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Sample records for accelerator-based light sources

  1. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  2. Panorama of new generation of accelerator based short wavelength coherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The newly developed intense short wavelength light sources (from Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) to X-rays) have open the path to the exploration of matter for revealing structures and electronic processes and for following their evolution in time. After drawing the panorama of existing accelerator based short wavelength light sources, the new trends of evolution of short wavelengths FEL are described, with some illustrations with the example of the LUNEX5 (free electron Laser a New accelerator for the Exploitation of X-ray radiation of 5th generation) demonstrator project of advanced compact Free Electron Laser.

  3. A low emittance and high efficiency visible light photocathode for high brightness accelerator-based X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchione, T.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dowell, D.H.; Feng, J.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.; Padmore, H.A.

    2011-07-21

    Free-electron lasers and energy recovery linacs represent a new generation of ultra-high brightness electron accelerator based x-ray sources. Photocathodes are a critical performance-limiting component of these systems. Here, we describe the development of photocathodes based on potassium-cesium-antimonide that satisfy many of the key requirements of future light sources, such as robustness, high quantum efficiency when excited with visible light, and low transverse emittance.

  4. A low emittance and high efficiency visible light photocathode for high brightness accelerator-based X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchione, T.; Feng, J.; Wan, W.; Padmore, H. A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Dowell, D. H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.

    2011-07-18

    Free-electron lasers and energy recovery linacs represent a new generation of ultra-high brightness electron accelerator based x-ray sources. Photocathodes are a critical performance-limiting component of these systems. Here, we describe the development of photocathodes based on potassium-cesium-antimonide that satisfy many of the key requirements of future light sources, such as robustness, high quantum efficiency when excited with visible light, and low transverse emittance.

  5. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  6. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    We review the current status of the development of accelerator sources of epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a promising method of malignant tumor treatment. Particular attention is given to the source of epithermal neutrons on the basis of a new type of charged particle accelerator: tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation and lithium neutron-producing target. It is also shown that the accelerator with specialized targets makes it possible to generate fast and monoenergetic neutrons, resonance and monoenergetic gamma-rays, alpha-particles, and positrons.

  7. The SPARC linear accelerator based terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Chiadroni, E.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Filippetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Pace, E.; Rossi, A. R.; Vaccarezza, C.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; and others

    2013-03-04

    Ultra-short electron beams, produced through the velocity bunching compression technique, are used to drive the SPARC linear accelerator based source, which relies on the emission of coherent transition radiation in the terahertz range. This paper reports on the main features of this radiation, as terahertz source, with spectral coverage up to 5 THz and pulse duration down to 200 fs, with an energy per pulse of the order of several micro-joule, and as electron beam longitudinal diagnostics.

  8. Intense coherent terahertz generation from accelerator-based sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Mafuyu; Kawai, Masayuki; Hinode, Fujio; Nanbu, Kenichi; Miyahara, Fusashi

    2011-05-01

    The development of terahertz (THz) technology and science relevant to accelerator-based sources has been rapid, based on laser and semiconductor physics. To assure further progress of this scientific field, extremely intense radiation, involving gigawatt-class peak power, is needed. In addition to discussing the prospects for typical accelerator-based THz sources, such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and free electron lasers (FELs), novel, advanced THz sources employing isochronous-ring and bunched-FEL approaches are proposed.

  9. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Mitchell, H.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Therapeutically-useful epithermal-neutron beams for BNCT are currently generated by nuclear reactors. Various accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed and some low intensity prototypes of such sources, generally featuring the use of proton beams and beryllium or lithium targets have been constructed. This paper describes an alternate approach to the realization of a clinically useful accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that reconciles the often conflicting objectives of target cooling, neutron beam intensity, and neutron beam spectral purity via a two stage photoneutron production process.

  10. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  11. Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Research on food growth for long duration spacecraft has resulted in a light source for growing plants indoors known as Qbeam, a solid state light source consisting of a control unit and lamp. The light source, manufactured by Quantum Devices, Inc., is not very hot, although it generates high intensity radiation. When Ron Ignatius, an industrial partner of WCSAR, realized that terrestrial plant research lighting was not energy efficient enough for space use, he and WCSAR began to experiment with light emitting diodes. A line of LED products was developed, and QDI was formed to market the technology. An LED-based cancer treatment device is currently under development.

  12. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  13. Hybrid photoneutron source optimization for electron accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, F.; Shahriari, M.

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is being studied as a possible radiotherapic treatment for some cancer types. Neutron energy for penetrating into tissue should be in the epithermal range. Different methods are used for neutron production. Electron accelerators are an alternative way for producing neutrons in electron-photon-neutron processes. Optimization of electron/photon and photoneutron targets calculations with respect to electron energy, dimension (radius and thickness) and neutron yield were done by MCNPX Monte Carlo code. According to the results, a hybrid photoneutron source including BeD 2 and Tungsten has been introduced.

  14. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  15. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >1011 nṡs-1. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  16. First experiments on neutron detection on the accelerator-based source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Makarov, A. N.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    A pilot accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons, which is intended for wide application in clinics for boron neutron capture therapy, has been constructed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). A stationary proton beam has been obtained and near-threshold neutron generation regime has been realized. Results of the first experiments on neutron generation using the proposed source are described.

  17. Additive effect of BPA and Gd-DTPA for application in accelerator-based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, F; Yamamoto, T; Nakai, K; Zaboronok, A; Matsumura, A

    2015-12-01

    Because of its fast metabolism gadolinium as a commercial drug was not considered to be suitable for neutron capture therapy. We studied additive effect of gadolinium and boron co-administration using colony forming assay. As a result, the survival of tumor cells with additional 5 ppm of Gd-DTPA decreased to 1/10 compared to the cells with boron only. Using gadolinium to increase the effect of BNCT instead of additional X-ray irradiation might be beneficial, as such combination complies with the short-time irradiation regimen at the accelerator-based neutron source. PMID:26242560

  18. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  19. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  20. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Bayanov, B; Kashaeva, E; Makarov, A; Malyshkin, G; Samarin, S; Taskaev, S

    2009-07-01

    An innovative accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT has just started operation at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. One of the main elements of the facility is a lithium target producing neutrons via the threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at 25 kW proton beam with energies of 1.915 MeV or 2.5 MeV. The design of an optimal target and results of the investigation of radiation blistering of the lithium layer were presented at previous NCT Congresses. During the last two years the neutron target has been manufactured, assembled and placed in the facility. Optimization of the target is carried out with the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP. In this article, the design of the target is discussed, results of all previous investigations are summarized, results of target testing and neutron generation are described, and results of simulation of neutron spectra are presented. PMID:19376729

  2. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  3. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  4. Artificial light sources.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T F

    1986-04-01

    A wide variety of artificial light sources exists for use in the diagnosis and treatment of photosensitivity disorders. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of these light sources (including gas discharge arcs, fluorescent lamps, and other apparatus) illustrates the importance of matching the emission spectrum of the light source, the spectral response of the radiometer, and the photobiologic action spectrum. Environmental and occupational exposure to artificial light sources may contribute to photosensitivity disorders. PMID:3955892

  5. LIGHT SOURCE: Conceptual design of Hefei advanced light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Min; Wang, Lin; Feng, Guang-Yao; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Xu, Hong-Liang; Liu, Zu-Ping

    2009-06-01

    The conceptual of Hefei Advanced Light Source, which is an advanced VUV and Soft X-ray source, was developed at NSRL of USTC. According to the synchrotron radiation user requirements and the trends of SR source development, some accelerator-based schemes were considered and compared; furthermore storage ring with ultra low emittance was adopted as the baseline scheme of HALS. To achieve ultra low emittance, some focusing structures were studied and optimized in the lattice design. Compromising of emittance, on-momentum and off-momentum dynamic aperture and ring scale, five bend acromat (FBA) was employed. In the preliminary design of HALS, the emittance was reduced to sub nm · rad, thus the radiation up to water window has full lateral coherence. The brilliance of undulator radiation covering several eVs to keVs range is higher than that of HLS by several orders. The HALS should be one of the most advanced synchrotron radiation light sources in the world.

  6. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  7. Light Sources and Lighting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Hisashi; Suwa, Takumi; Yasuda, Takeo; Ohtani, Yoshihiko; Maehara, Akiyoshi; Okada, Atsunori; Komatsu, Naoki; Mannami, Tomoaki

    According to the Machinery Statistics of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the production of incandescent lamps in Japan in 2007 was 990 million units (90.0% of the previous year's total), in which the production of incandescent lamps for general lighting was 110 million units (90.0% of the previous year's total) and of tungsten-halogen lamps was 44 million units (96.6% of the previous year's total). The production of fluorescent lamps was 927 million units (93.9% of the previous year's total), in which general fluorescent lamps, excluding those for LCD back lighting, was 320 million units (87.2% of the previous year's total). Also, the production of HID lamps was 10 million units (101.5% of the previous year's total). On the other hand, when the numbers of sales are compared with the sales of the previous year, incandescent lamps for general use was 99.8%, tungsten-halogen lamps was 96.9%, fluorescent lamps was 95.9%, and HID lamps was 98.9%. Self-ballasted fluorescent lamps alone showed an increase in sales as strong as 29 million units, or 121.7% of the previous year's sales. It is considered that the switchover of incandescent lamps to HID lamps was promoted for energy conservation and carbon dioxide reduction with the problem of global warming in the background. In regard to exhibitions, Lighting Fair 2007 was held in Tokyo in March, and LIGHTFAIR INTERNATIONAL 2007 was held in New York in May. Regarding academic conferences, LS:11 (the 11th International Symposium on the Science & Technology of Light Sources) was held in Shanghai in May, and the First International Conference on White LEDs and Solid State Lighting was held in Tokyo in November. Both conferences suggested that there are strong needs and concerns now about energy conservation, saving natural resources, and restrictions of hazardous materials. In regard to incandescent lamps, the development of products aiming at higher efficacy, electric power savings, and longer life was advanced by

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  9. A compact ion source and accelerator based on a piezoelectric driver

    SciTech Connect

    Norgard, P.; Kovaleski, S. D.; VanGordon, J. A.; Baxter, E. A.; Gall, B. B.; Kwon, Jae Wan; Kim, Baek Hyun; Dale, G. E.

    2013-04-19

    Compact ion sources and accelerators using piezoelectric devices for the production of energetic ion beams are being evaluated. A coupled source-accelerator is being tested as a neutron source to be incorporated into oil-well logging diagnostics. Two different ion sources are being investigated, including a piezoelectric transformer-based plasma source and a silicon-based field ion source. The piezoelectric transformer plasma ion source uses a cylindrical, resonantly driven piezoelectric crystal to produce high voltage inside a confined volume filled with low pressure deuterium gas. The plasma generated in the confined chamber is ejected through a small aperture into an evacuated drift region. The silicon field ion source uses localized electric field enhancement produced by an array of sharp emitters etched into a silicon blank to produce ions through field desorption ionization. A second piezoelectric device of a different design is used to generate an accelerating potential on the order of 130 kV; this potential is applied to a deuterated target plate positioned perpendicular to the ion stream produced by either plasma source. This paper discusses the results obtained by the individual components as they relate to the final neutron source.

  10. Industrial applications of accelerator-based infrared sources: Analysis using infrared microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bantignies, J.L.; Fuchs, G.; Wilhelm, C.; Carr, G.L.; Dumas, P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared Microspectroscopy, using a globar source, is now widely employed in the industrial environment, for the analysis of various materials. Since synchrotron radiation is a much brighter source, an enhancement of an order of magnitude in lateral resolution can be achieved. Thus, the combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful tool enabling sample regions only few microns size to be studied. This opens up the potential for analyzing small particles. Some examples for hair, bitumen and polymer are presented.

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-10

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  13. Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

    2004-02-20

    A modeling investigation was performed to choose moderator material and size for creating optimal epithermal neutron beams for BNCT based on a proton accelerator and the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutrons source. An optimal configuration is suggested for the beam shaping assembly made from polytetrafluoroethylene and magnesium fluorine. Results of calculation were experimentally tested and are in good agreement with measurements.

  14. Incoherent Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Dietrich; Born, Matthias; Jüstel, Thomas

    Since the invention and industrialization of incandescent lamps at the end radiation of the 19th century electrical lighting has become a commodity in our daily life. Today, incoherent light sources are used for numerous application areas. Major improvements have been achieved over the past decades with respect to lamp efficiency (Fig. 10.1), lifetime and color properties.

  15. Incoherent Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Dietrich; Born, Matthias; Jüstel, Thomas

    Since the invention and industrialization of incandescent lamps at the end of the 19th century electrical lighting has become a commodity in our daily life. Today, incoherent light sources are used for numerous application areas. Major improvements have been achieved over the past decades with respect to lamp efficiency Fig. 10.1, lifetime and color properties.

  16. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy. Annual report, [October 1990--April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  17. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25° and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  18. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  19. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  20. MEMS Incandescent Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret; King, Kevin; Kim, Lynn; Hansler, Richard; Jones, Eric; George, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    A MEMS-based, low-power, incandescent light source is being developed. This light source is fabricated using three bonded chips. The bottom chip consists of a reflector on Silicon, the middle chip contains a Tungsten filament bonded to silicon and the top layer is a transparent window. A 25-micrometer-thick spiral filament is fabricated in Tungsten using lithography and wet-etching. A proof-of-concept device has been fabricated and tested in a vacuum chamber. Results indicate that the filament is electrically heated to approximately 2650 K. The power required to drive the proof-of-concept spiral filament to incandescence is 1.25 W. The emitted optical power is expected to be approximately 1.0 W with the spectral peak at 1.1 microns. The micromachining techniques used to fabricate this light source can be applied to other MEMS devices.

  1. Femtosecond tunable light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesak, Edward Jozef

    1999-09-01

    A practical source of continuously tunable coherent visible and infrared light would have an enormous impact on science, medicine and technology. While microwave and radio transmitters offer wide tunability at the ``turn of a knob,'' the best known source of coherent optical radiation, the laser, does not possess the same versatility. Dye lasers provide some degree of tunability, but many dyes are needed to cover even the visible region. Ti:sapphire lasers are tunable only over the red to near infra-red portion of the spectrum (about 65 0 nm to about 1.1μm). This presentation documents the development of a unique pulsed light source tunable across the visible and near infrared portion of the spectrum, a femtosecond optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Much work was expended in developing the system itself. But a great deal of work was also done in developing the support equipment (hardware and software) necessary to build as well as maintain and operate an OPA. Once completed, the system characteristics were measured and documented. Initially it possessed ``personality'' which had to be understood and removed as much as possible. In addition, the pump source for this OPA, a regenerative amplifier, is unique in that it uses Cr3+:LiSGaF as the gain medium. This regen was also characterized and compared to other more standard regenerative amplifiers. System verification was done by performing a standard experiment (Z-scan) on well known samples, several of which are well characterized at specific wavelengths (1.06 μm, 0.523 μm) in the nanosecond and picosecond regimes. The results were compared against previously published results. The OPA was also compared against another very similar system which became commercially available during the time of this research. The results were helpful in analyzing the light source(s) and data acquisition systems for areas that could be improved.

  2. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  3. Fourth generation light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.

    1997-05-01

    Concepts and designs are now being developed at laboratories around the world for light sources with performance levels that exceed present sources, including the very powerful and successful third generation synchrotron radiation sources that have come on line in the past few years. Workshops, have been held to review directions for future sources. A main thrust is to increase the brightness and coherence of the radiation using storage rings with lower electron-beam emittance or free-electron lasers (FELs). In the infra-red part of the spectrum very high brightness and coherence is already provided by FEL user facilities driven by linacs and storage rings. It now appears possible to extend FEL operation to the VUV, soft X-ray and even hard X-ray spectral range, to wavelengths down to the angstrom range, using high energy linacs equipped with high-brightness rf photoinjectors and bunch-length compressors. R&D to develop such sources is in progress at BNL, DESY, KEK, SLAC and other laboratories. In the absence of mirrors to form optical cavities, short wavelengths are reached in FEL systems in which a high peak current, low-emittance electron beam becomes bunch-density modulated at the optical wavelength in a single pass through a long undulator by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE); i.e.; startup from noise. A proposal to use the last kilometer of the 3 kilometer SLAC linac (the first 2 kilometers will be used for injection to the PEP II B-Factory) to provide 15 GeV electron beams to reach 1.5 {angstrom} by SASE in a 100 m long undulator is in preparation.

  4. VCSEL Swept Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Jiang, James; Potsaid, Benjamin; Robertson, Martin; Heim, Peter J. S.; Burgner, Christopher; John, Demis; Cole, Garrett D.; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Fujimoto, James G.; Davis, Anjul M.; Cable, Alex E.

    Wavelength-swept light sources are widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). In recent years, amplified micro-electromechanical systems tunable vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (MEMS-VCSELs) have emerged as a high performance swept source, providing a unique combination of of wide tuning range, high maximum sweep rate, variable sweep rate, long dynamic coherence length enabled by dynamic mode-hop-free single mode operation, high optical power, and excellent imaging quality. Other important parameters provided by these devices include operation in a stable polarization state, low output power ripple, and linearized wavelength sweeping. This work describes MEMS-VCSEL device design, fabrication, and performance for devices in the 1050nm band relevant to ophthalmic imaging, and the 1310nm band relevant to vascular, skin, and anatomic imaging. Tuning ranges achieved include 100 nm at 1050nm and 150nm at 1310, with the latter result representing the widest tuning range of any MEMS-VCSEL at any wavelength. Both 1050 and 1310nm devices have enabled record imaging speed, record imaging range, and enhanced SS-OCT imaging.

  5. Nitride quantum light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype nitride quantum light sources, particularly single-photon emitters, have been successfully demonstrated, despite the challenges inherent in this complex materials system. The large band offsets available between different nitride alloys have allowed device operation at easily accessible temperatures. A wide range of approaches has been explored: not only self-assembled quantum dot growth but also lithographic methods for site-controlled nanostructure formation. All these approaches face common challenges, particularly strong background signals which contaminate the single-photon stream and excessive spectral diffusion of the quantum dot emission wavelength. If these challenges can be successfully overcome, then ongoing rapid progress in the conventional III-V semiconductors provides a roadmap for future progress in the nitrides.

  6. Thermal Management of Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J.; Völker, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The primary task of light sources is illumination, i.e., the emission of visible radiation—light. However, depending on the generation principle, besides light, also heat will be dissipated to the surroundings. Traditional thermal light sources generate light by the electrical heating of a tungsten wire to temperatures of about 3000 K. Even at this high temperature, the majority of the emitted thermal radiation is within the long wavelength range of the spectrum, i.e., not in the visible range of the optical spectrum. Generation of light with discharge lamps is completely different and non-thermal; however, even in this case the electrodes are heated to temperatures well above 2000 K. Thus, discharge lamps also suffer from thermal problems. In the case of solid-state light sources, also non-thermal light sources, the driving electrical current causes heating of the device, for which the temperature is, or should usually be, below 420 K for proper operation. Contrary to thermal or discharge light sources, such relatively low temperatures of solid-state light sources prevent efficient cooling by thermal radiation, requiring convective or conductive cooling. However, for all mentioned light sources, the thermal management, i.e., the adjusting and maintaining of an optimum operation temperature are vital for the efficiency and lifetime of the light sources. This paper deals with the methods of generation and measurement of the thermal load in the respective light sources and discusses ways to optimize the efficiency and lifetime of such light sources. Also, some practical examples are given to emphasize the relevance of such thermal management for industry, pointing out the potential for future more energy-efficient light source concepts.

  7. Lithography light source fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew; Pantel, Erica; Nelissen, Patrick; Moen, Jeffrey; Tincu, Eduard; Dunstan, Wayne; Brown, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    High productivity is a key requirement for today's advanced lithography exposure tools. Achieving targets for wafers per day output requires consistently high throughput and availability. One of the keys to high availability is minimizing unscheduled downtime of the litho cell, including the scanner, track and light source. From the earliest eximer laser light sources, Cymer has collected extensive performance data during operation of the source, and this data has been used to identify the root causes of downtime and failures on the system. Recently, new techniques have been developed for more extensive analysis of this data to characterize the onset of typical end-of-life behavior of components within the light source and allow greater predictive capability for identifying both the type of upcoming service that will be required and when it will be required. The new techniques described in this paper are based on two core elements of Cymer's light source data management architecture. The first is enhanced performance logging features added to newer-generation light source software that captures detailed performance data; and the second is Cymer OnLine (COL) which facilitates collection and transmission of light source data. Extensive analysis of the performance data collected using this architecture has demonstrated that many light source issues exhibit recognizable patterns in their symptoms. These patterns are amenable to automated identification using a Cymer-developed model-based fault detection system, thereby alleviating the need for detailed manual review of all light source performance information. Automated recognition of these patterns also augments our ability to predict the performance trending of light sources. Such automated analysis provides several efficiency improvements for light source troubleshooting by providing more content-rich standardized summaries of light source performance, along with reduced time-to-identification for previously

  8. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-04-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  9. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed. PMID:25931055

  10. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  11. The SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.; Okajima, S.; Setoyama, H.; Takabayashi, Y.; Tomimasu, T.; Yoshimura, D.; Ohgaki, H.

    2007-01-19

    Saga prefectural government operates a synchrotron light facility mainly for industrial applications of the synchrotron light. The facility comprises a 1.4 GeV storage ring, a 250 MeV linac as an electron injector and beamlines. The lattice of the storage ring is designed to perform as small emittance as 25 nm-radian and has long straight sections of 2.9 m length for installing insertion devices. Three beam lines have been prepared by Saga prefectural government and one by Saga University.

  12. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT. PMID:26300076

  13. Fusion pumped light source

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  14. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  15. Characterization of multiple light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Jessica Marie

    The integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) is an instrument that utilizes the absorption of water to detect alien substances in the water. The ICAM was first proposed by Elterman in 1970 and has since been enhanced by other scientists such as Kirk, Leathers, Fry, Musser, and Gray. While others have investigated the structure of the ICAM, little research has been published regarding the most efficient light source. This thesis compares the power consumption, spectral stability, and output intensity of three different light sources to determine which should be used in the ICAM to further develop its capabilities.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  18. The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Brum, J. A.; Tavares, P. F.

    2007-01-19

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory has been operating the only light source in the southern hemisphere since July 1997. During this period, approximately 28000 hours of beam time were delivered reaching more than 1000 users per year from all over Brazil as well as from 10 other countries. In this paper, we briefly recall the history of the project and describe the present configuration of the machine and associated instrumentation, focusing on improvements and upgrades of the various light source subsystems and beamlines implemented in recent years. Finally, we report on the use of the facility by the national and international scientific communities, its impact on the scientific and technological scene in Brazil and present perspectives for future improvements of the machine.

  19. Light pollution simulations for planar ground-based light sources.

    PubMed

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2008-02-20

    The light pollution model is employed to analyze spatial behavior of luminance at the night sky under cloudless and overcast conditions. Enhanced light excess is particularly identified at cloudy skies, because the clouds efficiently contribute to the downward luminous flux. It is evident that size of ground-based light sources can play an important role in the case of overcast sky conditions. Nevertheless, the realistically sized light sources are rarely embedded into light pollution modeling, and rather they are replaced by simple point sources. We discuss the discrepancies between sky luminance distributions when at first the planar light sources are considered and at second the point-source approximation is accepted. The found differences are noticeable if the size of the light source, distance to the observer, and altitude of a cloudy layer are comparable one to the other. Compared with point-source approximation, an inclusion of the size factor into modeling the light sources leads to partial elimination of the steep changes of sky luminance (typical for point sources of light). The narrow and sharp light pillars normally presented on the sky illuminated by point light sources can disappear or fuse together when two or more nearby light sources are considered with their real sizes. Sky elements situated close to the horizon will glow efficiently if luminous flux originates from two-dimensional ground-based entities (such as cities or villages). PMID:18288228

  20. Driver circuit for solid state light sources

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, Fred; Denvir, Kerry; Allen, Steven

    2016-02-16

    A driver circuit for a light source including one or more solid state light sources, a luminaire including the same, and a method of so driving the solid state light sources are provided. The driver circuit includes a rectifier circuit that receives an alternating current (AC) input voltage and provides a rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a switching converter circuit coupled to the light source. The switching converter circuit provides a direct current (DC) output to the light source in response to the rectified AC voltage. The driver circuit also includes a mixing circuit, coupled to the light source, to switch current through at least one solid state light source of the light source in response to each of a plurality of consecutive half-waves of the rectified AC voltage.

  1. Light Sources and Ballast Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Sakai, Makoto; Yasuda, Takeo; Maehara, Akiyoshi; Okada, Atsunori; Gouriki, Takeshi; Mannami, Tomoaki

    discharge models were reported. Further, studies on ultra high-pressure mercury lamps as light sources for projectors are becoming the mainstream of HID lamp related researches. For high-pressure sodium lamps, many studies on plant growing and pest control utilizing low insect attracting aspects were also reported in 2006. Additionally, for discharge lamps, the minimum sustaining electric power for arc tubes employed in electrode-less compact fluorescent lamps was investigated. For Hg-free rare-gas fluorescent lamps, a luminance of 10,000cd/m2 was attained by a 1 meter-long external duplex spiral electrode prototype using Xe/Ne barrier discharge. As to startup circuits, the commercialization of energy saving and high value added products mainly associated with fluorescent lamps and HID lamps are becoming common. Further, the miniaturization of startup circuits for self electronic-ballasted lamps has advanced. Speaking of the overall light sources and startup circuits in 2006 and with the enforcement of RoHS in Europe in July, the momentum toward hazardous substance-free and energy saving initiatives has been enhanced from the perspective of protecting the global environment. It is anticipated that similar restrictions will be globally enforced in the future.

  2. Light source design for machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieczka, Eric J.; Harding, Kevin G.

    1992-03-01

    There is a lack of commercially available white light sources for machine vision applications. Current commercial sources are typically expensive and primarily designed for workbench use. Because of their benchtop design, these light sources cannot be easily integrated into the inspection system. In most cases a light source must be custom designed and built to suit the needs of the particular machine vision application. The materials being inspected can vary from highly specular to highly diffuse, thus requiring a broad range of illumination levels. Other issues important in machine vision light sources include efficiency, light divergence, spectral content, source size, and packaging. This paper discusses the issues that must be overcome when designing a light source for machine vision applications, and describes the work done by ITI to produce an efficient white light source with computer controlled illumination level.

  3. Advanced Light Source elliptical wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Humphries, D.; Marks, S.; Minamihara, Y.; Pipersky, P.

    1994-07-01

    A 3.5m long elliptical wiggler, optimized to produce elliptically polarized light in the 50 eV to 10 keV range, is currently under design and construction at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Calculations of spectral performance show that the flux of circularly polarized photons exceeds 10{sup 13} photons/sec over the 50 eV to 10 keV operating range for current of 0.4 amps and 1.5 GeV electron energy. This device features vertical and horizontal magnetic structures of 14 and 14{1/2} periods respectively. The period length is 20.0 cm. The vertical structure is a hybrid permanent magnet design with tapered pole tips that produce a peak field of 2.0 T. The horizontal structure is an iron core electromagnetic design, shifted longitudinally {1/4} period, that is tucked between the upper and lower vertical magnetic structure sections. A maximum peak oscillating field of 0.095 T at a frequency up to 1 Hz will be achieved by excitation of the horizontal poles with a trapezoidal current waveform. The vacuum chamber is an unconventional design that is removable from the magnetic structure, after magnetic measurements, for UHV processing. The chamber is fabricated from non-magnetic stainless steel to minimize the effects of eddy currents. Device design is presented.

  4. Silicon micromachined broad band light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric (Inventor); Tuma, Margaret L. (Inventor); Eastwood, Michael (Inventor); Hansler, Richard (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A micro electromechanical system (MEMS) broad band incandescent light source includes three layers: a top transmission window layer; a middle filament mount layer; and a bottom reflector layer. A tungsten filament with a spiral geometry is positioned over a hole in the middle layer. A portion of the broad band light from the heated filament is reflective off the bottom layer. Light from the filament and the reflected light of the filament are transmitted through the transmission window. The light source may operate at temperatures of 2500 K or above. The light source may be incorporated into an on board calibrator (OBC) for a spectrometer.

  5. EDITORIAL: LED light sources (light for the future) LED light sources (light for the future)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandjean, N.

    2010-09-01

    comprehensive review of the different localization mechanisms and their implication for internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is proposed by Oliver and co-workers from Cambridge University. When discussing IQE in InGaN-based LEDs, the efficiency droop at high-current injection always emerges, which is a major concern for the future of SSL technology. Here, a collaborative work between Samsung and the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Korea) proves that a specific design of the active region can limit this detrimental effect. Once the issue of the IQE is solved, one still has to let the photons out of the chip. Matioli and Weisbuch from the University of California at Santa Barbara introduce the use of photonic crystals (PhCs) to improve light extraction efficiency. They describe different approaches to overcoming the main limitation of LEDs when implementing surface PhCs. The technology of SSL, and in particular of colour rendering, is tackled by Zukauskas et al who studied in detail different white light sources. They show that extreme colour-fidelity indices need to cover the entire spectrum, with a broad-band at 530-610 nm and a component beyond 610 nm. Then, the reliability of GaN-based LEDs is discussed in the paper of Meneghesso and co-workers. The authors consider the most important physical mechanisms that are (i) the degradation of the active layer of LEDs, (ii) the degradation of the package/phosphor system, (iii) the failure of GaN-based LEDs against electrostatic discharge. Finally, GaN LEDs on silicon developed in the group of Egawa at the Nagoya Institute of Technology are presented. This technology could allow a significant decrease in the fabrication cost of white LEDs.

  6. Photometer for tracking a moving light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A photometer that tracks a path of a moving light source with little or no motion of the photometer components. The system includes a non-moving, truncated paraboloid of revolution, having a paraboloid axis, a paraboloid axis, a small entrance aperture, a larger exit aperture and a light-reflecting inner surface, that receives and reflects light in a direction substantially parallel to the paraboloid axis. The system also includes a light processing filter to receive and process the redirected light, and to issue the processed, redirected light as processed light, and an array of light receiving elements, at least one of which receives and measures an associated intensity of a portion of the processed light. The system tracks a light source moving along a path and produces a corresponding curvilinear image of the light source path on the array of light receiving elements. Undesired light wavelengths from the light source may be removed by coating a selected portion of the reflecting inner surface or another light receiving surface with a coating that absorbs incident light in the undesired wavelength range.

  7. The LBL advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Keller, R.; Kim, C.; Nishimura, H.; Selph, F.; Zisman, M.

    1988-06-01

    The LBL Advanced Light Source (ALS) will be a third generation synchrotron radiation facility. It is based on a low emittance 1--2 GeV electron storage ring (natural radial emittance <10 nm-rad), optimized to produce extremely bright beams of electromagnetic radiation (in the energy range from a few eV to around one keV) from insertion devices known as undulators. The storage ring is fed from an injection system consisting of a 50 MeV linac and a 1.5 GeV, 1 Hz, booster synchrotron, which can fill the ring to its normal operating current (400 mA, multibunch, or 7.6 mA, single bunch) in a few minutes. As well as high brightness (which is a consequence of the very small electron beam emittance in the storage ring), the design emphasizes: picosecond timestructure, laserlike coherence properties, narrow bandwidth, and long beam lifetimes. The more familiar continuous synchrotron radiation spectrum will be available from bending magnets and from wiggler magnets. This paper gives a general description of the ALS and discusses some of the significant design issues associated with the low emittance storage ring that is required for this new facility. 7 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Development of a circadian light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, David B.; Ferguson, Ian T.

    2002-11-01

    Solid state lighting presents a new paradigm for lighting - controllability. Certain characteristics of the lighting environment can be manipulated, because of the possibility of using multiple LEDs of different emission wavelengths as the illumination source. This will provide a new, versatile, general illumination source due to the ability to vary the spectral power distribution. New effects beyond the visual may be achieved that are not possible with conventional light sources. Illumination has long been the primary function of lighting but as the lighting industry has matured the psychological aspects of lighting have been considered by designers; for example, choosing a particular lighting distribution or color variation in retail applications. The next step in the evolution of light is to consider the physiological effects of lighting that cause biological changes in a person within the environment. This work presents the development of a source that may have important bearing on this area of lighting. A circadian light source has been developed to provide an illumination source that works by modulating its correlated color temperature to mimic the changes in natural daylight through the day. In addition, this source can cause or control physiological effects for a person illuminated by it. The importance of this is seen in the human circadian rhythm's peak response corresponding to blue light at ~460 nm which corresponds to the primary spectral difference in increasing color temperature. The device works by adding blue light to a broadband source or mixing polychromatic light to mimic the variation of color temperature observed for the Planckian Locus on the CIE diagram. This device can have several applications including: a tool for researchers in this area, a general illumination lighting technology, and a light therapy device.

  9. The First Sources of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, Avi

    2011-09-01

    Looking deep into the Universe through powerful telescopes, we can see images of the Universe when it was younger because of the finite time it takes light to travel to us from distant sources. Existing data sets include an image of the Universe when it was 0.4 million years old (in the form of the cosmic microwave background), as well as images of individual galaxies when the Universe was older than a billion years. But there is a serious challenge: in between these two epochs was a period when the Universe was dark, stars had not yet formed, and the cosmic microwave background no longer traced the distribution of matter. And this is precisely the most interesting period, when the primordial soup evolved into the rich zoo of objects we now see. The observers are moving ahead along several fronts. The first involves the construction of large infrared telescopes on the ground and in space, that will provide us with new photos of the first galaxies. Current plans include ground-based telescopes which are 24-42 meter in diameter, and NASA's successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, called the James Webb Space Telescope. In addition, several observational groups around the globe are constructing radio arrays that will be capable of mapping the three-dimensional distribution of cosmic hydrogen in the infant Universe. These arrays are aiming to detect the long-wavelength (redshifted 21-cm) radio emission from hydrogen atoms. The images from these antenna arrays will reveal how the non-uniform distribution of neutral hydrogen evolved with cosmic time and eventually was extinguished by the ultra-violet radiation from the first galaxies. Theoretical research has focused in recent years on predicting the expected signals for the above instruments and motivating these ambitious observational projects.

  10. Solid-state light sources getting smart.

    PubMed

    Schubert, E Fred; Kim, Jong Kyu

    2005-05-27

    More than a century after the introduction of incandescent lighting and half a century after the introduction of fluorescent lighting, solid-state light sources are revolutionizing an increasing number of applications. Whereas the efficiency of conventional incandescent and fluorescent lights is limited by fundamental factors that cannot be overcome, the efficiency of solid-state sources is limited only by human creativity and imagination. The high efficiency of solid-state sources already provides energy savings and environmental benefits in a number of applications. However, solid-state sources also offer controllability of their spectral power distribution, spatial distribution, color temperature, temporal modulation, and polarization properties. Such "smart" light sources can adjust to specific environments and requirements, a property that could result in tremendous benefits in lighting, automobiles, transportation, communication, imaging, agriculture, and medicine. PMID:15919985

  11. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  12. Candle Synchrotron Light Source Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakanov, V. M.

    CANDLE - Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission - is a 3 GeV energy synchrotron light facility project in the Republic of Armenia. The main design features of the new facility are given. The results of the beam physics study in the future facility is overviewed including the machine impedance, single and multi-bunch instabilities, ion trapping and beam lifetime. The preliminary list of first group beamlines is discussed.

  13. Blue enhanced light sources: opportunities and risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Natural daylight is characterized by high proportions of blue light. By proof of a third type of photoreceptor in the human eye which is only sensitive in this spectral region and by subsequent studies it has become obvious that these blue proportions are essential for human health and well being. In various studies beneficial effects of indoor lighting with higher blue spectral proportions have been proven. On the other hand with increasing use of light sources having enhanced blue light for indoor illumination questions are arising about potential health risks attributed to blue light. Especially LED are showing distinct emission characteristics in the blue. Recently the French agency for food, environmental and occupational health & safety ANSES have raised the question on health issues related to LED light sources and have claimed to avoid use of LED for lighting in schools. In this paper parameters which are relevant for potential health risks will be shown and their contribution to risk factors will quantitatively be discussed. It will be shown how to differentiate between photometric parameters for assessment of beneficial as well as hazardous effects. Guidelines will be discussed how blue enhanced light sources can be used in applications to optimally support human health and well being and simultaneously avoid any risks attributed to blue light by a proper design of lighting parameters. In the conclusion it will be shown that no inherent health risks are related to LED lighting with a proper lighting design.

  14. The Advanced Light Source: Technical Design

    SciTech Connect

    Authors, Various

    1984-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a synchrotron radiation source consisting of a 50-MeV linear accelerator, a 1.3-GeV 'booster' synchrotron, a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring, and a number of photon beam lines, as shown in Figure 1. As an introduction to a detailed description of the Advanced Light Source, this section provides brief discussions on the characteristics of synchrotron radiation and on the theory of storage rings. Appendix A contents: Introduction to Synchrotron-Radiation Sources; Storage Ring; Injection System; Control System; Insertion Devices; Photon Beam Lines; and References.

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  16. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  17. [Hygienic evaluation of contemporary light sources].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, V N; Lyashko, G G; Kalinina, N I

    2013-01-01

    The article covers problems of illumination hygiene and electromagnetic safety of workers using contemporary light sources. The authors present results of experimental studies of electromagnetic environment in energy-efficient lamps. PMID:24745182

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  19. Red Shifts with Obliquely Approaching Light Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, C. E.; Moore-Head, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Refutes the Doppler effect as the explanation of large red shifts in the spectra of distant galaxies and explains the relativistic effects in which the light sources approach the observer obliquely. Provides several diagrams and graphs. (YP)

  20. Cathodoluminescent light sources: status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, A. S.; Kireev, V. B.; Sheshin, E. P.; Kolodyazhnyj, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    A feasible alternative to current energy-saving light sources is environmentally friendly new-generation cathodoluminescent light sources (CLSs) based on luminescence produced by electrons emitted from the field emission cathode. Because of the lack of available optimally designed general-purpose lamps with field emission cathodes, the development of an efficient prototype CLS potentially mass-produced at a low cost is currently the top priority.

  1. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Broadband Light Source Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.

    2003-01-01

    A miniature, low-power broadband light source has been developed for aerospace applications, including calibrating spectrometers and powering miniature optical sensors. The initial motivation for this research was based on flight tests of a Fabry-Perot fiberoptic temperature sensor system used to detect aircraft engine exhaust gas temperature. Although the feasibility of the sensor system was proven, the commercial light source optically powering the device was identified as a critical component requiring improvement. Problems with the light source included a long stabilization time (approximately 1 hr), a large amount of heat generation, and a large input electrical power (6.5 W). Thus, we developed a new light source to enable the use of broadband optical sensors in aerospace applications. Semiconductor chip-based light sources, such as lasers and light-emitting diodes, have a relatively narrow range of emission wavelengths in comparison to incandescent sources. Incandescent light sources emit broadband radiation from visible to infrared wavelengths; the intensity at each wavelength is determined by the filament temperature and the materials chosen for the filament and the lamp window. However, present commercial incandescent light sources are large in size and inefficient, requiring several watts of electrical power to obtain the desired optical power, and they emit a large percentage of the input power as heat that must be dissipated. The miniature light source, developed jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Lighting Innovations Institute, requires one-fifth the electrical input power of some commercial light sources, while providing similar output light power that is easily coupled to an optical fiber. Furthermore, it is small, rugged, and lightweight. Microfabrication technology was used to reduce the size, weight, power consumption, and potential cost-parameters critical to future aerospace applications. This chip

  2. Light emitting diodes as a plant lighting source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Tennessen, D. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    Electroluminescence in solid materials is defined as the generation of light by the passage of an electric current through a body of solid material under an applied electric field. A specific type of electroluminescence, first noted in 1923, involves the generation of photons when electrons are passed through a p-n junction of certain solid materials (junction of a n-type semiconductor, an electron donor, and a p-type semiconductor, an electron acceptor). The development of this light emitting semiconductor technology dates back less than 30 years. During this period of time, the LED has evolved from a rare and expensive light generating device to one of the most widely used electronic components. A number of LED characteristics are of considerable importance in selecting a light source for plant lighting in a controlled environment facility. Of particular importance is the characteristic that light is generated by an LED at a rate far greater than the corresponding thermal radiation predicted by the bulk temperature of the device as defined by Plank's radiation law. This is in sharp contrast to other light sources, such as an incandescent or high intensity discharge lamp. A plant lighting system for controlled environments must provide plants with an adequate flux of photosynthetically active radiation, plus providing photons in the spectral regions that are involved in the photomorphogenic and phototropic responses that result in normal plant growth and development. Use of light sources that emit photons over a broad spectral range generally meet these two lighting requirements. Since the LED's emit over specific spectral regions, they must be carefully selected so that the levels of photsynthetically active and photomorphogenic and phototropic radiation meet these plant requirements.

