely in the world since United States FDA approval in 2009. In spite of the global spread of TORS, it has not been approved by the Japan FDA, which has led to the development of other low-cost transoral surgical techniques in Japan. Transoral videolaryngoscopic surgery (TOVS) was developed as a new transoral surgery system for laryngo-pharyngeal lesions to address the problems of TLM. In TOVS, a rigid endoscope is used to visualize the surgical field instead of a microscope and the advantages of TOVS include the wide operative field and working space achieved using the distending laryngoscope and videolaryngoscope. Also, with the spread of narrow band imaging (NBI), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), which are widely used for superficial cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, have been applied for the superficial laryngo-pharyngeal cancer. Both EMR and ESD are performed mainly by gastroenterologists with a sharp dissector and magnifying endoscopy (ME)-NBI with minimal surgical margin

  16. Feasibility and Acceptance of a Telehealth Intervention to Promote Symptom Management during Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Head, Barbara A; Keeney, Cynthia; Studts, Jamie L; Khayat, Mamdouh; Bumpous, Jeffrey; Pfeifer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancers have a myriad of distressing symptoms and treatment side effects which significantly alter communication and lower quality of life. Telehealth technology has demonstrated promise in improving patient-provider communication by delivering supportive educational content and guidance to patients in their homes. A telehealth intervention using a simple telemessaging device was developed to provide daily education, guidance, and encouragement for patients undergoing initial treatment of head and neck cancer. The goal of this article is to report the feasibility and acceptance of the intervention using both quantitative and qualitative measures. No eligible patients declined participation based on technology issues. Participants completed the intervention over 86% of the expected days of use. Direct nursing contact was seldom needed during the study period. Satisfaction with the technology and the intervention was very high. In this study a telehealth intervention was shown to be feasible, well accepted, and regularly used by patients experiencing extreme symptom burden and declining quality of life as a result of aggressive treatment for head and neck cancer. PMID:21499540

  17. A consistent approach for the treatment of Fermi acceleration in time-dependent billiards.

    PubMed

    Karlis, A K; Diakonos, F K; Constantoudis, V

    2012-06-01

    The standard description of Fermi acceleration, developing in a class of time-dependent billiards, is given in terms of a diffusion process taking place in momentum space. Within this framework, the evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of the magnitude of particle velocities as a function of the number of collisions n is determined by the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE). In the literature, the FPE is constructed by identifying the transport coefficients with the ensemble averages of the change of the magnitude of particle velocity and its square in the course of one collision. Although this treatment leads to the correct solution after a sufficiently large number of collisions have been reached, the transient part of the evolution of the PDF is not described. Moreover, in the case of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM), if a standard simplification is employed, the solution of the FPE is even inconsistent with the values of the transport coefficients used for its derivation. The goal of our work is to provide a self-consistent methodology for the treatment of Fermi acceleration in time-dependent billiards. The proposed approach obviates any assumptions for the continuity of the random process and the existence of the limits formally defining the transport coefficients of the FPE. Specifically, we suggest, instead of the calculation of ensemble averages, the derivation of the one-step transition probability function and the use of the Chapman-Kolmogorov forward equation. This approach is generic and can be applied to any time-dependent billiard for the treatment of Fermi-acceleration. As a first step, we apply this methodology to the FUM, being the archetype of time-dependent billiards to exhibit Fermi acceleration. PMID:22757579

  18. A consistent approach for the treatment of Fermi acceleration in time-dependent billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlis, A. K.; Diakonos, F. K.; Constantoudis, V.

    2012-06-01

    The standard description of Fermi acceleration, developing in a class of time-dependent billiards, is given in terms of a diffusion process taking place in momentum space. Within this framework, the evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of the magnitude of particle velocities as a function of the number of collisions n is determined by the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE). In the literature, the FPE is constructed by identifying the transport coefficients with the ensemble averages of the change of the magnitude of particle velocity and its square in the course of one collision. Although this treatment leads to the correct solution after a sufficiently large number of collisions have been reached, the transient part of the evolution of the PDF is not described. Moreover, in the case of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM), if a standard simplification is employed, the solution of the FPE is even inconsistent with the values of the transport coefficients used for its derivation. The goal of our work is to provide a self-consistent methodology for the treatment of Fermi acceleration in time-dependent billiards. The proposed approach obviates any assumptions for the continuity of the random process and the existence of the limits formally defining the transport coefficients of the FPE. Specifically, we suggest, instead of the calculation of ensemble averages, the derivation of the one-step transition probability function and the use of the Chapman-Kolmogorov forward equation. This approach is generic and can be applied to any time-dependent billiard for the treatment of Fermi-acceleration. As a first step, we apply this methodology to the FUM, being the archetype of time-dependent billiards to exhibit Fermi acceleration.

  19. Who Benefits Most from Head Start? Using Latent Class Moderation to Examine Differential Treatment Effects

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Brittany Rhoades; Lanza, Stephanie T.

    2014-01-01

    Head Start is the largest federally funded preschool program for disadvantaged children. Research has shown relatively small impacts on cognitive and social skills; therefore some have questioned its effectiveness. Using data from the Head Start Impact Study (3-year-old cohort; N = 2,449), we used latent class analysis to (1) identify subgroups of children defined by baseline characteristics of their home environment and caregiver and (2) test whether the effects of Head Start on cognitive, and behavioral and relationship skills over two years differed across subgroups. The results suggest that the effectiveness of Head Start varies quite substantially. For some children there appears to be a significant, and in some cases, long-term, positive impact. For others there is little to no effect. PMID:25132426

  20. SU-E-T-197: Helical Cranial-Spinal Treatments with a Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Templeton, A; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) of systemic disease requires a high level of beam intensity modulation to reduce dose to bone marrow and other critical structures. Current helical delivery machines can take 30 minutes or more of beam-on time to complete these treatments. This pilot study aims to test the feasibility of performing helical treatments with a conventional linear accelerator using longitudinal couch travel during multiple gantry revolutions. Methods: The VMAT optimization package of the Eclipse 10.0 treatment planning system was used to optimize pseudo-helical CSI plans of 5 clinical patient scans. Each gantry revolution was divided into three 120° arcs with each isocenter shifted longitudinally. Treatments requiring more than the maximum 10 arcs used multiple plans with each plan after the first being optimized including the dose of the others (Figure 1). The beam pitch was varied between 0.2 and 0.9 (couch speed 5- 20cm/revolution and field width of 22cm) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared to tomotherapy plans. Results: Viable pseudo-helical plans were achieved using Eclipse. Decreasing the pitch from 0.9 to 0.2 lowered the maximum lens dose by 40%, the mean bone marrow dose by 2.1% and the maximum esophagus dose by 17.5%. (Figure 2). Linac-based helical plans showed dose results comparable to tomotherapy delivery for both target coverage and critical organ sparing, with the D50 of bone marrow and esophagus respectively 12% and 31% lower in the helical linear accelerator plan (Figure 3). Total mean beam-on time for the linear accelerator plan was 8.3 minutes, 54% faster than the tomotherapy average for the same plans. Conclusions: This pilot study has demonstrated the feasibility of planning pseudo-helical treatments for CSI targets using a conventional linac and dynamic couch movement, and supports the ongoing development of true helical optimization and delivery.

  1. A review of dental treatment of head and neck cancer patients, before, during and after radiotherapy: part 2.

    PubMed

    Jawad, H; Hodson, N A; Nixon, P J

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of head and neck cancer is on the rise. Radiation therapy is one of the major treatment modalities for the management of oral malignancies. As with any treatment modality, radiation therapy is associated with various complications. The second part of this series is a review of the oral changes that occur during and after radiotherapy and the oral management of head and neck oncology patients before, during and after radiotherapy. Dental practitioners will encounter patients who have been affected by cancer or who are current cancer patents. General dental practitioners (GDPs) have a vital and proactive role in supporting such patients. The aim of this article is to review the oral management of these patients during and after radiotherapy, and gives practical advice for GDPs and their teams in the long-term care of these patients. PMID:25613261

  2. [On medical screening of civilian candidates for cosmonauts by exposure to the head-to-pelvis acceleration profiles].

    PubMed

    Krotovskaia, A R; Koloteva, M I; Luk'ianiuk, V Iu; Vil'-Vil'iams, I F; Bazhanova, T M

    2006-01-01

    The subject of analysis was the data on +3 and +5 Gz tolerance of 130 civilian non-pilot applicants for cosmonauts (men and women, aged 23 to 55) gathered over the past 30 years. Length of the centrifuge arm was 7.25 meters and the total number of primary centrifuge runs was 309. For nearly every second of the applicants (46.7%) acceleration at +5 Gz was an ordeal causing distinct vascular or coronary decompensation. Thus, 29.7% exhibited various combinations of brief visual disturbances, tachycardia, tachypnea, and systolic arterial pressure in the shoulders; in 17%, visual disturbances and/or their precursors were combined with exaggerated cardio-vascular functional parameters, arrhythmia, and serious vegetative disorders. Most of those who had failed to endure the first centrifugation were unable to improve G tolerance during next runs; indeed, they showed negative G-tolerance dynamics. G intolerance grew in significance or was exacerbated by new disorders and their combinations. These results testify against exposure of non-pilot applicants for cosmonauts to +5 G, during the primary medical screening. PMID:16999066

  3. Acceleration of tooth movement during orthodontic treatment--a frontier in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nimeri, Ghada; Kau, Chung H; Abou-Kheir, Nadia S; Corona, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, there is an increased tendency for researches to focus on accelerating methods for tooth movement due to the huge demand for adults for a shorter orthodontic treatment time. Unfortunately, long orthodontic treatment time poses several disadvantages like higher predisposition to caries, gingival recession, and root resorption. This increases the demand to find the best method to increase tooth movement with the least possible disadvantages. The purpose of this study is to view the successful approaches in tooth movement and to highlight the newest technique in tooth movement. A total of 74 articles were reviewed in tooth movement and related discipline from 1959 to 2013. There is a high amount of researches done on the biological method for tooth movement; unfortunately, the majority of them were done on animals. Cytokine, PTH, vitamin D, and RANKL/RANK/OPG show promising results; on the other hand, relaxin does not accelerate tooth movement, but increases the tooth mobility. Low-level laser therapy has shown positive outcome, but further investigation should be done for the best energy and duration to achieve the highest success rate. Surgical approach has the most predictable outcomes but with limited application due to its aggressiveness. Piezocision technique is considered one of the best surgical approaches because it poses good periodontal tissue response and excellent aesthetic outcome. Due to the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, further investigations should be done to determine the best method to accelerate tooth movement. PMID:24326040

  4. Treatment of Elderly Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Szturz, Petr; Vermorken, Jan B.

    2016-01-01

    The demographics of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is marked by a growing number of patients aged 65 and over, which is in line with global projections for other cancer types. In developed countries, more than half of new SCCHN cases are diagnosed in older people, and in 15 years from now, the proportion is expected to rise by more than 10%. Still, a high-level evidence-based consensus to guide the clinical decision process is strikingly lacking. The available data from retrospective studies and subset analyses of prospective trials suffer from a considerable underrepresentation of senior participants. The situation is even more challenging in the recurrent and/or metastatic setting, where usually only palliative measures are employed. Nevertheless, it is becoming clear that, if treated irrespective of chronological age, fit elderly patients in a good general condition and with a low burden of comorbidities may derive a similar survival advantage as their younger counterparts. Despite that, undertreatment represents a widespread phenomenon and, together with competing non-cancer mortality, is suggested to be an important cause of the worse treatment outcomes observed in this population. Due to physiological changes in drug metabolism occurring with advancing age, the major concerns relate to chemotherapy administration. In locally advanced SCCHN, concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients over 70 years remains a point of controversy owing to its possibly higher toxicity and questionable benefit. However, accumulating evidence suggests that it should, indeed, be considered in selected cases when biological age is taken into account. Results from a randomized trial conducted in lung cancer showed that treatment selection based on a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) significantly reduced toxicity. However, a CGA is time-consuming and not necessary for all patients. To overcome this hurdle, geriatric screening tools have been introduced

  5. Failed vascularized fibular graft in treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A histopathological analysis

    PubMed Central

    MELONI, MARIA CHIARA; HOEDEMAEKER, W. RUSSALKA; FORNASIER, VICTOR

    2016-01-01

    Purpose vascularized fibular grafting has been used to treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head in younger patients. Although the results described in the literature are promising, the failure rate is still significant, especially in steroid users. This study was undertaken to learn more, on a histopathological level, about the mechanism of vascularized fibular graft failure. Methods fifteen femoral heads removed at conversion to total hip arthroplasty were analyzed. The case load comprised 10 men and 5 women. They ranged in age from 28 to 39 years and had a median age of 35 years. The interval between the vascularized fibular implant procedure and the conversion to total hip arthroplasty ranged from 22 months to 30 months; the median interval was 26 months. All the patients were steroid users. The heads were sectioned and axial and coronal sections were taken and stained using the WHO method (hematoxylin, phloxine, saffron and Alcian green). A quantitative and qualitative analysis of graft-host interaction at the head (zone 1), neck (zone 2) and epiphysis (zone 3) was performed. Results all the specimens showed recognizable collapse of the articular surface over the area of necrosis. Thirteen femoral heads showed the presence of an osteochondral flap attached only at the margins of the area of avascular necrosis, and 10 of these 13 femoral heads also showed loss of the articulating surface with an ulcer crater corresponding to the exposed area of avascular necrosis. Conclusions vascularized fibular graft failure seems to be related to a negative effect of creeping substitution: the revascularization becomes a negative force as it supports unbalanced bone resorption, which, as is well known, is enhanced by corticosteroids. Clinical relevance creeping substitution is an undermining force in the repair and revascularization of the necrotic area in the femoral head. PMID:27386444

  6. Feasibility Study of Moderately Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plus Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin After Induction Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Head-and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Mignogna, Samantha; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Cilla, Savino; Calista, Franco; Serafini, Giovanni; Digesu, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Picardi, Vincenzo; Caravatta, Luciana; Di Lullo, Liberato; Giglio, Gianfranco; Sallustio, Giuseppina; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of moderately accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with weekly cisplatin, after induction chemotherapy, in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV locally advanced HNC, without progressive disease after three courses of induction chemotherapy, received concurrent chemo-IMRT (weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m{sup 2} plus simultaneous integrated boost IMRT). A total of 67.5 Gy in 30 fractions were delivered to primary tumor and involved nodes, 60 Gy in 30 fractions to high-risk nodal areas, and 55.5 Gy in 30 fractions to low-risk nodal areas. Results: In all, 36 patients (median age, 56 years) with International Union Against Cancer (UICC) Stage III (n = 5) and IV (n = 31) were included. Of the 36 patients, 17 had received CF (cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) and 19 had received docetaxel cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (DCF). During concurrent chemoradiation, 11 of 36 patients (30.5%) experienced Grade III mucositis (CF, 47%; DCF, 15%; p < 0.04). Grade III pharyngeal-esophageal toxicity was observed in 5 of 19 patients (26.3%; CF, 0.0%; DCF, 26.3%; p = 0.02). Two patients died of complications (5.5%). After chemoradiation, the complete response rate was 63.8%. Two-year local control was 88.7%. Two-year progression free survival and overall survival were 74.5% and 60.9%, respectively. Conclusions: In our experience, a moderately accelerated chemo-IMRT was feasible after induction chemotherapy. However, a noteworthy early death rate of 5.5% was observed. Intensive supportive care strategies should be defined to better manage radiation-induced toxic effects. Longer follow-up is required to determine the incidence of late radiation toxicities and tumor control rates.

  7. Investigating Clinical Failure of Bone Grafting through a Window at the Femoral Head Neck Junction Surgery for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Zhao, Dingyan; Gao, Fuqiang; Su, Yangming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to analyze the clinical factors related to the failure of bone grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction. Methods In total, 119 patients (158 hips) underwent bone grafting for treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were classified by their ARCO staging and CJFH classification. All patients were clinically and radiographically followed up every three months during the first year and every six months in the following year. The clinical follow-up comprised determination of pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores, while serial AP, frog lateral radiographs, and CT scan were used for the radiographic follow-up. Results The clinical failure of bone grafting was observed in 40 patients. The clinical failure rates in patients belonging to ARCO stage II period, IIIa, and III (b + c) were 25.9%, 16.2%, and 61.5%, respectively, while those in patients belonging to (C + M + L1) type and L2, L3 type disease groups were 1.7%, 38.9%, and 39%, respectively. The clinical failure rates in patients aged below 40 and those aged 40 and over were 20.5% and 39.0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Disease type, disease stage, and patient age are risk factors for failure of bone graft surgery. Patients belonging to ARCO stage II and IIIa showed a good overall response rate, while patients belonging to ARCO stage IIIb and IIIc and those with necrotic lesions involving the lateral pillar (L2 and L3 type) showed high surgical failure rates. PMID:27285821

  8. Sartorius muscle pedicle iliac bone graft for the treatment of avascular necrosis of femur head

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head needs to be addressed early in the course of the disease, to prevent progression to osteoarthritis. A revascularizing procedure which can help preserve the head should be considered in young adults to alleviate the need for total hip arthroplasty. We included 40 cases (53 hips) of AVN of femoral head operated with Sartorius muscle pedicle iliac bone grafting, done by the senior author. Early post-operative rehabilitation was done. The weight bearing was delayed for 6 weeks. All the patients were followed clinically and radiologically at regular intervals. The operated femoral heads, were grouped according to Ficat’s staging: 24 in stage IIA (45.3%), 22 in stage IIB (41.5%) and 07 in stage III (13.2%). The average duration of surgery was 85 min (range: 55–130 min). The total duration of follow-up was average 4.2 years (range: 2.2–15 years).The Harris hip score was excellent (>90) in 18 hips (33.96%), good (80–89) in 24 hips (45.28%), fair (70–79) in 9 hips (17%) and poor (<70) in 2 hips (3.7%). AVN of the femoral head is a painful and disabling condition in young adults. Sartorius muscle pedicle bone graft technique allows adequate decompression, re vascularization and osteogenesis of the femur head in Ficat’s stage IIa, IIb and III, in young adults. This is an effective and easy technique to adopt with excellent to good results in 80% cases and is associated with only minimal complications. PMID:27583161

  9. Sartorius muscle pedicle iliac bone graft for the treatment of avascular necrosis of femur head.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Nishint; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-08-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head needs to be addressed early in the course of the disease, to prevent progression to osteoarthritis. A revascularizing procedure which can help preserve the head should be considered in young adults to alleviate the need for total hip arthroplasty. We included 40 cases (53 hips) of AVN of femoral head operated with Sartorius muscle pedicle iliac bone grafting, done by the senior author. Early post-operative rehabilitation was done. The weight bearing was delayed for 6 weeks. All the patients were followed clinically and radiologically at regular intervals. The operated femoral heads, were grouped according to Ficat's staging: 24 in stage IIA (45.3%), 22 in stage IIB (41.5%) and 07 in stage III (13.2%). The average duration of surgery was 85 min (range: 55-130 min). The total duration of follow-up was average 4.2 years (range: 2.2-15 years).The Harris hip score was excellent (>90) in 18 hips (33.96%), good (80-89) in 24 hips (45.28%), fair (70-79) in 9 hips (17%) and poor (<70) in 2 hips (3.7%). AVN of the femoral head is a painful and disabling condition in young adults. Sartorius muscle pedicle bone graft technique allows adequate decompression, re vascularization and osteogenesis of the femur head in Ficat's stage IIa, IIb and III, in young adults. This is an effective and easy technique to adopt with excellent to good results in 80% cases and is associated with only minimal complications. PMID:27583161

  10. Accelerated seeded precipitation pre-treatment of municipal wastewater to reduce scaling.

    PubMed

    Sanciolo, Peter; Zou, Linda; Gray, Stephen; Leslie, Greg; Stevens, Daryl

    2008-05-01

    Membrane based treatment processes are very effective in removing salt from wastewater, but are hindered by calcium scale deposit formation. This study investigates the feasibility of removing calcium from treated sewage wastewater using accelerated seeded precipitation. The rate of calcium removal was measured during bench scale batch mode seeded precipitation experiments at pH 9.5 using various quantities of calcium carbonate as seed material. The results indicate that accelerated seeded precipitation may be a feasible option for the decrease of calcium in reverse osmosis concentrate streams during the desalination of treated sewage wastewater for irrigation purposes, promising decreased incidence of scaling and the option to control the sodium adsorption ratio and nutritional properties of the desalted water. It was found that accelerated seeded precipitation of calcium from treated sewage wastewater was largely ineffective if carried out without pre-treatment of the wastewater. Evidence was presented that suggests that phosphate may be a major interfering substance for the seeded precipitation of calcium from this type of wastewater. A pH adjustment to 9.5 followed by a 1-h equilibration period was found to be an effective pre-treatment for the removal of interferences. Calcium carbonate seed addition at 10 g l(-1) to wastewater that had been pre-treated in this way was found to result in calcium precipitation from supersaturated level at 60 mg l(-1) to saturated level at 5 mg l(-1). Approximately 90% reduction of the calcium level occurred 5 min after seed addition. A further 10% reduction was achieved 30 min after seed addition. PMID:18328536

  11. Application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation treatment planning for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Musaddiq J; Siddiqui, Farzan; Schwartz, David; Yuan, Jiankui; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min

    2015-01-01

    18-fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) provides significant information in multiple settings in the management of head and neck cancers (HNC). This article seeks to define the additional benefit of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck through a review of relevant literature. By helping further define both primary and nodal volumes, radiation treatment planning can be improved using PET/CT. Special attention is paid to the independent benefit of PET/CT in targeting mucosal primaries as well as in detecting nodal metastases. The utility of PET/CT is also explored for treatment planning in the setting of SCC of unknown primary as PET/CT may help define a mucosal target volume by guiding biopsies for examination under anesthesia thus changing the treatment paradigm and limiting the extent of therapy. Implications of the use of PET/CT for proper target delineation in patients with artifact from dental procedures are discussed and the impact of dental artifact on CT-based PET attenuation correction is assessed. Finally, comment is made upon the role of PET/CT in the high-risk post-operative setting, particularly in the context of radiation dose escalation. Real case examples are used in these settings to elucidate the practical benefits of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning in HNCs. PMID:26644824

  12. Modified porous tantalum rod technique for the treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Pakos, Emilios E; Megas, Panayiotis; Paschos, Nikolaos K; Syggelos, Spyridon A; Kouzelis, Antonios; Georgiadis, Georgios; Xenakis, Theodoros A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study a modified porous tantalum technique for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. METHODS: The porous tantalum rod was combined with endoscopy, curettage, autologous bone grafting and use of bone marrow aspirates from iliac crest aspiration in 49 patients (58 hips) with a mean age of 38 years. The majority of the patients had idiopathic osteonecrosis, followed by corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis. Thirty-eight hips were of Steinberg stage II disease and 20 hips were of stage III disease. Patients were followed for 5 years and were evaluated clinically with the Merle D’Aubigne and Postel score and radiologically. The primary outcome of the study was survival based on the conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA). Secondary outcomes included deterioration of the osteonecrosis to a higher disease stage at 5 years compared to the preoperative period and identification of factors that were associated with survival. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to evaluate the survivorship of the prosthesis, and the Fisher exact test was performed to test associations between various parameters with survival. RESULTS: No patient developed any serious intraoperative or postoperative complication including implant loosening or migration and donor site morbidity. During the 5-year follow up, 1 patient died, 7 patients had disease progression and 4 hips were converted to THA. The 5-year survival based on conversion to THA was 93.1% and the respective rate based on disease progression was 87.9%. Stage II disease was associated with statistically significant better survival rates compared to stage III disease (P = 0.04). The comparison between idiopathic and non-idiopathic osteonecrosis and between steroid-induced and non-steroid-induced osteonecrosis did not showed any statistically significant difference in survival rates. The clinical evaluation revealed statistically significantly improved Merle d’Aubigne scores at 12 mo postoperatively

  13. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and 89Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. Methods ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250mg/m2 weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m2) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment. Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible. Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median 89Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function

  14. The Incidence of Complications Associated With Molding Helmet Therapy: An Avoidable Risk in the Treatment of Positional Head Deformities?

    PubMed

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Bodem, Jens P; Kargus, Steffen; Castrillon-Oberndorfer, Gregor; Hoffman, Jürgen; Engel, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Molding helmet therapy using an individual head orthosis presents a widely accepted treatment option for children with positional head deformities; however, studies addressing the incidence of complications during helmet therapy are rare. The current study evaluates the incidence of complications in 205 children with positional head deformity undergoing molding helmet therapy. Children were classified according to the severity of their deformity as presented by the Cranial Vault Asymmetry Index (CVAI) and the Cephalic Index (CI). Fifty-nine (28.8%) of our patients presented a moderate and 146 (71.2%) a severe form of a positional head deformity. Of these children, 166 (81.0%) were diagnosed for plagiocephaly, 19 (9.3%) were brachycephalic, and 20 (9.7%) showed a combination of plagiocephaly and brachycephaly. Overall, 54 children (26.3%) showed minor complications during their helmet molding including pressure sores (13.7%), ethanol erythema (2.9%), skin erosions/skin infections (4.3%), or deficient fitting (5.4%). Children with a combination of plagiocephaly and brachycephaly (n = 20) showed the highest risk for complications, which was significantly higher compared with children with plagiocephaly (50% vs 22.3%; P = 0.012). Irrespective of the type of positional head deformity, no statistical difference was revealed between the moderate and the severe form. Minor complications are a relatively frequent event during helmet molding therapy. Especially children with a combination of plagiocephaly-brachycephaly are at high risk for complications. A reduction of this rate might be reached by a close follow-up for a short period between helmet manufacturing adjustments. PMID:26080239

  15. Bubbles trapped at the coupling surface of the treatment head significantly reduce acoustic energy delivered in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Beard, Spencer; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2006-05-01

    The coupling efficiency of a "dry head" electromagnetic lithotripter (Dornier Compact Delta) was studied in vitro. A fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH-500) was positioned in a test tank filled with degassed water. The tank was coupled through a semi-transparent latex membrane to the water-filled cushion of the lithotripter head, so that bubbles (air pockets) trapped between the two coupling surfaces could be easily observed and photographed. When gel was applied to both the latex membrane and the water cushion, numerous bubbles (some several millimeters in diameter) could be seen at the coupling interface. Hydrophone measurements in the geometric focus of the lithotripter showed that the acoustic pressure could be two times lower when bubbles were present than when they were manually removed. In our in vitro design, trapped bubbles could be easily observed and therefore removed from the acoustic path. However, during patient treatment with a dry-head lithotripter one cannot see whether bubbles are trapped against the skin. This study provides a demonstration of the dramatic effect that trapped bubbles can have on the amount of acoustic energy actually delivered for treatment.

  16. Treatment Effectiveness of Large Group Basic Concept Instruction with Head Start Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Holly; Schwarz, Ilsa

    1991-01-01

    The study, with 57 children (ages 3-6) enrolled in 3 Head Start classes, demonstrated that short-term, large-group basic concept instruction combining direct instruction with interactive and incidental teaching techniques resulted in significantly improved scores on the Boehm Test of Basic Concepts-Revised. (Author/DB)

  17. Effects of Swallowing Exercises on Patients Undergoing Radiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Head and Neck Cancer; Stage I Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage I Laryngeal Cancer; Stage I Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage II Laryngeal Cancer; Stage II Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage III Laryngeal Cancer; Stage III Oropharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Stage IV Laryngeal Cancer; Stage IV Oropharyngeal Cancer

  18. Choosing an Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Technique in the Treatment of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy . E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org; Mechalakos, James; Puri, Dev R.; Hunt, Margie

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: With the emerging use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer, selection of technique becomes a critical issue. The purpose of this article is to establish IMRT guidelines for head-and-neck cancer at a given institution. Methods and Materials: Six common head-and-neck cancer cases were chosen to illustrate the points that must be considered when choosing between split-field (SF) IMRT, in which the low anterior neck (LAN) is treated with an anterior field, and the extended whole-field (EWF) IMRT in which the LAN is included with the IMRT fields. For each case, the gross tumor, clinical target, and planning target volumes and the surrounding critical normal tissues were delineated. Subsequently, the SF and EWF IMRT plans were compared using dosimetric parameters from dose-volume histograms. Results: Target coverage and doses delivered to the critical normal structures were similar between the two different techniques. Cancer involving the nasopharynx and oropharynx are best treated with the SF IMRT technique to minimize the glottic larynx dose. The EWF IMRT technique is preferred in situations in which the glottic larynx is considered as a target, i.e., cancer of the larynx, hypopharynx, and unknown head-and-neck primary. When the gross disease extends inferiorly and close to the glottic larynx, EWF IMRT technique is also preferred. Conclusion: Depending on the clinical scenario, different IMRT techniques and guidelines are suggested to determine a preferred IMRT technique. We found that having this treatment guideline when treating these tumors ensures a smoother flow for the busy clinic.

  19. Helical tomotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost dose painting for the treatment of synchronous primary cancers involving the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Daly, M E; Cui, J; Wooten, H O; Farwell, D G; Purdy, J A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the feasibility of helical tomotherapy (HT)-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for the treatment of synchronous primary cancers arising from the head and neck. Methods: 14 consecutive patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were determined to have a second primary cancer in the upper aerodigestive tract on further evaluation and were treated with HT using simultaneous integrated boost IMRT. Megavoltage CT scans were acquired daily as part of an image-guided registration protocol. Concurrent platinum-based systemic therapy was given to nine patients (64%). Results: HT resulted in durable local control in 21 of the 28 primary disease sites irradiated, including a complete clinical and radiographic response initially observed at 17 of the 20 sites with gross tumour. The mean displacements to account for interfraction motion were 2.44 ± 1.25, 2.92 ± 1.09 and 2.31 ± 1.70 mm for the medial–lateral (ML), superior–inferior (SI) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Table shifts of >3 mm occurred in 19%, 20% and 22% of the ML, SI and AP directions, respectively. The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control and progression-free survival were 58%, 73% and 60%, respectively. Conclusion: The effectiveness of HT for the treatment of synchronous primary cancers of the head and neck was demonstrated. Advances in knowledge: HT is a feasible option for synchronous primary cancers of the head and neck and can result in long-term disease control with acceptable toxicity in appropriately selected patients. PMID:24884726

  20. Anti EGFR therapy in the treatment of non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: The current evidence.

    PubMed

    Benson, Rony; Mallick, Supriya; Julka, P K; Rath, G K

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) accounts for a large oncologic burden in the developing countries. In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer multimodality treatment is warranted. Radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy has long been considered the standard for patients with disease involving the oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx. However, addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy increases treatment related toxicity by many folds and compliance rates decrease. In this context a systemic therapy, which when used concurrent with radiation with favorable toxicity profile is of great importance for improving disease control in locally advanced HNSCC. Anti-epithelial growth factor receptor targeted therapy emerged as a potential treatment option. In recent years many trials were conducted to find the optimum treatment option with the combination of these targeted agents. The initial trials showed excellent results with minimal morbidity and led to great enthusiasm across the globe to incorporate these regimens as a standard of care. However, subsequently many trials failed to maintain such results and now there is little agreement to the initial results achieved with these drugs. Based on the current evidence we cannot recommend the replacement of cisplatin with targeted therapy in concurrent setting. It may be considered in patients with altered renal parameters, hypersensitivity or intolerance to cisplatin. The addition of targeted therapy in addition to chemotherapy in the concurrent setting can't also be recommended as the benefit is doubtful and is associated with a significant increase in toxicity. PMID:27160750

  1. Recent Progress in Therapeutic Treatments and Screening Strategies for the Prevention and Treatment of HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Whang, Sonia N.; Filippova, Maria; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    The rise in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has elicited significant interest in the role of high-risk HPV in tumorigenesis. Because patients with HPV-positive HNSCC have better prognoses than do their HPV-negative counterparts, current therapeutic strategies for HPV+ HNSCC are increasingly considered to be overly aggressive, highlighting a need for customized treatment guidelines for this cohort. Additional issues include the unmet need for a reliable screening strategy for HNSCC, as well as the ongoing assessment of the efficacy of prophylactic vaccines for the prevention of HPV infections in the head and neck regions. This review also outlines a number of emerging prospects for therapeutic vaccines, as well as for targeted, molecular-based therapies for HPV-associated head and neck cancers. Overall, the future for developing novel and effective therapeutic agents for HPV-associated head and neck tumors is promising; continued progress is critical in order to meet the challenges posed by the growing epidemic. PMID:26393639

  2. Development of a patient positioning error compensation tool for Korea Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator Treatment Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Joo; Suh, Tae-Suk; Cho, Woong; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a potential validation tool for compensating for the patient positioning error was developed by using 2D/3D and 3D/3D image registration. For 2D/3D registration, digitallyreconstructed radiography (DRR) and three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images were applied. The ray-casting algorithm is the most straightforward method for generating DRR, so we adopted the traditional ray-casting method, which finds the intersections of a ray with all objects, voxels of the 3D-CT volume in the scene. The similarity between the extracted DRR and the orthogonal image was measured by using a normalized mutual information method. Two orthogonal images were acquired from a Cyber-knife system from the anterior-posterior (AP) and right lateral (RL) views. The 3D-CT and the two orthogonal images of an anthropomorphic phantom and of the head and neck of a cancer patient were used in this study. For 3D/3D registration, planning CT and in-room CT images were applied. After registration, the translation and the rotation factors were calculated to position a couch to be movable in six dimensions. Registration accuracies and average errors of 2.12 mm ± 0.50 mm for transformations and 1.23 ° ± 0.40 ° for rotations were acquired by using 2D/3D registration with the anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom. In addition, registration accuracies and average errors of 0.90 mm ± 0.30 mm for transformations and 1.00 ° ± 0.2 ° for rotations were acquired by using CT image sets. We demonstrated that this validation tool could compensate for patient positioning errors. In addition, this research could be a fundamental step in compensating for patient positioning errors at the Korea Heavy-ion Medical Accelerator Treatment Center.