  3. Light sources based on semiconductor current filaments

    DOEpatents

    Zutavern, Fred J.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Buttram, Malcolm T.; Mar, Alan; Helgeson, Wesley D.; O'Malley, Martin W.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Baca, Albert G.; Chow, Weng W.; Vawter, G. Allen

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a new type of semiconductor light source that can produce a high peak power output and is not injection, e-beam, or optically pumped. The present invention is capable of producing high quality coherent or incoherent optical emission. The present invention is based on current filaments, unlike conventional semiconductor lasers that are based on p-n junctions. The present invention provides a light source formed by an electron-hole plasma inside a current filament. The electron-hole plasma can be several hundred microns in diameter and several centimeters long. A current filament can be initiated optically or with an e-beam, but can be pumped electrically across a large insulating region. A current filament can be produced in high gain photoconductive semiconductor switches. The light source provided by the present invention has a potentially large volume and therefore a potentially large energy per pulse or peak power available from a single (coherent) semiconductor laser. Like other semiconductor lasers, these light sources will emit radiation at the wavelength near the bandgap energy (for GaAs 875 nm or near infra red). Immediate potential applications of the present invention include high energy, short pulse, compact, low cost lasers and other incoherent light sources.

  4. Optical radiation safety of medical light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliney, David H.

    1997-05-01

    The phototoxicity of medical ultraviolet (UV) sources used in dermatology has long been recognized. Less obvious are potential hazards to the eye and skin from many other optical sources - both to the patient and to the health-care worker. To assess potential hazards, one must consider not only the optical and radiometric parameters of the optical source in question but also the geometrical exposure factors. This knowledge is required to accurately determine the irradiances (dose rates) to exposed tissues. Both photochemically and thermally induced damage are possible from intense light sources used in medicine and surgery; however, thermal injury is rare unless the light source is pulsed or nearly in contact with tissue. Generally, photochemical interaction mechanisms are most pronounced at short wavelengths (UV) where photon energies are greatest, and also will be most readily observed for lengthy exposure durations.

  5. Research on Modern Gas Discharge Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, M.; Markus, T.

    This article gives an overview of today's gas discharge light sources and their application fields with focus on research aspects. In Sect. 15.1 of this chapter, an introduction to electric light sources, the lighting market and related research topics is outlined. Due to the complexity of the subject, we have focused on selected topics in the field of high intensity discharge (HID) lamps since these represent an essential part of modern lamp research. The working principle and light technical properties of HID lamps are described in Sect. 15.2. Physical and thermochemical modelling procedures and tools as well as experimental analysis are discussed in Sects. 15.3 and 15.4, respectively. These tools result in a detailed scientific insight into the complexity of real discharge lamps. In particular, analysis and modelling are the keys for further improvement and development of existing and new products.

  6. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOEpatents

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  7. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A.

    1999-11-30

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GaInSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2--6 {mu}m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  8. Physics Challenges for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lia Merminga

    2004-07-01

    We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of Energy Recovering Linac (ERL) based light sources. These challenges include the generation and preservation of low emittance, high-average current beams, manipulating and preserving the transverse and longitudinal phase space, control of the multipass beam breakup instability, efficient extraction of higher order mode power and RF control and stability of the superconducting cavities. These key R&D issues drive the design and technology choices for proposed ERL light sources. Simulations and calculations of these processes will be presented and compared with experimental data obtained at the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in commissioning, and during a 1 GeV demonstration of energy recovery at CEBAF.

  9. Solid-State Spectral Light Source System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maffione, Robert; Dana, David

    2011-01-01

    A solid-state light source combines an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with advanced electronic control and stabilization over both the spectrum and overall level of the light output. The use of LEDs provides efficient operation over a wide range of wavelengths and power levels, while electronic control permits extremely stable output and dynamic control over the output. In this innovation, LEDs are used instead of incandescent bulbs. Optical feedback and digital control are used to monitor and regulate the output of each LED. Because individual LEDs generate light within narrower ranges of wavelengths than incandescent bulbs, multiple LEDs are combined to provide a broad, continuous spectrum, or to produce light within discrete wavebands that are suitable for specific radiometric sensors.

  10. Tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source

    DOEpatents

    Powers, Peter E.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    A tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source and a method of operating a light source are provided. The light source includes a pump laser, first and second non-linear optical crystals, a tunable filter, and light pulse directing optics. The method includes the steps of operating the pump laser to generate a pulsed pump beam characterized by a nanosecond pulse duration and arranging the light pulse directing optics so as to (i) split the pulsed pump beam into primary and secondary pump beams; (ii) direct the primary pump beam through an input face of the first non-linear optical crystal such that a primary output beam exits from an output face of the first non-linear optical crystal; (iii) direct the primary output beam through the tunable filter to generate a sculpted seed beam; and direct the sculpted seed beam and the secondary pump beam through an input face of the second non-linear optical crystal such that a secondary output beam characterized by at least one spectral bandwidth on the order of about 0.1 cm.sup.-1 and below exits from an output face of the second non-linear optical crystal.

  11. An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chemla, Daniel S.; Feinberg, Benedict; Hussain, Zahid; Kirz, Janos; Krebs, Gary F.; Padmore, Howard A.; Robin, David S.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Smith, Neville V.

    2004-09-01

    One of the first third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS, has been operating for almost a decade at Berkeley Lab, where experimenters have been exploiting its high brightness for forefront science. However, accelerator and insertion-device technology have significantly changed since the ALS was designed. As a result, the performance of the ALS is in danger of being eclipsed by that of newer, more advanced sources. The ALS upgrade that we are planning includes full-energy, top-off injection with higher storage-ring current and the replacement of five first-generation insertion devices with nine state-of-the art insertion devices and four new application-specific beamlines now being identified in a strategic planning process. The upgrade will help keep the ALS at the forefront of soft x-ray synchrotron light sources for the next two decades.

  12. Generation and control of a powerful electron-beam current in an accelerator based on a secondary-emission source and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizatsky, N. I.; Dovbnya, A. N.; Zakutin, V. V.; Reshetnyak, N. G.; Romas'ko, V. P.; Chertishchev, I. A.; Boriskin, V. N.; Dovbnya, N. A.

    2014-09-01

    An electron accelerator in which magnetron guns with secondary-emission cathodes of two types are used as a particle source is described. The electron-beam parameters are investigated in an electron energy range of 20-150 keV at a pulse length of 10-50 μs. Results of target irradiation by an electron beam are represented. The target surface structure is studied by the metallographic method, and the microhardness and strength of zirconium materials are measured. The possibility of beam current control by factors of 2.5-3.5 with various methods is shown.

  13. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-02-22

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported.

  14. IR beamline at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ph, Lerch; L, Quaroni; J, Wambach; J, Schneider; B, Armstrong D.; D, Rossetti; L, Mueller F.; P, Peier; V, Schlott; L, Carroll; P, Friedli; H, Sigg; S, Stutz; M, Tran

    2012-05-01

    The infrared beamline at the Swiss light source uses dipole radiation and is designed to transport light to four experimental stations, A, B, C, D. Branch A is dedicated to far IR work in vacuum; branch B is a micro-spectrometer; branch C is dedicated to high resolution spectroscopy in the gas phase; branch D is a pump and probe set-up. This contribution describes the optical layout and provides a brief survey of currently available experimental stations. The beamline is in regular user operation since 2009.

  15. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  16. Rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source

    DOEpatents

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.; Fugitt, Jock A.

    2000-01-01

    An rf capacitively-coupled electrodeless light source is provided. The light source comprises a hollow, elongated chamber and at least one center conductor disposed within the hollow, elongated chamber. A portion of each center conductor extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. At least one gas capable of forming an electronically excited molecular state is contained within each center conductor. An electrical coupler is positioned concentric to the hollow, elongated chamber and the electrical coupler surrounds the portion of each center conductor that extends beyond the hollow, elongated chamber. A rf-power supply is positioned in an operable relationship to the electrical coupler and an impedance matching network is positioned in an operable relationship to the rf power supply and the electrical coupler.

  17. Photon Science at Modern Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, John

    2009-12-01

    More than 50 large x-ray and UV light sources based on high-energy electron accelerators are in operation around the world, serving a scientific community numbering in the tens of thousands. These sources generate synchrotron radiation from accelerated electrons or positrons. The development of synchrotron light sources over the last 40 years has fueled an exponential increase in x-ray source brightness of more than 10 orders of magnitude. The next large advance in source potential is now underway, with the commissioning of the first x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) sources. Using high-energy electron linear accelerators, these facilities produce sub-picosecond pulses of hard x-rays with peak brightness more than 10 orders of magnitude greater than current synchrotron facilities. FEL x-ray facilities will soon be operational in the US, Japan, and Germany. Research at modern light sources makes use of a wide range of experimental techniques. Many experiments are designed to study the structure of matter at the atomic scale using elastic x-ray scattering. This technique has been particularly effective for determining the structures of biological molecules, such as proteins, viruses, and drugs. Inelastic x-ray scattering, or x-ray absorption followed by emission of electrons or photons, can give information about the electronic structures of atoms, which can be used to deduce local environment information such as atomic species, bonding state, geometry of neighboring atoms, or magnetic state. For some techniques involving x-ray emission from a sample, cryogenic detectors with energy resolution at the ˜10 eV level or better would be very helpful. Shifts in electron energy levels associated with bonding states and magnetic states are typically several eV, while the energy structure associated with Compton inelastic scattering is typically in the range of a few tens of eV. Current energy-resolving detectors used at synchrotron light sources are hampered by either poor

  18. Reactions and moderators for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron capture therapy source for cancer treatment. Final report, October 1900--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, J.F.; Brugger, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been considered for nearly 30 years, and been practiced in Japan since the late 1970`s. Early experiments in the USA were generally nonpromising. However, new boron-containing ligand compounds were developed, which would seek out brain tumors. Concentration levels of the order of 30 micrograms of boron per gram of tissue become possible, and interest in the BNCT technique was revived in the USA beginning about 1985, with research reactors as the obvious source of the neutrons for the treatment. However, the limited number of research reactors in the USA (and the world) would mean that this treatment modality would be quite limited. The goals of this work was: (1) Examine as many as possible reactions of charged particles on various targets of an accelerator, and determine those that would give high neutron yields of a convenient energy. (2) Determine, through calculations (using Monte Carlo stochastic computer codes), the best design for a moderator/reflector assembly which would give high thermal flux at a nominal 5 cm depth in the head of a patient, with minimal radiation dose from gamma rays and fast neutrons. (3) Perform a benchmark experiment using a positive ion accelerator. The Li-7(p,n) reaction was chosen for the benchmark, since it was readily available for most accelerators, and was one of the two highest yielding reactions from Task No. 1. Since the University of Missouri has no accelerator, possible accelerators at other universities were investigated, as to availability and cost. A unit having capability in the 2.5 MeV range was desired.

  19. Invitation to the World of the Plasma for Light Source 3.Light Source Measurement 3.1 Laser Diagnostics of Plasmas for Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Hideki; Jinno, Masafumi

    Examples and basic theories of various methods of laser diagnostics of plasmas for light sources are introduced. Most introduced papers were presented at International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources (LS), which is the only international symposium on the science and technology of light sources.

  20. Linac Coherent Light Source Monte Carlo Simulation

    2006-03-15

    This suite consists of codes to generate an initial x-ray photon distribution and to propagate the photons through various objects. The suite is designed specifically for simulating the Linac Coherent Light Source, and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) being built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The purpose is to provide sufficiently detailed characteristics of the laser to engineers who are designing the laser diagnostics.

  1. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas Jan; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Sommers, Ricky; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  2. High brightness EUV light source modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Sergey V.; Choi, Peter; Zakharov, Vasily S.

    2010-04-01

    EUV source for actinic mask metrology, particularly for defect inspection, requires extremely high brightness. The selfabsorption of radiation limits the in-band EUV radiance of the source plasma and the etendue constraint limits the usable power of a conventional single unit EUV source. Theoretical study and numerical modelling has been carried out to address fundamental issues in tin and xenon plasmas and to optimize the performance of EUV sources. The highly ionized xenon plasma in the presence of fast electrons demonstrates the enhanced radiance. Theoretical models and robust modelling tools are being further developed under an international collaboration project FIRE in the frame of the EU FP7 IAPP program. NANO-UV is delivering a new generation of EUV light source with an intrinsic photon collector. Extensive numerical modelling has provided basic numbers to select the optimal regimes for tin and xenon based source operation. From these designs, a family of specially configured multiplexed source structures is being introduced to address the mask metrology needs.

  3. Sources of light in the deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, G. T.; Lutz, R. A.

    2001-02-01

    Studies during recent decades have shown that the deep ocean (depths below where solar luminance plays a direct environmental role) is far from a dark, cold, lifeless region. Evidence obtained by utilizing a variety of photo-optical devices, providing spatial, temporal, and spectral information, has demonstrated that this portion of the Earth is a region rich in life and light. Findings to date have provided challenges for geologists, physicists, biologists, chemists, and oceanographers, and the sharing of techniques and expertise among these disciplines has demonstrated the rewards to be gained from interdisciplinary research. Bioluminescence has been found far below the depths at which it has received most attention historically. The study of this phenomenon is complicated by the fact that the measuring apparatus itself causes a stimulation of the luminescence so that a true background will be difficult to determine. Nuclear physics has played a role in that the electron resulting from the decay of an isotope of potassium (K40) provides an ubiquitous background of light through a process known as Cerenkov radiation. The possibility of light generated by cosmic rays must also be taken into account. An intriguing source of light at the very bottom of the sea is found at hydrothermal vents. Here are found not only light but also abundant life. At the vent orifice, temperatures are found to be as high as 250°-400°C. A large component of the light is due to thermal radiation. However, the light in the wavelengths 450-600 nm is significantly greater than the thermal flux at those wavelengths. Identifying the physical mechanisms that may account for this excess is important in providing insight into the processes occurring in the vents and plumes and in the accompanying ecosystem.

  4. The JLab high power ERL light source

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made

  5. The JLab high power ERL light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, G. R.; Behre, C.; Benson, S. V.; Bevins, M.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Coleman, J.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, H. F.; Evans, R.; Grippo, A.; Gruber, D.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Kelley, M. J.; Merminga, L.; Mammosser, J.; Moore, W.; Nishimori, N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Preble, J.; Rimmer, R.; Shinn, M.; Siggins, T.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Williams, G. P.; Zhang, S.

    2006-02-01

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz ˜ half cycle pulse whose average brightness is >5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted [Carr, et al., Nature 420 (2002) 153]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [Neil, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 662]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 μm in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 ms long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the

  6. BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source.

    PubMed

    Aleynik, V; Burdakov, A; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Kanygin, V; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Sorokin, I; Taskaev, S

    2011-12-01

    Innovative facility for neutron capture therapy has been built at BINP. This facility is based on compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915-2.5 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. In the article, diagnostic techniques for proton beam and neutrons developed are described, results of experiments on proton beam transport and neutron generation are shown, discussed, and plans are presented. PMID:21439836

  7. Superbend upgrade of the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, D.; Krupnick, J.; Schlueter, R.; Steier, C.; Marks, S.; Wang, B.; Zbasnik, J.; Benjegerdes, R.; Biocca, A.; Bish, P.; Brown, W.; Byrne, W.; Chen, J.; Decking, W.; DeVries, J.; DeMarco, W.R.; Fahmie, M.; Geyer, A.; Harkins, J.; Henderson, T.; Hinkson, J.; Hoyer, E.; Hull, D.; Jacobson, S.; McDonald, J.; Molinari, P.; Mueller, R.; Nadolski, L.; Nishimura, H.; Nishimura, K.; Ottens, F.; Paterson, J.A.; Pipersky, P.; Portmann, G.; Richie, A.; Rossi, S.; Salvant, B.; Scarvie, T.; Schmidt,A.; Spring, J.; Taylor, C.; Thur, W.; Timossi, C.; Wandesforde, A.

    2004-05-26

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation synchrotron light source located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). There was an increasing demand at the ALS for additional high brightness hard x-ray beamlines in the 7 to 40 keV range. In response to that demand, the ALS storage ring was modified in August 2001. Three 1.3 Tesla normal conducting bending magnets were removed and replaced with three 5 Tesla superconducting magnets (Superbends). The radiation produced by these Superbends is an order of magnitude higher in photon brightness and flux at 12 keV than that of the 1.3 Tesla bends, making them excellent sources of hard x-rays for protein crystallography and other hard x-ray applications. At the same time the Superbends did not compromise the performance of the facility in the VUV and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The Superbends will eventually feed 12 new beamlines greatly enhancing the facility's capability and capacity in the hard x-ray region. The Superbend project is the biggest upgrade to the ALS storage ring since it was commissioned in 1993. In this paper we present an overview of the Superbend project, its challenges and the resulting impact on the ALS.

  8. Advanced Light Source beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkson, J.

    1991-10-28

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a synchrotron radiation facility nearing completion at LBL. As a third-generation machine, the ALS is designed to produce intense light from bend magnets, wigglers, and undulators (insertion devices). The facility will include a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator, a 1.5 GeV booster synchrotron, beam transport lines, a 1--2 GeV storage ring, insertion devices, and photon beam lines. Currently, the beam injection systems are being commissioned, and the storage ring is being installed. Electron beam position monitors (BPM) are installed throughout the accelerator and constitute the major part of accelerator beam diagnostics. The design of the BPM instruments is complete, and 50 units have been constructed for use in the injector systems. We are currently fabricating 100 additional instruments for the storage ring. In this paper I discuss engineering fabrication, testing and performance of the beam pickup electrodes and the BPM electronics.

  9. Plasma-based EUV light source

    DOEpatents

    Shumlak, Uri; Golingo, Raymond; Nelson, Brian A.

    2010-11-02

    Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

  10. Operator scheduling at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.

    1998-06-01

    Scheduling Operations staff at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has evolved from 5 shifts/week for commissioning operations in 1992 to the present 24 hour/day, 21 shift coverage as the ALS went to full operation for users. A number of schedules were developed and implemented in an effort to accommodate changing ALS shift coverage requirements. The present work schedule and the lessons learned, address a number of issues that are useful to any facility that is operating 24 hours/day, 7 days/week.

  11. Magnet costs for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, J.; Krupnick, J.; Hoyer, E.; Paterson, A.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerator is now completed. The numerous conventional magnets required for the booster ring, the storage ring and the low and high energy transfer lines were installed during the last two years. This paper summarizes the various costs associated with the quantity fabrication of selected magnet families. These costs include the costs of prototypes, tooling, coil and core fabrication, assembly and magnetic measurements. Brief descriptions of the magnets and specialized requirements for magnetic measurements are included in order to associate the costs with the relative complexities of the various magnet systems.

  12. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  13. Coded source imaging simulation with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Zou, Yubin; Zhang, Xueshuang; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2011-09-01

    A coded source could increase the neutron flux with high L/ D ratio. It may benefit a neutron imaging system with low yield neutron source. Visible light CSI experiments were carried out to test the physical design and reconstruction algorithm. We used a non-mosaic Modified Uniformly Redundant Array (MURA) mask to project the shadow of black/white samples on a screen. A cooled-CCD camera was used to record the image on the screen. Different mask sizes and amplification factors were tested. The correlation, Wiener filter deconvolution and Richardson-Lucy maximum likelihood iteration algorithm were employed to reconstruct the object imaging from the original projection. The results show that CSI can benefit the low flux neutron imaging with high background noise.

  14. Ultraviolet Light Source Using Electrodeless Microwave Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Surface treatment technologies using ultraviolet (UV) light, such as organic residue removal, surface modification or sterilization, are widely used. So far, UV lamps using DC discharge with electrodes inside the lamp tube is commonly used. However, sputtering of electrode materials sometimes causes deposition on the inner tube surface as well as degradation of the electrodes, resulting in short life time of the lamp tube. In this study, we propose an electrodeless UV mercury (Hg) lamp source using microwave power. 2.45 GHz Microwave power (<4 kW) from a power supply is divided into four power lines using branch waveguides. A mercury lamp tube (diameter: 9.6 mm, length: 42 cm, Hg: 13.5 mg, Ar: 1 Torr) is inserted into the branch waveguides and microwave power is coupled to the plasma. Emission from the lamp is monitored by a monochromator and an 254 nm UV monitor. Lamp temperature is also measured by a thermography camera and tube temperature up to 900 K with good uniformity along ~ 30 cm was observed. Uniformity of the 254 nm UV light intensity was +15 % along the lamp tube. The maximum UV light intensity of 64 mW/cm2 was observed at a microwave power of 4 kW.

  15. Status of the Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Westphal, C.; Weis, T.; Wille, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source located at University of Dortmund, is operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimisation and maintenance. The status of the synchrotron light source is presented with emphasis on the operation, commissioning and installation of beamlines and insertion devices. The soft X-ray undulator beamlines provide photon energies between 5 to 400 eV (U250) and 55 and 1500 eV (U55), respectively. One dipole beamline covers soft X-rays between 6 to 200 eV, and a second dipole beamline is used without a monochromator at 2.2 keV critical energy of the dipole spectrum. For photons in the hard X-ray regime, a superconducting asymmetric wiggler (SAW) with a field of 5.3 T and 7.9 keV critical energy was installed, providing circularly polarized X-rays in the range of 2 to 30 keV. Due to its broad radiation fan, three beamlines are simultaneously served. The first SAW-beamline with an energy range between 4 to 30 keV is in full operation, the second is under commissioning, serving the energy range between 2 to 30 keV. The third SAW beamline is near completion, additional dipole beamlines are under construction.

  16. Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

  17. A novel amblyopia treatment system based on LED light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Chen, Qingshan; Wang, Xiaoling

    2011-05-01

    A novel LED (light emitting diode) light source of five different colors (white, red, green, blue and yellow) is adopted instead of conventional incandescent lamps for an amblyopia treatment system and seven training methods for rectifying amblyopia are incorporated so as for achieving an integrated therapy. The LED light source is designed to provide uniform illumination, adjustable light intensity and alterable colors. Experimental tests indicate that the LED light source operates steadily and fulfills the technical demand of amblyopia treatment.

  18. A novel amblyopia treatment system based on LED light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Chen, Qingshan; Wang, Xiaoling

    2010-12-01

    A novel LED (light emitting diode) light source of five different colors (white, red, green, blue and yellow) is adopted instead of conventional incandescent lamps for an amblyopia treatment system and seven training methods for rectifying amblyopia are incorporated so as for achieving an integrated therapy. The LED light source is designed to provide uniform illumination, adjustable light intensity and alterable colors. Experimental tests indicate that the LED light source operates steadily and fulfills the technical demand of amblyopia treatment.

  19. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wharmby, D. O.

    2008-07-01

    The papers in this Special Issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics originate from the 11th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources (LS:11) held at Fudan University, Shanghai, China, during 20 24 May 2007. Abstracts of all papers were published in the conference book Light Sources 2007 (Sheffield: FAST-LS) edited by Muqing Liu and R Devonshire. Special issues were produced after LS:9 and LS:10 and have proved to be well-cited and important sources of information for this community. The Symposia occur at three-year intervals. In this one over 200 papers were presented—the majority as posters—with ample time provided for active discussion. As all submitted papers had to be refereed in the normal way for J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., I was concerned that too many submissions would overwhelm the small number of referees available in this area. To ensure a broad spread of interests and opinions, I invited 10 senior colleagues to give me their recommendations about who should be asked to submit papers for this Special Issue. The criteria were that the work should be new, complete and within the scope of the journal. As a result of their suggestions 42 authors were asked to submit papers. Not all authors were able to submit a manuscript in time and some, at my request, combined their work into a single paper. The 28 papers published here are the result of that process. The issue starts with a comprehensive review by Benilov of the remarkable progress that has been made in the past 15 years in understanding the behaviour of cathode and anode terminations in arcs. It is fair to say that we now have a fundamental understanding of the formerly baffling behaviour of spot and diffuse terminations, at least in the quasi-steady state. A number of following papers cover applications of this theory, extensions to time dependence and examination of the effects of the different gaseous atmospheres in which lighting arcs operate. Mercury has very

  20. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  1. Status of the SAGA Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyasu, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.

    2010-06-01

    The SAGA Light Source (SAGA-LS) is a synchrotron radiation facility consisting of a 255 MeV injector linac and a 1.4 GeV storage ring that is 75.6 m in circumference. The SAGA-LS has been stably providing synchrotron radiation to users since it first started user operation in February 2006. Along with the user operation, various machine improvements have been made over the past years, including upgrading the injector linac control system, replacing a septum magnet and constructing a beam diagnostic system. In addition to these improvements, insertion devices have been developed and installed. An APPLE-II type variable polarization undulator was installed in 2008. To address the demand from users for high-flux hard x-rays, a superconducting 4 T class wiggler is being developed. An experimental setup for generating MeV photons by laser Compton scattering is being constructed for beam monitoring and future user experiments.

  2. Status of the SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneyasu, T.; Takabayashi, Y.; Iwasaki, Y.; Koda, S.

    2010-06-23

    The SAGA Light Source (SAGA-LS) is a synchrotron radiation facility consisting of a 255 MeV injector linac and a 1.4 GeV storage ring that is 75.6 m in circumference. The SAGA-LS has been stably providing synchrotron radiation to users since it first started user operation in February 2006. Along with the user operation, various machine improvements have been made over the past years, including upgrading the injector linac control system, replacing a septum magnet and constructing a beam diagnostic system. In addition to these improvements, insertion devices have been developed and installed. An APPLE-II type variable polarization undulator was installed in 2008. To address the demand from users for high-flux hard x-rays, a superconducting 4 T class wiggler is being developed. An experimental setup for generating MeV photons by laser Compton scattering is being constructed for beam monitoring and future user experiments.

  3. Performance of the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.

    1994-06-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is the first of the lower energy (1--2 GeV) third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities to come into operation. Designed with very small electron beam emittances to operate with long insertion devices producing very high brightness beams of synchrotron radiation in the VUV and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum, these facilities are complementary to the higher energy (6--9 GeV) facilities designed for harder x-radiation. The ALS storage ring began operation in October 1993. In this paper, we will review the operational performance of the ALS, including the effects of the 4.5 m long undulators (period 5 cm), and discuss the overall performance of the facility.

  4. The Linac Cooherent Light Source (LCLS) Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Such an FEL requires a high energy, high brightness electron beam to drive the FEL instability to saturation. When fed by an RF-photocathode gun, and modified to include two bunch compressor chicanes, the SLAC linac will provide such a high quality beam at 14 GeV and 1-{micro}m normalized emittance. In this paper, we report on recent linac studies, including beam stability and tolerances, longitudinal and transverse feedback systems, conventional and time-resolved diagnostics, and beam collimation systems. Construction and installation of the injector through first bunch compressor will be completed by December 2006, and electron commissioning is scheduled to begin in January of 2007.

  5. LED intense headband light source for fingerprint analysis

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    2005-03-08

    A portable, lightweight and high-intensity light source for detecting and analyzing fingerprints during field investigation. On-site field analysis requires long hours of mobile analysis. In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a plurality of light emitting diodes; a power source; and a personal attachment means; wherein the light emitting diodes are powered by the power source, and wherein the power source and the light emitting diodes are attached to the personal attachment means to produce a personal light source for on-site analysis of latent fingerprints. The present invention is available for other applications as well.

  6. Diamond Light Source: status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Materlik, Gerhard; Rayment, Trevor; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Light Source, a third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facility in the UK, celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2012. A private limited company was set up in April 2002 to plan, construct and operate the new user-oriented SR facility, called in brief Diamond. It succeeded the Synchrotron Radiation Source in Daresbury, a second-generation synchrotron that opened in 1980 as the world's first dedicated X-ray-providing facility, closing finally in 2008, by which time Diamond's accelerators and first beamlines were operating and user experiments were under way. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A gives some examples of the rich diversity of research done in the initial five years, with some glimpses of activity up to 2014. Speakers at the 10 year anniversary symposium were drawn from a small number of major thematic areas and each theme was elaborated by a few speakers whose contributions were placed into a broader context by a leading member of the UK academic community in the role of rapporteur. This introduction gives a summary of the design choices and strategic planning of Diamond as a coherent user facility, a snapshot of its present status and some consideration of future perspectives. PMID:25624517

  7. Status of the Metrology Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.; Ulm, G.; Feikes, J.; Hartrott, M. von; Wuestefeld, G.

    2010-06-23

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, has set up the low-energy electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) in close cooperation with the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB, formerly BESSY). This new storage ring has been in regular user operation since April 2008 and is dedicated to synchrotron-radiation-based metrology and technological developments in the far-IR/THz, IR, UV, VUV and EUV spectral range. The MLS has a double-bend-achromate lattice structure, injection is from a 105 MeV racetrack microtron. The electron energy can be ramped to any value from 105 MeV up to 630 MeV and the electron beam current covers the range from one stored electron (1 pA) up to 200 mA. The MLS is the first electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation, based on an electron bunch shortening mode. In this mode, MLS delivers coherent radiation in the far-IR/THz spectral range with enhanced intensity as compared to the normal mode of operation. Several beamlines are in operation or in construction, including one undulator beamline, bending magnet beamlines for the calibration of radiation sources and detectors and for reflectometry, an EUV metrology beamline and three IR/THz beamlines.

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work

  9. The 4th Generation Light Source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Albert Grippo; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Steven Moore; George Neil; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Shukui Zhang; Gwyn Williams

    2007-04-25

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab. Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  10. The 4th generation light source at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S.; Biallas, G.; Boyce, J.; Bullard, D.; Coleman, J.; Douglas, D.; Dylla, F.; Evans, R.; Evtushenko, P.; Grippo, A.; Gould, C.; Gubeli, J.; Hardy, D.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Jordan, K.; Klopf, J. M.; Moore, W.; Neil, G.; Powers, T.; Preble, J.; Sexton, D.; Shinn, M.; Tennant, C.; Walker, R.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2007-11-01

    A number of "Grand Challenges" in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.

  11. Collimated Light Source Using Patterned Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Microlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukekazu Aratani,; Masaya Adachi,; Masao Shimizu,; Tatsuya Sugita,; Toshinari Shibasaki,; Katsusuke Shimazaki,

    2010-04-01

    We developed for the first time a collimated organic light-emitting diode (OLED) light source using a patterned OLED and a microlens. The structure of the collimated OLED light source was designed by conventional ray-tracking simulation. We demonstrated that the collimated OLED light source enhanced the luminance of a liquid crystal display (LCD) with a low aperture ratio by a factor of more than two compared with a conventional OLED light source, which was not patterned. The collimated OLED light source with the patterned OLED and microlens is thus very effective for achieving a highly efficient LCD with OLED backlight.

  12. The Sun: the Earth light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    We have implemented at Department of Physics of University of Rome Tor Vergata a project called "The Sun: the Earth light source". The project obtained the official endorsement from the IAU Executive Committee Working Group for the International Year of Light. The project, specifically designed for high school students, is focused on the "scientific" study of Sun light by means of a complete acquisition system based on "on the shelf" appropriately CMOS low-cost sensor with free control s/w and self-assembled telescopes. The project (hereafter stage) plan is based on a course of two weeks (60 hours in total). The course contains 20 hours of theoretical lectures, necessary to learn basics about Sun, optics, telescopes and image sensors, and 40 hours of laboratory. During the course, scientists and astronomers share with high schools students, work activities in real research laboratories. High schools teachers are intensely involved in the project. Their role is to share activities with university teachers and realize outreach actions in the home institutions. Simultaneously, they are introduced to innovative teaching methods and the project in this way is regarded as a professional development course. Sun light analysis and Sun-Earth connection through light are the main scientific topics of this project. The laboratory section of the stage is executed in two phases (weeks): First phase aims are the realization of a keplerian telescope and low-cost acquisition system. During this week students are introduced to astronomical techniques used to safety collect and acquire solar light; Second phase aims is the realization of a low-cost instrument to analyse sunlight extracting information about the solar spectrum, solar irradiance and Sun-Earth connection. The proposed stage has been already tested in Italy reached the fifth edition in 2014. Since 2010, the project has been a cornerstone outreach program of the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Italian Ministry of

  13. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  14. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  15. Matrix light and pixel light: optical system architecture and requirements to the light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinger, Benno; Timinger, Andreas L.

    2015-09-01

    Modern Automotive headlamps enable improved functionality for more driving comfort and safety. Matrix or Pixel light headlamps are not restricted to either pure low beam functionality or pure high beam. Light in direction of oncoming traffic is selectively switched of, potential hazard can be marked via an isolated beam and the illumination on the road can even follow a bend. The optical architectures that enable these advanced functionalities are diverse. Electromechanical shutters and lens units moved by electric motors were the first ways to realize these systems. Switching multiple LED light sources is a more elegant and mechanically robust solution. While many basic functionalities can already be realized with a limited number of LEDs, an increasing number of pixels will lead to more driving comfort and better visibility. The required optical system needs not only to generate a desired beam distribution with a high angular dynamic, but also needs to guarantee minimal stray light and cross talk between the different pixels. The direct projection of the LED array via a lens is a simple but not very efficient optical system. We discuss different optical elements for pre-collimating the light with minimal cross talk and improved contrast between neighboring pixels. Depending on the selected optical system, we derive the basic light source requirements: luminance, surface area, contrast, flux and color homogeneity.

  16. LIGHT SOURCE: Conceptual design of Hefei Advanced Light Source (HALS) injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wang, Lin; Feng, Guang-Yao; Wu, Cong-Feng; Li, Wei-Min; Xu, Hong-Liang; Liu, Zu-Ping

    2009-06-01

    The Hefei Advanced Light Source(HALS) is a super low emittance storage ring and has a very short beam life time. In order to run the ring stablely, top-up injection will be necessary. The injection system will greatly affect the quality of beam. This article first gives a physics design of the injecting system. Then the injecting system is tracked under different errors. The responses of storage beam and injecting beam are given in the article.

  17. Status Of The Synchrotron Light Source DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Friedl, J.; Hartmann, P.; Schirmer, D.; Schmidt, G.; Sternemann, C.; Tolan, M.; Weis, T.; Westphal, C.; Wille, K.

    2004-05-12

    The Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA, located at the University of Dortmund, changed its scope during the last years into a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source. DELTA is now operated for 3000 h per year including 2000 h dedicated beam time for synchrotron radiation use and 1000 h for machine physics, optimization and maintenance. The status of the accelerator complex is presented together with the beam operation, the installation and commissioning of beamlines and insertion devices. To serve user demands of photon energies up to more than 10 keV a 5.3 T superconducting asymmetric multipole wiggler (SAW) with a critical energy of 7.9 keV has been installed serving three beamlines in the hard X-ray regime with also circular polarization. Two undulator beamlines for photon energies between 5 and 400 eV (U250) and between 55 and 1500 eV (U55) and several dipole beamlines up to 200 eV are under operation. The construction and operation of the different beamlines is done by various universities and laboratories in Nordrhein-Westfalen.

  18. Wigglers at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Humphries, D.

    1995-04-01

    Two 3.4 m long wigglers are being designed and constructed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL) Advanced Light Source (ALS). A 19 period planar wiggler with 16.0 cm period length is designed to provide photons up to 12.4 keV for protein crystallography. This device features a hybrid permanent magnet structure with tapered poles and designed to achieve 2.0 T at a 1.4 cm magnetic gap. An elliptical wiggler is being designed to provide circularly polarized photons in the energy range of 50 eV to 10 keV for magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. This device features vertical and horizontal magnetic structures of 14 and 14 {1/2} periods respectively of 20 cm period length. The vertical magnetic structure is a 2.0 T hybrid permanent magnet configuration. The horizontal structure is an iron core electromagnetic design, shifted longitudinally {1/4} period with respect to the vertical magnetic structure. A maximum horizontal peak field of 0.1 T at an oscillating frequency up to 1 Hz will be achieved by excitation of the horizontal poles with a trapezoidal current waveform.

  19. First undulators for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Akre, J.; Chin, J.

    1993-05-01

    The first three undulators, each 4.6 m in length, for the Advanced Light source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), are near completion and are undergoing qualification tests before installation into the storage ring. Two devices have 5.0-cm period lengths, 89 periods, and achieve an effective field of 0.85 T at the 14 mm minimum magnetic gap. The other device has a period length of 8.0 cm, 55 periods, and an effective field of 1.2 T at the minimum 14 mm gap. Measurements on the first 5 cm period device show the uncorrelated field errors to be 0.23%, which is less than the required 0.25%. Measurements of gap control show reproducibility of {plus_minus}5 microns or better. The first vacuum chamber, 5.0 m long, is flat to within 0.53 mm over the 4.6 m magnetic structure section and a 4 x 10{sup -11} Torr pressure was achieved during vacuum tests. Device description, fabrication, and measurements are presented.

  20. Linac Coherent Light Source - Status and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2005-11-09

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Project will be an x-ray free-electron laser. It is intended to produce pulses of 800-8,000 eV photons. Each pulse, produced with a repetition frequency of up to 120 Hz, will provide >10{sup 12} photons within a duration of less than 200 femtoseconds. The project employs the last kilometer of the SLAC linac to provide a low-emittance electron beam in the energy range 4-14 GeV to a single undulator. Two experiment halls, located 100m and 350m from the undulator exit, will house six experiment stations for research in atomic/molecular physics, pump-probe dynamics of materials and chemical processes, x-ray imaging of clusters and complex molecules, and plasma physics. Engineering design activities began in 2003, and the project is to be completed in March 2009. The project design permits straightforward expansion of the LCLS to multiple undulators.

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  2. Filter selection based on light source for multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Xu, Haisong

    2016-07-01

    In multispectral imaging, it is necessary to select a reduced number of filters to balance the imaging efficiency and spectral reflectance recovery accuracy. Due to the combined effect of filters and light source on reflectance recovery, the optimal filters are influenced by the employed light source in the multispectral imaging system. By casting the filter selection as an optimization issue, the selection of optimal filters corresponding to the employed light source proceeds with respect to a set of target samples utilizing one kind of genetic algorithms, regardless of the detailed spectral characteristics of the light source, filters, and sensor. Under three light sources with distinct spectral power distributions, the proposed filter selection method was evaluated on a filter-wheel based multispectral device with a set of interference filters. It was verified that the filters derived by the proposed method achieve better spectral and colorimetric accuracy of reflectance recovery than the conventional one under different light sources.

  3. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light.

  4. Inorganic volumetric light source excited by ultraviolet light

    DOEpatents

    Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.

    1994-04-26

    The invention relates to a composition for the volumetric generation of radiation. The composition comprises a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting radiation upon interaction with an exciting radiation. Preferably, the composition is an aerogel substrate loaded with a component, e.g., a phosphor, capable of interacting with exciting radiation of a first energy, e.g., ultraviolet light, to produce radiation of a second energy, e.g., visible light. 4 figures.

  5. Monolithic LED arrays, next generation smart lighting sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrange, Alexandre; Bono, Hubert; Templier, François

    2016-03-01

    LED have become the main light sources of the future as they open the path for intelligent use of light in time, intensity and color. In many usages, strong energy economy is done by adjusting these properties. The smart lighting has three dimensions, energy efficiency brought by GaN blue emitting LEDs, integration of electronics, sensors, microprocessors in the lighting system and development of new functionalities and services provided by the light. Monolithic LED arrays allow two major innovations, the spatial control of light emission and the adjustment of the electrical properties of the source.

  6. Light absorption by biomass burning source emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan; Engling, Guenter; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W. Patrick; Chen, L.-W. Antony; Wold, Cyle E.; Hao, Wei Min; He, Ke-bin

    2016-02-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has relatively short atmospheric lifetimes yet plays a unique and important role in the Earth's climate system, making it an important short-term climate mitigation target. Globally, biomass burning is the largest source of BC emissions into the atmosphere. This study investigated the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of biomass burning BC generated by controlled combustion of various wildland fuels during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). MAE values derived from a photoacoustic spectrometer (∼7.8 m2/g at a wavelength of 532 nm) were in good agreement with those suggested for uncoated BC when the emission ratios of organic carbon (OC) to elemental carbon (EC) were extremely low (i.e., below 0.3). With the increase of OC/EC, two distinct types of biomass smoke were identified. For the first type, MAE exhibited a positive dependence on OC/EC, while the overestimation of the light absorption coefficient (babs) by a filter-based method was less significant and could be estimated by a nearly constant correction factor. For the second type, MAE was biased low and correlated negatively with OC/EC, while the overestimation of babs by the filter-based method was much more significant and showed an apparent OC/EC dependence. This study suggests that BC emission factors determined by the commonly used thermal-optical methods might be sustantially overestimated for some types of biomass burning emissions. Our results also indicate that biomass burning emissions may include some liquid-like organics that can significantly bias filter-based babs measurements.