  3. Treatment with 5-Azacytidine Accelerates Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Leukemogenesis in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Scaglioni, Pier Paolo; Cai, Lu Fan; Majid, Samia M.; Yung, Thomas M.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Kogan, Scott C.; Kopelovich, Levy; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    A key oncogenic force in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is the ability of the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RARA) oncoprotein to recruit transcriptional repressors and DNA methyltransferases at retinoic acid–responsive elements. Pharmacological doses of retinoic acid relieve transcriptional repression inducing terminal differentiation/apoptosis of the leukemic blasts. APL blasts often harbor additional recurrent chromosomal abnormalities, and significantly, APL prevalence is increased in Latino populations. These observations suggest that multiple genetic and environmental/dietary factors are likely implicated in APL. We tested whether dietary or targeted chemopreventive strategies relieving PML-RARA transcriptional repression would be effective in a transgenic mouse model. Surprisingly, we found that 1) treatment with a demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine, results in a striking acceleration of APL; 2) a high fat, low folate/choline–containing diet resulted in a substantial but nonsignificant APL acceleration; and 3) all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is ineffective in preventing leukemia and results in ATRA-resistant APL. Our findings have important clinical implications because ATRA is a drug of choice for APL treatment and indicate that global demethylation, whether through dietary manipulations or through the use of a pharmacologic agent such as 5-azacytidine, may have unintended and detrimental consequences in chemopreventive regimens. PMID:21779489

  4. Accelerating the development of improved analgesic treatments: the ACTION public-private partnership.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C

    2011-07-01

    There has been considerable progress identifying pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, but analgesic medications with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability still represent an unmet public health need. Numerous treatments examined in recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have failed to show efficacy for neuropathic pain, including treatments that had previously demonstrated efficacy. This suggests that at least some negative results reflect limited assay sensitivity of RCTs to distinguish efficacious treatments from placebo. Patient characteristics, clinical trial research designs and methods, outcome measures, approaches to data analysis, and statistical power may all play a role in accounting for difficulties in demonstrating the benefits of efficacious analgesic treatments vs placebo. The identification of specific clinical trial characteristics associated with assay sensitivity in existing data has the potential to provide an evidence-based approach to the design of analgesic clinical trials. The US Food and Drug Administration recently launched the Analgesic Clinical Trial Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) public-private partnership, which is designed to facilitate the discovery and development of analgesics with improved efficacy, safety, and tolerability for acute and chronic pain conditions. ACTION will establish a collaborative effort to prioritize research objectives, develop a standardized analgesic database platform, and conduct methodologically focused studies to increase the assay sensitivity and efficiency of analgesic clinical trials. The results of these activities have the potential to inform and accelerate the development of improved pain management interventions of all types, not just pharmacologic treatments. PMID:21752182

  5. Application of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Meng, Hao-Ye; Yuan, Xue-Ling; Xu, Xiao-Long; Wang, Ai-Yuan; Guo, Quan-Yi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shi-Bi

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a type of common and refractory disease in the orthopedic clinic that is primarily caused by a partial obstruction of the blood supply to the femoral head, resulting in a series of pathological processes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) comprise a mixture of various stem cells in myeloid tissue with multipotential differentiation capacity. They can differentiate into bone cells under specific conditions and can be used to treat ONFH through cell transplantation. This review summarizes research on MSCs in the field of ONFH in recent years, reveals the inner characteristics of MSCs, describes their potential to treat osteonecrosis disease, and analyzes the existing challenges of using MSCs in clinical applications. PMID:26064202

  6. Oral complications in patients receiving treatment for malignancies other than of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Sonis, S T; Sonis, A L; Lieberman, A

    1978-09-01

    Oral complications in patients being treated for malignancies that were not in the head and neck were studied. Age, type of therapy, and type of malignancy were factors related to the prevalence of oral complications. Mucosal ulcerations, xerostomia, and bacterial and fungal infections were the most frequently encountered oral problems. The frequency of oral complications in these patients indicates the need for an awareness and involvement of dental practitioners in their management. PMID:279602

  7. Effect of Pretreatment Anemia on Treatment Outcome of Concurrent Radiochemotherapy in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fortin, Andre Wang Changshu; Vigneault, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of anemia on outcome of treatment with radiochemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The data of 196 patients with Stage II-IV head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria as hemoglobin <130 g/L in men and <120 g/L in women. Results: Fifty-three patients were classified as anemic, 143 as nonanemic. The 3-year local control rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 72% and 85%, respectively (p = 0.01). The 3-year overall survival rate of anemic and nonanemic patients was 52% and 77%, respectively (p = 0.004). In multivariate analysis, anemia was the most significant predictor of local control (hazard ratio, 0.37, p = 0.009) and survival (hazard ratio, 0.47, p = 0.007). A dose-effect relationship was also found for local control (p = .04) and survival (0.04) when grouping by hemoglobin concentration: <120, 120-140, and >140 g/L. Conclusions: Anemia was strongly associated with local control and survival in this cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving radiochemotherapy.

  8. Treatment-related toxicities with Fluosol-DA 20% infusion during radiation in advanced head and neck malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, B.H.; Janjan, N.A.; Byhardt, R.W.; Toohill, R.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Fluosol-DA 20%, a synthetic perfluorocarbon emulsion first developed as a blood substitute, is currently being investigated as a radiation sensitizer. Theoretically, an oxygen-carrying perfluorocarbon emulsion combined with oxygen inhalation might be able to increase tumor response by decreasing the relative proportion of hypoxic tumor cells. Twenty-one patients with advanced head and neck malignancies receiving primary radiation therapy were evaluated for treatment-related toxicity. Mucosal reactions and weight loss during treatment in the group of patients who received the perfluorocarbon emulsion and the group who did not were comparable. Late sequelae appeared comparable. No patient in either group who completed radiation therapy required an interruption of the treatment course. We conclude that Fluosol-DA 20% is a tolerated adjunct to primary radiation therapy. Further study is needed to determine whether the agent will improve local/regional tumor control.

  9. Plasmonic nanobubble theranostics for intra-operative and preventive treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Ren, Xiaoyang; Sawant, Rupa R.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Kupferman, Michael; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Wu, Xiangwei; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2014-03-01

    Chemoradiation-resistant cancer cells and unresectable micro-tumors limit treatment efficacy and lead to high nonspecific toxicity or recurrence in head and neck cancers. We show the cancer cell-specific, on-demand enhancement of the chemo- and chemoradiation therapy with mechanical intracellular impact of plasmonic nanobubbles, a laser pulseinduced explosive nano-event, not a particle. We report cellular mechanisms of cancer cell-specific detection and enhancement of the entry drug and X-ray dose and validate these mechanisms in vitro and in vivo for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Plasmonic nanobubble technology showed more than 10-fold enhancement of the therapeutic efficacy compared to standard chemoradiation in murine models of primary, microscopic residual and recurrent diseases. At the same time our technology efficiently spared adjacent normal tissues due to the reduction of the effective therapeutic doses of drug by 30-40 fold, X-rays by 15-fold and the treatment time to a single procedure. The developed plasmonic nanobubble technology transforms a standard macro-therapy into a cell-level on-demand theranostic treatment for primary, adjuvant and adjunct applications.

  10. Revising the Radiobiological Model of Synchronous Chemotherapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A New Analysis Examining Reduced Weighting of Accelerated Repopulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, Sara; Sanghera, Paul; McConkey, Christopher; Fowler, Jack; Fountzilas, George; Glaholm, John; Hartley, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Previous studies of synchronous chemoradiation therapy have modeled the additional effect of chemotherapy as additional radiation therapy biologically effective dose (BED). Recent trials of accelerated versus conventional fractionation chemoradiation have cast doubt on such modeling. The purpose of this study was to identify alternative models. Methods and Materials: Nine trials of platinum-based chemoradiation were identified. In radiation therapy-alone arms, the radiation therapy BED for tumor was calculated using standard parameters. In chemoradiation arms, 3 methods were used to calculate tumor BED (tBED): additional BED, addition of 9.3 Gy BED for tumor to the radiation therapy BED; zero repopulation, BED with no correction for repopulation; variable t{sub p} (the average doubling time during accelerated repopulation), values of t{sub p} 3-10 were used to examine a partial suppression of repopulation. The correlations between the calculated percentage change in tBED for each method and observed percentage change in local control were assessed using the Pearson product moment correlation. Results: Significant correlations were obtained for all 3 methods but were stronger with zero repopulation (P=.0002) and variable t{sub p} (t{sub p} = 10) (P=.0005) than additional BED (P=.02). Conclusions: Radiobiological models using modified parameters for accelerated repopulation seem to correlate strongly with outcome in chemoradiation studies. The variable t{sub p} method shows strong correlation for outcome in local control and is potentially a more suitable model in the chemoradiation setting. However, a lack of trials with an overall treatment time of more than 46 days inhibits further differentiation of the optimal model.

  11. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiation treatment of patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Golanov, A V; Cherekaev, V A; Serova, N K; Pronin, I N; Gorlachev, G E; Kotel'nikova, T M; Podoprigora, A E; Kudriavtseva, P A; Galkin, M V

    2010-01-01

    Medial middle fossa meningiomas are challenging for neurosurgical treatment. Invasion of cranial nerves and vessels leads to high risk of complications after removal of such meningiomas. Currently methods of conformal stereotactic radiation treatment are applied wider and wider for the discussed lesions. During a 3.5-year period 80 patients with medial middle fossa meningiomas were treated in Burdenko Moscow Neurosurgical Institute using linear accelerator "Novalis". In 31 case radiation treatment was preceded by surgical resection. In majority of patients symptoms included cranial nerve dysfunction: oculomotor disturbances in 62.5%, trigeminal impairment--in 37.5%, visual deficit--in 43.8%, facial nerve palsy--in 1.25%. 74 patients underwent radiotherapy with classical fractioning, 2--in hypofractionated mode and 4 received radiosurgery. In cases of classical fractioning mean marginal dose reached 46.3 Gy during 28-33 fractions, in hypofractioning (7 fractions)--31.5 Gy, in radiosurgery--16.25 Gy. Mean follow-up period was 18.4 months (6-42 months). Control of tumor growth was achieved in 97.5% of cases (78 patients): in 42 (52.5%) lesion shrinked, in 36 (45%) stabilization was observed. Clinical examination revealed improvement of visual function in 15 patients (18%) and deterioration in 2 (2.5%). No new neuropathies were found. Stereotactic radiation treatment is the method of choice for medial anterior and middle fossa meningiomas due to effective control of tumor progression and minimal rate of complications. PMID:20429360

  12. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Methods: Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Results: Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the

  13. TU-C-17A-09: Multi-Case Knowledge-Based IMRT Treatment Planning in Head and Neck Cancer: Are Six Heads Better Than One?

    SciTech Connect

    Grzetic, S; Lutzky, C; Das, S; Lo, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: HNC IMRT treatment planning is a challenging process that relies heavily on the planner’s experience. Previously, we used the single, best match from a library of manually planned cases to semi-automatically generate IMRT plans for a new patient. The current multi-case Knowledge Based Radiation Therapy (MC-KBRT) study utilized different matching cases for each of six individual organs-at-risk (OARs), then combined those six cases to create the new treatment plan. Methods: From a database of 103 patient plans created by experienced planners, MC-KBRT plans were created for 40 (17 unilateral and 23 bilateral) HNC “query” patients. For each case, 2D beam’s-eye-view images were used to find similar geometric “match” patients separately for each of 6 OARs. Dose distributions for each OAR from the 6 matching cases were combined and then warped to suit the query case’s geometry. The dose-volume constraints were used to create the new query treatment plan without the need for human decision-making throughout the IMRT optimization. The optimized MC-KBRT plans were compared against the clinically approved plans and Version 1 (original KBRT) using the dose metrics: mean, median, and maximum (brainstem and cord+5mm) doses. Results: Compared to Version 1, MC-KBRT had no significant reduction of the dose to any of the OARs in either unilateral/bilateral cases. Compared to the manually-planned unilateral cases, there was significant reduction of the oral cavity mean/median dose (>2Gy) at the expense of the contralateral parotid. Compared to the manually-planned bilateral cases, reduction of dose was significant in the ipsilateral parotid, larynx, and oral cavity (>3Gy mean/median) while maintaining PTV coverage. Conclusion: MC-KBRT planning in head and neck cancer generates IMRT plans with equivalent dose sparing to manually created plans. MC-KBRT using multiple case matches does not show significant dose reduction compared to using a single match case with

  14. Expected treatment dose construction and adaptive inverse planning optimization: Implementation for offline head and neck cancer adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Di; Liang Jian

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To construct expected treatment dose for adaptive inverse planning optimization, and evaluate it on head and neck (h and n) cancer adaptive treatment modification. Methods: Adaptive inverse planning engine was developed and integrated in our in-house adaptive treatment control system. The adaptive inverse planning engine includes an expected treatment dose constructed using the daily cone beam (CB) CT images in its objective and constrains. Feasibility of the adaptive inverse planning optimization was evaluated retrospectively using daily CBCT images obtained from the image guided IMRT treatment of 19 h and n cancer patients. Adaptive treatment modification strategies with respect to the time and the number of adaptive inverse planning optimization during the treatment course were evaluated using the cumulative treatment dose in organs of interest constructed using all daily CBCT images. Results: Expected treatment dose was constructed to include both the delivered dose, to date, and the estimated dose for the remaining treatment during the adaptive treatment course. It was used in treatment evaluation, as well as in constructing the objective and constraints for adaptive inverse planning optimization. The optimization engine is feasible to perform planning optimization based on preassigned treatment modification schedule. Compared to the conventional IMRT, the adaptive treatment for h and n cancer illustrated clear dose-volume improvement for all critical normal organs. The dose-volume reductions of right and left parotid glands, spine cord, brain stem and mandible were (17 {+-} 6)%, (14 {+-} 6)%, (11 {+-} 6)%, (12 {+-} 8)%, and (5 {+-} 3)% respectively with the single adaptive modification performed after the second treatment week; (24 {+-} 6)%, (22 {+-} 8)%, (21 {+-} 5)%, (19 {+-} 8)%, and (10 {+-} 6)% with three weekly modifications; and (28 {+-} 5)%, (25 {+-} 9)%, (26 {+-} 5)%, (24 {+-} 8)%, and (15 {+-} 9)% with five weekly modifications. Conclusions

  15. Co-treatment of wild‑type EGFR head and neck cancer cell lines with afatinib and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Brands, Roman C; Müller-Richter, Urs D A; De Donno, Francesco; Seher, Axel; Mutzbauer, Grit; Linz, Christian; Kübler, Alexander C; Hartmann, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains challenging. Non‑surgical approaches typically comprise radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy, of which platinum‑based agents are the most common. Similar to other malignancies, targeted therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a useful target for specific therapeutic strategies. Resistance to EGFR‑directed therapies, including cetuximab, is partly mediated by the activation of alternative receptors and pathways. Therefore, other members of the ErbB family, including human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 and HER4, may have important therapeutic roles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of afatinib, an EGFR/HER2/HER4 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with cisplatin in HNSCC cell lines. The cisplatin concentration used was set at cell line‑specific half maximal inhibitory concentration values. Since the vast majority of head and neck cancers do not exhibit any EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutations, five human EGFR wild‑type HNSCC cell lines were used in the present study. For statistical analyses, non‑parametric Mann‑Whitney tests were conducted. The present study detected a concentration‑dependent efficacy of afatinib. In three out of the five cell lines (PCI‑9, PCI‑52 and PCI‑68), 0.625 µM afatinib in combination with cisplatin exerted significant antiproliferative effects. In the two other cell lines (PCI‑1 and PCI‑13), significant effects were observed following treatment with ≥1.25 µM afatinib. Notably, compared with the findings of previous studies, cell lines (PCI-9 and PCI-52) less vulnerable to erlotinib or gefitinib were more vulnerable to the afatinib/cisplatin combination, and vice versa. Differences in the treatment success of erlotinib/gefitinib (targeting only EGFR) and afatinib (targeting EGFR, HER2 and HER4

  16. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  17. Gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa™) as palliative treatment in recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M; A'hern, R P; D'ambrosio, C; Tanay, M; Syrigos, K N; Rogers, S J; Box, C; Eccles, S A; Nutting, C M; Harrington, K J

    2006-01-01

    To assess the level of activity and toxicity of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa™) in a population of patients with locally recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer. Patients were recruited into an expanded access programme through the multidisciplinary head and neck clinics at the Royal Marsden and St George's Hospitals. Patients were required to have received at least one course of standard systemic chemotherapy or radiation therapy, or be medically unfit for chemotherapy. Patients were commenced on single-agent gefitinib at a dose of 500 mg day−1. Clinical, symptomatic and radiological response, time to progression (TTP), survival and toxicity were recorded. A total of 47 patients were enrolled (35 male and 12 female) with a median age of 62 years (range 18–93 years). The observed clinical response rate was 8% with a disease control rate (complete response, partial response, stable disease) of 36%. In all, 34% of patients experienced an improvement in their symptoms. The median TTP and survival were 2.6 and 4.3 months, respectively. Acneiform folliculitis was the most frequent toxicity observed (76%) but the majority of cases were grade 1 or 2. Only four patients experienced grade 3 toxicity of any type (all cases of folliculitis). Gefitinib was well tolerated and yielded symptomatic improvement in one-third of patients. However, this agent appeared to possess limited antitumour activity in this group of patients with head and neck cancer in whom the objective response rate, median TTP and survival were all lower than has been reported in a previous study. PMID:16495923

  18. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Treatment for Elderly Patients with Medically Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Clump, David A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: With a growing elderly population, elderly patients with head and neck cancers represent an increasing challenge with limited prospective data to guide management. The complex interplay between advanced age, associated co-morbidities, and conventional local therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, can significantly impact elderly patients’ quality of life (QoL). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a well-established curative strategy for medical-inoperable early-stage lung cancers even in elderly populations; however, there is limited data examining SBRT as primary therapy in head and neck cancer. Material/methods: Twelve patients with medically inoperable head and neck cancer treated with SBRT ± cetuximab from 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. SBRT consisted of primarily 44 Gy in five fractions delivered on alternating days over 1–2 weeks. Concurrent cetuximab was administered at a dose of 400 mg/m2 on day −7 followed by 250 mg/m2 on day 0 and +7 in n = 3 (25%). Patient-reported quality of life (PRQoL) was prospectively recorded using the previously validated University of Washington quality of life revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Median clinical follow-up was 6 months (range: 0.5–29 months). The 1-year actuarial local progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival for definitively treated patients were 69, 100, 69, and 64%, respectively. One patient (8%) experienced acute grade 3 dysphagia and one patient (8%) experienced late grade 3 mucositis; there were no grade 4–5 toxicities. Prospective collection of PRQoL as assessed by UW-QoL-R was preserved across domains. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy shows encouraging survival and relatively low toxicity in elderly patients with unresectable head and neck cancer, which may provide an aggressive potentially curative local therapy while maintaining QoL. PMID

  19. Crizotinib: from discovery to accelerated development to front-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Blackhall, F; Cappuzzo, F

    2016-09-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with a poor prognosis and low survival rates, providing a strong rationale for the development of new treatment options. The discovery of ALK gene rearrangements in a subset of NSCLC specimens and the identification and development of the first-in-class ALK inhibitor crizotinib provided a personalised treatment option for patients with advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. Crizotinib demonstrated rapid and durable responses in advanced ALK-positive NSCLC patients in phase I and II studies, leading to accelerated FDA approval. Subsequent evaluation in phase III studies showed that crizotinib improved progression-free survival compared with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in previously untreated patients and compared with pemetrexed or docetaxel in previously treated patients. Crizotinib was shown to have an acceptable safety profile and also to improve quality of life and symptom scores. Overall, crizotinib has been shown to provide a valuable first- and second-line treatment option and is now the first-line standard of care for patients with advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:27573754

  20. In vivo Confocal Microscopy Report after Lasik with Sequential Accelerated Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Balestrazzi, Angelo; Traversi, Claudio; Caragiuli, Stefano; Caporossi, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    We report the first pilot qualitative confocal microscopic analysis of a laser in situ keratomileusis (Lasik) treatment combined with sequential high-fluence accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking, denominated Lasik XTra, by means of HRT II laser scanning in vivo confocal microscopy after a 6-month follow-up. After obtaining approval from the Siena University Hospital Institutional Review Board, a 33-year-old female patient underwent a Lasik XTra procedure in her left eye. Confocal analysis demonstrated induced slight corneal microstructural changes by the interaction between UV-A, riboflavin and corneal stromal collagen, beyond the interface to a depth of 160 µm, without adverse events at the interface and endothelial levels. This application may be considered a prophylactic biomechanical treatment, stiffening the intermediate corneal stroma to prevent corneal ectasia and stabilizing the clinical results of refractive surgery. According to our preliminary experiences, this combined approach may be useful in higher-risk Lasik patients for hyperopic treatments, high myopia and lower corneal thicknesses. PMID:24847258

  1. Future treatment directions for HPV-associated head and neck cancer based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Loredana G

    2016-07-01

    A relatively new entity of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma located in the oropharynx and associated to the human papillomavirus (HPV) is on the rise. This cancer represents a distinct entity from the non-HPV tumours, holds different biological characteristics and responds differently to treatment. An outcome analysis of locoregionally-advanced oropharyngeal versus non-oropharyngeal cancers treated with chemo-radiotherapy revealed a statistically significant improvement for oropharyngeal cancers, which are thought to be due to their HPV-association. Consequently, more attention is paid to HPV-related head and neck cancers, given that HPV status serves as prognostic marker in oropharyngeal cancer patients. Yet, HPV positivity is a simplistic approach for risk stratification, thus more robust biomarkers are needed to fulfil this task. Despite differences in clinical response, HPV-related oral cancers undergo similar therapy to their non-HPV counterparts. This review discusses future treatment directions for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence. PMID:27221393

  2. Radiobiological evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments of patients with head and neck cancer: A dual-institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, G.; Pyakuryal, A. P.; Pandit, S.; Vincent, J.; Lee, C.; Mavroidis, P.; Papanikolaou, N.; Kudrimoti, M.; Sio, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, evaluation of clinical efficacy of treatment planning stems from the radiation oncologist's experience in accurately targeting tumors, while keeping minimal toxicity to various organs at risk (OAR) involved. A more objective, quantitative method may be raised by using radiobiological models. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the potential correlation of OAR-related toxicities to its radiobiologically estimated parameters in simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans of patients with head and neck tumors at two institutions. Lyman model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) models were used in the Histogram Analysis in Radiation Therapy (HART) analysis. In this study, 33 patients with oropharyngeal primaries in the head and neck region were used to establish the correlation between NTCP values of (a) bilateral parotids with clinically observed rates of xerostomia, (b) esophagus with dysphagia, and (c) larynx with dysphagia. The results of the study indicated a strong correlation between the severity of xerostomia and dysphagia with Lyman NTCP of bilateral parotids and esophagus, respectively, but not with the larynx. In patients without complications, NTCP values of these organs were negligible. Using appropriate radiobiological models, the presence of a moderate to strong correlation between the severities of complications with NTCP of selected OARs suggested that the clinical outcome could be estimated prior to treatment. PMID:26500403

  3. Interobserver variability effects on computerized volume analysis of treatment response of head and neck lesions in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Chan, Heang-Ping; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Sahiner, Berkman; Gujar, Sachin; Mukherji, Suresh K.

    2010-03-01

    A computerized system for segmenting lesions in head and neck CT scans was developed to assist radiologists in estimation of the response to treatment of malignant lesions. The system performs 3D segmentation based on a level set model and uses as input an approximate bounding box for the lesion of interest. We investigated the effect of the interobserver variability of radiologists' marking of the bounding box on the automatic segmentation performance. In this preliminary study, CT scans from a pre-treatment exam and a post one-cycle chemotherapy exam of 34 patients with primary site head and neck neoplasms were used. For each tumor, an experienced radiologist marked the lesion with a bounding box and provided a reference standard by outlining the full 3D contour on both the pre- and post treatment scans. A second radiologist independently marked each tumor again with another bounding box. The correlation between the automatic and manual estimates for both the pre-to-post-treatment volume change and the percent volume change was r=0.95. Based on the bounding boxes by the second radiologist, the correlation between the automatic and manual estimate for the pre-to-post-treatment volume change was r=0.89 and for the percent volume change was r=0.91. The correlation for the automatic estimates obtained from the bounding boxes by the two radiologists was as follows: (1) pretreatment volume r=0.92, (2) post-treatment volume r=0.88, (3) pre-to-post-treatment change r=0.89 and (4) percent preto- post-treatment change r=0.90. The difference between the automatic estimates based on the two sets of bounding boxes did not achieve statistical significance for any of the estimates (p>0.29). The preliminary results indicate that the automated segmentation system can reliably estimate tumor size change in response to treatment relative to radiologist's hand segmentation as reference standard, and that the performance was robust against inter-observer variability in marking the

  4. Effect of Process Variables During the Head-End Treatment of Spent Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    K.J. Bateman; C.D. Morgan; J.F. Berg; D.J. Brough; P.J. Crane; D.G. Cummings; J.J. Giglio; M.W. Huntley; M.J. Rodriquez; J.D. Sommers; R.P. Lind; D.A. Sell

    2006-08-01

    The development of a head-end processing step for spent oxide fuel that applies to both aqueous and pyrometallurgical technologies is being performed by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute through a joint International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. The processing step employs high temperatures and oxidative gases to promote the oxidation of UO2 to U3O8. Potential benefits of the head-end step include the removal or reduction of fission products as well as separation of the fuel from cladding. The effects of temperature, pressure, oxidative gas, and cladding have been studied with irradiated spent oxide fuel to determine the optimum conditions for process control. Experiments with temperatures ranging from 500oC to 1250oC have been performed on spent fuel using either air or oxygen gas for the oxidative reaction. Various flowrates and applications have been tested with the oxidative gases to discern the effects on the process. Tests have also been performed under vacuum conditions, following the oxidation cycle, at high temperatures to improve the removal of fission products. The effects of cladding on fission product removal have also been investigated with released fuel under vacuum and high temperature conditions. Results from these experiments will be presented as well as operating conditions based on particle size and decladding characteristics.

  5. Sir Victor Horsley's contributions to the study and treatment of gunshot wounds of the head.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, George R; Stone, James L; Patel, Ketan J

    2008-10-01

    Sir Victor Horsley'S many contributions to neurological surgery include experimental and clinical studies of gunshot wounds (GSW) of the head. Horsley's publications from 1894 to 1897 and 1914 to 1915 on GSWs were reviewed. Horsley described GSWs in animal and clay models, illustrating characteristics of the primary missile tract and secondary cavitation. A transcranial GSW model in 67 dogs related intracranial damage to the projectile's velocity and sectional area, producing a marked sudden increase in intracranial pressure that presumably "tunneled" to the medullary respiratory and cardiac centers. If the resultant sudden apnea was treated with artificial respiration and prompt surgical decompression, the animal often survived. In these animal experiments, Horsley clearly described increased intracranial pressure, hypertension, and bradycardia-later recognized as the Cushing response or triad. With the onset of World War I, Horsley again reviewed the ballistics of military weaponry, emphasizing projectile spin and velocity as the main wounding mechanisms. He was outspoken against the "wicked tradition" of neglecting cranial GSWs and personally treated cases with aggressive respiratory support and prompt decompression of devitalized tissue. Horsley's contributions to the experimental and clinical aspects of GSWs to the head are consistent with his other important contributions to neurosurgery and have largely stood the test of time. PMID:18981893

  6. Cevimeline for the Treatment of Postirradiation Xerostomia in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Mark S. . E-mail: mchamber@mdanderson.org; Posner, Marshall; Jones, Christopher Uwe; Biel, Merrill A.; Hodge, Kenneth M.; Vitti, Robert; Armstrong, Ingrid; Yen, Cindy; Weber, Randal S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To study the efficacy and safety of cevimeline in two double-blind trials (Studies 003 and 004) enrolling patients with head and neck cancer in whom xerostomia developed after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were randomly assigned to receive cevimeline, 30 mg three times daily, or placebo for 12 weeks, with the possibility of dose escalation to 45 mg three times daily at 6 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the patient's final global evaluation of oral dryness; change in unstimulated salivary flow was a secondary endpoint. Results: Five hundred seventy subjects (284 in Study 003 and 286 in Study 004) were randomized. Significantly more cevimeline-treated subjects than placebo recipients (47.4% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.0162) in Study 003 reported improvement in dry mouth in the final global evaluation of oral dryness. No significant difference between groups in the final global evaluation was seen in Study 004, in which a high placebo response rate of 47.6% was observed. In both studies, cevimeline-treated subjects had significantly greater increases in the objective measure of unstimulated salivary flow than placebo recipients (p 0.0093 [Study 003] and p = 0.0215 [Study 004]), whereas no significant differences in stimulated salivary flow were observed. The most frequent adverse event was increased sweating. Conclusion: Cevimeline was well tolerated by patients with xerostomia after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and oral administration of 30-45 mg of cevimeline three times daily increased unstimulated salivary flow.

  7. Psychological Factors Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Treatment and Survivorship: Evidence and Opportunities for Behavioral Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Howren, M. Bryant; Christensen, Alan J.; Karnell, Lucy Hynds; Funk, Gerry F.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC) face not only a potentially life-threatening diagnosis, but must endure treatment that often results in significant, highly visible disfigurement and disruptions of essential functioning, such as deficits or complications in eating, swallowing, breathing, and speech. Each year, approximately 650,000 new cases are diagnosed, making HNC the sixth most common type of cancer in the world. Despite this, however, HNC remains understudied in behavioral medicine. In this article, the authors review available evidence regarding several important psychosocial and behavioral factors associated with HNC diagnosis, treatment, and recovery, as well as various psychosocial interventions conducted in this patient population, before concluding with opportunities for behavioral medicine research and practice. PMID:22963591

  8. Is there room for combined modality treatments? Dosimetric comparison of boost strategies for advanced head and neck and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Góra, Joanna; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Kuess, Peter; Paskeviciute, Brigita; Georg, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the dosimetric difference between three emerging treatment modalities—volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), intensity-modulated proton beam therapy (IMPT) and intensity-modulated carbon ion beam therapy (IMIT)—for two tumour sites where selective boosting of the tumour is applied. For 10 patients with locally advanced head and neck (H&N) cancer and 10 with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) a VMAT plan was generated for PTVinitial that included lymph node regions, delivering 50 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and 50.4 Gy (IsoE) for PC patients. Furthermore, separate boost plans (VMAT, IMPT and IMIT) were created to boost PTVboost up to 70 Gy (IsoE) and 78 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and PC cases, respectively. Doses to brainstem, myelon, larynx and parotid glands were assessed for H&N cases. Additionally, various OARs (e.g. cochlea, middle ear, masticator space) were evaluated that are currently discussed with respect to quality of life after treatment. For PC cases, bladder, rectum and femoral heads were considered as OARs. For both tumour sites target goals were easily met. Looking at OAR sparing, generally VMAT + VMAT was worst. VMAT + IMIT had the potential to spare some structures in very close target vicinity (such as cochlea, middle ear, masticator space ) significantly better than VMAT + IMPT. Mean doses for rectal and bladder wall were on average 4 Gy (IsoE) and 1.5 Gy (IsoE) higher, respectively, compared to photons plus particles scenarios. Similar results were found for parotid glands and larynx. Concerning target coverage, no significant differences were observed between the three treatment concepts. Clear dosimetric benefits were observed for particle beam therapy as boost modality. However, the clinical benefit of combined modality treatments remains to be demonstrated. PMID:23824134

  9. Is there room for combined modality treatments? Dosimetric comparison of boost strategies for advanced head and neck and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Góra, Joanna; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Kuess, Peter; Paskeviciute, Brigita; Georg, Dietmar

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the dosimetric difference between three emerging treatment modalities--volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), intensity-modulated proton beam therapy (IMPT) and intensity-modulated carbon ion beam therapy (IMIT)--for two tumour sites where selective boosting of the tumour is applied. For 10 patients with locally advanced head and neck (H&N) cancer and 10 with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) a VMAT plan was generated for PTV initial that included lymph node regions, delivering 50 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and 50.4 Gy (IsoE) for PC patients. Furthermore, separate boost plans (VMAT, IMPT and IMIT) were created to boost PTV boost up to 70 Gy (IsoE) and 78 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and PC cases, respectively. Doses to brainstem, myelon, larynx and parotid glands were assessed for H&N cases. Additionally, various OARs (e.g. cochlea, middle ear, masticator space) were evaluated that are currently discussed with respect to quality of life after treatment. For PC cases, bladder, rectum and femoral heads were considered as OARs. For both tumour sites target goals were easily met. Looking at OAR sparing, generally VMAT + VMAT was worst. VMAT + IMIT had the potential to spare some structures in very close target vicinity (such as cochlea, middle ear, masticator space ) significantly better than VMAT + IMPT. Mean doses for rectal and bladder wall were on average 4 Gy (IsoE) and 1.5 Gy (IsoE) higher, respectively, compared to photons plus particles scenarios. Similar results were found for parotid glands and larynx. Concerning target coverage, no significant differences were observed between the three treatment concepts. Clear dosimetric benefits were observed for particle beam therapy as boost modality. However, the clinical benefit of combined modality treatments remains to be demonstrated. PMID:23824134

  10. Intra-cavitary dosimetry for IMRT head and neck treatment using thermoluminescent dosimeters in a naso-oesophageal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, F. M.; Roxby, K. J.; Engström, P. E.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2009-06-01

    Complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans require rigorous quality assurance tests. The aim of this study was to independently verify the delivered dose inside the patient in the region of the treatment site. A flexible naso-gastric tube containing thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) was inserted into the oesophagus via the sinus cavity before the patient's first treatment. Lead markers were also inserted into the tube in order that the TLD positions could be accurately determined from the lateral and anterior-posterior electronic portal images taken prior to treatment. The measured dose was corrected for both daily linac output variations and the estimated dose received from the portal images. The predicted dose for each TLD was determined from the treatment planning system and compared to the measured TLD doses. The results comprise 431 TLD measurements on 43 patients. The mean measured-to-predicted dose ratio was 0.988 ± 0.011 (95% confidence interval) for measured doses above 0.2 Gy. There was a variation in this ratio when the measurements were separated into low dose (0.2-1.0 Gy), medium dose (1.0-1.8 Gy) and high dose (>1.8 Gy) measurements. The TLD-loaded, naso-oesophageal tube for in vivo dose verification is straightforward to implement, and well tolerated by patients. It provides independent reassurance of the delivered dose for head and neck IMRT.

  11. Accelerated formation of sodium depletion layer on soda lime glass surface by corona discharge treatment in hydrogen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Keiga; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Funatsu, Shiro; Uraji, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Toshio; Harada, Kenji; Nishii, Junji

    2014-05-01

    Formation of a sodium depletion layer on a soda lime glass surface was accelerated efficiently using a corona discharge treatment in H2 atmosphere. One origin of such acceleration was the preferential generation of H+ with a larger mobility at an anode needle end with a lower applied voltage than that in air. The second origin was the applied voltage across the glass plate during the corona discharge treatment, which was estimated theoretically as 2.7 times higher than that in air. These two effects doubled the depletion layer thickness compared with that in air.