  7. Achromatic lattice comparison for light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Crosbie, E.A.; Cho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The next generation of synchrotron light sources are being designed to support a large number of undulators and require long dispersion-free insertion regions. With less demand for radiation from the dipole magnets, the storage ring cost per undulator beam can be reduced by decreasing the number of dipole magnets and increasing the number of dispersion free straight sections. The two simplest achromatic lattices are the Chasman-Green or double-bend achromatic (DBA) and the three-bend achromat (TBA). The DBA in its simplest form consists of a single horizontally-focussing quadrupole between the two dipole magnets. Since this quadrupole strength is fixed by the achromatic condition, the natural emittance (/var epsilon//sub n/) may vary as the beta functions in the insertion region (IR) are varied. The expanded Chasman-Green (also DBA) uses multiple quadrupoles in the dispersive section to provide emittance control independent of the beta functions in the IR. Although this provides flexibility in the ID beta functions, the horizontal phase advance is constrained to /phi/ /approx equal/ 180/degree/ between approximately the centers of the dipole magnets. If small /var epsilon//sub n/ is required, the horizontal phase advance between the dipoles will be near one and the lattice properties will be dominated by this systematic resonance. The TBA lattice places a third dipole between the DBA dipoles, eliminating the 180/degree/ horizontal phase advance constraint. However, the requirement of small /var epsilon//sub n/ limits the range of tune, since /mu//sub x/ /approx equal/ 1.29 in the dipoles alone for /var epsilon//sub n/ near its minimum value. The minimum emittance is five times smaller for the TBA than for the DBA with the same number of periods and, therefore, its phase advance can be relaxed more than the DBA for the same natural emittance. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Common operation metrics for storage ring light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdeke, A.; Bieler, M.; Farias, R. H. A.; Krecic, S.; Müller, R.; Pont, M.; Takao, M.

    2016-08-01

    Storage ring light sources aim for high operational reliability. Very often beam availability is used as an operation metric to measure the reliability. A survey of several light sources reveals that the calculation of availability varies significantly between facilities. This complicates useful comparisons of reliability. Furthermore the beam availability does not provide insight regarding reliability of beam characteristics such as orbit and beam size stability. The authors propose specific metrics to evaluate the reliability of storage ring light sources; these metrics allow a detailed and meaningful comparison across facilities. Such comparisons are useful to further optimize the reliability of storage ring light source facilities.

  9. Barium light source method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, John J. (Inventor); MacDonagh-Dumler, Jeffrey (Inventor); Anderson, Heidi M. (Inventor); Lawler, James E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Visible light emission is obtained from a plasma containing elemental barium including neutral barium atoms and barium ion species. Neutral barium provides a strong green light emission in the center of the visible spectrum with a highly efficient conversion of electrical energy into visible light. By the selective excitation of barium ionic species, emission of visible light at longer and shorter wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously with the green emission from neutral barium, effectively providing light that is visually perceived as white. A discharge vessel contains the elemental barium and a buffer gas fill therein, and a discharge inducer is utilized to induce a desired discharge temperature and barium vapor pressure therein to produce from the barium vapor a visible light emission. The discharge can be induced utilizing a glow discharge between electrodes in the discharge vessel as well as by inductively or capacitively coupling RF energy into the plasma within the discharge vessel.

  10. Phosphor-Free Solid State Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nause, Jeff E; Ferguson, Ian; Doolittle, Alan

    2007-02-28

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a light emitting diode that emitted white light without the aid of a phosphor. The device was based on the combination of a nitride LED and a fluorescing ZnO substrate. The early portion of the work focused on the growth of ZnO in undoped and doped form. The doped ZnO was successfully engineered to emit light at specific wavelengths by incorporating various dopants into the crystalline lattice. Thereafter, the focus of the work shifted to the epitaxial growth of nitride structures on ZnO. Initially, the epitaxy was accomplished with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Later in the program, metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) was successfully used to grow nitrides on ZnO. By combining the characteristics of the doped ZnO substrate with epitaxially grown nitride LED structures, a phosphor-free white light emitting diode was successfully demonstrated and characterized.

  11. Perception of light source distance from shading patterns.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Heiko H; Baier, Franziska; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    Varying the distance of a light source from an object alters both the intensity and spatial distribution of surface shading patterns. We tested whether observers can use such cues to infer light source distance. Participants viewed stereoscopic renderings of rough objects with diffuse and glossy surfaces, which were illuminated by a point source at a range of distances. In one task, they adjusted the position of a small probe dot in three dimensions to report the apparent location of the light in the scene. In a second task, they adjusted the shading on one object (by moving an invisible light source) until it appeared to be illuminated from the same distance as another object. Participants' responses increased linearly with the true light source distance, suggesting that they have clear intuitions about how light source distance affects shading patterns for a variety of different surfaces. However, there were also systematic errors: Subjects overestimated light source distance in the probe adjustment task, and in both experiments, roughness and glossiness affected responses. We find the pattern of results is predicted surprisingly well by a simplistic model based only on the area of the image that exceeds a certain intensity threshold. Thus, although subjects can report light source distance, they may rely on simple--sometimes erroneous--heuristics to do so. PMID:26868887

  12. 21 CFR 352.71 - Light source (solar simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Light source (solar simulator). 352.71 Section 352... Light source (solar simulator). A solar simulator used for determining the SPF of a sunscreen drug... total energy output contributed by nonsolar wavelengths shorter than 290 nanometers; and it has not...

  13. 21 CFR 352.71 - Light source (solar simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Light source (solar simulator). 352.71 Section 352... Light source (solar simulator). A solar simulator used for determining the SPF of a sunscreen drug... total energy output contributed by nonsolar wavelengths shorter than 290 nanometers; and it has not...

  14. 21 CFR 352.71 - Light source (solar simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Light source (solar simulator). 352.71 Section 352... Light source (solar simulator). A solar simulator used for determining the SPF of a sunscreen drug... total energy output contributed by nonsolar wavelengths shorter than 290 nanometers; and it has not...

  15. 21 CFR 352.71 - Light source (solar simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Light source (solar simulator). 352.71 Section 352... Light source (solar simulator). A solar simulator used for determining the SPF of a sunscreen drug... total energy output contributed by nonsolar wavelengths shorter than 290 nanometers; and it has not...

  16. 21 CFR 352.71 - Light source (solar simulator).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Light source (solar simulator). 352.71 Section 352... Light source (solar simulator). A solar simulator used for determining the SPF of a sunscreen drug... total energy output contributed by nonsolar wavelengths shorter than 290 nanometers; and it has not...

  17. Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, powerful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia.

  18. New results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source is the world's first low-energy third-generation synchrotron radiation source. It has been running reliably and exceeding design specifications since it began operation in October 1993. It is available to a wide community of researchers in many scientific fields, including atomic and molecular science and chemistry. Here, new results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source demonstrate the opportunities available in atomic and molecular physics at this synchrotron light source. The unprecedented brightness allows experiments with high flux, high spectral resolution, and nearly 100% linear polarization.

  19. Utraviolet Light Source in an Old Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope's exquisite resolution has allowed astronomers to resolve, for the first time, hot blue stars deep inside an elliptical galaxy. The swarm of nearly 8,000 blue stars resembles a blizzard of snowflakes near the core (lower right) of the neighboring galaxy M32, located 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. Hubble confirms that the ultraviolet light comes from a population of extremely hot helium-burning stars at a late stage in their lives. Unlike the Sun, which burns hydrogen into helium, these old stars exhausted their central hydrogen long ago, and now burn helium into heavier elements. The observations, taken in October 1998, were made with the camera mode of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in ultraviolet light. The STIS field of view is only a small portion of the entire galaxy, which is 20 times wider on the sky. For reference, the full moon is 70 times wider than the STIS field-of-view. Thirty years ago, the first ultraviolet observations of elliptical galaxies showed that they were surprisingly bright when viewed in ultraviolet light. Before those pioneering UV observations, old groups of stars were assumed to be relatively cool and thus extremely faint in the ultraviolet. Over the years since the initial discovery of this unexpected ultraviolet light, indirect evidence has accumulated that it originates in a population of old, but hot, helium-burning stars. Now Hubble provides the first direct visual evidence.

  20. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  1. Advanced capabilities for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1997-11-01

    Methods to extend the capabilities beyond those available from the current generation synchrotron radiation sources based on undulators in electron storage rings are discussed. Taking advantage of the radiation-particle interaction and/or the availability of high power, ultrashort, optical lasers, it is possible to develop sources with higher brightness, smaller temporal resolution, or higher photon energy.

  2. Femtosecond Light Source for Phase-Controlled Multiphoton Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A. V.; Walker, D. R.; Yavuz, D. D.; Yin, G. Y.; Harris, S. E.

    2001-07-16

    We describe a femtosecond Raman light source with more than an octave of optical bandwidth. We use this source to demonstrate phase control of multiphoton ionization under conditions where ionization requires eleven photons of the lowest frequency of the spectrum or five photons of the highest frequency. The nonlinearity of the photoionization process allows us to characterize the light source. Experiment-to-theory comparison implies generation of a near single-cycle waveform.

  3. Rapidly pulsed, high intensity, incoherent light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A rapid pulsing, high intensity, incoherent light is produced by selectively energizing a plurality of discharge lamps with a triggering circuit. Each lamp is connected to a capacitor, and a power supply is electrically connected to all but one of the capacitors. This last named capacitor is electrically connected to a discharge lamp which is connected to the triggering circuit.

  4. Cathodoluminescent Source of Intense White Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    The device described exploits cathodoluminescence to generate intense light in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. In this device, the material to be excited to luminescence is a layer of quartz or alumina powder on an electrically conductive plate exposed to a low-pressure plasma discharge. The plate is electrically biased positively to collect electron current.

  5. Laser produced plasma light source for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Ershov, Alex I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel; Sandstrom, Richard L.; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Hou, Richard R.; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshihiko; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Brandt, David C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the development of laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) source architecture for advanced lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for sub-22 nm critical layer patterning. In this paper we discuss the most recent results from high qualification testing of sources in production. Subsystem performance will be shown including collector protection, out-of-band (OOB) radiation measurements, and intermediate-focus (IF) protection as well as experience in system use. This presentation reviews the experimental results obtained on systems with a focus on the topics most critical for an HVM source.

  6. A New Storage-Ring Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alex

    2015-07-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  7. A New Storage-Ring Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Alex

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  8. A new storage-ring light source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  9. An experiment on the color rendering of different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Simonetta; Bonanomi, Cristian; Rizzi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    The color rendering index (CRI) of a light source attempts to measure how much the color appearance of objects is preserved when they are illuminated by the given light source. This problem is of great importance for various industrial and scientific fields, such as lighting architecture, design, ergonomics, etc. Usually a light source is specified through the Correlated Color Temperature or CCT. However two (or more) light sources with the same CCT but different spectral power distribution can exist. Therefore color samples viewed under two light sources with equal CCTs can appear different. Hence, the need for a method to assess the quality of a given illuminant in relation to color. Recently CRI has had a renewed interest because of the new LED-based lighting systems. They usually have a color rendering index rather low, but good preservation of color appearance and a pleasant visual appearance (visual appeal). Various attempts to develop a new color rendering index have been done so far, but still research is working for a better one. This article describes an experiment performed by human observers concerning the appearance preservation of color under some light sources, comparing it with a range of available color rendering indices.

  10. Thermal effects of cold light sources used in otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Fadlullah; Dogan, Remzi; Ozturan, Orhan; Eren, Sabri Baki; Veyseller, Bayram; Gedik, Ozge

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the thermal effects of cold light sources and endoscopes on the inner ear. 25 male guinea pigs were assigned equally to five groups (1: Halogen-1 min, 2: Halogen-5 min, 3: Xenon-1 min, 4: Xenon-5 min, 5: Controls). After both bullae of the guinea pigs were opened, light sources and endoscopes were positioned in the middle ears of the first four groups for specific time periods. DPOAE and ABR tests were conducted on all animals at the beginning of the study, at the end of surgery, and 2 h after surgery. The temperatures of cold light sources were measured by a thermocouple thermometer, and the surface temperatures of the endoscopes were measured by an infrared thermometer. DPOAE and ABR measurements performed right after and 2 h after surgery in group 1, 2, 3, and 5 did not reveal any significant difference. In group 4, DPOAE values were significantly lower and ABR threshold values were significantly higher than those in the other groups, right after and 2 h after surgery. Thermocouple thermometer readings showed that, after the first minute, the Xenon light source generated significantly more temperature rise than the Halogen light source. The surface temperatures of all endoscopes returned to normal approximately 1 min after light sources were turned off. Our study demonstrated that when an endoscope using a Xenon light source was applied to the middle ear for a specific time periods, inner ear functions deteriorated, as reflected by audiologic tests. PMID:25118982

  11. A numerical experiment on light pollution from distant sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, M.

    2011-08-01

    To predict the light pollution of the night-time sky realistically over any location or measuring point on the ground presents quite a difficult calculation task. Light pollution of the local atmosphere is caused by stray light, light loss or reflection of artificially illuminated ground objects or surfaces such as streets, advertisement boards or building interiors. Thus it depends on the size, shape, spatial distribution, radiative pattern and spectral characteristics of many neighbouring light sources. The actual state of the atmospheric environment and the orography of the surrounding terrain are also relevant. All of these factors together influence the spectral sky radiance/luminance in a complex manner. Knowledge of the directional behaviour of light pollution is especially important for the correct interpretation of astronomical observations. From a mathematical point of view, the light noise or veil luminance of a specific sky element is given by a superposition of scattered light beams. Theoretical models that simulate light pollution typically take into account all ground-based light sources, thus imposing great requirements on CPU and MEM. As shown in this paper, a contribution of distant sources to the light pollution might be essential under specific conditions of low turbidity and/or Garstang-like radiative patterns. To evaluate the convergence of the theoretical model, numerical experiments are made for different light sources, spectral bands and atmospheric conditions. It is shown that in the worst case the integration limit is approximately 100 km, but it can be significantly shortened for light sources with cosine-like radiative patterns.

  12. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2004

    SciTech Connect

    MILLER,L.

    2005-05-01

    for the environmental science community, is also very important, as it will help to satisfy the large over subscription rate for this technique at the NSLS. Two other important upgrades that were initiated this past year are the replacement of the X25 wiggler with an undulator and the construction of the X9 undulator beamline for small-angle scattering, with an emphasis on nanoscience research. Another key activity that will benefit all users was the restoration of the x-ray ring lattice symmetry, which reduced the horizontal emittance and made the operational lattice more robust. Similarly, all users will benefit from the introduction of the PASS (Proposal Allocation Safety Scheduling) system this past year, which has greatly improved the process of proposal submission, review, allocation, and scheduling. This coming year we will work to add Rapid Access to the capabilities of PASS. Overall, the success of these and the many other projects that space does not permit listing is a testament to the dedication, hard work, and skill of the NSLS staff. Safety has always been an important issue at a large, complex scientific facility like the NSLS and in 2004 it received renewed attention. Safety is our highest priority and we spent a great deal of time reviewing and refining our safety practices and procedures. A new 'Safety Highlights' web page was created for safety news, and a large number of safety meetings and discussions were held. These reviews and meetings generated many ideas on how the NSLS might improve its safety practices, and we are committed to putting these in place and improving our already very good safety program. We had no lost-time accidents in 2004, which is a notable accomplishment. Our goal is to be best in class and I'm confident that by working together we can achieve that status. Several activities took place this past year to advance our proposal to replace the NSLS with a new National Synchrotron Light Source-II facility. These included a major

  13. Measurement of the speed of light from extraterrestrial sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingshown; Huang, Yen-Ru; Tsao, Hen-Wai; Lee, San-Liang; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Tsay, Ho-Lin; Young, Hong-Tsu

    2015-09-01

    The conventional measurements of the speed of light were performed before the early twentieth century. Only few used extraterrestrial sources and got the result with large uncertainty. We design a transmitter to modulate the rays from the local infrared light source and the extraterrestrial sources simultaneously into pulses. Both are received by a distant receiver. We have the white light travelling exactly along the path of the starlight pulses for calibration. It is found that the travel times of Aldebaran and Capella pulses are longer than that of Vega pulses. The results indicate that the speeds of starlights are different.

  14. An improved light source for laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Richardson, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The development of a new laser material, Cr-doped LiSAF, makes possible the development of a laser source for satellite ranging systems that is more superior in performance capabilities than current Nd:YAG-based laser sources. This new material offers the potential of shorter pulses and more preferable wavelengths (850 and 425 nm) than multiwavelength Nd:YAG systems, leading to superior ranging resolution and greater detection sensitivity. We are embarking on a feasibility study of a two-wavelength, mode-locked laser system based on Cr:LiSAF, providing shorter pulses for improved ranging resolution.

  15. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  16. Effect of light sources and light intensity on growth performance and behaviour of female turkeys.

    PubMed

    Denbow, D M; Leighton, A T; Hulet, R M

    1990-09-01

    1. The effect of different light sources (incandescent, sodium vapour, daylight fluorescent and warm fluorescent) and light intensities (10.8 and 86.1 lux) on growth performance and behaviour of female turkeys was investigated in two experiments conducted at different times of the year. 2. Although light source influenced body weight and efficiency of food utilisation, there was no consistent effect between experiments in favour of any particular source. 3. Light intensity had no effect on body weight, efficiency of food utilisation or behaviour. PMID:2245342

  17. Open-source products for a lighting experiment device.

    PubMed

    Gildea, Kevin M; Milburn, Nelda

    2014-12-01

    The capabilities of open-source software and microcontrollers were used to construct a device for controlled lighting experiments. The device was designed to ascertain whether individuals with certain color vision deficiencies were able to discriminate between the red and white lights in fielded systems on the basis of luminous intensity. The device provided the ability to control the timing and duration of light-emitting diode (LED) and incandescent light stimulus presentations, to present the experimental sequence and verbal instructions automatically, to adjust LED and incandescent luminous intensity, and to display LED and incandescent lights with various spectral emissions. The lighting device could easily be adapted for experiments involving flashing or timed presentations of colored lights, or the components could be expanded to study areas such as threshold light perception and visual alerting systems. PMID:24281687

  18. Interference of light from independent sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, David T.

    2006-12-15

    We extend and generalize previous work on the interference of light from independent cavities that began with the suggestion of Pfleegor and Mandel [Phys. Rev. 159, 1084 (1967)] that their observed interference of laser beams should not be associated too closely with particular states of the beams but more with the detection process itself. In particular we examine how the detection of interference induces a nonrandom-phase difference between internal cavity states with initial random phases for a much broader range of such states than has previously been considered. We find that a subsequent interference measurement should give results consistent with the induced phase difference. The inclusion of more cavities in the interference measurements enables the construction in principle of a laboratory in the sense used by Aharonov and Susskind, made up of cavity fields that can serve as frames of phase reference. We also show reasonably simply how intrinsic phase coherence of a beam of light leaking from a single cavity arises for any internal cavity state, even a photon number state. Although the work presented here may have some implications for the current controversy over whether or not a typical laboratory laser produces a coherent state, it is not the purpose of this paper to enter this controversy; rather it is to examine the interesting quantum physics that arises for cavities with more general internal states.

  19. Lighting system combining daylight concentrators and an artificial source

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, Jonathan G.; Friedman, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    A combined lighting system for a building interior includes a stack of luminescent solar concentrators (LSC), an optical conduit made of preferably optical fibers for transmitting daylight from the LSC stack, a collimating lens set at an angle, a fixture for receiving the daylight at one end and for distributing the daylight as illumination inside the building, an artificial light source at the other end of the fixture for directing artifical light into the fixture for distribution as illumination inside the building, an automatic dimmer/brightener for the artificial light source, and a daylight sensor positioned near to the LSC stack for controlling the automatic dimmer/brightener in response to the daylight sensed. The system also has a reflector positioned behind the artificial light source and a fan for exhausting heated air out of the fixture during summer and for forcing heated air into the fixture for passage into the building interior during winter.

  20. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Quigley, Gerard P.

    1996-01-01

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm.sup.2 emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm.sup.2 at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing.

  1. Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet light source

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.; Quigley, G.P.

    1996-12-17

    Large area, surface discharge pumped, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is disclosed. A contamination-free VUV light source having a 225 cm{sup 2} emission area in the 240-340 nm region of the electromagnetic spectrum with an average output power in this band of about 2 J/cm{sup 2} at a wall-plug efficiency of approximately 5% is described. Only ceramics and metal parts are employed in this surface discharge source. Because of the contamination-free, high photon energy and flux, and short pulse characteristics of the source, it is suitable for semiconductor and flat panel display material processing. 3 figs.

  2. Status report on the Advanced Light Source control system

    SciTech Connect

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.; Young, J.

    1991-11-11

    This paper is a status report on the ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE (ALS) control system. The current status, performance data, and future plans will be discussed. Manpower, scheduling, and costs issues are addressed.

  3. Interferometer combines laser light source and digital counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Measurement of small linear displacements in digital readouts with extreme accuracy and sensitivity is achieved by an interferometer. The instrument combines a digital electro-optical fringe-counting system and a laser light source.

  4. Light source for narrow and broadband coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Maximilian; Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    We present a light source that is well adapted to both narrow- and broadband coherent Raman scattering (CRS) methods. Based on a single oscillator, the light source delivers synchronized broadband pulses via supercontinuum generation and narrowband, frequency-tunable pulses via four-wave mixing in a photonic crystal fiber. Seeding the four-wave mixing with a spectrally filtered part of the supercontinuum yields high-pulse energies up to 8 nJ and the possibility of scanning a bandwidth of 2000  cm(-1) in 25 ms. All pulses are emitted with a repetition frequency of 1 MHz, which ensures efficient generation of CRS signals while avoiding significant damage of the samples. Consequently, the light source combines the performance of individual narrow- and broadband CRS light sources in one setup, thus enabling hyperspectral imaging and rapid single-resonance imaging in parallel. PMID:26625022

  5. Diffusion filter eliminates fringe effects of coherent laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsasky, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion filter comprised of small particles in colloidal suspension reduces the coherence of a laser beam used as a photographic light source. Interference patterns which obscure details in photographic film are eliminated, the intensity and collimation are moderately affected.

  6. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dierker,S.; Bergmann, U.; Corlett, J.; Dierker, S.; Falcone, R.; Galayda, J.; Gibson, M.; Hastings, J.; Hettel, B.; Hill, J.; Hussain, Z.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirx, J.; Long, G.; McCurdy, B.; Raubenheimer, T.; Sannibale, F.; Seeman, J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, g.; Schoenlein, B.; Shen, Q.; Stephenson, B.; Stohr, J.; Zholents, A.

    2008-12-01

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  7. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, Janos; Long, Danielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z. -X.; Schenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; Stephenson, Brian; Stohr, Joachim; Zholents, Alexander

    2009-01-28

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of

  8. Development and evaluation of a light-emitting diode endoscopic light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Li, Rui; Rogers, Kevin; Driscoll, Paul; Excel, Peter; Yandle, Ron; Hanna, George; Copner, Nigel; Elson, Daniel S.

    2012-03-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) based endoscopic illumination devices have been shown to have several benefits over arclamp systems. LEDs are energy-efficient, small, durable, and inexpensive, however their use in endoscopy has been limited by the difficulty in efficiently coupling enough light into the endoscopic light cable. We have demonstrated a highly homogenised lightpipe LED light source that combines the light from four Luminus LEDs emitting in the red, green, blue and violet using innovative dichroics that maximise light throughput. The light source spectrally combines light from highly divergent incoherent sources that have a Lambertian intensity profile to provide illumination matched to the acceptance numerical aperture of a liquid light guide or fibre bundle. The LED light source was coupled to a standard laparoscope and performance parameters (power, luminance, colour temperature) compared to a xenon lamp. Although the total illuminance from the endoscope was lower, adjustment of the LEDs' relative intensities enabled contrast enhancement in biological tissue imaging. The LED light engine was also evaluated in a minimally invasive surgery (MIS) box trainer and in vivo during a porcine MIS procedure where it was used to generate 'narrowband' images. Future work using the violet LED could enable photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  9. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema

    Falcone, Roger

    2010-01-08

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  10. Survey, alignment, and beam stability at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes survey and alignment at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerators from 1993 to 1997. The ALS is a third generation light source requiring magnet alignment to within 150 microns. To accomplish this, a network of monuments was established and maintained. Monthly elevation surveys show the movement of the floor over time. Inclinometers have recently been employed to give real time information about magnet, vacuum tank and magnet girder motion in the ALS storage ring.

  11. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-18

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  12. Hyperspectral microscopy to identify foodborne bacteria with optimum lighting source

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral microscopy is an emerging technology for rapid detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Since scattering spectral signatures from hyperspectral microscopic images (HMI) vary with lighting sources, it is important to select optimal lights. The objective of this study is to compare t...

  13. Advanced light source, User`s Handbook, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a national facility for scientific research and development located at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) of the University of California. Its purpose is to generate beams of very bright light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The facility is open to researchers from industry, universities, and government laboratories.

  14. Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Falkenstein, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

  15. Solid state light source for wavelength multiplex 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junejei

    2012-10-01

    A solid state light source provided for wavelength multiplex 3D Display is proposed. The system of solid state light source includes blue laser arrays of two wavelengths, a 2-ring phosphor wheel, a multi-band filter and a TIR prism. Green and red phosphors excited by blue lasers provide the original green and red lights of wide bandwidth. By passing through or reflected by a multi-band filter, two groups of green and red lights of narrow bandwidth for left or right eyes are selected. Blue lasers of two wavelengths also provide two blue lights for left and right eyes. Instead of using a second rotated narrow band filters that synchronized with the first phosphor wheel, a wheel having two rings coated with mirrors and phosphors is used to replace the synchronization existing in the conventional two wheels method. After passing the 2-ring wheel, the light source switches between two light paths that lead to be reflected or transmitting through the multiband filter. The multi-band filter can be disposed in a telecentric optical path to secure a high efficiency for the filter. A compact spectral multiplex light source is realized and can be directly attached to any existing optical engine.

  16. An active lighting module with natural light guiding system and solid state source for indoor illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-An; Chen, Yi-Yung; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei

    2009-08-01

    Recently, many researches focus on healthy lighting with sunlight. A Natural Light Guiding System includes collecting, transmitting, and lighting parts. In general, the lighting module of the Natural Light Guiding System only uses scattering element, such as diffuser, to achieve uniform illumination. With the passive lighting module, the application of the Natural Light Guiding System is limited because sunlight is dynamic source. When the sunlight is weak at morning, at evening, or on cloudy day, the illumination system is fail. In this paper, we provide an active lighting module that includes the lighting part of Natural Light Guiding System, LED auxiliary sources, optical elements, and optical detector. We use optical simulation tool to design and simulate the efficiency of the active module. The optical element can redistribute the sunlight only, LED light only, or sunlight with LED light to achieve uniform illumination. With the feedback of the detector, the active lighting module will adjust the intensity of LED to provide a steady illumination. Moreover, the module could replace the backlight module of LCD TV when the house has Natural Light Guiding System for saving energy and higher performance of image.

  17. A compact Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya-Jun; Yang, Wen-Hai; Zheng, Yao-Hui; Peng, Kun-Chi

    2015-07-01

    We present a stable entangled light source that integrates the pump laser, entanglement generator, detectors, and electronic control systems. By optimizing the design of the mechanical elements and the optical path, the size of the source is minimized, and the quantum correlations over 6 dB can be directly provided by the entangled source. The compact and stable entangled light source is suitable for practical applications in quantum information science and technology. The presented protocol provides a useful reference for manufacturing products of bright entangled light sources. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61227015) and the Program for the Outstanding Innovative Teams of Higher Learning Institutions of Shanxi, China.

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  19. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  20. A multi-source portable light emitting diode spectrofluorometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A portable luminescence spectrofluorometer weighing only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed and evaluated. Excitation using a sequence of seven individual broad-band LED emission sources enabled the generation of excitation-emission spectra usi...

  1. Low coherence interferometry modelling using combined broadband Gaussian light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansz, Paul; Wild, Graham; Richardson, Steven; Hinckley, Steven

    2012-02-01

    Using a Low Coherence Interferometry (LCI) model, a comparison of broadband single-Gaussian and multi-Gaussian light sources has been undertaken. For single-Gaussian sources, the axial resolution improved with source bandwidth, confirming the coherence length relation that resolution for single Gaussian sources improves with increasing spectral bandwidth. However, narrow bandwidth light sources resulted in interferograms with overlapping strata peaks and the loss of individual strata information. For multiple-Gaussian sources with the same bandwidth, spectral side lobes increased, reducing A-scan reliability to show accurate layer information without eliminating the side lobes. The simulations show the conditions needed for resolution of strata information for broadband light sources using both single and multiple Gaussian models. The potential to use the model to study LCI and OCT light sources, optical delays and sample structures can better characterise these LCI and OCT elements. Forecasting misinformation in the interferogram, may allow preliminary corrections. With improvements to the LCI-OCT model, more applications are envisaged.

  2. Demonstration of the light source color on a photograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Rumi; Ikeda, Mitsuo; Shinoda, Hiroyuki

    2002-06-01

    We don't normally perceive the light source color in a night scene photograph even at the spot of a shining lamp, although of course we do perceive the color if we are in the corresponding real world. This different experience can be nicely explained by the concept of the recognized visual space of illumination, RVSI. We see the light source color for a shining lamp in a real world because its luminance is too high to be included within the RVSI constructed for the world. On the contrary, the luminance of the shining lamp in the photograph never goes beyond that of N10 in Munsell Value and it is easily included within the RVSI constructed for the space where the photograph is observed. The spot should appear a mere white, not a light source color. We proposed in the present paper a new method to perceive the light source color in a printed photograph. A subject used a dimension-up goggle to input only the photograph into his/her monocular eye so that he/she can perceive a 3D scene in it. The RVSI of a small brightness size was made for the scene by employing a night scene photograph and a spot in the scene was perceived as the light source color when the area had lightness 8.1 or larger in Munsell Value.

  3. LED light sources for head-up displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninger, Mario

    2005-02-01

    The concept of Head-Up Displays is simple: move the important information a driver needs to see up into their line of sight, so they don"t have to take their eyes off the road. A projected image appears to be floating freely over the hood, at a distance of approximately two meters. Mirrors direct light from an image-generating LCD to the windshield where it is superimposed with the driver"s field of view. The LCD is lit with an appropriate light source. Requirements like long lifetime, vibration resistance, thermal stability and high luminance make LED light sources ideal for use in the automotive industry. The paper discusses the principles of the optical system design of an LED light source for Head-Up Displays.

  4. Thomson scattering calibration with ultrabright supercontinuum light source

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R.; Alfier, A.

    2006-10-15

    The recently developed supercontinuum light source (SLS) finds a useful application in the calibration of a Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. When filter polychromators are used, the relative responsivity of the spectral channels is generally measured with a cw halogen light source from the dc output of the detectors, while the TS signal is measured from an ac output. In a TS system with optical delay lines, like in RFX-mod, a cw light source cannot discriminate differences between the relative responsivities of the positions that share the same polychromator but are connected to different delay lines: this can be achieved with a pulsed white light source instead. In addition a pulsed source with a time response similar to the TS signals would avoid any frequency response problem, because the same ac output of the detectors used for the TS signals could also be used for the calibration. An SLS produces a 5 ns Gaussian pulse, with a wide and smooth spectrum that covers the range of 550-1600 nm. The SLS provides a light source sufficiently bright to calibrate simultaneously all spectrometers. The experimental setup used for the calibration and obtained results are presented.

  5. Status of the MAX IV Light Source Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen, Erik; Eriksson, Mikael; Berglund, Magnus; Malmgren, Lars; Lindgren, Lars-Johan; Tarawneh, Hamed; Brandin, Mathias; Werin, Sverker; Thorin, Sara; Sjoestroem, Magnus; Svensson, Haakan; Kumbaro, Dionis; Hansen, Tue

    2007-01-19

    The MAX IV light source project is presented. The MAX IV light source will consist of three low emittance storage rings and a 3 GeV injector linac. The three storage rings will be operated at 700 MeV, 1.5 GeV, and 3.0 GeV, which make it possible to cover a large spectral range from IR to hard X-rays with high brilliance undulator radiation from insertion devices optimised for each storage ring. The preparation of the injector linac to serve as a short pulse source and the major sub-systems of the facility are also presented.

  6. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  7. LED-based endoscopic light source for spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Craig M.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is the United States 3rd leading cancer in death rates.1 The current screening for colorectal cancer is an endoscopic procedure using white light endoscopy (WLE). There are multiple new methods testing to replace WLE, for example narrow band imaging and autofluorescence imaging.2 However, these methods do not meet the need for a higher specificity or sensitivity. The goal for this project is to modify the presently used endoscope light source to house 16 narrow wavelength LEDs for spectral imaging in real time while increasing sensitivity and specificity. The process to do such was to take an Olympus CLK-4 light source, replace the light and electronics with 16 LEDs and new circuitry. This allows control of the power and intensity of the LEDs. This required a larger enclosure to house a bracket system for the solid light guide (lightpipe), three new circuit boards, a power source and National Instruments hardware/software for computer control. The results were a successfully designed retrofit with all the new features. The LED testing resulted in the ability to control each wavelength's intensity. The measured intensity over the voltage range will provide the information needed to couple the camera for imaging. Overall the project was successful; the modifications to the light source added the controllable LEDs. This brings the research one step closer to the main goal of spectral imaging for early detection of colorectal cancer. Future goals will be to connect the camera and test the imaging process.

  8. The Munich Compact Light Source: initial performance measures.

    PubMed

    Eggl, Elena; Dierolf, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Jud, Christoph; Günther, Benedikt; Braig, Eva; Gleich, Bernhard; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-09-01

    While large-scale synchrotron sources provide a highly brilliant monochromatic X-ray beam, these X-ray sources are expensive in terms of installation and maintenance, and require large amounts of space due to the size of storage rings for GeV electrons. On the other hand, laboratory X-ray tube sources can easily be implemented in laboratories or hospitals with comparatively little cost, but their performance features a lower brilliance and a polychromatic spectrum creates problems with beam hardening artifacts for imaging experiments. Over the last decade, compact synchrotron sources based on inverse Compton scattering have evolved as one of the most promising types of laboratory-scale X-ray sources: they provide a performance and brilliance that lie in between those of large-scale synchrotron sources and X-ray tube sources, with significantly reduced financial and spatial requirements. These sources produce X-rays through the collision of relativistic electrons with infrared laser photons. In this study, an analysis of the performance, such as X-ray flux, source size and spectra, of the first commercially sold compact light source, the Munich Compact Light Source, is presented. PMID:27577768

  9. Picosecond supercontinuum light source for stroboscopic white-light interferometry with freely adjustable pulse repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Steffen; Durairaj, Vasuki; Shavrin, Igor; Lipiäinen, Lauri; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Kaivola, Matti; Ludvigsen, Hanne

    2014-06-01

    We present a picosecond supercontinuum light source designed for stroboscopic white-light interferometry. This source offers a potential for high-resolution characterization of vibrational fields in electromechanical components with frequencies up to the GHz range. The light source concept combines a gain-switched laser diode, the output of which is amplified in a two-stage fiber amplifier, with supercontinuum generation in a microstructured optical fiber. Implemented in our white-light interferometer setup, optical pulses with optimized spectral properties and below 310 ps duration are used for stroboscopic illumination at freely adjustable repetition rates. The performance of the source is demonstrated by characterizing the surface vibration field of a square-plate silicon MEMS resonator at 3.37 MHz. A minimum detectable vibration amplitude of less than 100 pm is reached. PMID:24921556

  10. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions. PMID:26973689

  11. Suboptimal Light Conditions Influence Source-Sink Metabolism during Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Annelies; De Keyser, Ellen; Pauwels, Els; De Riek, Jan; Gobin, Bruno; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids). Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS) was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural) and optimal (supplemental light) light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark) to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions. PMID:26973689

  12. Phototaxis of Grapholitha molesta (Lepidoptera: Olethreutidae) to Different Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y-X; Tian, A; Zhang, X-B; Zhao, Z-G; Zhang, Z-W; Ma, R-Y

    2014-10-01

    The Oriental Fruit Moth Grapholita molesta (Busck) causes substantial damage to stone and pome fruit crops worldwide. Light-based traps offer a potential means for pest monitoring and management. In this study, we tested the preference of G. molesta for the following light sources: monochromatic light produced from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, and white), specific wavelengths of light produced from filters (405, 450, 480, 512, 540, 576, and 610 nm), and polychromatic light produced by different numbers (0, 12, 24, and 36) of green, blue, and violet LEDs. The arrangement of polychromatic lights was based on an orthogonal design matrix of L16 (4(3)). Based on the results of former studies, we further determined the optimal number of green and violet LEDs. The results showed that: 1) G. molesta strongly preferred the green, violet, and blue LEDs; 2) G. molesta significantly preferred light at 405 nm, followed by 540 nm, and showed no phototaxis to 480 nm; 3) for the polychromatic light configuration, violet and green were the factors that determined the preference of G. molesta, and the lamp with 12 violet LEDs captured the most moths; and 4) for the lamps with different light intensities, 36 violet LEDs or 12 green LEDs attracted the most moths, with the former performing better. PMID:26309269

  13. Lattice Design for PEP-X Ultimate Storage Ring Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wang, M.-H.; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    SLAC expertise in designing and operating high current storage rings and the availability of the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel present an opportunity for building a next generation light source - PEP-X - that would replace the SPEAR3 storage ring in the future. The PEP-X 'baseline' design, with 164 pm-rad emittance at 4.5 GeV beam energy and a current of 1.5 A, was completed in 2010. As a next step, a so-called 'ultimate' PEP-X lattice, reducing the emittance to 11 pm-rad at zero current, has been designed. This emittance approaches the diffraction limited photon emittance for multi-keV photons, providing near maximum photon brightness and high coherence. It is achieved by using 7-bend achromat cells in the ring arcs and a 90-m damping wiggler in one of the 6 long straight sections. Details of the lattice design, dynamic aperture, and calculations of the intra-beam scattering effect and Touschek lifetime at a nominal 0.2 A current are presented. Accelerator-based light sources are in high demand for many experimental applications. The availability of the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel at SLAC presents an opportunity for building a next generation light source - PEP-X - that would replace the existing SPEAR3 light source in the future. The PEP-X study started in 2008, and the 'baseline' design, yielding 164 pm-rad emittance at 4.5 GeV beam energy and a current of 1.5 A, was completed in 2010. This relatively conservative design can be built using existing technology. However, for a long term future, it is natural to investigate a more aggressive, so-called 'ultimate' ring design. The goal is to reduce the electron emittance in both x and y planes to near the diffraction limited photon emittance of 8 pm-rad at hard X-ray photon wavelength of 0.1 nm. This would provide a near maximum photon brightness and significant increase in photon coherence. This study was motivated by the advances in low emittance design at MAX-IV. The latter was used as a starting point for the PEP-X arc lattice

  14. Theoretical investigation of a tunable free-electron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shenggang; Hu Min; Zhang Yaxin; Liu Weihao; Zhang Ping; Zhou Jun

    2011-06-15

    The concept and experimental results of a light source given in a recent paper by Adamo et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 113901 (2009)] are very interesting and attractive. Our paper presents detailed theoretical investigations on such a light source, and our results confirm that the mechanism of the light radiation experimentally detected in the published paper is a special kind of diffraction radiation in a waveguide with nanoscale periodic structure excited by an electron beam. The numerical calculations based on our theory and digital simulations agree well with the experimental results. This mechanism of diffraction radiation is of significance in physics and optics, and may bring good opportunities for the generation of electromagnetic waves from terahertz to light frequency regimes.

  15. Electrodeless lighting RF power source development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-30

    An efficient, solid state RF power source has been developed on this NICE project for exciting low power electrodeless lamp bulbs. This project takes full advantage of concurrent advances in electrodeless lamp technology. Electrodeless lamp lighting systems utilizing the sulfur based bulb type developed by Fusion Lighting, Inc., is an emerging technology which is based on generating light in a confined plasma created and sustained by RF excitation. The bulb for such a lamp is filled with a particular element and inert gas at low pressure when cold. RF power from the RF source creates a plasma within the bulb which reaches temperatures approaching those of high pressure discharge lamp plasmas. At these temperatures the plasma radiates substantial visible light with a spectrum similar to sunlight.