  12. Head shop compound abuse amongst attendees of the Drug Treatment Centre Board.

    PubMed

    McNamara, S; Stokes, S; Coleman, N

    2010-05-01

    The use of "Head Shop" compounds has received much media attention lately. There is very little research in the current literature with regard to the extent of the usage of these substances amongst the drug using population in Ireland. We conducted a study to examine the extent of the usage of Mephedrone, Methylone and BZP amongst attendees of Methadone maintenance programs at the DTCB. Two hundred and nine samples in total were tested. The results showed significant usage of these compounds amongst this cohort of drug users, with 29 (13.9%) of samples tested being positive for Mephedrone, 7 (3.3%) positive for Methylone and 1 (0.5%) positive for BZP. PMID:20666082

  13. European Research on Electrochemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer (EURECA) project: Results of the treatment of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Giulia; Sersa, Gregor; De Terlizzi, Francesca; Occhini, Antonio; Plaschke, Christina Caroline; Groselj, Ales; Langdon, Cristobal; Grau, Juan J; McCaul, James A; Heuveling, Derrek; Cemazar, Maja; Strojan, Primoz; de Bree, Remco; Leemans, C Renè; Wessel, Irene; Gehl, Julie; Benazzo, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemotherapy is an effective and safe method for local treatment of cutaneous and subcutaneous tumours, where electric pulses cause increased permeability of cell membranes in the tumour mass, enabling dramatically enhanced effectiveness of bleomycin and other hydrophilic drugs. Here, we report results of a European multi-institutional prospective study of the effectiveness of electrochemotherapy in the treatment of skin cancer of the head and neck (HN) area, where standard treatments had either failed or were not deemed suitable or declined by the patient. A total of 105 patients affected by primary or recurrent skin cancer of the HN area were enrolled; of these, 99 were eligible for evaluation of tumour response. By far, the majority (82%) were treated only once, and 18% of patients had a second treatment. The objective response was highest for basal cell carcinoma (97%) and for other histologies was 74%. Small, primary, and treatment-naive carcinomas responded significantly better (p < 0.05), as investigated by univariate analysis. Electrochemotherapy was well tolerated and led to a significant improvement of quality of life, estimated by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires. At 1-year follow-up, the percentages of overall and disease-free survival were 76% and 89%, respectively. Electrochemotherapy is an effective option for skin cancers of the HN area and can be considered a feasible alternative to standard treatments when such an alternative is appropriate. The precise role for electrochemotherapy in the treatment algorithm for non-melanoma skin cancer of the HN region requires data from future randomised controlled studies. (ISRCTN registry N. 30427). PMID:27267144

  14. Midline Dose Verification with Diode In Vivo Dosimetry for External Photon Therapy of Head and Neck and Pelvis Cancers During Initial Large-Field Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chuan-Jong; Yu, Pei-Chieh; Chiu, Min-Chi; Yeh, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Chung-Chi; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2010-01-01

    During radiotherapy treatments, quality assurance/control is essential, particularly dose delivery to patients. This study was designed to verify midline doses with diode in vivo dosimetry. Dosimetry was studied for 6-MV bilateral fields in head and neck cancer treatments and 10-MV bilateral and anteroposterior/posteroanterior (AP/PA) fields in pelvic cancer treatments. Calibrations with corrections of diodes were performed using plastic water phantoms; 190 and 100 portals were studied for head and neck and pelvis treatments, respectively. Calculations of midline doses were made using the midline transmission, arithmetic mean, and geometric mean algorithms. These midline doses were compared with the treatment planning system target doses for lateral or AP (PA) portals and paired opposed portals. For head and neck treatments, all 3 algorithms were satisfactory, although the geometric mean algorithm was less accurate and more uncertain. For pelvis treatments, the arithmetic mean algorithm seemed unacceptable, whereas the other algorithms were satisfactory. The random error was reduced by using averaged midline doses of paired opposed portals because the asymmetric effect was averaged out. Considering the simplicity of in vivo dosimetry, the arithmetic mean and geometric mean algorithm should be adopted for head/neck and pelvis treatments, respectively.

  15. Acceleration of Membrane Senescence in Cut Carnation Flowers by Treatment with Ethylene 1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John E.; Mayak, Shimon; Shinitzky, Meir; Halevy, Abraham H.

    1982-01-01

    The lipid microviscosity of microsomal membranes from senescing cut carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. cv. White Sim) flowers rises with advancing senescence. The increase in membrane microviscosity is initiated within 3 to 4 days of cutting the flowers and coincides temporally with petal-inrolling denoting the climacteric-like rise in ethylene production. Treatment of young cut flowers with aminoethoxyvinylglycine prevented the appearance of petal-inrolling and delayed the rise in membrane microviscosity until day 9 after cutting. When freshly cut flowers or aminoethoxyvinylglycine-treated flowers were exposed to exogenous ethylene (1 microliter per liter), the microviscosity of microsomal membranes rose sharply within 24 hours, and inrolling of petals was clearly evident. Thus, treatment with ethylene accelerates membrane rigidification. Silver thiosulphate, a potent anti-ethylene agent, delayed the rise in microsomal membrane microviscosity even when the flowers were exposed to exogenous ethylene. Membrane rigidification in both naturally senescing and ethylene-treated flowers was accompanied by an increased sterol:phospholipid ratio reflecting the selective loss of membrane phospholipid that accompanies senescence. The results collectively indicate that the climacteric-like surge in ethylene production during senescence of carnation flowers facilitates physical changes in membrane lipids that presumably lead to loss of membrane function. PMID:16662309

  16. Validation of a deformable image registration produced by a commercial treatment planning system in head and neck.

    PubMed

    García-Mollá, Rafael; de Marco-Blancas, Noelia; Bonaque, Jorge; Vidueira, Laura; López-Tarjuelo, Juan; Perez-Calatayud, José

    2015-05-01

    In recent years one of the areas of interest in radiotherapy has been adaptive radiation therapy (ART), with the most efficient way of performing ART being the use of deformable image registration (DIR). In this paper we use the distances between points of interest (POIs) in the computed tomography (CT) and the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition images and the inverse consistence (IC) property to validate the RayStation treatment planning system (TPS) DIR algorithm. This study was divided into two parts: Firstly the distance-accuracy of the TPS DIR algorithm was ascertained by placing POIs on anatomical features in the CT and CBCT images from five head and neck cancer patients. Secondly, a method was developed for studying the implication of these distances on the dose by using the IC. This method compared the dose received by the structures in the CT, and the structures that were quadruply-deformed. The accuracy of the TPS was 1.7 ± 0.8 mm, and the distance obtained with the quadruply-deformed IC method was 1.7 ± 0.9 mm, i.e. the difference between the IC method multiplied by two, and that of the TPS validation method, was negligible. Moreover, the IC method shows very little variation in the dose-volume histograms when comparing the original and quadruply-deformed structures. This indicates that this algorithm is useful for planning adaptive radiation treatments using CBCT in head and neck cancer patients, although these variations must be taken into account when making a clinical decision to adapt a treatment plan. PMID:25661695

  17. [{sup 18}FDG] PET-CT-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bassiouni, Mazen; Ciernik, I. Frank Davis, J. Bernard; El-Attar, Inas; Reiner, Beatrice; Burger, Cyrill; Goerres, Gerhard W.; Studer, Gabriela M.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To define the best threshold for tumor volume delineation of the (18) fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}FDG-PET) signal for radiotherapy treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: In 25 patients with head-and-neck cancer, CT-based gross tumor volume (GTV{sub CT}) was delineated. After PET-CT image fusion, window level (L) was adapted to best fit the GTV{sub CT}, and GTV{sub PET} was delineated. Tumor maximum (S) and background uptake (B) were measured, and the threshold of the background-subtracted tumor maximum uptake (THR) was used for PET signal segmentation. Gross tumor volumes were expanded to planning target volumes (PTVs) and analyzed. Results: The mean value of S was 40 kBq/mL, S/B ratio was 16, and THR was 26%. The THR correlated with S (r = -0.752), but no correlation between THR and the S/B ratio was seen (r = -0.382). In 77% of cases, S was >30 kBq/mL, and in 23% it was {<=}30 kBq/mL, with a mean THR of 21.4% and 41.6%, respectively (p < 0.001). Using PTV{sub PET} in radiotherapy treatment planning resulted in a reduced PTV in 72% of cases, while covering 88.2% of GTV{sub CT}, comparable to the percentage of GTV{sub PET} covered by PTV{sub CT} (p = 0.15). Conclusions: A case-specific PET signal threshold is optimal in PET-based radiotherapy treatment planning. Signal gating using a THR of 20% in tumors with S >30% {+-} 1.6% kBq/mL and 40% in tumors with S {<=}30% {+-} 1.6% kBq/mL is suitable.

  18. Ultralow Oxygen Treatment for Postharvest Control of Western Flower Thrips on Head Lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), were subjected to ULO treatments with different combinations of oxygen level, temperature, and treatment duration in plastic jars. Oxygen levels used ranged from 0.0015% to 0.01%. Temperatures ranged from 1 to 10°C. Treatme...

  19. Core Decompression and Autologous Bone Marrow Concentrate for Treatment of Femoral Head Osteonecrosis: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pepke, Wojciech; Kasten, Philip; Beckmann, Nicholas A.; Janicki, Patricia; Egermann, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of injection of bone marrow aspirate concentrate during core decompression and to study its clinical (visual analogue scale; Harris-Hip-score) and radiological outcomes (magnetic resonance imaging). In this prospective and randomized clinical trial we evaluated 24 consecutive patients with non-traumatic femoral head necrosis (FHN) during a period of two years after intervention. In vitro analysis of mesenchymal stem cells was performed by evaluating the fibroblast colony forming units (CFU-Fs). Postoperatively, significant decrease in pain associated with a functional benefit lasting was observed. However, there was no difference in the clinical outcome between the two study groups. Over the period of two years there was no significant difference between the head survival rate between both groups. In contrast to that, we could not perceive any significant change in the volume of FHN in both treatment groups related to the longitudinal course after treating. The number of CFU showed a significant increase after centrifugation. This trial could not detect a benefit from the additional injection of bone marrow concentrate with regard to bone regeneration and clinical outcome in the short term. PMID:27114808

  20. Bisphosphonate-modified gold nanoparticles: a useful vehicle to study the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanord, Fedena; Fairbairn, Korie; Kim, Harry; Garces, Amanda; Bhethanabotla, Venkat; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2011-01-01

    Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is a juvenile form of osteonecrosis of the femoral head that presents in children aged 2-14 years. To date, there is no effective medical therapy for treating LCPD largely due to an inability to modulate the repair process, including the predominance of bone resorption. This investigation aims to evaluate the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) that are surface modified with a bisphosphonate compound for the treatment of osteonecrosis at the cellular level. Studies have found osteoclast-mediated resorption to be a process that contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of femoral head deformities arising from Perthes disease. Our in vitro model was designed to elucidate the effect of alendronate-(a bisphosphonate) modified GNPs, on osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function. RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were cultured with recombinant mouse receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), which stimulates osteoclastogenesis, and were then treated with alendronate-modified GNPs for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell proliferation, osteoclast function, and osteoclast morphology were evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion assay, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Comparative studies were performed with GNPs that were only stabilized with citrate ions and with alendronate alone. Neither osteoclastogenesis nor osteoclast function were adversely affected by the presence of the citrate-GNP. Alendronate-modified GNPs had an enhanced effect on inducing osteoclast apoptosis and impairing osteoclast function when compared to unbound alendronate populations.

  1. Core Decompression and Autologous Bone Marrow Concentrate for Treatment of Femoral Head Osteonecrosis: A Randomized Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pepke, Wojciech; Kasten, Philip; Beckmann, Nicholas A; Janicki, Patricia; Egermann, Marcus

    2016-03-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of injection of bone marrow aspirate concentrate during core decompression and to study its clinical (visual analogue scale; Harris-Hip-score) and radiological outcomes (magnetic resonance imaging). In this prospective and randomized clinical trial we evaluated 24 consecutive patients with non-traumatic femoral head necrosis (FHN) during a period of two years after intervention. In vitro analysis of mesenchymal stem cells was performed by evaluating the fibroblast colony forming units (CFU-Fs). Postoperatively, significant decrease in pain associated with a functional benefit lasting was observed. However, there was no difference in the clinical outcome between the two study groups. Over the period of two years there was no significant difference between the head survival rate between both groups. In contrast to that, we could not perceive any significant change in the volume of FHN in both treatment groups related to the longitudinal course after treating. The number of CFU showed a significant increase after centrifugation. This trial could not detect a benefit from the additional injection of bone marrow concentrate with regard to bone regeneration and clinical outcome in the short term. PMID:27114808

  2. Topical antimycotic treatment of atopic dermatitis in the head/neck area. A double-blind randomised study.

    PubMed

    Broberg, A; Faergemann, J

    1995-01-01

    In order for us to evaluate the effect of topical antimycotic treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis affecting the head and neck area, 60 patients (36 females and 24 males; median age 28 years; range 14-53 years) were included in a double-blind study during 6 weeks. Of the 53 evaluable patients, 55% had positive skin prick tests to Pityrosporum ovale. In addition to oral antibiotic treatment, patients in group A (n = 26) were given miconazole-hydrocortisone cream and ketoconazole shampoo, whereas patients in group B (n = 27) were given hydrocortisone cream and placebo shampoo. At the start of the study P. ovale cultures were positive in 83% of all patients (no significant difference between the groups). After 4 weeks of treatment, there was a decrease in P. ovale colonisation in group A (p < 0.001) but not in group B. Patients in both groups improved (p < 0.001). The decrease in eczema score did not differ between group A and group B after 4 weeks' treatment. A further decrease of the eczema score was seen in both groups at the end of the study, but no difference was found between the groups. PMID:7747534

  3. Overview of Current Treatment Options and Investigational Targeted Therapies for Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Zibelman, Matthew; Mehra, Ranee

    2016-08-01

    Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) typically present with locally advanced (LA) stage III or IV disease and are treated with combined-modality therapy with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery (if resectable). These aggressive, upfront treatment measures are often associated with substantial morbidity, and about half the patients develop locoregional or distant recurrences. Thus, new therapeutic strategies are needed that offer similar efficacy benefits with less toxicity. Current research is focused on selectively targeting signaling pathways involved in the proliferation and malignant transformation of SCCHN cells and the tumor microenvironment. For example, the ErbB receptor pathway has been implicated in the development and progression of SCCHN, and several agents targeting this pathway and downstream effectors are in various phases of clinical investigation. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is the only currently approved targeted therapy for the treatment of LA SCCHN. Additional agents targeting EGFR and other ErbB family members, including monoclonal antibodies (eg, panitumumab, nimotuzumab) and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (eg, erlotinib, afatinib, lapatinib) are being studied in LA SCCHN with varying results. Other treatment strategies for LA SCCHN include targeting downstream effectors of signaling and resistance mechanisms to EGFR inhibitors (eg, mammalian target of rapamycin, Src family, and Aurora kinase family). Data from ongoing and future clinical trials will continue to refine current treatment paradigms for LA SCCHN and provide new therapeutic options and potential predictive biomarkers to improve patient efficacy and safety and abrogate resistance. PMID:26967327

  4. Investigation of Accelerated Partial Breast Patient Alignment and Treatment With Helical Tomotherapy Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, Katja M. Buchholz, Daniel J.; Burch, Doug R. C.; Burkavage, Rob C.; Limaye, Arti U.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Henderson, Doug; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the precision of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)-based alignment of the seroma cavity for patients undergoing partial breast irradiation; and to determine whether accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) plans can be generated for TomoTherapy deliveries that meet the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0413 protocol guidelines for target coverage and normal tissue dose limitations. Methods and Materials: We obtained 50 MVCT images from 10 patients. An interuser study was designed to assess the alignment precision. Using a standard helical and a fixed beam prototype ('topotherapy') optimizer, two APBI plans for each patient were developed. Results: The precision of the MVCT-based seroma cavity alignment was better than 2 mm if averaged over the patient population. Both treatment techniques could be used to generate acceptable APBI plans for patients that fulfilled the recommended NSABP B-39/RTOG-0413 selection criteria. For plans of comparable treatment time, the conformation of the prescription dose to the target was greater for helical deliveries, while the ipsilateral lung dose was significantly reduced for the topotherapy plans. Conclusions: The inherent volumetric imaging capabilities of a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit allow for alignment of patients undergoing partial breast irradiation that is determined from the visibility of the seroma cavity on the MVCT image. The precision of the MVCT-based alignment was better than 2 mm ({+-} standard deviation) when averaged over the patient population. Using the NSABP B-39/RTOG-0413 guidelines, acceptable APBI treatment plans can be generated using helical- or topotherapy-based delivery techniques.

  5. [Particular posteromedial and posterolateral approaches for the treatment of tibial head fractures].

    PubMed

    Lobenhoffer, P; Gerich, T; Bertram, T; Lattermann, C; Pohlemann, T; Tscheme, H

    1997-12-01

    Tibial plateau fractures with depression of posterior aspects of the proximal tibia cause significant therapeutic problems. Posterior fractures on the medial side are mainly highly instable fracture-dislocations (Moore type I). Posterolateral fractures usually cause massive depression and destruction of the chondral surface. Surgical exposure of these fractures from anterior requires major soft tissue dissection and has a significant complication rate. However, incomplete restoration of the joint surface results in chronic postero-inferior joint subluxation, osteoarthritis and pain. We present new specific approaches for posterior fracture types avoiding large skin incisions, but allowing for atraumatic exposure, reduction and fixation. Posteromedial fracture-dislocations are exposed by a direct posteromedial skin incision and a deep incision between medial collateral ligament and posterior oblique ligament. The posteromedial pillar and the posterior flare of the proximal tibia are visualized. The inferior extent of the joint fragment can be reduced by indirect techniques or direct manipulation of the fragment. Fixation is achieved with subchondral lag screws and an anti-glide plate at the tip of the fragment. Posterolateral fractures are exposed by a transfibular approach: the skin is incised laterally, the peroneal nerve is dissected free. The fibula neck is osteotomized, the tibiofibular syndesmosis is divided and the fibula neck is reflected upwards in one layer with the meniscotibial ligament and the iliotibial tract attachment. Reflexion of the fibula head relaxes the lateral collateral ligament, allows for lateral joint opening and internal rotation of the tibia and thus exposes the posterolateral and posterior aspect of the tibial plateau. Fixation and buttressing on the posterolateral side can be achieved easily with this approach. In closure, the fibula head is fixed back with a lag screw or a tension-band system. These two exposures can be combined in

  6. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  7. Integrating genomics in head and neck cancer treatment: Promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Thariat, Juliette; Vignot, Stéphane; Lapierre, Ariane; Falk, Alexander T; Guigay, Joel; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen; Milano, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) represent a multifactorial disease of poor prognosis. They have lagged behind other cancers in terms of personalized therapy. With expansion and high throughput sequencing methods, recent landmark exonic studies and Cancer Genome Atlas data have identified genes relevant to carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Mutational profiles and rates vary widely depending on exposure to carcinogens, anatomic subsites and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. Tumors may exhibit specific, tissue-specific, not exclusively HPV-related, gene alterations, such those observed in oral cavity cancers in Asia or Occident. Except for the PI3K pathway, the rate of mutations in HPV+ cancers is much lower than in tobacco/alcohol-related cancers. Somatic driver mutation analyses show that relatively few driver genes are druggable in HNSCC and that tumor suppressor gene alterations prevail. More mature for therapeutic applications is the oncogenic PI3K pathway, with preclinical human xenograft models suggesting that PI3KCA pathway mutations may be used as predictive biomarkers and clinical data showing efficacy of mTOR/Akt inhibitors. Therapeutic guidance, to date, relies on classical histoprognostic factors, anatomic subsite and HPV status, with integration of hierarchized supervised mutational profiling to provide additional therapeutic options in advanced HNSCC in a near future. Unsupervised controlled genomic analyses remain necessary to unravel potentially relevant genes. PMID:25979769

  8. Outlet biceps tenodesis: a new technique for treatment of biceps long head tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Lemos, David; Esquivel, Amanda; Duncan, Douglas; Marsh, Stephanie; Lemos, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    Degeneration and tearing of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) are common intra-articular findings, and surgical intervention including tenodesis or tenotomy is beneficial. A new arthroscopic shoulder technique may be performed through an anterior portal while one is viewing from a posterior portal: (1) Visualize the intra-articular biceps tendon. (2) Identify the segment of the LHBT to be enlarged. (3) Use a tissue modulation wand to enlarge the tendon. (4) Evaluate the diameter of the enlarged segment. It should be twice the original diameter. (5) Cut the biceps tendon at the proximal end of the enlarged segment. (6) View the tendon within the tunnel. (7) Identify and cut the remaining stump of the biceps tendon. Seventeen cadaveric shoulders were used to compare the pullout force, stiffness, and displacement of outlet tenodesis versus tenotomy. There was a significant increase in pullout force for the outlet tenodesis group when compared with tenotomy. This technique is used to operatively treat LHBT intra-articular pathology in patients who would benefit from tenotomy and traditional biceps tenodesis and may minimize the retraction of the biceps tendon distally. PMID:23875155

  9. Trends in Chemoradiation Use in Elderly Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Changing treatment patterns with cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Shrujal S.; O’Neill, Caitriona; Sherman, Eric J.; Atoria, Coral L.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Pfister, David G.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cetuximab was approved for use in chemoradiation (CTRT) for locally-advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in 2006. Methods Among 3,705 patients with locally-advanced HNSCC identified in the linked Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we assessed treatment trends including surgery, RT, CTRT and specific agents used in CTRT. We examined the influence of demographic and clinical characteristics on the likelihood of receiving CTRT before and after 2006. Results Chemoradiation use increased from 29% of patients diagnosed in 2001 to 61% in 2009 (p<0.0001). Compared to prior to 2006, neither age nor comorbidity score was associated with receipt of CTRT after 2006. Platinum combinations were the most commonly used concurrent chemotherapies before 2006, but since then cetuximab has become the most commonly used agent. Conclusions The use of CTRT has increased substantially and cetuximab may have increased CTRT use, especially in older and sicker patients. PMID:25535104

  10. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  11. Accelerated intermittent theta burst stimulation treatment in medication-resistant major depression: A fast road to remission?

    PubMed

    Duprat, Romain; Desmyter, Stefanie; Rudi, De Raedt; van Heeringen, Kees; Van den Abbeele, Dirk; Tandt, Hannelore; Bakic, Jasmina; Pourtois, Gilles; Dedoncker, Josefien; Vervaet, Myriam; Van Autreve, Sara; Lemmens, Gilbert M D; Baeken, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Although accelerated repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) paradigms and intermittent Theta-burst Stimulation (iTBS) may have the potency to result in superior clinical outcomes in Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD), accelerated iTBS treatment has not yet been studied. In this registered randomized double-blind sham-controlled crossover study, spread over four successive days, 50 TRD patients received 20 iTBS sessions applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The accelerated iTBS treatment procedure was found to be safe and resulted in immediate statistically significant decreases in depressive symptoms regardless of order/type of stimulation (real/sham). While only 28% of the patients showed a 50% reduction of their initial Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score at the end of the two-week procedure, this response rate increased to 38% when assessed two weeks after the end of the sham-controlled iTBS protocol, indicating delayed clinical effects. Importantly, 30% of the responders were considered in clinical remission. We found no demographic predictors for response. Our findings indicate that only four days of accelerated iTBS treatment applied to the left DLPFC in TRD may lead to meaningful clinical responses within two weeks post stimulation. PMID:27107779

  12. Evaluating the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced changes in virally mediated head and neck cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Elizabeth; Owen, Rebecca; Mengersen, Kerrie; Harden, Fiona; Porceddu, Sandro

    2013-12-15

    Patients with virally mediated head and neck cancer (VMHNC) often present with advanced nodal disease that is highly radioresponsive as demonstrated by tumour and nodal regression during treatment. The resultant changes may impact on the planned dose distribution and so adversely affect the therapeutic ratio. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced anatomical changes in VMHNC patients who had undergone a replan. Thirteen patients with virally mediated oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal cancer who presented for definitive radiotherapy between 2005 and 2010 and who had a replan generated were investigated. The dosimetric effect of anatomical changes was quantified by comparing dose–volume histograms (DVH) of primary and nodal gross target volumes and organs at risk (OAR), including spinal cord and parotid glands, from the original plan and a comparison plan. Eleven three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and two intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were evaluated. Dose to the spinal cord and brainstem increased by 4.1% and 2.6%, respectively. Mean dose to the parotid glands also increased by 3.5%. In contrast, the dose received by 98% of the primary and nodal gross tumour volumes decreased by 0.15% and 0.3%, respectively, when comparing the initial treatment plan to the comparison plan. In this study, treatment-induced anatomical changes had the greatest impact on OAR dose with negligible effect on the dose to nodal gross tumour volumes. In the era of IMRT, accounting for treatment-induced anatomical changes is important as focus is placed on minimizing the acute and long-term side effects of treatment.

  13. Investigation of Pitch and Jaw Width to Decrease Delivery Time of Helical Tomotherapy Treatments for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Moldovan, Monica; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Gibbons, John P.; Lee, Tae Kyu; Rosen, Isaac I.; Fields, Robert S.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2011-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy plans using a combination of pitch and jaw width settings were developed for 3 patients previously treated for head and neck cancer. Three jaw widths (5, 2.5, and 1 cm) and 4 pitches (0.86, 0.43, 0.287, and 0.215) were used with a (maximum) modulation factor setting of 4. Twelve plans were generated for each patient using an identical optimization procedure (e.g., number of iterations, objective weights, and penalties, etc.), based on recommendations from TomoTherapy (Madison, WI). The plans were compared using isodose plots, dose volume histograms, dose homogeneity indexes, conformity indexes, radiobiological models, and treatment times. Smaller pitches and jaw widths showed better target dose homogeneity and sparing of normal tissue, as expected. However, the treatment time increased inversely proportional to the jaw width, resulting in delivery times of 24 {+-} 1.9 min for the 1-cm jaw width. Although treatment plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw were dosimetrically superior to plans produced with the 5-cm jaw, subsequent calculations of tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities suggest that these differences may not be radiobiologically meaningful. Because treatment plans produced with the 5-cm jaw can be delivered in approximately half the time of plans produced with the 2.5-cm jaw (5.1 {+-} 0.6 min vs. 9.5 {+-} 1.1 min), use of the 5-cm jaw in routine treatment planning may be a viable approach to decreasing treatment delivery times from helical tomotherapy units.

  14. Evaluating the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced changes in virally mediated head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Elizabeth; Owen, Rebecca; Mengersen, Kerrie; Harden, Fiona; Porceddu, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with virally mediated head and neck cancer (VMHNC) often present with advanced nodal disease that is highly radioresponsive as demonstrated by tumour and nodal regression during treatment. The resultant changes may impact on the planned dose distribution and so adversely affect the therapeutic ratio. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effect of treatment-induced anatomical changes in VMHNC patients who had undergone a replan. Methods Thirteen patients with virally mediated oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal cancer who presented for definitive radiotherapy between 2005 and 2010 and who had a replan generated were investigated. The dosimetric effect of anatomical changes was quantified by comparing dose–volume histograms (DVH) of primary and nodal gross target volumes and organs at risk (OAR), including spinal cord and parotid glands, from the original plan and a comparison plan. Results Eleven three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and two intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were evaluated. Dose to the spinal cord and brainstem increased by 4.1% and 2.6%, respectively. Mean dose to the parotid glands also increased by 3.5%. In contrast, the dose received by 98% of the primary and nodal gross tumour volumes decreased by 0.15% and 0.3%, respectively, when comparing the initial treatment plan to the comparison plan. Conclusion In this study, treatment-induced anatomical changes had the greatest impact on OAR dose with negligible effect on the dose to nodal gross tumour volumes. In the era of IMRT, accounting for treatment-induced anatomical changes is important as focus is placed on minimizing the acute and long-term side effects of treatment. PMID:26229622

  15. Comparison of core decompression and conservative treatment for avascular necrosis of femoral head at early stage: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu-Cai; Zhong, Hui-Ming; Lin, Tiao; Shi, Jian-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of core decompression (CD) and conservative treatment (CT) for saving femoral heads in patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head (ANFH). Four RCTs and two CCTs involving 323 hips with 24- to 48-months follow-up were included in this review. Our results suggested CD had a trend of favorable results in contrast to other CT (OR 3.28; 95% CI 0.77-14.02; P = 0.11) but saved much less hips compared to biophysical treatments [odds ratio (OR) 0.37; 95% CI 0.18-0.74; P = 0.005]. In the stratified survival rate analysis by ANFH stage, interestingly, CD group got a significantly higher successful rate of hip joint conservation than other CT group in both stage I and stage II-III (stage I: OR 4.43; 95% CI 1.34-14.65; P = 0.01; stage II-III: OR 6.75; 95% CI 2.18-20.90; P = 0.0009). In the biophysical stimulation subgroup, however, an even higher frequency of survived hips were observed compared to CD group at stage II-III (CD vs. biophysical stimulation: OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.17-0.67; P = 0.002). In conclusion, performing CD for ANFH is effective for preventing femoral collapse within a short-term follow-up, but an even higher successful rate were expected by biophysical stimulations. Nevertheless, the short-term follow-up, the small sample size of the current meta-analysis only provide limited quality of evidence, which required confirmation from further large-scale, well-designed RCT with longer follow-up. PMID:26131094

  16. Predictors of Long-Term Opioid Treatment Among Patients Who Receive Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Hye; Hui, David; Chisholm, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The factors associated with successful opioid discontinuation after cancer treatment are not well-known. We determined the proportion of patients with advanced head and neck cancer who continued using opioids 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods. We included 70 patients with head and neck cancer referred to our institution's supportive care center between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010. Patients who no longer used opioids 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy were classified as stoppers; patients who continued using opioids were considered nonstoppers. We compared demographics, cancer-related characteristics, alcoholism, substance abuse history, use of psychoactive drugs, and opioid-related factors between stoppers and nonstoppers. Results. In all, 44 of 70 patients (63%) and 23 of 70 patients (33%) continued opioids 3 months and 6 months after the completion of radiation therapy, respectively. A total of 18 of 44 nonstoppers (41%) and 3 of 26 stoppers (12%) were positive for alcoholism based on the CAGE questionnaire (i.e., Cut down, Annoying, Guilty, Eye opener; odds ratio: 5.3). Demographic and clinical characteristics did not differ between stoppers and nonstoppers. The median duration of any type of opioid use of CAGE-positive patients was significantly longer than that of CAGE-negative patients (median: 261 days vs. 93 days; hazard ratio: 2.5). Conclusion. CAGE positivity is a risk factor for opioid use beyond 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy and for duration of opioid treatment. Routine CAGE screening and meticulous follow-up are needed for these patients. PMID:23723332

  17. SU-E-T-149: Electron Beam Profile Differences Between Elekta MLCi2 and Elekta Agility Treatment Heads

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C; Hatcher, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report and investigate observed differences in electron beam profiles at various energies/applicators between Elekta MLCi2 and Agility treatment head on Elekta Infinity LINAC Methods: When we upgraded from MLCi2 to Agility on one of our Elekta Infinity LINAC's, electron beam PDDs and profiles were acquired for comparison purpose. All clinical electron energies (6/9/12/15/12/18 MeV) and electron applicators (6/10/14/20/25 square) were included in measurement. PDDs were acquired at 100 SSD in water (PTW MP3 water tank) with a plane-parallel ion chamber (PTW Roos). X and Y Profiles were acquired using IC Profiler (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at 1cm and maximum PDD depths (water equivalent). Results: All PDD curves match very well between MLCi2 and Agility treatment head. However, some significant differences on electron profiles were found. On Agility, even after increasing the default auto-tracking offset values for backup diaphragms in Y and MLC in X by 2.8 cm (the maximum allowed change is 3.0 cm), electron profiles still have rounder shoulders comparing to corresponding MLCi2 profiles. This difference is significantly more pronounced at larger applicators (20 and 25 square), for all electron energies. Conclusion: The significant design change between MLCi2 and Agility beam limiting device seems to affect exit electron beam profiles. In IEC1217 X direction, the main change on Agility is the removal of the original MLCi2 X backup diaphragms and replacing it with MLC leaves; In Y direction, the main change is the radius and materials on Y backup diaphragms.

  18. SU-E-T-593: Clinical Evaluation of Direct Aperture Optimization in Head/Neck and Prostate IMRT Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hosini, M; GALAL, M; Emam, I; Kamal, G; Algohary, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the planning and dosimetric advantages of direct aperture optimization (DAO) over beam-let optimization in IMRT treatment of head and neck (H/N) and prostate cancers. Methods: Five Head and Neck as well as five prostate patients were planned using the beamlet optimizer in Elekta-Xio ver 4.6 IMRT treatment planning system. Based on our experience in beamlet IMRT optimization, PTVs in H/N plans were prescribed to 70 Gy delivered by 7 fields. While prostate PTVs were prescribed to 76 Gy with 9 fields. In all plans, fields were set to be equally spaced. All cases were re-planed using Direct Aperture optimizer in Prowess Panther ver 5.01 IMRT planning system at same configurations and dose constraints. Plans were evaluated according to ICRU criteria, number of segments, number of monitor units and planning time. Results: For H/N plans, the near maximum dose (D2) and the dose that covers 95% D95 of PTV has improved by 4% in DAO. For organs at risk (OAR), DAO reduced the volume covered by 30% (V30) in spinal cord, right parotid, and left parotid by 60%, 54%, and 53% respectively. This considerable dosimetric quality improvement achieved using 25% less planning time and lower number of segments and monitor units by 46% and 51% respectively. In DAO prostate plans, Both D2 and D95 for the PTV were improved by only 2%. The V30 of the right femur, left femur and bladder were improved by 35%, 15% and 3% respectively. On the contrary, the rectum V30 got even worse by 9%. However, number of monitor units, and number of segments decreased by 20% and 25% respectively. Moreover the planning time reduced significantly too. Conclusion: DAO introduces considerable advantages over the beamlet optimization in regards to organs at risk sparing. However, no significant improvement occurred in most studied PTVs.

  19. Estimating Impacts of Treatment Random Assignment on Classroom Quality in the Head Start Impact Study: The Problem of Missing Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman-Krauss, Allison H.; Connors, Maia C.; Morris, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the 1998 reauthorization of Head Start, the Department of Health and Human Services conducted a national evaluation of the Head Start program. The goal of Head Start is to improve the school readiness skills of low-income children in the United States. There is a substantial body of experimental and correlational research that has…

  20. Less may be more: nodal treatment in neck positive head neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Studer, Gabriela; Huber, Gerhard F; Holz, Edna; Glanzmann, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing debates about the need and extent of planned neck dissection (PND), and required nodal radiation doses volumes lead to this evaluation. Aim was to assess nodal control after definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT ± systemic therapy) followed by PND in our head neck cancer cohort with advanced nodal disease. Between 01/2005 and 12/2013, 99 squamous cell cancer HNC patients with pre-therapeutic nodal metastasis ≥3 cm were treated with definitive IMRT followed by PND. In addition, outcome in 103 patients with nodal relapse after IMRT and observation only (no-PND cohort) were analyzed. Prior to PND, PET-CT, fine needle aspirations, ultrasound and palpation were assessed regarding its predictive value. Patterns of nodal relapse were assessed in patients with isolated neck failure after definitive IMRT alone. 70/99 (70 %) PND specimens showed histopathological complete response (hCR), which translated into statistically significantly superior survival compared with partial response (hPR) with 4-year overall survival, disease specific survival and nodal control rates of 90/83/96 vs 67/60/78 % (p = 0.002/0.001/0.003). 1/99 patient developed isolated subsequent nodal disease. 64/2147 removed nodes contained viable tumor (3 %). Predictive information of the performed diagnostic investigations was not reliable. 17/70 hCR patients showed true negative findings in available three to four investigations (0/29 hPR). 27/103 no-PND patients developed isolated neck disease (26 %) with successful salvage in 21/24 [88 %, or 21/27 (78 %)]. Nearly all failures occurred in the prior nodal gross tumor volume area. A more restrictive approach regarding PND and/or nodal IMRT dose-volumes may be justified. PMID:25920604

  1. Electrical Stimulation of the Ear, Head, Cranial Nerve, or Cortex for the Treatment of Tinnitus: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Adjamian, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is defined as the perception of sound in the absence of an external source. It is often associated with hearing loss and is thought to result from abnormal neural activity at some point or points in the auditory pathway, which is incorrectly interpreted by the brain as an actual sound. Neurostimulation therapies therefore, which interfere on some level with that abnormal activity, are a logical approach to treatment. For tinnitus, where the pathological neuronal activity might be associated with auditory and other areas of the brain, interventions using electromagnetic, electrical, or acoustic stimuli separately, or paired electrical and acoustic stimuli, have been proposed as treatments. Neurostimulation therapies should modulate neural activity to deliver a permanent reduction in tinnitus percept by driving the neuroplastic changes necessary to interrupt abnormal levels of oscillatory cortical activity and restore typical levels of activity. This change in activity should alter or interrupt the tinnitus percept (reduction or extinction) making it less bothersome. Here we review developments in therapies involving electrical stimulation of the ear, head, cranial nerve, or cortex in the treatment of tinnitus which demonstrably, or are hypothesised to, interrupt pathological neuronal activity in the cortex associated with tinnitus. PMID:27403346

  2. A current review of core decompression in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Jauregui, Julio J; Elmallah, Randa K; Lavernia, Carlos J; Mont, Michael A; Nace, James

    2015-09-01

    The review describes the following: (1) how traditional core decompression is performed, (2) adjunctive treatments, (3) multiple percutaneous drilling technique, and (4) the overall outcomes of these procedures. Core decompression has optimal outcomes when used in the earliest, precollapse disease stages. More recent studies have reported excellent outcomes with percutaneous drilling. Furthermore, adjunct treatment methods combining core decompression with growth factors, bone morphogenic proteins, stem cells, and bone grafting have demonstrated positive results; however, larger randomized trial is needed to evaluate their overall efficacy. PMID:26045085

  3. Guanabenz Treatment Accelerates Disease in a Mutant SOD1 Mouse Model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fernando G.; Ping, Qinggong; Moreno, Andy J.; Kidd, Joshua D.; Thompson, Kenneth; Jiang, Bingbing; Lincecum, John M.; Wang, Monica Z.; De Zutter, Gerard S.; Tassinari, Valerie R.; Levine, Beth; Hatzipetros, Theo; Gill, Alan; Perrin, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of motor neurons. The mechanisms leading to motor neuron degeneration in ALS are unclear. However, there is evidence for involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in ALS, notably in mutant SOD1 mediated models of ALS. Stress induced phosphorylation of the eIF2 alpha subunit by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha kinase 3 Perk activates the UPR. Guanabenz is a centrally acting alpha2 adrenergic receptor agonist shown to interact with a regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase, Pp1/Gadd34, and selectively disrupt the dephosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eif2alpha). Here we demonstrate that guanabenz is protective in fibroblasts expressing G93A mutant SOD1 when they are exposed to tunicamycin mediated ER stress. However, in contrast to other reports, guanabenz treatment accelerated ALS-like disease progression in a strain of mutant SOD1 transgenic ALS mice. This study highlights challenges of pharmacological interventions of cellular stress responses in whole animal models of ALS. PMID:26288094

  4. Improving Bone Microarchitecture in Aging with Diosgenin Treatment: A Study in Senescence-Accelerated OXYS Rats.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Maria A; Ting, Che-Hao; Kolosova, Nataliya G; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Chen, Jian-Horng; Huang, Chi-Wen; Tseng, Ging-Ting; Hung, Ching-Sui; Kao, Pan-Fu; Amstislavskaya, Tamara G; Ho, Ying-Jui

    2015-10-31

    Osteoporosis is a major disease associated with aging. We have previously demonstrated that diosgenin prevents osteoporosis in both menopause and D-galactose-induced aging rats. OXYS rats reveal an accelerated senescence and are used as a suitable model of osteoporosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats using morphological tests and microcomputed tomography scanning, and to evaluate the effects of oral administration of diosgenin at 10 and 50 mg/kg/day on femur in OXYS rats. The result showed that, compared with age-matched Wistar rats, the femur of OXYS rats revealed lower bone length, bone weight, bone volume, frame volume, frame density, void volume, porosity, external and internal diameters, cortical bone area, BV/TV, Tb.N, and Tb.Th, but higher Tb.Sp. Eight weeks of diosgenin treatment decreased porosity and Tb.Sp, but increased BV/TV, cortical bone area, Tb.N and bone mineral density, compared with OXYS rats treated with vehicle. These data reveal that microarchitecture and morphological changes in femur of OXYS rats showed osteoporotic aging features and suggest that diosgenin may have beneficial effects on aging-induced osteoporosis. PMID:26387656

  5. Anemia During Sequential Induction Chemotherapy and Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer: The Impact of Blood Transfusion on Treatment Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, Shreerang A.; Ahmed, Merina; Rengarajan, Vijayan; Powell, Ceri; Miah, Aisha; Newbold, Kate; Nutting, Christopher M.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Sequential treatment (chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation; CCRT) is increasingly being used for radical treatment of squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN), which results in increased myelosuppression. In this study, we review the incidence of anemia and the effect of a policy of hemoglobin (Hb) maintenance by blood transfusion on disease outcomes in these patients. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of the records of patients with SCCHN treated with sequential CCRT formed the basis of this study. The incidence of anemia and statistics on blood transfusion were documented. For the purpose of outcome analyses, patients were divided into four categories by (1) transfusion status, (2) nadir Hb concentration, (3) number of transfusion episodes, and (4) number of units of blood transfused (NOUT). Data on 3-year locoregional control (LRC), relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were identified. The median follow-up was 23.6 months. The RFS (52% vs. 41%, p = 0.03), DSS (71% vs. 66%, p = 0.02), and OS (58% vs. 42% p = 0.005) were significantly better for patients who did not have a transfusion vs. those who did. The LRC, RFS, DSS, and OS were also significantly better for patients with nadir Hb level >12 vs. <12 g/dL and NOUT 1-4 vs. >4. Conclusion: Our study seems to suggest that blood transfusion during radical treatment for SCCHN might be detrimental. Further research should be undertaken into the complex interactions among tumor hypoxia, anemia, and the treatment of anemia before making treatment recommendations.

  6. Development of Femoral Head Interior Supporting Device and 3D Finite Element Analysis of its Application in the Treatment of Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongmin; Ye, Ming; Li, Xinfa; Yang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and perform the 3D finite element analysis of a femoral head interior supporting device (FHISD). Material/Methods The 3D finite element model was developed to analyze the surface load of femoral head and analyze the stress and strain of the femoral neck, using the normal femoral neck, decompressed bone graft, and FHISD-implanted bone graft models. Results The stress in the normal model concentrated around the femoral calcar, with displacement of 0.3556±0.1294 mm. In the decompressed bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the femur calcar and top and lateral sides of femoral head, with the displacement larger than the normal (0.4163±0.1310 mm). In the FHISD-implanted bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the segment below the lesser trochanter superior to the femur, with smaller displacement than the normal (0.1856±0.0118 mm). Conclusions FHISD could effectively maintain the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck. PMID:26010078

  7. Characteristics of a novel treatment system for linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ning; Li, Haisen; Song, Kwang; Chin-Snyder, Karen; Qin, Yujiao; Kim, Jinkoo; Bellon, Maria; Gulam, Misbah; Gardner, Stephen; Doemer, Anthony; Devpura, Suneetha; Gordon, James; Chetty, Indrin; Siddiqui, Farzan; Ajlouni, Munther; Pompa, Robert; Hammoud, Zane; Simoff, Michael; Kalkanis, Steven; Movsas, Benjamin; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the dosimetric properties and accuracy of a novel treatment platform (Edge radiosurgery system) for localizing and treating patients with frameless, image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Initial measurements of various components of the system, such as a comprehensive assessment of the dosimetric properties of the flattening filter-free (FFF) beams for both high definition (HD120) MLC and conical cone-based treatment, positioning accuracy and beam attenuation of a six degree of freedom (6DoF) couch, treatment head leakage test, and integrated end-to-end accuracy tests, have been performed. The end-to-end test of the system was performed by CT imaging a phantom and registering hidden targets on the treatment couch to determine the localization accuracy of the optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), cone-beam CT (CBCT), and MV imaging systems, as well as the radiation isocenter targeting accuracy. The deviations between the percent depth-dose curves acquired on the new linac-based system (Edge), and the previously published machine with FFF beams (TrueBeam) beyond D(max) were within 1.0% for both energies. The maximum deviation of output factors between the Edge and TrueBeam was 1.6%. The optimized dosimetric leaf gap values, which were fitted using Eclipse dose calculations and measurements based on representative spine radiosurgery plans, were 0.700 mm and 1.000 mm, respectively. For the conical cones, 6X FFF has sharper penumbra ranging from 1.2-1.8 mm (80%-20%) and 1.9-3.8 mm (90%-10%) relative to 10X FFF, which has 1.2-2.2mm and 2.3-5.1mm, respectively. The relative attenuation measurements of the couch for PA, PA (rails-in), oblique, oblique (rails-out), oblique (rails-in) were: -2.0%, -2.5%, -15.6%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 6X FFF and -1.4%, -1.5%, -12.2%, -2.5%, -5.0% for 10X FFF, respectively, with a slight decrease in attenuation versus field size. The systematic

  8. Accelerated repopulation as a cause of radiation treatment failure in non-small cell lung cancer: review of current data and future clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Yom, Sue S

    2015-04-01

    Despite convincing evidence that the principles of accelerated repopulation would open up additional therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, this strategy has been generally underexplored. The implementation of accelerated radiotherapy schedules has been hampered by logistical barriers, concerns about acute toxicity, and the prioritization of integrating concurrent chemotherapy into the standard treatment platform. At present, it is unclear to what extent accelerated fractionation will influence future treatment paradigms in non-small cell lung cancer, although technical advances in radiotherapy, allowing higher dose delivery with reduced toxicity, could permit the development of more convenient and tolerable forms of accelerated schedules. PMID:25771413

  9. Swing of the Surgical Pendulum: A Return to Surgery for Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer in the 21st Century?

    SciTech Connect

    Holsinger, F. Christopher Weber, Randal S.

    2007-10-01

    Treatment for head and neck cancer has evolved significantly during the past 100 years. Beginning with Bilroth's total laryngectomy on New Year's Day in 1873, 'radical' surgery remained the only accepted treatment for head and neck cancer when optimal local and regional control was the goal. Bigger was still better when it came to managing the primary tumor and the neck. The 'commando' procedure and radical neck dissection were the hallmarks of this first generation of treatments of head-and-neck cancer. With the advent of microvascular reconstructive techniques, larger and more comprehensive resections could be performed. Despite these large resections and their 'mutilating' sequelae, overall survival did not improve. Even for intermediate-stage disease in head-and-neck cancer, the 5-year survival rate did not improve >50%. Many concluded that more than the scalpel was needed for optimal local and regional control, especially for intermediate- and advanced-stage disease. Most important, the multidisciplinary teams must identify and correlate biomarkers in the tumor and host that predict for a response to therapy and for optimal functional recovery. As the pendulum swings back, a scientific approach using tissue biomarkers for the response to treatment in the setting of multidisciplinary trials must emerge as the new paradigm. In the postgenomic era, treatment decisions should be made based on functional and oncologic parameters-not just to avoid perceived morbidity.

  10. Biodynamic simulations of the effect of a neck-mounted air bag on the head/neck response during high G acceleration.

    PubMed

    Lee, C M; Freivalds, A; Lee, S Y

    1991-08-01

    New helmet-mounted devices (such as night-vision goggles, laser eye protection, etc.) have created new safety hazards for pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. In order to prevent the resulting head/neck injuries, this study extends the air-bag protection system developed for ground vehicles to a neck mounted system for aircrew personnel. Results, carried out by computer biodynamic simulations using the Articulated Total Body Model (ATB), showed that: 1) helmet weight had little effect on head/neck torque, contact force and flexion angle; 2) initial head/neck position and center of gravity offsets of the helmet-mounted devices had significant effects on head-neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles; and 3) the neck mounted air bag significantly reduced neck torques, contact forces, and neck flexion angles. We conclude that the neck-mounted air bag system could significantly reduce the severity of head/neck injuries to pilots during ejection or high G maneuvering. PMID:1930056

  11. Assessing the socioeconomic impact of improved treatment of head and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, M

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of improved treatment of neurotrauma presents two basic challenges: 1) measurement of the medical effects of treatment, and 2) evaluation of these effects in socioeconomic terms. A nationwide survey was conducted in 1988 to estimate the prevalence of persons in the United States who suffered traumatic spinal cord injury and to calculate its economic consequences. Seven hundred fifty-eight persons weighted to be representative of the spinal cord injury population were interviewed. The prevalence rate was found to be 721 cases per million people. Conservative calculations for 1988 showed that the average direct costs per person were $103,000 for hospitalization and home modifications during the first 2 years postinjury and $14,000 per year thereafter for medical care. Losses in earnings and homemaker services averaged $12,726 per year. Total aggregate costs for 1 year were estimated at $5.6 billion. Lifetime costs for a representative person with complete paraplegia injured at age 33 were estimated to be $500,000. For a representative person with complete quadriplegia injured at age 27, these costs amounted to $1 million. These data can be used to estimate cost savings related to decreased disability resulting from improved treatment. PMID:8445206

  12. Pyrethrins combined with piperonyl butoxide (RID) vs 1% permethrin (NIX) in the treatment of head lice.

    PubMed

    Carson, D S; Tribble, P W; Weart, C W

    1988-07-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, 58 subjects were treated for Pediculus humanus var capitis with either pyrethrins combined with piperonyl butoxide (RID, Pfizer Inc, New York) or 1% permethrin (NIX, Burroughs Wellcome Co, Research Triangle Park, NC); 31 subjects received RID and 27 subjects received NIX. Both products were applied according to manufacturer's directions so that NIX was applied only on the first visit and RID was applied on the first visit and again seven days later. After each treatment with a pediculicide, the comb supplied by the manufacturer was used to remove nits. Seven days after the initial visit, NIX was determined to be significantly better than RID for eradicating the lice infestation. Of the 27 subjects receiving NIX, 26 were live free vs 14 of the 31 RID-treated subjects. At day 14, there was no statistically significant difference in the treatments (27 of 27 NIX-treated vs 29 of 31 RID-treated subjects were lice free). The RID comb was superior to the NIX comb for nit removal. Both treatments were effective and well tolerated, and no subject experienced adverse reactions. PMID:3381781

  13. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  14. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  15. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of head injuries include bicycle or motorcycle wrecks, sports injuries, falls from windows (especially among children who live ... to watch for? When can I start playing sports again after a head injury? How can brain damage from a head injury ...

  16. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to do ...

  17. Molecularly targeted therapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer: a review of the ErbB family inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Assuntina G; Worden, Francis P

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) present with locally advanced disease, which requires site-specific combinations of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite aggressive therapy, survival outcomes remain poor, and treatment-related morbidity is not negligible. For patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, therapeutic options are further limited and prognosis is dismal. With this in mind, molecularly targeted therapy provides a promising approach to optimizing treatment efficacy while minimizing associated toxicity. The ErbB family of receptors (ie, epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR], ErbB2/human epidermal growth factor receptor [HER]-2, ErbB3/HER3, and ErbB4/HER4) is known to contribute to oncogenic processes, such as cellular proliferation and survival. EGFR, specifically, is upregulated in more than 90% of HNSCC, has been implicated in radiation resistance, and correlates with poorer clinical outcomes. The central role of EGFR in the pathogenesis of HNSCC suggests that inhibition of this pathway represents an attractive treatment strategy. As a result, EGFR inhibition has been extensively studied, with the emergence of two classes of drug therapy: monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. While the monoclonal antibody cetuximab is currently the only US Food and Drug Administration–approved EGFR inhibitor for the treatment of HNSCC, numerous investigational drugs are being evaluated in clinical trials. This paper will review the role of the ErbB family in the pathogenesis of HNSCC, as well as the evidence-based data for the use of ErbB family inhibition in clinical practice. PMID:27110122

  18. Synergy of Radiotherapy and a Cancer Vaccine for the Treatment of HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondini, Michele; Nizard, Mevyn; Tran, Thi; Mauge, Laetitia; Loi, Mauro; Clémenson, Céline; Dugue, Delphine; Maroun, Pierre; Louvet, Emilie; Adam, Julien; Badoual, Cécile; Helley, Dominique; Dransart, Estelle; Johannes, Ludger; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Perfettini, Jean-Luc; Tartour, Eric; Deutsch, Eric

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in the association of radiotherapy and immunotherapy for the treatment of solid tumors. Here, we report an extremely effective combination of local irradiation (IR) and Shiga Toxin B (STxB)-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for the treatment of HPV-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The efficacy of the irradiation and vaccine association was tested using a model of HNSCC obtained by grafting TC-1/luciferase cells at a submucosal site of the inner lip of immunocompetent mice. Irradiation and the STxB-E7 vaccine acted synergistically with both single and fractionated irradiation schemes, resulting in complete tumor clearance in the majority of the treated mice. A dose threshold of 7.5 Gy was required to elicit the dramatic antitumor response. The combined treatment induced high levels of tumor-infiltrating, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, which were required to trigger the antitumor activity. Treatment with STxB-E7 and irradiation induced CD8(+) T-cell memory, which was sufficient to exert complete antitumor responses in both local recurrences and distant metastases. We also report for the first time that a combination therapy based on local irradiation and vaccination induces an increased pericyte coverage (as shown by αSMA and NG2 staining) and ICAM-1 expression on vessels. This was associated with enhanced intratumor vascular permeability that correlated with the antitumor response, suggesting that the combination therapy could also act through an increased accessibility for immune cells. The combination strategy proposed here offers a promising approach that could potentially be transferred into early-phase clinical trials. PMID:25833837

  19. State-of-the-art and emerging treatment options in the management of head and neck cancer: news from 2013.

    PubMed

    Denaro, Nerina; Russi, Elvio Grazioso; Adamo, Vincenzo; Merlano, Marco Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cause of cancer death worldwide. Its treatment is complex and evolving. In general, early-stage disease may be managed with single-modality treatment while an advanced stage (about 60% of clinical presentation) needs a multidisciplinary approach. In this setting concurrent chemoradiation has been associated with improvement in locoregional control and organ preservation, but at the cost of significant acute and chronic toxicity. Molecular target therapies specially directed to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) might improve the outcomes and reduce toxicities. In recurrent-metastatic (R/M) HNSCC, cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against EGFR, plus platinum-based chemotherapy (CT) allow an overall survival (OS) of about 10 months. However, the prognosis for R/M-HNSCC remains dismal and additional efforts are needed. At the 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Meeting, data on induction CT, anti-EGFR inhibitors, innovative molecular targets and predictor factors were reported. Further results on target therapies were presented at the European Cancer Congress (ECC) 2013, where a large study also showed that hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) improve OS rates compared with standard RT. The aim of this review is to discuss current standards and emerging therapies by considering recent new updates. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:24820548

  20. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D).

  1. Radiation dose response simulation for biomechanical-based deformable image registration of head and neck cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Brock, Kristy

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical-based deformable image registration is conducted on the head and neck region. Patient specific 3D finite element models consisting of parotid glands (PG), submandibular glands (SG), tumor, vertebrae (VB), mandible, and external body are used to register pre-treatment MRI to post-treatment MR images to model the dose response using image data of five patients. The images are registered using combinations of vertebrae and mandible alignments, and surface projection of the external body as boundary conditions. In addition, the dose response is simulated by applying a new loading technique in the form of a dose-induced shrinkage using the dose-volume relationship. The dose-induced load is applied as dose-induced shrinkage of the tumor and four salivary glands. The Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) is calculated for the four salivary glands, and tumor to calculate the volume overlap of the structures after deformable registration. A substantial improvement in the registration is found by including the dose-induced shrinkage. The greatest registration improvement is found in the four glands where the average DSC increases from 0.53, 0.55, 0.32, and 0.37 to 0.68, 0.68, 0.51, and 0.49 in the left PG, right PG, left SG, and right SG, respectively by using bony alignment of vertebrae and mandible (M), body (B) surface projection and dose (D) (VB+M+B+D). PMID:26485227

  2. Assessment of contralateral mammary gland dose in the treatment of breast cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tolia, Maria; Platoni, Kalliopi; Foteineas, Andreas; Kalogeridi, Maria-Aggeliki; Zygogianni, Anna; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Caimi, Mariangela; Margari, Niki; Dilvoi, Maria; Pantelakos, Panagiotis; Kouvaris, John; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To measure the dose distribution, related to the treatment planning calculations, in the contralateral mammary gland of breast cancer patients treated with accelerated hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. METHODS: Thirty-four prospectively selected female patients with right breast cancer (pN0, negative surgical margins) were treated with breast-conserving surgery. A total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy/fraction) was prescribed; it was requested that planning target volumes be covered by the 95% isodose line. The contralateral mammary gland was defined on CT simulation. The dose received was evaluated by dose volume histograms. RESULTS: The measured contralateral breast doses were: (1) Dose maximum: 290-448 cGy [Equivalent (Eq) 337-522 cGy]; (2) Mean dose: 45-70 cGy (Eq 524-815 cGy); and (3) Median dose: 29-47 cGy (337-547 cGy) for total primary breast dose of 42.5 Gy in 16 equal fractions. The spearman rho correlation showed statistical significance between the contralateral breast volume and maximum dose (P = 0.0292), as well as mean dose (P = 0.0025) and median dose (P = 0.046) to the breast. CONCLUSION: Minimizing the dose to the contralateral breast has to be one of the priorities of the radiation oncologist when using short schedules because of the radiosensitivity of this organ at risk. Further study is necessary to assess the long-term clinical impact of this schedule. PMID:22013502

  3. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome. PMID:26274050

  4. Combined treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with surgery, chemotherapy, and hyperfractionated accelerated external radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Crevoisier, Renaud . E-mail: rdecrevo@mdanderson.org; Baudin, Eric; Bachelot, Anne; Leboulleux, Sophie; Travagli, Jean-Paul; Caillou, Bernard; Schlumberger, Martin

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze a prospective protocol combining surgery, chemotherapy (CT), and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Methods and materials: Thirty anaplastic thyroid carcinoma patients (mean age, 59 years) were treated during 1990-2000. Tumor extended beyond the capsule gland in 26 patients, with tracheal extension in 8. Lymph node metastases were present in 18 patients and lung metastases in 6. Surgery was performed before RT-CT in 20 patients and afterwards in 4. Two cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (120 mg/m{sup 2}) were delivered before RT and four cycles after RT. RT consisted of two daily fractions of 1.25 Gy, 5 days per week to a total dose of 40 Gy to the cervical lymph node areas and the superior mediastinum. Results: Acute toxicity (World Health Organization criteria) was Grade 3 or 4 pharyngoesophagitis in 10 patients; Grade 4 neutropenia in 21, with infection in 13; and Grade 3 or 4 anemia and thrombopenia in 8 and 4, respectively. At the end of the treatment, a complete local response was observed in 19 patients. With a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 12-78 months), 7 patients were alive in complete remission, of whom 6 had initially received a complete tumor resection. Overall survival rate at 3 years was 27% (95% confidence interval 10-44%) and median survival 10 months. In multivariate analysis, tracheal extension and macroscopic complete tumor resection were significant factors in overall survival. Death was related to local progression in 5% of patients, to distant metastases in 68%, and to both in 27%. Conclusions: Main toxicity was hematologic. High long-term survival was obtained when RT-CT was given after complete surgery. This protocol avoided local tumor progression, and death was mainly caused by distant metastases.

  5. Effects of Testosterone Treatment on Synaptic Plasticity and Behavior in Senescence Accelerated Mice.

    PubMed

    Jian-xin, Jia; Cheng-li, Cui; Song, Wei; Yan, Xu-sheng; Huo, Dong-sheng; Wang, He; Yang, Zhan-jun

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory are known to be influenced by circulating sex steroidal hormones and these behavioral processes are diminished in aging. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the mechanism underlying testosterone-induced effects on cognitive performance in the senescence accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8) model. Treatment with testosterone (T) as evidenced by the Morris water maze test produced a significantly shorter escape latency and reduced path length to reach the platform compared to the control (C). No significant differences were noted in mean swim speed among all groups. During the probe trials, the T group spent a significantly greater percent of time in the target quadrant and improved the number of platform crossings. Flutamide (F), an antiandrogen, significantly inhibited the effects of T on behavioral and memory performances indicators. Following Nissl staining, the number of intact pyramidal cells was markedly elevated in the treated mice, and this effect was blocked by F. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of NMDAR1, SYN, and p-CREC/CREB protein levels were significantly increased in the T group, while F inhibited the T-mediated effects. Western blot analysis showed that there were no significant differences in the expression levels of SYN, p-CREC/CREB, and NMDAR1 between C, F, and F + T groups. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the mRNA expression levels of NMDAR1 and SYN were significantly increased in T-administered mice, while F inhibited the T-mediated effects. Data suggest that the T-mediated increase in SYN expression levels resulted in improvement in behavioral performances and learning, which may involve stimulation of central nervous system androgen receptors (AR). PMID:26529502

  6. Palliative combined treatment for unresectable cutaneous basosquamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Deganello, A; Gitti, G; Struijs, B; Paiar, F; Gallo, O

    2013-10-01

    A case is presented of a patient with a skin basosquamous cell carcinoma of the frontal region infiltrating the cerebral tissue and with a widespread unresectable regional metastatic ulceration of the left parotid region. The patient underwent combined palliative treatment: surgical coverage of the ulceration by means of a pectoralis mayor flap transposition and radiotherapy. After 18 months of follow-up, no signs of tumour progression were noted, the patient is currently free from pain, no increase in trismus was seen, and a slight gain in weight was recorded. Unresectable cancer is mainly treated by concurrent chemoradiation; radiotherapy, however, is contraindicated in deep neoplastic ulcerations with exposure of large vessels. The data reported suggest that surgical coverage of an unresectable neoplastic ulcer is feasible, and combined with early administration of radiation permits a palliative approach in an otherwise untreatable condition. PMID:24227904

  7. Active head rotations and eye-head coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zangemeister, W. H.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that head movements play an important role in gaze. The interaction between eye and head movements involves both their shared role in directing gaze and the compensatory vestibular ocular reflex. The dynamics of head trajectories are discussed, taking into account the use of parameterization to obtain the peak velocity, peak accelerations, the times of these extrema, and the duration of the movement. Attention is given to the main sequence, neck muscle EMG and details of the head-movement trajectory, types of head model accelerations, the latency of eye and head movement in coordinated gaze, gaze latency as a function of various factors, and coordinated gaze types. Clinical examples of gaze-plane analysis are considered along with the instantaneous change of compensatory eye movement (CEM) gain, and aspects of variability.

  8. Initial clinical experience with Epid-based in-vivo dosimetry for VMAT treatments of head-and-neck tumors.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Savino; Meluccio, Daniela; Fidanzio, Andrea; Azario, Luigi; Ianiro, Anna; Macchia, Gabriella; Digesù, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G; Piermattei, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated an EPID-based in-vivo dosimetry algorithm (IVD) for complex VMAT treatments in clinical routine. 19 consecutive patients with head-and-neck tumors and treated with Elekta VMAT technique using Simultaneous Integrated Boost strategy were enrolled. In-vivo tests were evaluated by means of (i) ratio R between daily in-vivo isocenter dose and planned dose and (ii) γ-analysis between EPID integral portal images in terms of percentage of points with γ-value smaller than one (γ%) and mean γ-values (γmean), using a global 3%-3 mm criteria. Alert criteria of ±5% for R ratio, γ% < 90% and γmean > 0.67 were chosen. A total of 350 transit EPID images were acquired during the treatment fractions. The overall mean R ratio was equal to 1.002 ± 0.019 (1 SD), with 95.9% of tests within ±5%. The 2D portal images of γ-analysis showed an overall γmean of 0.42 ± 0.16 with 93.3% of tests within alert criteria, and a mean γ% equal to 92.9 ± 5.1% with 85.9% of tests within alert criteria. Relevant discrepancies were observed in three patients: a set-up error was detected for one patient and two patients showed major anatomical variations (weight loss/tumor shrinkage) in the second half of treatment. The results are supplied in quasi real-time, with IVD tests displayed after only 1 minute from the end of arc delivery. This procedure was able to detect when delivery was inconsistent with the original plans, allowing physics and medical staff to promptly act in case of major deviations between measured and planned dose. PMID:26511150

  9. Development of image-guided targeted two-photon PDT for the treatment of head and neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Starkey, Jean R.; Liang, Bo; Fedorka, Sara; Yang, Hao; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-03-01

    There has been significant effort over the past two decades in the treatment of malignancies of epithelial origin, including some of the most devastating of cancers, such as colorectal cancer (CRC), squamous call carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC), and carcinomas of the pancreas, lungs, (both Small Cell and Non-Small Cell), renal cell, prostate, bladder and breast. Recurring, refractory HNSCC is a particularly difficult cancer to treat once the tumors recur due to mutations that are resistant to repeat chemotherapy and radiation. In addition, repeat surgery is often difficult due to the requirement of significant surgical margins that may not be possible due to the attending potential functional deficits (e.g., salivary glands, nerves and major blood vessels in confined areas). In this study FaDu HNSCC xenograft tumors in SCID mice were imaged, and "optical", as opposed to "surgical" margins defined for the tumor being treated. The subsequent two-photon treatment irradiation was computer-controlled to carry out the tumor treatment by rastering the laser beam throughout the tumor volume plus the defined optical margins simultaneously. In our initial studies, up to 85% regression in tumor volume was observed in 5 days post PDT, with complete tumor regression in 18 days. No re-growth was observed up to 41 days post-PDT, with little or no scarring and complete hair re-growth. However, competition between imaging and PDT moieties was also observed in some mouse models, possibly favoring tumor re-growth. Strategies to selectively optimize the PDT effect will be discussed.

  10. A systematic review of quality of life in head and neck cancer treated with surgery with or without adjuvant treatment.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Shrinivas; Livergant, Jonathan; Klein, Jonathan; Witterick, Ian; Ringash, Jolie

    2015-10-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important consideration in the management of head and neck cancers (HNC). We systematically reviewed the literature to assess the impact of curative surgical resection (+/- adjuvant therapy) of HNC on QoL. Eligible studies (participants>age 18 years, reported fully in English, and prospectively assessed QoL) were filtered using quality criteria, and classified according to the added value, using a published taxonomy. MEDLINE and EMBASE searching yielded 302 distinct reports, 49 met eligibility, and 26 met quality criteria. Among the eligible studies, achievement of certain quality criteria was poor: a priori hypothesis (8%), statistical accounting of missing data (8%), reporting of assessment interval (35%) and rationale for chosen measure (53%). The most frequent ways QoL added value were: understanding of treatment benefit and risk (100%), comparing treatments for QoL effect (92%) and advancing QoL research methodology (50%). QoL (physical/social functioning and various symptom domains) deteriorated with treatment, gradually recovering to baseline (cancer diagnosis) level. Swallowing, chewing, saliva, taste, eating disruption, and aesthetic deficits may persist. Advanced tumors, extensive surgical resection, need for flap reconstruction, neck dissection, and postoperative radiation are associated with worse QoL outcomes. Knowledge of these trends can be applied in shared decision making, identification of commonly faced QoL issues, and to develop and provide survivorship resources. Future research should focus on routinely incorporating QoL in randomized studies, reporting the result according to guidelines, and following knowledge translation principles to maximize the clinician's and patient's ability to use QoL data. PMID:26209066

  11. In vivo verification of superficial dose for head and neck treatments using intensity-modulated techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Zhang Li; He Zhichun; Allen Li, X.; Kwan, Ian; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Metcalfe, Peter; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2009-01-15

    Skin dose is one of the key issues for clinical dosimetry in radiation therapy. Currently planning computer systems are unable to accurately predict dose in the buildup region, leaving ambiguity as to the dose levels actually received by the patient's skin during radiotherapy. This is one of the prime reasons why in vivo measurements are necessary to estimate the dose in the buildup region. A newly developed metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) detector designed specifically for dose measurements in rapidly changing dose gradients was introduced for accurate in vivo skin dosimetry. The feasibility of this detector for skin dose measurements was verified in comparison with plane parallel ionization chamber and radiochromic films. The accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in skin dose calculations for intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was evaluated using MOSFET detectors in an anthropomorphic phantom as well as on the patients. Results show that this newly developed MOSFET detector can provide a minimal but highly reproducible intrinsic buildup of 7 mg cm{sup -2} corresponding to the requirements of personal surface dose equivalent Hp (0.07). The reproducibility of the MOSFET response, in high sensitivity mode, is found to be better than 2% at the phantom surface for the doses normally delivered to the patients. The MOSFET detector agrees well with the Attix chamber and the EBT Gafchromic registered film in terms of surface and buildup region dose measurements, even for oblique incident beams. While the dose difference between MOSFET measurements and TPS calculations is within measurement uncertainty for the depths equal to or greater than 0.5 cm, an overestimation of up to 8.5% was found for the surface dose calculations in the anthropomorphic phantom study. In vivo skin dose measurements reveal that the dose difference between the MOSFET results and the TPS calculations was on

  12. Does Visceral Osteopathic Treatment Accelerate Meconium Passage in Very Low Birth Weight Infants?- A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haiden, Nadja; Pimpel, Birgit; Kreissl, Alexandra; Jilma, Bernd; Berger, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine whether the complementary approach of visceral manipulative osteopathic treatment accelerates complete meconium excretion and improves feeding tolerance in very low birth weight infants. Methods This study was a prospective, randomized, controlled trial in premature infants with a birth weight <1500 g and a gestational age <32 weeks who received a visceral osteopathic treatment 3 times during their first week of life or no treatment. Results Passage of the last meconium occurred after a median of 7.5 days (95% confidence interval: 6–9 days, n = 21) in the intervention group and after 6 days (95% confidence interval: 5-9 days, n = 20,) in the control group (p = 0.11). However, osteopathic treatment was associated with a 8 day longer time to full enteral feedings (p = 0.02), and a 34 day longer hospital stay (Median = 66 vs. 100 days i.e.; p=0.14). Osteopathic treatment was tolerated well and no adverse events were observed. Conclusions Visceral osteopathic treatment of the abdomen did not accelerate meconium excretion in VLBW (very low birth weight)-infants. However infants in the osteopathic group had a longer time to full enteral feedings and a longer hospital stay, which could represent adverse effects. Based on our trial results, we cannot recommend visceral osteopathic techniques in VLBW-infants. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov: NCT02140710 PMID:25875011

  13. Effect of bacterial lectin on acceleration of fat cell lipolysis at in vitro diode laser treatment using encapsulated ICG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, Irina Yu.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Portnov, Sergey A.; Svenskaya, Yuliya I.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Ponomareva, Elena G.; Nikitina, Valentina E.