  16. Effect of light sources and light intensity on growth performance and behavior of male turkeys.

    PubMed

    Leighton, A T; Hulet, R M; Denbow, D M

    1989-09-01

    This study consisted of two experiments: the first was conducted with Large White turkey males during the spring and summer (experiment 1) and the second during the autumn and winter (experiment 2). When 56 d of age, the birds were assigned to light-controlled pens and exposed to continuous illumination. Light sources used were incandescent, daylight fluorescent, warm fluorescent or high pressure sodium vapour lamps at light intensities of 10.8 or 86.1 lux. Results obtained showed that the light sources used had no significant effects on growth performance, efficiency of food utilization, feather scores or live bird quality of Large White turkeys. Social encounters were higher in birds reared under fluorescent and sodium vapour lights and mortality was higher in birds under fluorescent lights in experiment 1. Behaviour, feather scores, live bird grade and mortality were unaffected by light source treatments in experiment 2. Light intensity had no significant effect on growth, efficiency of food utilization, feather scores or bird market quality. Social encounters and mortality were higher in males exposed to 86.1 lux of light intensity. PMID:2819500

  17. Data format standard for sharing light source measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, G. Groot; Ashdown, Ian; Brandenburg, Willi; Chabaud, Dominique; Dross, Oliver; Gangadhara, Sanjay; Garcia, Kevin; Gauvin, Michael; Hansen, Dirk; Haraguchi, Kei; Hasna, Günther; Jiao, Jianzhong; Kelley, Ryan; Koshel, John; Muschaweck, Julius

    2013-09-01

    Optical design requires accurate characterization of light sources for computer aided design (CAD) software. Various methods have been used to model sources, from accurate physical models to measurement of light output. It has become common practice for designers to include measured source data for design simulations. Typically, a measured source will contain rays which sample the output distribution of the source. The ray data must then be exported to various formats suitable for import into optical analysis or design software. Source manufacturers are also making measurements of their products and supplying CAD models along with ray data sets for designers. The increasing availability of data has been beneficial to the design community but has caused a large expansion in storage needs for the source manufacturers since each software program uses a unique format to describe the source distribution. In 2012, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) formed a working group to understand the data requirements for ray data and recommend a standard file format. The working group included representatives from software companies supplying the analysis and design tools, source measurement companies providing metrology, source manufacturers creating the data and users from the design community. Within one year the working group proposed a file format which was recently approved by the IES for publication as TM-25. This paper will discuss the process used to define the proposed format, highlight some of the significant decisions leading to the format and list the data to be included in the first version of the standard.

  18. Structural biology research at the National Synchroton Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The world`s foremost facility for scientific research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation is operated by the national synchrotron Light Source Department. This year alone, a total of 2200 guest researchers performed experiments at the world`s largest source of synchrotron light. Researchers are trying to define the three- dimensional structures of biological macromolecules to create a map of life, a guide for exploring the biological and chemical interactions of the vast variety of molecules found in living organisms. Studies in structural biology may lead to new insights into how biological systems are formed and nourished, how they survive and grow, how they are damaged and die. This document discusses some the the structural biological research done at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

  19. [A solar blind light source with long dynamic range].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Ming-Chao; Gao, Song-Tao

    2012-06-01

    In order to realize the irradiance calibration of SBUV-ICCD (solar blind ultraviolent Intensified change-coupled device) with dynamic range reaching 120 dB, a light source with long dynamic range was designed and realized. Firstly, the irradiance dynamic range was estimated. Then using deuterium lamp, integrating sphere, precise stop and rail, an ultraviolent light source was developed, which has fixed structure of spectrum, but the irradiance can change continuously in long range. At last the light source's performance was tested. The result shows that the irradiance between 0.278 and 2.8 x 10(-7) microW x cm(-2) was covered, and the stability was 0.93%/3 h. So the demand of calibration of irradiance was satisfied. It will help for measuring the surface uniformity of detector and the calibration of imaging systems. PMID:22870617

  20. Tunable light source for use in photoacoustic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Bisson, Scott E.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides a photoacoustic spectrometer that is field portable and capable of speciating complex organic molecules in the gas phase. The spectrometer has a tunable light source that has the ability to resolve the fine structure of these molecules over a large wavelength range. The inventive light source includes an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) having combined fine and coarse tuning. By pumping the OPO with the output from a doped-fiber optical amplifier pumped by a diode seed laser, the inventive spectrometer is able to speciate mixtures having parts per billion of organic compounds, with a light source that has a high efficiency and small size, allowing for portability. In an alternative embodiment, the spectrometer is scanned by controlling the laser wavelength, thus resulting in an even more compact and efficient design.

  1. Does the light source affect the repairability of composite resins?

    PubMed

    Karaman, Emel; Gönülol, Nihan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the light source on the microshear bond strength of different composite resins repaired with the same substrate. Thirty cylindrical specimens of each composite resin--Filtek Silorane, Filtek Z550 (3M ESPE), Gradia Direct Anterior (GC), and Aelite Posterior (BISCO)--were prepared and light-cured with a QTH light curing unit (LCU). The specimens were aged by thermal cycling and divided into three subgroups according to the light source used--QTH, LED, or PAC (n = 10). They were repaired with the same substrate and a Clearfil Repair Kit (Kuraray). The specimens were light-cured and aged for 1 week in distilled water at 37 °C. The microshear bond strength and failure modes were assessed. There was no significant difference in the microshear bond strength values among the composite resins, except for the Filtek Silorane group that showed significantly lower bond strength values when polymerized with the PAC unit compared to the QTH or LED unit. In conclusion, previously placed dimethacrylate-based composites can be repaired with different light sources; however, if the composite to be repaired is silorane-based, then using a QTH or LED device may be the best option. PMID:25098825

  2. Dynamic Aperture Measurements at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Decking, W.; Robin, D.

    1999-03-12

    A large dynamic aperture for a storage ring is of importance for long lifetimes and a high injection efficiency. Measurements of the dynamic aperture of the third generation synchrotron light source Advanced Light Source (ALS) using beam excitation with kicker magnets are presented. The experiments were done for various accelerator conditions, allowing us to investigate the influence of different working points, chromaticities, insertion devices, etc.. The results are compared both with tracking calculations and a simple model for the dynamic aperture yielding good agreements. This gives us confidence in the predictability of the nonlinear accelerator model. This is especially important for future ALS upgrades as well as new storage ring designs.

  3. Design of Beamline BL9 at Saga Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Tooru; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Kamada, Masao; Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Guo, Qixin; Masuda, Masataka; Motooka, Teruaki; Kondo, Yuzi; Hayashida, Kazuki; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Okajima, Toshihiro

    2007-01-19

    Saga Light Source (SAGA-LS), which has been constructed at Tosu city in Saga prefecture, is a compact synchrotron light source with storage electron energy of 1.4 GeV. A new beamline for the development of advanced materials and processing has been designed, and is now under construction at BL9 of SAGA-LS. This beamline is one of the three bending magnet beamlines (BL9, BL12, and BL15) constructed by Saga Prefectural Government. In this paper, we describe the design and the expected optical performance of the beamline BL9 at SAGA-LS.

  4. Brighter Light Sources from Black Metal: Significant Increase in Emission Efficiency of Incandescent Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Makin, V. S.; Guo, Chunlei

    2009-06-01

    By applying the femtosecond laser blackening technique directly to a tungsten incandescent lamp filament, we dramatically brighten the tungsten lamp and enhance its emission efficiency to approach 100%. A comparison study of emission and absorption for the structured metal surfaces shows that Kirchhoff’s law is applicable for the black metal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can even obtain partially polarized light as well as control the spectral range of the optimal light emission from the laser-blackened tungsten lamp.

  5. Brighter light sources from black metal: significant increase in emission efficiency of incandescent light sources.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, A Y; Makin, V S; Guo, Chunlei

    2009-06-12

    By applying the femtosecond laser blackening technique directly to a tungsten incandescent lamp filament, we dramatically brighten the tungsten lamp and enhance its emission efficiency to approach 100%. A comparison study of emission and absorption for the structured metal surfaces shows that Kirchhoff's law is applicable for the black metal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can even obtain partially polarized light as well as control the spectral range of the optimal light emission from the laser-blackened tungsten lamp. PMID:19658938

  6. Spectral matching research for light-emitting diode-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Ruting; Guo, Zhenning; Lin, Jieben

    2015-09-01

    To decrease the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy and minimize the need for exchange transfusions, we report a novel design for light source of light-emitting diode (LED)-based neonatal jaundice therapeutic device (NJTD). The bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo was regarded as target. Based on spectral constructing theory, we used commercially available LEDs with different peak wavelengths and full width at half maximum as matching light sources. Simple genetic algorithm was first proposed as the spectral matching method. The required LEDs number at each peak wavelength was calculated, and then, the commercial light source sample model of the device was fabricated to confirm the spectral matching technology. In addition, the corresponding spectrum was measured and the effect was analyzed finally. The results showed that fitted spectrum was very similar to the target spectrum with 98.86 % matching degree, and the actual device model has a spectrum close to the target with 96.02 % matching degree. With higher fitting degree and efficiency, this matching algorithm is very suitable for light source matching technology of LED-based spectral distribution, and bilirubin absorption spectrum in vivo will be auspicious candidate for the target spectrum of new LED-based NJTD light source.

  7. High efficiency light source using solid-state emitter and down-conversion material

    DOEpatents

    Narendran, Nadarajah; Gu, Yimin; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2010-10-26

    A light emitting apparatus includes a source of light for emitting light; a down conversion material receiving the emitted light, and converting the emitted light into transmitted light and backward transmitted light; and an optic device configured to receive the backward transmitted light and transfer the backward transmitted light outside of the optic device. The source of light is a semiconductor light emitting diode, a laser diode (LD), or a resonant cavity light emitting diode (RCLED). The down conversion material includes one of phosphor or other material for absorbing light in one spectral region and emitting light in another spectral region. The optic device, or lens, includes light transmissive material.

  8. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  9. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  10. PREFACE: Diagnostics for electrical discharge light sources: pushing the limits Diagnostics for electrical discharge light sources: pushing the limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zissis, Georges; Haverlag, Marco

    2010-06-01

    Light sources play an indispensable role in the daily life of any human being. Quality of life, health and urban security related to traffic and crime prevention depend on light and on its quality. In fact, every day approximately 30 billion electric light sources operate worldwide. These electric light sources consume almost 19% of worldwide electricity production. Finding new ways to light lamps is a challenge where the stakes are scientific, technological, economic and environmental. The production of more efficient light sources is a sustainable solution for humanity. There are many opportunities for not only enhancing the efficiency and reliability of lighting systems but also for improving the quality of light as seen by the end user. This is possible through intelligent use of new technologies, deep scientific understanding of the operating principles of light sources and knowledge of the varied human requirements for different types of lighting in different settings. A revolution in the domain of light source technology is on the way: high brightness light emitting diodes arriving in the general lighting market, together with organic LEDs (OLEDs), are producing spectacular advances. However, unlike incandescence, electrical discharge lamps are far from disappearing from the market. In addition, new generations of discharge lamps based on molecular radiators are becoming a reality. There are still many scientific and technological challenges to be raised in this direction. Diagnostics are important for understanding the fundamental mechanisms taking place in the discharge plasma. This understanding is an absolute necessity for system optimization leading to more efficient and high quality light sources. The studied medium is rather complex, but new diagnostic techniques coupled to innovative ideas and powerful tools have been developed in recent years. This cluster issue of seven papers illustrates these efforts. The selected papers cover all domains, from

  11. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  12. Research by industry at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The world`s foremost facility for research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation, is operated by the National Synchrotron Light Source dept. This pamphlet described the participating research teams that built most of the beam lines, various techniques for studying materials, treatment of materials, and various industrial research (catalysis, pharmaceuticals, etc.).

  13. The light curve of a transient X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-5 satellite has monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on Dec. 4, 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of about 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable preflare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-5 operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37-th power ergs/sec, a frequency of occurrence which may be as high as 100/yr, and a median decay time which is less than 1 month.

  14. Enabling instrumentation and technology for 21st century light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Shea, T.J.; Denes, P.; Siddons, P.; Attwood, D.; Kaertner, F.; Moog, L.; Li, Y.; Sakdinawat, A.; Schlueter, R.

    2010-06-01

    We present the summary from the Accelerator Instrumentation and Technology working group, one of the five working groups that participated in the BES-sponsored Workshop on Accelerator Physics of Future Light Sources held in Gaithersburg, MD September 15-17, 2009. We describe progress and potential in three areas: attosecond instrumentation, photon detectors for user experiments, and insertion devices.

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Annette

    1999-03-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

  16. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  17. A mobile light source for carbon/nitrogen cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trower, W. P.; Karev, A. I.; Melekhin, V. N.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Sobenin, N. P.

    1995-05-01

    The pulsed light source for carbon/nitrogen cameras developed to image concealed narcotics/explosives is described. This race-track microtron will produce 40 mA pulses of 70 MeV electrons, have minimal size and weight, and maximal ruggedness and reliability, so that it can be transported on a truck.

  18. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Chris

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity's Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  19. Prospects for Next-Generation Storage Ring Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borland, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Storage ring light sources are among the most productive large-scale scientific user facilities in existence, owing to a combination of broad tunability, mature technology, high capacity, remarkable reliability, and high performance. The most commonly-used performance measure is the photon beam brightness, which is proportional to the flux per unit volume in six-dimensional phase space. The brightness is generally maximized by minimizing the transverse phase space area, or emittance, of the electron beam that generates the photons. Since the 1990's, most storage ring light sources have used a variant of the Chasman-Green, or double-bend-achromat (DBA), lattice, which produces transverse emittances of several nanometers. Presently, several light sources are under construction based on more challenging multi-bend-achromat (MBA) concepts, which promise an order of magnitude reduction in the emittance. Somewhat larger reductions are contemplated for upgrades of the largest facilities. This talk briefly surveys the relevant concepts in light source design, then explains both the mechanism and challenge of achieving next-generation emittances. Other factors, such as improved radiation-emitting devices, are also described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  20. Miniature Incandescent Lamps as Fiber-Optic Light Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret; Collura, Joe; Helvajian, Henry; Pocha, Michael; Meyer, Glenn; McConaghy, Charles F.; Olsen, Barry L.

    2008-01-01

    Miniature incandescent lamps of a special type have been invented to satisfy a need for compact, rapid-response, rugged, broadband, power-efficient, fiber-optic-coupled light sources for diverse purposes that could include calibrating spectrometers, interrogating optical sensors, spot illumination, and spot heating.

  1. [Possibility of using halogen lamps in surgical light sources].

    PubMed

    Mel'kin, A A; Kopli, V A

    1980-01-01

    For higher efficiency of surgical light-sources the halogen lamps are recommended for them instead of incandescent lamps. First experimental results indicated the following advantages of halogen lamps: lesser consumption of electrical power per unit of illumination, prolonged service term, and lower temperature of operative field. PMID:7402019

  2. Measurement of storage ring motion at the advanced light source

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The mechanical stability of the Advanced Light Source storage ring is examined over a period of 1.5 years from the point of view of floor motion. The storage ring beam position monitor stability is examined under various operating conditions.

  3. Photonic crystal fibre-based light source for STED lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Glubokov, D A; Sychev, V V; Vitukhnovsky, Alexey G; Korol'kov, A E

    2013-06-30

    A light source having a relative noise level in the order of 10{sup -6} and sufficient stability for application in STED lithography has been obtained using the generation of Cherenkov peaks in a supercontinuum spectrum. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. High-intensity xenon pulse light source for fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Makoto; Ueno, Kazuo

    1997-05-01

    A newly developed 60W xenon flash lamp, L6604 and L6605, achieves the goals of longer operating life, higher output, and improved light stability. It operates at 2 Joules per flash input energy with approximately a 4 microsecond flash duration. The stability achieved is 2-3 percent peak-to-peak during a lifetime of 5 X 10e7 flashes, which is almost double that of conventional xenon flash lamps. This newly developed xenon flashlamp should serve as an excellent light source for analytical cytology and other fluorescence instruments. It can function as a high output, stable excitation light source for conventional fluorescence or delayed luminescence with a CCD. Besides providing powerful and stable illumination for absorption analysis of cells on slides, this lamp eliminates the optical artifacts associated with vibration of the stage which often limit throughput. This paper will describe in detail performance improvements obtained from this newly developed xenon flash lamp.

  5. Towards monolithic integration of germanium light sources on silicon chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shinichi; Zaher Al-Attili, Abdelrahman; Oda, Katsuya; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Germanium (Ge) is a group-IV indirect band gap semiconductor, and therefore bulk Ge cannot emit light efficiently. However, the direct band gap energy is close to the indirect one, and significant engineering efforts are being made to convert Ge into an efficient gain material monolithically integrated on a Si chip. In this article, we will review the engineering challenges of developing Ge light sources fabricated using nano-fabrication technologies compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processes. In particular, we review recent progress in applying high-tensile strain to Ge to reduce the direct band gap. Another important technique is doping Ge with donor impurities to fill the indirect band gap valleys in the conduction band. Realization of carrier confinement structures and suitable optical cavities will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss possible applications of Ge light sources in potential photonics-electronics convergent systems.

  6. Applicability of light-emitting diodes as light sources for active differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christoph; Trick, Sebastian; Rippel, Bernhard; Platt, Ulrich

    2006-03-20

    We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry-Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630 nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0.3 parts in 10(9) and 16 parts in 10(12) respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere. PMID:16579579

  7. Light emitting diode-based nanosecond ultraviolet light source for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Tsutomu; Misawa, Hiroaki

    1995-12-01

    A compact pulsed-light source is devised from an InGaN/AlGaN double heterostructure light-emitting diode (LED). The LED emits a 450-nm (blue) light under conventional dc operation below 30 mA. When a current larger than 50 mA is applied, the intensity of the 450-nm light saturates, but that of the 380-nm light due to the InGaN component continues to increase. This phenomenon is utilized to realize a nanosecond ultraviolet (UV) light source. Under repetitive, large current pulsing (frequency=10 kHz, pulse width=4 ns, peak current=2 A), the peak LED emission shifts from 450 to 380 nm. Intense light pulses (peak value=40 mW) of 4-ns duration were generated. To evaluate the potential of the pulsed LED as an excitation source, the fluorescence lifetime of a quinine-sulfate solution was measured. The observed lifetime characteristics agreed well with the generally accepted behavior.

  8. The Materials Science beamline upgrade at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, P. R.; Meister, D.; Leake, S. J.; Lange, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Böge, M.; Calvi, M.; Cancellieri, C.; Casati, N.; Cervellino, A.; Chen, Q.; David, C.; Flechsig, U.; Gozzo, F.; Henrich, B.; Jäggi-Spielmann, S.; Jakob, B.; Kalichava, I.; Karvinen, P.; Krempasky, J.; Lüdeke, A.; Lüscher, R.; Maag, S.; Quitmann, C.; Reinle-Schmitt, M. L.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, B.; Streun, A.; Vartiainen, I.; Vitins, M.; Wang, X.; Wullschleger, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Materials Science beamline at the Swiss Light Source has been operational since 2001. In late 2010, the original wiggler source was replaced with a novel insertion device, which allows unprecedented access to high photon energies from an undulator installed in a medium-energy storage ring. In order to best exploit the increased brilliance of this new source, the entire front-end and optics had to be redesigned. In this work, the upgrade of the beamline is described in detail. The tone is didactic, from which it is hoped the reader can adapt the concepts and ideas to his or her needs. PMID:23955029

  9. The Materials Science beamline upgrade at the Swiss Light Source.

    PubMed

    Willmott, P R; Meister, D; Leake, S J; Lange, M; Bergamaschi, A; Böge, M; Calvi, M; Cancellieri, C; Casati, N; Cervellino, A; Chen, Q; David, C; Flechsig, U; Gozzo, F; Henrich, B; Jäggi-Spielmann, S; Jakob, B; Kalichava, I; Karvinen, P; Krempasky, J; Lüdeke, A; Lüscher, R; Maag, S; Quitmann, C; Reinle-Schmitt, M L; Schmidt, T; Schmitt, B; Streun, A; Vartiainen, I; Vitins, M; Wang, X; Wullschleger, R

    2013-09-01

    The Materials Science beamline at the Swiss Light Source has been operational since 2001. In late 2010, the original wiggler source was replaced with a novel insertion device, which allows unprecedented access to high photon energies from an undulator installed in a medium-energy storage ring. In order to best exploit the increased brilliance of this new source, the entire front-end and optics had to be redesigned. In this work, the upgrade of the beamline is described in detail. The tone is didactic, from which it is hoped the reader can adapt the concepts and ideas to his or her needs. PMID:23955029

  10. Improving the Efficiency of Solid State Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Joanna McKittrick

    2003-03-31

    This proposal addresses the national need to develop a high efficiency light source for general illumination applications. The goal is to perform research that would lead to the fabrication of a unique solid state, white-emitting light source. This source is based on an InGaN/GaN UV-emitting chip that activates a luminescent material (phosphor) to produce white light. White-light LEDs are commercially available which use UV from a GaN chip to excite a phosphor suspended in epoxy around the chip. Currently, these devices are relatively inefficient. This research will target one technical barrier that presently limits the efficiency of GaN based devices. Improvements in efficiencies will be achieved by improving the internal conversion efficiency of the LED die, by improving the coupling between the die and phosphor(s) to reduce losses at the surfaces, and by selecting phosphors to maximize the emissions from the LEDs in conversion to white light. The UCSD research team proposes for this project to develop new phosphors that have high quantum efficiencies that can be activated by the UV-blue (360-410 nm) light emitted by the GaN device. The main goal for the UCSD team was to develop new phosphor materials with a very specific property: phosphors that could be excited at long UV-wavelengths ({lambda}=350-410 nm). The photoluminescence of these new phosphors must be activated with photons emitted from GaN based dies. The GaN diodes can be designed to emit UV-light in the same range ({lambda}=350-410 nm). A second objective, which is also very important, is to search for alternate methods to fabricate these phosphors with special emphasis in saving energy and time and reduce pollution.

  11. Light source design for spectral tuning in biomedical imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Chandrajit; Schlangen, Sebastian; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    We propose an architecture with a remote phosphor-based modular and compact light-emitting diode (LED) light source in a noncontact dermoscope prototype for skin cancer screening. The spectrum and color temperature of the output light can easily and significantly be changed depending on spectral absorption characteristics of the tissues being imaged. The new system has several advantages compared to state-of-the-art phosphor converted ultrabright white LEDs, used in a wide range of medical imaging devices, which have a fixed spectrum and color temperature at a given operating point. In particular, the system can more easily be adapted to the requirements originating from different tissues in the human body, which have wavelength-dependent absorption and reflectivity. This leads to improved contrast for different kinds of imaged tissue components. The concept of such a lighting architecture can be vastly utilized in many other medical imaging devices including endoscopic systems. PMID:26839911

  12. Effects of laryngoscope handle light source on the light intensity from disposable laryngoscope blades.

    PubMed

    Milne, A D; Brousseau, P A; Brousseau, C A

    2014-12-01

    A bench-top study was performed to assess the effects of different laryngoscope handles on the light intensity delivered from disposable metal or plastic laryngoscope blades. The light intensity from both the handle light sources themselves and the combined handle and laryngoscope blade sets was measured using a custom-designed testing system and light meter. Five samples of each disposable blade type were tested and compared with a standard re-usable stainless steel blade using three different handle/light sources (Vital Signs LED, Heine 2.5 V Xenon and 3.5 V Xenon). The light intensity delivered by the disposable blades ranged from 790 to 3846 lux for the different handle types. Overall, the 3.5 V Heine handle delivered the highest light output (p < 0.007) in comparison with the other handles. For the disposable blades, the overall light output was significantly higher from the plastic than the metal blades (p < 0.001). PMID:25040627

  13. Performance characteristics of white light sources consisting of multiple light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Li; Shah, Jay M.; Leung, P.-H.; Gessmann, Thomas; Schubert, E. F.

    2004-01-01

    The performance characteristics of white light sources based on a multiple-LED approach, in particular dichromatic and trichromatic sources are analyzed in detail. Figures of merit such as the luminous efficacy, color temperature, and color rendering capabilities are provided for a wide range of primary emission wavelengths. Spectral power density functions of LEDs are assumed to be thermally and inhomogeneously broadened to a full width at half maximum of several kT, in agreement with experimental results. A gaussian line shape is assumed for each of the emission bands. It is shown that multi-LED white light sources have the potential for luminous efficacies greater than 400 lm/W (dichromatic source) and color rendering indices of greater than 90 (trichromatic source). Contour maps for the color rendering indices and luminous efficacies versus three wavelengths are given.

  14. Light extraction by directional sources within optically dense media.

    PubMed

    Nagel, James R

    2012-12-01

    Light extraction efficiency (LEE) from a light-emitting diode is commonly referenced against an isotropic radiator within a dense dielectric medium. However, this description is not necessarily accurate for photonic devices with directional source elements. We therefore derive exact solutions for the LEE of a directive radiating source next to a planar dielectric boundary, accounting for any Fresnel reflections at the interface. These results can be used to validate numerical simulations and to quantify the baseline LEE for different source models. Four variations are explored, including the isotropic radiator, parallel and perpendicular orientations of the Hertzian dipole, and Lambertian scattering. Due to index matching, Fresnel reflections are generally negligible for materials with large escape cones, but reduce LEE by 20 % or more when critical angle is below 25°. PMID:23262703

  15. Lithography imaging control by enhanced monitoring of light source performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Lalovic, Ivan; Seong, Nakgeuon; Rechsteiner, Gregory; Thornes, Joshua; D'havé, Koen; Van Look, Lieve; Bekaert, Joost

    2013-04-01

    Reducing lithography pattern variability has become a critical enabler of ArF immersion scaling and is required to ensure consistent lithography process yield for sub-30nm device technologies. As DUV multi-patterning requirements continue to shrink, it is imperative that all sources of lithography variability are controlled throughout the product life-cycle, from technology development to high volume manufacturing. Recent developments of new ArF light-source metrology and monitoring capabilities have been introduced in order to improve lithography patterning control.[1] These technologies enable performance monitoring of new light-source properties, relating to illumination stability, and enable new reporting and analysis of in-line performance.

  16. Light-pollution model for cloudy and cloudless night skies with ground-based light sources.

    PubMed

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2007-05-20

    The scalable theoretical model of light pollution for ground sources is presented. The model is successfully employed for simulation of angular behavior of the spectral and integral sky radiance and/or luminance during nighttime. There is no restriction on the number of ground-based light sources or on the spatial distribution of these sources in the vicinity of the measuring point (i.e., both distances and azimuth angles of the light sources are configurable). The model is applicable for real finite-dimensional surface sources with defined spectral and angular radiating properties contrary to frequently used point-source approximations. The influence of the atmosphere on the transmitted radiation is formulated in terms of aerosol and molecular optical properties. Altitude and spectral reflectance of a cloud layer are the main factors introduced for simulation of cloudy and/or overcast conditions. The derived equations are translated into numerically fast code, and it is possible to repeat the entire set of calculations in real time. The parametric character of the model enables its efficient usage by illuminating engineers and/or astronomers in the study of various light-pollution situations. Some examples of numerical runs in the form of graphical results are presented. PMID:17514252

  17. Current Status of the SAGA Light Source Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.; Koda, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Takabayashi, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2007-01-19

    The SAGA Light Source (SAGA-LS) is the third-generation synchrotron light source designed, constructed and operated by Saga Prefecture, the Japanese local government, for the promotion of scientific researches and industrial applications in Kyushu area. The SAGA-LS consists of a 250-MeV electron linac injector and a 1.4-GeV storage ring with eight double-bend (DB) cell and eight 2.93-m long straight sections. The DB cell structure with a distributed dispersion system was chosen to produce a compact and low cost ring of 75.6-m long circumference. The construction budget was 1.94 billion yen for the light source and 1.1 billion yen for the building. The machine installation started on September 29, 2003. The commissioning began on August 24, 2004. The first synchrotron light was observed on November 12. The commissioning goal of 1.4GeV-100mA was achieved on August 25, 2005. The SAGA-LS was opened for users in February 17, 2006.

  18. 3D imaging with a linear light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunazzi, José J.; Rivera, Noemí I. R.

    2008-04-01

    In a previous system we showed how the three-dimensionality of an object can be projected and preserved on a diffractive screen, which is just a simple diffractive holographic lens. A transmission object is illuminated with an extended filament of a white light lamp and no additional element is necessary. The system forms three-dimensional (3D) images with normal depth (orthoscopic) of the shadow type. The continuous parallax, perfect sharpness and additional characteristics of the image depend on the width and extension of the luminous filament and the properties of the diffractive lens. This new imaging system is shown to inspire an interesting extension to non-perfect reflective or refractive imaging elements because the sharpness of the image depends only on the width of the source. As new light sources are being developed that may result in very thin linear white light sources, for example, light emitting diodes, it may be useful to further develop this technique. We describe an imaging process in which a rough Fresnel metallic mirror can give a sharp image of an object due to the reduced width of a long filament lamp. We will discuss how the process could be extended to Fresnel lenses or to any aberrating imaging element.

  19. The advanced light source: America`s brightest light for science and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, J.; Lawler, G.

    1994-03-01

    America`s brightest light comes from the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national facility for scientific research, product development, and manufacturing. Completed in 1993, the ALS produces light in the ultraviolet and x-ray regions of the spectrum. Its extreme brightness provides opportunities for scientific and technical progress not possible anywhere else. Technology is poised on the brink of a major revolution - one in which vital machine components and industrial processes will be drastically miniaturized. Industrialized nations are vying for leadership in this revolution - and the huge economic rewards the leaders will reap.

  20. Developing electron beam bunching technology for improving light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Feldman, D.W.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to develop a new electron bunch compression technology, experimentally demonstrate subpicosecond compression of bunches with charges on the order of 1 nC, and to theoretically investigate fundamental limitations to electron bunch compression. All of these goals were achieved, and in addition, the compression system built for this project was used to generate 22 nm light in a plasma-radiator light source.

  1. Power analysis of light source in laser projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jingyuan; Shi, Ancun; Zhang, Yunfang; Fang, Qing; Liu, Yuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we design a high power and small volume laser projector using the red laser diode, green laser diode, blue laser diode and green fluorescence as light source, which could improve the performance of the projector significantly with longer lifetime than lamps, higher reliability, and larger color gamut. According to the requirement of CIE Standard Illuminant D65 and light output, the power of red laser diode, green laser diode, blue laser diode and green fluorescence were calculated. The energy efficiency of four base-color optical path was also analyzed. It could be concluded that the blue laser and red laser have higher power requirements.

  2. Method and apparatus for acquisition and tracking of light sources in a transient event rich environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissh, Frank (Inventor); Flynn, David (Inventor); Fowski, Walter (Inventor); Abreu, Rene (Inventor); Miklus, Kenneth (Inventor); Bolin, Kenneth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for tracking a light source in a transient event rich environment locks on to a light source incident on a field-of-view 1 of a charge-coupled-device (CCD) array 6, validates the permanence of said light source and transmits data relating to the brilliance and location of said light source if said light source is determined to be permanent.

  3. Simulating Dicke-like superradiance with classical light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, D.; Oppel, S.; Wiegner, R.; Agarwal, G. S.; von Zanthier, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the close relationship between Dicke superradiance, originally predicted for an ensemble of two-level atoms in entangled states, and the Hanbury Brown and Twiss effect, initially established in astronomy to determine the dimensions of classical light sources such as stars. By studying the state evolution of the fields produced by classical sources—defined by a positive Glauber-Sudarshan P function—when recording intensity correlations of higher order in a generalized Hanbury Brown and Twiss setup we find that the angular distribution of the last detected photon, apart from an offset, is identical to the superradiant emission pattern generated by an ensemble of two-level atoms in entangled symmetric Dicke states. We show that the phenomenon derives from projective measurements induced by the measurement of photons in the far field of the sources and the permutative superposition of quantum paths identical to those leading to superradiance in the case of single photon emitters. We thus point out an important similarity between classical sources and quantum emitters upon detection of photons if the particular photon source remains unknown. We finally present a compact result for the characteristic functional which generates intensity correlations of arbitrary order for any kind of light source.

  4. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Harkay, K.; Hernandez-Garcia; Legg, R.; Padmore, H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  5. Hyperspectral retinal imaging with a spectrally tunable light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Robert P.; Zuzak, Karel J.; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael

    2011-03-01

    Hyperspectral retinal imaging can measure oxygenation and identify areas of ischemia in human patients, but the devices used by current researchers are inflexible in spatial and spectral resolution. We have developed a flexible research prototype consisting of a DLP®-based spectrally tunable light source coupled to a fundus camera to quickly explore the effects of spatial resolution, spectral resolution, and spectral range on hyperspectral imaging of the retina. The goal of this prototype is to (1) identify spectral and spatial regions of interest for early diagnosis of diseases such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and diabetic retinopathy (DR); and (2) define required specifications for commercial products. In this paper, we describe the challenges and advantages of using a spectrally tunable light source for hyperspectral retinal imaging, present clinical results of initial imaging sessions, and describe how this research can be leveraged into specifying a commercial product.

  6. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; et al

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a newmore » generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.« less

  7. Ultraminiature broadband light source with spiral shaped filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L. (Inventor); Collura, Joseph S. (Inventor); Helvajian, Henry (Inventor); Pocha, Michael D. (Inventor); Meyer, Glenn A. (Inventor); McConaghy, Charles F. (Inventor); Olsen, Barry L. (Inventor); Hansen, William W (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An ultraminiature light source using a double-spiral shaped tungsten filament includes end contact portions which are separated to allow for radial and length-wise unwinding of the spiral. The double-spiral filament is spaced relatively far apart at the end portions thereof so that contact between portions of the filament upon expansion is avoided. The light source is made by fabricating a double-spiral ultraminiature tungsten filament from tungsten foil and housing the filament in a ceramic package having a reflective bottom and a well wherein the filament is suspended. A vacuum furnace brazing process attaches the filament to contacts of the ceramic package. Finally, a cover with a transparent window is attached onto the top of the ceramic package by solder reflow in a second vacuum furnace process to form a complete hermetically sealed package.

  8. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced. PMID:25931071

  9. Using metallic photonic crystals as visible light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Sergei; Bogdanova, Maria; Deinega, Alexei; Eyderman, Sergey; Valuev, Ilya; Lozovik, Yurii; Polischuk, Ilya; Potapkin, Boris; Ramamurthi, Badri; Deng, Tao; Midha, Vikas

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we study numerically and experimentally the possibility of using metallic photonic crystals (PC's) of different geometries (log-piles, direct and inverse opals) as visible light sources. It is found that by tuning geometrical parameters of a direct opal PC one can achieve substantial reduction of the emissivity in the infrared along with its increase in the visible. We take into account disorder of the PC elements in their sizes and positions, and we get quantitative agreement between the numerical and experimental results. We analyze the influence of known temperature-resistant refractory host materials necessary for fixing the PC elements, and we find that PC effects become completely destroyed at high temperatures due to the host absorption. Therefore, creating PC-based visible light sources requires that low-absorbing refractory materials for the embedding medium be found.

  10. New robust and highly customizable light source management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Yuji; Takahisa, Kenji; Ochiai, Hideyuki; Ohta, Takeshi; Enami, Tatsuo

    2015-03-01

    In semiconductor lithography, light sources play a significant role in the wafer production process as well as impacting the manufacturing cost per wafer. Chip manufacturers going forward will be challenged to develop new ways to become more cost effective than their competitors, and the software tools necessary to compete in this environment must be capable of effectively adapting to the unique needs of each manufacturer. Gigaphoton has developed a new highly customizable software system for managing light sources. It not only offers a simple and intuitive user interface that can be operated using a standard web browser on PCs, tablets, and smartphones, but also a platform for users and third parties to develop unique extensions and optimizations.

  11. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; Herrmann, Sven; Kenney, Chris; Markovic, Bojan; Nishimura, Kurtis; Osier, Shawn; Pines, Jack; Reese, Benjamin; Segal, Julie; Tomada, Astrid; Weaver, Matt

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a new generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.

  12. Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Savoy, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Electron Beam Collimation for the Next Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Emma, P.; Nishimura, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Sannibale, F.

    2013-05-20

    The Next Generation Light Source will deliver high (MHz) repetition rate electron beams to an array of free electron lasers. Because of the significant average current in such a facility, effective beam collimation is extremely important to minimize radiation damage to undulators, prevent quenches of superconducting cavities, limit dose rates outside of the accelerator tunnel and prevent equipment damage. This paper describes the early conceptual design of a collimation system, as well as initial results of simulations to test its effectiveness.

  14. CONTROL OF DYNAMIC APERTURE FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BENGTSSON, J.

    2005-05-15

    A summary of how modern analytical and numerical techniques enable one to construct a realistic model of state-of-the-art synchrotron light sources is provided. The effects of engineering tolerances and radiation are included in a self-consistent manner. An approach for utilizing these tools to develop an effective strategy for the design and control of the dynamic aperture for such dynamical systems is also outlined.

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1982-07-01

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given.

  16. Recent Developments in Impact and Application to Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Warnock, R.; /SLAC

    2008-02-13

    This paper discusses two recently added capabilities of the IMPACT suite that are relevant to modeling electron linacs, namely the new 1D coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) modeling capability and the integrated Green's function (IFG) algorithm for modeling high aspect ratio beams. In addition, we present initial results of application of the enhanced version of IMPACT-Z to high-fidelity modeling of the microbunching instability in a realistic light source lattice.

  17. Development of micro-incandescent light sources on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollub, A. H.; Carvalho, D. O.; Rehder, G.; Alayo, M. I.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we report one simple fabrication process to build incandescent microlamps over silicon microtips. By taking advantage of the underetch observed when the Si substrate is anisotropically etched in KOH solutions, specific silicon microtips are created which serve as mechanical supports for the incandescent light sources. A thin film of chrome is deposited by sputtering technique above the microtip and defined by photolitography in order to create an electrical resistance. Consequently, the electrical energy transformed in heat is concentrated in a small spot achieving temperatures high enough to produce incandescent light similar to a blackbody spectrum. To reduce the heat loss caused by the high thermal conductivity of silicon, a layer of silicon dioxide (SiO2) placed between substrate and metal was necessary to avoid the use of large electrical currents to generate the incandescence in the light source. A SiO2 film is also used as a protection layer against moisture and specially oxygen, since at high temperatures chrome can easily oxidize losing its electrical conductivity. As the microtips are very tall compared to photoresist thickness, the lift-off process was needed in order to guarantee that the top of the microtip would be covered by chrome. The results showed that it is possible to produce light in all visible spectrum by applying electrical power higher than 4 W.

  18. Ultraviolet light output of compact fluorescent lamps: comparison to conventional incandescent and halogen residential lighting sources.

    PubMed

    Nuzum-Keim, A D; Sontheimer, R D

    2009-05-01

    Patients with photosensitive dermatologic and systemic diseases often question the ultraviolet light (UVL) output of household lighting sources. Such individuals have increasing concern about potential UVL exposure from energy-efficient compact fluorescent lamps (CFL), as little data have been presented concerning their UVL output. The objective was to compare, via pilot study, the levels of ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) leak between residential lighting sources. Equivalent wattage CFL, incandescent and halogen bulbs were purchased from local retailers in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA. The UVA and UVB outputs of these sources were measured under controlled conditions at 10, 25, 50, 100 and 150 cm away from the light source using an IL-1700 research radiometer equipped with UVA and UVB detectors. Negligible UVB and UVA was detected at 100 and 150 cm. Therefore, data were analysed from measurements at 10, 25 and 50 cm only. The results demonstrated UVA leak highest from incandescent and halogen bulbs, and UVB leak highest from CFL. The overall UVA/UVB leak was lowest from CFL shielded during the manufacturing process. In conclusion, patients with photosensitivity have choices depending on their relative risk from different UVL wavelength spectra. UVB exposure risk may be reduced the greatest by utilising CFL with manufacturer-provided shields. PMID:19395458

  19. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm-1. For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm-1. With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  20. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm(-1). For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm(-1). With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements. PMID:26988107

  1. Daily light integral and light quality from sole-source light-emitting diodes impact growth, morphology, and nutrient uptake of Brassica microgreens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-layer vertical production systems using sole-source (SS) lighting can be used for microgreen production; however, traditional SS lighting can consume large amounts of electrical energy. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offer many advantages over conventional light sources including: high photoelec...