    2012-03-01

    The influence of bacterial lectin on photochemically induced fat cell lipolysis was studied. Resulting capsules were tested for ICG absorption by optical spectra measurements. To separate released and encapsulated ICG supernatant was removed and capsules were redispered in pure deionized water. Supernatant and capsule suspension spectra were measured separately. It was also found that pretreatment of tissue by lectin leads to acceleration of lipolysis at photochemical treatment. The data obtained can be used to enhance efficiency of photochemical therapy.

  14. Effect of bacterial lectin on acceleration of fat cell lipolysis at in vitro diode laser treatment using encapsulated ICG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, Irina Yu.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Portnov, Sergey A.; Svenskaya, Yuliya I.; Gorin, Dmitry A.; Ponomareva, Elena G.; Nikitina, Valentina E.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of bacterial lectin on photochemically induced fat cell lipolysis was studied. Resulting capsules were tested for ICG absorption by optical spectra measurements. To separate released and encapsulated ICG supernatant was removed and capsules were redispered in pure deionized water. Supernatant and capsule suspension spectra were measured separately. It was also found that pretreatment of tissue by lectin leads to acceleration of lipolysis at photochemical treatment. The data obtained can be used to enhance efficiency of photochemical therapy.

  15. Randomized Phase III Trial to Test Accelerated Versus Standard Fractionation in Combination With Concurrent Cisplatin for Head and Neck Carcinomas in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0129 Trial: Long-Term Report of Efficacy and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, K. Kian; Weber, Randal S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Soulieres, Denis; Kim, Harold; Silverman, Craig; Raben, Adam; Galloway, Thomas J.; Fortin, André; Gore, Elizabeth; Westra, William H.; Chung, Christine H.; Jordan, Richard C.; Gillison, Maura L.; List, Marcie; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We tested the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin plus accelerated fractionation with a concomitant boost (AFX-C) versus standard fractionation (SFX) in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma (LA-HNC). Patients and Methods Patients had stage III to IV carcinoma of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, or larynx. Radiation therapy schedules were 70 Gy in 35 fractions over 7 weeks (SFX) or 72 Gy in 42 fractions over 6 weeks (AFX-C). Cisplatin doses were 100 mg/m2 once every 3 weeks for two (AFX-C) or three (SFX) cycles. Toxicities were scored by using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0 and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by using the one-sided log-rank test. Locoregional failure (LRF) and distant metastasis (DM) rates were estimated by using the cumulative incidence method and Gray's test. Results In all, 721 of 743 patients were analyzable (361, SFX; 360, AFX-C). At a median follow-up of 7.9 years (range, 0.3 to 10.1 years) for 355 surviving patients, no differences were observed in OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.18; P = .37; 8-year survival, 48% v 48%), PFS (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.24; P = .52; 8-year estimate, 42% v 41%), LRF (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.38; P = .78; 8-year estimate, 37% v 39%), or DM (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.24; P = .16; 8-year estimate, 15% v 13%). For oropharyngeal cancer, p16-positive patients had better OS than p16-negative patients (HR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.42; P < .001; 8-year survival, 70.9% v 30.2%). There were no statistically significant differences in the grade 3 to 5 acute or late toxicities between the two arms and p-16 status. Conclusion When combined with cisplatin, AFX-C neither improved outcome nor increased late toxicity in patients with LA-HNC. Long-term high survival

  16. Role of Positron Emission Tomography in the Treatment of Occult Disease in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark H.; Smith, Wade P.; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine under what conditions positron emission tomography (PET) imaging will be useful in decisions regarding the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of clinically occult lymph node metastases in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A decision model of PET imaging and its downstream effects on radiotherapy outcomes was constructed using an influence diagram. This model included the sensitivity and specificity of PET, as well as the type and stage of the primary tumor. These parameters were varied to determine the optimal strategy for imaging and therapy for different clinical situations. Maximum expected utility was the metric by which different actions were ranked. Results: For primary tumors with a low probability of lymph node metastases, the sensitivity of PET should be maximized, and 50 Gy should be delivered if PET is positive and 0 Gy if negative. As the probability for lymph node metastases increases, PET imaging becomes unnecessary in some situations, and the optimal dose to the lymph nodes increases. The model needed to include the causes of certain health states to predict current clinical practice. Conclusion: The model demonstrated the ability to reproduce expected outcomes for a range of tumors and provided recommendations for different clinical situations. The differences between the optimal policies and current clinical practice are likely due to a disparity between stated clinical decision processes and actual decision making by clinicians.

  17. Cost-effectiveness landscape analysis of treatments addressing xerostomia in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sasportas, Laura S.; Hosford, Andrew T.; Sodini, Maria A.; Waters, Dale J.; Zambricki, Elizabeth A.; Barral, Joëlle K.; Graves, Edward E.; Brinton, Todd J.; Yock, Paul G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Sirjani, Davud

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck (H&N) radiation therapy (RT) can induce irreversible damage to the salivary glands thereby causing long-term xerostomia or dry mouth in 68%–85% of the patients. Not only does xerostomia significantly impair patients’ quality-of-life (QOL) but it also has important medical sequelae, incurring high medical and dental costs. In this article, we review various measures to assess xerostomia and evaluate current and emerging solutions to address this condition in H&N cancer patients. These solutions typically seek to accomplish 1 of the 4 objectives: (1) to protect the salivary glands during RT, (2) to stimulate the remaining gland function, (3) to treat the symptoms of xerostomia, or (4) to regenerate the salivary glands. For each treatment, we assess its mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, clinical utilization, and cost. We conclude that intensity-modulated radiation therapy is both the most widely used prevention approach and the most cost-effective existing solution and we highlight novel and promising techniques on the cost-effectiveness landscape. PMID:23643579

  18. Dual drug loaded nanoliposomal chemotherapy: A promising strategy for treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aarti; Narayanan, Shridhar; Balasubramanian, Gopalan; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2016-02-01

    The rising incidence of head and neck cancer and the drawbacks of currently used therapeutic strategies such as salvage surgery followed by adjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy have encouraged pursuits for better therapeutic approaches. This work describes the development and characterization of a PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier encapsulated with trans-resveratrol (Res), a plant stilbenoid, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), a standard chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma. The two drugs were loaded in liposomes prepared from egg phosphatidylcholine and DSPE-PEG with maximum encapsulation efficiencies of about 80% for each drug achieved at Res to Dox ratio of 2:1. The liposomal suspension was found to be stable with a zeta potential of -30.53 mV and size of approximately 250 nm. Thermal properties and release kinetics of the dual drug loaded liposomes were determined. The nanoformulation was evaluated for its in vitro anticancer efficacy on an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line (NT8e). The cell uptake mechanism of the liposomal formulation was determined using pharmacological inhibitors for different endocytosis pathways. The combination effect of the two drugs was evaluated in free form and was found to have synergistic effects. The formulation was found to have a higher IC50 value than that of free doxorubicin hydrochloride but was found to have a superior effect on the signaling proteins involved in apoptosis and cell cycle. PMID:26690333

  19. NM23-H1 expression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in association with the response to cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Chang, Chun-Ju; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Lin, Chin-Ping; Li, Wing-Yin; Chang, Shyue-Yih; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2014-09-15

    We recently reported that low NM23-H1 expression of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) correlated with poor patients' prognosis. Growing evidence has indicated that high tumor NM23-H1 expression contributes to a good response to chemotherapy. Therefore, we investigated the role of NM23-H1 in susceptibility of HNSCC cells to cisplatin and its clinical significance, as well as the in vitro study for validation was performed. Using immunohistochemistry, we analyzed NM23-H1 expression in surgical specimens from 46 HNSCC patients with cervical metastases receiving surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Low tumor NM23-H1 expression correlated with locoregional recurrence of HNSCC following postoperative cisplatin-based therapy (p = 0.056) and poor patient prognosis (p = 0.001). To validate the clinical observation and the effect of NM23-H1 on cisplatin cytotoxicity, we established several stable clones derived from a human HNSCC cell line (SAS) by knockdown and overexpression. Knockdown of NM23-H1 attenuated the chemosensitivity of SAS cells to cisplatin, which was associated with reduced cisplatin-induced S-phase accumulation and downregulation of cyclin E1 and A. Overexpression of NM23-H1 reversed these results, indicating the essential role of NM23-H1 in treatment response to cisplatin. NM23-H1 may participate in HNSCC cell responses to cisplatin and be considered a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25277180

  20. Positron Emission Tomography for Neck Evaluation Following Definitive Treatment with Chemoradiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ad, Voichita; Mishra, Mark; Ohri, Nitin; Intenzo, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the current review was to assess published data on the role of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for evaluation of nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Studies were identified by searching PubMed electronic databases. Only studies using a post-chemoradiotherapy PET for nodal residual disease evaluation were included in the present review. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included. Information regarding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PET for detecting nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC was extracted and analyzed. Results Twenty published studies were included in the present review. Existing data suggest that a negative post-chemoradiotherapy PET scan is associated with a negative predictive value up to 100%. The sensitivity of PET in detecting nodal residual disease is greater for scans performed ≥ 10 weeks after definitive treatment with chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC. Conclusions Further studies are needed to quantify the reliability of PET in detecting nodal residual disease after chemoradiotherapy for locoregionally advanced HNSCC. The optimal timing of PET imaging after chemoradiotherapy remains to be defined. PMID:21864252

  1. Outcome following surgical treatment for regional metastases from cutaneous cancers of the head and neck in patients aged 80 and over

    PubMed Central

    Khandavilli, Sunil D; Lloyd, Christopher J; Jones, Huw B

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Population demographics and disease epidemiology is resulting in more elderly patients presenting with regional metastases from cutaneous malignancy of the head and neck region. Surgery remains the most appropriate primary treatment option. PATIENTS AND METHODS We analysed consecutive patients aged 80 and over who developed regional metastases from cutaneous cancers of head and neck and underwent a neck dissection over a two-and-a-half-year period. Data were obtained from the cancer database and patients’ notes. A Kaplan-Meier survival graph was constructed. RESULTS Our study demonstrated a low postoperative morbidity but one patient died from medical complications with in the first 30 days post surgery. The median survival time following surgery is nearly two years. CONCLUSIONS We continue to advocate primary surgery for cutaneous metastatic malignancy from the head and neck area but patients need multidisciplinary team discussions, thorough assessment and counselling. PMID:21477435

  2. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Caravatta, Luciana; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Macchia, Gabriella; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Rossi, Marco; Flocco, Mariano; Scapati, Andrea; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  3. Selective Delivery of a Therapeutic Gene for Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Human Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung U; Song, Jae-Jun; Cho, Chang Gun; Park, Seok-Won

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Based on studies of the extensive tropism of neural stem cells (NSCs) toward malignant brain tumor, we hypothesized that NSCs could also target head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and could be used as a cellular therapeutic delivery system. Methods To apply this strategy to the treatment of HNSCC, we used a human NSC line expressing cytosine deaminase (HB1.F3-CD), an enzyme that converts 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an anticancer agent. HB1. F3-CD in combination with 5-FC were cocultured with the HNSCC (SNU-1041) to examine the cytotoxicity on target tumor cells in vitro. For in vivo studies, an HNSCC mouse model was created by subcutaneous implantation of human HNSCC cells into athymic nude mice. HB1.F3-CD cells were injected into mice using tumoral, peritumoral, or intravenous injections, followed by systemic 5-FC administration. Results In vitro, the HB1.F3-CD cells significantly inhibited the growth of an HNSCC cell line in the presence of the 5-FC. Independent of the method of injection, the HB1.F3-CD cells migrated to the HNSCC tumor, causing a significant reduction in tumor volume. In comparison to 5-FU administration, HB1.F3-CD cell injection followed by 5-FC administration reduced systemic toxicity, but achieved the same level of therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion Transplantation of human NSCs that express the suicide enzyme cytosine deaminase combined with systemic administration of the prodrug 5-FC may be an effective regimen for the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:24069522

  4. The Effect of Socioeconomic Factors on Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demiral, Ayse Nur Sen, Mehmet; Demiral, Yuecel; Kinay, Muenir

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of socioeconomic factors on quality of life (QoL) after treatment in patients with head and neck carcinoma (HNC). Patients and Methods: The study population included 50 HNC patients seen in their control examinations after radiotherapy during a 2-month interval and who were willing to complete the Short-Form 36 QoL questionnaire. Socioeconomic, demographic, and tumor- and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their effect on physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: All patients received radiotherapy, and 33 patients (66%) underwent surgery for the primary tumor and/or neck disease. Chemotherapy was given in 9 patients (18%). Mean PCS and MCS were 47.9 (range, 24.8-59.3) and 46.7 (range, 22-63.3) for the whole patient population. There was no significant factor affecting PCS. Education level of 'middle school or higher,' perceived economic status of 'medium or higher,' social security status of not being 'absent or minimally covered,' and unilateral type of neck surgery were found to increase MCS significantly. According to separate linear regression analyses performed for three socioeconomic variables, the most significant factor for MCS was social security status compared with education level and perceived economic status. It was the only parameter that retained its significance when all five parameters were combined in a linear regression model. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that educational status, perceived economic status, and social security status showed a significant effect on the QoL of HNC patients after radiotherapy. When all variables were taken into account, only 'social security status' remained significant.

  5. A Novel Peptide for Simultaneously Enhanced Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer and Mitigation of Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peili; Mancini, Maria; Sonis, Stephen T.; Fernandez-Martinez, Juan; Liu, Jing; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Toback, F. Gary

    2016-01-01

    We have characterized a novel 21 amino acid-peptide derived from Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18 that mediates growth promotion of cultured normal epithelial cells and mitigates radiation-induced oral mucositis in animal models, while suppressing in vitro function of cancer cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate these dual potential therapeutic effects of AMP peptide in a clinically relevant animal model of head and neck cancer (HNC) by simultaneously assessing its effect on tumor growth and radiation-induced oral mucositis in an orthotopic model of HNC. Bioluminescent SCC-25 HNC cells were injected into the anterior tongue and tumors that formed were then subjected to focal radiation treatment. Tumor size was assessed using an in vivo imaging system, and the extent of oral mucositis was compared between animals treated with AMP peptide or vehicle (controls). Synergism between AMP peptide and radiation therapy was suggested by the finding that tumors in the AMP peptide/radiation therapy cohort demonstrated inhibited growth vs. radiation therapy-only treated tumors, while AMP peptide-treatment delayed the onset and reduced the severity of radiation therapy-induced oral mucositis. A differential effect on apoptosis appears to be one mechanism by which AMP-18 can stimulate growth and repair of injured mucosal epithelial cells while inhibiting proliferation of HNC cells. RNA microarray analysis identified pathways that are differentially targeted by AMP-18 in HNC vs. nontransformed cells. These observations confirm the notion that normal cells and tumor cells may respond differently to common biological stimuli, and that leveraging this finding in the case of AMP-18 may provide a clinically relevant opportunity. PMID:27049860

  6. SU-E-T-541: Bolus Effect of Thermoplastic Masks in IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, H; Nedzi, L; Chen, S; Jiang, S; Zhao, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the bolus effect of thermoplalstic mask on patient skin dose during multi-field IMRT and VMAT treatment. Methods: The clinically approved target contours for five head and neck patients were deformably registered to an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. Two plans: Multifield IMRT plan with 7-9 beams and VMAT plan with 2-4 arcs were created for each patient following same dose constraints. 3mm skin was excluded from PTVs but not constrained during optimization. The prescription dose was 200-220 cGy/fraction. A thermoplastic head and shoulder mask was customized for the Rando phantom. Each plan was delivered to the phantom twice with and without mask. During each delivery, two rectangular strips of EBT3 films (1cm x 6.8cm) were placed across the anterior upper and lower neck near PTVs to measure the surface dose. For consistency films were positioned at same locations for same patient. A total of 8 film strips were obtained for each patient. Film dose was calibrated in the range of 0-400cGy on the day of plan delivery. For dose comparison 3 regions of interests (ROIs) of 1×1 cm{sup 2} were selected at left, right and middle part of each film, resulting in 6 point doses at each plan delivery. Results: The films without mask show relatively uniform dose distribution while those with mask clearly show mesh pattern of mask, usually indicating an increase in skin dose. On average the increase in skin dose over all ROIs with mask was 31.9%(±14.8%) with a range of 11.4%- 58.4%. There is no statistically significant difference (p=0.44) between skin dose increase in VMAT (30.8%±15.3%) and IMRT delivery (33.0%±14.9%). Conclusion: Thermoplastic immobilization masks increase surface dose for HN patient by around 30%. The magnitude is comparable between multi-field IMRT and VMAT. Radiochromic EBT3 film serves as an effective tool to quantify bolus effect.

  7. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: new translational therapies.

    PubMed

    Prince, Anthony; Aguirre-Ghizo, Julio; Genden, Eric; Posner, Marshall; Sikora, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma includes cancers of the mouth, throat, larynx, and lymph nodes of the neck. Although early disease is amenable to single-modality treatment with surgery or radiation, patients with advanced disease have a dramatically worse prognosis, despite potentially morbid/toxic treatment regimens involving surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or all 3 modalities. The present review seeks to provide an overview of current understanding and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the nonspecialist clinician or basic/translational researcher, followed by an overview of major translational approaches to the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Translational research topics addressed include targeted molecular therapy, immunotherapy, minimally invasive robotic surgery, and ablation of dormant/residual tumor cells. Despite the many potentially promising avenues of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma research, only 2 new treatment approaches (antiepidermal growth factor receptor therapy and robotic surgery) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in the past 30 years. Focused research programs involving integrated teams of clinicians, basic scientists, and translational clinician-researchers have the potential to accelerate discovery and change treatment paradigms for patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:21105129

  8. Diffusion Acceleration Schemes for Self-Adjoint Angular Flux Formulation with a Void Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Hongbin Zhang; Richard C. Martineau

    2014-02-01

    A Galerkin weak form for the monoenergetic neutron transport equation with a continuous finite element method and discrete ordinate method is developed based on self-adjoint angular flux formulation. This weak form is modified for treating void regions. A consistent diffusion scheme is developed with projection. Correction terms of the diffusion scheme are derived to reproduce the transport scalar flux. A source iteration that decouples the solution of all directions with both linear and nonlinear diffusion accelerations is developed and demonstrated. One-dimensional Fourier analysis is conducted to demonstrate the stability of the linear and nonlinear diffusion accelerations. Numerical results of these schemes are presented.

  9. Survival Impact of Increasing Time to Treatment Initiation for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Colin T.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Egleston, Brian L.; Wang, Lora S.; Mehra, Ranee; Flieder, Douglas B.; Ridge, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the overall survival (OS) impact from increasing time to treatment initiation (TTI) for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), we examined patients who received curative therapy for the following sites: oral tongue, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. TTI was the number of days from diagnosis to initiation of curative treatment. The effect of TTI on OS was determined by using Cox regression models (MVA). Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) identified TTI thresholds via conditional inference trees to estimate the greatest differences in OS on the basis of randomly selected training and validation sets, and repeated this 1,000 times to ensure robustness of TTI thresholds. Results A total of 51,655 patients were included. On MVA, TTI of 61 to 90 days versus less than 30 days (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.19) independently increased mortality risk. TTI of 67 days appeared as the optimal threshold on the training RPA, statistical significance was confirmed in the validation set (P < .001), and the 67-day TTI was the optimal threshold in 54% of repeated simulations. Overall, 96% of simulations validated two optimal TTI thresholds, with ranges of 46 to 52 days and 62 to 67 days. The median OS for TTI of 46 to 52 days or fewer versus 53 to 67 days versus greater than 67 days was 71.9 months (95% CI, 70.3 to 73.5 months) versus 61 months (95% CI, 57 to 66.1 months) versus 46.6 months (95% CI, 42.8 to 50.7 months), respectively (P < .001). In the most recent year with available data (2011), 25% of patients had TTI of greater than 46 days. Conclusion TTI independently affects survival. One in four patients experienced treatment delay. TTI of greater than 46 to 52 days introduced an increased risk of death that was most consistently detrimental beyond 60 days. Prolonged TTI is currently affecting survival. PMID:26628469

  10. Double-blind, randomized pilot study of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel in the prevention and treatment of mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Sanchez, Rosa-Maria; Pachón-Ibáñez, Jerónimo; Marín-Conde, Fátima; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate, in an initial way, the effectiveness of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% versus placebo as a preventive and therapeutic intervention of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. Material and Methods In this pilot study, 7 patients (range of age: 18- 65), having histological documented diagnosis of squamous carcinoma on the head and neck region in stage III and IV, and receiving combined radiation treatment and chemotherapy (cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 22, and 43 of irradiation) were studied. Simultaneously, a topical application was performed with bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% in the study group, and the placebo gel for the control group in 5 applications per day, from the time of initiation of cancer treatment to 2 weeks after completion of chemo-radiotherapy treatment (11 weeks of follow-up). The gradation of mucositis, pain, analgesic consumption, infectious complications, and treatment tolerance was measured. Results After 7 patients completed the protocol, any differences were observed between groups in an interval analysis. Mucositis, pain, and tolerance was similar in both groups. Conclusions Our results must be interpreted with caution due to the reduced sample size, but the use of bioadhesive chlorhexidine gel 0.2% didn’t contribute clinical improvement to the oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Key words: Chlorhexidine, mucositis, head and neck cancer. PMID:25662553

  11. The potential investment impact of improved access to accelerated approval on the development of treatments for low prevalence rare diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over 95% of rare diseases lack treatments despite many successful treatment studies in animal models. To improve access to treatments, the Accelerated Approval (AA) regulations were implemented allowing the use of surrogate endpoints to achieve drug approval and accelerate development of life-saving therapies. Many rare diseases have not utilized AA due to the difficulty in gaining acceptance of novel surrogate endpoints in untreated rare diseases. Methods To assess the potential impact of improved AA accessibility, we devised clinical development programs using proposed clinical or surrogate endpoints for fifteen rare disease treatments. Results We demonstrate that better AA access could reduce development costs by approximately 60%, increase investment value, and foster development of three times as many rare disease drugs for the same investment. Conclusion Our research brings attention to the need for well-defined and practical qualification criteria for the use of surrogate endpoints to allow more access to the AA approval pathway in clinical trials for rare diseases. PMID:21733145

  12. Optimization of conditions for thermal treatment of rice bran using an accelerator including an organo-iron compound.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hikari; Tachibana, Naoya; Fukushima, Masami

    2011-02-01

    A method for thermal conversion of raw organic waste (ROW) to a compost-like material (CLM) with higher levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds was developed, in which rice bran and an organo-iron compound were employed as a model ROW and the accelerator, respectively. To evaluate the qualities of CLMs, organic substances of an acid insoluble fraction of alkaline extracts (AIAEs) from a CLM were structurally characterized by elemental analysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FT-IR. The levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, and nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds in the CLM samples were increased by long-term treatment (60°C for 5 days, 170°C for 3 days). In particular, the high lipid content of the AIAEs, which was indicative of inadequate digestion of CLM components, was dramatically reduced in the presence of the accelerator. PMID:21044838

  13. Effects of vestibular loss on head stabilization in response to head and body perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Control of head position during postural responses is important to facilitate both the interpretation of vestibular signals and the stabilization of gaze. In these experiments, we compared head stabilization for two different postural tasks: 1) in response to perturbations at the head, and 2) in response to perturbations induced at the support surface, which perturb both body and head position. To determine whether normal vestibular function is necessary for head stabilization in these two tasks, responses to forward and backward mechanical perturbations of the head and body were compared for 13 normal subjects and 4 patients with profound bilateral vestibular loss (two with vestibular loss in adulthood and two in infancy). Normal subjects showed little neck muscle activity for body perturbations, but large, early activations in both neck extensors and flexors for head perturbations. In contrast, vestibular patients showed excessive neck muscle activation for body perturbations and reduced or absent neck muscle activity for head perturbations. Patients with vestibular loss in adulthood also showed increased head acceleration in response to both head and body perturbations, but patients with vestibular loss in infancy showed more normal head accelerations. For body perturbations, the differences in head acceleration between patients and normals were greater for later head acceleration peaks, indicating poor head control during the execution of the postural response. Trunk angle changes were also higher in the patients for forward body perturbations, indicating that poorer control of trunk position could have contributed to their poorer head stabilization. These results indicate that the vestibular system plays an important role in head and trunk stabilization for both head and body perturbations. However, the more normal head accelerations of the patients with infant vestibular loss also indicate that other mechanisms, possibly involving neck reflexes, can at least

  14. A Novel Modular Polymer Platform for the Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, David; Lau, Ontario D.; Wang, Linda; Wang, Guanyu; Schaue, Dorthe; Zhu, Li; Huang, Min; Lin, Yuan; Dennis, Miranda; Abemayor, Elliot; Elashoff, David A.; Dubinett, Steven M.; McBride, William H.; Sharma, Sherven; Wu, Ben; St John, Maie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of a novel modular polymer platform in the treatment of HNSCC. Study Design in vivo study. Setting Academic research laboratory. Subjects and Methods C3H/HeJ mice and SCID Beige mice were randomized to receive implantation of (1) no polymer; (2) plain polymer; (3) plain polymer with local cisplatin injection; (4) cisplatin polymer. The two groups of mice implanted with cisplatin polymer or no polymer were further randomized to receive (1) 4 Grays external beam radiation for 4 days; (2) no radiation. Tumor size was measured until the mice were euthanized. At necropsy, the tumors were excised and weighed. Results Our results using this novel polymer platform demonstrate a significant reduction in tumor growth. The cisplatin secreting polymer effectively reduced human head and neck tumor growth in SCID mice by 17 fold (P < 0.01); and SCCVII/SF tumors in the C3H/HeJ mice by over 16-fold (P < 0.01) as compared to control, plain polymer, and plain polymer + intratumoral cisplatin injection groups. We also observed a statistically significant lower tumor weight among mice treated with cisplatin polymer and concomitant radiation compared to the radiation alone group and the control group. Conclusion Herein we demonstrate the efficacy of a novel polymer platform in delivering cisplatin to a partially resected SCC in a murine model. Our results indicate that this polymer may represent a new therapeutic modality for patients with HNSCC. Once this polymer platform is optimized we will plan for validation in the context of a prospective trial in patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent HNSCC. PMID:22508626

  15. Improved Clearance during Treatment of HPV-Positive Head and Neck Cancer through mTOR Inhibition12

    PubMed Central

    Coppock, Joseph D; Wieking, Bryant G; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Gutkind, J Silvio; Miskimins, W Keith; Lee, John H

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) incidence is increasing at a near epidemic rate. We investigated whether the mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, rapamycin, can be used as a concurrent agent to standard-of-care cisplatin/radiation therapy (CRT) to attenuate tumor lactate production, thus enhancing CRT-induced immune-mediated clearance of this antigenic tumor type. A C57Bl/6-derived mouse oropharyngeal epithelial cell line retrovirally transduced with HPV type 16 E6/E7 and human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were evaluated for their response to rapamycin in vitro with proliferation assays, Western blots, and lactate assays. Clonogenic assays and a preclinical mouse model were used to assess rapamycin as a concurrent agent to CRT. The potential of rapamycin to enhance immune response through lactate attenuation was assessed using quantitative tumor lactate bioluminescence and assessment of cell-mediated immunity using E6/E7-vaccinated mouse splenocytes. Rapamycin alone inhibited mTOR signaling of all cancer cell lines tested in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, rapamycin administered alone significantly prolonged survival in vivo but did not result in any long-term cures. Given concurrently, CRT/rapamycin significantly enhanced direct cell killing in clonogenic assays and prolonged survival in immunocompromised mice. However, in immunocompetent mice, concurrent CRT/rapamycin increased long-term cures by 21%. Preliminary findings suggest that improved survival involves increased cell killing and enhanced immune-mediated clearance in part due to decreased lactate production. The results may provide rationale for the clinical evaluation of mTOR inhibitors concurrent with standard-of-care CRT for treatment of HPV-positive HNSCC. PMID:23730210

  16. AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF SOCIAL CONTROL, MOOD, AND SELF-EFFICACY IN COUPLES DURING TREATMENT FOR HEAD AND NECK CANCER

    PubMed Central

    BADR, HODA; YEUNG, CHI; LEWIS, MEGAN A.; MILBURY, KATHRIN; REDD, WILLIAM H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients experience debilitating side effects, including abnormally reduced salivation and difficulty swallowing. Intensive self-care protocols are prescribed to control side effects and minimize discomfort, but non-adherence rates are high. Although spouses are in a prime position to encourage adherence, studies have yet to examine how spouse social control (i.e., attempts to influence patient behavior to support adherence) affects HNC patient mood and self-efficacy for engaging in these self-care routines. METHODS One-hundred twenty-five HNC couples where the patient (86% male) was undergoing radiotherapy were recorded in the laboratory as they discussed a cancer-related issue that the patient identified as being a topic of concern. RESULTS Sixty-eight couples discussed side-effects and spouses engaged in social control in 61 of these discussions. Although oral complications and pain were frequently identified by patients as being topics of concern, dental/oral care and pain management were some of the least likely self-care behaviors to be targeted by spouses, who focused primarily on encouraging patients to maintain their weight and hydration. Although spouses engaged in an almost equal number of positive and negative control attempts, only positive control was significantly (p<.05) associated with patient positive mood and self-efficacy. CONCLUSION HNC couples may benefit from programs that emphasize the regular practice of self-care routines to control oral side effects, pain, and nutrition/hydration problems. Likewise, programs that encourage spouses to maximize their use of positive social control may also boost patients’ mood during treatment and empower them to engage in recommended self-care behaviors. PMID:25471820

  17. Comparative study of four advanced 3d-conformal radiation therapy treatment planning techniques for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herrassi, Mohamed Yassine; Bentayeb, Farida; Malisan, Maria Rosa

    2013-01-01

    For the head-and-neck cancer bilateral irradiation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most reported technique as it enables both target dose coverage and organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. However, during the last 20 years, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques have been introduced, which are tailored to improve the classic shrinking field technique, as regards both planning target volume (PTV) dose conformality and sparing of OAR’s, such as parotid glands and spinal cord. In this study, we tested experimentally in a sample of 13 patients, four of these advanced 3DCRT techniques, all using photon beams only and a unique isocentre, namely Bellinzona, Forward-Planned Multisegments (FPMS), ConPas, and field-in-field (FIF) techniques. Statistical analysis of the main dosimetric parameters of PTV and OAR’s DVH’s as well as of homogeneity and conformity indexes was carried out in order to compare the performance of each technique. The results show that the PTV dose coverage is adequate for all the techniques, with the FPMS techniques providing the highest value for D95%; on the other hand, the best sparing of parotid glands is achieved using the FIF and ConPas techniques, with a mean dose of 26 Gy to parotid glands for a PTV prescription dose of 54 Gy. After taking into account both PTV coverage and parotid sparing, the best global performance was achieved by the FIF technique with results comparable to that of IMRT plans. This technique can be proposed as a valid alternative when IMRT equipment is not available or patient is not suitable for IMRT treatment. PMID:23776314

  18. Lethal effects of treatment with a special dimeticone formula on head lice and house crickets (Orthoptera, Ensifera: Acheta domestica and Anoplura, phthiraptera: Pediculus humanus). Insights into physical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Richling, Ira; Böckeler, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The present study provides the first convincing explanation of the mode of action of the medical device NYDA, a special dimeticone (CAS 9006-65-9) formula containing 92% of two dimeticones with different viscosities specifically designed for the physical treatment of head lice infestations (pediculosis capitis) by suffocation. Both, lice (Pediculus humanus) and house crickets (Acheta domestica) treated with this anti-head lice product are knocked out to the status "of no major vital signs" within less than 1 min that in consequence is accompanied irreversibly with the death of the respective insects. Scanning electron microscopical investigations have revealed that the cuticle is coated by a thin closed layer of the dimeticone formula that also enters the stigmata. In vivo observations and dissections of Acheta domestica have shown that application of the medical device to the thoracic stigmata invariably leads to rapid death; this is strongly correlated with the influx of the special dimeticone formula into the head trachea, whereby the solution effectively blocks the oxygen supply of the central nervous system. Dissections after application of the stained product show that it also enters the finest tracheal branches. Analogous in vivo observations in Pediculus humanus have confirmed the correlation between the disappearance of major vital signs and the displacement of air by the dimeticone formula in the tracheal system of the head. For both insect species, statistical data are provided for the chronological sequence of the filling of the tracheal system in relation to the respective vitality conditions of the Insects. On average, the special dimeticone formula reaches the insect's head tracheae within 0.5 min in house crickets and in less than 1 min in lice with a complete filling of the entire head tracheal system of lice within 3.5 min. In addition, a timed sequence of images illustrates this process for lice. The experiments clearly reveal the exclusive and

  19. Gentlemen (and ladies), choose your weapons: Gamma knife vs. linear accelerator radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Stieber, Volker W; Bourland, J Daniel; Tome, Wolfgang A; Mehta, Minesh P

    2003-04-01

    This article compares and contrasts Gamma Knife radiosurgery with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery; where appropriate, Cyberknife technology is discussed. Topics covered are: positioning of the head (invasive versus non-invasive positioning systems); collimator construction; beam properties; beam arrangements; treatment planning; and issues regarding manpower (including a discussion of patient repositioning during treatment), machine availability, and financial considerations. PMID:12680787

  20. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  1. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prescription products. Over-the-counter shampoos and lotions containing pyrethrin (one brand name: Rid) or permethrin ( ... commonly used to treat head lice. Shampoos and lotions that kill head lice contain pesticides and other ...