  2. Sole-Source Lighting for Controlled-Environment Agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell.Cary; Stutte, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Since plants on Earth evolved under broad-spectrum solar radiation, anytime they are grown exclusively under electric lighting that does not contain all wavelengths in similar proportion to those in sunlight, plant appearance and size could be uniquely different. Nevertheless, plants have been grown for decades under fluorescent (FL) (1) + incandescent (IN) (2) lamps as a sole source of lighting (SSL), and researchers have become comfortable that, in certain proportions of FL + IN for a given species, plants can appear "normal" relative to their growth outdoors. The problem with using such traditional SSLs for commercial production typically is short lamp lifespans and not obtaining enough photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) when desired. These limitations led to supplementation of FL + IN lamp outputs with longer-lived, high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps in growth chambers (3). As researchers became comfortable that mixes of orange-biased high-pressure sodium (HPS) and blue-biased metal halide (MH) HIDs together also could give normal plant growth at higher intensities, growth chambers and phytotrons subsequently were equipped mainly with HID lamps, with their intense thermal output filtered out by ventilated light caps or thermal-controlled water barriers. For the most part, IN and HID lamps have found a home in commercial protected horticulture, usually for night-break photoperiod lighting (IN) or for seasonal supplemental lighting (mostly HPS) in greenhouses. However, lack of economically viable options for SSL have held back aspects of year-round indoor agriculture from taking off commercially.

  3. Phase-sensitive swept source OCT imaging of the human retina with a VCSEL light source

    PubMed Central

    Choi, WooJhon; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Baumann, Bernhard; Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Cable, Alex E.; Huang, David; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the challenges in achieving high phase stability, Doppler swept source / Fourier domain OCT has advantages of less fringe washout and faster imaging speeds compared to spectral / Fourier domain detection. This manuscript demonstrates swept source OCT with a VCSEL light source at 400kHz sweep rate for phase-sensitive Doppler imaging, measuring pulsatile total retinal blood flow with high sensitivity and phase stability. A robust, simple, and computationally efficient phase stabilization approach for phase-sensitive swept source imaging is also presented. PMID:23381430

  4. Beacon system based on light-emitting diode sources for runways lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Mario González; Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio A.; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2014-06-01

    New aeronautical ground lighting techniques are becoming increasingly important to ensure the safety and reduce the maintenance costs of the plane's tracks. Until recently, tracks had embedded lighting systems whose sources were based on incandescent lamps. But incandescent lamps have several disadvantages: high energy consumption and frequent breakdowns that result in high maintenance costs (lamp average life-time is ˜1500 operating hours) and the lamp's technology has a lack of new lighting functions, such as signal handling and modification. To solve these problems, the industry has developed systems based on light-emitting diode (LED) technology with improved features: (1) LED lighting consumes one tenth the power, (2) it improves preventive maintenance (an LED's lifetime range is between 25,000 and 100,000 hours), and (3) LED lighting technology can be controlled remotely according to the needs of the track configuration. LEDs have been in use for more than three decades, but only recently, around 2002, have they begun to be used as visual aids, representing the greatest potential change for airport lighting since their inception in the 1920s. Currently, embedded LED systems are not being broadly used due to the specific constraints of the rules and regulations of airports (beacon dimensions, power system technology, etc.). The fundamental requirements applied to embedded lighting systems are to be hosted on a volume where the dimensions are usually critical and also to integrate all the essential components for operation. An embedded architecture that meets the lighting regulations for airport runways is presented. The present work is divided into three main tasks: development of an optical system to optimize lighting according to International Civil Aviation Organization, manufacturing prototype, and model validation.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of clinical metal needle by a LED light source integrated transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke; Tanaka, Chizuyo

    2016-03-01

    We have achieved penetration depth of 30mm by photoacoustic imaging system using LED light source integrated transducer to image a clinical metal needle inserted into a tissue mimicking phantom. We developed the transducer that integrated near-infrared LED array light source, which was connected to a photoacoustic imaging system which drove LED array light source and controlled photoacoustic data acquisition process. Conventionally solid-state laser has been used as the light source for photoacoustic imaging system. Because LED is diffused light source, laser safety glasses is not necessary, also inflexible fibers are not used to guide light close to a transducer, and we integrated LED light source inside the transducer, which became compact and practical size for conventional ultrasound equipment users. We made LED light source unit as detachable to the transducer easily, so wave-length of light can be selectable by changing the LED light source unit.

  6. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R.N.C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources.

  7. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore » laser sources.« less

  8. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map.

    PubMed

    Aquila, A; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Boutet, S; Carini, G; dePonte, D; Drell, P; Doniach, S; Downing, K H; Earnest, T; Elmlund, H; Elser, V; Gühr, M; Hajdu, J; Hastings, J; Hau-Riege, S P; Huang, Z; Lattman, E E; Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Ourmazd, A; Pellegrini, C; Santra, R; Schlichting, I; Schroer, C; Spence, J C H; Vartanyants, I A; Wakatsuki, S; Weis, W I; Williams, G J

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  9. Precision Calibration via Artificial Light Sources Above the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J. E.; Fagin, M. H.; Brown, Y. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Kuklev, N. A.; Conley, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    Deeper understanding of the properties of dark energy via SNIa surveys, and to a large extent other methods as well, will require unprecedented photometric precision. Laboratory and solar photometry and radiometry regularly achieve precisions on the order of parts in ten thousand, but photometric calibration for non-solar astronomy presently remains stuck at the percent or greater level. We discuss our project to erase this discrepancy, and our steps toward achieving laboratory-level photometric precision for surveys late this decade. In particular, we show near-field observations of the balloon-borne light source we are presently testing, in addition to previous work with a calibrated laser source presently in low-Earth orbit. Our technique is additionally applicable to microwave astronomy. Observation of gravitational waves in the polarized CMB will similarly require unprecedented polarimetric and radiometric precision, and we briefly discuss our plans for a calibrated microwave source above the atmosphere as well.

  10. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    PubMed Central

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; Elmlund, H.; Elser, V.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Huang, Z.; Lattman, E. E.; Maia, F. R. N. C.; Marchesini, S.; Ourmazd, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Santra, R.; Schlichting, I.; Schroer, C.; Spence, J. C. H.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Wakatsuki, S.; Weis, W. I.; Williams, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electron laser sources. PMID:26798801

  11. Linac Coherent Light Source: The first five years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostedt, Christoph; Boutet, Sébastien; Fritz, David M.; Huang, Zhirong; Lee, Hae Ja; Lemke, Henrik T.; Robert, Aymeric; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Williams, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    A new scientific frontier opened in 2009 with the start of operations of the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS provides femtosecond pulses of x rays (270 eV to 11.2 keV) with very high peak brightness to access new domains of ultrafast x-ray science. This article presents the fundamental FEL physics and outlines the LCLS source characteristics along with the experimental challenges, strategies, and instrumentation that accompany this novel type of x-ray source. The main part of the article reviews the scientific achievements since the inception of LCLS in the five primary areas it serves: atomic, molecular, and optical physics; condensed matter physics; matter in extreme conditions; chemistry and soft matter, and biology.

  12. Far-Infrared Beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; May, Tim E.

    2014-06-01

    The far-infrared beamline at the Canadian Light Source is a state of the art user facility, which offers significantly more far-infrared brightness than conventional globar sources. The infrared radiation is collected from a bending magnet through a 55 X 37 mrad2 port to a Bruker IFS 125 HR spectrometer, which is equipped with a nine compartment scanning arm, allowing it to achieve spectral resolution better than 0.001 cm-1. Currently the beamline can achieve signal to noise ratios up to 8 times that which can be achieved using a traditional thermal source. This talk will provide an overview of the the beamline, and the capabilities available to users, recent and planned improvements including the addition of a Glow Discharge cell and advances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation. Furthermore, the process of acquiring access to the facility will be covered.

  13. The Far-Infrared Beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant; May, Tim

    2009-06-01

    The far-infrared beamline at the Canadian Light Source. is a state of the art facility, which offers significantly more far-infrared brightness than conventional globar sources. While there is the potential to direct this advantage to many research areas, to date most of the effort has been directed toward high-resolution gas phase studies. The infrared radiation is collected from a bending magnet through a 55 X 37 mrad^{2} port to a Bruker IFS 125 HR spectrometer, which is equipped with a nine compartment scanning arm, allowing it to achieve spectral resolution better than 0.001 cm^{-1}. Currently the beamline can achieve signal to noise ratios up to 8 times that which can be achieved using a traditional thermal source. Data from the recently completed commissioning experiments will be presented along with a general overview of the beamline.

  14. UV light source adaptive sensing technology for flue gas measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Changku; Zhang, Chi; Sun, Bo; Liu, Bin; Wang, Peng

    2010-11-01

    The UV absorption spectrometry technique DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) has been widely used in continuous monitoring of flue gas, and has achieved good results. DOAS method is based on the basic law of light absorption--Lambert-Beer law. SO2, NOX are the principal component of the flue gas. These components are considered by DOAS method at the same time. And certain mathematical methods are used for concentrations measuring. The Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEMS) based on the principle of DOAS mainly has two probe-styles present: in-situ probe-style and extractive probe-style. For the in-situ probe-style CEMS based on DOAS method, prolonged use for the UV light source, contaminated lens caused by floating oil and complex environment of the flue will all bring attenuation of the spectral intensity, it will affect the accuracy of measurement. In this article, an in-situ continuous monitoring system based on DOAS method is described, and a component adaptive sensing technology is proposed. By using this adaptive sensing technology, CEMS can adjust the integral time of the spectrometer according to the non-measuring attenuation of the light source intensity and automatically compensate the loss of spectral intensity. Under the laboratory conditions, the experiments for SO2, NO standard gas measurement using adaptive sensing technology is made. Many different levels of light intensity attenuation are considered in the experiments. The results show that the adaptive sensing technology can well compensate the non-measuring loss of spectral intensity. In the field measurement, this technology can well reduce the measurement error brought by attenuation of light intensity, compared with the handheld gas analyzer, the average error of concentration measurement is less than 2% FS(Full Scale).

  15. Light source comprising a common substrate, a first led device and a second led device

    DOEpatents

    Choong, Vi-En

    2010-02-23

    At least one stacked organic or polymeric light emitting diode (PLEDs) devices to comprise a light source is disclosed. At least one of the PLEDs includes a patterned cathode which has regions which transmit light. The patterned cathodes enable light emission from the PLEDs to combine together. The light source may be top or bottom emitting or both.

  16. A lighting assembly based on red and blue light-emitting diodes as a lighting source for space agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avercheva, Olga; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Bassarskaya, Elizaveta; Zhigalova, Tatiana; Ptushenko, Vasiliy; Erokhin, Alexei

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a promising lighting source for space agriculture due to their high efficiency, longevity, safety, and other factors. Assemblies based on red and blue LEDs have been recommended in literature, although not all plants show sufficient productivity in such lighting conditions. Adding of green LEDs proposed in some works was aimed at psychological support for the crew, and not at the improvement of plant growth. We studied the growth and the state of the photosynthetic apparatus in Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis L.) plants grown under red (650 nm) and blue (470 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Plants grown under a high-pressure sodium lamp (HPS lamp) were used as a control. The plants were illuminated with two photosynthetic photon flux levels: nearly 400 µE and about 100 µE. Plants grown under LEDs with 400 µE level, as compared to control plants, showed lower fresh weight, edible biomass, growth rate, and sugar content. The difference in fresh weight and edible biomass was even more pronounced in plants grown with 100 µE level; the data indicate that the adaptability of the test plants to insufficient lighting decreased. Under LEDs, we observed the decreasing of root growth and the absence of transition to the flowering stage, which points to a change in the hormonal balance in plants grown in such lighting conditions. We also found differences in the functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus and its reaction to a low lighting level. We have concluded that a lighting assembly with red and blue LEDs only is insufficient for the plant growth and productivity, and can bring about alterations in their adaptive and regulatory mechanisms. Further studies are needed to optimize the lighting spectrum for space agriculture, taking into account the photosynthetic, phototropic and regulatory roles of light. Using white LEDs or adding far-red and green LEDs might be a promising approach.

  17. The Use of Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) as Green and Red/Far-Red Light Sources in Plant Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, David L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The use of green, red, and far-red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for plant physiological studies is outlined and evaluated. Indicates that LED lamps have the advantage over conventional light sources in that they are lightweight, low-cost, portable, easily constructed, and do not require color filters. (Author/DH)

  18. Boron-Containing Red Light-Emitting Phosphors And Light Sources Incorporating The Same

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-03-28

    A boron-containing phosphor comprises a material having a formula of AD1-xEuxB9O16, wherein A is an element selected from the group consisting of Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg, and combinations thereof; D is at least an element selected from the group consisting of rare-earth metals other than europium; and x is in the range from about 0.005 to about 0.5. The phosphor is used in a blend with other phosphors in a light source for generating visible light with a high color rendering index.

  19. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, L.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  20. Theory of ghost scattering with incoherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Inspired by the idea of ghost imaging, we propose a ghost scattering scheme to study light scattering with incoherent light sources through the nonlocal correlation measurement of the differential scattering cross-section fluctuations in two different optical paths. We present a rigorous formal theory to describe the ghost scattering process. Also we have derived a simple and closed-form ghost scattering formula within the first-order Born approximation which is particularly suited for weak scatterers. We find that the scattering information of a test scatterer can be obtained by using only a single-pixel detector in the corresponding optical path through the nonlocal correlation measurement with the help of another reference path.

  1. Ultraminiature Broadband Light Source and Method of Manufacturing Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L. (Inventor); Collura, Joseph S. (Inventor); Helvajian, Henry (Inventor); Pocha, Michael D. (Inventor); Meyer, Glenn A. (Inventor); McConaghy, Charles F. (Inventor); Olsen, Barry L. (Inventor); Hansen, William W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultraminiature light source using a double-spiral shaped tungsten filament includes end contact portions which are separated to allow for radial and length-wise unwinding of the spiral. The double-spiral filament is spaced relatively far apart at the end portions thereof so that contact between portions of the filament upon expansion is avoided. The light ource is made by fabricating a double-spiral ultraminiature tungsten filament from tungsten foil and housing the filament in a ceramic package having a reflective bottom and a well wherein the filament is suspended. A vacuum furnace brazing process attaches the filament to contacts of the ceramic package. Finally, a cover with a transparent window is attached onto the top of the ceramic package by solder reflow in a second vacuum furnace process to form a complete hermetically sealed package.

  2. An XAFS Beamline at the SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, Toshihiro; Hara, Kazuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Chikaura, Yoshinori

    2007-02-02

    A new hard X-ray beamline, BL15, has been designed and constructed at the SAGA-Light Source. The beamline is optimized for industrial applications of the synchrotron light. X-rays with photon energies from 2.1 keV to 14.2 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator and a bent cylindrical mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, high resolution diffractometry, various kinds of X-ray imaging and energy-dispersive diffractometry have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, we show that BL15 can perform XAFS measurements.

  3. Analysis and optimization of several designs of the light source in spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shi-zhi; Jin, Shang-zhong; Yuan, Kun; Wang, Cong

    2012-10-01

    The light source in spectrophotometer must contain all spectral lines of visible light and have strong enough power in entire visible light spectrum range, so it calls for composition of several light sources. In order to reduce light source error and improve test accuracy, the light source was divided into reference light and test light. The reference light goes into inference path directly to get electrical signals; the test light falls on testing sample after perfect diffuse reflected by integrating sphere, then carries information of testing sample ,and passes through emitting hole, falls on photovoltaic cell to get corresponding electrical signals. Several projects of realizing perfect diffuse reflection of test light from both light source design and structure design are put forward in the essay, and simulated by Tracepro and other optical software. Then analyze and evaluate these several projects to get optimization design.

  4. JLab CW Cryomodules for 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Bundy, Richard; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Daly, Edward; Henry, James; Hicks, William; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Marhauser, Frank; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Smith, Karl; Stirbet, Mircea; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2008-01-23

    Fourth generation light sources hold the prospect of unprecedented brightness and optical beam quality for a wide range of scientific applications. Many of the proposed new facilities will rely on large superconducting radio frequency (SRF) based linacs to provide high energy, low emittance CW electron beams. For high average power applications there is a growing acceptance of energy recovery linac (ERL) technology as the way to support large recirculating currents with modest RF power requirements. CW SRF and high current ERLs are two core competencies at Jefferson Lab. JLab has designed and built a number of CW cryomodules of several different types starting with the original CEBAF design, with variations for higher current in the two generations of JLab’s free-electron laser (FEL), through two intermediate prototypes to the final high-performance module for the 12 GeV upgrade. Each of these represent fully engineered and tested configurations with a variety of specifications that could be considered for possible use in fourth generation light sources. Furthermore JLab has been actively pursuing advanced concepts for highcurrent high-efficiency cryomodules for next generation ERL based FEL’s. These existing and proposed designs span the range from about 1mA single-pass to over 100 mA energy recovered current capability. Specialized configurations also exist for high-current non-energy recovered sections such as the injector region where very high RF power is required. We discuss the performance parameters of these existing and proposed designs and their suitability to different classes of fourth generation light sources.

  5. Limit of concentration for cylindrical concentrators under extended light sources.

    PubMed

    Miñano, J C; Luque, A

    1983-08-15

    Cylindrical concentrators illuminated by an extended source with an arbitrary distribution of radiance are analyzed taking into account basic properties derived from the Fermat principle and not from the specific concentrator shape. The upper limit of concentration achievable with this type of concentrator is obtained and it is found to be lower than that of general (3-D) concentrators. Cylindrical compound parabolic concentrators are analyzed in the light of this theory, and it is shown that they achieve the highest optical concentration possible for a cylindrical concentrator. PMID:18196152

  6. Global Orbit Feedback System Upgrade At The Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Payne, Chris; Chabot, Daron; Maxwell, Dylan; Dallin, Les

    2013-03-01

    The Canadian Light Source has been using a Matlab application called CLSORB to perform slow orbit correction in the storage ring. A fast global orbit feedback system is recently deployed to replace the old system. The correction rate is about 45 Hz and all the corrections are calculated and applied by an RTEMS IOC. This upgrade has resulted in increased beam stability and reduced perturbations caused by the ramping of superconducting wigglers. This paper will discuss the implementation and performance of the fast orbit correction system.

  7. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  8. Producing terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation at the Hefei Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, De-Rong; Xu, Hong-Liang; Shao, Yan

    2015-07-01

    This paper theoretically proves that an electron storage ring can generate coherent radiation in the THz region using a quick kicker magnet and an AC sextupole magnet. When the vertical chromaticity is modulated by the AC sextupole magnet, the vertical beam collective motion excited by the kicker produces a wavy spatial structure after a number of longitudinal oscillation periods. The radiation spectral distribution was calculated from the wavy bunch parameters at the Hefei Light Source (HLS). When the electron energy is reduced to 400 MeV, extremely strong coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at 0.115 THz should be produced. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375176)

  9. Radiation properties of Turkish light source facility TURKAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nergiz, Zafer

    2015-09-01

    The synchrotron light source TURKAY, which is one of the sub-project of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC), has been supported by Ministry of Development of Turkey since 2006. The facility is designed to generate synchrotron radiation (SR) in range 0.01-60 keV from a 3 GeV storage ring with a beam emittance of 0.51 nm rad. Synchrotron radiation will be produced from the bending magnets and insertion devices in the storage ring. In this paper design studies for possible devices to produce synchrotron radiation and radiation properties of these devices with TURKAY storage ring parameters are presented.

  10. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS. PMID:25931064

  11. Status report on the Advanced Light Source control system, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.; Brown, W. Jr.; Cork, C.

    1993-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), under construction for the past seven years, has become operational. The accelerator has been successfully commissioned using a control system based on hundreds of controllers of our own design and high performance personal computers which are the operator interface. The first beamlines are being commissioned using a control system based on VME hardware and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) software. The two systems are being integrated, and this paper reports on the current work being done.

  12. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  13. Billion particle linac simulations for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A. A.; Qiang, J.

    2008-09-25

    In this paper we report on multi-physics, multi-billion macroparticle simulation of beam transport in a free electron laser (FEL) linac for future light source applications. The simulation includes a self-consistent calculation of 3D space-charge effects, short-range geometry wakefields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wakefields, and detailed modeling of RF acceleration and focusing. We discuss the need for and the challenges associated with such large-scale simulation. Applications to the study of the microbunching instability in an FEL linac are also presented.

  14. Broadband visible light source based on AllnGaN light emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Mary H.; Nelson, Jeffrey S.

    2003-12-16

    A visible light source device is described based on a light emitting diode and a nanocluster-based film. The light emitting diode utilizes a semiconductor quantum well structure between n-type and p-type semiconductor materials on the top surface a substrate such as sapphire. The nanocluster-based film is deposited on the bottom surface of the substrate and can be derived from a solution of MoS.sub.2, MoSe.sub.2, WS.sub.2, and WSe.sub.2 particles of size greater than approximately 2 nm in diameter and less than approximately 15 nm in diameter, having an absorption wavelength greater than approximately 300 nm and less than approximately 650 nm.

  15. Multi-contrast computed laminography at ANKA light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Altapova, V.; Helfen, L.; Xu, F.; dos Santos Rolo, T.; Vagovič, P.; Fiederle, M.; Baumbach, T.

    2013-10-01

    X-ray computed laminography has been developed as a non-destructive imaging technique for inspecting laterally extended objects. Benefiting from a parallel-beam geometry, high photon flux of synchrotron sources and modern high-resolution detector systems, synchrotron radiation computed laminography (SRCL) results in a powerful three-dimensional microscopy technique. SRCL can be combined with different contrast modes, such as absorption, phase and dark-field contrasts, in order to provide complementary information for the same specimen. Here we show the development of SRCL at the TopoTomo beamline of the ANKA light source. A novel instrumentation design is reported and compared to the existing one. For this design, experimental results from different contrast modalities are shown.

  16. Photoinjectors R&D for future light sources & linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Linac-driven light sources and proposed linear colliders require high brightness electron beams. In addition to the small emittances and high peak currents, linear colliders also require spin-polarization and possibly the generation of asymmetric beam in the two transverse degrees of freedom. Other applications (e.g., high-average-power free-electron lasers) call for high duty cycle and/or (e.g., electron cooling) angular-momentum-dominated electron beams. We review ongoing R&D programs aiming at the production of electron beams satisfying these various requirements. We especially discuss R&D on photoemission electron sources (with focus on radiofrequency guns) along with the possible use of emittance-manipulation techniques.

  17. Explosive Vessel for Dynamic Experiments at Advanced Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Charles; Sorensen, Christian; Armstrong, Christopher; Sanchez, Nathaniel; Jensen, Brian

    2015-06-01

    There has been significant effort in coupling dynamic loading platforms to advanced light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to take advantage of X-ray diagnostics for examining material physics at extremes. Although the focus of these efforts has been on using gun systems for dynamic compression experiments, there are many experiments that require explosive loading capabilities including studies related to detonator dynamics, small angle X-ray scattering on explosives, and ejecta formation, for example. To this end, an explosive vessel and positioning stage was designed specifically for use at a synchrotron with requirements to confine up to 15 grams of explosives, couple the vessel to the X-ray beam line, and reliably position samples in the X-ray beam remotely with micrometer spatial accuracy. In this work, a description of the system will be provided along with explosive testing results for the robust, reusable positioning system.

  18. Source apportionment of light absorbing WSOC in South Asian outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Carme; Kirillova, Elena; Andersson, August; Kruså, Martin; Budhavant, Krishnakant; Tiwari, Suresh; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2013-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) formed over South Asia are of special concern for human health and regional climate impacts. Anthropogenic emissions forming CA are generally high throughout the region and particularly over the Indo-Gangetic Plain. The net effects of CA on radiative climate forcing are still uncertain. One of the components of CA is black carbon (BC), dominated by soot-like elemental carbon, a strong absorber of solar radiation. Another component is organic carbon (OC), traditionally considered as a light scattering particle. However, recent field studies have shown OC to absorb at lower wavelengths. Thus OC, in addition to BC, may also contribute to light absorption and have a positive direct radiative effect on climate. Light absorbing organic aerosol is usually termed brown carbon (BrC). A significant fraction of BrC is water-soluble, therefore its dissolution into clouds could result in absorbing droplets that affect the cloud absorption and thus contributing to the indirect aerosol climate effects. In this study, light absorption and δ13C + Δ14C isotopic measurements of WSOC were studied in fine aerosols (PM 2.5) at two sites during early pre-monsoon season. New Delhi, one of the most densely populated and industrialized urban megacities in South Asia, was chosen to represent a strong source and Maldives Climate Observatory at Hanimaadhoo (MCOH) was chosen as a regional receptor which in wintertime is located downwind of the Indian subcontinent. Sampling in Delhi was done from mid-February to mid-March 2011 and in MCOH during March 2012. WSOC concentrations were 12±4.5 and 0.71±0.30 μg m-3 in Delhi and MCOH respectively. Whereas in Delhi WSOC contributed 31±4% of total organic carbon, this contribution was slightly higher in MCOH (40±12%). Light absorption by WSOC exhibited strong wavelength (?) dependence. In Maldives, WSOC Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) was found to be 6.9±0.4 and Mass Absorption Efficiency (MAE) measured at 365 nm

  19. Penning plasma based simultaneous light emission source of visible and VUV lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, G. L.; Prakash, R.; Pal, U. N.; Manchanda, R.; Halder, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a laboratory-based penning plasma discharge source is reported which has been developed in two anode configurations and is able to produce visible and VUV lights simultaneously. The developed source has simultaneous diagnostics facility using Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The two anode configurations, namely, double ring and rectangular configurations, have been studied and compared for optimum use of the geometry for efficient light emissions and recording. The plasma is produced using helium gas and admixture of three noble gases including helium, neon, and argon. The source is capable to produce eight spectral lines for pure helium in the VUV range from 20 to 60 nm and total 24 spectral lines covering the wavelength range 20-106 nm for the admixture of gases. The large range of VUV lines is generated from gaseous admixture rather from the sputtered materials. The recorded spectrum shows that the plasma light radiations in both visible and VUV range are larger in double ring configuration than that of the rectangular configurations at the same discharge operating conditions. To clearly understand the difference, the imaging of the discharge using ICCD camera and particle-in-cell simulation using VORPAL have also been carried out. The effect of ion diffusion, metastable collision with the anode wall and the nonlinear effects are correlated to explain the results.

  20. X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C.; Gorkhover, T.; Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Rolles, D.; Rouzee, A.

    2012-03-19

    X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

  1. A squeezed light source operated under high vacuum.

    PubMed

    Wade, Andrew R; Mansell, Georgia L; Chua, Sheon S Y; Ward, Robert L; Slagmolen, Bram J J; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E

    2015-01-01

    Non-classical squeezed states of light are becoming increasingly important to a range of metrology and other quantum optics applications in cryptography, quantum computation and biophysics. Applications such as improving the sensitivity of advanced gravitational wave detectors and the development of space-based metrology and quantum networks will require robust deployable vacuum-compatible sources. To date non-linear photonics devices operated under high vacuum have been simple single pass systems, testing harmonic generation and the production of classically correlated photon pairs for space-based applications. Here we demonstrate the production under high-vacuum conditions of non-classical squeezed light with an observed 8.6 dB of quantum noise reduction down to 10 Hz. Demonstration of a resonant non-linear optical device, for the generation of squeezed light under vacuum, paves the way to fully exploit the advantages of in-vacuum operations, adapting this technology for deployment into new extreme environments. PMID:26657616

  2. A squeezed light source operated under high vacuum

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Andrew R.; Mansell, Georgia L.; Chua, Sheon S. Y.; Ward, Robert L.; Slagmolen, Bram J. J.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; McClelland, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Non-classical squeezed states of light are becoming increasingly important to a range of metrology and other quantum optics applications in cryptography, quantum computation and biophysics. Applications such as improving the sensitivity of advanced gravitational wave detectors and the development of space-based metrology and quantum networks will require robust deployable vacuum-compatible sources. To date non-linear photonics devices operated under high vacuum have been simple single pass systems, testing harmonic generation and the production of classically correlated photon pairs for space-based applications. Here we demonstrate the production under high-vacuum conditions of non-classical squeezed light with an observed 8.6 dB of quantum noise reduction down to 10 Hz. Demonstration of a resonant non-linear optical device, for the generation of squeezed light under vacuum, paves the way to fully exploit the advantages of in-vacuum operations, adapting this technology for deployment into new extreme environments. PMID:26657616

  3. A squeezed light source operated under high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Andrew R.; Mansell, Georgia L.; Chua, Sheon S. Y.; Ward, Robert L.; Slagmolen, Bram J. J.; Shaddock, Daniel A.; McClelland, David E.

    2015-12-01

    Non-classical squeezed states of light are becoming increasingly important to a range of metrology and other quantum optics applications in cryptography, quantum computation and biophysics. Applications such as improving the sensitivity of advanced gravitational wave detectors and the development of space-based metrology and quantum networks will require robust deployable vacuum-compatible sources. To date non-linear photonics devices operated under high vacuum have been simple single pass systems, testing harmonic generation and the production of classically correlated photon pairs for space-based applications. Here we demonstrate the production under high-vacuum conditions of non-classical squeezed light with an observed 8.6 dB of quantum noise reduction down to 10 Hz. Demonstration of a resonant non-linear optical device, for the generation of squeezed light under vacuum, paves the way to fully exploit the advantages of in-vacuum operations, adapting this technology for deployment into new extreme environments.

  4. Refrigeration options for the Advanced Light Source Superbend Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Hoyer, E.H.; Schlueter, R.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Zbasnik, J.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-07-09

    The 1.9 GeV Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) produces photons with a critical energy of about 3.1 kev at each of its thirty-six 1.3 T gradient bending magnets. It is proposed that at three locations around the ring the conventional gradient bending magnets be replaced with superconducting bending magnets with a maximum field of 5.6 T. At the point where the photons are extracted, their critical energy will be about 12 keV. In the beam lines where the SuperBend superconducting magnets are installed, the X ray brightness at 20 keV will be increased over two orders of magnitude. This report describes three different refrigeration options for cooling the three SuperBend dipoles. The cooling options include: (1) liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryogen cooling using stored liquids, (2) a central helium refrigerator (capacity 70 to 100 W) cooling all of the SuperBend magnets, (3) a Gifford McMahon (GM) cryocooler on each of the dipoles. This paper describes the technical and economic reasons for selecting a small GM cryocooler as the method for cooling the SuperBend dipoles on the LBNL Advanced Light Source.

  5. A multi-source portable light emitting diode spectrofluorometer.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Safwan; Bai, Baolong; Rayson, Gary D; Anderson, Dean M; Puscheck, Adam D; Landau, Serge Y; Glasser, Tzach

    2008-03-01

    A portable luminescence spectrofluorometer weighing only 1.5 kg that uses multiple light emitting diodes (LEDs) as excitation sources was developed and evaluated. Excitation using a sequence of seven individual broad-band LED emission sources enabled the generation of excitation-emission spectra using a light weight (<1.5 kg) spectrometer. Limits of detection for rhodamine 6G, rhodamine B, and fluorescein were 2.9, 3.2, and 11.0 nM, respectively. Generation of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) enabled the analysis of samples containing mixtures of rhodamine B and fluorescein. Buffered saline plant and animal feed extracts were also analyzed using this instrument. These samples included the woody plants Pistacia lentiscus (Evergreen pistache or Mastic) and Philyria latifolia, and the herbaceous species Medicago sativa (alfalfa), Trifolium spp. (clover), and a feed concentrate. Application of multi-way principal component analysis (MPCA) to the resulting three-dimensional data sets enabled discernment among these various diet constituents. PMID:18339242

  6. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2012-04-09

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we

  7. Polymerization shrinkage stress of composites photoactivated by different light sources.

    PubMed

    Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Drubi Filho, Brahim; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Consani, Simonides

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the polymerization shrinkage stress of composite resins (microfilled, microhybrid and hybrid) photoactivated by quartz-tungsten halogen light (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED). Glass rods (5.0 mm x 5.0 cm) were fabricated and had one of the surfaces air-abraded with aluminum oxide and coated with a layer of an adhesive system, which was photoactivated with the QTH unit. The glass rods were vertically assembled, in pairs, to a universal testing machine and the composites were applied to the lower rod. The upper rod was placed closer, at 2 mm, and an extensometer was attached to the rods. The 20 composites were polymerized by either QTH (n=10) or LED (n=10) curing units. Polymerization was carried out using 2 devices positioned in opposite sides, which were simultaneously activated for 40 s. Shrinkage stress was analyzed twice: shortly after polymerization (t40s) and 10 min later (t10min). Data were analyzed statistically by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=5%). The shrinkage stress for all composites was higher at t10min than at t40s, regardless of the activation source. Microfilled composite resins showed lower shrinkage stress values compared to the other composite resins. For the hybrid and microhybrid composite resins, the light source had no influence on the shrinkage stress, except for microfilled composite at t10min. It may be concluded that the composition of composite resins is the factor with the strongest influence on shrinkage stress. PMID:20069256

  8. Light emitting diodes as an excitation source for biomedical photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. J.; Beard, P. C.

    2013-03-01

    Semiconductor light sources, such as laser diodes or light emitting diodes (LEDs) could provide an inexpensive and compact alternative to traditional Q-switched lasers for photoacoustic imaging. So far, only laser diodes 1-3 operating in the 750 to 905nm wavelength range have been investigated for this purpose. However, operating in the visible wavelength range (400nm to 650nm) where blood is strongly absorbent (<10cm-1) and water absorption is weak (<0.01cm-1) could allow for high contrast photoacoustic images of the superficial vasculature to be achieved. High power laser diodes (<10Watt peak power) are however not available in this wavelength range. High power LEDs could be a potential alternative as they are widely available in the visible wavelength range (400nm to 632nm) and relatively cheap. High power LEDs are generally operated in continuous wave mode and provide average powers of several Watts. The possibility of over driving them by tens of times their rated current when driven at a low duty cycle (<1%), offers the prospect of achieving similar pulse energies (tens of μJ) to that provided by high peak power pulsed laser diodes. To demonstrate the possibility of using high power LEDs as an excitation source for biomedical applications, single point measurements were implemented in a realistic blood vessel phantom. A four colour device was also used to demonstrate the possibility of using LEDs for making spectroscopic measurements. It was shown that when driving all four wavelengths at once, the generated photoacoustic signal could be used to design a filter in order to improve the SNR of the photoacoustic signals generated at each individual wavelength. The possibility of acquiring multiwavelength data sets simultaneously when using Golay excitation methods was also demonstrated. This preliminary study demonstrated the potential for using high power LEDs as an inexpensive and compact excitation source for biomedical photoacoustics.

  9. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverlag, Marco; Kroesen, Gerrit; Ferguson, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The papers in this special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics (JPhysD) originate from the 12th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources and the 3rd International Conference on White LEDs and Solid State Lighting, held 11-16 July 2010 at Eindhoven University. Abstracts of all papers presented at this combined conference were published in the Conference Proceedings LS-WLED 2010 by FAST-LS, edited by M Haverlag, G M W Kroesen and T Taguchi. Special issues of the previous three LS conferences have been well-cited and have proven to be an important source of information for the lighting community. The 2010 LS-Symposium was a combined conference with the White LED Conference in order to enhance the scope of this conference series towards new light source technologies such as LEDs and OLEDs, and this co-operation will be continued in the future. Given the faster technology development in these areas it was also decided to shorten the interval between conferences from three to two years. Well over 200 invited presentations, landmark presentations and poster contributions were presented at the 2010 LS-Symposium. The organizing committee have selected from these a number of outstanding contributions with a high technological content and invited the authors to submit a full paper in JPhysD. The criteria were that the work should not be a repetition of the work already published in the Proceedings, but should be new, complete, within the scope of JPhysD, and meeting the normal quality standards of this journal. After peer review a combined set of 18 papers is published in this JPhysD special issue. In addition, a number of lighting-application-orientated papers will be published in a special issue of Journal of Light & Visual Environment later in 2011. The papers in this special issue of JPhysD show that research in the science and technology of light sources still covers a broad set of subject areas which includes both 'classical

  10. Terahertz Light Source and User Area at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Fisher, A.D.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    FACET at SLAC provides high charge, high peak current, low emittance electron beam that is bunched at THz wavelength scale during its normal operation. A THz light source based coherent transition radiation (CTR) from this beam would potentially be the brightest short-pulse THz source ever constructed. Efforts have been put into building this photon source together with a user area, to provide a platform to utilize this unique THz radiation for novel nonlinear and ultrafast phenomena researches and experiments. Being a long-time underutilized portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, terahertz (100 GHz {approx} 10 THz) spectral range is experiencing a renaissance in recent years, with broad interests from chemical and biological imaging, material science, telecommunication, semiconductor and superconductor research, etc. Nevertheless, the paucity of THz sources especially strong THz radiation hinders both its commercial applications and nonlinear processes research. FACET - Facilities for Accelerator science and Experimental Test beams at SLAC - provides 23 GeV electron beam with peak currents of {approx} 20 kA that can be focused down to 100 {mu}m{sup 2} transversely. Such an intense electron beam, when compressed to sub-picosecond longitudinal bunch length, coherently radiates high intensity EM fields well within THz frequency range that are orders of magnitude stronger than those available from laboratory tabletop THz sources, which will enable a wide variety of THz related research opportunities. Together with a description of the FACET beamline and electron beam parameters, this paper will report FACET THz radiation generation via coherent transition radiation and calculated photon yield and power spectrum. A user table is being set up along the THz radiation extraction sites, and equipped with various signal diagnostics including THz power detector, Michelson interferometer, sample stages, and sets of motorized optical components. This setup will also be

  11. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverlag, Marco; Kroesen, Gerrit; Ferguson, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The papers in this special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics (JPhysD) originate from the 12th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources and the 3rd International Conference on White LEDs and Solid State Lighting, held 11-16 July 2010 at Eindhoven University. Abstracts of all papers presented at this combined conference were published in the Conference Proceedings LS-WLED 2010 by FAST-LS, edited by M Haverlag, G M W Kroesen and T Taguchi. Special issues of the previous three LS conferences have been well-cited and have proven to be an important source of information for the lighting community. The 2010 LS-Symposium was a combined conference with the White LED Conference in order to enhance the scope of this conference series towards new light source technologies such as LEDs and OLEDs, and this co-operation will be continued in the future. Given the faster technology development in these areas it was also decided to shorten the interval between conferences from three to two years. Well over 200 invited presentations, landmark presentations and poster contributions were presented at the 2010 LS-Symposium. The organizing committee have selected from these a number of outstanding contributions with a high technological content and invited the authors to submit a full paper in JPhysD. The criteria were that the work should not be a repetition of the work already published in the Proceedings, but should be new, complete, within the scope of JPhysD, and meeting the normal quality standards of this journal. After peer review a combined set of 18 papers is published in this JPhysD special issue. In addition, a number of lighting-application-orientated papers will be published in a special issue of Journal of Light & Visual Environment later in 2011. The papers in this special issue of JPhysD show that research in the science and technology of light sources still covers a broad set of subject areas which includes both 'classical

  12. Light-assisted drying (LAD) of small volume biologics: a comparison of two IR light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Madison A.; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    Protein therapeutics have been developed to treat diseases ranging from arthritis and psoriasis to cancer. A challenge in the development of protein-based drugs is maintaining the protein in the folded state during processing and storage. We are developing a novel processing method, light-assisted drying (LAD), to dehydrate proteins suspended in a sugar (trehalose) solution for storage at supra-zero temperatures. Our technique selectively heats the water in small volume samples using near-IR light to speed dehydration which prevents sugar crystallization that can damage embedded proteins. In this study, we compare the end moisture content (EMC) as a function of processing time of samples dried with two different light sources, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Thulium fiber (1850 nm) lasers. EMC is the ratio of water to dry weight in a sample and the lower the EMC the higher the possible storage temperature. LAD with the 1064 and 1850 nm lasers yielded 78% and 65% lower EMC, respectively, than standard air-drying. After 40 minutes of LAD with 1064 and 1850 nm sources, EMCs of 0.27+/-.27 and 0.15+/-.05 gH2O/gDryWeight were reached, which are near the desired value of 0.10 gH2O/gDryWeight that enables storage in a glassy state without refrigeration. LAD is a promising new technique for the preparation of biologics for anhydrous preservation.

  13. Optical Pumping Experiments on Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, S J; Fournier, K B; Scott, H; Chung, H K; Lee, R W

    2004-07-29

    Laser-based plasma spectroscopic techniques have been used with great success to determine the line shapes of atomic transitions in plasmas, study the population kinetics of atomic systems embedded in plasmas, and look at the redistribution of radiation. However, the possibilities for optical lasers end for plasmas with n{sub e}>10{sup 22}cm{sup -3} as light propagation is severely altered by the plasma. The construction of the Tesla Test Facility(TTF) at DESY(Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron), a short pulse tunable free electron laser in the vacuum-ultraviolet and soft X-ray regime (VUV FEL), based on the SASE(self amplified spontaneous emission) process, will provide a major advance in the capability for dense plasma-related research. This source will provide 10{sup 13} photons in a 200 fs duration pulse that is tunable from {approx} 6nm to 100nm. Since an VUV FEL will not have the limitation associated with optical lasers the entire field of high density plasmas kinetics in laser produced plasma will then be available to study with tunable source. Thus, one will be able to use this and other FEL x-ray sources to pump individual transitions creating enhanced population in the excited states that can easily be monitored. We show two case studies illuminating different aspects of plasma spectroscopy.

  14. Color-dulling solid-state sources of light.

    PubMed

    Žukauskas, Artūras; Vaicekauskas, Rimantas; Shur, Michael

    2012-04-23

    The spectral power distributions (SPDs) of solid-state sources were optimized for rendering the highest number of colors with a perceptually noticeable reduction in chroma (dulling) while maintaining the hue distortion below an acceptable threshold. Statistical color rendition indices derived from the analysis of color-shift vectors of 1269 Munsell samples were used in the objective functions for the optimization of SPDs of the color-dulling sources. The starting optimization point was the SPD composed of narrow yellow and blue (YB) emissions, which both dulls colors and distorts hues. Two methods were applied to reduce the hue-distorting effect of the narrow-band YB source. The first method, broadening the spectral bands, yields SPDs similar to that of a dichromatic white light-emitting diode (LED) with the partial conversion of narrow-band blue electroluminescence to wide-band yellow photoluminescence. The second method, multiplying the spectral bands, results in the SPDs similar to those of trichromatic clusters of red, yellow, and blue (RYB) and amber, green, and blue (AGB) LEDs. PMID:22535067

  15. Light-emitting diodes as a radiation source for plants.

    PubMed

    Bula, R J; Morrow, R C; Tibbitts, T W; Barta, D J; Ignatius, R W; Martin, T S

    1991-02-01

    Development of a more effective radiation source for use in plant-growing facilities would be of significant benefit for both research and commercial crop production applications. An array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce red radiation, supplemented with a photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 30 micromoles s-1 m-2 in the 400- to 500-nm spectral range from blue fluorescent lamps, was used effectively as a radiation source for growing plants. Growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Grand Rapids') plants maintained under the LED irradiation system at a total PPF of 325 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 21 days was equivalent to that reported in the literature for plants grown for the same time under cool-white fluorescent and incandescent radiation sources. Characteristics of the plants, such as leaf shape, color, and texture, were not different from those found with plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps. Estimations of the electrical energy conversion efficiency of a LED system for plant irradiation suggest that it may be as much as twice that published for fluorescent systems. PMID:11537727

  16. Light-emitting diodes as a radiation source for plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Morrow, R. C.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Barta, D. J.; Ignatius, R. W.; Martin, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a more effective radiation source for use in plant-growing facilities would be of significant benefit for both research and commercial crop production applications. An array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce red radiation, supplemented with a photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 30 micromoles s-1 m-2 in the 400- to 500-nm spectral range from blue fluorescent lamps, was used effectively as a radiation source for growing plants. Growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. Grand Rapids') plants maintained under the LED irradiation system at a total PPF of 325 micromoles s-1 m-2 for 21 days was equivalent to that reported in the literature for plants grown for the same time under cool-white fluorescent and incandescent radiation sources. Characteristics of the plants, such as leaf shape, color, and texture, were not different from those found with plants grown under cool-white fluorescent lamps. Estimations of the electrical energy conversion efficiency of a LED system for plant irradiation suggest that it may be as much as twice that published for fluorescent systems.

  17. First neutron generation in the BINP accelerator based neutron source.

    PubMed

    Bayanov, B; Burdakov, A; Chudaev, V; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Kuznetsov, A; Makarov, A; Malyshkin, G; Mekler, K; Sorokin, I; Sulyaev, Yu; Taskaev, S

    2009-07-01

    Pilot innovative facility for neutron capture therapy was built at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk. This facility is based on a compact vacuum insulation tandem accelerator designed to produce proton current up to 10 mA. Epithermal neutrons are proposed to be generated by 1.915 MeV protons bombarding a lithium target using (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be threshold reaction. The results of the first experiments on neutron generation are reported and discussed. PMID:19375928

  18. X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Dennis; Padmore, Howard; Lessner, Eliane

    2013-03-27

    potentially revolutionary science involves soft excitations such as magnons and phonons; in general, these are well below the resolution that can be probed by today’s optical systems. The study of these low-energy excitations will only move forward if advances are made in high-resolution gratings for the soft X-ray energy region, and higher-resolution crystal analyzers for the hard X-ray region. In almost all the forefront areas of X-ray science today, the main limitation is our ability to focus, monochromate, and manipulate X-rays at the level required for these advanced measurements. To address these issues, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) sponsored a workshop, X-ray Optics for BES Light Source Facilities, which was held March 27–29, 2013, near Washington, D.C. The workshop addressed a wide range of technical and organizational issues. Eleven working groups were formed in advance of the meeting and sought over several months to define the most pressing problems and emerging opportunities and to propose the best routes forward for a focused R&D program to solve these problems. The workshop participants identified eight principal research directions (PRDs), as follows: Development of advanced grating lithography and manufacturing for high-energy resolution techniques such as soft X-ray inelastic scattering. Development of higher-precision mirrors for brightness preservation through the use of advanced metrology in manufacturing, improvements in manufacturing techniques, and in mechanical mounting and cooling. Development of higher-accuracy optical metrology that can be used in manufacturing, verification, and testing of optomechanical systems, as well as at wavelength metrology that can be used for quantification of individual optics and alignment and testing of beamlines. Development of an integrated optical modeling and design framework that is designed and maintained specifically for X-ray optics. Development of

  19. High precision digital control LED spot light source used to calibrate camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Boyu; Xu, Xiping; Liu, Yang

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces a method of using LED point light source as the camera calibration light. According to the characteristics of the LED point light source, the constant current source is used to provide the necessary current and the illuminometer is used to measure the luminance of the LED point light source. The constant current source is controlled by ARM MCU and exchange data with the host computer though the mode of serial communications. The PC is used as the host computer, it adjust the current according to the luminance of the LED point light source until the luminance achieve the anticipated value. By experimental analysis, we found that the LED point light source can achieve the desired requirements as the calibration light source, and the accuracy is quite better that achieve the desired effect and it can adaptive control the luminance of LED well. The system is convenient and flexible, and its performance is stable and reliable.

  20. Front-Light Source Using Inverted Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Microcathode Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Kohei; Naka, Shigeki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    We have demonstrated an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) front-light source with a blinding microcathode array on a transparent electrode and a top-emission structure. Contrast ratio was improved by inserting MoO3 at the indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/Al interface. In a device of glass substrate/ITO/MoO3/meshed Al/lithium fluoride (LiF)/tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum(III) (Alq3)/bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl] benzidine (α-NPD)/MoO3/semitransparent Au structure, the maximum luminance of top-side emission was 1,140 cd/m2, and the contrast ratio was 19:1. The transmittance was 44% at 555 nm.

  1. Optics, Diagnostics and Applications for Fourth-Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A; Barbee, T; Bionta, R; Chapman, H; Ditmire, T; Dyer, G; Kuba, J; Jankowski, A; London, R; Ryutov, R; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Toor, A

    2003-02-05

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL), proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC). The photon output consists of high brightness, transversely coherent pulses with duration < 300 fs, together with a broad spontaneous spectrum with total power comparable to the coherent output. The output fluence, and pulse duration, pose special challenges for optical component and diagnostic designs. We first discuss the specific requirements for the initial scientific experiments, and our proposed solutions. We then describe the supporting research and development program that includes: (1) radiation field modeling, (2) experimental and theoretical material damage studies, (3) high resolution, high fluence-tolerant optical design, fabrication, and testing, (including material manufacturing), and (4) diagnostic design and testing.

  2. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  3. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  4. Continuous-wave optical fiber based supercontinuum light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. G.; Song, Y.; Liu, J. R.; Zhang, X. P.

    2007-11-01

    We have demonstrated a continuum-wave (CW) supercontinuum (SC) fiber light source with over 1000 nm bandwidth based on a low-cost erbium/ytterbium co-doped double-cladding fiber ring cavity laser. Based on the observation to the SC evolvement, we have experimentally analyzed the detailed contributions of several nonlinear effects within highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber (HNLF). Our experimental results have clearly indicated that four-wave mixing (FWM) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) play key roles in CW-pumped SC generation. At the same time, self-phase modulation (SPM) mainly contributes to generate new frequency components near the peaks that appear in the form of the spectra broadening while cross-phase modulation (XPM) enhances the broadening of peaks.

  5. Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System

    SciTech Connect

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

    2007-04-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  6. Commissioning and operation of the first brazilian synchrotron light source.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A R; Craievich, A F; Gonçalves Da Silva, C E

    1998-05-01

    The synchrotron light source designed and constructed at the LNLS is composed of a 1.37 GeV electron storage ring and a 120 MeV linac for low-energy injection. The storage ring has been commissioned and has already reached the designed electron-beam energy, current and emittance. The electron lifetime is now 6 h at 60 mA, and is steadily increasing. Seven beamlines (TGM, SGM, SXS, XAFS, XRD, SAXS, PCr) have been constructed in parallel with the electron accelerators and are at present in operation. Beam time was allocated to 129 approved research projects for the second semester of 1997. A number of them are currently under way. PMID:15263777

  7. A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

    2011-03-23

    The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

  8. Compact light source performance in recessed type luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, E.E.

    1998-11-01

    Photometric comparisons were made with an indoor, recessed, type luminaire using incandescent, high intensity discharge and compact fluorescent lamps. The test results show substantial performance advantages, as expected, for the discharge light sources where the efficacy gains can be in the order for 400% even when including the ballast losses associated with the discharge lamps. The candlepower distribution patterns emerging from these luminaries are also different from those associated with the baseline incandescent lamps, and which are in some ways, even more desirable from a uniformity of illuminance perspective. A section on fluorescent lamp starting is also included which describes a system having excellent starting characteristics in terms of electrode starting temperature (RH/RC technique), proper operating frequency to minimize unwanted IR interactions, and satisfactory current crest factor values to help insure life performance.

  9. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses ; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS' Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  10. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses?; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS` Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  11. Industry-grade high average power femtosecond light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, O. H.; Weiler, S.; Fleischhaker, R.; Gebs, R.; Budnicki, A.; Wolf, M.; Kleinbauer, J.; Russ, S.; Kumkar, M.; Sutter, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrashort pulses are capable of processing practically any material with negligible heat affected zone. Typical pulse durations for industrial applications are situated in the low picosecond-regime. Pulse durations of 5 ps or below are a well established compromise between the electron-phonon interaction time of most materials and the need for pulses long enough to suppress detrimental effects such as nonlinear interaction with the ablated plasma plume. However, sub-picosecond pulses can further increase the ablation efficiency for certain materials, depending on the available average power, pulse energy and peak fluence. Based on the well established TruMicro 5000 platform (first release in 2007, third generation in 2011) an Yb:YAG disk amplifier in combination with a broadband seed laser was used to scale the output power for industrial femtosecond-light sources: We report on a subpicosecond amplifier that delivers a maximum of 160 W of average output power at pulse durations of 750 fs. Optimizing the system for maximum peak power allowed for pulse energies of 850 μJ at pulse durations of 650 fs. Based on this study and the approved design of the TruMicro 5000 product-series, industrygrade, high average power femtosecond-light sources are now available for 24/7 operation. Since their release in May 2013 we were able to increase the average output power of the TruMicro 5000 FemtoEdition from 40 W to 80 W while maintaining pulse durations around 800 fs. First studies on metals reveal a drastic increase of processing speed for some micro processing applications.

  12. Split Hole Resonator: A Nanoscale UV Light Source.

    PubMed

    Melentiev, Pavel N; Afanasiev, Anton E; Kuzin, Arthur A; Gusev, Valeriy M; Kompanets, Oleg N; Esenaliev, Rinat O; Balykin, Victor I

    2016-02-10

    Because of strong light absorption by metals, it is believed that plasmonic nanostructures cannot be used for generating intensive radiation harmonics in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range. This work presents results of investigation of nonlinear optical interaction with a single gold nanostructure, the split-hole resonator (SHR) under the state-of-the-art experimentally realized conditions. To realize interaction with all spectral components of a 6 fs laser pulse several multipole plasmon resonances were simultaneously excited in the SHR nanostructure. To the best of our knowledge, this paper reports for the first time a strong nonlinear optical interaction at the frequencies of these resonances that leads to (i) the second harmonic generation, (ii) the third harmonic generation (THG), and (iii) the light generation at mixed frequencies. The THG near field amplitude reaches 0.6% of the fundamental frequency field amplitude, which enables the creation of UV radiation sources with a record high intensity. The UV THG may find many important applications including biomedical ones (such as cancer therapy). PMID:26797270

  13. Magnetic design of the advanced light source elliptical wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Akre, J.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Jackson, T.; Minamihara, Y.; Pipersky, P.; Plate, D.; Schlueter, R.

    1995-06-01

    An elliptical wiggler has been designed for installation in the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The design has been optimized for the production of circularly polarized light in the 50 eV to 10 KeV energy range. The device will be 3.4 m long consisting of vertical and horizontal periodic structures. The period length for both is 20 cm. The vertical structure is a hybrid permanent magnet design which produces a peak field of 2.0 T. The horizontal magnetic structure is an iron core electromagnetic design shifted longitudinally by one-quarter period relative to the vertical structure; it has a peak field of 0.095 T. The polarity of the horizontal field can be switched at a rate of up to 1 Hz, which results in a modulation of the chirality of the circularly polarized radiation on-axis. This paper discusses the magnetic design and presents the results of radiation spectra calculations used for determining optimal field parameter settings.

  14. Performance of a nonlaser light source for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehurst, Colin; Byrne, Karen T.; Morton, Colin; Moore, James V.

    1995-03-01

    Advances in short arc technology and optical filter coatings led to the design and construction of a table-top light source in 1989; the first viable and cost-effective alternative to a laser. The device can deliver over 3 W within a 30 nm band centered at any wavelength from 200 nm to 1200 nm at fluence rates of over 1 W cm-2. Its relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in vitro has been proven alongside an argon pumped dye laser and a copper vapor pumped dye laser. These in vitro tests showed an efficiency of hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) induced cellular photoinactivation close to that of the argon/dye laser (RBE 100%), with a mean RBE for the lamp of 87 +/- 3% (p < 0.05). The lamp proved to be superior to that of the copper/dye laser system with an RBE of up to 150% at fluence rates above 50 mWcm-2. In vivo tests show that the extent and depth of tumor necrosis are comparable to that of an argon/dye laser. An in situ bioassay using tumor regrowth delay is currently underway. Early clinical trials show clearance of Bowen's disease and actinic keratosis using the same light fluences as costly PDT lasers.

  15. A comparison of new and existing light sources for the petrochemical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Borton, J.A.; Daley, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will compare current light sources with new research available for the Petrochemical Industry in the 1990`s. High lumen output, by today`s standards, is not necessarily the correct criterion for selection of light sources in process and work areas. This paper will demonstrate how the human eye reacts to various light sources both photopically (day vision) and scotopically (night vision). This comparison of light sources with the new research may change the thinking of users and designers in their selection of light sources.

  16. Quantitative phase imaging of biological cells using spatially low and temporally high coherent light source.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Azeem; Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Gyanendra; Singh, Veena; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of biological samples, such as human red blood cells (RBCs) and onion cells using narrow temporal frequency and wide angular frequency spectrum light source. This type of light source was synthesized by the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity of speckle reduction technique. The importance of using low spatial and high temporal coherence light source over the broad band and narrow band light source is that it does not require any dispersion compensation mechanism for biological samples. Further, it avoids the formation of speckle or spurious fringes which arises while using narrow band light source. PMID:27192285

  17. A two-metric proposal to specify the color-rendering properties of light sources for retail lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Rea, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Lighting plays an important role in supporting retail operations, from attracting customers, to enabling the evaluation of merchandise, to facilitating the completion of the sale. Lighting also contributes to the identity, comfort, and visual quality of a retail store. With the increasing availability and quality of white LEDs, retail lighting specifiers are now considering LED lighting in stores. The color rendering of light sources is a key factor in supporting retail lighting goals and thus influences a light source's acceptance by users and specifiers. However, there is limited information on what consumers' color preferences are, and metrics used to describe the color properties of light sources often are equivocal and fail to predict preference. The color rendering of light sources is described in the industry solely by the color rendering index (CRI), which is only indirectly related to human perception. CRI is intended to characterize the appearance of objects illuminated by the source and is increasingly being challenged because new sources are being developed with increasingly exotic spectral power distributions. This paper discusses how CRI might be augmented to better use it in support of the design objectives for retail merchandising. The proposed guidelines include the use of gamut area index as a complementary metric to CRI for assuring good color rendering.

  18. Status of PEP-X Light Source Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Bertsche, K.J.; Cai, Y.; Chao, A.; Huang, X.; Jiao, Y.; Ng, C.-K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Novokhatski, A.; Rivetta, C.H.; Safranek, J.A.; Stupakov, G.V.; Wang, L.; Wang, M.-H.; Xiao, L.; Hettel, R.O.; Rabedeau, T.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    The SLAC Beam Physics group and other SLAC collaborators continue to study options for implementing a near diffraction-limited ring-based light source in the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel that will serve the SSRL scientific program in the future. The study team has completed the baseline design for a 4.5-GeV storage ring having 160 pm-rad emittance with stored beam current of 1.5 A, providing >10{sup 22} brightness for multi-keV photon beams from 3.5-m undulator sources. The team has also investigated possible 5-GeV ERL configurations which, similar to the Cornell and KEK ERL plans, would have {approx}30 pm-rad emittance with 100 mA current, and {approx}10 pm-rad emittance with 25 mA or less. Now a 4.5-GeV 'ultimate' storage ring having emittance similar to the ERL and operating with {approx}200 mA is under study. An overview of the progress of the PEP-X design study and SSRL's plans for defining performance parameters that will guide the choice of ring options is presented.

  19. The macromolecular crystallography facility at the advanced light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earnest, Thomas; Padmore, Howard; Cork, Carl; Behrsing, Rolf; Kim, Sung-Hou

    1996-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over the use of rotating anode sources for biological crystallography, which allow for the collection of higher-resolution data, substantially more rapid data collection, phasing by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) techniques, and time-resolved experiments using polychromatic radiation (Laue diffraction). The use of synchrotron radiation is often necessary to record useful data from crystals which diffract weakly or have very large unit cells. The high brightness and stability characteristics of the advanced light source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, along with the low emittance and long straight sections to accommodate insertion devices present in third generation synchrotrons like the ALS, lead to several advantages in the field of macromolecular crystallography. We are presently constructing a macromolecular crystallography facility at the ALS which is optimized for user-friendliness and high-throughput data collection, with advanced capabilities for MAD and Laue experiments. The X-rays will be directed to three branchlines. A well-equipped support lab will be available for biochemistry, crystal mounting and sample storage, as well as computer hardware and software available, along with staff support, allowing for the complete processing of data on site.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, M.

    1998-01-01

    To improve the quality and uniformity of operations at the Department of Energy`s facilities, the DOE issued Order 5480.19 ``Conduct of Operations Requirements at DOE facilities.`` This order recognizes that the success of a facilities mission critically depends upon a high level of performance by its personnel and equipment. This performance can be severely impaired if the facility`s Conduct of Operations pays inadequate attention to issues of organization, safety, health, and the environment. These guidelines are Brookhaven National Laboratory`s and the National Synchrotron Light Source`s acknowledgement of the principles of Conduct of Operations and the response to DOE Order 5480.19. These guidelines cover the following areas: (1) operations organization and administration; (2) shift routines and operating practices; (3) control area activities; (4) communications; (5) control of on-shift training; (6) investigation of abnormal events; (7) notifications; (8) control of equipment and system studies; (9) lockouts and tagouts; (10) independent verification; (11) log-keeping; (12) operations turnover; (13) operations aspects of facility process control (14) required reading; (15) timely orders to operators; (16) operations procedures; (17) operator aid posting; and (18) equipment sizing and labeling.

  1. Accelerator-based neutron radioscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Harold; Dance, William E.

    1999-06-01

    There is interest in non-reactor source, thermal neutron inspection systems for applications in aircraft maintenance, explosive devices, investment-cast turbine blades, etc. Accelerator sources, (d-T), RFQ accelerators and cyclotrons as examples, are available for either transportable or fixed neutron inspection systems. Sources are reviewed for neutron output, portability, ease of use and cost, and for use with an electronic neutron imaging camera (image intensifier or scintillator-camera system) to provide a prompt response, neutron inspection system. Particular emphasis is given to the current aircraft inspection problem to detect and characterize corrosion. Systems are analyzed to determine usefulness in providing an on-line inspection technique to detect corrosion in aluminum honeycomb aircraft components, either on-aircraft or in a shop environment. The neutron imaging sensitivity to hydrogenous aluminum corrosion product offers early detection advantages for aircraft corrosion, to levels of aluminum metal loss as small as 25 μm. The practical capability for a continuous scan thermal neutron radioscopic system to inspect up to 500 square feet of component surface per day is used as an evaluation criterion, with the system showing contrast sensitivity of at least 5% and image detail in the order of 4 mm for parts 10 cm thick. Under these practical conditions and 3-shift operation, the source must provide an incident thermal neutron flux of 5.6×104n cm-2 s-1 at an L/D of 30. A stop and go inspection approach, offering improved resolution, would require a source with similar characteristics.

  2. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using multiple wave-length LED array light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke; Tanaka, Chizuyo

    2016-03-01

    We have successfully imaged photoacoustic differences of light absorbance between two images acquired by different wave-length LED array light source. Compared to photoacoustic imaging system using conventional solid-state laser light source, LED light source can be driven at higher frequency pulses, so we were able to get the subtraction image at higher frame rate that calculated from two images which were captured at each wave-length LED light pulse timing. We developed LED array light source which is composed to have two different wave-length chips, so each wave-length light pulse can be controlled and emitted freely. Thus LED array light source can be composed as multiple selectable wavelength more than two, and a various combination of subtraction image may become available at high frame rate.

  3. Novel Waveguide Architectures for Light Sources in Silicon Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummidi, Ravi Sekhar

    Of the many challenges which are threatening to derail the success trend set by Moore's Law, perhaps the most prominent one is the "Interconnect Bottleneck". The metallic interconnections which carry inter-chip and intra-chip signals are increasingly proving to be inadequate to carry the enormous amount of data due to band-width limitations, cross talk and increased latency. A silicon based optical interconnect is showing enormous promise to address this issue in a cost effective manner by leveraging the extremely matured CMOS fabrication infrastructure. An optical interconnect system consists of a low loss waveguide, modulator, photo detector and a light source. Of these the only component yet to be demonstrated in silicon is a CMOS compatible electrically pumped silicon based laser. The present work is our endeavor towards the goal of a practical light source in silicon. To this end we have focused our efforts on horizontal slot waveguide which consists of a nm thin low index silica layer sandwiched between two high index silicon layers. Such a structure provides an exceptionally high confinement for the TM-like mode in the thin silica slot. The shallow ridge profile of the waveguide allows in principle for lateral electrical access to the core of the waveguide for excitation of the slot embedded gain material like erbium or nano-crystal sensitized erbium using tunneling, polarization transfer or transport. Low losses in the proposed structure are paramount due to the low gain expectation (˜1dB/cm) from CMOS compatible gain media. This dissertation details the novel techniques conceived to mitigate the severe lateral radiation leakage loss of the TM-like mode in these waveguides and resonators using "Magic Widths" and "Magic Radii" designs. New fabrication techniques are discussed which were developed to achieve ultra-smooth waveguide surfaces to substantially reduce the scattering induced losses in the Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) high index contrast system. This

  4. Variable light source with a million-to-one intensity ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. B.

    1964-01-01

    A wide range, variable intensity light source of constant color characteristics has been developed for testing and calibrating photomultiplier tubes. A light attenuator first diffuses light from a constant source, then permits variable attenuation through a series of chambers and adjustable apertures.

  5. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, David H.; Jongewaard, Erik; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2008-09-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL) requiring extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new type of light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. Therefore a new RF gun or at least the modification of an existing gun was necessary. The parameters listed in Table 1 illustrate the unique characteristics of LCLS which drive the requirements for the electron gun as given in Table 2. The gun beam quality needs to accommodate emittance growth as the beam is travels through approximately one kilometer of linac and two bunch compressors before reaching the undulator. These beam requirements were demonstrated during the recent commissioning runs of the LCLS injector and linac [2] due to the successful design, fabrication, testing and operation of the LCLS gun. The goal of this paper is to relate the technical background of how the gun was able to achieve and in some cases exceed these requirements by understanding and correcting the deficiencies of the prototype s-band RF photocathode gun, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA Gun III. This paper begins with a brief history and technical description of Gun III and the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC, and studies of the gun's RF and emittance compensation solenoid. The work at the GTF identified the gun and solenoid deficiencies, and helped to define the specifications for the LCLS gun. Section 1.1.5 describes the modeling used to compute and correct the gun RF fields and Section 1.1.6 describes the use of these fields in the electron beam simulations. The magnetic design and measurements of

  6. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-08-12

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

  7. Feasibility of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes as an Alternative Light Source for Photocatalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Langanf H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Soler, Robert; Maxik, Fred; Coutts, Janelle; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) could serve as an alternative photon source efficiently for heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO). An LED module consisting of 12 high-power UV-A LEDs was designed to be interchangeable with a UV-A fluorescent black light blue (BLB) lamp in a Silica-Titania Composite (STC) packed bed annular reactor. Lighting and thermal properties were characterized to assess the uniformity and total irradiant output. A forward current of (I(sub F)) 100 mA delivered an average irradiance of 4.0 m W cm(exp -2), which is equivalent to the maximum output of the BLB, but the irradiance of the LED module was less uniform than that of the BLB. The LED- and BLB-reactors were tested for the oxidization of 50 ppmv ethanol in a continuous flow-through mode with 0.94 sec space time. At the same irradiance, the UV-A LED reactor resulted in a lower PCO rate constant than the UV-A BLB reactor (19.8 vs. 28.6 nM CO2 sec-I), and consequently lower ethanol removal (80% vs. 91%) and mineralization efficiency (28% vs. 44%). Ethanol mineralization increased in direct proportion to the irradiance at the catalyst surface. This result suggests that reduced ethanol mineralization in the LED- reactor could be traced to uneven irradiance over the photocatalyst, leaving a portion of the catalyst was under-irradiated. The potential of UV-A LEDs may be fully realized by optimizing the light distribution over the catalyst and utilizing their instantaneous "on" and "off' feature for periodic irradiation. Nevertheless, the current UV-A LED module had the same wall plug efficiency (WPE) of 13% as that of the UV-A BLB. These results demonstrated that UV-A LEDs are a viable photon source both in terms of WPE and PCO efficiency.

  8. The U5. 0 Undulator for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D. )

    1992-01-01

    The U5.0 Undulator, an 89 period, 5 cm period length, 4.6 m long insertion device has been designed, is being fabricated, and is scheduled for completion in early 1992. This undulator will be the first high brightness source, in the 50 to 1,500 eV range, for the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A hybrid magnetic configuration using Nd--Fe--B permanent magnet material and vanadium permendur poles has been selected to achieve the field quality needed to meet performance requirements. The magnetic structure is modular with each half consisting of five assembly sections, which provide the periodic structure, and end structures, for entrance and exit correction, mounted on a steel backing beam. Each assembly section consists of 35 half-period pole assemblies bolted to a mount. The required 0.837 T effective peak field at a 1.4 cm gap has been verified with model measurements. Vertical field integral correction is accomplished with the end structures, each having an arrangement of permanent magnet rotors which will be adjusted to minimize electron beam missteering over the undulator operating field range. To reduce the effect of environmental fields, the steel backing beams are connected through parallel, low-reluctance, Ni--Fe hinges. The magnetic structure is connected through four rollernuts to the drive system that provides gap adjustment with an arrangement of roller screws, chain drives, a gear reduction unit, and a stepper motor driven by a closed loop control system. Magnetic structure and drive system support are from a 2.4 m high structure which includes a support base with four vertical supports. The vacuum chamber design is a two-piece machined and welded 5083-H321 aluminum construction of 5.1 m length. Pumping is with a combination of ion, titanium sublimation pump and nonevaporable getter pumps. Magnetic design, subsystem design, and fabrication progress are presented.

  9. Ozone production at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Weilandics, C.; Rohrig, N.; Gmur, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone production by synchrotron radiation as a function of power density in air was investigated using a white beam at the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) x-ray ring. Power densities were calculated from the energy spectrum at 2.52 GeV. Ozone concentrations in small beam pipes were measured for power densities between I = 10/sup 12/ and 10/sup 15/ eV . cm/sup -3/ . sec/sup -1/. The measured ozone half-life was 37 +- 2 min. The measured G-value was 2.69 +- 0.14 mol/100 eV and the ozone destruction factor k was less than 7 x 10/sup -19/ cm/sup 3/ . eV/sup -1/. The random uncertainties stated are approximately one standard error. The large departure of the values for G and k from previous values suggest that some undiscovered systematic error may exist in the experiment. Ozone concentration in excess of the 0.1 ppM ACGIH TLV can be generated in the experimental hutches but can readily be controlled. Industrial hygiene aspects of operation and possible control measures will be discussed. 19 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Linear Coherent Light Source, LCLS: The upgrade path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    With ultrashort and ultrabright X-ray pulses (>1012 photons in pulses of < 100 femtosecond length) X-ray Free electron lasers provide revolutionary new capabilities to study a wide range of phenomena including novel states of matter, quantum materials, ultrafast chemistry and structural biology. Starting operations in 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC has been the first of such machines delivering 280 eV-11 keV X-ray pulses to users at a rate of 120 Hz. The success of the LCLS has positively impacted numerous efforts around the world and there are now five hard X-ray FELs in operation or under construction in addition to two FELs that operate in the VUV and soft X-ray region. The planned LCLS upgrade, LCLS-II, has recently been modified in order to address the recommendation of a report of the Basic Energy Science Advisory Committee from last summer. We will present examples of some of the most exciting LCLS science highlights, discuss operation upgrades and present the parameters of the new LCLS-II upgrade.

  11. Alternate Tunings for the Linac Coherent Light Source Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) project based on the SLAC linac. The LCLS Photoinjector beamline has been designed to deliver 10-ps long electron bunches of 1 nC with a normalized projected transverse emittance smaller than 1.2 mm-mrad at 135 MeV. Tolerances and regulation requirements are tight for this tuning. Half of the total emittance at the end of the injector comes from the ''cathode emittance'' which is 0.7 mm-mrad for our nominal 1nC tuning. As the ''cathode emittance'' scales linearly with laser spot radius, the emittance will be dramatically reduced for smaller radius, but this is only possible at lower charge. In particular, for a 0.2 nC charge, we believe we can achieve an emittance closer to 0.4 mm-mrad. This working point will be easier to tune and the beam quality should be much easier to maintain than for the 1 nC case. In the second half of this paper, we discuss optimum laser pulse shapes. We demonstrate that the benefits of the ellipsoidal shapes seem to be important enough so that serious investigations should be carried out in the production of such pulses.

  12. Vacuum system for the LBL Advanced Light Source (ALS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, K.; Henderson, T.; Meneghetti, J. )

    1989-03-01

    A 1.5 to 1.9 GeV synchrotron light source is being built at LBL. The vacuum system is designed to permit most synchrotron photons to escape the electron channel and be absorbed in an antechamber. The gas generated by the photons hitting the absorbers in the antechambers will be pumped by titanium sublimation pumps located directly under the absorbers. The electron channel and the antechamber are connected by a 10-mm-high slot that offers good electrodynamic isolation of the two chambers of frequencies affecting the store electron orbit. Twelve 10-meter-long vessels constitute the vacuum chambers for all the lattice magnets. Each chamber will be machined from two thick plates of 5083-H321 aluminum and welded at the perimeter. Machining both the inside and outside of the vacuum chamber permits the use of complex and accurate surfaces. The use of thick plates allows flanges to be machined directly into the wall of each chamber, thus avoiding much welding. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  13. Vacuum system for the LBL advanced light source (ALS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, K.

    1988-05-01

    A 1.5 to 1.9 GeV synchrotron light source is being built at LBL. The vacuum system is designed to permit all synchrotron photons on the median plane to escape the electron channel and go into an antechamber through a 10 mm high slot. This slot offers effective RF isolation between the electron duct and the antechamber. All unused synchrotron photons within a few mrad of the median plane will be stopped by 96 nearly horizontal absorbers located in the antechamber. The gas, generated by the photons hitting the absorbers, will be directed down to reactive titanium surfaces. Twelve 10 meter long vessels constitute the vacuum chambers for all the lattice magnets. Each chamber will be machined from two thick plates of 5083-H321 aluminum and welded at the perimeter. The nominal wall thickness of the vacuum chamber is 40 mm, which makes it possible to machine a flange into the chamber without the use of welding. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Beam-based Feedback for the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, D.; Allison, S.; Chevtsov, S.; Chu, P.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Himel, T.; Kim, K.; Krejcik, P.; Loos, H.; Lahey, T.; Natampalli, P.; Peng, S.; Rogind, D.; Shoaee, H.; Straumann, T.; Williams, E.; White, G.; Wu, J.; Zelazney, M.; /SLAC

    2010-02-11

    Beam-based feedback control loops are required by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) program in order to provide fast, single-pulse stabilization of beam parameters. Eight transverse feedback loops, a 6 x 6 longitudinal feedback loop, and a loop to maintain the electron bunch charge were successfully prototyped in MATLAB for the LCLS, and have been maintaining stability of the LCLS electron beam at beam rates up to 30Hz. In the final commissioning phase of LCLS the beam will be operating at up to 120Hz. In order to run the feedback loops at beam rate, the feedback loops will be implemented in EPICS IOCs with a dedicated ethernet multi-cast network. This paper will discuss the design of the beam-based Fast Feedback System for LCLS. Topics include MATLAB feedback prototyping, algorithm for 120Hz feedback, network design for fast data transport, actuator and sensor design for single-pulse control and sensor readback, and feedback configuration and runtime control.

  15. A multipole superconducting wiggler for Canadian light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekhtenev, E. A.; Khruschev, S. V.; Kuper, E. A.; Lev, V. H.; Mezentsev, N. A.; Miginsky, E. G.; Repkov, V. V.; Shkaruba, B. A.; Syrovatin, V. M.; Tsukanov, V. M.

    2006-12-01

    A contract for multipole superconducting wiggler design and fabrication between The University of Saskatchewan and Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics was signed in October 2003. A wiggler with the photons energy range 4 to 40 keV, the maximum field 1.9 T, and the period length as small as possible was required for the micro-XAFS beamline. In 2004 the 2 T 63-pole superconducting wiggler with the average period length 34 mm was fabricated in BINP. To eliminate the undulator-type spectrum, the periodicity of the wiggler was broken. A new approach to the cryostat design enabled long-time (up to 6 months) machine operation without liquid helium refilling (LHe consumption <0.03 l/h). After successful tests the wiggler was installed on the Canadian Light Source (CLS) storage ring with the energy 2.9 GeV in January 2005. The main parameters of the magnet and the cryogenic systems, as well as magnet measurements data, cryogenic system test data, and experimental results during machine operation on the CLS storage ring are presented.

  16. New Large Volume Press Beamlines at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Hormes, J.; Lauterjung, J.; Secco, R.; Hallin, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Canadian Light Source, the German Research Centre for Geosciences and the Western University recently agreed to establish two new large volume press beamlines at the Canadian Lightsource. As the first step a 250 tons DIA-LVP will be installed at the IDEAS beamline in 2014. The further development is associated with the construction of a superconducting wiggler beamline at the Brockhouse sector. A 1750 tons DIA LVP will be installed there about 2 years later. Up to the completion of this wiggler beamline the big press will be used for offline high pressure high temperature experiments under simulated Earth's mantle conditions. In addition to X-ray diffraction, all up-to-date high pressure techniques as ultrasonic interferometry, deformation analyses by X-radiography, X-ray densitometry, falling sphere viscosimetry, multi-staging etc. will be available at both beamlines. After the required commissioning the beamlines will be open to the worldwide user community from Geosciences, general material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology etc. based on the evaluation and ranking of the submitted user proposals by an international review panel.

  17. Lattice Development for Pep-X High Brightness Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Cai, Yunhai; Wang, Min-Huey; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Design of PEP-X high brightness light source machine is under development at SLAC. The PEP-X is a proposed replacement for the PEP-II in the existing 2.2 km tunnel. Two of the PEP-X six arcs contain DBA type lattice providing 30 dispersion free straights suitable for 3.5 m long undulators. The lattice contains TME cells in the other four arcs and 89.3 m wiggler in a long straight section yielding a horizontal emittance of {approx}0.1 nm-rad at 4.5 GeV. The recent lattice modifications are aimed at increasing the predicted brightness and improving beam dynamic properties. The standard DBA cells are modified into supercells for providing low-{beta} undulator straights. The DBA and TME cell phase advance is better optimized. Harmonic sextupoles are added to minimize the sextupole driven resonance effects and amplitude dependent tune shift. Finally, the injection scheme is changed from vertical to horizontal plane in order to avoid large vertical amplitudes of injected beam within small vertical aperture of undulators.

  18. Final Report, Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-antimonide cathodes b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns and copper RF photoguns

  19. Spectra of Three Light Sources with a CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanetti, Vittorio; Harris, John

    1993-01-01

    Uses a compact disc (CD) as a grating in spectroscopy experiments. Suggests using the CD with fluorescent tubes, compact fluorescent light bulbs, incandescent filament light bulbs, and sodium and mercury vapor lamps. Discusses environmental and economic aspects of fluorescent lighting. (MVL)

  20. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a

  1. Two-function light source in a FBG multi-point sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shi-Ya; Deng, Yan-Hao; Yu, Yang; Hu, Shu-Yang; Guan, Zheng

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, a two-function light source is recommended. It can both amplify the light power and demodulate the wavelength signal. Its output power is 1000 times as high as traditional broadband light source (BBS) and it can demodulate the signal by scanning wavelength in 30 nm of bandwidth range in the situation of 1550 nm central wavelength. This kind of light source effectively solves the problem of light energy supply in more-point measurement of FBG and simplifies the structure of sensing measurement.

  2. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. )

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  3. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  4. Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

  5. Polymer and small molecule based hybrid light source

    DOEpatents

    Choong, Vi-En; Choulis, Stelios; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Mathai, Mathew; So, Franky

    2010-03-16

    An organic electroluminescent device, includes: a substrate; a hole-injecting electrode (anode) coated over the substrate; a hole injection layer coated over the anode; a hole transporting layer coated over the hole injection layer; a polymer based light emitting layer, coated over the hole transporting layer; a small molecule based light emitting layer, thermally evaporated over the polymer based light emitting layer; and an electron-injecting electrode (cathode) deposited over the electroluminescent polymer layer.

  6. Multi-channel LED light source for fluorescent agent aided minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiacheng; Venugopalan, Janani; Xu, Jian; Kairdolf, Brad; Durfee, Robert; Wang, May D

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common and deadly diseases around the world. Amongst all the different treatments of cancer such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, surgical resection is the most effective. Successful surgeries greatly rely on the detection of the accurate tumor size and location, which can be enhanced by contrast agents. Commercial endoscope light sources, however, offer only white light illumination. In this paper, we present the development of a LED endoscope light source that provides 2 light channels plus white light to help surgeons to detect a clear tumor margin during minimally invasive surgeries. By exciting indocyanine green (ICG) and 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), the light source is intended to give the user a visible image of the tumor margin. This light source is also portable, easy to use and costs less than $300 to build. PMID:25571589

  7. Multi-Channel LED Light Source for Fluorescent Agent Aided Minimally Invasive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiacheng; Venugopalan, Janani; Xu, Jian; Kairdolf, Brad; Durfee, Robert; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common and deadly diseases around the world. Amongst all the different treatments of cancer such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, surgical resection is the most effective. Successful surgeries greatly rely on the detection of the accurate tumor size and location, which can be enhanced by contrast agents. Commercial endoscope light sources, however, offer only white light illumination. In this paper, we present the development of a LED endoscope light source that provides 2 light channels plus white light to help surgeons to detect a clear tumor margin during minimally invasive surgeries. By exciting indocyanine green (ICG) and 5-Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), the light source is intended to give the user a visible image of the tumor margin. This light source is also portable, easy to use and costs less than $300 to build. PMID:25571589

  8. Influences of colorful LED emissions on spectrophotometric properties of a LED based white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sametoglu, F.; Celikel, O.