  2. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  3. High pressure treatments accelerate changes in volatile composition of sulphur dioxide-free wine during bottle storage.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mickael C; Nunes, Cláudia; Rocha, M Angélica M; Rodrigues, Ana; Rocha, Sílvia M; Saraiva, Jorge A; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2015-12-01

    The impact of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments on volatile composition of sulphur dioxide-free wines during bottle storage was studied. For this purpose, white and red wines were produced without sulphur dioxide (SO2) and, at the end of the alcoholic fermentation, the wines were pressurised at 500 MPa and 425 MPa for 5 min. Wine with 40 ppm of SO2 and a wine without a preservation treatment were used as controls. More than 160 volatile compounds, distributed over 12 chemical groups, were identified in the wines by an advanced gas chromatography technique. The pressurised wines contained a higher content of furans, aldehydes, ketones, and acetals, compared with unpressurised wines after 9 months of storage. The changes in the volatile composition indicate that HHP treatments accelerated the Maillard reaction, and alcohol and fatty acid oxidation, leading to wines with a volatile composition similar to those of faster aged and/or thermally treated wines. PMID:26041211

  4. A statistical treatment of accelerated life test data for copper-water heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Arai, K.; Kojima, Y.

    1988-03-01

    A statistical method is proposed to treat accelerated life test data conducted at several elevated temperatures for a sufficient number of commercially available Cu-water heat pipes to predict the operation life. The temperature distribution measurements periodically carried out yield both data sets concerning the temperature drop and the gas column length as measures of noncondensible gas accumulation. The gas analysis with a mass spectrometer is also carried out to obtain the gas quantity data. A method of unified regression analysis to take account of the acceleration factor resulted from a number of elevated test temperatures is proposed to establish a method to predict the long term performance degradation from life test data. The mutual correlations among three kinds of data sets are also discussed.

  5. Topical R1 and R2 Prophylactic Treatment of Acute Radiation Dermatitis in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck and Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Manas, Ana; Santolaya, Miguel; Ciapa, Violeta Mirela; Belinchón, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A clinical study was conducted on the use of the topical Lactokine-based R1 and R2 system as a prophylactic treatment of acute radiation dermatitis in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck and breast cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy. Methods: Ninety-eight patients were studied who attended the Radiation Oncology Services, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, for treatment with chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer (n = 19) and breast cancer (n = 79). The treatment group (R1 and R2) included 51 patients; 47 control patients were given the local standard topical treatment (5% wt/wt urea lotion). At 3 postradiotherapy follow-up clinics, radiation dermatitis was graded, if present. All patients were administered with “quality-of-life” questionnaires. Results: Treatment with R1 and R2 significantly reduced the grade of radiation dermatitis in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. At the fourth (last) clinic visit, at 2 weeks following the end of radiation treatment, 66.7% of patients in the treated group (R1 and R2) were free from radiation dermatitis compared with 34% in those given the center's usual skin care (topical urea lotion). There were no reported side effects, and quality of life improved for patients treated with R1 and R2. Conclusion: Topical skin treatment with the R1 and R2 system has been shown to be effective in preventing, reducing the onset, and reducing the degree (grade) of radiation dermatitis in head and neck and breast cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. PMID:26171097

  6. CD24 Expression May Play a Role as a Predictive Indicator and a Modulator of Cisplatin Treatment Response in Head and Neck Squamous Cellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Modur, Vishnu; Joshi, Pooja; Nie, Daotai; Robbins, K. Thomas; Khan, Aziz U.; Rao, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based therapy is most often used to treat advanced cases of head and neck cancers, but only a small fraction of the patient population responds to cisplatin, with a median survival time of less than a year. Although gene signatures and molecular etiology of head and neck cancers have been previously described, none of them are predictive indicators of cisplatin treatment response in particular. Therefore, currently, there is a lack of clinically employable predictive indicators of the disease beyond HPV status to specifically predict patients' response to platinum-based therapy. It beckons a substantial effort to look for predictive indicators of cisplatin treatment response. In this regard, CD24 expression level appears to be a significant molecular phenotype of cisplatin-resistant residual cells in laryngeal carcinoma lines. CD24 expression level directly affects cisplatin sensitivity and affects the expression of critical apoptotic, stem and drug resistance genes. A relatively small retrospective patient tumor analysis suggests that CD24 high tumors go on to show an unfavorable response to cisplatin treatment. Overall, based on the strength of further analysis, CD24 presents a strong rationale to be utilized as a predictive indicator to stratify head and neck cancer patients for platinum-based therapy. It also provides a rationale for using CD24 as a therapeutic adjuvant target along with standard cisplatin therapy. PMID:27276062

  7. Dosimetric influences of rotational setup errors on head and neck carcinoma intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Weihua; Yang, Yong; Yue, Ning J.; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the dosimetric influence of the residual rotational setup errors on head and neck carcinoma (HNC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with routine 3 translational setup corrections and the adequacy of this routine correction. A total of 66 kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image sets were acquired on the first day of treatment and weekly thereafter for 10 patients with HNC and were registered with the corresponding planning CT images, using 2 3-dimensional (3D) rigid registration methods. Method 1 determines the translational setup errors only, and method 2 determines 6-degree (6D) setup errors, i.e., both rotational and translational setup errors. The 6D setup errors determined by method 2 were simulated in the treatment planning system and were then corrected using the corresponding translational data determined by method 1. For each patient, dose distributions for 6 to 7 fractions with various setup uncertainties were generated, and a plan sum was created to determine the total dose distribution through an entire course and was compared with the original treatment plan. The average rotational setup errors were 0.7°± 1.0°, 0.1°±1.9°, and 0.3°±0.7° around left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) axes, respectively. With translational corrections determined by method 1 alone, the dose deviation could be large from fraction to fraction. For a certain fraction, the decrease in prescription dose coverage (V{sub p}) and the dose that covers 95% of target volume (D{sub 95}) could be up to 15.8% and 13.2% for planning target volume (PTV), and the decrease in V{sub p} and the dose that covers 98% of target volume (D{sub 98}) could be up to 9.8% and 5.5% for the clinical target volume (CTV). However, for the entire treatment course, for PTV, the plan sum showed that the average V{sub p} was decreased by 4.2% and D{sub 95} was decreased by 1.2 Gy for the first phase of IMRT with a

  8. Heading in football. Part 1: Development of biomechanical methods to investigate head response

    PubMed Central

    Shewchenko, N; Withnall, C; Keown, M; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: There has been growing controversy regarding long term effects of repeated low severity head impacts such as when heading a football. However, there are few scientific data substantiating these concerns in terms of the biomechanical head response to impact. The present study aimed to develop a research methodology to investigate the biomechanical response of human subjects during intentional heading and identify strategies for reducing head impact severity. Methods: A controlled laboratory study was carried out with seven active football players, aged 20–23 and of average stature and weight. The subjects were fitted with photographic targets for kinematic analysis and instrumented to measure head linear/angular accelerations and neck muscle activity. Balls were delivered at two speeds (6 m/s and 8 m/s) as the subjects executed several specific forward heading manoeuvres in the standing position. Heading speeds up to 11 m/s were seen when the head closing speed was considered. One subject demonstrating averaged flexion–extension muscle activity phased with head acceleration data and upper torso kinematics was used to validate a biofidelic 50th percentile human model with a detailed head and neck. The model was exercised under ball incoming speeds of 6–7 m/s with parameter variations including torso/head alignment, neck muscle tensing, and follow through. The model output was subsequently compared with additional laboratory tests with football players (n = 3). Additional heading scenarios were investigated including follow through, non-active ball impact, and non-contact events. Subject and model head responses were evaluated with peak linear and rotational accelerations and maximum incremental head impact power. Results: Modelling of neck muscle tensing predicted lower head accelerations and higher neck loads whereas volunteer head acceleration reductions were not consistent. Modelling of head–torso alignment predicted a modest reduction in

  9. Treatment of head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) infestation: is regular combing alone with a special detection comb effective at all levels?

    PubMed

    Kurt, Özgür; Balcıoğlu, I Cüneyt; Limoncu, M Emin; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Arserim, Süha K; Görgün, Serhan; Oyur, Tuba; Karakuş, Mehmet; Düzyol, Didem; Gökmen, Aysegül Aksoy; Kitapçıoğlu, Gül; Özbel, Yusuf

    2015-04-01

    Head lice infestation (HLI) caused by Pediculus humanus capitis has been a public health problem worldwide. Specially designed combs are used to identify head lice, while anti-lice products are applied on the scalp for treatment. In the present study, we aimed to test whether combing only by precision detection comb (PDC) or metal pin comb (MPC) could be effective alternatives to the use of anti-lice products in children. A total of 560 children from two rural schools in Turkey were screened. In the PDC trial, children were combed every second day for 14 days, while in the MPC trial, combing was performed once in every four days for 15 days. Children were divided into two groups (dry combing and wet combing) for both trials and results were compared. The results showed no significant differences between dry and wet combing strategies for both combs for the removal of head lice (p > 0.05). The number of adult head lice declined significantly on each subsequent combing day in both approaches, except on day 15 in the MPC trial. In the end, no louse was found in 54.1 and 48.9% of children in the PDC and MPC trials, respectively. Since family members of infested children were not available, they were not checked for HLI. Four times combing within 2 weeks with MPC combs was found effective for both treatment of low HLI and prevention of heavy HLI. In conclusion, regular combing by special combs decreases HLI level in children and is safely applicable as long-term treatment. PMID:25604670

  10. BNCT treatment planning for superficial and deep-seated tumors: Experience from clinical trial of recurrent head and neck cancer at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Chang, Chih-Ting; Yeh, Lan-Yun; Wang, Ling-Wei; Lin, Tzung-Yi

    2015-12-01

    Under the collaboration between National Tsing Hua University and Taipei Veterans General Hospital, clinical trial of recurrent head-and-neck cancer by Boron neutron capture therapy at Tsing Hua open-pool reactor started on August 11, 2010. Up to January 2014, 17 patients were treated. Based on the treatment planning experiences of clinical trials using in-house designed THORplan, different setups should be used for superficial and deep-seated tumors. Superficial tumor treatment gains benefits from the use of patient collimator, while direct irradiation is a better choice for deep-seated tumor. PMID:26278349

  11. The role of stem cells in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Nevens, Daan; Nuyts, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Xerostomia is an important complication following radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer. Current treatment approaches are insufficient and can only temporarily relieve symptoms. New insights into the physiopathology of radiation-induced xerostomia might help us in this regard. This review discusses the current knowledge of salivary gland stem cells in radiation-induced xerostomia and their value in the prevention and treatment of this complication. Salivary gland stem cell transplantation, bone marrow-derived cell mobilization, molecular regulation of parotid stem cells, stem cell sparing RT, and adaptive RT are promising techniques that are discussed in this study. PMID:26880659

  12. Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej; Licki, Janusz

    2003-08-26

    Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

  13. Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej; Licki, Janusz

    2003-08-01

    Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

  14. Modified surgical techniques of free vascularized fibular grafting for treatment of the osteonecrosis of femoral head: results from a series of 407 cases.

    PubMed

    Gao, You-Shui; Chen, Sheng-Bao; Jin, Dong-Xu; Sheng, Jia-Gen; Cheng, Xiang-Guo; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2013-11-01

    The goal for treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is to relieve pain, preserve the contour of the femoral head, and delay the need for total hip arthroplasty. The free vascularized fibular grafting (FVFG) has been shown to support the subchondral architecture as well as restore local circulation for the necrotic femoral head in treatment of ONFH. This report aimed to present the clinical results of the use of a modified surgical technique of FVFG for treatment of ONFH. Four hundred and seven patients with 578 hips of ONFH were included. The patients' average age was 36.7 years old (ranging 19-55 years old). The disease was staged from II to V based on the Steinberg classification system. By the modified procedure, the vascularized fibular graft was harvested via a lateral incision with fibular osteotomy prior to the exposure of the vascular pedicle, and the removal of necrotic tissue and inset of graft were performed through an anterior approach. The operative time averaged 90 min for unilateral ONFH (ranging 75-110 min) and 190 min for simultaneous treatment of bilateral ONFH (ranging 160-230 min). The average length of follow-up was 5.0 years (ranging 3-10 years). The complications included one infection in one case, temporary loss of sensation of the thigh in eleven cases, and restricted motion of the great toe in nine cases. The Harris hip score of patients improved from 65.0 to 86.9 on average. Radiographic evaluation showed no changes in 331 hips (57.3%), improvement in 195 hips (33.7%) and necrosis progression in 52 hips (9.0%). Twenty-three hips (4.0%) in 20 patients had total hip arthroplasty during the period. These results show that the modified technique of the use of FVFG for treatment of ONFH yields similar postoperative results in comparison to the traditional method. PMID:23907776

  15. Role of stereotactic radiosurgery with a linear accelerator in treatment of intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, J S; Rossitch, E; Siddon, R; Moore, M R; Rockoff, M A; Alexander, E

    1990-05-01

    Between 1986 and 1988, 16 children were treated for 10 arteriovenous malformations and 6 recurrent intracranial tumors with stereotactic radiation therapy using a modified Clinac 6/100 linear accelerator. The median age of our patients was 10.5 years. For the group with arteriovenous malformation, follow-up ranged from 6 months to 37 months (median was 20 months). No patient bled during the follow-up period. Five of eight patients with follow-up longer than 12 months have achieved complete obliteration of their arteriovenous malformation by angiogram. The four remaining patients who have not achieved a complete obliteration are awaiting their 2-year posttreatment angiogram. The other patient has been treated within the year and have not yet been studied. Five of the six recurrent tumor patients are alive with a median follow-up of 8 months. The remaining patient was controlled locally, but he died of recurrent disease outside the area treated with radiosurgery. The radiographic responses of these patients have included three complete responses, two substantial reductions in tumor volume (greater than 50%) and one stabilization. Despite previous radiotherapy, there have been no significant complications in these patients. We conclude that stereotactic radiation therapy using a standard linear accelerator is an effective and safe technique in the treatment of selected intracranial arteriovenous malformations and tumors in children. In addition, stereotactic radiosurgery may have unique applications in the treatment of localized primary and recurrent pediatric brain tumors. PMID:2184409

  16. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life. PMID:25190337

  17. Two-year longitudinal study of parotid salivary flow rates in head and neck cancer patients receiving unilateral neck parotid-sparing radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Henson, B S; Eisbruch, A; D'Hondt, E; Ship, J A

    1999-05-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment for head and neck cancers, and frequently causes permanent salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. This 2-year longitudinal study evaluated unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates in 11 patients with head and neck cancers who received unilateral neck parotid-sparing RT. The results demonstrated that treated parotid glands had essentially no output up to 2 years post-RT. Alternatively, spared parotid flow rates were indistinguishable from pre-RT values at 1 and 2 years post-RT, and increased slightly over time. Total unstimulated and stimulated parotid flow rates 2 years after completion of RT were similar to pre-RT values, suggesting that spared parotid function may compensate for lost function from treated parotid glands. These results demonstrate that unilateral neck parotid-sparing techniques are effective in preserving contralateral parotid glands up to 2 years after the completion of RT. PMID:10621842

  18. Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer: A local center's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shixiu . E-mail: wushixiu@medmail.com.cn; Xie Congying; Jin Xiance; Zhang Ping

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, toxicity, and clinical efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy boost technique for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Method and Materials: Seventy-five patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy boost technique. Daily fraction of 2.5 Gy and 2.0 Gy were prescribed to the gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical tumor volume (CTV) to a total dose of 70 Gy and 56 Gy, respectively, in 38 days. In 24 of these patients, GTV was boosted to 80 Gy. Quantitative {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate salivary scintigraphy was performed by assessing excretion uptake and excretion index of parotid glands. Results: In dosimetry, the mean doses delivered to the GTV, CTV1, and CTV2 were 68.1 Gy, 58.7 Gy, and 54.3 Gy, respectively. An average of 1% of the GTV and 3% of the CTV received less than 90% and 95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, whereas the mean doses delivered to the organ at risk were kept below tolerance limits. The mean doses to the ipsilateral and contralateral parotids were 31.1 Gy and 21.9 Gy, respectively. {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate salivary scintigraphy showed excretion index and uptake index decreased by 44.6% and 28.3%, respectively, in ipsilateral parotid (p < 0.05), whereas no significant decline in contralateral parotid was observed. Acute toxicities were well tolerated, except for the relatively high incidence of severe mucositis. No Grade 4 side effect occurred. With a median follow-up of 23.8 months (range, 10-39 months), the 2-year local progression-free, local-regional progression-free, and distant metastasis-free survival were 97.26%, 87.21%, and 82.03%, respectively. The 2-year overall survival was 86.81%. Conclusions: Simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy yielded superior dose distribution over conventional radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and could be delivered with acceptable toxicity and risky organ sparing. Dose

  19. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy (HART) of 70.6 Gy With Concurrent 5-FU/Mitomycin C Is Superior to HART of 77.6 Gy Alone in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Long-term Results of the ARO 95-06 Randomized Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Budach, Volker; Stromberger, Carmen; Poettgen, Christoph; Baumann, Michael; Budach, Wilfried; Grabenbauer, Gerhard; Marnitz, Simone; Olze, Heidi; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the ARO 95-06 randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation with mitomycin C/5-fluorouracil (C-HART) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) alone in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: The primary endpoint was locoregional control (LRC). Three hundred eighty-four patients with stage III (6%) and IV (94%) oropharyngeal (59.4%), hypopharyngeal (32.3%), and oral cavity (8.3%) cancer were randomly assigned to 30 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total of 70.6 Gy concurrently with mitomycin C/5-FU (C-HART) or 16 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total dose of 77.6 Gy alone (HART). Statistical analyses were done with the log-rank test and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 8.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-9.7 years). At 10 years, the LRC rates were 38.0% (C-HART) versus 26.0% (HART, P=.002). The cancer-specific survival and overall survival rates were 39% and 10% (C-HART) versus 30.0% and 9% (HART, P=.042 and P=.049), respectively. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combined treatment was associated with improved LRC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.5-0.8; P=.002]). The association between combined treatment arm and increased LRC appeared to be limited to oropharyngeal cancer (P=.003) as compared with hypopharyngeal or oral cavity cancer (P=.264). Conclusions: C-HART remains superior to HART in terms of LRC. However, this effect may be limited to oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  20. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with paragraph (c) of this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the... than 260g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal and shall lie at or above the... lateral acceleration vector shall not exceed 10g. (c) Test procedure: (1) Suspend the head as shown...

  1. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with paragraph (c) of this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the... than 260g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal and shall lie at or above the... lateral acceleration vector shall not exceed 10g. (c) Test procedure: (1) Suspend the head as shown...

  2. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the head in accordance with § 572.36(c) shall not be less than 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse are less than ten...

  3. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... The head shall be tested per procedure specified in 49 CFR § 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1... acceleration shall be between 125 g's and 155 g's; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse shall not exceed...

  4. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the head in accordance with § 572.36(c) shall not be less than 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse are less than ten...

  5. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... accordance with paragraph (c) of this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the... than 260g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal and shall lie at or above the... lateral acceleration vector shall not exceed 10g. (c) Test procedure: (1) Suspend the head as shown...

  6. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... The head shall be tested per procedure specified in 49 CFR § 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1... acceleration shall be between 125 g's and 155 g's; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse shall not exceed...

  7. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the head in accordance with § 572.36(c) shall not be less than 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse are less than ten...

  8. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Test procedure. The head shall be tested per procedure specified in 49 CFR § 572.112(a). (c... peak resultant acceleration shall be between 125 g's and 155 g's; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration...

  9. 49 CFR 572.32 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accelerations at the location of the accelerometers mounted in the head in accordance with § 572.36(c) shall not be less than 225g, and not more than 275g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse are less than ten...

  10. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... accordance with paragraph (c) of this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the... than 260g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal and shall lie at or above the... lateral acceleration vector shall not exceed 10g. (c) Test procedure: (1) Suspend the head as shown...

  11. 49 CFR 572.6 - Head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with paragraph (c) of this section, the peak resultant accelerations at the location of the... than 260g. The acceleration/time curve for the test shall be unimodal and shall lie at or above the... lateral acceleration vector shall not exceed 10g. (c) Test procedure: (1) Suspend the head as shown...

  12. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Test procedure. The head shall be tested per procedure specified in 49 CFR § 572.112(a). (c... peak resultant acceleration shall be between 125 g's and 155 g's; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration...

  13. 49 CFR 572.182 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... The head shall be tested per procedure specified in 49 CFR § 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1... acceleration shall be between 125 g's and 155 g's; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall be unimodal to the extent that oscillations occurring after the main acceleration pulse shall not exceed...

  14. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in paragraph (c) of this section, then the resultant head acceleration measured at the location of... more than 160g. (1) The recorded acceleration-time curve for this test is unimodal at or above the 50g... milliseconds. (2) The lateral acceleration vector does not exceed 5g. (c) Head test procedure. The...

  15. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in paragraph (c) of this section, then the resultant head acceleration measured at the location of... more than 160g. (1) The recorded acceleration-time curve for this test is unimodal at or above the 50g... milliseconds. (2) The lateral acceleration vector does not exceed 5g. (c) Head test procedure. The...

  16. 49 CFR 572.72 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in paragraph (c) of this section, then the resultant head acceleration measured at the location of... more than 160g. (1) The recorded acceleration-time curve for this test is unimodal at or above the 50g... milliseconds. (2) The lateral acceleration vector does not exceed 5g. (c) Head test procedure. The...

  17. Somatostatin Analogue Treatment of a TSH-Secreting Adenoma Presenting With Accelerated Bone Metabolism and a Pericardial Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Mousiolis, Athanasios C.; Rapti, Eleni; Grammatiki, Maria; Yavropoulou, Maria; Efstathiou, Maria; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Daniilidis, Michalis; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increased bone turnover and other less frequent comorbidities of hyperthyroidism, such as heart failure, have only rarely been reported in association with central hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma (TSHoma). Treatment is highly empirical and relies on eliminating the tumor and the hyperthyroid state. We report here an unusual case of a 39-year-old man who was initially admitted for management of pleuritic chest pain and fever of unknown origin. Diagnostic work up confirmed pericarditis and pleural effusion both refractory to treatment. The patient had a previous history of persistently elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), indicative of increased bone turnover. He had also initially been treated with thyroxine supplementation due to elevated TSH levels. During the diagnostic process a TSHoma was revealed. Thyroxine was discontinued, and resection of the pituitary tumor followed by treatment with a somatostatin analog led to complete recession of the effusions, normalization of ALP, and shrinkage of pituitary tumor. Accelerated bone metabolism and pericardial and pleural effusions attributed to a TSHoma may resolve after successful treatment of the tumor. The unexpected clinical course of this case highlights the need for careful long-term surveillance in patients with these rare pituitary adenomas. PMID:26765410

  18. Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H. Ahn, Andrew I.; Lee, C. Joe; Shen Jin; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: With 54{sup o} of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck.

  19. Treatment of recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery: carotid reconstruction with ePTFE graft.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-bo; Li, Jing-jia; Chen, Yue-hong; Shu, Chang; Tang, Qing-lai; Yang, Xin-ming

    2011-12-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the carotid artery using expanded polytetraflouroethylene (ePTFE) in patients with recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery. Ten patients, who had recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery, received carotid artery resection and reconstruction with ePTFE, tissue defects were repaired by pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results show that eight patients did not present any vascular and neurologic complications. One patient presented slight hemiparesis, another patient developed wound infection and pharyngocutaneous fistula. The mean follow-up period was 33.1 ± 16.0 months. The 2-year survival rate was 50% (5/10), and there was one patient who survived for 60 months without locoreginal recurrence or distant metastasis. En bloc resection of tumor and involved carotid-associated ePTFE reconstruction provide effective improvement in the locoregional control of the recurrent head and neck carcinoma. The pedicle pectoralis major myocutaneous flap can provide not only wound bed with affluent blood supply for the vascular grafts, but also reparation of skin or the tissue defects of oropharynx and hypopharynx. PMID:21400255

  20. A preliminary pilot survey on head lice, pediculosis in Sharkia Governorate and treatment of lice with natural plant extracts.

    PubMed

    El-Basheir, Zeinab M; Fouad, Mahmoud A H

    2002-12-01

    Twelve different representative areas in Sharkia Governorate were surveyed for head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis. The pre-valence was investigated among 120 houses containing 2,448 individual, with different age, sex and socioeconomic status. Examination was done by naked eye aided with hand-lens. A total of 137 individuals were infested. Infestation rates were higher in the rural areas with low socioeconomic levels, concrete houses with over-crowded family members. Children had significantly higher infestation rates than adults. Males had lower infestation rates than females. However, the hair length and permanent hair washing were the factors accounted for both age and sex difference in prevalence of pediculosis. Head lice infestations were found all over the year, but increased in summer and spring. One hundred infested patients (90 females and 10 males) with different aged and hair length were treated with tour mixed cream from plants Lawsonia alba L. (Henna). Trigonella faemum-gracanum (Fenugreek), Hibiscus cannabinus (Hibiscus) and Artemisia cina (Wormseed). The head lice completely disappeared within a week among those patients treated by henna mixed with aqueous extract of sheah (100%) or mixed with helba (75%) or with karkada (50%). PMID:12512805

  1. Response of brown-headed cowbirds and three host species to thinning treatments in low-elevation ponderosa pine forests along the northern Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeley, W.H.; Germaine, Stephen; Stanley, Thomas R.; Spaulding, Sarah A.; Wanner, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    Thinning ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests to achieve desired ecological conditions remains a priority in the North American west. In addition to reducing the risk of high-severity wildfires in unwanted areas, stand thinning may increase wildlife and plant diversity and provide increased opportunity for seedling recruitment. We initiated conservative (i.e. minimal removal of trees) ponderosa stand thinning treatments with the goals of reducing fire risk and improving habitat conditions for native wildlife and flora. We then compared site occupancy of brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), chipping sparrows (Spizella passerina), plumbeous vireos (Vireo plumbeus), and western wood-pewees (Contopus sordidulus) in thinned and unthinned (i.e., control) forest stands from 2007 to 2009. Survey stations located in thinned stands had 64% fewer trees/ha, 25% less canopy cover, and 23% less basal area than stations in control stands. Occupancy by all three host species was negatively associated with tree density, suggesting that these species respond favorably to forest thinning treatments in ponderosa pine forests. We also encountered plumbeous vireos more frequently in plots closer to an ecotonal (forest/grassland) edge, an association that may increase their susceptibility to edge-specialist, brood parasites like brown-headed cowbirds. Occupancy of brown-headed cowbirds was not related to forest metrics but was related to occupancy by plumbeous vireos and the other host species in aggregate, supporting previous reports on the affiliation between these species. Forest management practices that promote heterogeneity in forest stand structure may benefit songbird populations in our area, but these treatments may also confer costs associated with increased cowbird occupancy. Further research is required to understand more on the complex relationships between occupancy of cowbirds and host species, and between cowbird occupancy and realized rates of nest parasitism.

  2. Late effects after treatment of twenty children with soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck. Experience at a single institution with a review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, M.; Littman, P.; Raney, R.B.; Nelson, L.; Handler, S.; Diamond, G.; Stanley, C.

    1986-05-15

    Twenty children with soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck, treated at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania from 1972 to 1981, were evaluated for the late deleterious effects of treatment. All patients received radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide; certain patients also received Adriamycin (doxorubicin). All had ophthalmologic, otologic, growth, and cosmetic evaluations; 15 also had dental and maxillofacial examinations. The median age at diagnosis was 6 years (range, 7 months-13 years). Median follow-up from time of diagnosis was 5.5 years with a minimum of 3 years in all but four patients. The major problems encountered were related to the eyes (xerophthalmia and cataracts), ears (hearing loss), teeth (maleruption and caries), glandular structures (xerostomia, hypopituitarism), and development (craniofacial deformity). It is concluded that children treated for soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck with combined modality therapy, including radiation enhancers, may show a variety of late treatment-related adversities. These children require close multidisciplinary follow-up for detection of late effects in order that appropriate prophylactic or symptomatic treatment can be instituted to minimize their consequences.

  3. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment

  4. Effects of Change in Tongue Pressure and Salivary Flow Rate on Swallow Efficiency Following Chemoradiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogus-Pulia, Nicole M; Larson, Charles; Mittal, Bharat B; Pierce, Marge; Zecker, Steven; Kennelty, Korey; Kind, Amy; Connor, Nadine P

    2016-10-01

    Patients treated with chemoradiation for head and neck cancer frequently develop dysphagia. Tissue damage to the oral tongue causing weakness along with decreases in saliva production may contribute to dysphagia. Yet, effects of these variables on swallowing-related measures are unclear. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine effects of chemoradiation on tongue pressures, as a surrogate for strength, and salivary flow rates and (2) to elucidate relationships among tongue pressures, saliva production, and swallowing efficiency by bolus type. Twenty-one patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation were assessed before and after treatment and matched with 21 healthy control participants who did not receive chemoradiation. Each participant was given a questionnaire to rate dysphagia symptoms. Videofluoroscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (VFES) was used to determine swallowing efficiency; the Saxon test measured salivary flow rate; and the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI) was used for oral tongue maximum and endurance measures. Results revealed significantly lower tongue endurance measures for patients post-treatment as compared to controls (p = .012). Salivary flow rates also were lower compared to pre-treatment (p = .000) and controls (p = .000). Simple linear regression analyses showed that change in salivary flow rate was predictive of change in swallow efficiency measures from pre- to post-treatment for 1 mL thin liquid (p = .017), 3 mL nectar-thick liquid (p = .026), and 3 mL standard barium pudding (p = .011) boluses. Based on these findings, it appears that chemoradiation treatment affects tongue endurance and salivary flow rate, and these changes may impact swallow efficiency. These factors should be considered when planning treatment for dysphagia. PMID:27492408

  5. SU-C-19A-07: Influence of Immobilization On Plan Robustness in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer with IMPT

    SciTech Connect

    Bues, M; Anand, A; Liu, W; Shen, J; Keole, S; Patel, S; Morse, B; Kruse, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of interposing immobilization devices into the beam's path on the robustness of a head and neck plan. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom was placed into a preliminary prototype of a specialized head and neck immobilization device for proton beam therapy. The device consists of a hard low density shell, a custom mold insert, and thermoplastic mask to immobilize the patient's head in the shell. This device was provided by CIVCO Medical Solutions for the purpose of evaluation of suitability for proton beam therapy. See Figure 1. Two pairs of treatment plans were generated. The first plan in each pair was a reference plan including only the anthropomorphic phantom, and the second plan in each pair included the immobilization device. In all other respects the plans within the pair were identical. Results: In the case of the simple plan the degradation of plan robustness was found to be clinically insignificant. In this case, target coverage in the worst case scenario was reduced from 95% of the target volume receiving 96.5% of prescription dose to 95% of the target volume receiving 96.3% of prescription dose by introducing the immobilization device. In the case of the complex plan, target coverage of the boost volume in the worst case scenario was reduced from 95% of the boost target volume receiving 97% of prescription dose to 95% of the boost target volume receiving 83% of prescription dose by introducing the immobilization device. See Figure 2. Conclusion: Immobilization devices may have a deleterious effect on plan robustness. Evaluation of the preliminary prototype revealed a variable impact on the plan robustness depending of the complexity of the case. Brian Morse is an employee of CIVCO Medical Solutions.

  6. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions "How much?" and "What kind?" of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room , patient "scatterer," and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. PMID:8887513

  7. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions {open_quotes}How much?{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}What kind?{close_quotes} of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient {open_quotes}scatterer,{close_quotes} and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h{sup {minus}1} was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Accelerated evaluation of the robustness of treatment plans against geometric uncertainties by Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotta, B.; Söhn, M.; Alber, M.

    2012-12-01

    In order to provide a consistently high quality treatment, it is of great interest to assess the robustness of a treatment plan under the influence of geometric uncertainties. One possible method to implement this is to run treatment simulations for all scenarios that may arise from these uncertainties. These simulations may be evaluated in terms of the statistical distribution of the outcomes (as given by various dosimetric quality metrics) or statistical moments thereof, e.g. mean and/or variance. This paper introduces a method to compute the outcome distribution and all associated values of interest in a very efficient manner. This is accomplished by substituting the original patient model with a surrogate provided by a machine learning algorithm. This Gaussian process (GP) is trained to mimic the behavior of the patient model based on only very few samples. Once trained, the GP surrogate takes the place of the patient model in all subsequent calculations.The approach is demonstrated on two examples. The achieved computational speedup is more than one order of magnitude.

  9. Dosimetric effects of air pocket sizes in MammoSite treatment as accelerated partial breast irradiation for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y Jessica; Blough, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    MammoSite Brachytherapy System had been used as one of the Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) techniques since 2002. The clinical results from several clinical institutions had shown comparable treatment efficacy, cosmesis, and toxicity, to other APBI techniques. During MammoSite treatment, air cavities had been one of the primary issues causing treatment cancellation or delay. With the tolerance of the air volume less than 10% of the total Planning Target Volume (PTV) been set, there is still no data available to show the actual dose delivered to the breast tissue with the existence of the air pocket. In this paper, Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP5) was used to model a hypothesis MammoSite phantom with different sizes of air pockets, and compared to the calculation results from the treatment planning system (TPS) without heterogeneous corrections. It was found that without heterogeneous corrections, the difference between the TPS and MCNP5 calculations in the air cavity surface doses and PTV point doses can be up to 2.02% and 3.61%, respectively, with the balloon and air pocket size combinations calculated in this paper. Based on the distance from the point of interest to the balloon surface, an approximate dose can be calculated using the linear relationship found in this study. These equations provide a quick and simple way to predict the actual dose delivered to the breast soft tissue located within the PTV. With the equation applied to the dose from the TPS, the dose error caused by the air pocket during MammoSite treatment can be reduced to the minimum. PMID:20160678

  10. SU-E-T-03: 3D GPU-Accelerated Secondary Checks of Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, F; Perez, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Redundant treatment verifications in conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques are traditionally performed with single point calculations. New solutions can replace these checks with 3D treatment plan verifications. This work describes a software tool (Mobius3D, Mobius Medical Systems) that uses a GPU-accelerated collapsed cone algorithm to perform 3D independent verifications of TPS calculations. Methods: Mobius3D comes with reference beam models for common linear accelerators. The system uses an independently developed collapsed cone algorithm updated with recent enhancements. 144 isotropically-spaced cones are used for each voxel for calculations. These complex calculations can be sped up by using GPUs. Mobius3D calculate dose using DICOM information coming from TPS (CT, RT Struct, RT Plan RT Dose). DVH-metrics and 3D gamma tests can be used to compare both TPS and secondary calculations. 170 patients treated with all common techniques as 3DCFRT (including wedged), static and dynamic IMRT and VMAT have been successfully verified with this solution. Results: Calculation times are between 3–5 minutes for 3DCFRT treatments and 15–20 for most complex dMLC and VMAT plans. For all PTVs mean dose and 90% coverage differences are (1.12±0.97)% and (0.68±1.19)%, respectively. Mean dose discrepancies for all OARs is (0.64±1.00)%. 3D gamma (global, 3%/3 mm) analysis shows a mean passing rate of (97.8 ± 3.0)% for PTVs and (99.0±3.0)% for OARs. 3D gamma pasing rate for all voxels in CT has a mean value of (98.5±1.6)%. Conclusion: Mobius3D is a powerful tool to verify all modalities of radiation therapy treatments. Dose discrepancies calculated by this system are in good agreement with TPS. The use of reference beam data results in time savings and can be used to avoid the propagation of errors in original beam data into our QA system. GPU calculations permit enhanced collapsed cone calculations with reasonable calculation times.

  11. Consensus Recommendations for Current Treatments and Accelerating Clinical Trials for Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Jaishri O; Evans, D. Gareth; Adler, John; Brackmann, Derald; Chen, Ruihong; Ferner, Rosalie E.; Hanemann, C. Oliver; Harris, Gordon; Huson, Susan M.; Jacob, Abraham; Kalamarides, Michel; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Korf, Bruce R.; Mautner, Victor-Felix; McClatchey, Andrea I.; Miao, Harry; Plotkin, Scott R.; Slattery, William; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Welling, D. Bradley; Wen, Patrick Y.; Widemann, Brigitte; Hunter-Schaedle, Kim; Giovannini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a tumor suppressor syndrome characterized by bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) which often result in deafness despite aggressive management. Meningiomas, ependymomas and other cranial nerve and peripheral schwannomas are also commonly found in NF2 and collectively lead to major neurologic morbidity and mortality. Traditionally, the overall survival rate in patients with NF2 is estimated to be 38% at 20 years from diagnosis. Hence, there is a desperate need for new, effective therapies. Recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of NF2 related tumors has aided in the identification of potential therapeutic targets and emerging clinical therapies. In June 2010, representatives of the international NF2 research and clinical community convened under the leadership of Drs. D. Gareth Evans (University of Manchester) and Marco Giovannini (House Research Institute) to review the state of NF2 treatment and clinical trials. This manuscript summarizes the expert opinions about current treatments for NF2 associated tumors and recommendations for advancing therapies emerging from that meeting. The development of effective therapies for NF2 associated tumors has the potential for significant clinical advancement not only for patients with NF2 but for thousands of neuro-oncology patients afflicted with these tumors. PMID:22140088

  12. Accelerated ovarian aging in mice by treatment of busulfan and cyclophosphamide*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Qi, Hui-jing; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Shi-rong; Song, Daniel W.; Yu, Chi-yang; Gao, Jian-gang

    2013-01-01

    Busulfan/cyclophosphamide (Bu/Cy) conditioning regimen has been widely used to treat cancer patients, while their effects on major internal organs in females are not fully understood. We treated female mice with Bu/Cy, and examined the histopathology of major internal organs on Day 30 after the treatment. The results show that Bu/Cy treatment affected the ovaries most extensively, while it had less effect on the spleen, lungs, and kidneys, and no effect on the heart, liver, stomach, and pancreas. To better understand the effect of Bu/Cy on the ovaries, we counted follicles, and determined the levels of ovarian steroids. The Bu/Cy-treated mice showed a reduction of primordial and primary follicles (P<0.01) on Day 30 and a marked loss of follicles at all developmental stages (P<0.01) on Day 60. Plasma levels of estradiol and progesterone in Bu/Cy-treated mice decreased by 43.9% and 61.4%, respectively. Thus, there was a gradual process of follicle loss and low estradiol in Bu/Cy-treated mice; this is a profile similar to what is found in women with premature ovarian failure (POF). The Bu/Cy-treated mice may serve as a useful animal model to study the dynamics of follicle loss in women undergoing POF. PMID:23549849

  13. Improved Survival in Patients With Stage III-IV Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy as Primary Local Treatment Modality

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Raben, David; Chen Changhu

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the overall and cause-specific survival in patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy (RT) as the primary local treatment modality. Methods and Materials: The survival of patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT was queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The effect of the year of treatment on overall and cause-specific survival was analyzed as a categorical and continuous variable. The patterns of care for these patients were also evaluated. Results: Between 1988 and 2004, 6,759 patients were identified. Survival was significantly improved in patients treated more recently. When analyzed as a continuous variable, each year was associated with a 3% and 4.1% reduction in the relative risk of overall and cause-specific mortality, respectively (p < 0.0001). Patients treated after 1998 had a 7.6% and 6.1% absolute improvement in overall and cause-specific survival, respectively, compared with patients treated before 1998 (overall survival, hazard ratio, 0.81; cause-specific survival, hazard ratio, 0.77; p < 0.0001). This benefit in survival was limited to tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. The use of RT increased among patients treated more recently. This shift in patterns of care was most pronounced for tumors of the larynx and hypopharynx. Conclusions: The overall and cause-specific survival of patients with Stage III-IVb head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary RT has improved with time. The improvement is consistent with that observed in a large meta-analysis of randomized patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  14. Trismus Secondary Release Surgery and Microsurgical Free Flap Reconstruction After Surgical Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang-Ming; Deek, Nidal Farhan Al; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-10-01

    This article addresses trismus following head and neck cancer ablation and free flap reconstruction whether or not radiotherapy has been utilized. The focus is to achieve durable and favorable outcomes and avoid untoward results. To aid surgeons in fulfilling these goals, key factors, including adequate release surgery, optimal free flap selection and reconstruction, long-lasting results, and the untoward outcomes specific to trismus release and reconstruction surgery and how to avoid them have been investigated and discussed based on the authors' experience in this surgery. PMID:27601398

  15. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  16. Dasatinib in the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Accelerated Phase After Imatinib Failure: The START A Trial

    PubMed Central

    Apperley, Jane F.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Roy, Lydia; Roboz, Gail J.; Rosti, Gianantonio; Bullorsky, Eduardo O.; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Hochhaus, Andreas; Heim, Dominik; de Souza, Carmino A.; Larson, Richard A.; Lipton, Jeffrey H.; Khoury, H. Jean; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Sillaber, Christian; Hughes, Timothy P.; Erben, Philipp; Van Tornout, Jan; Stone, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in accelerated phase (CML-AP) that is resistant or intolerant to imatinib have limited therapeutic options. Dasatinib, a potent inhibitor of BCR-ABL and SRC-family kinases, has efficacy in patients with CML-AP who have experienced treatment failure with imatinib. We now report follow-up data from the full patient cohort of 174 patients enrolled onto a phase II trial to provide a more complete assessment of the efficacy and safety of dasatinib in this population. Patients and Methods Patients with imatinib-resistant (n = 161) or -intolerant (n = 13) CML-AP received dasatinib 70 mg orally twice daily. Results At a median follow-up of 14.1 months (treatment duration, 0.1 to 21.7 months), major and complete hematologic responses were attained by 64% and 45% of patients, respectively, and major and complete cytogenetic responses were achieved in 39% and 32% of patients, respectively. Responses were achieved irrespective of imatinib status (resistant or intolerant), prior stem-cell transplantation, or the presence of prior BCR-ABL mutation. The 12-month progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 82%, respectively. Dasatinib was generally well tolerated; the most frequent nonhematologic severe treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (52%; grade 3 to 4, 8%). Cytopenias were common, including grade 3 to 4 neutropenia (76%) and thrombocytopenia (82%). Pleural effusion occurred in 27% of patients (grade 3 to 4, 5%). Conclusion Dasatinib is effective in patients with CML-AP after imatinib treatment failure. PMID:19487385

  17. Recommended Patient-Reported Core Set of Symptoms to Measure in Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Trials

    PubMed Central

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Murphy, Barbara A.; Ridge, John A.; Gavin, Patrick; Reeve, Bryce B.; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Movsas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We identified a standard core set of patient-reported symptoms and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) domains to be assessed in head and neck (H&N) cancer clinical trials. The core symptom and HRQOL domain scores were used to guide recommendations by a working group of experts as part of a National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and HRQOL Clinical Trials Planning Meeting. A PubMed search was conducted using the search terms of “health-related quality of life” and “head & neck cancer,” limited to publications from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. Fifty-four articles were used to guide the choice of recommendations. Twenty-nine symptoms and nine domains were identified, from which 12 H&N-specific core symptoms and HRQOL domains were recommended: swallowing, oral pain, skin changes, dry mouth, dental health, opening mouth/trismus, taste, excess/thick mucous/saliva, shoulder disability/motion, voice/hoarseness, social domain, and functional domain. This core set of 12 H&N-specific, patient-reported symptoms and HRQOL domains should be assessed in future H&N cancer clinical trials. PMID:25006189

  18. Recommended patient-reported core set of symptoms to measure in head and neck cancer treatment trials.

    PubMed

    Chera, Bhishamjit S; Eisbruch, Avraham; Murphy, Barbara A; Ridge, John A; Gavin, Patrick; Reeve, Bryce B; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Movsas, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    We identified a standard core set of patient-reported symptoms and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) domains to be assessed in head and neck (H&N) cancer clinical trials. The core symptom and HRQOL domain scores were used to guide recommendations by a working group of experts as part of a National Cancer Institute Symptom Management and HRQOL Clinical Trials Planning Meeting. A PubMed search was conducted using the search terms of "health-related quality of life" and "head & neck cancer," limited to publications from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2010. Fifty-four articles were used to guide the choice of recommendations. Twenty-nine symptoms and nine domains were identified, from which 12 H&N-specific core symptoms and HRQOL domains were recommended: swallowing, oral pain, skin changes, dry mouth, dental health, opening mouth/trismus, taste, excess/thick mucous/saliva, shoulder disability/motion, voice/hoarseness, social domain, and functional domain. This core set of 12 H&N-specific, patient-reported symptoms and HRQOL domains should be assessed in future H&N cancer clinical trials. PMID:25006189

  19. Using co-metabolism to accelerate synthetic starch wastewater degradation and nutrient recovery in photosynthetic bacterial wastewater treatment technology.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haifeng; Zhang, Guangming; Lu, Yufeng; Zhang, Yuanhui; Li, Baoming; Cao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Starch wastewater is a type of nutrient-rich wastewater that contains numerous macromolecular polysaccharides. Using photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) to treat starch wastewater can reduce pollutants and enhance useful biomass production. However, PSB cannot directly degrade macromolecular polysaccharides, which weakens the starch degradation effect. Therefore, co-metabolism with primary substances was employed in PSB wastewater treatment to promote starch degradation. The results indicated that co-metabolism is a highly effective method in synthetic starch degradation by PSB. When malic acid was used as the optimal primary substrate, the chemical oxygen demand, total sugar, macromolecules removal and biomass yield were considerably higher than when primary substances were not used, respectively. Malic acid was the primary substrate that played a highly important role in starch degradation. It promoted the alpha-amylase activity to 46.8 U and the PSB activity, which induced the degradation of macromolecules. The products in the wastewater were ethanol, acetic acid and propionic acid. Ethanol was the primary product throughout the degradation process. The introduction of co-metabolism with malic acid to treat wastewater can accelerate macromolecules degradation and bioresource production and weaken the acidification effect. This method provides another pathway for bioresource recovery from wastewater. This approach is a sustainable and environmentally friendly wastewater treatment technology. PMID:26360302

  20. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  1. Role of Polymer Architecture on the Activity of Polymer-Protein Conjugates for the Treatment of Accelerated Bone Loss Disorders.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Bryan S; Stewart, Jon D; Aguirre, J Ignacio; Holliday, L Shannon; Figg, C Adrian; Messer, Jonathan G; Sumerlin, Brent S

    2015-08-10

    Polymers of similar molecular weights and chemical constitution but varying in their macromolecular architectures were conjugated to osteoprotegerin (OPG) to determine the effect of polymer topology on protein activity in vitro and in vivo. OPG is a protein that inhibits bone resorption by preventing the formation of mature osteoclasts from the osteoclast precursor cell. Accelerated bone loss disorders, such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and metastatic bone disease, occur as a result of increased osteoclastogenesis, leading to the severe weakening of the bone. OPG has shown promise as a treatment in bone disorders; however, it is rapidly cleared from circulation through rapid liver uptake, and frequent, high doses of the protein are necessary to achieve a therapeutic benefit. We aimed to improve the effectiveness of OPG by creating OPG-polymer bioconjugates, employing reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization to create well-defined polymers with branching densities varying from linear, loosely branched to densely branched. Polymers with each of these architectures were conjugated to OPG using a "grafting-to" approach, and the bioconjugates were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The OPG-polymer bioconjugates showed retention of activity in vitro against osteoclasts, and each bioconjugate was shown to be nontoxic. Preliminary in vivo studies further supported the nontoxic characteristics of the bioconjugates, and measurement of the bone mineral density in rats 7 days post-treatment via peripheral quantitative computed tomography suggested a slight increase in bone mineral density after administration of the loosely branched OPG-polymer bioconjugate. PMID:26151628

  2. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Usually, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  4. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  5. Induction chemotherapy with TPF (Docetaxel, Carboplatin and Fluorouracil) in the treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J D; Bran, G; Anders, C; Sadick, H; Faber, A; Hörmann, K; Sauter, A

    2010-11-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) presents at a locally advanced (LA) stage in many patients. Chemotherapy, which is one fundamental therapy mode for local disease control of inoperable disease or if organ preservation is desired, has become an important factor of first line treatment regimens either during or prior to radiotherapy (RT). Patients with locoregionally advanced inoperable, recurrent or metastatic disease still have a poor prognosis, which enforces the need for new treatment approaches and new drug therapies, adjusted to the different settings of the disease. One innovative progress for this collective of patients with locally advanced tumor was the implementation of Docetaxel in chemotherapeutic regimes in optimal combination with concurrent chemoradiotherapy or in neoadjuvant setting of induction phase treatment. Docetaxel combined with the conventional chemotherapy regimen, containing Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil (TPF), is now acknowledged as being the gold standard of induction treatment. Various studies suggest survival advantage due to the induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by chemoradiotherapy, which is known as sequential therapy, over chemoradiotherapy alone. In contrast to prevailing studies we administered Docetaxel, Carboplatin and 5-FU within the frame-work of induction chemotherapy instead of conventional use of Cisplatin for five patients with locoregionally advanced HNSCC. The clinical progress was evaluated through cross section imaging (computer tomography/MRI) prior and after ICT and classified following the RECIST criteria. Due to a very small collective of patient and the administration of Carboplatin instead of Cisplatin in this study, it was not possible to document the the efficacy of ICT (TPF) concerning survival advantage in patient with locoregionally advanced head and neck tumors. Further studies with an extended collective of patients are neccessary. PMID:20878112

  6. Early treatment with the von Rosen splint for neonatal instability of the hip is safe regarding avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Daniel; Samuelsson, Hanna; Düppe, Henrik; Tiderius, Carl Johan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN) is a complication in treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We evaluated the risk of AVN after early treatment in the von Rosen splint and measured the diameter of the ossific nucleus at 1 year of age. Children and methods — All children born in Malmö, Sweden, undergo clinical screening for neonatal instability of the hip (NIH). We reviewed 1-year radiographs of all children treated early for NIH in our department from 2003 through 2010. The diameter of the ossific nucleus was measured, and signs of AVN were classified according to Kalamchi-MacEwen. Subsequent radiographs, taken for any reason, were reviewed and a local registry of diagnoses was used to identify subsequent AVN. Results — 229 of 586 children referred because of suspected NIH received early treatment (age ≤ 1 week) for NIH during the study period. 2 of the 229 treated children (0.9%, 95% CI: 0.1–3.1) had grade-1 AVN. Both had spontaneous resolution and were asymptomatic during the observation time (6 and 8 years). 466 children met the inclusion criteria for measurement of the ossific nucleus. Neonatally dislocated hips had significantly smaller ossific nuclei than neonatally stable hips: mean 9.4 mm (95% CI: 9.1–9.8) vs. 11.1 mm (95% CI: 10.9–11.3) at 1 year (p < 0.001). Interpretation — Early treatment with the von Rosen splint for NIH is safe regarding AVN. The ossification of the femoral head is slower in children with NIH than in untreated children with neonatally stable hips. PMID:26730503

  7. Dichloroacetate treatment accelerates the development of pathology in rodent autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gattone, Vincent H; Bacallao, Robert L

    2014-11-15

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is a toxicant by-product from the chlorination disinfection process for municipal water. The levels would not affect people with normal renal and liver function. However, people with impaired renal or liver function may have an increased susceptibility to DCA toxicity as those are the organs affected by DCA. People (and rodents) with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are polyuric, drink more fluids, and have both renal and liver pathology. In PKD, renal tubules and biliary epithelial cells proliferate to form cysts, which can eventually cause renal and/or liver dysfunction. Therefore, PKD may be a predisposing condition with an increased sensitivity to DCA toxicity. PCK rats are an orthologous model of human autosomal recessive PKD and were treated with 75 mg/l DCA in their drinking water. Male and female PCK and male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated from 4 to 8 wk of age, after which the severity of the renal and liver pathology induced by DCA were assessed. Only male PCK rats were adversely affected by DCA treatment, with an increase in the severity of renal cystic disease evinced by an increase in cystic enlargement and proteinuria. In conclusion, the chlorination byproduct DCA may adversely affect those with a preexisting renal disease, especially those who are polydipsic, like those with PKD. PMID:25234313

  8. Hardware acceleration of a Monte Carlo simulation for photodynamic therapy [corrected] treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Lo, William Chun Yip; Redmond, Keith; Luu, Jason; Chow, Paul; Rose, Jonathan; Lilge, Lothar

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are being used extensively in the field of medical biophysics, particularly for modeling light propagation in tissues. The high computation time for MC limits its use to solving only the forward solutions for a given source geometry, emission profile, and optical interaction coefficients of the tissue. However, applications such as photodynamic therapy treatment planning or image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography require solving the inverse problem given a desired dose distribution or absorber distribution, respectively. A faster means for performing MC simulations would enable the use of MC-based models for accomplishing such tasks. To explore this possibility, a digital hardware implementation of a MC simulation based on the Monte Carlo for Multi-Layered media (MCML) software was implemented on a development platform with multiple field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The hardware performed the MC simulation on average 80 times faster and was 45 times more energy efficient than the MCML software executed on a 3-GHz Intel Xeon processor. The resulting isofluence lines closely matched those produced by MCML in software, diverging by only less than 0.1 mm for fluence levels as low as 0.00001 cm(-2) in a skin model. PMID:19256707

  9. Attachment of Listeria monocytogenes to an austenitic stainless steel after welding and accelerated corrosion treatments.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tam L; Sofyan, Nofrijon I; Fergus, Jeffrey W; Gale, William F; Conner, Donald E

    2006-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels, widely used in food processing, undergo microstructural changes during welding, resulting in three distinctive zones: weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal. This research was conducted to determine the attachment of Listeria monocytogenes in these three zones before and after exposure to a corrosive environment. All experiments were done with tungsten inert gas welding of type 304 stainless steel. The four welding treatments were large or small beads with high or low heat. After welding, all surfaces were polished to an equivalent surface finish. A 10-microl droplet of an L. monocytogenes suspension was placed on the test surfaces. After 3 h at 23 degrees C, the surfaces were washed and prepared for scanning electron microscopy, which was used to determine attachment of L. monocytogenes by counting cells remaining on each test surface. In general, bacteria were randomly distributed on each surface type. However, differences in surface area of inoculum due to differences in interfacial energy (as manifested by the contact angle) were apparent and required normalization of bacterial count data. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in numbers of bacteria on the three surface zones. However, after exposure to the corrosive medium, numbers of bacteria on the three zones were higher (P < 0.05) than those on the corresponding zones of noncorroded surfaces. For the corroded surfaces, bacterial counts on the base metal were lower (P < 0.05) than those on heat-affected and weld zones. PMID:16865881

  10. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer This page ... and neck cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  11. Nifedipine Treatment for Hypertension is Associated with Enhanced Lipolytic Activity and Accelerated Clearance of Postprandial Lipemia.

    PubMed

    Grosskopf, I; Shaish, A; Charach, G; Harats, D; Kamari, Y

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension, advanced age, postprandial hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance are major risk factors for atherosclerosis. The calcium channel blocker nifedipine is reported to ameliorate insulin resistance possibly by activating PPARγ. This is expected to become accentuated in elderly individuals due to age-related insulin resistance. Insulin resistance modulates lipoprotein metabolism. Therefore, we reasoned that nifedipne offers the potential for improving postprandial lipemia in association with increasing age. We studied the effect of nifedipine on fasting lipids, postprandial lipemia, insulin sensitivity, and plasma lipolytic activity in 24 and 15 hypertensive subjects aged 70-75 years and 40-45 years, respectively. As expected, nifedipine significantly lowered systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Nifedipine decreased fasting triglyceride level (23%) and increased HDL-C (15%) in the elderly group. At baseline, postprandial triglyceride levels were remarkably elevated in elderly compared to younger patients (1 288±798 vs. 501±260 mg·dl(-1)·h, p<0.05), as was retinyl palmitate (surrogate marker for intestinally-derived cholesterol) in the chylomicrons (45.0±26.5 vs. 23.4±10.6 mg·l(-1)·h, p<0.05) and chylomicron remnant (15.2±5.4 vs. 11.7±4.7 mg·l(-1)·h, p<0.05) fractions. Importantly, while the level of chylomicron remnants in the group of younger subjects remained unchanged after treatment, nifedipine was associated with a significantly decreased chylomicron remnants retinyl palmitate in the elderly group, which dropped to levels, observed in younger subjects. This was accompanied by enhanced insulin sensitivity and augmented plasma lipolytic activity. The present work suggests that nifedipine has favorable metabolic effects that are beyond the known enhancement of insulin sensitivity. The improvement in postprandial lipidemia by nifedipine may add to its anti-atherogenic effects in hypertensive patients. PMID:26849821

  12. Chemical Treatments for Mobilizing Arsenic from Contaminated Aquifer Solids to Accelerate Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Mailloux, Brian J.; Lacko, Allison; Keimowitz, Alison R.; Stute, Martin; Simpson, H. James; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at US Superfund sites where remediation by pump and treat systems is often complicated by slow desorption of As from Fe and Al (hydr)oxides in aquifer solids. Chemical amendments that either compete with As for sorption sites or dissolve Fe and Al (hydr)oxides can increase As mobility and improve pump and treat remediation efficiency. The goal of this work was to determine optimal amendments for improving pump and treat at As contaminated sites such as the Vineland Chemical Co. Superfund site in southern New Jersey. Extraction and column experiments were performed using As contaminated aquifer solids (81 ± 1 mg/kg), site groundwater, and either phosphate (NaH2PO4·H2O) or oxalic acid (C2H2O4·2H2O). In extraction experiments, phosphate mobilized between 11% and 94% of As from the aquifer solids depending on phosphate concentration and extraction time (1 mM-1 M; 1–24 h) and oxalic acid mobilized between 38 and 102% depending on oxalic acid concentration and extraction time (1–400 mM; 1–24 h). In column experiments, phosphate additions induced more As mobilization in the first few pore volumes but oxalic acid was more effective at mobilizing As overall and at lower amendment concentrations. At the end of the laboratory column experiments, 48% of As had been mobilized from the aquifer sediments with 100 mM phosphate and 88% had been mobilized with 10 mM oxalic acid compared with 5% with ambient groundwater alone. Furthermore, simple extrapolations based on pore volumes suggest that chemical treatments could lower the time necessary for clean up at the Vineland site from 600 a with ambient groundwater alone to potentially as little as 4 a with 10 mM oxalic acid. PMID:21076621

  13. Chronic lead treatment accelerates photochemically induced platelet aggregation in cerebral microvessels of mice, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Al Dhaheri, A.H.; El-Sabban, F.; Fahim, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    Effects of two chronic treatment levels with lead on platelet aggregation in cerebral (pial) microcirculation of the mouse were investigated. Exposure to lead was made by subcutaneous injections for 7 days of lead acetate dissolved in 5% glucose solution, vehicle. Two doses of lead were used, a low dose of 0.1 mg/kg and a high dose of 1.0 mg/kg. Adult male mice were divided into three groups, 10 each; one group was injected with vehicle (control), another was injected with the low dose, and the third was injected with the high dose. Additional mice were used for the determination of hematological parameters and for the lead level in serum of the three groups. On the eighth day, platelet aggregation in pial microvessels of these groups of mice was carried out in vivo. Animals were anesthetized (urethane, 1-2 mg/g, ip), the trachea was intubated, and a craniotomy was performed. Platelet aggregation in pial microvessels was induced photochemically, by activation of circulating sodium fluorescein (0.1 mg/25 g, iv) with an intense mercury light. The time required for the first platelet aggregate to appear in pial arterioles was significantly shorter in the lead-treated mice than in control. This effect was in a dose-dependent manner; 113 {+-} 44 sec for low dose and 71 {+-} 18 sec for high dose vs 155 {+-} 25 sec for control, P < 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively. Between the two lead-treated groups, the high dose significantly (P < 0.05) shortened the time to first aggregate. These data evidenced an increased susceptibility to cerebrovascular thrombosis as a result of exposure to lead. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Head kinematics during shaking associated with abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Lintern, T O; Puhulwelle Gamage, N T; Bloomfield, F H; Kelly, P; Finch, M C; Taberner, A J; Nash, M P; Nielsen, P M F

    2015-09-18

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a potentially fatal result of child abuse but the mechanisms of injury are controversial. To address the hypothesis that shaking alone is sufficient to elicit the injuries observed, effective computational and experimental models are necessary. This paper investigates the use of a coupled rigid-body computational modelling framework to reproduce in vivo shaking kinematics in AHT. A sagittal plane OpenSim computational model of a lamb was developed and used to interpret biomechanical data from in vivo shaking experiments. The acceleration of the head during shaking was used to provide in vivo validation of the associated computational model. Results of this study demonstrated that peak accelerations occurred when the head impacted the torso and produced acceleration magnitudes exceeding 200ms(-)(2). The computational model demonstrated good agreement with the experimental measurements and was shown to be able to reproduce the high accelerations that occur during impact. The biomechanical results obtained with the computational model demonstrate the utility of using a coupled rigid-body modelling framework to describe infant head kinematics in AHT. PMID:26256822

  15. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®)

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Kevin E.; Elk, Carrie A.; Sullivan, Kelly L.; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Long, Christopher J.; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F.; Street, Jennifer D.; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1–5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21–60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants’ mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p < 0.0001 for all pre-ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD. PMID:25379218

  16. Accelerated Resolution Therapy for treatment of pain secondary to symptoms of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Kevin E.; Rosenzweig, Laney; Hernandez, Diego F.; Shuman, Amy; Diamond, David M.; Girling, Sue Ann; Sullivan, Kelly L.; Wittenberg, Trudy; Witt, Ann M.; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Anderson, Brian; McMillan, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background As many as 70% of veterans with chronic pain treated within the US Veterans Administration (VA) system may have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and conversely, up to 80% of those with PTSD may have pain. We describe pain experienced by US service members and veterans with symptoms of PTSD, and report on the effect of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART), a new, brief exposure-based therapy, on acute pain reduction secondary to treatment of symptoms of PTSD. Methods A randomized controlled trial of ART versus an attention control (AC) regimen was conducted among 45 US service members/veterans with symptoms of combat-related PTSD. Participants received a mean of 3.7 sessions of ART. Results Mean age was 41.0 + 12.4 years and 20% were female. Most veterans (93%) reported pain. The majority (78%) used descriptive terms indicative of neuropathic pain, with 29% reporting symptoms of a concussion or feeling dazed. Mean pre-/post-change on the Pain Outcomes Questionnaire (POQ) was −16.9±16.6 in the ART group versus −0.7±14.2 in the AC group (p=0.0006). Among POQ subscales, treatment effects with ART were reported for pain intensity (effect size = 1.81, p=0.006), pain-related impairment in mobility (effect size = 0.69, p=0.01), and negative affect (effect size = 1.01, p=0.001). Conclusions Veterans with symptoms of combat-related PTSD have a high prevalence of significant pain, including neuropathic pain. Brief treatment of symptoms of combat-related PTSD among veterans by use of ART appears to acutely reduce concomitant pain. PMID:24959325

  17. Relationship Between Radiation Treatment Time and Overall Survival After Induction Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Carcinoma: A Subset Analysis of TAX 324

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Posner, Marshall R.; Sarlis, Nicholas J.; Haddad, Robert I.; Holupka, Edward J.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between overall survival (OS) and radiation treatment time (RTT) and overall treatment time (OTT) in a well-described sequential therapy paradigm for locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma (LAHNC). Methods and Materials: TAX 324 is a Phase III study comparing TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil) with PF (cisplatin and fluorouracil) induction chemotherapy (IC) in LAHNC patients; both arms were followed by carboplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Prospective radiotherapy quality assurance was performed. This analysis includes all patients who received three cycles of IC and a radiation dose of {>=} 70 Gy. Radiotherapy treatment time was analyzed as binary ({<=} 8 weeks vs. longer) and continuous (number of days beyond 8 weeks) functions. The primary analysis assessed the relationship between RTT, OTT, and OS, and the secondary analysis explored the association between treatment times and locoregional recurrence (LRR). Results: A total of 333 (of 501) TAX 324 patients met the criteria for inclusion in this analysis. There were no significant differences between the treatment arms in baseline or treatment characteristics. On multivariable analysis, PF IC, World Health Organization performance status of 1, non-oropharynx site, T3/4 stage, N3 status, and prolonged RTT (hazard ratio 1.63, p = 0.006) were associated with significantly inferior survival. Performance status, T3/4 disease, and prolonged RTT (odds ratio 1.68, p = 0.047) were independently and negatively related to LRR on multivariable analysis, whereas PF was not. Overall treatment time was not independently associated with either OS or LRR. Conclusions: In this secondary analysis of the TAX 324 trial, TPF IC remains superior to PF IC after controlling for radiotherapy delivery time. Even with optimal IC and concurrent chemotherapy, a non-prolonged RTT is a crucial determinant of treatment success. Appropriate delivery of radiotherapy after IC remains essential

  18. Evaluation of a head-to-head study of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and atomoxetine: evaluation of Dittmann RW, Cardo E, Nagy P, et al. Efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and atomoxetine in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a head-to-head, randomised, double-blind, Phase IIIb study. CNS Drugs 2013;27:1081-1092. doi: 10.1007/s40263-013-0104-8 ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01106430.

    PubMed

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Rothermel, Boris; Poustka, Luise

    2014-09-01

    Here, we evaluate a report of a head-to-head study of the prodrug stimulant lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) and the non-stimulant atomoxetine hydrochloride (ATX) in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). An inadequate response to previous methylphenidate (MPH) treatment was a notable inclusion criterion. The primary efficacy outcome of a more rapid clinical response to LDX than to ATX was predictable from the known properties of the two drugs. However, secondary efficacy outcomes indicated that LDX was significantly more effective than ATX in relieving investigator-rated symptoms of ADHD, with an effect size of 0.56. Safety and tolerability profiles were consistent with the known properties of LDX and ATX. Despite some issues with the study design, the conclusion that LDX is more effective than ATX over the short term appears robust. In addition, the magnitude of improvement with both treatments indicated that previous MPH treatment is not a factor affecting the potential for patients to benefit from LDX or ATX. The results may help to inform clinical practice in Europe, where LDX is approved for treating children and adolescents with ADHD and a previous inadequate response to MPH, and in other regions where generic MPH formulations are typically the first-line therapeutic option. PMID:25085429

  19. Single application of 4% dimeticone liquid gel versus two applications of 1% permethrin creme rinse for treatment of head louse infestation: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A previous study indicated that a single application of 4% dimeticone liquid gel was effective in treating head louse infestation. This study was designed to confirm this in comparison with two applications of 1% permethrin. Methods We have performed a single centre parallel group, randomised, controlled, open label, community based trial, with domiciliary visits, in Cambridgeshire, UK. Treatments were allocated through sealed instructions derived from a computer generated list. We enrolled 90 children and adults with confirmed head louse infestation analysed by intention to treat (80 per-protocol after 4 drop outs and 6 non-compliant). The comparison was between 4% dimeticone liquid gel applied once for 15 minutes and 1% permethrin creme rinse applied for 10 minutes, repeated after 7 days as per manufacturer’s directions. Evaluated by elimination of louse infestation after completion of treatment application regimen. Results Intention to treat comparison of a single dimeticone liquid gel treatment with two of permethrin gave success for 30/43 (69.8%) of the dimeticone liquid gel group and 7/47 (14.9%) of the permethrin creme rinse group (OR 13.19, 95% CI 4.69 to 37.07) (p < 0.001). Per protocol results were similar with 27/35 (77.1%) success for dimeticone versus 7/45 (15.6%) for permethrin. Analyses by household gave essentially similar outcomes. Conclusions The study showed one 15 minute application of 4% dimeticone liquid gel was superior to two applications of 1% permethrin creme rinse (p < 0.001). The low efficacy of permethrin suggests it should be withdrawn. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN88144046. PMID:23548062

  20. Monte Carlo evaluation of the AAA treatment planning algorithm in a heterogeneous multilayer phantom and IMRT clinical treatments for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Tomsej, M.; Smedt, B. de; Reynaert, N.; Vynckier, S.