    2011-05-01

    A LED based white light source (WLS) is designed and constructed to determine the color characteristics of the samples having specular and diffuse reflectance properties at the standard measurement conditions of 0/45 and d/8. The light source is composed of high power cool white and ultraviolet light emitting diodes (LEDs) which are operable in adjustable current levels. In order to combine the light beams emerging from two LED sources, a 1x2 fiber optic combiner is used. Optical characterizations of the light source designed and influences of several colorful LEDs called Royal-Blue, Blue, Cyan, Green, Amber, Red-Orange and Red on spectrophotometric properties of the light source are investigated.

  9. Development of multiwavelength excitation light source for autofluorescence and photodynamic diagnosis systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenar, Necla; Lim, H. S.; Mirzaaghasi, Amin

    2014-02-01

    New design of the excitation light source that can stably generate light with center wavelengths of 450nm, 530nm, 632.8nm and white light for auto-fluorescence(AF) and photodynamic diagnosis(PDD) of cancer in clinics in a single system is presented in this study. The light source consists of Xenon Lamp (300W), light guide module including motorize filter wheel equipped with optical filters with corresponding to wavelength bands, servo motor, motorize iris, a cooling system, power supply and optical transmission part for the output light. The transmission part of the light source was developed to collimate the light with desired wavelength into input of fiber optic. Output powers are obtained average 99.91 mW for 450+/-40 nm, 111.01 mW for 530+/-10nm, and 78.50 mW for 632.8+/-10nm.

  10. A compact high brightness laser synchrotron light source for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    1999-07-01

    The present high-brightness hard X-ray sources have been developed as third generation synchrotron light sources based on large high energy electron storage rings and magnetic undulators. Recently availability of compact terawatt lasers arouses a great interest in the use of lasers as undulators. The laser undulator concept makes it possible to construct an attractive compact synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed as a laser synchrotron light source. This paper proposes a compact laser synchrotron light source for mediacal applications, such as an intravenous coronary angiography and microbeam therapy.

  11. Organic Light Emitting Device as a fluorescence spectroscopy's light source : one step towards the lab-on-a-chip device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camou, S.; Kitamura, M.; Gouy, Jean-Philippe; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Teruo

    2003-02-01

    Many papers were recently dedicated to the lab-on-a-chip applications, where all the basic elements should be integrated directly onto the microchip. The fluorescence spectroscopy is mostly used as a detection method due to its high reliability and sensitivity, but requires light source and photo-detector. For the first time, we then propose to use Organic material Light Emitting Diode (OLED) to supply a light source for the optical detection based on fluorescence spectroscopy. By combining this OLED with micro-fluidic channels patterned in PDMS layer, the integration of light source on the chip is then achieved. First, the ability of Organic Material to excite fluorescent response from dye is demonstrated. Then, some configurations are described in order to decrease the major drawbacks that have to be solved before applying such kind of devices.

  12. A low-cost low-maintenance ultraviolet lithography light source based on light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Erickstad, M; Gutierrez, E; Groisman, A

    2015-01-01

    A source of collimated ultraviolet (UV) light is a central piece of equipment needed for lithographic fabrication of microfluidic devices. Conventional UV light sources based on high-pressure mercury lamps require considerable maintenance and provide broad-band illumination with intensity that often changes with time. Here we present a source of narrow-band UV light based on an array of nine 365 nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Each LED has two dedicated converging lenses, reducing the divergence of light emanating from it to 5.4°. Partial overlap of the areas illuminated by individual LEDs provides UV illumination with a mean intensity of ~1.7 mW cm(-2) and coefficient of variation <3% over a 90 × 90 mm target area. The light source was used to lithographically fabricate micro-reliefs with thicknesses from ~25 to 311 μm with SU8 photoresists. A cumulative irradiation of 370 mJ cm(-2) (4 min exposure) produced reliefs of good quality for all SU8 thicknesses. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replicas of the SU8 reliefs had microchannels with nearly rectangular cross-sections that were highly consistent over the entire target area, and partitions between the channels had depth to width ratios up to 5. The UV light source has also been successfully used for photolithography with positive photoresists, AZ40XT and SPR-220. The proposed light source is built with a total cost of <$1000, consumes a minimal amount of power, is expected to last for ~50,000 exposures, is maintenance-free, and is particularly appealing for small research-and-development microfluidic fabrication. PMID:25322205

  13. Comparative effectiveness of clinically used light sources for cutaneous protoporphyrin IX-based photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sayre, Robert M; Dowdy, John C; Gottschalk, Ronald W

    2011-04-01

    This report documents the optical characteristics of a number of photodynamic therapy (PDT) light sources of varied types, measured and indexed relative to estimated effectiveness for activation of the PDT chromaphore protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). PDT sources in use at several clinics, including intense pulsed light (IPL) sources, lasers, and continuous wave (CW) light sources, were spectroradiometrically measured and indexed relative to their overlap to an absorption spectrum of PpIX. The sources were highly disparate, varying in power from irradiance in the mW/cm(2) range for the CW sources up to ∼30 J/cm(2) per flash for the IPL sources. Our PpIX Index ranged by a factor of nearly 100 (0.008-0.630) in estimated PpIX PDT effectiveness following the distinct spectral characteristics of the light sources surveyed. Application of this PpIX Index, tempered with an understanding of the biology of the lesion being treated and effective spectrum of the light source reaching the lesion requiring therapy, provides a rational algorithm to approximate equivalent light doses prior to clinical protocols to establish equivalent patient outcomes employing alternative PDT light sources. PMID:21401379

  14. Brighter incandescent light sources from the black metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, Anatoliy Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2010-02-01

    In this work, by applying the femtosecond laser blackening technique directly to a tungsten incandescent lamp filament, we dramatically brighten the tungsten lamp and enhance its emission efficiency by 60%. This process in fact leads the tungsten incandescent light bulb to approach the 100% emission efficiency. A comparison study of emission and absorption for the structured metal surface shows that Kirchhoff's law is applicable for the black metal. More importantly, we demonstrate that we can even obtain partially polarized light as well as control the spectral range of the optimal light emission from the laser-blackened tungsten lamp.

  15. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  16. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  17. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  18. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  19. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  20. 21 CFR 874.4350 - Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4350 Ear, nose, and throat fiberoptic light source and carrier. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and...

  1. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1997-05-06

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 10 figs.

  2. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kopelman, R.; Tan, W.; Shi, Z.Y.

    1994-11-01

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications. 4 figs.

  3. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kopelman, Raoul; Tan, Weihong; Shi, Zhong-You

    1997-01-01

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a fiber optic micro-light source and sensor (50). An optical fiber micro-light source (50) is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors (22) in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material (60). This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source (50). Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material (60) enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  4. Micro optical fiber light source and sensor and method of fabrication thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kopelman, Raoul; Tan, Weihong; Shi, Zhong-You

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates generally to the development of and a method of fabricating a micro optical fiber light source. An optical fiber micro-light source is presented whose aperture is extremely small yet able to act as an intense light source. Light sources of this type have wide ranging applications, including use as micro-sensors in NSOM. Micro-sensor light sources have excellent detection limits as well as photo stability, reversibility, and millisecond response times. Furthermore, a method for manufacturing a micro optical fiber light source is provided. It involves the photo-chemical attachment of an optically active material onto the end surface of an optical fiber cable which has been pulled to form an end with an extremely narrow aperture. More specifically, photopolymerization has been applied as a means to photo-chemically attach an optically active material. This process allows significant control of the size of the micro light source. Furthermore, photo-chemically attaching an optically active material enables the implementation of the micro-light source in a variety of sensor applications.

  5. lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light SourceCommunication

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2004-10-04

    Research at the world's accelerator- (storage-ring and linac) based light sources is one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of science. It frequently results in direct benefits to society, thereby demonstrating the value of the research with very concrete examples, but this is not widely understood or appreciated outside of the immediate user community. Our growing group of light source communicators from facilities in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, inspired by the Interactions.org Web site created by high-energy (elementary-particle)physics communicators, concluded that a light source community Web site (lightsources.org) would be the best tool for establishing effective collaboration between the communications offices of the world's light sources and to maximize the impact of our efforts. We envision lightsources.org to serve as a one-stop-shopping site for information about all aspects of light sources and the research they make possible. Audiences to be served include science communicators, the press, policymakers, the light source community, the wider scientific community, the science-interested public, and students and educators. Our proposal has been sent to the world's light source facility directors by J. Murray Gibson (APS) and William G. Stirling (ESRF). As a result,light sources.org is now being supported by a growing list of facilities from Europe, North America, and Asia. We hope to launch lightsources.org before the end of 2004.

  6. X-ray micro-Tomography at the Advanced Light Source

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A...

  7. Take a quick trip around the experimental floor of the Lab's new light source

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-30

    Take a quick trip around the experimental floor of Brookhaven Lab's new light source -- the $912-million National Synchrotron Light Source II. Construction of the facility is now over 70 percent completed. With much of the conventional construction done, accelerator and experimental components are being installed.

  8. A narrow-band speckle-free light source via random Raman lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokr, Brett H.; Schmidt, Morgan S.; Bixler, Joel N.; Dyer, Phillip N.; Noojin, Gary D.; Redding, Brandon; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Cao, Hui; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no light source exists which is both narrowband and speckle free with sufficient brightness for full-field imaging applications. Light-emitting diodes are excellent spatially incoherent sources, but are tens of nanometers broad. Lasers, on the other hand, can produce very narrow-band light, but suffer from high spatial coherence which leads to speckle patterns, which distort the image. Here, we propose the use of random Raman laser emission as a new kind of light source capable of providing short-pulsed narrow-band speckle-free illumination for imaging applications.

  9. Inferred motion perception of light sources in 3D scenes is color-blind.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Holly E; Maloney, Laurence T

    2013-01-01

    In everyday scenes, the illuminant can vary spatially in chromaticity and luminance, and change over time (e.g. sunset). Such variation generates dramatic image effects too complex for any contemporary machine vision system to overcome, yet human observers are remarkably successful at inferring object properties separately from lighting, an ability linked with estimation and tracking of light field parameters. Which information does the visual system use to infer light field dynamics? Here, we specifically ask whether color contributes to inferred light source motion. Observers viewed 3D surfaces illuminated by an out-of-view moving collimated source (sun) and a diffuse source (sky). In half of the trials, the two sources differed in chromaticity, thereby providing more information about motion direction. Observers discriminated light motion direction above chance, and only the least sensitive observer benefited slightly from the added color information, suggesting that color plays only a very minor role for inferring light field dynamics. PMID:23755354

  10. High luminance low etendue white light source using blue laser over static phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Tayyab; Qian, KeYuan

    2015-10-01

    A High Luminance White Light source for Etendue limited application has been demonstrated in this research paper by using blue InGaN laser diode beam over static source of phosphor Ce: YAG layer. Phosphor target has kept static because moving phosphor target light output is not constant and uniform. Different color temperatures had been obtained by varying phosphor concentration and thickness of the layer. When laser beam has focused on phosphor target spot, it induced very high temperature at that spot area. Temperature induced in the layer by laser beam depends on the layer thickness. All the layer thickness, surface temperature, output light flux, efficiency, and light color temperature are interrelate with each other. Uniform laser beam distribution, surface temperature, laser spot size, phosphor layer thickness are successfully calculated. Luminous efficiency, light color temperature, flux, wavelength spectrum, and light output power of laser driven white light source had been successfully observed at different laser beam powers.

  11. Parallel Beam Dynamics Simulation Tools for Future Light SourceLinac Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Pogorelov, Ilya v.; Ryne, Robert D.

    2007-06-25

    Large-scale modeling on parallel computers is playing an increasingly important role in the design of future light sources. Such modeling provides a means to accurately and efficiently explore issues such as limits to beam brightness, emittance preservation, the growth of instabilities, etc. Recently the IMPACT codes suite was enhanced to be applicable to future light source design. Simulations with IMPACT-Z were performed using up to one billion simulation particles for the main linac of a future light source to study the microbunching instability. Combined with the time domain code IMPACT-T, it is now possible to perform large-scale start-to-end linac simulations for future light sources, including the injector, main linac, chicanes, and transfer lines. In this paper we provide an overview of the IMPACT code suite, its key capabilities, and recent enhancements pertinent to accelerator modeling for future linac-based light sources.

  12. Nanograting-based compact VUV spectrometer and beam profiler for in-situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

    2010-07-09

    A compact, versatile device for VUV beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a micro-channel plate based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 nm to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25 nm to 0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for non-intrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

  13. Accelerator-based Experiments For Introductory-level Undergraduates

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Justin M.

    2009-03-10

    Although accelerator based experiments for undergraduates are often considered only for junior or senior physics majors, introductory students can also benefit from them. Rutherford backscattering and a {sup 12}C(p,p){sup 12}C elastic scattering resonance can be presented in ways that are well-suited for students who have taken only an introductory physics course.

  14. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-05-04

    Design considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-gamma collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator gamma gamma collider is presented.

  15. Highly reliable 198-nm light source for semiconductor inspection based on dual fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Shinichi; Matsuki, Kazuto; Kikuiri, Nobutaka; Takayama, Katsuhiko; Iwase, Osamu; Urata, Yoshiharu; Shinozaki, Tatsuya; Wada, Yoshio; Wada, Satoshi

    2010-02-01

    Highly reliable DUV light sources are required for semiconductor applications such as a photomask inspection. The mask inspection for the advanced devices requires the UV lightning wavelength beyond 200 nm. By use of dual fiber lasers as fundamental light sources and the multi-wavelength conversion we have constructed a light source of 198nm with more than 100 mW. The first laser is Yb doped fiber laser with the wavelength of 1064 nm; the second is Er doped fiber laser with 1560 nm. To obtain the robustness and to simplify the configuration, the fundamental lights are run in the pulsed operation and all wavelength conversions are made in single-pass scheme. The PRFs of more than 2 MHz are chosen as an alternative of a CW light source; such a high PRF light is equivalent to CW light for inspection cameras. The light source is operated described as follows. Automatic weekly maintenance within an hour is done if it is required; automatic monthly maintenance within 4 hours is done on fixed date per month; manufacturer's maintenance is done every 6 month. Now this 198 nm light sources are equipped in the leading edge photomask inspection machines.

  16. Light intensity and quality from sole-source light-emitting diodes impact growth, morphology, and nutrient content of Brassica microgreens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-layer vertical production systems using sole-source (SS) lighting can be used for microgreen production; however, traditional SS lighting can consume large amounts of electrical energy. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offer many advantages over conventional light sources including: high photoelec...

  17. Preliminary study for improving the VIIRS DNB low light calibration accuracy with ground based active light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changyong; Zong, Yuqing; Bai, Yan; Shao, Xi

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the science and user community in the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) low light detection capabilities at night for quantitative applications such as airglow, geophysical retrievals under lunar illumination, light power estimation, search and rescue, energy use, urban expansion and other human activities. Given the growing interest in the use of the DNB data, a pressing need arises for improving the calibration stability and absolute accuracy of the DNB at low radiances. Currently the low light calibration accuracy was estimated at a moderate 15%-100% while the long-term stability has yet to be characterized. This study investigates selected existing night light point sources from Suomi NPP DNB observations and evaluates the feasibility of SI traceable nightlight source at radiance levels near 3 nW·cm-2·sr-1, that potentially can be installed at selected sites for VIIRS DNB calibration/validation. The illumination geometry, surrounding environment, as well as atmospheric effects are also discussed. The uncertainties of the ground based light source are estimated. This study will contribute to the understanding of how the Earth's atmosphere and surface variability contribute to the stability of the DNB measured radiances, and how to separate them from instrument calibration stability. It presents the need for SI traceable active light sources to monitor the calibration stability, radiometric and geolocation accuracy, and point spread functions of the DNB. Finally, it is also hoped to address whether or not active light sources can be used for detecting environmental changes, such as aerosols.

  18. Present Status and Future of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) Light Source Research 4.Laser Produced Plasma Light Sources 4.2High Average Power Laser Produced Plasma EUV Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira

    This paper reviews the research and development of the high average power, extreme ultraviolet light source based on laser produced plasma by EUVA. The technology is based on a liquid Xe micro jet, high repetition rate short pulse Nd:YAG laser, and various diagnostics for plasma optimization are described.

  19. Computation and visualization of the MacAdam limits for any lightness, hue angle, and light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Verdú, Francisco; Perales, Esther; Chorro, Elisabet; de Fez, Dolores; Viqueira, Valentín; Gilabert, Eduardo

    2007-06-01

    We present a systematic algorithm capable of searching for optimal colors for any lightness L* (between 0 and 100), any illuminant (D65, F2, F7, F11, etc.), and any light source reported by CIE. Color solids are graphed in some color spaces (CIELAB, SVF, DIN99d, and CIECAM02) by horizontal (constant lightness) and transversal (constant hue angle) sections. Color solids plotted in DIN99d and CIECAM02 color spaces look more spherical or homogeneous than the ones plotted in CIELAB and SVF color spaces. Depending on the spectrum of the light source or illuminant, the shape of its color solid and its content (variety of distinguishable colors, with or without color correspondence) change drastically, particularly with sources whose spectrum is discontinuous and/or very peaked, with correlated color temperature lower than 5500 K. This could be used to propose an absolute colorimetric quality index for light sources comparing the volumes of their gamuts, in a uniform color space.

  20. Detecting an Extended Light Source through a Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litaker, E. T.; Machacek, J. R.; Gay, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of a cylindrical luminescent volume and a typical lens-detector system. The results of this simulation yield a graphically simple picture of the regions within the cylindrical volume from which this system detects light. Because the cylindrical volume permits large angles of incidence, we use a modification of…

  1. Fluorescent photography of spray droplets using a laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, J.; Hiroyasu, H.; Sowls, R.

    1969-01-01

    Monochromatic laser emission transformed by a fluorescent process into droplet emission over a wavelength band provides high light intensities for obtaining adequate time resolution to stop droplet motion in photographic spray studies. Experiments showed that the Q-switched laser-optical harmonic generator combination produced sharp, well-exposed droplet images.

  2. Stage Scenery, Machinery, and Lighting: A Guide to Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Richard

    This annotated bibliography traces the status of stage scenery and lighting, throughout the world, from the classical Greek theatre to the theatre of the 1970s, and includes references to available books, articles, pamphlets, some exhibition catalogs, and a few newspaper articles. Part one lists general references, including bibliographies and…

  3. Microwave Oven Experiments with Metals and Light Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter; Karstadt, Detlef

    2004-01-01

    "Don't put metal objects in the microwave" is common safety advice. But why? Here we describe demonstration experiments involving placing household metallic objects in a microwave oven. These allow a better understanding of the interaction of microwaves with materials. Light bulbs and discharge lamps can also be used in instructive demonstrations.

  4. A novel photobioreactor structure using optical fibers as inner light source to fulfill flashing light effects of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shengzhang; Zhang, Qinghua; Wu, Xia; Yan, Chenghu; Cong, Wei

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a novel photobioreactor structure using optical fibers being fixed vertically to culture flow direction as inner light source was proposed to fulfill flashing light effects (FLE) of microalgae, so as to obtain high light efficiency. Three types of optical-fiber photobioreactor fulfilling FLE of microalgae, i.e. air-driven panel, pump-driven panel and stirred tank type, were proposed and a 130 L airlift panel one was practically constructed on which both cold (light profile, liquid velocity) and hot model tests were carried out. Results demonstrated that it could produce uniformed light/dark frequencies being over 10 Hz and microalgae productivity increased by 43% and 38% for Spirulina platensis and Scenedesmus dimorphus respectively, compared with the control. This suggested the structure to be a viable and promising option for future photobioreactors. PMID:23612173

  5. In situ calibration of a light source in a sensor device

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Serkland, Darwin k.; Merchant, Bion J.

    2015-12-29

    A sensor device is described herein, wherein the sensor device includes an optical measurement system, such as an interferometer. The sensor device further includes a low-power light source that is configured to emit an optical signal having a constant wavelength, wherein accuracy of a measurement output by the sensor device is dependent upon the optical signal having the constant wavelength. At least a portion of the optical signal is directed to a vapor cell, the vapor cell including an atomic species that absorbs light having the constant wavelength. A photodetector captures light that exits the vapor cell, and generates an electrical signal that is indicative of intensity of the light that exits the vapor cell. A control circuit controls operation of the light source based upon the electrical signal, such that the light source emits the optical signal with the constant wavelength.

  6. Modelling of a laser-pumped light source for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Hanna, George B.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-09-01

    A white light source, based on illumination of a yellow phosphor with a fibre-coupled blue-violet diode laser, has been designed and built for use in endoscopic surgery. This narrow light probe can be integrated into a standard laparoscope or inserted into the patient separately via a needle. We present a Monte Carlo model of light scattering and phosphorescence within the phosphor/silicone matrix at the probe tip, and measurements of the colour, intensity, and uniformity of the illumination. Images obtained under illumination with this light source are also presented, demonstrating the improvement in illumination quality over existing endoscopic light sources. This new approach to endoscopic lighting has the advantages of compact design, improved ergonomics, and more uniform illumination in comparison with current technologies.

  7. Science at the Speed of Light: Advanced Photon Source

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2010-01-08

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays.

  8. Science at the Speed of Light: Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2009-06-03

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays.

  9. VIA screening for cervical cancer in developing countries: potential role of the light source.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Parashari, A; Sehgal, A

    2013-11-01

    A total of 385 symptomatic patients presenting to the gynaecology and obstetrics outpatient department were screened by two sources of light: the yellow light of the tungsten bulb and the white light of the halogen bulb (100 Watt, 12 Volt), fitted with KODAK 80B filter and diffuser in an instrument called a 'Magnivisualizer' (developed by our Institute). Colposcopic examination was the gold standard for visualisation of the cervix. This study clearly brings out the significance of visual examination of the cervix using white light; as, in addition to having perfect correlation with colposcopy (0.86 for white vs 0.53 for yellow light), white light enables us to select the correct site of biopsy. Most of the rural clinics use torch or ordinary tungsten bulb, thus missing many significant lesions. In the light of our research findings, we strongly recommend the use of white light (complete spectrum of light) for screening purposes. PMID:24219738

  10. Study of Selecting on Light Source Used for Micro-algae Cultivation in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Weidang; Ai, Weidang; Guo, Shuang-Sheng; Gao, Feng; Tang, Yong-Kang; Qin, Li-Feng

    To select suitable light source for micro-algae cultivation in future space station, the selected Spirulina plastensis(No.7) were cultured under different lightening qualities, including six light sources that were made up of different combinations of red and blue light-emitting diode(LED). The growth, photosynthetic efficiency and nutrition quality of the Spirulina, were analyzed. From the experiments, the red light may promote the cumulation of biomass of the Spirulina, and the cumulating rate was the highest under all red light source, but the syntheses of protein, phycobiliprotein, β-carotene, VE and other nutrients needs a certain portion of blue light; yet, the complete blue light condition is not favorable to the growth of Spirulina, and may bring pollution by chlorella and other kinds of micro-algae. It is concluded that the LEDs can be used as the light resource of micro-algae cultivation. The normal growth and development of microalgae need two light sources of both red and blue LEDs. The comprehensive analyses of the various factors that affect the growth of Spirulina, such as nutrition quality and photosynthetic activities, etc., showed that the combination of 80% red and 20% blue LED is the optimum one among those tested combinations. Key word: light-emitting diode; micro-algae; controlled ecological life support system (CELSS); space cultivation

  11. High-Efficiency Nitride-Base Photonic Crystal Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    James Speck; Evelyn Hu; Claude Weisbuch; Yong-Seok Choi; Kelly McGroddy; Gregor Koblmuller; Elison Matioli; Elizabeth Rangel; Fabian Rol; Dobri Simeonov

    2010-01-31

    The research activities performed in the framework of this project represent a major breakthrough in the demonstration of Photonic Crystals (PhC) as a competitive technology for LEDs with high light extraction efficiency. The goals of the project were to explore the viable approaches to manufacturability of PhC LEDS through proven standard industrial processes, establish the limits of light extraction by various concepts of PhC LEDs, and determine the possible advantages of PhC LEDs over current and forthcoming LED extraction concepts. We have developed three very different geometries for PhC light extraction in LEDs. In addition, we have demonstrated reliable methods for their in-depth analysis allowing the extraction of important parameters such as light extraction efficiency, modal extraction length, directionality, internal and external quantum efficiency. The information gained allows better understanding of the physical processes and the effect of the design parameters on the light directionality and extraction efficiency. As a result, we produced LEDs with controllable emission directionality and a state of the art extraction efficiency that goes up to 94%. Those devices are based on embedded air-gap PhC - a novel technology concept developed in the framework of this project. They rely on a simple and planar fabrication process that is very interesting for industrial implementation due to its robustness and scalability. In fact, besides the additional patterning and regrowth steps, the process is identical as that for standard industrially used p-side-up LEDs. The final devices exhibit the same good electrical characteristics and high process yield as a series of test standard LEDs obtained in comparable conditions. Finally, the technology of embedded air-gap patterns (PhC) has significant potential in other related fields such as: increasing the optical mode interaction with the active region in semiconductor lasers; increasing the coupling of the incident

  12. Spectral purification and infrared light recycling in extreme ultraviolet lithography sources.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Muharrem; van Goor, Fred A; Boller, Klaus J; Bijkerk, Fred

    2014-04-01

    We present the design of a novel collector mirror for laser produced plasma (LPP) light sources to be used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The design prevents undesired infrared (IR) drive laser light, reflected from the plasma, from reaching the exit of the light source. This results in a strong purification of the EUV light, while the reflected IR light becomes refocused into the plasma for enhancing the IR-to-EUV conversion. The dual advantage of EUV purification and conversion enhancement is achieved by incorporating an IR Fresnel zone plate pattern into the EUV reflective multilayer coating of the collector mirror. Calculations using Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction theory for a typical collector design show that the IR light at the EUV exit is suppressed by four orders of magnitude. Simultaneously, 37% of the reflected IR light is refocused back the plasma. PMID:24718234

  13. Utilization of the Crawford transformation in evaluation of the spectral efficiency of solid state light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, H.; Edsall, P.; Ness, J.; Hare, L.; Stuck, B.

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop procedures for evaluating the transient effects of solid state light sources used as illumination sources at night. Traditional light sources used at night are designed to preserve dark adaptation by employing long wavelength visible sources that minimally affect rod photoreceptor sensitivity, while new LED light sources provide a mix of visible spectral sources with visible spectral components that may effect rod function and possibly impede night vision. The Crawford transformation was used generate spectral dark adaptation functions for LED flashlight background effects on dark adaptation induced by background exposure conditions from four solid state light sources. Increment background spectral sensitivity functions were generated for each of four LED flashlight sources (S1, S2, & S3) as well as from a merger of each LED source with a broadband Goldman-Weekers (GW) dark adaptometer source (S5) to simulate transition for day to night light environments. Increment background spectral sensitivity for both methods of generating increment spectral sensitivity were consistent in showing similar spectral background effects on spectral sensitivity but differed in the dynamic range of recovery. Those spectra that had components in the middle wavelength region (S2 and S3) showed a more restricted rod function as compared with S1 and S2.

  14. LPP light source for actinic HVM inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinger, Bob; Gambino, Nadia; Hudgins, Duane; Sanders, Alexander; Brandstätter, Markus; Abhari, Reza S.; Abreau, F.

    2015-03-01

    EUV sources with high brightness and stability are required for actinic photomask inspection. High availability and cleanliness after IF are additional stringent requirements. EUV lithography is only production ready, if these tools are available with HVM specifications. At the Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, droplet-based EUV LPP sources have been designed, developed and tested at the system level for the last 8 years and has been commercialized by Adlyte AG. The most advanced facility, namely ALPS II, has been operated as a prototype source for hundreds of hours. In the present work, the EUV plasma is imaged with the help of a pinhole camera. The dimension of the plasma in the direction of the laser axis and the direction of the train equal 60 μm and 70 μm, respectively. The plasma is also imaged using an ICCD with an exposure time of 5 ns. The observed droplet plasma has a characteristic kidney shape. The ICCD is a valuable diagnostic as inspection tools require high pulse-to-pulse reproducibility that cannot be assessed to the full extend using a EUV pinhole camera. Various collector configurations, using either NI or GI, have been integrated into the source. The measurements of the emission characteristics at IF for a GI collector configuration reveal a Gaussian spot shape at IF and a pulse-to-pulse stability of 6.8 % (σ), which matches previous stabilities at the source level. The debris mitigation system employs a three layer strategy between the plasma and IF. Introducing a high momentum flow as a first layer of debris mitigation, the load of tin spots on the collector could be reduced by a factor of 9, hence a significant increase of source life-time is obtained. A quantification by Adlyte of IF cleanliness after 24 hours source operation revealed no relevant contamination with respect to the requirements for Blank Inspection Cleanliness after IF.

  15. Optical-Fiber Fluorosensors With Polarized Light Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1995-01-01

    Chemiluminescent and/or fluorescent molecules in optical-fiber fluorosensors oriented with light-emitting dipoles along transverse axis. Sensor of proposed type captures greater fraction of chemiluminescence or fluorescence and transmits it to photodetector. Transverse polarization increases sensitivity. Basic principles of optical-fiber fluorosensors described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525), "Improved Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors" (LAR-14607), and "Improved Optical-Fiber Temperature Sensors" (LAR-14647).

  16. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  17. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  18. HUBBLE IDENTIFIES SOURCE OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT IN AN OLD GALAXY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope's exquisite resolution has allowed astronomers to resolve, for the first time, hot blue stars deep inside an elliptical galaxy. The swarm of nearly 8,000 blue stars resembles a blizzard of snowflakes near the core (lower right) of the neighboring galaxy M32, located 2.5 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. Hubble confirms that the ultraviolet light comes from a population of extremely hot helium-burning stars at a late stage in their lives. Unlike the Sun, which burns hydrogen into helium, these old stars exhausted their central hydrogen long ago, and now burn helium into heavier elements. The observations, taken in October 1998, were made with the camera mode of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) in ultraviolet light. The STIS field of view is only a small portion of the entire galaxy, which is 20 times wider on the sky. For reference, the full moon is 70 times wider than the STIS field-of-view. The bright center of the galaxy was placed on the right side of the image, allowing fainter stars to be seen on the left side of the image. These results are to be published in the March 1, 2000 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. Thirty years ago, the first ultraviolet observations of elliptical galaxies showed that they were surprisingly bright when viewed in ultraviolet light. Before those pioneering UV observations, old groups of stars were assumed to be relatively cool and thus extremely faint in the ultraviolet. Over the years since the initial discovery of this unexpected ultraviolet light, indirect evidence has accumulated that it originates in a population of old, but hot, helium-burning stars. Now Hubble provides the first direct visual evidence. Nearby elliptical galaxies are thought to be relatively simple galaxies comprised of old stars. Because they are among the brightest objects in the Universe, this simplicity makes them useful for tracing the evolution of stars and galaxies. Credits: NASA and Thomas

  19. PHOTOINJECTED ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC UPGRADE FOR THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BABZIEN,M.; BLUM,E.; CASEY,W.; CHANG,X.; GRAVES,W.; HASTINGS,J.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,E.; KAO,C.C.; KRAMER,S.; KRINSKY,S.; MORTAZAVI,P.; MURPHY,J.; OZAKI,S.; PJEROV,S.; PODOBEDOV,B.; RAKOWSKY,G.; ROSE,J.; SHAFTAN,T.; SHEEHY,B.; SIDDONS,D.; SMEDLEY,J.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; TOWNE,N.; WANG,J.M.; WANG,X.; WU,J.; YAKIMENKO,V.; YU,L.H.

    2001-06-18

    We describe a major paradigm shift in the approach to the production of synchrotron radiation This change will considerably improve the scientific capabilities of synchrotron light sources. We introduce plans for an upgrade of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This upgrade will be based on the Photoinjected Energy Recovering Linac (PERL). This machine emerges from the union of two technologies, the laser-photocathode RF gun (photoinjector) and superconducting linear accelerators with beam energy recovery (Energy Recovering Linac). The upgrade will bring the NSLS users many new insertion device beam lines, brightness greater than 3rd generation lightsource's and ultra-short pulse capabilities, not possible with storage ring light sources.

  20. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  1. Light Well: A Tunable Free-Electron Light Source on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, G.; MacDonald, K. F.; Fu, Y. H.; Wang, C.-M.; Tsai, D. P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2009-09-01

    The passage of a free-electron beam through a nanohole in a periodically layered metal-dielectric structure creates a new type of tunable, nanoscale radiation source—a “light well”. In the reported demonstration, tunable light is generated at an intensity of ˜200W/cm2 as electrons with energies in the 20-40 keV range are injected into gold-silica well structures with a lateral size of just a few hundred nanometers.

  2. Formation of visible single-mode light sources using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Sarfaraz; Xu, Jianfeng; Wu, Pengfei; Chen, Bing; Wang, Michael

    2008-08-01

    The market demands for innovative, efficient, small package and single-mode light sources are always high because of their broad applications in scientific, medical, industrial, and commercial fields. The high photoluminescence quantum yield, photophysical and photochemical stability, and tunable emission wavelength make quantum dots ideal for a new generation of solid state light sources. We report on the realization of various single-mode light sources in the visible spectral band by using semiconductor quantum dots. The effective use of a waveguide structure can help achieve the divergence control of the output light beam. This technique may benefit the development for next generation light emitting diodes, optical communication, intelligent optical sensors, microprocessors, and nanoscale optical imaging systems.

  3. Assessing the Performance of 5mm White LED Light Sources forDeveloping-Country Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2007-05-03

    Some white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources haverecently attained levels of efficiency and cost that allow them tocompete with fluorescent lighting for off-grid applications in thedeveloping world. Additional attributes (optics, size, ruggedness, andservice life) make them potentially superior products. Enormousreductions in energy use and greenhouse-gas emissions are thus possible,and system costs can be much lower given the ability to downsize thecharging and energy storage components compared to a fluorescentstrategy. However, there is a high risk of "market-spoiling" if inferiorproducts are introduced and result in user dissatisfaction. Completesystems involve the integration of light sources and optics, energysupply, and energy storage. A natural starting point for evaluatingproduct quality is to focus on the individual light sources. This reportdescribes testing results for batches of 10 5mm white LEDs from 26manufacturers. Efficacies and color properties are presented.

  4. Dissimilarity of yellow-blue surfaces under neutral light sources differing in intensity: separate contributions of light intensity and chroma.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Rumi; Logvinenko, Alexander D; Maloney, Laurence T

    2008-01-01

    Observers viewed two side-by-side arrays each of which contained three yellow Munsell papers, three blue, and one neutral Munsell. Each array was illuminated uniformly and independently of the other. The neutral light source intensities were 1380, 125, or 20 lux. All six possible combinations of light intensities were set as illumination conditions. On each trial, observers were asked to rate the dissimilarity between each chip in one array and each chip in the other by using a 30-point scale. Each pair of surfaces in each illumination condition was judged five times. We analyzed this data using non-metric multi-dimensional scaling to determine how light intensity and surface chroma contributed to dissimilarity and how they interacted. Dissimilarities were captured by a three-dimensional configuration in which one dimension corresponded to differences in light intensity. PMID:18598408

  5. Pulsed-laser micropatterned quantum-dot array for white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Huang-Yu; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kao, Tsung Sheng; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Han, Hau-Vei; Li, Jie-Ru; Lee, Po-Tsung; Chen, Huang-Ming; Hong, Ming-Hui; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a novel photoluminescent quantum dots device with laser-processed microscale patterns has been demonstrated to be used as a white light emitting source. The pulsed laser ablation technique was employed to directly fabricate microscale square holes with nano-ripple structures onto the sapphire substrate of a flip-chip blue light-emitting diode, confining sprayed quantum dots into well-defined areas and eliminating the coffee ring effect. The electroluminescence characterizations showed that the white light emission from the developed photoluminescent quantum-dot light-emitting diode exhibits stable emission at different driving currents. With a flexibility of controlling the quantum dots proportions in the patterned square holes, our developed white-light emitting source not only can be employed in the display applications with color triangle enlarged by 47% compared with the NTSC standard, but also provide the great potential in future lighting industry with the correlated color temperature continuously changed in a wide range.

  6. Laser produced plasma for efficient extreme ultraviolet light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Tony; Cummins, Thomas; O' Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Harte, Colm S.; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2012-05-25

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasma and their relevance to EUV source development is discussed. The current state of the field for Sn LPP sources operating at 13.5 nm is described and initial results are given for EUV emission from CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of a bulk Sn target. A maximum conversion efficiency of 1.7% has been measured and the influence of the CO{sub 2} laser temporal profile on the CE is discussed. A double pulse irradiation scheme is shown to increase CE up to a maximum value of 2.1% for an optimum prepulse - pulse delay of 150 ns. The emergence of a new EUVL source wavelength at 6.7 nm based on Gd and Tb LPPs has been outlined. An initial experiment investigating picosecond laser irradiation as a means to produce strong 6.7 nm emission from a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been performed and verified.

  7. LLNL's Precision Compton Scattering Light Source: Status & Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, F. V.; Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Bayramian, A. J.; Cross, R. R.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Houck, T. L.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M. J.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Wu, S. S.; Scarpetti, R. D.; Siders, C. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Bonanno, R. E.; Barty, C. P. J.; Adolphsen, C. E.; Chu, T. S.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Li, Z.; Tantawi, S. G.; Vlieks, A. E.; Wang, J. W.; Raubenheimer, T. O.

    2010-11-01

    A precision, tunable, monochromatic (< 0.4% rms spectral width) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC is under construction at LLNL. High-brightness (250 pC, 3.5 ps, 0.4 mm.mrad), relativistic electron bunches will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped laser pulse to generate tunable >=-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range. This >=-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) in various isotopes, of interest for homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source current status will be discussed, along with important applications, including NRF and in situ ps thermal measurements. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and funded by the DHS DNDO.

  8. The light curve of a transient X-ray source. [the aeriel satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaluzienski, L. J.; Holt, S. S.; Boldt, E. A.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Eadie, G.; Pounds, K. A.; Ricketts, M. J.; Watson, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel-V satellite monitored the X-ray light curve of A1524-62 almost continuously from 40 days prior to maximum light until its disappearance below the effective experimental sensitivity. The source exhibited maximum light on approximately 4 December 1974, at a level of 0.9 the apparent magnitude of the Crab Nebula in the energy band 3-6 keV. Although similar to previously reported transient sources with a decay time constant of approximately 2 months, the source exhibited an extended, variable pre-flare on-state of about 1 month at a level of greater than approximately 0.1 maximum light. The four bright (greater than 0.2 of the Crab Nebula) transient sources observed during the first half-year of Ariel-V operation are indicative of a galactic disk distribution, and a luminosity at maximum in excess of 10 to the 37th power ergs/sec.

  9. Modulation transfer function analysis for a digitally spectrum-controllable light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Suodong; Wang, Yan; Pan, Qiao; Shen, Weimin

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the ability of generating designated spectrums as special requirements, spectrum-controllable light source has attracted huge interesting in several fields, e.g. medical science, industrial detection, defense-related testing. In principle, optical performance of a spectrum-controllable light source can be predicted by some transfer functions of the corresponding system, e.g. modulation transfer function (MTF). Unfortunately, the aforementioned research work is still lacking at present although it is meaningful for the optical design and evaluation of this new kind of light sources. Hence, a MTF model for a modified version of our previously-proposed spectrum-controllable light source system based on a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) and an Offner dispersion configuration with a convex grating is deduced as an example. Related preliminary analyses have been present in this paper as well.

  10. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  11. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources: A White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray; Hastings, Jerry; Hettel, Bob; Hill, John; Hussain, Zahid; Kao, Chi-Chang; Kirz, a= Janos; Long, Gabrielle; McCurdy, Bill; Raubenheimer, Tor; Sannibale, Fernando; Seeman, John; Shen, Z.-X.; Shenoy, Gopal; Schoenlein, Bob; Shen, Qun; /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-02-03

    Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects (Figure 1.1). The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter

  12. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

    1999-05-12

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

  13. Advanced Light Source report. Volume 7, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The exceptional science already emerging from the user program at the ALS shows that the promises of ``unique research opportunities`` and ``experiments not possible anywhere else`` made at the inception of the ALS are indeed coming true. In less than a year of beamline operations, the ALS has produced numerous high-quality results and achieved an enviable level of performance. Since the beginning of 1994, the ALS has operated for 92% of its scheduled hours, an outstanding achievement for a new machine. The ALS` ability to deliver the brightest light in the world in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum has attracted a who`s who of synchrotron research to the experiment floor. These users have produced a variety of scientifically significant results during the ALS` first year of operation, a few of which are highlighted in this article.

  14. Growth performance and hematological traits of broiler chickens reared under assorted monochromatic light sources.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Parvin, R; Mushtaq, M M H; Hwangbo, J; Kim, J H; Na, J C; Kim, D W; Kang, H K; Kim, C D; Cho, K O; Yang, C B; Choi, H C

    2013-06-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of different monochromatic lights on growth performance and hematological response of growing broiler chickens. A total of 360 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 6 lighting treatments, which were replicated 6 times with 10 chicks in each replicate. Six light treatments include incandescent bulbs (as a control) and light-emitting diode white light, blue light, red light, green light, and yellow light (YL). The birds were provided with similar nutritional specifications and environmental management facilities, except for the lights throughout the experimental period. Growth performance was evaluated in terms of BW, BW gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio at weekly intervals. At the end of 5 wk, 2 birds from each replicate were randomly selected for blood collection to determine hematological response. The BW and feed intake was numerically higher in YL at 5 wk of age. But interestingly, this did not result in improved feed conversion ratio in YL; nevertheless, numerical values were lower in YL at 5 wk (P > 0.05). Red blood cells, blood platelet count, and percent hematocrit were numerically higher under YL, whereas white blood cell counts and percent hemoglobin remained unaffected due to light treatments. It was concluded that monochromatic light is a potential light source that might provide a beneficial effect on growth performance but is inconclusive for hematological measures of broilers. PMID:23687140

  15. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  16. Composite-type Rb-87 optical-pumping light source for the rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oura, N.; Kuramochi, N.; Naritsuka, S.; Hayashi, T.

    1982-01-01

    The light source is composed of a cylindrical Rb-87 lamp 10 mm diameter and a Rb-85 filter cell 3-7 mm long attached to the front flat face of the lamp. This composite type device is operated in an oven at about 100 C. Thus a light source for Rb-87 hyperfine optical pumping less than 4 cm long by 3 cm diameter was constructed.

  17. Motivation and approach to creating true color temperature low light level V-NIR source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, Stephen D.; Mazzetta, Jason A.; Ennerson, Fred A.

    2010-04-01

    With the continuing innovation in night vision and multispectral imaging technologies, the requirements for more sophisticated test systems continue to increase. Various manufacturers of Visible and Near Infrared (V-NIR) cameras and detection systems need to verify the lowest detectable light level and check system performance at very low light levels as well as recovery from exposure to typical daytime light levels. Typical low level requirements are in the range of 10-4 to 10-6 foot-lamberts, equivalent to starlight radiance levels; typical daytime light levels are 103 foot-lamberts. There is a relatively straightforward approach to producing low light level output using "neutral" density filters to reduce the light to the proper level. Although neutral density filters are not spectrally neutral over the entire V-NIR wavelength range. For some test applications the loss of spectral fidelity is unacceptable for tests of sensor response. The challenge was to create an adjustable output V-NIR source that maintains the color temperature setting over the entire output range. This paper explains how the requirement of True Color Temperature Low Light Level source is met and the benefits compared to prior methods. In addition how the daylight level is also met with the same source. Once the high and low light levels are achieved in a stable and repeatable manner and are calibrated; the unique tests that can be performed with this source are discussed.

  18. Solution of multi-element LED light sources development automation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Korotaev, Valery V.; Peretyagin, Vladimir S.

    2014-09-01

    The intensive development of LED technologies resulted in the creation of multicomponent light sources in the form of controlled illumination devices based on usage of mentioned LED technologies. These light sources are used in different areas of production (for example, in the food industry for sorting products or in the textile industry for quality control, etc.). The use of LED lighting products in the devices used in specialized lighting, became possible due to wide range of colors of light, LED structures (which determines the direction of radiation, the spatial distribution and intensity of the radiation, electrical, heat, power and other characteristics), and of course, the possibility of obtaining any shade in a wide dynamic range of brightness values. LED-based lighting devices are notable for the diversity of parameters and characteristics, such as color radiation, location and number of emitters, etc. Although LED technologies have several advantages, however, they require more attention if you need to ensure a certain character of illumination distribution and/or distribution of the color picture at a predetermined distance (for example, at flat surface, work zone, area of analysis or observation). This paper presents software designed for the development of the multicomponent LED light sources. The possibility of obtaining the desired color and energy distribution at the zone of analysis by specifying the spatial parameters of the created multicomponent light source and using of real power, spectral and color parameters and characteristics of the LEDs is shown as well.

  19. History of Science and Conceptual Change: The Formation of Shadows by Extended Light Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedes, Christos; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a teaching conflict procedure whose purpose was the transformation of the representations of 12-16-year-old pupils in Greece concerning light emission and shadow formation by extended light sources. The changes observed during the children's effort to destabilize and reorganise their representations…

  20. Development of tunable Fabry-Perot spectral camera and light source for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaarre, M.; Kivi, S.; Panouillot, P. E.; Saari, H.; Mäkynen, J.; Sorri, I.; Juuti, M.

    2013-05-01

    VTT has developed a fast, tunable Fabry-Perot (FP) filter component and applied it in making small, lightweight spectral cameras and light sources. One application field where this novel technology is now tested is medical field. A demonstrator has been made to test the applicability of FP based spectral filtering in the imaging of retina in visible light wavelength area.

  1. Performance of light sources and radiation sensors under low gravity realized by parabolic airplane flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro

    A fundamental study was conducted to establish an experimental system for space farming. Since to ensure optimal light for plant cultivation in space is of grave importance, this study examined the performance of light sources and radiation sensors under microgravity conditions created during the parabolic airplane flight. Three kinds of light sources, a halogen bulb, a fluorescent tube, and blue and red LEDs, and ten models of radiation sensors available in the market were used for the experiment. Surface temperature of the light sources, output signals from the radiation sensors, spectroscopic characteristics were measured at the gravity levels of 0.01, 1.0 and 1.8 G for 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the performance of the halogen lamp was affected the most by the gravity level among the three light sources. Under the microgravity conditions which do not raise heat convection, the temperature of the halogen lamp rose and the output of the radiation sensors increased. Spectral distributions of the halogen lamp indicated that peak wavelength appeared the highest at the level of 0.01G, which contributed to the increase in light intensity. In the case of red and blue LEDs, which are promising light sources in space farming, the temperature of both LED chips rose but irradiance from red LED increased and that from blue LED decreased under microgravity conditions due to the different thermal characteristics.

  2. Studies of industrial emissions by accelerator-based techniques: A review of applications at CEDAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagnile, L.; Quarta, G.

    2012-04-01

    Different research activities are in progress at the Centre for Dating and Diagnostics (CEDAD), University of Salento, in the field of environmental monitoring by exploiting the potentialities given by the different experimental beam lines implemented on the 3 MV Tande-tron accelerator and dedicated to AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrome-try) radiocarbon dating and IB A (Ion Beam Analysis). An overview of these activities is presented by showing how accelerator-based analytical techniques can be a powerful tool for monitoring the anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources and for the assessment of the biogenic content in SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) burned in WTE (Waste to Energy) plants.

  3. Laser-driven phosphor-converted white light source for solid-state illumination.

    PubMed

    George, Anthony F; Al-waisawy, Sara; Wright, Jason T; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M; Rahman, Faiz

    2016-03-10

    Energy efficiency and lighting quality considerations are driving research into laser-pumped white light sources. Laser diodes as pump sources for downconversion phosphors promise freedom from "droop" that adversely affects the efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). High-intensity laser diode-pumped light sources for applications such as search lights and automobile headlights have been demonstrated recently. Our paper describes the design and construction of a domestic/office-type solid-state luminaire driven by light from an integrated violet laser-diode module. A trichromatic phosphor made from a blend of separate europium-containing rare-earth phosphors was used as the downconversion medium. Mechanical and optical design of the reflector and the phosphor plate are described. Characteristics of both the pump light and the downconverted light are also described. Our studies also looked at the variation of chromaticity coordinates with variation in pump power and the effect of laser speckle on the lamp's light output. Finally, there is a brief discussion of energy conversion efficiency and longevity considerations, comparing pumping with LEDs versus pumping with laser diodes. PMID:26974780

  4. Glow discharge lamp: A light source for optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanathan, K. S.; Srinivasan, V.; Nalini, S.; Mahalingam, T. R.

    A glow discharge lamp based on a modified version of the Grimm design has been fabricated. Its utility as a radiation source for optical emission spectrography by standardizing a method for the analysis of low alloy steels using a set of certified standards from DMRL, Hyderabad, has been demonstrated. A model has been proposed where the sputtering rates of different metals have been correlated with their heats of sublimation, metallic radii, and densities. Sputtering rates of ten different metals obtained from literature have been used to test this model, and the correlation appears to be excellent.

  5. Broadband light source for fiber-optic measurement system in spaceborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößner, Max R.; Müller, Mathias S.; Buck, Thorbjörn C.; Koch, Alexander W.

    2012-01-01

    Measuring temperatures, mechanical loads and derived quantities precisely and reliably play an important role in spaceflight. With spacecraft becoming increasingly complex, upscaling of present telemetry techniques can become cumbersome. Additionally, there are entirely new sensory requirements, resulting from emerging technologies such as smart structures, active vibration damping and composite material health monitoring. It has been demonstrated in preceding studies that these measurements can be advantageously and efficiently carried out by means of fiber-optic systems. The most prominent fiber-optic strain and temperature sensor is the fiber Bragg grating. Typically, multiple fiber Bragg gratings are used to translate entire temperature and strain fields into an optical wavelength information. For the interrogation of these sensors, a broadband or scanning light source is required. Additional requirements with respect to the light source are high intensity and unpolarized illumination of the gratings. These constraints can be met by a light source that is based on amplified spontaneous emission in a rare-earth-doped fiber. In the presented work, a compact light source, adapted for measurement applications and targeted towards space applications, has been developed. The design of this light source is presented, as well as its implementation. The light source has been designed and tested for selected core aspects of space robustness and the results of these tests are summarized.

  6. EDITORIAL: Extreme Ultraviolet Light Sources for Semiconductor Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, David

    2004-12-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) [1] provides industry expectations for high volume computer chip fabrication a decade into the future. It provides expectations to anticipated performance and requisite specifications. While the roadmap provides a collective projection of what international industry expects to produce, it does not specify the technology that will be employed. Indeed, there are generally several competing technologies for each two or three year step forward—known as `nodes'. Recent successful technologies have been based on KrF (248 nm), and now ArF (193 nm) lasers, combined with ultraviolet transmissive refractive optics, in what are known as step and scan exposure tools. Less fortunate technologies in the recent past have included soft x-ray proximity printing and, it appears, 157 nm wavelength F2 lasers. In combination with higher numerical aperture liquid emersion optics, 193 nm is expected to be used for the manufacture of leading edge chip performance for the coming five years. Beyond that, starting in about 2009, the technology to be employed is less clear. The leading candidate for the 2009 node is extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, however this requires that several remaining challenges, including sufficient EUV source power, be overcome in a timely manner. This technology is based on multilayer coated reflective optics [2] and an EUV emitting plasma. Following Moore's Law [3] it is expected, for example, that at the 2009 `32 nm node' (printable patterns of 32 nm half-pitch), isolated lines with 18 nm width will be formed in resist (using threshold effects), and that these will be further narrowed to 13 nm in transfer to metalized electronic gates. These narrow features are expected to provide computer chips of 19 GHz clock frequency, with of the order of 1.5 billion transistors per chip [1]. This issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains a cluster of eight papers addressing the critical

  7. A beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Padmore, H.A.; Earnest, T.; Kim, S.H.; Thompson, A.C.; Robinson, A.L.

    1994-08-01

    A beamline for macromolecular crystallography has been designed for the ALS. The source will be a 37-pole wiggler with a, 2-T on-axis peak field. The wiggler will illuminate three beamlines, each accepting 3 mrad of horizontal aperture. The central beamline will primarily be used for multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion measurements in the wavelength range from 4 to 0.9 {angstrom}. The beamline optics will comprise a double-crystal monochromator with a collimating pre-mirror and a double-focusing mirror after the monochromator. The two side stations will be used for fixed-wavelength experiments within the wavelength range from 1.5 to 0.95 {angstrom}. The optics will consist of a conventional vertically focusing cylindrical mirror followed by an asymmetrically cut curved-crystal monochromator. This paper presents details of the optimization of the wiggler source for crystallography, gives a description of the beamline configuration, and discusses the reasons for the choices made.

  8. Contributions of artificial lighting sources on light pollution in Hong Kong measured through a night sky brightness monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason; So, Chu Wing; Leung, Wai Yan; Wong, Chung Fai

    2014-05-01

    Light pollution is a form of environmental degradation in which excessive artificial outdoor lighting, such as street lamps, neon signs, and illuminated signboards, affects the natural environment and the ecosystem. Poorly designed outdoor lighting not only wastes energy, money, and valuable Earth resources, but also robs us of our beautiful night sky. Effects of light pollution on the night sky can be evaluated by the skyglow caused by these artificial lighting sources, through measurements of the night sky brightness (NSB). The Hong Kong Night Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (NSN) was established to monitor in detail the conditions of light pollution in Hong Kong. Monitoring stations were set up throughout the city covering a wide range of urban and rural settings to continuously measure the variations of the NSB. Over 4.6 million night sky measurements were collected from 18 distinct locations between May 2010 and March 2013. This huge dataset, over two thousand times larger than our previous survey [1], forms the backbone for studies of the temporal and geographical variations of this environmental parameter and its correlation with various natural and artificial factors. The concepts and methodology of the NSN were presented here, together with an analysis of the overall night sky conditions in Hong Kong. The average NSB in Hong Kong, excluding data affected by the Moon, was 16.8 mag arcsec-2, or 82 times brighter than the dark site standard established by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) [2]. The urban night sky was on average 15 times brighter than that in a rural location, firmly establishing the effects of artificial lighting sources on the night sky.

  9. Organic light sources look forward to optimize the photosynthesis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattori, Valeria; Williams, J. A. Gareth; Murphy, Lisa; Cocchi, Massimo; Kalinowski, Jan

    2008-12-01

    We introduce a series of organic LEDs that exploit the monomer and excimer emissions from single phosphor dopant emitters. These organic LEDs were found to be effective in the simultaneous creation of blue and red emission bands essential for plant growth. By varying the concentration of novel phosphorescent dopants selected from a series of newly synthesized platinum complexes [Pt L22-25Cl], we have manufactured the blue-biased LEDs [with the Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates ( x, y) (0.27, 0.37)] and the red-biased LEDs [CIE coordinates (0.53, 0.38)], at a high luminance of ≈500 cd/m 2 and with external electroluminescence (EL) quantum efficiency of 15-18% photon/electron (→ power efficiency 8-12 lm/W). The EL spectrum most suitable for the action spectrum of photosynthesis yield was that of a device incorporating 20 wt.% content of [Pt L23Cl]. This LED yielded photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) approaching 10 μmol s -1 W -1 of the electrical power, a value which significantly exceeds that for the professional lamps used commonly for horticultural lighting.

  10. Parametric Modeling of Electron Beam Loss in Synchrotron Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.; Hartman, E.; Corbett, J.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Paterson, E.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    Synchrotron light is used for a wide variety of scientific disciplines ranging from physical chemistry to molecular biology and industrial applications. As the electron beam circulates, random single-particle collisional processes lead to decay of the beam current in time. We report a simulation study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to capture the decay in beam current due to Touschek, Bremsstrahlung, and Coulomb effects. The FP block in the combined model is a parametric description of the beam current decay where model parameters vary as a function of beam operating conditions (e.g. vertical scraper position, RF voltage, number of the bunches, and total beam current). The NN block provides the parameters of the FP model and is trained (through constrained nonlinear optimization) to capture the variation in model parameters as operating condition of the beam changes. Simulation results will be presented to demonstrate that the proposed combined framework accurately models beam decay as well as variation to model parameters without direct access to parameter values in the model.

  11. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source For VASMIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Glover, T. W.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Winter, D. S.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    The VASIMR space propulsion development effort relies on a high power (greater than 10kW) helicon source to produce a dense flowing plasma (H, D and He) target for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) acceleration of the ions. Subsequent expansion in an expanding magnetic field (magnetic nozzle) converts ion lunetic energy to directed momentum. This plasma source must have critical features to enable an effective propulsion device. First, it must ionize most of the input neutral flux of gas, thus producing a plasma stream with a high degree of ionization for application of ICR power. This avoids propellant waste and potential power losses due to charge exchange. Next, the plasma stream must flow into a region of high magnetic field (approximately 0.5 T) for efficient ICR acceleration. Third, the ratio of input power to plasma flux must be low, providing an energy per ion-electron pair approaching 100 eV. Lastly, the source must be robust and capable of very long life-times (years). In our helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a ratio of input gas to plasma flux near 100%. The plasma flows from the helicon region (B approximately 0.1 T) into a region with a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T. The energy input per ion-electron pair has been measured at 300 plus or minus 100 eV. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show an enhanced efficiency mode of operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 3.5 kW of input power. An upgrade to a power level of 10 kW is underway. Much of our recent work has been with a Boswell double-saddle antenna design. We are also converting the antenna design to a helical type. With these modifications, we anticipate an improvement in the ionization efficiency. This paper presents the results from scaling the helicon in the VX-10 device from 3.5 to 10 kW. We also compare the operation with a double-saddle to a helical antenna design. Finally, we

  12. 77 FR 66647 - License Amendment Request to Byproduct Material License 06-31445-01 for Light Sources, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment Request to Byproduct Material License 06-31445- 01 for Light Sources, Inc... No.06-31445-01 issued to Light Sources, Inc. (the Licensee), to approve of proposed alternate... Part 30. This license authorizes Light Sources, Inc. to possess and store lamps containing up to...

  13. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Alan M.; Edwards, William R.

    1983-01-01

    A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

  14. Environmental remediation and superhydrophilicity of ultrafine antibacterial tungsten oxide-based nanofibers under visible light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srisitthiratkul, Chutima; Yaipimai, Wittaya; Intasanta, Varol

    2012-10-01

    Fabrication of nanosilver-decorated WO3 nanofibers was successfully performed. First, deposition of nanosilver onto electrospun WO3 nanofibers' surface was done via photoreduction of silver ion under visible or UV light. The resulting hybrid nanofibers not only revealed antibacterial characteristics but also maintained their photocatalytic performance towards methylene blue decomposition. Unexpectedly, the nanofibrous layers prepared from these nanofibers showed superhydrophilicity under a visible light source. The nanofibers might be advantageous in environmental and hygienic nanofiltration under natural light sources, where the self-cleaning characteristics could be valuable in maintenance processes.

  15. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOEpatents

    Hamil, Roy A.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  16. Elliptical trough reflector for the collection of light from linear sources.

    PubMed

    Kao, H P; Schoeniger, J S

    1998-07-01

    A trough reflector with a reflective, truncated elliptical surface was designed to efficiently collect freely propagating light from a linear source. The source was placed at one focus of the reflector, and light was collected through a rectangular aperture near the second focus. Collection efficiency was much greater than that of a spherical integrator and approximately 6.5x greater than that of an objective lens; as much as approximately 55% of the light could be captured from the full aperture. This reflector could be used to efficiently collect surface fluorescence excited by use of evanescent waves in fluorescence-based fiber optic or capillary waveguide sensors. PMID:18285861

  17. Employing partially coherent, compact gas-discharge sources for coherent diffractive imaging with extreme ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bußmann, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Bresenitz, R.; Rudolf, D.; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W. S.; Grützmacher, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) and related techniques enable a new type of diffraction-limited high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy. Here, we demonstrate CDI reconstruction of a complex valued object under illumination by a compact gas-discharge EUV light source emitting at 17.3 nm (O VI spectral line). The image reconstruction method accounts for the partial spatial coherence of the radiation and allows imaging even with residual background light. These results are a first step towards laboratory-scale CDI with a gas-discharge light source for applications including mask inspection for EUV lithography, metrology and astronomy.

  18. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Compact Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, William A.; Borland, Michael

    2010-05-11

    This report is based on a BES Workshop on Compact Light Sources, held May 11-12, 2010, to evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of compact light source approaches and compared their performance to the third generation storage rings and free-electron lasers. The workshop examined the state of the technology for compact light sources and their expected progress. The workshop evaluated the cost efficiency, user access, availability, and reliability of such sources. Working groups evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of Compact Light Source (CLS) approaches, and compared their performance to the third-generation storage rings and free-electron lasers (FELs). The primary aspects of comparison were 1) cost effectiveness, 2) technical availability v. time frame, and 3) machine reliability and availability for user access. Five categories of potential sources were analyzed: 1) inverse Compton scattering (ICS) sources, 2) mini storage rings, 3) plasma sources, 4) sources using plasma-based accelerators, and 5) laser high harmonic generation (HHG) sources. Compact light sources are not a substitute for large synchrotron and FEL light sources that typically also incorporate extensive user support facilities. Rather they offer attractive, complementary capabilities at a small fraction of the cost and size of large national user facilities. In the far term they may offer the potential for a new paradigm of future national user facility. In the course of the workshop, we identified overarching R&D topics over the next five years that would enhance the performance potential of both compact and large-scale sources: Development of infrared (IR) laser systems delivering kW-class average power with femtosecond pulses at kHz repetition rates. These have application to ICS sources, plasma sources, and HHG sources. Development of laser storage cavities for storage of 10-mJ picosecond and femtosecond pulses focused to micron beam sizes. Development of high-brightness, high

  19. Reflected-light-source-based three-dimensional display with high brightness.

    PubMed

    Lv, Guo-Jiao; Wu, Fei; Zhao, Wu-Xiang; Fan, Jun; Zhao, Bai-Chuan; Wang, Qiong-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A reflected-light-source (RLS)-based 3D display is proposed. This display consists of an RLS and a 2D display panel. The 2D display panel is located in front of the RLS. The RLS consists of a light source, a light guide plate (LGP), and a reflection cavity. The light source and the LGP are located in the reflection cavity. Light from the light source can enter into the LGP and reflect continuously in the reflection cavity. The reflection cavity has a series of slits, and light can exit only from these slits. These slits can work as a postpositional parallax barrier, so when they modulate the parallax images on the 2D display, 3D images are formed. Different from the conventional 3D display based on a parallax barrier, this RLS has less optical loss, so it can provide higher brightness. A prototype of this display is developed. Experimental results show that this RLS-based 3D display can provide higher brightness than the conventional one. PMID:27140355

  20. Modeling of low coherence interferometry using broadband multi-Gaussian light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansz, Paul; Richardson, Steven; Wild, Graham; Hinckley, Steven

    2012-09-01

    Using a low coherence interferometry (LCI) model, a comparison of broadband single-Gaussian and multi-Gaussian light sources has been undertaken. For single-Gaussian sources, the axial resolution improves with the source bandwidth, confirming the coherence length relation that the resolution for single Gaussian sources improves with increasing spectral bandwidth. However, narrow bandwidth light sources result in interferograms with overlapping strata peaks and the loss of individual strata information. For multiple-Gaussian sources with the same bandwidth, spectral side lobes increase, reducing A-scan reliability to show accurate layer information without eliminating the side lobes. The simulations show the conditions needed for the resolution of strata information for broadband light sources using both single and multiple Gaussian models. The potential to use the model to study optical coherence tomography (OCT) light sources including super luminescent diodes (SLDs), as reviewed in this paper, as well as optical delay lines and sample structures could better characterize these LCI and OCT elements. Forecasting misinformation in the interferogram may allow preliminary corrections. With improvement to the LCI-OCT model, more applications are envisaged.

  1. Effects of thermocycling and light source on the bond strength of metallic brackets to bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rosa; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Vedovello Filho, Mário

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of thermocycling and different light sources on the bond strength of metallic brackets to bovine tooth enamel using an adhesive resin. Bovine teeth were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel for 20 s. After application of primer, metallic brackets were bonded to the buccal surface using Transbond XT, forming 8 groups (n = 20), depending on the light source used for photoactivation (AccuCure 3000 argon laser--20 s, Apollo 95E plasma arc--12 s, UltraLume 5 LED--40 s and XL2500 halogen light--40 s) and experimental conditions without (Groups 1 to 4) or with thermocycling (Groups 5 to 8). Shear bond testing was carried out after 24 h of distilled water storage (Groups 1 to 4) or storage and thermocycling in distilled water (groups 5 to 8; 1,500 cycles--5°/55 °C). Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was evaluated at ×8 magnification. No significant differences (p>0.05) in bond strength were found when the conditions without and with thermocycling were compared for any of the light sources. No significant differences (p>0.05) in bond strength were found among the light sources, irrespective of performing or not thermocycling. There was a predominance of ARI scores 1 in all groups. In conclusion, light sources and thermocycling had no influence on the bond strength of brackets to bovine enamel. PMID:22189644

  2. 100W EUV light-source key component technology update for HVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Tsukasa; Kawasuji, Yasufumi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yukio; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Abe, Tamotsu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Kodama, Takeshi; Nakarai, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Taku; Okazaki, Shinji; Saitou, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-03-01

    Gigaphoton Inc. develops a high-power laser produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (LPP EUV) light source for high volume manufacturing which enables sub-10nm critical layer patterning for semiconductor device fabrication. A technology update of key components of a 100 W LPP-EUV light source is given in this paper. The key components efficiently produce a stable plasma and evacuate the tin debris from the EUV vessel with a magnetic debris mitigation system. The chosen technology guarantees therefore a high-power and long-life EUV light source system. Each component is described with updated data. The latest system performance results are also presented. They were obtained from our proto LPP-EUV light systems which support 100 W output power.

  3. Effects of light sources on growth and carotenoid content of photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fu-Shiu; Chien, Yew-Hu; Chen, Chang-Jiang

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of eight light sources on photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas palustris) growth and carotenoid content (CD), cultured for 144 h. Light sources were incandescent lamp (IL), halogen lamp (HL), fluorescence lamp (FL), and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) of white (LW), yellow (LY), red (LR), blue (LB), and green (LG). Dark condition served as the control. Under around 2000 lux, light sources ranked greatest to least bacterial growth effect were (LB=IL) > FL > LW ≥ HL ≥ LR ≥ (LG=LY=DK). Ranking effect on CD content was LB > IL ≥ LY ≥ (HL=LR=LG) ≥ LW ≥ DK ≥ FL. Energy efficiency for bacterial growth was LB > LW > LY > IL > LG > HL > FL > LR. CD productivity ranking was LB > LY > LW > LG > IL > HL > LR > FL. Results revealed that LB saved 75% energy and increased CD productivity by 348% compared with IL. PMID:22330604

  4. Sampling Scarab Beetles in Tropical Forests: The Effect of Light Source and Night Sampling Periods

    PubMed Central

    García-López, Alejandra; Micó, Estefanía; Zumbado, Manuel A.; Galante, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Light traps have been used widely to sample insect abundance and diversity, but their performance for sampling scarab beetles in tropical forests based on light source type and sampling hours throughout the night has not been evaluated. The efficiency of mercury-vapour lamps, cool white light and ultraviolet light sources in attracting Dynastinae, Melolonthinae and Rutelinae scarab beetles, and the most adequate period of the night to carry out the sampling was tested in different forest areas of Costa Rica. Our results showed that light source wavelengths and hours of sampling influenced scarab beetle catches. No significant differences were observed in trap performance between the ultraviolet light and mercury-vapour traps, whereas these two methods caught significantly more species richness and abundance than cool white light traps. Species composition also varied between methods. Large differences appear between catches in the sampling period, with the first five hours of the night being more effective than the last five hours. Because of their high efficiency and logistic advantages, we recommend ultraviolet light traps deployed during the first hours of the night as the best sampling method for biodiversity studies of those scarab beetles in tropical forests. PMID:22208730

  5. Neutron field measurements at the Aladdin Synchrotron Light Source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Li, Y; DeLuca, P M; Otte, R; Rowe, E M

    1986-01-01

    The neutron field near the inflector of the 800-MeV electron storage ring was studied. Photon-induced neutrons are produced by 100-MeV electrons bombarding the inflector during injection into the synchrotron ring. Neutrons were measured with moderating detectors made of 15 X 15 X 20 cm Lucite blocks and Au activation foils. Detector response was established with a Pu-Be neutron source and a 25.4-cm polyethylene sphere and Au foil detector. The neutron yield was 0.97 +/- 0.14 X 10(12) kJ-1. For 1.38 W of electron pulse power, the dose equivalent rate 1 m aside and 1 m above the inflector was 4.35 +/- 0.47 mu Sv s-1 and 3.13 +/- 0.23 mu Sv s-1, respectively. A measured dose equivalent transmission curve for polyethylene yielded an attenuation coefficient of 15.7 m-1. PMID:3943962

  6. The Nanoscience Beamline (I06) at Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S. A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Mott, R. A.; Steadman, P.; Peach, A.; Shepherd, E. L.; Ren, X.; Wagner, U. H.; Reininger, R.

    2010-06-23

    The Nanoscience beamline (I06) is one of seven Diamond Phase-I beamlines which has been operational since January 2007 delivering polarised soft x-rays, for a PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) and branchline, in the energy range 80-2100 eV. The beamline is based on a collimated plane grating monochromator with sagittal focusing elements, utilising two APPLE II helical undulator sources, and has been designed for high flux density at the PEEM sample position. A {approx}5 {mu}m ({sigma}) diameter beam is focussed onto the sample in the PEEM allowing a range of experiments using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) as contrast mechanisms. The beamline is also equipped with a branchline housing a 6T superconducting magnet for XMCD and XMLD experiments. The magnet is designed to move on and off the branchline which allows a diverse range of experiments.

  7. The Nanoscience Beamline (I06) at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S. A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Mott, R. A.; Steadman, P.; Peach, A.; Shepherd, E. L.; Ren, X.; Wagner, U. H.; Reininger, R.

    2010-06-01

    The Nanoscience beamline (I06) is one of seven Diamond Phase-I beamlines which has been operational since January 2007 delivering polarised soft x-rays, for a PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) and branchline, in the energy range 80-2100 eV. The beamline is based on a collimated plane grating monochromator with sagittal focusing elements, utilising two APPLE II helical undulator sources, and has been designed for high flux density at the PEEM sample position. A ˜5 μm (σ) diameter beam is focussed onto the sample in the PEEM allowing a range of experiments using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) as contrast mechanisms. The beamline is also equipped with a branchline housing a 6T superconducting magnet for XMCD and XMLD experiments. The magnet is designed to move on and off the branchline which allows a diverse range of experiments.

  8. Radio Frequency Plasma Discharge Lamps for Use as Stable Calibration Light Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAndrew, Brendan; Cooper, John; Arecchi, Angelo; McKee, Greg; Durell, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Stable high radiance in visible and near-ultraviolet wavelengths is desirable for radiometric calibration sources. In this work, newly available electrodeless radio-frequency (RF) driven plasma light sources were combined with research grade, low-noise power supplies and coupled to an integrating sphere to produce a uniform radiance source. The stock light sources consist of a 28 VDC power supply, RF driver, and a resonant RF cavity. The RF cavity includes a small bulb with a fill gas that is ionized by the electric field and emits light. This assembly is known as the emitter. The RF driver supplies a source of RF energy to the emitter. In commercial form, embedded electronics within the RF driver perform a continual optimization routine to maximize energy transfer to the emitter. This optimization routine continually varies the light output sinusoidally by approximately 2% over a several-second period. Modifying to eliminate this optimization eliminates the sinusoidal variation but allows the output to slowly drift over time. This drift can be minimized by allowing sufficient warm-up time to achieve thermal equilibrium. It was also found that supplying the RF driver with a low-noise source of DC electrical power improves the stability of the lamp output. Finally, coupling the light into an integrating sphere reduces the effect of spatial fluctuations, and decreases noise at the output port of the sphere.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime measurement via a radionuclide-scintillation light source and analog cross correlation.

    PubMed

    Burden, D L; Hobbs, S E; Hieftje, G M

    1997-05-15

    beta-Emitting 90Sr is used with a plastic scintillator to produce excitation-light pulses for fluorescence lifetime analysis. This light source is less expensive, more compact, and much more reliable than traditionally employed excitation sources such as lasers or pulsed flash lamps. The pulse train from this light source varies randomly in amplitude and time. Cross-correlation signal analysis is ideal for such a source because, unlike other time domain techniques, cross correlation takes complete advantage of its random nature. Here we report on the construction of an instrument and the methods employed to make fluorescence lifetime measurements via the new source and an analog correlation processor. Although the light intensity of the scintillator-based excitation source is comparatively low, an adequate signal level can be generated. The fluorescence lifetimes of three fluorophores are measured with a 1-mCi radionuclide to demonstrate a lifetime range from less than 1.5 to 28 ns. Long-lifetime measurements require an extra calibration step in order to compensate for delay cable energy loss. The light collection efficiency of the current instrument was found to be undesirably low; improvements in the instrument optics are suggested that will increase the collection efficiency and enhance the detection capability. PMID:9164162

  10. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  11. Beam dynamics of a new low emittance third generation synchrotron light source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasem, H.; Ahmadi, E.; Saeidi, F.; Sarhadi, K.

    2015-03-01

    The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF) is a new 3 GeV third generation synchrotron light source facility which is in the design stage. As the main radiation source, design of the ILSF storage ring emphasizes an ultralow electron beam emittance, great brightness, stability and reliability. The storage ring is based on a five-bend achromat lattice providing an ultralow horizontal beam emittance of 0.48 nm rad. In this paper, we present the design feature of the ILSF storage ring, give the linear and nonlinear dynamic properties of the lattice and discuss the related beam dynamic specifications.

  12. Light sources and output couplers for a backlight with switchable emission angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Ichiro; Imai, Keita; Takagi, Yoshihiko

    2007-09-01

    For switching viewing angles of a liquid crystal display, we proposed to place a liquid crystal device between an LED and a light-guide of a backlight. The first key component for this configuration is a light source with electronically-controlled emission angles. Here, we construct such a device by stacking an optical film and a polymer-network liquid crystal (PNLC) cell on top of a chip-type LED. The optical film contains opaque parallel plates that limit the LED output in a narrow angular range. The PNLC cell either transmits or scatters the light emerging from the optical film. Experiment using a 15μm-thick PNLC cell shows that the angular distribution becomes 2.3 times wider by turning off the PNLC cell. We place this light source at one end of a light-guide so that the angular distribution of the light propagating inside is controlled. The second key component is some types of micro-strucrures built on the light-guide to out-couple the propagating light. We first attached various optical films on a light-guide surface. Although the angular distribution of the extracted light was switched successfully, light was mostly emitted into an oblique direction, approximately 60° from the plane normal. Next, we used a half-cylinder in place of the optical films. The curved surface of the cylinder was attached to the light-guide with a small amount of matching oil, which constituted an optical window. We measured that the angular distribution of the extracted light decreased to 35° FWHM from 62° FWHM by turning on the PNLC cell.

  13. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON LIGHT SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-08-15

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photoscience and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. A prototype, capable of producing > 10{sup 8} 0.7 MeV photons in a single shot, with a fractional bandwidth of 1%, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is currently under construction at LLNL; this system will be used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. A new symmetrized S-band rf gun, using a Mg photocathode, will produce up to 1 nC of charge in an 8 ps bunch, with a normalized emittance modeled at 0.8 mm.mrad; electrons are subsequently accelerated up to 120 MeV to interact with a 500 mJ, 10 ps, 355 nm laser pulse and generate {gamma}-rays. The laser front end is a fiber-based system, using corrugated-fiber Bragg gratings for stretching, and drives both the frequency-quadrupled photocathode illumination laser and the Nd:YAG interaction laser. Two new technologies are used in the laser: a hyper-Michelson temporal pulse stacker capable of producing 8 ps square UV pulses, and a hyper-dispersion compressor for the interaction laser. Other key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will also be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  14. Fifty years of accelerator based physics at Chalk River

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, John W.

    1999-04-26

    The Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was a major centre for Accelerator based physics for the last fifty years. As early as 1946, nuclear structure studies were started on Cockroft-Walton accelerators. A series of accelerators followed, including the world's first Tandem, and the MP Tandem, Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) facility that was opened in 1986. The nuclear physics program was shut down in 1996. This paper will describe some of the highlights of the accelerators and the research of the laboratory.

  15. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.J.; Trapp, T.J.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Linford, R.K.

    1993-06-01

    An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper.

  16. Evolution of light source technology to support immersion and EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenstock, Gerry M.; Meinert, Christine; Farrar, Nigel R.; Yen, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Since the early 1980's, the resolution of optical projection lithography has improved dramatically primarily due to three factors: increases in projection lens numerical aperture, reduction of the imaging source wavelength, and continued reduction of the k1 factor. These three factors have been enabled by the concurrent improvements in lens making technology, DUV light sources, photoresist technology, and resolution enhancement techniques. The DUV light source, excimer KrF and ArF lasers, has entered main stream production and now images more than 50% of the critical layers in today's leading edge devices. Looking forward to both immersion lithography and beyond to EUV lithography, new light source technologies must be created to enable the continued progression of shrinking feature sizes embodied by Moore's law.

  17. Mapping algorithm for freeform construction using non-ideal light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Michaelis, D.; Schreiber, P.; Dick, L.; Bräuer, A.

    2015-09-01

    Using conventional mapping algorithms for the construction of illumination freeform optics' arbitrary target pattern can be obtained for idealized sources, e.g. collimated light or point sources. Each freeform surface element generates an image point at the target and the light intensity of an image point is corresponding to the area of the freeform surface element who generates the image point. For sources with a pronounced extension and ray divergence, e.g. an LED with a small source-freeform-distance, the image points are blurred and the blurred patterns might be different between different points. Besides, due to Fresnel losses and vignetting, the relationship between light intensity of image points and area of freeform surface elements becomes complicated. These individual light distributions of each freeform element are taken into account in a mapping algorithm. To this end the method of steepest decent procedures are used to adapt the mapping goal. A structured target pattern for a optics system with an ideal source is computed applying corresponding linear optimization matrices. Special weighting factor and smoothing factor are included in the procedures to achieve certain edge conditions and to ensure the manufacturability of the freefrom surface. The corresponding linear optimization matrices, which are the lighting distribution patterns of each of the freeform surface elements, are gained by conventional raytracing with a realistic source. Nontrivial source geometries, like LED-irregularities due to bonding or source fine structures, and a complex ray divergence behavior can be easily considered. Additionally, Fresnel losses, vignetting and even stray light are taken into account. After optimization iterations, with a realistic source, the initial mapping goal can be achieved by the optics system providing a structured target pattern with an ideal source. The algorithm is applied to several design examples. A few simple tasks are presented to discussed

  18. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  19. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  20. Computer simulation of PPF distribution under blue and red LED light source for plant growth.

    PubMed

    Takita, S; Okamoto, K; Yanagi, T

    1996-12-01

    The superimposed pattern of "luminescence spectrum of blue light emitting diode (LED)" and "that of red LED", corresponds well to light absorption spectrum of chlorophyll. If these two kinds of LED are used as a light source, various plant cultivation experiments are possible. The cultivation experiments which use such light sources are becoming increasingly active, and in such experiments, it is very important to know the distribution of the photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) which exerts an important influence on photosynthesis. Therefore, we have developed a computer simulation system which can visualize the PPF distribution under a light source equipped with blue and red LEDs. In this system, an LED is assumed to be a point light source, and only the photons which are emitted directly from LED are considered. This simulation system can display a perspective view of the PPF distribution, a transverse and a longitudinal section of the distribution, and a contour map of the distribution. Moreover, a contour map of the ratio of the value of the PPF emitted by blue LEDs to that by blue and red LEDs can be displayed. As the representation is achieved by colored lines according to the magnitudes of the PPF in our system, a user can understand and evaluate the state of the PPF well. PMID:11541576