    2007-05-15

    The Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) is a new pencil beam convolution/superposition algorithm proposed by Varian for photon dose calculations. The configuration of AAA depends on linear accelerator design and specifications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of AAA for an Elekta SL25 linear accelerator for small fields and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments in inhomogeneous media. The accuracy of AAA was evaluated in two studies. First, AAA was compared both with Monte Carlo (MC) and the measurements in an inhomogeneous phantom simulating lung equivalent tissues and bone ribs. The algorithm was tested under lateral electronic disequilibrium conditions, using small fields (2x2 cm{sup 2}). Good agreement was generally achieved for depth dose and profiles, with deviations generally below 3% in lung inhomogeneities and below 5% at interfaces. However, the effects of attenuation and scattering close to the bone ribs were not fully taken into account by AAA, and small inhomogeneities may lead to planning errors. Second, AAA and MC were compared for IMRT plans in clinical conditions, i.e., dose calculations in a computed tomography scan of a patient. One ethmoid tumor, one orophaxynx and two lung tumors are presented in this paper. Small differences were found between the dose volume histograms. For instance, a 1.7% difference for the mean planning target volume dose was obtained for the ethmoid case. Since better agreement was achieved for the same plans but in homogeneous conditions, these differences must be attributed to the handling of inhomogeneities by AAA. Therefore, inherent assumptions of the algorithm, principally the assumption of independent depth and lateral directions in the scaling of the kernels, were slightly influencing AAA's validity in inhomogeneities. However, AAA showed a good accuracy overall and a great ability to handle small fields in inhomogeneous media compared to other pencil beam convolution

  1. Transplantation of iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    CUI, GUOFENG; WEI, RONG; HOU, CHUNYING; BI, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and clinical application of iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels for the treatment of Association for Research on Osseous Circulation (ARCO) stage II–III osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in young adults. In total, 35 patients with ONFH at ARCO stage II–III were treated with iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels. Patients were classified according to etiological factors and ARCO stages. Postoperative clinical assessment was accomplished with Harris hip scores (HHSs), and ARCO stage change was evaluated with imaging. All 35 patients completed the follow-up. The HHS results indicated that hip function was improved significantly from the preoperative status of 56.53±7.66 points to the postoperative status of 87.49±5.89 points (P<0.0001). Postoperative imaging displayed apparent osteogenesis and satisfactory structural remodeling in 32 patients, presenting no staging progress. Three patients exhibited mild collapse (<2 mm) compared with preoperative collapse. No patients developed osteoarthritis or required total hip arthroplasty. The clinical success rate was 91.43%. Iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels is a feasible means for treating ARCO stage II–III ONFH in young adults, who have abundant blood circulation, good osteogenesis and function of the hip. It is also an effective means for retaining the femoral head. PMID:27284301

  2. AVASCULAR NECROSIS OF THE FEMORAL HEAD IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR CERAMIC-CERAMIC JOINT REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Henrique Amorim; Santos, Alexandre Leme de Godoy; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Lima, Ana Lúcia Munhoz; Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba; Ejnisman, Leandro; Gurgel, Henrique Melo Campos; Uip, David; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the initial functional results and early complication rate of ceramic-ceramic total hip replacements among patients living with HIV who presented osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Method: Twelve HIV–positive patients with a diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the incongruent femoral head were evaluated using clinical and laboratory criteria and the WOMAC functional scale before and after treatment with joint replacement. Results: We observed that 83.3% of the subjects were taking protease inhibitors, 75% had dyslipidemia and 66.6% had lipodystrophy syndrome. The improvement over the evolution of the WOMAC score was statistically significant at six and twelve months after the operation, in comparison with the preoperative score. We did not observe complications secondary to this procedure. Conclusion: Total hip arthroplasty with a ceramic-ceramic implant for treating avascular necrosis of the hip is an appropriate surgical option for this portion of the population. It provides a significant initial functional improvement and a low early complication rate. PMID:27047876

  3. [A detailed examination of injuries to the head and neck caused by bullfighting, and of their surgical treatment; the role of the cervico-facial surgeon].

    PubMed

    Chambres, O; Giraud, C; Gouffrant, J M; Debry, C

    2003-01-01

    Bullfighting (corrida) dates back to the 13th century in France, especially in the Camargue and the South-West, even if this fight between man and wild bull had been described before in other countries. The current modern bullfight, as an artistic interpretation, was codified in Spain during the 18th century into 3 tercios (parts): the tercio of the lance, of the bandillera, and of the muletta, which end with the death of the bull. Celebrated by our Spanish neighbours as a national fiesta, the corrida represents a confrontation between the intelligence of man and the power of the bull. Injuries are the heavy cost of this art paid by each bullfighter. Most of them have been injured seriously, or even gored to death inside the bullring. Goring is a single injury, a mix of wound, burn, contusion and infection. Its treatment calls for an expert, which makes this type of surgery highly specialised. Head and neck trauma represents 16% of the total wounds in bullfighting. Its not very often that this type of injury happens, but each time it is serious. This study is based on 1450 case reports, deals with causes and accident circumstances, together with the type of injuries and their early management in the bullring's infirmary. The seriousness of these wounds would justify a head and neck surgeon being part of the medical staff during the corrida. PMID:15038564

  4. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... acceleration measured at the head CG shall not be less than 100 g or more than 120 g. The resultant acceleration vs. time history curve shall be unimodal, and the oscillations occurring after the main pulse shall be less than 17 percent of the peak resultant acceleration. The lateral acceleration shall...

  5. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... acceleration measured at the head CG shall not be less than 100 g or more than 120 g. The resultant acceleration vs. time history curve shall be unimodal, and the oscillations occurring after the main pulse shall be less than 17 percent of the peak resultant acceleration. The lateral acceleration shall...

  6. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... acceleration measured at the head CG shall not be less than 100 g or more than 120 g. The resultant acceleration vs. time history curve shall be unimodal, and the oscillations occurring after the main pulse shall be less than 17 percent of the peak resultant acceleration. The lateral acceleration shall...

  7. 49 CFR 572.152 - Head assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... acceleration measured at the head CG shall not be less than 100 g or more than 120 g. The resultant acceleration vs. time history curve shall be unimodal, and the oscillations occurring after the main pulse shall be less than 17 percent of the peak resultant acceleration. The lateral acceleration shall...

  8. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 50} values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life.

  9. Accelerating Math Development in Head Start Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, David H.; Fisher, Paige H.; Doctoroff, Greta L.; Dobbs, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Teachers implemented a 6-week classroom intervention designed to promote emergent math skills and math interest in preschool-aged children. After the program, experimental children scored significantly higher than control children on a standardized test of math ability and enjoyed math activities more than the control children, as measured by both…

  10. Two-field versus three-field irradiation technique in the postoperative treatment of head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yom, Sue S.; Morrison, William H.; Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I.; Perkins, George H.; Wong, Pei-Fong M.S.; Garden, Adam S. . E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: We have increasingly used a two-field noncoplanar 'caudal tilt' technique (CTT) for irradiating postlaryngectomy and pharyngectomy patients to avoid matchline problems that can be encountered with the classic three-field head-and-neck radiation technique (3FT). This report compares the clinical outcomes of patients treated with postoperative radiation (PORT) using either 3FT or CTT. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of all patients with laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancers consecutively treated with PORT between 1997 and 2002. Three-dimensional dosimetric planning was carried out for all patients. Results: Of 91 patients, 39 were treated with 3FT and 52 with CTT. The median follow-up was 34 months. Estimated rates of 2-year locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival for patients treated with 3FT and CTT were, respectively, 92% and 85% (p = 0.241), 62% and 55% (p = 0.497), and 77% and 72% (p = 0.616). There were no significant differences in the incidence of acute or late side effects in the two groups. Conclusions: 'Caudal tilt' technique is often used as an alternative to 3FT for postoperative radiotherapy in cases of greater medical and technical complexity. Despite its use in more challenging cases, CTT provides similar long-term clinical outcomes compared with standard 3FT, when computerized three-dimensional dosimetry is used to assure adequate dosimetry throughout the treated volume.

  11. Prospective Trial Incorporating Pre-/Mid-Treatment [{sup 18}F]-Misonidazole Positron Emission Tomography for Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Nehmeh, Sadek; Schoeder, Heiko; Fury, Matthew; Chan, Kelvin; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To report the results from a prospective study of a series of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy and to discuss the findings of their pre-/mid-treatment [{sup 18}F]-misonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients agreed to participate in this study. Of these 28 patients, 20 (90% with an oropharyngeal primary cancer) were able to undergo the requirements of the protocol. Each patient underwent four PET scans: one pretreatment fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography scan, two pretreatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET/computed tomography scans, and a third {sup 18}F-FMISO PET (mid-treatment) scan performed 4 weeks after the start of chemoradiotherapy. The {sup 18}F-FMISO PET scans were acquired 2-3 h after tracer administration. Patients were treated with 2-3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy concurrent with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: A heterogeneous distribution of {sup 18}F-FMISO was noted in the primary and/or nodal disease in 90% of the patients. Two patients had persistent detectable hypoxia on their third mid-treatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET scan. One patient experienced regional/distant failure but had no detectable residual hypoxia on the mid-treatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET scan. Conclusion: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this series of head-and-neck cancer patients treated with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy despite evidence of detectable hypoxia on the pretreatment {sup 18}F-FMISO PET/computed tomography scans of 18 of 20 patients. In this prospective study, neither the presence nor the absence of hypoxia, as defined by positive {sup 18}F-FMISO findings on the mid-treatment PET scan, correlated with patient outcome. The results of this study have confirmed similar results reported previously.

  12. Exercise intervention for the treatment of trismus in head and neck cancer - a prospective two-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Nina; Svensson, Ulrika; Karlsson, Therese; Finizia, Caterina

    2016-06-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the long-term effects of structured trismus intervention in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) and trismus in terms of mouth opening, trismus-related symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Material and methods Fifty patients with HNC to receive radiotherapy ± chemotherapy were included in this prospective study along with a matched control group. The intervention group received a 10-week structured exercise with a jaw mobilizing device (TheraBite® jaw device or Engström device). Patients were assessed before and after trismus exercise intervention and at a two-year follow-up. Primary endpoint was maximum interincisal opening (MIO) and secondary endpoints included trismus-related symptoms and HRQL assessed with patient-reported outcome (PRO)-instruments [Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the related HNC-specific module the EORTC Head & Neck Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-H&N35)]. Results The intervention group had a higher MIO at the two-year follow-up compared to the control group (40.5 mm and 34.3 mm, respectively), which was statistically significant. The intervention group also reported less jaw-related problems according to the GTQ and higher functioning as measured by EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35 compared to the control group. Conclusion A positive persistent effect of exercise intervention for trismus in HNC patients was found with regard to MIO, trismus-related symptoms and HRQL. Exercise intervention is important in long-term treatment of radiation-induced trismus in HNC patients. The trismus-specific questionnaire, GTQ, is a valuable tool for observing and evaluating trismus over time. PMID:26878553

  13. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-02-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

  14. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Vaelimaeki, Petteri; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Revitzer, Hannu; Kouri, Mauri; Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Joensuu, Heikki

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  15. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  16. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  17. Cone Heads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The author, a middle school art teacher, describes a sculpture project lesson involving Cone Heads (sculptures made from cardboard cones). Discussion of caricatures with exaggerated facial features and interesting profiles helped students understand that the more expressive the face, the better. This project took approximately four to five…

  18. Cardiac comorbidity in head and neck cancer patients and its influence on cancer treatment selection and mortality: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Roland; Breitenstein, Kerstin; Eßer, Dirk; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    Comorbidity assessment and a profound cardiac examination were implemented into pre-treatment diagnostics to analyze their influence on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) therapy selection and short-term mortality. Comorbidity was measured prospectively in 49 HNSCC patients using standard indices between 2012 and 2013. Cardiac examinations included electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and bicycle ergometry. Most patients had stage IV tumors (61 %), smoked (61 %), and showed alcohol abuse (57 %); 38 patients (78 %) received a multimodal therapy; 65 % had an adult comorbidity evaluation 27 index ≥2, 59 % a Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) ≥4, and 12 % a revised cardiac risk index (RCRI) ≥2. Additional cardiac examinations revealed moderate to severe cardiovascular pathologies in 32 % of the patients and led to recommendations for additional therapy in 4 patients (8 %) necessary only after cancer treatment. RCRI was associated with CCI and cardiac examinations (p = 0.009, p = 0.030). Chemotherapy, stroke history, and RCRI ≥2 were risk factors for early mortality within first 2 years after cancer therapy (p = 0.037; p = 0.012; p = 0.015). Although one-third of a strongly smoking and drinking patient cohort had relevant cardiac morbidity, extended unselected cardiac diagnostics had only low impact on HNSCC therapy selection. The risk of early mortality after HNSCC cancer treatment seems to be sufficiently reflected by the RCRI. PMID:26581475

  19. Treatment of alarming head and neck infantile hemangiomas with interferon-α2a: a clinical study in eleven consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Jia Wei; Yuan, Wei En

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of interferon-α2a in the treatment of alarming infantile hemangiomas in the head and neck region. Patients and methods From January 2009–December 2010, a subcutaneous injection of interferon-α2a was applied to eleven infants with giant multifocal or segmental hemangiomas at a dose of 3 million units/m2 per day. All patients did not respond to propranolol or corticosteroids. The age at initiation of interferon-α2a therapy ranged from 3 days to 8 months (median: 4 months). The duration of therapy ranged from 2–4.5 months (median: 3 months). Eight patients received medication for 3 months, one patient for 4.5 months, and two patients for 2 months. Results Nine patients had a reduction in tumor mass of 95%; two patients’ tumors decreased in size by 75%. The overall response rate was 100%. The main adverse effects included fever, diarrhea, and anorexia, which resolved after stopping the medication. No serious adverse effect was observed. Conclusion Short-term treatment with interferon-α2a can be used as a safe and effective treatment for alarming infantile hemangiomas that are resistant to propranolol or corticosteroids, and that endanger the proper functioning of the affected organ or the patient’s life. PMID:25678777

  20. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-1000) and a set of three (3) accelerometers in conformance with specifications in 49 CFR 572.200(d) and... CFR 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1) When the head assembly is dropped from either the right... resultant acceleration shall be between 115 g and 137 g; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall...

  1. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) and a set of three (3) accelerometers in conformance with specifications in 49 CFR 572.200(d) and... CFR 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1) When the head assembly is dropped from either the right... resultant acceleration shall be between 115 g and 137 g; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall...

  2. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-1000) and a set of three (3) accelerometers in conformance with specifications in 49 CFR 572.200(d) and... CFR 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1) When the head assembly is dropped from either the right... resultant acceleration shall be between 115 g and 137 g; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall...

  3. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) and a set of three (3) accelerometers in conformance with specifications in 49 CFR 572.200(d) and... CFR 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1) When the head assembly is dropped from either the right... resultant acceleration shall be between 115 g and 137 g; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall...

  4. 49 CFR 572.192 - Head assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) and a set of three (3) accelerometers in conformance with specifications in 49 CFR 572.200(d) and... CFR 572.112(a). (c) Performance criteria. (1) When the head assembly is dropped from either the right... resultant acceleration shall be between 115 g and 137 g; (2) The resultant acceleration-time curve shall...

  5. The response of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to cetuximab treatment depends on Aurora kinase A polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Alexander; Huhn, Maximilian; Wirth, Markus; Reiter, Rudolf; Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Brockhoff, Gero

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of cetuximab-based anti-EGFR treatment and Aurora kinase A / B knockdown as a function of Aurora kinase polymorphism in HNSCC cell lines. Materials and methods First, protein expression of Aurora kinase A / B and EGFR and Aurora kinase A polymorphism were studied in tumour samples. The survival and proliferation of Aurora kinase A homo- (Cal27) and heterozygous (HN) HNSCC cell lines was evaluated using a colony formation assay and a flow cytometric assay. Also, aneuploidy was determined. EGFR signalling pathway were visualised by western blotting. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed the overexpression of Aurora kinase A / B in HNSCC. The knockdown of each kinase caused a significant decrease in clonogenic survival, independent of Aurora kinase A polymorphism. In contrast, cetuximab treatment impaired clonogenic survival only in the Aurora kinase A-homozygous cell line (Cal27). Conclusion This study provides in vitro evidence for the predictive value of Aurora kinase A polymorphism in the efficiency of cetuximab treatment. Resistance to cetuximab treatment can be overcome by simultaneous Aurora kinase A/B knockdown. PMID:24980817

  6. Measuring uncertainty in dose delivered to the cochlea due to setup error during external beam treatment of patients with cancer of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, M.; Lovelock, D.; Hunt, M.; Mechalakos, J.; Hu, Y.; Pham, H.; Jackson, A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To use Cone Beam CT scans obtained just prior to treatments of head and neck cancer patients to measure the setup error and cumulative dose uncertainty of the cochlea. Methods: Data from 10 head and neck patients with 10 planning CTs and 52 Cone Beam CTs taken at time of treatment were used in this study. Patients were treated with conventional fractionation using an IMRT dose painting technique, most with 33 fractions. Weekly radiographic imaging was used to correct the patient setup. The authors used rigid registration of the planning CT and Cone Beam CT scans to find the translational and rotational setup errors, and the spatial setup errors of the cochlea. The planning CT was rotated and translated such that the cochlea positions match those seen in the cone beam scans, cochlea doses were recalculated and fractional doses accumulated. Uncertainties in the positions and cumulative doses of the cochlea were calculated with and without setup adjustments from radiographic imaging. Results: The mean setup error of the cochlea was 0.04 ± 0.33 or 0.06 ± 0.43 cm for RL, 0.09 ± 0.27 or 0.07 ± 0.48 cm for AP, and 0.00 ± 0.21 or −0.24 ± 0.45 cm for SI with and without radiographic imaging, respectively. Setup with radiographic imaging reduced the standard deviation of the setup error by roughly 1–2 mm. The uncertainty of the cochlea dose depends on the treatment plan and the relative positions of the cochlea and target volumes. Combining results for the left and right cochlea, the authors found the accumulated uncertainty of the cochlea dose per fraction was 4.82 (0.39–16.8) cGy, or 10.1 (0.8–32.4) cGy, with and without radiographic imaging, respectively; the percentage uncertainties relative to the planned doses were 4.32% (0.28%–9.06%) and 10.2% (0.7%–63.6%), respectively. Conclusions: Patient setup error introduces uncertainty in the position of the cochlea during radiation treatment. With the assistance of radiographic imaging during setup

  7. Correlated histogram representation of Monte Carlo derived medical accelerator photon-output phase space

    DOEpatents

    Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E.

    2003-01-01

    A method is provided to represent the calculated phase space of photons emanating from medical accelerators used in photon teletherapy. The method reproduces the energy distributions and trajectories of the photons originating in the bremsstrahlung target and of photons scattered by components within the accelerator head. The method reproduces the energy and directional information from sources up to several centimeters in radial extent, so it is expected to generalize well to accelerators made by different manufacturers. The method is computationally both fast and efficient overall sampling efficiency of 80% or higher for most field sizes. The computational cost is independent of the number of beams used in the treatment plan.

  8. Continuous Arc Rotation of the Couch Therapy for the Delivery of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: A Treatment Planning Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Yan Di; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Vicini, Frank A.; Grills, Inga S.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel form of arc therapy: continuous arc rotation of the couch (C-ARC) and compare its dosimetry with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). C-ARC, like VMAT, uses a modulated beam aperture and dose rate, but with the couch, not the gantry, rotating. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients previously treated with APBI using 3D-CRT were replanned with (1) C-ARC, (2) IMRT, and (3) VMAT. C-ARC plans were designed with one medial and one lateral arc through which the couch rotated while the gantry was held stationary at a tangent angle. Target dose coverage was normalized to the 3D-CRT plan. Comparative endpoints were dose to normal breast tissue, lungs, and heart and monitor units prescribed. Results: Compared with 3D-CRT, C-ARC, IMRT, and VMAT all significantly reduced the ipsilateral breast V50% by the same amount (mean, 7.8%). Only C-ARC and IMRT plans significantly reduced the contralateral breast maximum dose, the ipsilateral lung V5Gy, and the heart V5%. C-ARC used on average 40%, 30%, and 10% fewer monitor units compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, respectively. Conclusions: C-ARC provides improved dosimetry and treatment efficiency, which should reduce the risks of toxicity and secondary malignancy. Its tangent geometry avoids irradiation of critical structures that is unavoidable using the en face geometry of VMAT.

  9. Effect of treatment with simvastatin on bone microarchitecture of the femoral head in an osteoporosis animal model.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Lucas Oliveira; Macedo, Ana Paula; Shimano, Roberta Carminati; Shimano, Antônio Carlos; Yanagihara, Gabriela Rezende; Ramos, Junia; Paulini, Marina Ribeiro; Tocchini de Figueiredo, Fellipe Augusto; Gonzaga, Miliane Gonçalves; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microarchitecture and trabecular bone strength at the distal region of the femur, and its biomechanical properties with simvastatin administration with two different doses in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Ninety rats were divided into six groups to evaluate treatment with the simvastatin drug (n = 15): SH (Sham surgery), SH-5 (5 mg simvastatin), SH-20 (20 mg simvastatin), OVX, OVX-5, and OVX-20. Euthanasia was performed at three different times, five animals per period: 7, 14, and 28 days. The effectiveness of the treatments was evaluated by mechanical testing and histomorphometric analysis of the femurs. The results of analysis by the linear model of mixed effects showed 20 mg of simvastatin results in increased trabecular bone after 14 days (P = 0.039) of ingestion in ovariectomized animals. However, ingestion of 5 mg of simvastatin is able to sensitize the trabecular bone only at 28 days (P = 0.005) of ingestion. In the mechanical tests stiffness improves within 28 days (P = 0.003). Regarding maximum strength, no statistical differences were observed. According to these results, it can be concluded that for a decrease in oral intake, longer treatment times are required. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:684-690, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27186631

  10. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar; Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  11. Curative-Intent Aggressive Treatment Improves Survival in Elderly Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma and High Comorbidity Index

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), therapeutic decisions depend on comorbidity or age. We estimated the treatment outcomes of patients with different Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores and ages to determine whether aggressive treatment improves survival. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases were analyzed, and we included >20-year-old patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage III or IV HNSCC (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0–148.9) undergoing surgery, chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), sequential CT and RT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. The exclusion criteria were a past cancer history, distant metastasis, AJCC stage I or II, missing sex data, an age < 20 years, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and HNSCC recurrence. The index date was the date of first HNSCC diagnosis, and comorbidities were scored using the CCI. The enrolled patients were categorized into Group 1 (curative-intent aggressive treatments) and Group 2 (best supportive care or palliative treatments). We enrolled 21,174 stage III or IV HNSCC patients without distant metastasis (median follow-up, 3.25 years). Groups 1 and 2 comprised 18,584 and 2232 patients, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, and clinical stage, adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of overall death in Group 1 were 0.33 (0.31–0.35), 0.34 (0.31–0.36), and 0.37 (0.28–0.49), and those of all-cause death among patients undergoing curative surgical aggressive treatments were 1.13 (0.82–1.55), 0.67 (0.62–0.73), and 0.49 (0.46–0.53) for CCI scores of ≥10, 5 to 9, and <5, respectively. Aggressive treatments improve survival in elderly (≥65 years) and critically ill HNSCC patients. Curative nonsurgical aggressive treatments including definitive RT or CCRT might be suitable for

  12. An MCNP-based model for the evaluation of the photoneutron dose in high energy medical electron accelerators.

    PubMed

    Carinou, Eleutheria; Stamatelatos, Ion Evangelos; Kamenopoulou, Vassiliki; Georgolopoulou, Paraskevi; Sandilos, Panayotis

    The development of a computational model for the treatment head of a medical electron accelerator (Elekta/Philips SL-18) by the Monte Carlo code mcnp-4C2 is discussed. The model includes the major components of the accelerator head and a pmma phantom representing the patient body. Calculations were performed for a 14 MeV electron beam impinging on the accelerator target and a 10 cmx10 cm beam area at the isocentre. The model was used in order to predict the neutron ambient dose equivalent at the isocentre level and moreover the neutron absorbed dose distribution within the phantom. Calculations were validated against experimental measurements performed by gold foil activation detectors. The results of this study indicated that the equivalent dose at tissues or organs adjacent to the treatment field due to photoneutrons could be up to 10% of the total peripheral dose, for the specific accelerator characteristics examined. Therefore, photoneutrons should be taken into account when accurate dose calculations are required to sensitive tissues that are adjacent to the therapeutic X-ray beam. The method described can be extended to other accelerators and collimation configurations as well, upon specification of treatment head component dimensions, composition and nominal accelerating potential. PMID:18348851

  13. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  14. Fully Automated Simultaneous Integrated Boosted-Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning Is Feasible for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Binbin; McNutt, Todd; Zahurak, Marianna; Simari, Patricio; Pang, Dalong; Taylor, Russell; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively determine whether overlap volume histogram (OVH)-driven, automated simultaneous integrated boosted (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning for head-and-neck cancer can be implemented in clinics. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to compare fully automated plans (APs) created by an OVH-driven, automated planning application with clinical plans (CPs) created by dosimetrists in a 3-dose-level (70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 58.1 Gy), head-and-neck SIB-IMRT planning. Because primary organ sparing (cord, brain, brainstem, mandible, and optic nerve/chiasm) always received the highest priority in clinical planning, the study aimed to show the noninferiority of APs with respect to PTV coverage and secondary organ sparing (parotid, brachial plexus, esophagus, larynx, inner ear, and oral mucosa). The sample size was determined a priori by a superiority hypothesis test that had 85% power to detect a 4% dose decrease in secondary organ sparing with a 2-sided alpha level of 0.05. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression model was used for statistical comparison. Results: Forty consecutive patients were accrued from July to December 2010. GEE analysis indicated that in APs, overall average dose to the secondary organs was reduced by 1.16 (95% CI = 0.09-2.33) with P=.04, overall average PTV coverage was increased by 0.26% (95% CI = 0.06-0.47) with P=.02 and overall average dose to the primary organs was reduced by 1.14 Gy (95% CI = 0.45-1.8) with P=.004. A physician determined that all APs could be delivered to patients, and APs were clinically superior in 27 of 40 cases. Conclusions: The application can be implemented in clinics as a fast, reliable, and consistent way of generating plans that need only minor adjustments to meet specific clinical needs.

  15. The effect of exercise therapy in head and neck cancer patients in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced trismus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Scherpenhuizen, Anne; van Waes, Anne M A; Janssen, Luuk M; Van Cann, Ellen M; Stegeman, Inge

    2015-08-01

    Trismus is characterized by a reduced ability to open the mouth, directly affecting many aspects of daily life, such as chewing, swallowing, speaking and maintaining oral hygiene. Several studies have shown that trismus affects health related quality of life. Radiotherapy in the head and neck area is identified as one of the most frequent causes of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Currently, there is no standard treatment for trismus. Several stretching techniques and jaw mobilizing devices are available, but their effect in radiotherapy-induced trismus is still largely unknown. With this review we give an overview of the present relevant literature and compare the effect of exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy on jaw mobility, expressed in millimeters mouth opening, in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. A systematic literature search in four electronic bibliographic databases was conducted in July 2014. Selected articles were critically appraised on relevance and validity. Best available evidence was analyzed and compared. Three of the four selected articles show a significant increase (p-value<0.05) in maximal interincisal opening (MIO) after exercise therapy using a jaw-mobilizing device. One article reports a significant decrease in MIO. However, this decrease is less in the intervention group, which implies a positive effect of exercise therapy. Based on this current best clinical evidence, it can be assumed that exercise therapy with a jaw-mobilizing device yields better results than no exercise, with regards to opening of the mouth in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. PMID:26058916

  16. The feasibility of high-dose multiple daily fractionation and its combination with anoxic cell sensitizers in the treatment of head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Bogaert, W.; Van Der Schueren, E.; Horiot, J.C.; Chaplain, G.; Arcangeli, G.; Gonzalez, D.; Svoboda, V.

    1982-10-01

    From 1978 to the end of 1980, 179 patients with advanced head and neck tumors were accrued in a multicenter pilot study of the EORTC Radiotherapy Group, investigating the feasibility of high dose multiple daily fractionation (MDF) and its combination with misonidazole. The irradiation scheme consisted of three daily fractions of 1.6 Gy (four hour intervals) to a total dose of 48 Gy in two weeks, followed 3 to 4 weeks later by a boost to a total of about 70 Gy in 6 to 7 weeks. Misonidazole was given in daily doses of 1 g/m/sup 2/ (total 13 or 14 g/m/sup 2/) to 53 patients, thus sensitizing every radiation session. All patients had large head and neck tumors, with poor prognosis. Acute reactions were well tolerated. Skin reactions were very moderate; mucosal reactions started at day 10 to 12. All patients had a confluent mucositis that lasted for one to two weeks. When the whole oral cavity was irradiated, reactions lasted somewhat longer. The boost caused no significant symptoms. The radiosensitizer did not modify the reaction pattern. Tumor regression was very impressive, so that palliation was obtained quickly. Nine patients died from treatment related causes. It is difficult to assess local control at this time, but at the time of analysis (August 1981), the actuarial control was 48% at 20 months, with misonidazole 57%. This difference, however, is not statistically significant. Survival of the total group is 31% at 20 months. In these patients with a heavy tumor burden the early results were considered a success by all participants. For patients with sufficient follow-up, late reactions can be evaluated. Some edema and fibrosis is seen, but did not exceed a degree which could be expected with single daily fractionation to the same dose.

  17. Treatment Planning Constraints to Avoid Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy: An Independent Test of QUANTEC Criteria Using a Prospectively Collected Dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, Vitali; Wu, Jonn; Hovan, Allan; Saleh, Ziad; Apte, Aditya; Deasy, Joseph O.; Harrow, Stephen; Rabuka, Carman; Muggli, Adam; Thompson, Anna

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The severe reduction of salivary function (xerostomia) is a common complication after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Consequently, guidelines to ensure adequate function based on parotid gland tolerance dose-volume parameters have been suggested by the QUANTEC group and by Ortholan et al. We perform a validation test of these guidelines against a prospectively collected dataset and compared with a previously published dataset. Methods and Materials: Whole-mouth stimulated salivary flow data from 66 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA) were measured, and treatment planning data were abstracted. Flow measurements were collected from 50 patients at 3 months, and 60 patients at 12-month follow-up. Previously published data from a second institution, Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL), were used for comparison. A logistic model was used to describe the incidence of Grade 4 xerostomia as a function of the mean dose of the spared parotid gland. The rate of correctly predicting the lack of xerostomia (negative predictive value [NPV]) was computed for both the QUANTEC constraints and Ortholan et al. recommendation to constrain the total volume of both glands receiving more than 40 Gy to less than 33%. Results: Both datasets showed a rate of xerostomia of less than 20% when the mean dose to the least-irradiated parotid gland is kept to less than 20 Gy. Logistic model parameters for the incidence of xerostomia at 12 months after therapy, based on the least-irradiated gland, were D{sub 50} = 32.4 Gy and and {gamma} = 0.97. NPVs for QUANTEC guideline were 94% (BCCA data), and 90% (WUSTL data). For Ortholan et al. guideline NPVs were 85% (BCCA) and 86% (WUSTL). Conclusion: These data confirm that the QUANTEC guideline effectively avoids xerostomia, and this is somewhat more effective than constraints on the volume receiving more than 40 Gy.

  18. Montecarlo simulation code in optimisation of the IntraOperative Radiation Therapy treatment with mobile dedicated accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, M.; Agosteo, S.; Moretti, R.; Andreoli, S.

    2007-06-01

    The principle of optimisation of the EURATOM 97/43 directive foresees that for all medical exposure of individuals for radiotherapeutic purposes, exposures of target volumes shall be individually planned, taking into account that doses of non-target volumes and tissues shall be as low as reasonably achievable and consistent with the intended radiotherapeutic purpose of the exposure. Treatment optimisation has to be carried out especially in non conventional radiotherapic procedures, as Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT) with mobile dedicated LINear ACcelerator (LINAC), which does not make use of a Treatment Planning System. IORT is carried out with electron beams and refers to the application of radiation during a surgical intervention, after the removal of a neoplastic mass and it can also be used as a one-time/stand alone treatment in initial cancer of small volume. IORT foresees a single session and a single beam only; therefore it is necessary to use protection systems (disks) temporary positioned between the target volume and the underlying tissues, along the beam axis. A single high Z shielding disk is used to stop the electrons of the beam at a certain depth and protect the tissues located below. Electron back scatter produces an enhancement in the dose above the disk, and this can be reduced if a second low Z disk is placed above the first. Therefore two protection disks are used in clinical application. On the other hand the dose enhancement at the interface of the high Z disk and the target, due to back scattering radiation, can be usefully used to improve the uniformity in treatment of thicker target volumes. Furthermore the dose above the disks of different Z material has to be evaluated in order to study the optimal combination of shielding disks that allow both to protect the underlying tissues and to obtain the most uniform dose distribution in target volumes of different thicknesses. The dose enhancement can be evaluated using the electron

  19. Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head Treated with Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: Analysis of Short-term Clinical Outcomes of Treatment with Radiologic Staging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Kwon, Jae-Woo; Park, Jung-Seob; Han, Kyeol; Shin, Woo-jin; Lee, Jeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate clinical results of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) with radiographic staging on patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH). Materials and Methods We evaluated 24 patients diagnosed with AVNFH (32 hip joints) who were treated with ESWT from 1993 to 2012. Average follow-up period was 27 months, and the average age of patients was 47.8 years. The Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) system was used to grade radiographic stage prior to treatment. For this study patients were divided into two groups based on their ARCO stage, group 1 (ARCO stages I and II) and group 2 (ARCO stage III). Comparative analyses were done between the two groups using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Harris hip score (HHS) at pre-treatment and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. Failure was defined when radiographic stage progressed or arthroplasty surgery was needed due to clinical exacerbation. Results Both groups showed clinical improvements with VAS scoring at final follow-up (group 1: median 7 to 1.5, P<0.001; group 2: mean 7 to 4, P=0.056). Using HHS, group 1 showed a significant improvement (from 65.5 to 95 [P<0.001]), while no significance was observed for group 2 (P=0.280). At final follow-up, 3 hips from group 1 and one hip from group 2 showed radiographic improvement; however, two patients underwent total hip arthroplasty due to persistent pain and dysfunction. Conclusion ESWT can be considered as an interventional option before surgical treatment in patients with not only early stage AVNFH but also with mid stage. PMID:27536633

  20. Baylisascaris procyonis larva migrans in two white-headed lemurs (Eulemur albifrons) in Spain and response to treatment derived from a human pediatric protocol.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Martinez, Maria-Angeles; Valderrabano Cano, Esther; Rois, Jose L

    2015-06-15

    Baylisascaris procyonis is a well-known ascaridoid nematode that causes larva migrans in humans and many other animal species. The North American raccoon (Procyon lotor) is the definitive host, which has been successfully introduced in the past decades to other geographical regions around the world. Two white-headed lemurs (Eulemuralbifrons) from a Zoological Park in Lugo, Spain, developed severe neurological signs within a brief period after being transferred from exhibit and placed in close contact with three captive raccoons from the same zoo. One lemur was euthanized due to the severity of disease progression and histopathology revealed granulomatous inflammation and ascaridoid larvae in kidneys, lung, spleen and brain. Larvae were identified as B. procyonis larvae by real time PCR. In light of the results, the cage mate with similar neurological signs was put on an albendazole treatment regimen adapted from a human pediatric protocol. The aggressive anthelmintic treatment likely contributed to the arrest of clinical signs and recovery of some motor skills. Importantly, Baylisascaris procyonis infection might occur in wild raccoon populations in Spain. PMID:25936436

  1. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque,