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Sample records for accelerator-based pulsed neutron

  1. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  2. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  3. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa; Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Oba, Yojiro; Otake, Yoshie; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  4. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  5. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  6. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  7. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  8. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  10. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A.

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  11. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  12. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  13. Designing accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L. |; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Vujic, J.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction has been investigated as an accelerator-driven neutron source for proton energies between 2.1 and 2.6 MeV. Epithermal neutron beams shaped by three moderator materials, Al/AlF{sub 3}, {sup 7}LiF, and D{sub 2}O, have been analyzed and their usefulness for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments evaluated. Radiation transport through the moderator assembly has been simulated with the Monte Carlo {ital N}-particle code (MCNP). Fluence and dose distributions in a head phantom were calculated using BNCT treatment planning software. Depth-dose distributions and treatment times were studied as a function of proton beam energy and moderator thickness. It was found that an accelerator-based neutron source with Al/AlF{sub 3} or {sup 7}LiF as moderator material can produce depth-dose distributions superior to those calculated for a previously published neutron beam design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, achieving up to {approximately}50{percent} higher doses near the midline of the brain. For a single beam treatment, a proton beam current of 20 mA, and a {sup 7}LiF moderator, the treatment time was estimated to be about 40 min. The tumor dose deposited at a depth of 8 cm was calculated to be about 21 Gy-Eq. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  14. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig; Rowland, Mark S.

    1989-03-21

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  15. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  16. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  17. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  18. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  19. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  20. Preliminary energy-filtering neutron imaging with time-of-flight method on PKUNIFTY: A compact accelerator based neutron imaging facility at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Zou, Yubin; Wen, Weiwei; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2016-07-01

    Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility (PKUNIFTY) works on an accelerator-based neutron source with a repetition period of 10 ms and pulse duration of 0.4 ms, which has a rather low Cd ratio. To improve the effective Cd ratio and thus improve the detection capability of the facility, energy-filtering neutron imaging was realized with the intensified CCD camera and time-of-flight (TOF) method. Time structure of the pulsed neutron source was firstly simulated with Geant4, and the simulation result was evaluated with experiment. Both simulation and experiment results indicated that fast neutrons and epithermal neutrons were concentrated in the first 0.8 ms of each pulse period; meanwhile in the period of 0.8-2.0 ms only thermal neutrons existed. Based on this result, neutron images with and without energy filtering were acquired respectively, and it showed that detection capability of PKUNIFTY was improved with setting the exposure interval as 0.8-2.0 ms, especially for materials with strong moderating capability.

  1. Development and construction of a neutron beam line for accelerator-based boron neutron capture synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C; Shefer, R E

    2000-01-01

    A potential application of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li nuclear reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, termed Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), is under investigation. In an arthritic joint, the synovial lining becomes inflamed and is a source of great pain and discomfort for the afflicted patient. The goal of BNCS is to ablate the synovium, thereby eliminating the symptoms of the arthritis. A BNCS treatment would consist of an intra-articular injection of boron followed by neutron irradiation of the joint. Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations have been used to develop an accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam line for BNCS treatments. The model includes a moderator/reflector assembly, neutron producing target, target cooling system, and arthritic joint phantom. Single and parallel opposed beam irradiations have been modeled for the human knee, human finger, and rabbit knee joints. Additional reflectors, placed to the side and back of the joint, have been added to the model and have been shown to improve treatment times and skin doses by about a factor of 2. Several neutron-producing charged particle reactions have been examined for BNCS, including the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies of 4 and 3.7 MeV, the 9Be(d,n) reaction at deuteron energies of 1.5 and 2.6 MeV, and the 7Li(p,n) reaction at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV. For an accelerator beam current of 1 mA and synovial boron uptake of 1000 ppm, the time to deliver a therapy dose of 10,000 RBEcGy ranges from 3 to 48 min, depending on the treated joint and the neutron producing charged particle reaction. The whole-body effective dose that a human would incur during a knee treatment has been estimated to be 3.6 rem or 0.75 rem, for 1000 ppm or 19,000 ppm synovial boron uptake, respectively, although the shielding configuration has not yet been optimized. The Monte Carlo design process culminated in the construction, installation, and testing of a dedicated BNCS beam line on the high

  2. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  3. Multipurpose applications of the accelerator-based neutron source[1pt] GENEPI2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, F.; Baylac, M.; Billebaud, A.; Boge, P.; Cabanel, T.; Labussière, E.; Méplan, O.; Rey, S.

    2016-11-01

    GENEPI2 (GEnérateur de NEutrons Pulsé Intense) is an accelerator-based neutron source operating at LPSC laboratory in Grenoble (France). The neutrons are produced at 2.5MeV or 14.2MeV trough fusion reactions. GENEPI2 specifications allow performing efficiently accelerated irradiation tests of integrated circuits. This facility can also be operated to test and calibrate different types of detectors. This paper will describe the facility and its performances. Then, measurements of the neutron production will be presented as well as different types of experiments and irradiations. Finally, we describe upgrades undertaken to increase the neutron flux and optimize the facility for multiple applications.

  4. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C.; Marino, Stephen A.; Geard, Charles R.; Brenner, David J.; Garty, Guy

    2015-01-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  5. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields. PMID:26414507

  6. Accelerator-Based Biological Irradiation Facility Simulating Neutron Exposure from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Turner, Helen C; Marino, Stephen A; Geard, Charles R; Brenner, David J; Garty, Guy

    2015-10-01

    We describe here an accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility, intended to expose blood or small animals to neutron fields mimicking those from an improvised nuclear device at relevant distances from the epicenter. Neutrons are generated by a mixed proton/deuteron beam on a thick beryllium target, generating a broad spectrum of neutron energies that match those estimated for the Hiroshima bomb at 1.5 km from ground zero. This spectrum, dominated by neutron energies between 0.2 and 9 MeV, is significantly different from the standard reactor fission spectrum, as the initial bomb spectrum changes when the neutrons are transported through air. The neutron and gamma dose rates were measured using a custom tissue-equivalent gas ionization chamber and a compensated Geiger-Mueller dosimeter, respectively. Neutron spectra were evaluated by unfolding measurements using a proton-recoil proportional counter and a liquid scintillator detector. As an illustration of the potential use of this facility we present micronucleus yields in single divided, cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral lymphocytes up to 1.5 Gy demonstrating 3- to 5-fold enhancement over equivalent X-ray doses. This facility is currently in routine use, irradiating both mice and human blood samples for evaluation of neutron-specific biodosimetry assays. Future studies will focus on dose reconstruction in realistic mixed neutron/photon fields.

  7. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  8. Short pulse neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2016-08-02

    Short pulse neutron generators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the short pulse neutron generator includes a Blumlein structure. The Blumlein structure includes a first conductive plate, a second conductive plate, a third conductive plate, at least one of an inductor or a resistor, a switch, and a dielectric material. The first conductive plate is positioned relative to the second conductive plate such that a gap separates these plates. A vacuum chamber is positioned in the gap, and an ion source is positioned to emit ions in the vacuum chamber. The third conductive plate is electrically grounded, and the switch is operable to electrically connect and disconnect the second conductive plate and the third conductive plate. The at least one of the resistor or the inductor is coupled to the first conductive plate and the second conductive plate.

  9. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  10. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1998-08-01

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin ({approximately} 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target {approximately} 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies ({approximately} 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV.

  11. Development of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Castell, W; Di Paolo, H; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J; Burlon, A A; Cartelli, D; Vento, V Thatar; Kesque, J M; Erhardt, J; Ilardo, J C; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Sandin, J C Suarez; Igarzabal, M; Huck, H; Estrada, L; Repetto, M; Obligado, M; Padulo, J; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M; Gonzalez, S J; Capoulat, M E

    2011-12-01

    We describe the present status of an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT. The project final goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction. The machine currently being constructed is a folded TESQ with a high-voltage terminal at 0.6 MV. We report here on the progress achieved in a number of different areas.

  12. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks.

  13. ANALYSIS OF ACCELERATOR BASED NEUTRON SPECTRA FOR BNCT USING PROTON RECOIL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.; LUDEWIG,H.; POWELL,J.R.; RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI,J.G.; LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    1998-11-06

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase I/II clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  14. Analysis of accelerator based neutron spectra for BNCT using proton recoil spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.G.; Lowenstein, D.I.

    1999-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising binary treatment modality for high-grade primary brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme, GM) and other cancers. BNCT employs a boron-10 containing compound that preferentially accumulates in the cancer cells in the brain. Upon neutron capture by {sup 10}B energetic alpha particles and triton released at the absorption site kill the cancer cell. In order to gain penetration depth in the brain Fairchild proposed, for this purpose, the use of energetic epithermal neutrons at about 10 keV. Phase 1/2 clinical trials of BNCT for GM are underway at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) and at the MIT Reactor, using these nuclear reactors as the source for epithermal neutrons. In light of the limitations of new reactor installations, e.g. cost, safety and licensing, and limited capability for modulating the reactor based neutron beam energy spectra, alternative neutron sources are being contemplated for wider implementation of this modality in a hospital environment. For example, accelerator based neutron sources offer the possibility of tailoring the neutron beams, in terms of improved depth-dose distributions, to the individual and offer, with relative ease, the capability of modifying the neutron beam energy and port size. In previous work new concepts for compact accelerator/target configuration were published. In this work, using the Van de Graaff accelerator the authors have explored different materials for filtering and reflecting neutron beams produced by irradiating a thick Li target with 1.8 to 2.5 MeV proton beams. However, since the yield and the maximum neutron energy emerging from the Li-7(p,n)Be-7 reaction increase with increase in the proton beam energy, there is a need for optimization of the proton energy versus filter and shielding requirements to obtain the desired epithermal neutron beam. The MCNP-4A computer code was used for the initial design studies that were verified with benchmark

  15. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  16. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  17. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy. Annual report, [October 1990--April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  18. Optical polarizing neutron devices designed for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, M.; Kurahashi, K.; Endoh, Y.; Itoh, S.

    1997-09-01

    We have designed two polarizing neutron devices for pulsed cold neutrons. The devices have been tested at the pulsed neutron source at the Booster Synchrotron Utilization Facility of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. These two devices proved to have a practical use for experiments to investigate condensed matter physics using pulsed cold polarized neutrons.

  19. An accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam design for BNCT and dosimetric evaluation using a voxel head phantom.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deok-jae; Han, Chi Young; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2004-01-01

    The beam shaping assembly design has been investigated in order to improve the epithermal neutron beam for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy in intensity and quality, and dosimetric evaluation for the beams has been performed using both mathematical and voxel head phantoms with MCNP runs. The neutron source was assumed to be produced from a conventional 2.5 MeV proton accelerator with a thick (7)Li target. The results indicate that it is possible to enhance epithermal neutron flux remarkably as well as to embody a good spectrum shaping to epithermal neutrons only with the proper combination of moderator and reflector. It is also found that a larger number of thermal neutrons can reach deeply into the brain and, therefore, can reduce considerably the treatment time for brain tumours. Consequently, the epithermal neutron beams designed in this study can treat more effectively deep-seated brain tumours.

  20. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future.

  1. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  2. a Portable Pulsed Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoulakis, A.; Androulakis, G. C.; Clark, E. L.; Hassan, S. M.; Lee, P.; Chatzakis, J.; Bakarezos, M.; Dimitriou, V.; Petridis, C.; Papadogiannis, N. A.; Tatarakis, M.

    2014-02-01

    The design and construction of a pulsed plasma focus device to be used as a portable neutron source for material analysis such as explosive detection using gamma spectroscopy is presented. The device is capable of operating at a repetitive rate of a few Hz. When deuterium gas is used, up to 105 neutrons per shot are expected to be produced with a temporal pulse width of a few tens of nanoseconds. The pulsed operation of the device and its portable size are its main advantage in comparison with the existing continuous neutron sources. Parts of the device include the electrical charging unit, the capacitor bank, the spark switch (spark gap), the trigger unit and the vacuum-fuel chamber / anode-cathode. Numerical simulations are used for the simulation of the electrical characteristics of the device including the scaling of the capacitor bank energies with total current, the pinch current, and the scaling of neutron yields with energies and currents. The MCNPX code is used to simulate the moderation of the produced neutrons in a simplified geometry and subsequently, the interaction of thermal neutrons with a test target and the corresponding prompt γ-ray generation.

  3. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s.

  4. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided_by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided_by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center_dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s.

  5. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  6. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  7. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  8. Simulation study of accelerator based quasi-mono-energetic epithermal neutron beams for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Adib, M; Habib, N; Bashter, I I; El-Mesiry, M S; Mansy, M S

    2016-01-01

    Filtered neutron techniques were applied to produce quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams in the energy range of 1.5-7.5 keV at the accelerator port using the generated neutron spectrum from a Li (p, n) Be reaction. A simulation study was performed to characterize the filter components and transmitted beam lines. The feature of the filtered beams is detailed in terms of optimal thickness of the primary and additive components. A computer code named "QMNB-AS" was developed to carry out the required calculations. The filtered neutron beams had high purity and intensity with low contamination from the accompanying thermal, fast neutrons and γ-rays.

  9. The relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Watterson, J. I. W.

    1999-06-10

    Fast neutron radiography as a method for non destructive testing is a fast growing field of research. At the Schonland Research Center for Nuclear Sciences we have been engaged in the formulation of a model for the physics of image formation in fast neutron radiography (FNR). This involves examining all the various factors that affect image formation in FNR by experimental and Monte Carlo methods. One of the major problems in the development of a model for fast neutron radiography is the determination of the factors that affect image contrast and resolution. Monte Carlo methods offer an ideal tool for the determination of the origin of many of these factors. In previous work the focus of these methods has been the determination of the scattered neutron field in both a scintillator and a fast neutron radiography facility. As an extension of this work MCNP has been used to evaluate the role neutron scattering in a specimen plays in image detectability. Image processing of fast neutron radiographs is a necessary method of enhancing the detectability of features in an image. MCNP has been used to determine the part it can play in indirectly improving image resolution and aiding in image processing. The role noise plays in fast neutron radiography and its impact on image reconstruction has been evaluated. All these factors aid in the development of a model describing the relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability.

  10. An accelerator-based neutron microbeam system for studies of radiation effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Bigelow, Alan W.; Akselrod, Mark S.; Sykora, Jeff G.; Brenner, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A novel neutron microbeam is being developed at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) of Columbia University. The RARAF microbeam facility has been used for studies of radiation bystander effects in mammalian cells for many years. Now a prototype neutron microbeam is being developed that can be used for bystander effect studies. The neutron microbeam design here is based on the existing charged particle microbeam technology at the RARAF. The principle of the neutron microbeam is to use the proton beam with a micrometre-sized diameter impinging on a very thin lithium fluoride target system. From the kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction near the threshold of 1.881 MeV, the neutron beam is confined within a narrow, forward solid angle. Calculations show that the neutron spot using a target with a 17-µm thick gold backing foil will be <20 µm in diameter for cells attached to a 3.8-µm thick propylene-bottomed cell dish in contact with the target backing. The neutron flux will roughly be 2000 per second based on the current beam setup at the RARAF singleton accelerator. The dose rate will be about 200 mGy min−1. The principle of this neutron microbeam system has been preliminarily tested at the RARAF using a collimated proton beam. The imaging of the neutron beam was performed using novel fluorescent nuclear track detector technology based on Mg-doped luminescent aluminum oxide single crystals and confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy. PMID:21131327

  11. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2009-03-10

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  12. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  13. Characteristic impedance and capacitance analysis of Blumlein type pulse forming line of accelerator based on tape helix

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Liu Jinliang; Fan Xuliang; Zhang Hongbo; Wang Shiwen; Feng Jiahuai

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, the electromagnetic dispersion theory and the classic telegraph equations were combined to calculate the important parameters of the helical Blumlein pulse forming line (BPFL) of accelerator based on tape helix. In the work band of the BPFL at several hundred ns range, electromagnetic dispersion characteristics were almost determined by the zeroth harmonic. In order to testify the dispersion theory of BPFL in this paper, filling dielectrics, such as de-ionized water, transformer oil, and air were employed in the helical BPFL, respectively. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, characteristic impedance, and pulse duration of the BPFL were calculated. Effects of dispersion on these parameters were analyzed. Circuit simulation and electromagnetic simulation were carried out to prove these parameters of BPFL filled with these three kinds of dielectrics, respectively. The accelerator system was set up, and experimental results also corresponded to the theoretical calculations. The average theoretical errors of impedances and pulse durations were 3.5% and 3.4%, respectively, which proved the electromagnetic dispersion analyses in this paper.

  14. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-guang; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-03-15

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  15. Electrostatic design and beam transport for a folded tandem electrostatic quadrupole accelerator facility for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Vento, V Thatar; Bergueiro, J; Cartelli, D; Valda, A A; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), we discuss here the electrostatic design of the machine, including the accelerator tubes with electrostatic quadrupoles and the simulations for the transport and acceleration of a high intensity beam.

  16. A study of neutron radiation quality with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter for a low-energy accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Waker, A J

    2011-02-01

    The accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility at McMaster University has been used successfully for the measurement of several minor and trace elements in human hand bones due to their importance to health. Most of these in vivo measurements have been conducted at a proton beam energy (E(p)) of 2.00 MeV to optimise the activation of the selected element of interest with an effective dose of the same order as that received in chest X rays. However, measurement of other elements at the same facility requires beam energies other than 2.00 MeV. The range of energy of neutrons produced at these proton beam energies comes under the region where tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are known to experience difficulty in assessing the quality factor and dose equivalent. In this study, the response of TEPCs was investigated to determine the quality factor of neutron fields generated via the (7)Li(p, n)(7)Be reaction as a function of E(p) in the range 1.884-2.56 MeV at the position of hand irradiation in the facility. An interesting trend has been observed in the quality factor based on ICRP 60, Q(ICRP60), such that the maximum value was observed at E(p)=1.884 MeV (E(n)=33±16 keV) and then continued to decline with increasing E(p) until achieving a minimum value at E(p)=2.0 MeV despite a continuous increase in the mean neutron energy with E(p). This observation is contrary to what has been observed with direct fast neutrons where the quality factor was found to increase continuously with an increase in E(p) (i.e. increasing E(n)). The series of measurements conducted with thermal and fast neutron fields demonstrate that the (14)N(n, p)(14)C produced 580 keV protons in the detector play an important role in the response of the counter under 2.0 MeV proton energy (E(n) ≤ 250 keV). In contrast to the lower response of TEPCs to low-energy neutrons, the quality factor is overestimated in the range 1-2 depending on beam energy <2.0 MeV. This study provides

  17. Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. PULSE PROFILES FROM THERMALLY EMITTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Turolla, R.; Nobili, L.

    2013-05-10

    The problem of computing the pulse profiles from thermally emitting spots on the surface of a neutron star in general relativity is reconsidered. We show that it is possible to extend Beloborodov's approach to include (multiple) spots of finite size in different positions on the star surface. The results for the pulse profiles are expressed by comparatively simple analytical formulae which involve only elementary functions.

  19. Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-04

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments.

  20. Development of high intensity ion sources for a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bergueiro, J; Igarzabal, M; Sandin, J C Suarez; Somacal, H R; Vento, V Thatar; Huck, H; Valda, A A; Repetto, M; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Several ion sources have been developed and an ion source test stand has been mounted for the first stage of a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole facility For Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. A first source, designed, fabricated and tested is a dual chamber, filament driven and magnetically compressed volume plasma proton ion source. A 4 mA beam has been accelerated and transported into the suppressed Faraday cup. Extensive simulations of the sources have been performed using both 2D and 3D self-consistent codes.

  1. Silver-lined proportional counter for detection of pulsed neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, P. M.; Prasad, K. R.; Kataria, S. K.

    2004-05-01

    A silver-lined proportional counter is developed for pulsed neutron monitoring near the electron accelerator INDUS-I at CAT, Indore. The device was developed since neutron flux meters with boron counters showed poor response to pulsed neutron background. The detector has 110 mm length and its inner diameter (26 mm) is lined with silver foil of 0.025 cm thickness. Tests in a thermal neutron flux of 150 nv show that it has 0.2 cps/nv neutron sensitivity. Tests at Plasma Focus Device facility with single neutron pulse (pulse width 50 ns) showed that the counter has 1.2×10 6 neutron/pulse counts sensitivity. Tests at INDUS-I electron accelerator facility in multiple neutron pulses (pulse width 1 μs and 1 Hz repetition rate) showed that the neutron flux estimated by the counter is comparable to the flux measured by passive CR-39 foils. The counter has potential application to detect neutron pulses of high intensity that occur within the shielded areas of electron accelerators during partial or total beam loss.

  2. Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Crawford, R.K.; Rauchas, A.V.; Schulke, A.W.; Worlton, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    IPNS is not unique in having concerns about the level of funding, and the future looks good despite these concerns. This report details the progress made at IPNS during the last two years. Other papers in these proceedings discuss in detail the status of the enriched uranium Booster target, the two instruments that are under construction, GLAD and POSY II, and a proposal for research on an Advanced Pulsed Neutron Source (ASPUN) that has been submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE). Further details on IPNS are available in the IPNS Progress Report 1987--1988, available by writing the IPNS Division Office. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  4. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  5. Ultra-short ion and neutron pulse production

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2006-01-10

    An ion source has an extraction system configured to produce ultra-short ion pulses, i.e. pulses with pulse width of about 1 .mu.s or less, and a neutron source based on the ion source produces correspondingly ultra-short neutron pulses. To form a neutron source, a neutron generating target is positioned to receive an accelerated extracted ion beam from the ion source. To produce the ultra-short ion or neutron pulses, the apertures in the extraction system of the ion source are suitably sized to prevent ion leakage, the electrodes are suitably spaced, and the extraction voltage is controlled. The ion beam current leaving the source is regulated by applying ultra-short voltage pulses of a suitable voltage on the extraction electrode.

  6. Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.; Brown, B.S.; Kustom, R.L.; Lander, G.H.; Potts, C.W.; Schulke, A.W.; Wuestefeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fortunately in spite of some premature reports of its impending demise, IPNS has passed the fourth anniversary of the first delivery of protons to the targets (May 5, 1981) and is approaching the fourth anniversary of its operation as a scattering facility (August 4, 1981). On June 10, 1984, the RCS delivered its one billionth pulse to the IPNS target - the total number of protons delivered to the targets amounted then to 75 stp cm/sup 3/ of H/sub 2/ gas. Since startup IPNS has improved steadily in terms of the performance of the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron, the source and its moderators and the scattering instruments, and a substantial and productive user program has evolved. This report summarizes the current status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We include reference to recent accelerator operating experience, neutron facility operating experience, improvements to these systems, design work on the ASPUN high-current facility, booster target design, the new solid methane moderator, characterization of the room temperature moderators, and provide some examples of recent results from several of the spectrometers.

  7. The design of an intense accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam prototype for BNCT using near-threshold reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles L.

    Near-threshold boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) uses proton energies only tens of rev above the (pan) reaction threshold in lithium in order to reduce the moderation requirements of the neutron source. The goals of this research were to prove the feasibility of this near-threshold concept for BNCT applications, using both calculation and experiment, and design a compact neutron source prototype from these results. This required a multidisciplinary development of methods for calculation of neutron yields, head phantom dosimetry, and accelerator target heat removal. First, a method was developed to accurately calculate thick target neutron yields for both near-threshold and higher energy proton beams, in lithium metal as well as lithium compounds. After these yields were experimentally verified, they were used as neutron sources for Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of neutron and photon transport in head phantoms. The theoretical and experimental determination of heat removal from a target backing with multiple fins, as well as numerical calculations of heat deposition profiles based on proton energy loss in target and backing materials, demonstrated that lithium integrity can be maintained for proton beam currents up to 2.5 mA. The final design uses a proton beam energy of 1.95 MeV and has a centerline epithermal neutron flux of 2.2 × 108 n/cm2- sec/mA, an advantage depth of 5.7 cm, an advantage ratio of 4.3, and an advantage depth dose rate of 6.7 RBE- cGy/min/mA, corresponding to an irradiation time of 38 minutes with a 5 mA beam. Moderator, reflector, and shielding weigh substantially less than other accelerator BNCT designs based on higher proton energies, e.g. 2.5 MeV. The near-threshold concept is useful as a portable neutron source for hospital settings, with applications ranging from glioblastomas to melanomas and synovectomy. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  8. Supergiant pulses from extragalactic neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J. M.; Wasserman, Ira

    2016-03-01

    We consider radio bursts that originate from extragalactic neutron stars (NSs) by addressing three questions about source distances. What are the physical limitations on coherent radiation at GHz frequencies? Do they permit detection at cosmological distances? How many bursts per NS are needed to produce the inferred burst rate ˜103-104sky-1 d-1? The burst rate is comparable to the NS formation rate in a Hubble volume, requiring only one per NS if they are bright enough. Radiation physics suggests a closer population, requiring more bursts per NS and increasing the chances for repeats. Bursts comprise sub-ns, coherent shot pulses superposed incoherently to produce ms-duration ˜1 Jy amplitudes; each shot pulse can be much weaker than 1 Jy, placing less restrictive requirements on the emission process. None the less, single shot pulses are similar to the extreme, unresolved (<0.4 ns) MJy shot pulse seen from the Crab pulsar, consistent with coherent curvature radiation emitted near the light cylinder by an almost neutral clump with net charge ˜± 1021e and total energy ≳ 1023 erg. Bursts from Gpc distances require incoherent superposition of {˜ } 10^{12}d_Gpc^2 shot pulses or a total energy ≳ 10^{35} d_Gpc^2 erg. The energy reservoir near the light cylinder limits the detection distance to ≲ few × 100 Mpc for a fluence ˜1 Jy ms unless conditions are more extreme than for the Crab pulsar, such as in magnetars. We discuss contributions to dispersion measures from galaxy clusters and we propose tests for the overall picture presented.

  9. High Intensity, Pulsed, D-D Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. L.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Jones, G.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Harris, J. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Cremer, J. T.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Kwan, J. W.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    Single ion-beam RF-plasma neutron generators are presented as a laboratory source of intense neutrons. The continuous and pulsed operations of such a neutron generator using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction are reported. The neutron beam can be pulsed by switching the RF plasma and/or a gate electrode. These generators are actively vacuum pumped so that a continuous supply of deuterium gas is present for the production of ions and neutrons. This contributes to the generator's long life. These single-beam generators are capable of producing up to 1E10 n/s. Previously, Adelphi and LBNL have demonstrated these generators' applications in fast neutron radiography, Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Together with an inexpensive compact moderator, these high-output neutron generators extend useful applications to home laboratory operations.

  10. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, T.

    2008-03-01

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of Δd/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 Å-1

  11. LENS: A New Pulsed Neutron Source for Research and Education

    PubMed Central

    Leuschner, M.; Baxter, D. V.; Cameron, J. M.; Derenchuk, V.; Lavelle, C.; Lone, A.; Nann, H.; Rinckel, T.; Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    A new pulsed neutron source is under construction at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). Neutrons are produced via (p,n) reactions by a low-energy proton beam incident on a thin beryllium target. The source is tightly coupled to a cold methane moderator held at a temperature of 20 K or below. The resulting time-averaged cold neutron flux is expected to be comparable to that of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial experimental suite will include instrumentation for small angle neutron scattering (SANS), moderator studies, radiography, and zero-field spin-echo SANS. PMID:27308113

  12. Program system for three-dimensional coupled Monte Carlo-deterministic shielding analysis with application to the accelerator-based IFMIF neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.

    2005-10-01

    A program system for three-dimensional coupled Monte Carlo-deterministic shielding analysis has been developed to solve problems with complex geometry and bulk shield by integrating the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code TORT and a coupling interface program. A newly-proposed mapping approach is implemented in the interface program to calculate the angular flux distribution from the scored Monte Carlo particle tracks and generate the boundary source file for the use of TORT. Test calculations were performed with comparison to MCNP solutions. Satisfactory agreements were obtained between the results calculated by these two approaches. The program system has been chosen to treat the complicated shielding problem of the accelerator-based IFMIF neutron source. The successful application demonstrates that coupling scheme with the program system is a useful computational tool for the shielding analysis of complex and large nuclear facilities.

  13. Improving the output voltage waveform of an intense electron-beam accelerator based on helical type Blumlein pulse forming line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin-Bing; Liu, Jin-Liang; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Feng, Jia-Huai; Qian, Bao-Liang

    2010-07-01

    The Blumlein pulse forming line (BPFL) consisting of an inner coaxial pulse forming line (PFL) and an outer coaxial PFL is widely used in the field of pulsed power, especially for intense electron-beam accelerators (IEBA). The output voltage waveform determines the quality and characteristics of the output beam current of the IEBA. Comparing with the conventional BPFL, an IEBA based on a helical type BPFL can increase the duration of the output voltage in the same geometrical volume. However, for the helical type BPFL, the voltage waveform on a matched load may be distorted which influences the electron-beam quality. In this paper, an IEBA based on helical type BPFL is studied theoretically. Based on telegrapher equations of the BPFL, a formula for the output voltage of IEBA is obtained when the transition section is taken into account, where the transition section is between the middle cylinder of BPFL and the load. From the theoretical analysis, it is found that the wave impedance and transit time of the transition section influence considerably the main pulse voltage waveform at the load, a step is formed in front of the main pulse, and a sharp spike is also formed at the end of the main pulse. In order to get a well-shaped square waveform at the load and to improve the electron-beam quality of such an accelerator, the wave impedance of the transition section should be equal to that of the inner PFL of helical type BPFL and the transit time of the transition section should be designed as short as possible. Experiments performed on an IEBA with the helical type BPFL show reasonable agreement with theoretical analysis.

  14. Accelerator tube construction and characterization for a tandem-electrostatic-quadrupole for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Cartelli, D; Vento, V Thatar; Castell, W; Di Paolo, H; Kesque, J M; Bergueiro, J; Valda, A A; Erhardt, J; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    The accelerator tubes are essential components of the accelerator. Their function is to transport and accelerate a very intense proton or deuteron beam through the machine, from the ion source to the neutron production target, without significant losses. In this contribution, we discuss materials selected for the tube construction, the procedures used for their assembly and the testing performed to meet the stringent requirements to which it is subjected.

  15. Development of an accelerator based system for in vivo neutron activation analysis measurements of manganese in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle Lynn

    2001-11-01

    Manganese is required by the human body, but as with many heavy elements, in large amounts it can be toxic, producing a neurological disorder similar to that of Parkinson's Disease. The primary industrial uses of the element are for the manufacturing of steel and alkali batteries. Environmental exposure may occur via drinking water or exhaust emissions from vehicles using gasoline with the manganese containing compound MMT as an antiknock agent (MMT has been approved for use in both Canada and the United States). Preclinical symptoms of toxicity have recently been detected in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne manganese at levels below the present threshold limit value set by the EPA. Evidence also suggests that early detection of manganese toxicity is crucial since once the symptoms have developed past a certain point, the syndrome will continue to progress even if manganese exposure ceases. The development of a system for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) measurement of manganese levels was investigated, with the goal being to have a means of monitoring both over exposed and manganese deficient populations. The McMaster KN-accelerator was used to provide low-energy neutrons, activation within an irradiation site occurred via the 55Mn(n,gamma) 56Mn capture reaction, and the 847 keV gamma-rays emitted when 56Mn decayed were measured using one or more Nal(TI) detectors. The present data regarding manganese metabolism and storage within the body are limited, and it is unclear what the optimal measurement site would be to provide a suitable biomarker of past exposure. Therefore the feasibility of IVNAA measurements in three sites was examined---the liver, brain and hand bones. Calibration curves were derived, minimum detectable limits determined and resulting doses calculated for each site (experimentally in the case of the liver and hand bones, and through computer simulations for the brain). Detailed analytical calculations of the 7Li(p,n) 7Be

  16. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelashvili, I.; Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A.; Pedersen, B.; Beck, A.; Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J. M.; Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I.

    2015-06-01

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  17. Characterization of pulsed (plasma focus) neutron source with image plate and application to neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Andola, Sanjay; Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, S. C.; Shaikh, A. M.

    2013-02-05

    Plasma focus device of Mather type developed in house has been used first time for neutron radiography of different objects. The device gives (1.2{+-}0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} neutrons per pulse produced by D-D fusion reaction with a pulse width of 50{+-}5 ns. The method involves exposing sample to be radiographed to thermalized D-D neutrons and recording the image on Fuji-film BAS-ND image plates. The thermal neutron component of the moderated beam was estimated using two image plates: a conventional IP for X-rays and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of mercury target concepts for a pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.; Haines, J.

    1996-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (ORSNS) is a high-power, accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The ORSNS is projected to have a 1 MW proton beam upgradable to 5 MW. About 60% of the beam power (1-5 MW, 17-83 kJ/pulse in 0.5 microsec at 60 cps) is deposited in the liquid metal (mercury) target having the dimensions of 65x30x10 cm (about 19.5 liter). Peak steady state power density is about 150 and 785 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW and 5 MW beam respectively, whereas peak pulsed power density is as high as 5.2 and 26.1 GW/m{sup 3}, respectively. The peak pulse temperature rise rate is 14 million C/s (for 5 MW beam) whereas the total pulse temperature rise is only 7 C. In addition to thermal shock and materials compatibility, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. This includes proper flow distribution, flow reversals, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles throughout the mercury volume or other concepts. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFDS-FLOW3D was used to simulate the thermal and flow distribution in three preliminary concepts of the mercury target. Very initial CFD simulation of He bubbles injection demonstrates some potential for simulating behavior of He bubbles in flowing mercury. Much study and development will be required to be able to `predict`, even in a crude way, such a complex phenomena. Future direction in both design and R&D is outlined.

  19. The Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination Method for Neutron Flux Detection in the ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiufeng; Li, Shiping; Cao, Hongrui; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Qingwei; Yin, Zejie

    2013-05-01

    The neutron flux monitor (NFM), as a significant diagnostic system in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will play an important role in the readings of a series of key parameters in the fusion reaction process. As the core of the main electronic system of the NFM, the neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination (n-γ PSD) can distinguish the neutron pulse from the gamma pulse and other disturbing pulses according to the thresholds of the rising time and the amplitude pre-installed on the board, the double timing point CFD method is used to get the rising time of the pulse. The n-γ PSD can provide an accurate neutron count.

  20. Neutron and Gamma Ray Pulse Shape Discrimination with Polyvinyltoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Stave, Jean A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this was research effort was to test the ability of two poly vinyltoluene research samples to produce recordable, distinguishable signals in response to gamma rays and neutrons. Pulse shape discrimination was performed to identify if the signal was generated by a gamma ray or a neutron. A standard figure of merit for pulse shape discrimination was used to quantify the gamma-neutron pulse separation. Measurements were made with gamma and neutron sources with and without shielding. The best figure of merit obtained was 1.77; this figure of merit was achieved with the first sample in response to an un-moderated 252Cf source shielded with 5.08 cm of lead.

  1. Pulsed-neutron techniques for condensed-matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Price, D.L.; Kamitakahara, W.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources are reviewed in a historical content as the latest generation of neutron sources in a line that started with the discovery of the neutron in 1932 and proceeded through research-reactor and accelerator-driven sources. The characteristics of the spallation sources are discussed in relation to their capabilities for structural and dynamical studies of condensed matter with slow neutrons and radiation effects research with fast neutrons. The new scientific opportunities opened up in these fields by the unique features of the sources are briefly reviewed, with some examples of completed work and experiments being planned.

  2. Electron acceleration based on a laser pulse propagating through a plasma in the simultaneous presence of a helical wiggler and an obliquely applied external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashti, M. A.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    Electron acceleration based on a laser pulse propagating through plasma channel has been studied in the simultaneous presence of a helical magnetic wiggler and an obliquely applied external magnetic field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectory has been made using the fourth-order Runge-kutta method. Numerical results indicate that electron energy increases with decreasing θ -angle of the obliquely external magnetic field. Besides, it increases with increasing the amplitude of the obliquely magnetic field. It is also found that the electron attains a higher energy at shorter distances for higher amplitude of the wiggler field Ωw . Therefore, employing a magnetic wiggler field is very beneficial for electron acceleration in short distances. Further new results reveal that in the absence of the wiggler field (Ωw=0) , the electron energy increases with increasing the laser intensity, whereas in the presence of the wiggler field (Ωwneq0) , the electron energy increases with decreasing the laser intensity. As a result, employing a wiggler magnetic field in the laser-based electron accelerators can be worthwhile in the design of table top accelerators and it can enhance the electron energy at lower laser intensities.

  3. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  4. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors.

  5. A neutron imaging device for sample alignment in a pulsed neutron scattering instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Grazzi, F.; Scherillo, A.; Zoppi, M.

    2009-09-15

    A neutron-imaging device for alignment purposes has been tested on the INES beamline at ISIS, the pulsed neutron source of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (U.K.). Its use, in conjunction with a set of movable jaws, turns out extremely useful for scattering application to complex samples where a precise and well-defined determination of the scattering volume is needed.

  6. Spatial corrections for pulsed-neutron reactivity measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Lee, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-07-01

    For pulsed-neutron experiments performed in a subcritical reactor, the reactivity obtained from the area-ratio method is sensitive to detector positions. The spatial effects are induced by the presence of both the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics in the reactor. The traditional kinetics distortion factor is only limited to correcting the spatial effects caused by the fundamental prompt-{alpha} mode. In this paper, we derive spatial correction factors fp and fd to account for spatial effects induced by the prompt neutron harmonics and the delayed neutron harmonics, respectively. Our numerical simulations with the FX2-TH time-dependent multigroup diffusion code indicate that the high-order prompt neutron harmonics lead to significant spatial effects and cannot be neglected in calculating the spatial correction factors. The prompt spatial correction factor fp can be simply determined by the ratio of the normalized detector responses corresponding to the fundamental k-mode and the prompt neutron flux integrated over the pulse period. Thus, it is convenient to calculate and provides physically intuitive explanations on the spatial dependence of reactivity measured in the MUSE-4 experiments: overestimation of the subcriticality in regions close to the external neutron source and underestimation of the subcriticality away from the source but within the fuel region.

  7. LANL Efforts on Neutron Coincidence Modeling of INL Pulsed Neutron Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott; Thron, Jonathan L.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Geist, William H.; Charlton, William S.

    2012-06-25

    Overview of this presentation is: (1) pulsed histogram analysis, (2) creation of SPNS, (3) use of SPNS for modeling pulsed neutron data, (4) creation of MUDI, (5) calculated accidentals correction using GUAM + MUDI, (6) background subtraction analysis, and (7) current/figure work with MCNP.

  8. Detection of pulsed neutrons with solid-state electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzakis, J.; Rigakis, I.; Hassan, S. M.; Clark, E. L.; Lee, P.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of the spatial and time-resolved characteristics of pulsed neutron sources require large area detection materials and fast circuitry that can process the electronic pulses readout from the active region of the detector. In this paper, we present a solid-state detector based on the nuclear activation of materials by neutrons, and the detection of the secondary particle emission of the generated radionuclides’ decay. The detector utilizes a microcontroller that communicates using a modified SPI protocol. A solid-state, pulse shaping filter follows a charge amplifier, and it is designed as an inexpensive, low-noise solution for measuring pulses measured by a digital counter. An imaging detector can also be made by using an array of these detectors. The system can communicate with an interface unit and pass an image to a personal computer.

  9. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed.

  10. Data acquisition system for the neutron scattering instruments at the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Daly, R.T.; Haumann, J.R.; Hitterman, R.L.; Morgan, C.B.; Ostrowski, G.E.; Worlton, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a major new user-oriented facility which is now coming on line for basic research in neutron scattering and neutron radiation damage. This paper describes the data-acquisition system which will handle data acquisition and instrument control for the time-of-flight neutron-scattering instruments at IPNS. This discussion covers the scientific and operational requirements for this system, and the system architecture that was chosen to satisfy these requirements. It also provides an overview of the current system implementation including brief descriptions of the hardware and software which have been developed.

  11. Residual stress measurement using the pulsed neutron source at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A. ); Holden, T.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The presence of residual stress in engineering components can effect their mechanical properties and structural integrity. Neutron diffraction is the only measuring technique which can make spatially resolved non-destructive strain measurements in the interior of components. By recording the change in the crystalline interplanar spacing, elastic strains can be measured for individual lattice reflections. Using a pulsed neutron source, all the lattice reflections are recorded in each measurement which allows anisotropic effects to be studied. Measurements made at the Manuel Lujan Jr Neutron Scattering Centre (LANSCE) demonstrate the potential for stress measurements on a pulsed source and indicate the advantages and disadvantages over measurements made on a reactor. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Magnetic structures of actinide materials by pulsed neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Goldstone, J.A.; Huber, J.G.; Giorgi, A.L.; Conant, J.W.; Severing, A.; Cort, B.; Robinson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We describe some attempts to observe magnetic structure in various actinide (5f-electron) materials. Our experimental technique is neutron powder diffraction as practiced at a spallation (pulsed) neutron source. We will discuss our investigations of {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, {alpha}-UD{sub 3} and {beta}-UD{sub 3}. {beta}-UD{sub 3} is a simple ferromagnet: surprisingly, the moments on the two non-equivalent uranium atoms are the same within experimental error. {alpha}-UD{sub 3}, {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu are non-magnetic, within the limits of our observations. Our work with pulsed neutron diffraction shows that it is a useful technique for research on magnetic materials.

  13. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 ..mu..amp proton beam is 4.0 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error.

  14. Preliminary Pulsing Experiments to Measure Delayed Neutron Emission Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, W.S.; Parish, T.A.; Raman, S.

    1998-10-05

    Recent interest in delayed neutron parameters including comparisons between macroscopic (experimental) and microscopic (calculated) results have prompted a set of experiments using the 1MW Triga Reactor at the Texas A and M University (TAMU) Nuclear Science Center (NSC) designed to measure the complete set of seven-group delayed neutron parameters for several higher actinides. Operating the Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) in a pulsed mode, a complete set of delayed neutron parameters were measured for Np-237 and Am-243. The total delayed neutron yield per 100 fissions for Np-237 and Am-243 was found to be 1.14 {+-} 0.07 and 0.85 {+-} 0.05, respectively. Comparisons to previous measurements are made where such measurements are available.

  15. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  16. Pulsed neutron imaging using 2-dimensional position sensitive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Y.; Kamiyama, T.; Kino, K.; Sato, H.; Sato, S.; Uno, S.

    2014-07-01

    2-dimensional position sensitive detectors are used for pulsed neutron imaging and at each pixel of the detector a time of flight spectrum is recorded. Therefore, a transmission spectrum through the object has wavelength dependent structure reflecting the neutron total cross section. For such measurements, the detectors are required to have ability to store neutron events as a function of the flight time as well as to have good spatial resolution. Furthermore, high counting rate is also required at the high intensity neutron sources like J-PARC neutron source in Japan. We have developed several types of detectors with different characteristics; two counting type detectors for high counting rate with coarse spatial resolution and one camera type detector for high spatial resolution. One of counting type detectors is a pixel type. The highest counting rate is about 28 MHz. Better spatial resolution is obtained by a GEM detector. Effective area is 10 × 10 cm2, pixel size is 0.8 mm. The maximum counting rate is 3.65 MHz. To get higher spatial resolution we are now developing the camera type detector system using a neutron image intensifier, which have image integration function as a function of time of flight. We have succeeded to obtain time dependent images in this camera system. By using these detectors we performed transmission measurements for obtaining the crystallographic information and elemental distribution images.

  17. Small plasma focus as neutron pulsed source for nuclides identification

    SciTech Connect

    Milanese, M.; Moroso, R.; Barbaglia, M.; Niedbalski, J.; Mayer, R.; Castillo, F.

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we present preliminary results on the feasibility of employing a low energy (2 kJ, 31 kV) plasma focus device as a portable source of pulsed neutron beams (2.45 MeV) generated by nuclear fusion reactions D-D, for the “in situ” analysis of substances by nuclear activation. This source has the relevant advantage of being pulsed at requirement, transportable, not permanently radioactive, without radioactive waste, cheap, among others. We prove the feasibility of using this source showing several spectra of the characteristic emission line for manganese, gold, lead, and silver.

  18. Small-angle neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in biological, chemical, physical, and engineering research mandates that all intense neutron sources be equipped with SANS instruments. Four existing instruments are described, and the general differences between pulsed-source and reactor-based instrument designs are discussed. The basic geometries are identical, but dynamic range is achieved by using a broad band of wavelengths (with time-of-flight analysis) rather than by moving the detector. This allows a more optimized collimation system. Data acquisition requirements at a pulsed source are more severe, requiring large, fast histogramming memories. Data reduction is also more complex, as all wave length-dependent and angle-dependent backgrounds and non-linearities must be accounted for before data can be transformed to intensity vs Q. A comparison is shown between the Los Alamos pulsed instrument and D-11 (Institute Laue-Langevin), and examples from the four major topics of the conference are shown. The general conclusion is that reactor-based instruments remain superior at very low Q or if only a narrow range of Q is required, but that the current generation of pulsed-source instruments is competitive at moderate Q and may be faster when a wide range of Q is required. In principle, a user should choose which facility to use on the basis of optimizing the experiment; in practice the tradeoffs are not severe and the choice is usually made on the basis of availability.

  19. Measurement of Ultracold Neutrons Produced by Using Doppler-shifted Bragg Reflection at a Pulsed-neutron Source

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brun, T. O.; Carpenter, J. M.; Krohn, V. E.; Ringo, G. R.; Cronin, J. W.; Dombeck, T. W.; Lynn, J. W.; Werner, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) have been produced at the Argonne pulsed-neutron source by the Doppler shift of 400-m/s neutrons Bragg reflected from a moving crystal. The peak density of UCN produced at the crystal exceeds 0.1 n/cm{sup 3}.

  20. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  1. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  2. Heat generation and neutron beam characteristics in a high power pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jerng, D.W.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    In the course of conceptual design of a high power pulsed spallation source, a Monte Carlo model was developed for heat generation and neutronics studies. In this paper, we present two sets of results. The first set of calculations was performed with a simple target model to investigate general characteristics of power distribution and neutron production with various proton energies ranging from 0.8 to 12 GeV. The second set was performed with a realistic target model including major components of the target system to provide basic parameters for engineering design of a high power pulsed spallation source. Calculated results generally confirm that higher proton energy provides and advantage in target cooling system requirements and yet somewhat lower neutron beam intensity as a counter effect. The heat generation in the systems surrounding the target was investigated in detail and found to have important variation with position and according to proton beam energy. Calculations of the neutron currents from the moderators showed that the neutron beam intensity from moderators in the front region of the target decreased fro higher proton energy while that from moderators in the back region of the target remained almost unchanged.

  3. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Mitchell, H.E.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1995-11-01

    Therapeutically-useful epithermal-neutron beams for BNCT are currently generated by nuclear reactors. Various accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed and some low intensity prototypes of such sources, generally featuring the use of proton beams and beryllium or lithium targets have been constructed. This paper describes an alternate approach to the realization of a clinically useful accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons for BNCT that reconciles the often conflicting objectives of target cooling, neutron beam intensity, and neutron beam spectral purity via a two stage photoneutron production process.

  4. The SPARC linear accelerator based terahertz source

    SciTech Connect

    Chiadroni, E.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Castellano, M.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Ficcadenti, L.; Filippetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Pace, E.; Rossi, A. R.; Vaccarezza, C.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; and others

    2013-03-04

    Ultra-short electron beams, produced through the velocity bunching compression technique, are used to drive the SPARC linear accelerator based source, which relies on the emission of coherent transition radiation in the terahertz range. This paper reports on the main features of this radiation, as terahertz source, with spectral coverage up to 5 THz and pulse duration down to 200 fs, with an energy per pulse of the order of several micro-joule, and as electron beam longitudinal diagnostics.

  5. Non destructive characterization using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, P. C.; Schultz, F. J.; Vourvopoulos, G.

    It has been shown that explosives, illicit drugs, and other contraband materials contain various chemical elements in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from other innocuous substances. In coal, the major chemical elements in it can provide information about various parameters of importance to the coal industry. In both examples, the nondestructive identification of chemical elements can be performed by utilizing incident pulsed fast-thermal neutrons that, through nuclear reactions, excite the nuclei of the various elements. This technique is being currently developed for dismantling of nuclear weapons classified as trainer's, and for on-line coal bulk analysis.

  6. Non-destructive characterization using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, P. C.; Schultz, F. J.; Vourvopoulos, G.

    1995-05-01

    Explosives, illicit drugs, and other contraband materials contain various chemical elements in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from innocuous substances. Furthermore, the major chemical elements in coal can provide information about various parameters of importance to the coal industry. In both examples, the non-destructive identification of chemical elements can be performed using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons that, through nuclear reactions, excite the nuclei of the various elements. This technique is being currently developed for the dismantling of nuclear weapons classified as trainers, and for the on-line coal bulk analysis.

  7. X-ray and neutron transparent pulse magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmichi, E.; Ikeda, N.; Nogami, Y.; Osada, T.

    2006-11-01

    A new type of pulse magnet, x-ray and neutron transparent pulse magnet, is suggested for use in high-field diffraction experiments. The magnet is made of aluminumbased material, so we expect that the scattered beam penetrates the magnet body and hence the total number of reflection points available substantially increases. This feature possibly allows full determination of the lattice and magnetic structure in strong magnetic fields. To realize this idea, we constructed a prototype transparent magnet consisting of aluminum wire and duralumin reinforcement. With a portable capacitor bank, the maximum field of 25 T was successfully generated in a 1.6 mm bore, even though the aluminum wire is less strong and less conducting than copper wire. Since the total energy is small (Ebank ~ 100 J), high repetition rate, which is necessary for sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, is realized. Technical details, coil performance, and future prospects will be described.

  8. Reactions and moderators for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron capture therapy source for cancer treatment. Final report, October 1900--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, J.F.; Brugger, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been considered for nearly 30 years, and been practiced in Japan since the late 1970`s. Early experiments in the USA were generally nonpromising. However, new boron-containing ligand compounds were developed, which would seek out brain tumors. Concentration levels of the order of 30 micrograms of boron per gram of tissue become possible, and interest in the BNCT technique was revived in the USA beginning about 1985, with research reactors as the obvious source of the neutrons for the treatment. However, the limited number of research reactors in the USA (and the world) would mean that this treatment modality would be quite limited. The goals of this work was: (1) Examine as many as possible reactions of charged particles on various targets of an accelerator, and determine those that would give high neutron yields of a convenient energy. (2) Determine, through calculations (using Monte Carlo stochastic computer codes), the best design for a moderator/reflector assembly which would give high thermal flux at a nominal 5 cm depth in the head of a patient, with minimal radiation dose from gamma rays and fast neutrons. (3) Perform a benchmark experiment using a positive ion accelerator. The Li-7(p,n) reaction was chosen for the benchmark, since it was readily available for most accelerators, and was one of the two highest yielding reactions from Task No. 1. Since the University of Missouri has no accelerator, possible accelerators at other universities were investigated, as to availability and cost. A unit having capability in the 2.5 MeV range was desired.

  9. Temporal Narrowing of Neutrons Produced by High-Intensity Short-Pulse Lasers.

    PubMed

    Higginson, D P; Vassura, L; Gugiu, M M; Antici, P; Borghesi, M; Brauckmann, S; Diouf, C; Green, A; Palumbo, L; Petrascu, H; Sofia, S; Stardubtsev, M; Willi, O; Kar, S; Negoita, F; Fuchs, J

    2015-07-31

    The production of neutron beams having short temporal duration is studied using ultraintense laser pulses. Laser-accelerated protons are spectrally filtered using a laser-triggered microlens to produce a short duration neutron pulse via nuclear reactions induced in a converter material (LiF). This produces a ∼3  ns duration neutron pulse with 10(4)  n/MeV/sr/shot at 0.56 m from the laser-irradiated proton source. The large spatial separation between the neutron production and the proton source allows for shielding from the copious and undesirable radiation resulting from the laser-plasma interaction. This neutron pulse compares favorably to the duration of conventional accelerator sources and should scale up with, present and future, higher energy laser facilities to produce brighter and shorter neutron beams for ultrafast probing of dense materials.

  10. Temporal Narrowing of Neutrons Produced by High-Intensity Short-Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, D. P.; Vassura, L.; Gugiu, M. M.; Antici, P.; Borghesi, M.; Brauckmann, S.; Diouf, C.; Green, A.; Palumbo, L.; Petrascu, H.; Sofia, S.; Stardubtsev, M.; Willi, O.; Kar, S.; Negoita, F.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-07-01

    The production of neutron beams having short temporal duration is studied using ultraintense laser pulses. Laser-accelerated protons are spectrally filtered using a laser-triggered microlens to produce a short duration neutron pulse via nuclear reactions induced in a converter material (LiF). This produces a ˜3 ns duration neutron pulse with 104 n /MeV /sr /shot at 0.56 m from the laser-irradiated proton source. The large spatial separation between the neutron production and the proton source allows for shielding from the copious and undesirable radiation resulting from the laser-plasma interaction. This neutron pulse compares favorably to the duration of conventional accelerator sources and should scale up with, present and future, higher energy laser facilities to produce brighter and shorter neutron beams for ultrafast probing of dense materials.

  11. Application of a Bonner sphere spectrometer for the determination of the angular neutron energy spectrum of an accelerator-based BNCT facility.

    PubMed

    Mirzajani, N; Ciolini, R; Di Fulvio, A; Esposito, J; d'Errico, F

    2014-06-01

    Experimental activities are underway at INFN Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) (Padua, Italy) and Pisa University aimed at angular-dependent neutron energy spectra measurements produced by the (9)Be(p,xn) reaction, under a 5MeV proton beam. This work has been performed in the framework of INFN TRASCO-BNCT project. Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), based on (6)LiI (Eu) scintillator, was used with the shadow-cone technique. Proper unfolding codes, coupled to BSS response function calculated by Monte Carlo code, were finally used. The main results are reported here.

  12. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rhodes, N. J.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  13. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Schooneveld, E M; Pietropaolo, A; Andreani, C; Perelli Cippo, E; Rhodes, N J; Senesi, R; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources. PMID:27502571

  14. A Long-Pulse Spallation Source at Los Alamos: Facility description and preliminary neutronic performance for cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Weinacht, D.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has discussed installing a new 1-MW spallation neutron target station in an existing building at the end of its 800-MeV proton linear accelerator. Because the accelerator provides pulses of protons each about 1 msec in duration, the new source would be a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS). The facility would employ vertical extraction of moderators and reflectors, and horizontal extraction of the spallation target. An LPSS uses coupled moderators rather than decoupled ones. There are potential gains of about a factor of 6 to 7 in the time-averaged neutron brightness for cold-neutron production from a coupled liquid H{sub 2} moderator compared to a decoupled one. However, these gains come at the expense of putting ``tails`` on the neutron pulses. The particulars of the neutron pulses from a moderator (e.g., energy-dependent rise times, peak intensities, pulse widths, and decay constant(s) of the tails) are crucial parameters for designing instruments and estimating their performance at an LPSS. Tungsten is the reference target material. Inconel 718 is the reference target canister and proton beam window material, with Al-6061 being the choice for the liquid H{sub 2} moderator canister and vacuum container. A 1-MW LPSS would have world-class neutronic performance. The authors describe the proposed Los Alamos LPSS facility, and show that, for cold neutrons, the calculated time-averaged neutronic performance of a liquid H{sub 2} moderator at the 1-MW LPSS is equivalent to about 1/4th the calculated neutronic performance of the best liquid D{sub 2} moderator at the Institute Laue-Langevin reactor. They show that the time-averaged moderator neutronic brightness increases as the size of the moderator gets smaller.

  15. INITIAL EVALUATION OF A PULSED WHITE SPECTRUM NEUTRON GENERATOR FOR EXPLOSIVE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel,, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-06-02

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is acritical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designedand fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set ofparallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80 - 120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing.

  16. A single-shot nanosecond neutron pulsed technique for the detection of fissile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Scholz, M.; Prokopovicz, R.; Tomaszewski, K.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiacek, U.; Gabanska, B.; Dworak, D.; Pytel, K.; Zawadka, A.

    2012-07-01

    A novel technique with the potential of detecting hidden fissile materials is presented utilizing the interaction of a single powerful and nanosecond wide neutron pulse with matter. The experimental system is based on a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) device as a neutron source generating pulses of almost mono-energetic 2.45 MeV and/or 14.0 MeV neutrons, a few nanoseconds in width. Fissile materials, consisting of heavy nuclei, are detected utilizing two signatures: firstly by measuring those secondary fission neutrons which are faster than the elastically scattered 2.45 MeV neutrons of the D-D reaction in the DPF; secondly by measuring the pulses of the slower secondary fission neutrons following the pulse of the fast 14 MeV neutrons from the D-T reaction. In both cases it is important to compare the measured spectrum of the fission neutrons induced by the 2.45 MeV or 14 MeV neutron pulse of the DPF with theoretical spectra obtained by mathematical simulation. Therefore, results of numerical modelling of the proposed system, using the MCNP5 and the FLUKA codes are presented and compared with experimental data.

  17. Neutron generator burst timing measured using a pulse shape discrimination plastic scintillator with silicon photomultiplier readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R. M.; Eberhardt, J. E.; Tickner, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    An EJ-299-34 plastic scintillator with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout was used to measure the fast neutron output of a pulsed Thermo-Fisher A-325 Deuterium-Tritium sealed tube neutron generator (STNG). The SiPM signals were handled by a prototype digital pulse processing system, based on a free-running analogue to digital converter feeding a digital signal processor (DSP). Pulse shape discrimination was used to distinguish between detected fast-neutrons and gammas. Pulse detection, timing, energy and shape were all processed by the DSP in real-time. The time-dependency of the neutron output of the STNG was measured for various pulsing schemes. The switch-on characteristics of the tube strongly depended on the operating settings, with the delay between pulse turn-on and the production of neutrons ranging between 13 μs to 74 μs for the tested pulse rates and duty cycles. This work will facilitate the optimization and modeling of apparatus that use the neutron generator's pulsing abilities.

  18. Application of LiTaO3 pyroelectric crystal for pulsed neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W. F.; Lu, Y.; Wu, J.; Gao, H.; Li, M.

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of a LiTaO3 pyroelectric crystal for pulsed neutron detection has been studied. The detector consists of a slice of electroded Z-cut LiTaO3 pyroelectric crystal, and no additional neutron converter is required owing to the Li contained in the crystal. The slight temperature increase caused by neutron radiation will lead to the release of bound charges and will give rise to a pyroelectric signal. The response of it has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Our preliminary experiment on the CFBR-II reactor suggests that the LiTaO3 pyroelectric detector is promising for high intensity neutron - pulse measurement.

  19. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ˜10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ˜2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA-600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV-18 kV) in a quarter time period of ˜2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar-11 mbar at ˜17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ˜7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ˜4 × 109 neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ˜2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  20. Prospects for measuring neutron-star masses and radii with X-ray pulse profile modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Chakrabarty, Deepto E-mail: fozel@email.arizona.edu

    2014-06-01

    Modeling the amplitudes and shapes of the X-ray pulsations observed from hot, rotating neutron stars provides a direct method for measuring neutron-star properties. This technique constitutes an important part of the science case for the forthcoming NICER and proposed LOFT X-ray missions. In this paper, we determine the number of distinct observables that can be derived from pulse profile modeling and show that using only bolometric pulse profiles is insufficient for breaking the degeneracy between inferred neutron-star radius and mass. However, we also show that for moderately spinning (300-800 Hz) neutron stars, analysis of pulse profiles in two different energy bands provides additional constraints that allow a unique determination of the neutron-star properties. Using the fractional amplitudes of the fundamental and the second harmonic of the pulse profile in addition to the amplitude and phase difference of the spectral color oscillations, we quantify the signal-to-noise ratio necessary to achieve a specified measurement precision for neutron star radius. We find that accumulating 10{sup 6} counts in a pulse profile is sufficient to achieve a ≲ 5% uncertainty in the neutron star radius, which is the level of accuracy required to determine the equation of state of neutron-star matter. Finally, we formally derive the background limits that can be tolerated in the measurements of the various pulsation amplitudes as a function of the system parameters.

  1. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Chettle, D. R.

    2008-02-15

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the {sup 26}Mg(n,{gamma}){sup 27}Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4{pi} geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when {sup 27}Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1{sigma}). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96{+-}1.25 ({+-}1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several

  2. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A; McNeill, F E; Byun, S H; Prestwich, W V; Chettle, D R

    2008-02-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the 26Mg (n, gamma) 27Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4 pi geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when 27Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1 sigma). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96 +/- 1.25 (+/- 1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several studies using in

  3. In vivo assessment of magnesium status in human body using accelerator-based neutron activation measurement of hands: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Pejović-Milić, A; McNeill, F E; Byun, S H; Prestwich, W V; Chettle, D R

    2008-02-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an element essential for many enzymatic reactions in the human body. Various human and animal studies suggest that changes in Mg status are linked to diseases such as cardiac arrhythmia, coronary heart disease, hypertension, premenstrual syndrome, and diabetes mellitus. Thus, knowledge of Mg levels in the human body is needed. A direct measurement of human blood serum, which contains only 0.3% of the total body Mg, is generally used to infer information about the status of Mg in the body. However, in many clinical situations, Mg stored in large levels, for example in bones, muscles, and soft tissues, needs to be monitored either to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment or to study the progression of diseases associated with the deficiency of total body Mg. This work presents a feasibility study of a noninvasive, in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) technique using the 26Mg (n, gamma) 27Mg reaction to measure Mg levels in human hands. The technique employs the McMaster University high beam current Tandetron accelerator hand irradiation facility and an array of eight NaI (T1) detectors arranged in a 4 pi geometry for delayed counting of the 0.844 and 1.014 MeV gamma rays emitted when 27Mg decays in the irradiated hand. Mg determination in humans using IVNAA of hands has been demonstrated to be feasible, with effective doses as low as one-quarter of those delivered in chest x rays. The overall experimental uncertainty in the measurements is estimated to be approximately 5% (1 sigma). The results are found to be in the range of the in vitro measurements reported for other cortical bones collected from different sites of the human skeleton, which confirms that this technique mainly provides a measure of the amount of Mg in hand bones. The average concentration of Mg determined in human hands is 10.96 +/- 1.25 (+/- 1 SD) mg Mg/g Ca. The coefficient of variation (11%) observed in this study is comparable with or lower than several studies using in

  4. Performance of a reflectometer at continuous wave and pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Monte-Carlo simulations presented here involve simulations of reflectivity measurements of one sample using a reflectometer of traditional geometry at different neutron sources. The same reflectometer was used in all simulations. Only the characteristics of the neutron source, and the technique used to measure neutron wavelength were changed. In the case of the CW simulation, a monochromating crystal was used to select a nearly monochromatic beam (MB) from the neutron spectrum. In the simulations of the pulse sources, the time needed to traverse a fixed distance was measured, from which neutron wavelength is deduced.

  5. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  6. Continued development of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE) for lunar and planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandler, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current progress is reported on the inelastic scattering, capture, and activation gamma ray portions of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE). Experiments are described which have enabled a reduction in weight of the experimental probe to 7.3 kg. Parametric studies are described which enabled the optimization of experimental parameters (e.g., gate time settings, neutron pulse rate, etc.). Estimated detection sensitivities using this light weight probe and the optimized experimental parameters are discussed.

  7. Pulse-shape analysis for gamma background rejection in thermal neutron radiation using CVD diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Pappalardo, A.; Weiss, C.

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for the rejection of gamma background from charged-particle spectra was demonstrated using a CVD diamond detector with a 6Li neutron converter installed at a thermal neutron beamline of the TRIGA research reactor at the Atominstitut (Vienna University of Technology). Spectra of the alpha particles and tritons of 6Li(n,T)4He thermal neutron capture reaction were separated from the gamma background by a new algorithm based on pulse-shape analysis. The thermal neutron capture in 6Li is already used for neutron flux monitoring, but the ability to remove gamma background allows using a CVD diamond detector for thermal neutron counting. The pulse-shape analysis can equally be applied to all cases where the charged products of an interaction are absorbed in the diamond and to other background particles that fully traverse the detector.

  8. A Kinematically Beamed, Low Energy Pulsed Neutron Source for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D; Hagmann, C; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W; Hamm, R

    2004-10-07

    We are developing a new active interrogation system based on a kinematically focused low energy neutron beam. The key idea is that one of the defining characteristics of SNM (Special Nuclear Materials) is the ability for low energy or thermal neutrons to induce fission. Thus by using low energy neutrons for the interrogation source we can accomplish three goals, (1) Energy discrimination allows us to measure the prompt fast fission neutrons produced while the interrogation beam is on; (2) Neutrons with an energy of approximately 60 to 100 keV do not fission 238U and Thorium, but penetrate bulk material nearly as far as high energy neutrons do and (3) below about 100keV neutrons lose their energy by kinematical collisions rather than via the nuclear (n,2n) or (n,n') processes thus further simplifying the prompt neutron induced background. 60 keV neutrons create a low radiation dose and readily thermal capture in normal materials, thus providing a clean spectroscopic signature of the intervening materials. The kinematically beamed source also eliminates the need for heavy backward and sideway neutron shielding. We have designed and built a very compact pulsed neutron source, based on an RFQ proton accelerator and a lithium target. We are developing fast neutron detectors that are nearly insensitive to the ever-present thermal neutron and neutron capture induced gamma ray background. The detection of only a few high energy fission neutrons in time correlation with the linac pulse will be a clear indication of the presence of SNM.

  9. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  10. Development of Measurement Methods for Detection of Special Nuclear Materials using D-D Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Kimura, Masaharu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    For detection of hidden special nuclear materials (SNMs), we have developed an active neutron-based interrogation system combined with a D-D fusion pulsed neutron source and a neutron detection system. In the detection scheme, we have adopted new measurement techniques simultaneously; neutron noise analysis and neutron energy spectrum analysis. The validity of neutron noise analysis method has been experimentally studied in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), and was applied to a cargo container inspection system by simulation.

  11. The dynamic method for time-of-flight measurement of thermal neutron spectra from pulsed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepyolyshev, Yu. N.; Chukiyaev, S. V.; Tulaev, A. B.; Bobrakov, V. F.

    1995-02-01

    A time-of-flight method for measurement of thermal neutron spectra in pulsed neutron sources with an efficiency more than 10 5 times higher than the standard method is described. The main problems associated with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results for spectra from the surfaces of water and solid methane moderators obtained at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor (Dubna, Russia) are presented.

  12. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  13. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne`s ZING-P and ZING-P` prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and ``in press`` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

  14. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schriesheim, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne's ZING-P and ZING-P' prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and in press'' articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

  15. Note: A portable pulsed neutron source based on the smallest sealed-type plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, Rohit; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.; Mishra, Prabhat

    2011-02-15

    Development and operation of a portable and compact pulsed neutron source based on sealed-type plasma focus (PF) device are reported. The unit is the smallest sealed-type neutron producing PF device. The effective volume of the PF unit is 33 cm{sup 3} only. A compact size single capacitor (4 {mu}F) is used as the energy driver. A battery based power supply unit is used for charging the capacitor and triggering the spark gap. The PF unit is operated at 10 kV (200 J) and at a deuterium gas filling pressure of 8 mb. The device is operated over a time span of 200 days and the neutron emissions have been observed for 200 shots without changing the gas in between the shots. The maximum yield of this device is 7.8 x 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse. Beyond 200 shots the yield is below the threshold (1050 neutrons/pulse) of our {sup 3}He detector. The neutron energy is evaluated using time of flight technique and the value is (2.49 {+-} 0.27) MeV. The measured neutron pulse width is (24 {+-} 5) ns. Multishot and long duration operations envisage the potentiality of such portable device for repetitive mode of operation.

  16. Note: A portable pulsed neutron source based on the smallest sealed-type plasma focus device.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R K; Mishra, Prabhat; Srivastava, Rohit; Rawool, A M; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2011-02-01

    Development and operation of a portable and compact pulsed neutron source based on sealed-type plasma focus (PF) device are reported. The unit is the smallest sealed-type neutron producing PF device. The effective volume of the PF unit is 33 cm(3) only. A compact size single capacitor (4 μF) is used as the energy driver. A battery based power supply unit is used for charging the capacitor and triggering the spark gap. The PF unit is operated at 10 kV (200 J) and at a deuterium gas filling pressure of 8 mb. The device is operated over a time span of 200 days and the neutron emissions have been observed for 200 shots without changing the gas in between the shots. The maximum yield of this device is 7.8 × 10(4) neutrons/pulse. Beyond 200 shots the yield is below the threshold (1050 neutrons/pulse) of our (3)He detector. The neutron energy is evaluated using time of flight technique and the value is (2.49 ± 0.27) MeV. The measured neutron pulse width is (24 ± 5) ns. Multishot and long duration operations envisage the potentiality of such portable device for repetitive mode of operation. PMID:21361643

  17. Note: A portable pulsed neutron source based on the smallest sealed-type plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Mishra, Prabhat; Srivastava, Rohit; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2011-02-01

    Development and operation of a portable and compact pulsed neutron source based on sealed-type plasma focus (PF) device are reported. The unit is the smallest sealed-type neutron producing PF device. The effective volume of the PF unit is 33 cm3 only. A compact size single capacitor (4 μF) is used as the energy driver. A battery based power supply unit is used for charging the capacitor and triggering the spark gap. The PF unit is operated at 10 kV (200 J) and at a deuterium gas filling pressure of 8 mb. The device is operated over a time span of 200 days and the neutron emissions have been observed for 200 shots without changing the gas in between the shots. The maximum yield of this device is 7.8 × 104 neutrons/pulse. Beyond 200 shots the yield is below the threshold (1050 neutrons/pulse) of our 3He detector. The neutron energy is evaluated using time of flight technique and the value is (2.49 ± 0.27) MeV. The measured neutron pulse width is (24 ± 5) ns. Multishot and long duration operations envisage the potentiality of such portable device for repetitive mode of operation.

  18. Pulsed Neutron Monitoring at High Energy Electron Accelerators with Silver Lined Proportional Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, P. M.; Ghodgaonkar, M. D.; Dhairyawan, M. P.; Haridas, P.

    2007-01-01

    To meet the challenging requirement of pulsed neutron background measurement, which is present around electron accelerators at the Indus-1 facility of the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) Indore, a silver lined proportional counter with 0.2cps/n cm-2s-1 thermal neutron sensitivity has been developed. The detector has been tested for its performance in continuous thermal neutron field at Apsara reactor and in pulsed neutron field at Indus-1 facility. The detector shows ±11% signal linearity at various reactor powers and follows the silver decay scheme during reactor scram experiment. Off-line measurements made in pulsed neutron background at the Indus-1 facility compare well with nuclear track detectors (CR-39). For monitoring on-line neutron flux, electronic gating circuit was used that can switch off the scalar counter unit during the prompt X-ray response of the detector taking trigger pulse from the accelerator and experiments showed that the neutron flux measured by the detector is in close agreement with CR-39 values.

  19. A compact pulse shape discriminator module for large neutron detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramanan, S.; Gupta, Arti; Golda, K. S.; Singh, Hardev; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2008-11-01

    A cost-effective high-performance pulse shape discriminator module has been developed to process signals from organic liquid scintillator-based neutron detectors. This module is especially designed for the large neutron detector array used for studies of nuclear reaction dynamics at the Inter University Accelerator Center (IUAC). It incorporates all the necessary pulse processing circuits required for neutron spectroscopy in a novel fashion by adopting the zero crossover technique for neutron-gamma (n- γ) pulse shape discrimination. The detailed layout of the circuit and different features of the module are described in the present paper. The quality of n- γ separation obtained with this electronics is much better than that of commercial modules especially in the low-energy region. The results obtained with our module are compared with similar setups available in other laboratories.

  20. The performance of neutron spectrometers AR a long-pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Daemen, L.L.

    1995-12-01

    At a recent workshop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory members of the international neutron scattering community discussed the performance to be anticipated from neutron scattering instruments installed at a 1 MW long-pulse spallation source (LPSS). Although the report of this workshop is long, its principal conclusions can be easily summarised and almost as easily understood. This article presents such a synthesis for a 60 Hz LPSS with 1 msec proton pulses. We discuss some of the limitations of the workshop conclusions and suggest a simple analysis of the performance differences that might be expected between short- and long-pulse sources both of which exploit coupled moderators.

  1. A Fast Pulsed Neutron Source for Time-of-Flight Detection of Nuclear Materials and Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; James, Colt; Madden, Robert; Hennig, Wolfgang; Breus, Dimitry; Asztalos, Stephen; Sabourov, Konstantin; Lane, Stephen

    2011-12-13

    AASC has built a fast pulsed neutron source based on the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF). The more current version stores only 100 J but fires at {approx}10-50 Hz and emits {approx}10{sup 6}n/pulse at a peak current of 100 kA. Both sources emit 2.45{+-}0.1 MeV(DD) neutron pulses of {approx}25-40 ns width. Such fast, quasi-monoenergetic pulses allow time-of-flight detection of characteristic emissions from nuclear materials or high explosives. A test is described in which iron targets were placed at different distances from the point neutron source. Detectors such as Stilbene and LaBr3 were used to capture inelastically induced, 847 keV gammas from the iron target. Shielding of the source and detectors eliminated most (but not all) of the source neutrons from the detectors. Gated detection, pulse shape analysis and time-of-flight discrimination enable separation of gamma and neutron signatures and localization of the target. A Monte Carlo simulation allows evaluation of the potential of such a fast pulsed source for a field-portable detection system. The high rep-rate source occupies two 200 liter drums and uses a cooled DPF Head that is <500 cm{sup 3} in volume.

  2. Neutron production and time resolution of a new class moderator for pulsed neutron diffraction. Measurements and transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, R. E.; Florido, P. C.; Granada, J. R.; Dawidowski, J.; Gillette, V. H.

    1992-06-01

    Measurements of neutron pulse time-width and intensity have been carried out on grids of small moderators placed side by side and decoupled by cadium strips; a moderator concept introduced by the authors through previous publications. Transport calculations are based on the standard reactor code DOT 3.5 with the ENDF-B IV nuclear data library.

  3. Annular shape silver lined proportional counter for on-line pulsed neutron yield measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, P. M.; Das, D.

    2015-04-01

    An annular shape silver lined proportional counter is developed to measure pulsed neutron radiation. The detector has 314 mm overall length and 235 mm overall diameter. The central cavity of 150 mm diameter and 200 mm length is used for placing the neutron source. Because of annular shape the detector covers >3π solid angle of the source. The detector has all welded construction. The detector is developed in two halves for easy mounting and demounting. Each half is an independent detector. Both the halves together give single neutron pulse calibration constant of 4.5×104 neutrons/shot count. The detector operates in proportional mode which gives enhanced working conditions in terms of dead time and operating range compared to Geiger Muller based neutron detectors.

  4. The performance of reflectometers at continuous wave and pulsed-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsimmons, M.R.; Pynn, R.

    1995-12-01

    To quantify gains from time-of-flight (TOF) methods, identical reflectometers viewing a continuous wave (CW) neutron source and a variety of pulsed-neutron sources were simulated using a Monte Carlo technique. Reflectivity profiles obtained for a simple thin-film, reflecting,sample were nearly identical in all simulations, and models fitted to the simulated data yielded parameters (film thickness, surface roughness, and scattering length density) that were equally accurate and precise in all cases. The simulations confirm the power of the TOF method and demonstrate that the performance of pulsed sources for reflectometry does not scale simply as the inverse duty factor of the source. In the case of long-pulse sources, the simulations suggest that pulse tails have little effect on results obtained from specular reflectometry and that maximum brightness of the neutron source should be the primary design criterion.

  5. Distortion of pulse-height spectra of neutron capture gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A.; Harada, H.; Nakamura, S.; Hori, J.; Igashira, M.; Ohsaki, T.; Ohgama, K.

    2006-03-13

    A distortion of pulse-height spectra of neutron capture {gamma}-rays caused by {gamma}-flash at neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement using a pulse neutron source has been investigated. Pulses from C6D6 detectors accumulated by flash-ADC were processed with both traditional analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and flash-ADC operational modes. A correction factor of {gamma}-ray yields, due to baseline shift, was quantitatively obtained by comparing the pulse-height spectra of the two data-collecting modes. The magnitude of the correction factor depends on the time, which passed after {gamma}-flash, and has complicated time dependence with a changing sign.

  6. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  7. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Rezac, K.; Sila, O.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Velyhan, A.

    2015-09-01

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 108 at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 1016 W/cm2. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the 2H(d,n)3He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 109 with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 108 n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 1014 deuterons in the 0.5-2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 109 at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 106 n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  8. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Deppert, O.; and others

    2013-05-15

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4π and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 × 10{sup 9} neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  9. High Field Pulsed Magnets for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granroth, G. E.; Lee, J.; Fogh, E.; Christensen, N. B.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Nojiri, H.

    2015-03-01

    A High Field Pulsed Magnet (HFPM) setup, is in use at the Spallation Nuetron Source(SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With this device, we recently measured the high field magnetic spin structure of LiNiPO4. The results of this study will be highlighted as an example of possible measurements that can be performed with this device. To further extend the HFPM capabilities at SNS, we have learned to design and wind these coils in house. This contribution will summarize the magnet coil design optimization procedure. Specifically by varying the geometry of the multi-layer coil, we arrive at a design that balances the maximum field strength, neutron scattering angle, and the field homogeneity for a specific set of parameters. We will show that a 6.3kJ capacitor bank, can provide a magnetic field as high as 30T for a maximum scattering angle around 40° with homogeneity of +/- 4 % in a 2mm diameter spherical volume. We will also compare the calculations to measurements from a recently wound test coil. This work was supported in part by the Lab Directors' Research and Development Fund of ORNL.

  10. Characterizations of double pulsing in neutron multiplicity and coincidence counting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Katrina E.; Henzl, Vladimir; Croft, Stephen S.; Henzlova, Daniela; Santi, Peter A.

    2016-10-01

    Passive neutron coincidence/multiplicity counters are subject to non-ideal behavior, such as double pulsing and dead time. It has been shown in the past that double-pulsing exhibits a distinct signature in a Rossi-alpha distribution, which is not readily noticed using traditional Multiplicity Shift Register analysis. However, it has been assumed that the use of a pre-delay in shift register analysis removes any effects of double pulsing. In this work, we use high-fidelity simulations accompanied by experimental measurements to study the effects of double pulsing on multiplicity rates. By exploiting the information from the double pulsing signature peak observable in the Rossi-alpha distribution, the double pulsing fraction can be determined. Algebraic correction factors for the multiplicity rates in terms of the double pulsing fraction have been developed. We discuss the role of these corrections across a range of scenarios.

  11. Some general reflections on {open_quotes}long pulse{close_quotes} neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A long pulse spallation neutron source (LPSS) having about 20 times more time average thermal flux than its short pulse counterpart (SPSS) at the same proton beam power and featuring a pronounced time structure not available on CW sources (CWNS) of equal time average flux can in principle host instruments typical for both classes of facilities. While the need for additional choppers introduces some restrictions on inverted time of flight techniques typical for SPSS and high incident neutron energies are not easier to use on LPSS than on CWNS, taking advantage of the pulsed nature of the neutron flux can enhance significantly the performance of direct time of flight instruments and of crystal spectrometers or diffractometers. In the paper some of the options are reviewed in a general manner and criteria are discussed which can be used to optimize the performance enhancement.

  12. Inter-pulse high-resolution gamma-ray spectra using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.; Jensen, D.H.; Stephenson, W.A.; Hoover, R.A.; Mikesell, J.L.; Tanner, A.B.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron generator pulsed at 100 s-1 was suspended in an artificial borehole containing a 7.7 metric ton mixture of sand, aragonite, magnetite, sulfur, and salt. Two Ge(HP) gamma-ray detectors were used: one in a borehole sonde, and one at the outside wall of the sample tank opposite the neutron generator target. Gamma-ray spectra were collected by the outside detector during each of 10 discrete time windows during the 10 ms period following the onset of gamma-ray build-up after each neutron burst. The sample was measured first when dry and then when saturated with water. In the dry sample, gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering, neutron capture, and decay were counted during the first (150 ??s) time window. Subsequently only capture and decay gamma rays were observed. In the wet sample, only neutron capture and decay gamma rays were observed. Neutron capture gamma rays dominated the spectrum during the period from 150 to 400 ??s after the neutron burst in both samples, but decreased with time much more rapidly in the wet sample. A signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) analysis indicates that optimum conditions for neutron capture analysis occurred in the 350-800 ??s window. A poor S/N in the first 100-150 ??s is due to a large background continuum during the first time interval. Time gating can be used to enhance gamma-ray spectra, depending on the nuclides in the target material and the reactions needed to produce them, and should improve the sensitivity of in situ well logging. ?? 1984.

  13. The use of pulsed neutron diffraction to measure strain in composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Shi, N.; Gray, G.T. III; James, M.R.; Todd, R.I.

    1994-03-01

    Neutron diffraction is a technique for measuring strain in crystalline materials. It is non destructive, phase discriminatory and more penetrating than X rays. Pulsed neutron sources (in contrast with steady state reactor sources) are particularly appropriate for examining heterogeneous materials or for recording the polycrystalline response of all lattice reflections. Several different aspects of composite behavior can be characterized and examples are given of residual strain measurements, strain relaxation during heating, applied loading, and determination of the strain distribution function.

  14. Toward a fractal spectrum approach for neutron and gamma pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Zhe; Liu, Bing-Qi; Zuo, Zhuo; Wang, Lei; Zan, Gui-Bin; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Accurately selecting neutron signals and discriminating γ signals from a mixed radiation field is a key research issue in neutron detection. This paper proposes a fractal spectrum discrimination approach by means of different spectral characteristics of neutrons and γ rays. Figure of merit and average discriminant error ratio are used together to evaluate the discrimination effects. Different neutron and γ signals with various noise and pulse pile-up are simulated according to real data in the literature. The proposed approach is compared with the digital charge integration and pulse gradient methods. It is found that the fractal approach exhibits the best discrimination performance, followed by the digital charge integration method and the pulse gradient method, respectively. The fractal spectrum approach is not sensitive to high frequency noise and pulse pile-up. This means that the proposed approach has superior performance for effective and efficient anti-noise and high discrimination in neutron detection. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41274109), Sichuan Youth Science and Technology Innovation Research Team (2015TD0020), Scientific and Technological Support Program of Sichuan Province (2013FZ0022), and the Creative Team Program of Chengdu University of Technology.

  15. Pulsed Operation of a Compact Fusion Neutron Source Using a High-Voltage Pulse Generator Developed for Landmine Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Kunihito; Watanabe, Masato; Okino, Akitoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Hotta, Eiki; Yuura, Morimasa

    2005-05-15

    Preliminary experimental results of pulsed neutron source based on a discharge-type beam fusion called Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion (IECF) for landmine detection are presented. In Japan, a research and development project for constructing an advanced anti-personnel landmine detection system by using IECF, which is effective not only for metal landmines but also for plastic ones, is now in progress. This project consists of some R and D topics, and one of them is R and D of a high-voltage pulse generator system specialized for landmine detection, which can be used in the severe environment such as that in the field in Afghanistan. Thus a prototype of the system for landmine detection was designed and fabricated in consideration of compactness, lightness, cooling performance, dustproof and robustness. By using this prototype pulse generator system, a conventional IECF device was operated as a preliminary experiment. As a result, it was confirmed that the suggested pulse generator system is suitable for landmine detection system, and the results follow the empirical law obtained by the previous experiments. The maximum neutron production rate of 2.0x10{sup 8} n/s was obtained at a pulsed discharge of -51 kV, 7.3 A.

  16. Pulse processing routines for neutron time-of-flight data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žugec, P.; Weiß, C.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Vlachoudis, V.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Wright, T.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Mingrone, F.; Ryan, J. A.; Warren, S. G.; Tsinganis, A.; Barbagallo, M.

    2016-03-01

    A pulse shape analysis framework is described, which was developed for n_TOF-Phase3, the third phase in the operation of the n_TOF facility at CERN. The most notable feature of this new framework is the adoption of generic pulse shape analysis routines, characterized by a minimal number of explicit assumptions about the nature of pulses. The aim of these routines is to be applicable to a wide variety of detectors, thus facilitating the introduction of the new detectors or types of detectors into the analysis framework. The operational details of the routines are suited to the specific requirements of particular detectors by adjusting the set of external input parameters. Pulse recognition, baseline calculation and the pulse shape fitting procedure are described. Special emphasis is put on their computational efficiency, since the most basic implementations of these conceptually simple methods are often computationally inefficient.

  17. Neutron Detection With Ultra-Fast Digitizer and Pulse Identification Techniques on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Piglowski, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    A prototype system for neutron detection with an ultra-fast digitizer and pulse identification techniques has been implemented on the DIII-D tokamak. The system consists of a cylindrical neutron fission chamber, a charge sensitive amplifier, and a GaGe Octopus 12-bit CompuScope digitizer card installed in a Linux computer. Digital pulse identification techniques have been successfully performed at maximum data acquisition rate of 50 MSPS with on-board memory of 2 GS. Compared to the traditional approach with fast nuclear electronics for pulse counting, this straightforward digital solution has many advantages, including reduced expense, improved accuracy, higher counting rate, and easier maintenance. The system also provides the capability of neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination and pulse height analysis. Plans for the upgrade of the old DIII-D neutron counting system with these techniques will be presented. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under SC-G903402, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  18. On-line analysis of bulk materials using pulsed neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, P.; Tourneur, P. Le; Poumarede, B.; Bach, P.; Moeller, H.

    1999-06-10

    On the basis of our joint experience in neutronics for SODERN and in cement plant engineering for KRUPP POLYSIUS, we have developed a new on-line bulk materials analyser for the cement industry. This equipment includes a pulsed neutron generator GENIE 16, some gamma ray and neutron detectors, specially designed electronics with high counting rate, software delivering the mean elemental composition of raw material, and adequate shielding. This material is transported through the equipment on a conveyor belt, the size of which is adapted to the requirements. This paper briefly describes the equipment and some results, as obtained in dynamic test from a demonstrator installed in Germany.

  19. On-line analysis of bulk materials using pulsed neutron interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, P.; Tourneur, P. Le; Poumarede, B.; Möller, H.; Bach, P.

    1999-06-01

    On the basis of our joint experience in neutronics for SODERN and in cement plant engineering for KRUPP POLYSIUS, we have developed a new on-line bulk materials analyser for the cement industry. This equipment includes a pulsed neutron generator GENIE 16, some gamma ray and neutron detectors, specially designed electronics with high counting rate, software delivering the mean elemental composition of raw material, and adequate shielding. This material is transported through the equipment on a conveyor belt, the size of which is adapted to the requirements. This paper briefly describes the equipment and some results, as obtained in dynamic test from a demonstrator installed in Germany.

  20. Angular distribution of neutrons from deuterated cluster explosions driven by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Buersgens, F; Madison, K W; Symes, D R; Hartke, R; Osterhoff, J; Grigsby, W; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2006-07-01

    We have studied experimentally the angular distributions of fusion neutrons from plasmas of multi-keV ion temperature, created by 40 fs, multi-TW laser pulses in dense plumes of D2 and CD4 clusters. A slight anisotropy in the neutron emission is observed. We attribute this anisotropy to the fact that the differential cross section for DD fusion is anisotropic even at low collision energies, and this, coupled with the geometry of the gas jet target, leads to beam-target neutrons that are slightly directed. The qualitative features of this anisotropy are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Angular distribution of neutrons from deuterated cluster explosions driven by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buersgens, F.; Madison, K. W.; Symes, D. R.; Hartke, R.; Osterhoff, J.; Grigsby, W.; Dyer, G.; Ditmire, T.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied experimentally the angular distributions of fusion neutrons from plasmas of multi-keV ion temperature, created by 40fs , multi-TW laser pulses in dense plumes of D2 and CD4 clusters. A slight anisotropy in the neutron emission is observed. We attribute this anisotropy to the fact that the differential cross section for DD fusion is anisotropic even at low collision energies, and this, coupled with the geometry of the gas jet target, leads to beam-target neutrons that are slightly directed. The qualitative features of this anisotropy are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Hidden explosives detector employing pulsed neutron and x-ray interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Frederick J.; Caldwell, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Methods and systems for the detection of small amounts of modern, highly-explosive nitrogen-based explosives, such as plastic explosives, hidden in airline baggage. Several techniques are employed either individually or combined in a hybrid system. One technique employed in combination is X-ray imaging. Another technique is interrogation with a pulsed neutron source in a two-phase mode of operation to image both nitrogen and oxygen densities. Another technique employed in combination is neutron interrogation to form a hydrogen density image or three-dimensional map. In addition, deliberately-placed neutron-absorbing materials can be detected.

  3. Hidden explosives detector employing pulsed neutron and x-ray interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1993-04-06

    Methods and systems for the detection of small amounts of modern, highly-explosive nitrogen-based explosives, such as plastic explosives, hidden in airline baggage. Several techniques are employed either individually or combined in a hybrid system. One technique employed in combination is X-ray imaging. Another technique is interrogation with a pulsed neutron source in a two-phase mode of operation to image both nitrogen and oxygen densities. Another technique employed in combination is neutron interrogation to form a hydrogen density image or three-dimensional map. In addition, deliberately-placed neutron-absorbing materials can be detected.

  4. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  5. The performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at a long-pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1997-06-01

    In this document the author considers the performance of a long pulse spallation source for those neutron scattering experiments that are usually performed with a monochromatic beam at a continuous wave (CW) source such as a nuclear reactor. The first conclusion drawn is that comparison of the performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at CW and pulsed sources is simpler for long-pulsed sources than it is for the short-pulse variety. Even though detailed instrument design and assessment will require Monte Carlo simulations (which have already been performed at Los Alamos for SANS and reflectometry), simple arguments are sufficient to assess the approximate performance of spectrometers at an LPSS and to support the contention that a 1 MW long-pulse source can provide attractive performance, especially for instrumentation designed for soft-condensed-matter science. Because coupled moderators can be exploited at such a source, its time average cold flux is equivalent to that of a research reactor with a power of about 15 MW, so only a factor of 4 gain from source pulsing is necessary to obtain performance that is comparable with the ILL. In favorable cases, the gain from pulsing can be even more than this, approaching the limit set by the peak flux, giving about 4 times the performance of the ILL. Because of its low duty factor, an LPSS provides the greatest performance gains for relatively low resolution experiments with cold neutrons. It should thus be considered complementary to short pulse sources which are most effective for high resolution experiments using thermal or epithermal neutrons.

  6. DrSPINE - New approach to data reduction and analysis for neutron spin echo experiments from pulsed and reactor sources

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, Michael; Holderer, Olaf; Ohl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neutron spin echo (NSE) method at a pulsed neutron source presents new challenges to the data reduction and analysis as compared to the instruments installed at reactor sources. The main advantage of the pulsed source NSE is the ability to resolve the neutron wavelength and collect neutrons over a wider bandwidth. This allows us to more precisely determine the symmetry phase and measure the data for several Q-values at the same time. Based on the experience gained at the SNS NSE - the first, and to date the only one, NSE instrument installed at a pulsed spallation source, we propose a novel and unified approach to the NSE data processing.

  7. Improving the resolution of chopper spectrometers at pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M. ); Mildner, D.F.R. . Center for Analytical Chemistry)

    1990-01-01

    We examine the relationships between intensity and resolution in pulsed-source chopper spectrometers, including the effects of Soller collimation, narrower rotor slits and higher rotor speeds. The basis is a simplified description of a spectrometer, approximately optimizing the rotor pulse and lighthouse effects. the analysis includes a new treatment of the angular distribution transmitted through a system consisting of a coarse collimator and a Soller collimator. The results encourage the prospect for a reasonably easily accomplished, higher resolution, optional configuration of the pulsed source chopper spectrometers at IPNS. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Fundamental neutron physics at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    Modern neutron sources and modern neutron science share a common origin in mid twentieth century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for the study of condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and primarily justified) as tools for condensed matter research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities carried out at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for the continuation of this program of research.

  9. Explosives (and other threats) detection using pulsed neutron interrogation and optimized detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strellis, Dan A.; Elsalim, Mashal; Gozani, Tsahi

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported results from a human-portable system using neutron interrogation to detect contraband and explosives. We summarized our methodology for distinguishing threat materials such as narcotics, C4, and mustard gas in the myriad of backgrounds present in the maritime environment. We are expanding our mission for the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) to detect Special Nuclear Material (SNM) through the detection of multiple fission signatures without compromising the conventional threat detection performance. This paper covers our initial investigations into using neutrons from compact pulsed neutron generators via the d(D,n)3He or d(T,n)α reactions with energies of ~2.5 and 14 MeV, respectively, for explosives (and other threats) detection along with a variety of gamma-ray detectors. Fast neutrons and thermal neutrons (after successive collisions) can stimulate the emission of various threat detection signatures. For explosives detection, element-specific gamma-ray signatures via the (n,n'γ) inelastic scattering reaction and the (n,'γ) thermal capture reaction are detected. For SNM, delayed gamma-rays following fission can be measured with the same detector. Our initial trade-off investigations of several gamma-ray detectors types (NaI, CsI, LaBr3, HPGe) for measuring gamma-ray signatures in a pulsed neutron environment for potential application in a human-portable active interrogation system are covered in this paper.

  10. Neutron diagnostics for pulsed high-density thermonuclear plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ekdahl, C A

    1979-08-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the neutron flux from the Scylla IV-P linear theta-pinch experiment have been made with scintillator-photomultiplier combinations. Calibration of the detectors is accomplished by a comparison of their time-integrated output with the total neutron yield measured using a foil-activation technique for which an accurate calibration has been established. The temperature of the Maxwellian ion velocity distribution that would produce the observed flux is obtained from the Maxwellian reactivity < sigmav >(DD) for D (d,n)He3 and measurements of the temporal evolution of the plasma column density and dimensions. This determination of the time history of the ion temperature is in good agreement with the plasma energy measured using other techniques.

  11. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron experiments : data processing and spatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    The YALINA-Booster experiments and analyses are part of the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory of USA and the Joint Institute for Power & Nuclear Research - SOSNY of Belarus for studying the physics of accelerator driven systems for nuclear energy applications using low enriched uranium. The YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly is utilized for studying the kinetics of accelerator driven systems with its highly intensive D-T or D-D pulsed neutron source. In particular, the pulsed neutron methods are used to determine the reactivity of the subcritical system. This report examines the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster facility with different configurations for the subcritical assembly. The 1141 configuration with 90% U-235 fuel and the 1185 configuration with 36% or 21% U-235 fuel are examined. The Sjoestrand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the different configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from the experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations inside the subcritical assembly and the types of detector used for the measurements. In this report, Bell's spatial correction factors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo model to remove the detector dependences. The large differences between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone of the YALINA-Booster are reduced after applying the spatial corrections. In addition, the estimated reactivity values after the spatial corrections are much less spatially dependent.

  12. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Cikhardt, J.; Rezac, K.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Sila, O.

    2015-09-15

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 8 }n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 10{sup 14} deuterons in the 0.5–2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 10{sup 9} at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 10{sup 6 }n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  13. Fast-neutron spectrometry using a ³He ionization chamber and digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Johnson, J T; Seabury, E H

    2012-08-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type (3)He ionization chamber to measure the fast-neutron spectra of a deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator, a bare (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, and of the transmitted fast neutron spectra of a (252)Cf source attenuated by water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, and magnesium. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common approach for analyzing n +(3)He→(1)H+(3)H ionization events and improved to account for wall-effect and pile-up events, increasing the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed of the different experimental arrangements and compared with the measurements, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA-processed fast-neutron spectra and predictions. The fast-neutron resonance features of the attenuation cross sections of the attenuating materials are clearly visible within the resolution limits of the electronics used for the measurements, and the potential applications of high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards measurements are discussed.

  14. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  15. Comparison Between Digital and Analog Pulse Shape Discrimination Techniques for Neutron and Gamma Ray Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad

    2005-10-01

    Recent advancements in digital signal processing (DSP) using fast processors and a computer allows one to envision using it in pulse shape discrimination. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of using a DSP to distinguish between neutrons and gamma rays by the shape of their pulses in a liquid scintillator detector (BC501). For neutron/gamma discrimination, the advantage of using a DSP over the analog method is that in an analog system, two separate charge-sensitive ADCs are required. One ADC is used to integrate the beginning of the pulse rise time while the second ADC is for integrating the tail part. In DSP techniques the incoming pulses coming directly from the detector are immediately digitized and can be decomposed into individual pulses waveforms. This eliminates the need for separate ADCs as one can easily get the integration of two parts of the pulse from the digital waveforms. This work describes the performance of these DSP techniques and compares the results with the analog method.

  16. A 109 neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 108 neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head.

  17. Using pulsed neutron transmission for crystalline phase imaging and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steuwer, A.; Withers, P. J.; Santisteban, J. R.; Edwards, L.

    2005-04-01

    The total scattering cross section of polycrystalline materials in the thermal neutron region contains valuable information about the scattering processes that neutrons undergo as they pass through the sample. In particular, it displays characteristic discontinuities or Bragg edges of selected families of lattice planes. We have developed a pixelated time-of-flight transmission detector able to record these features and in this paper we examine the potential for quantitative phase analysis and crystalline phase imaging through the examination of a simple two-phase test object. Two strategies for evaluation of the absolute phase volumes (path lengths) are examined. The first approach is based on the evaluation of the Bragg edge amplitude using basic profile information. The second approach focuses on the information content of certain regions of the spectrum using a Rietveld-type fit after first identifying the phases via the characteristic edges. The phase distribution is determined and the coarse chemical species radiographic image reconstructed. The accuracy of this method is assessed.

  18. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Response of Shielded SNM to a Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester

    2010-08-01

    Active interrogation (AI) has been used as a technique for the detection and identification of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) for both proposed and field-tested systems. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been studying this technique for systems ranging from small systems employing portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) 1 to larger systems employing linear accelerators as high-energy photon sources for assessment of vehicles and cargo2. In order to assess the feasibility of new systems, INL has undertaken a campaign of Monte Carlo simulations of the response of a variety of masses of SNM in multiple shielding configurations to a pulsed neutron source using the MCNPX3 code, with emphasis on the neutron and photon response of the system as a function of time after the initial neutron pulse. We present here some preliminary results from these calculations. 1. D.L. Chichester and E.H. Seabury, “ Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Nuclear Material,” IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science 56 (2009) pp 441-447. 2. J.L. Jones et al., “Photonuclear-based, nuclear material detection system for cargo containers,” Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 241 (2005) pp 770-776. 3. D.B. Pelowitz, “MCNPXTM User’s Manual version 2.6.0,” Los Alamos National Laboratory Report LA-CP-07-1473 (2008).

  19. First production of ultracold neutrons with a solid deuterium source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, A.; Sobolev, Yu.; Altarev, I.; Eberhardt, K.; Gschrey, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Hackl, R.; Hampel, G.; Hartmann, F. J.; Heil, W.; Kratz, J. V.; Lauer, Th.; Liźon Aguilar, A.; Müller, A. R.; Paul, S.; Pokotilovski, Yu.; Schmid, W.; Tassini, L.; Tortorella, D.; Trautmann, N.; Trinks, U.; Wiehl, N.

    2007-11-01

    The production rates of ultracold neutrons (UCN) with a solid deuterium converter have been measured at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz. Exposed to a thermal neutron fluence of ensuremath ˜ 1\\cdot 10^{13} n·cm^-2·pulse^-1, the number of detected very cold and ultracold neutrons ranges up to 200 000 at 7mol of solid deuterium (sD2) in combination with a pre-moderator (mesitylene). About 50% of the measured neutrons can be assigned to UCN with energies E of ensuremath V_F(sD_2)≤ E ≤ V_F(guide) where V F( sD 2) = 105 neV and V F( guide) = 190 neV are the Fermi potentials of the sD2 converter and our stainless steel neutron guides, respectively. Thermal cycling of solid deuterium, which was frozen out from the gas phase, considerably improved the UCN yield, in particular at higher amounts of sD2.

  20. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator. PMID:27370444

  1. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station.

    PubMed

    Gallmeier, F X; Lu, W; Riemer, B W; Zhao, J K; Herwig, K W; Robertson, J L

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm(2) to 20 × 20 mm(2). This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  2. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have been identified using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared to the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. This increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments' sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. A first effort was undertaken to group decoupled moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.

  3. Conceptual moderator studies for the Spallation Neutron Source short-pulse second target station

    DOE PAGES

    Gallmeier, F. X.; Lu, W.; Riemer, B. W.; Zhao, J. K.; Herwig, K. W.; Robertson, J. L.

    2016-06-14

    We identified candidate moderator configurations for a short-pulse second target station (STS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using a global optimizer framework built around the MCNPX particle transport code. Neutron brightness metrics were selected as the figure-of-merit. We assumed that STS would use one out of six proton pulses produced by an SNS accelerator upgraded to operate at 1.3 GeV proton energy, 2.8 MW power and 60 Hz repetition rate. The simulations indicate that the peak brightness can be increased by a factor of 5 and 2.5 on a per proton pulse basis compared tomore » the SNS first target station for both coupled and decoupled para-hydrogen moderators, respectively. Additional increases by factors of 3 and 2 were demonstrated for coupled and decoupled moderators, respectively, by reducing the area of neutron emission from 100 × 100 mm2 to 20 × 20 mm2. Furthermore, this increase in brightness has the potential to translate to an increase of beam intensity at the instruments’ sample positions even though the total neutron emission of the smaller moderator is less than that of the larger. This is especially true for instruments with small samples (beam dimensions). The increased fluxes in the STS moderators come at accelerated poison and de-coupler burnout and higher radiation-induced material damage rates per unit power, which overall translate into lower moderator lifetimes. Our first effort decoupled group moderators into a cluster collectively positioning them at the peak neutron production zone in the target and having a three-port neutron emission scheme that complements that of a cylindrical coupled moderator.« less

  4. Neutron scattering studies of the dynamics of biopolymer-water systems using pulsed-source spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Middendorf, H.D.; Miller, A.

    1994-12-31

    Energy-resolving neutron scattering techniques provide spatiotemporal data suitable for testing and refining analytical models or computer simulations of a variety of dynamical processes in biomolecular systems. This paper reviews experimental work on hydrated biopolymers at ISIS, the UK Pulsed Neutron Facility. Following an outline of basic concepts and a summary of the new instrumental capabilities, the progress made is illustrated by results from recent experiments in two areas: quasi- elastic scattering from highly hydrated polysaccharide gels (agarose and hyaluronate), and inelastic scattering from vibrational modes of slightly hydrated collagen fibers.

  5. Testing a scale pulsed modulator for an IEC neutron source into a resistive load

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Wheat, Robert M; Aragonez, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A 1/10th scaled prototype pulse modulator for an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) neutron source has been designed and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The scaled prototype modulator is based on a solid-state Marx architecture and has an output voltage of 13 kV and an output current of 10 A. The modulator has a variable pulse width between 50 {micro}s and 1 ms with < 5% droop at all pulse widths. The modulator operates with a duty factor up to 5% and has a maximum pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz. The use of a solid-state Marx modulator in this application has several potential benefits. These benefits include variable pulse width and amplitude, inherent switch overcurrent and transient overvoltage protection, and increased efficiency over DC supplies used in this application. Several new features were incorporated into this design including inductorless charging, fully snubberless operation, and stage fusing. The scaled prototype modulator has been tested using a 1 k{Omega} resistive load. Test results are given. Short (50 {micro}s) and long (1 ms) pulses are demonstrated as well as high duty factor operation (1 kHz rep rate at a 50 {micro}s pulse width for a 5% duty factor). Pulse agility of the modulator is demonstrated through turning the individual Marx stages on and off in sequence producing ramp, pyramid, and reverse pyramid waveforms.

  6. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform

  7. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.P. Ray, H.; Jordan, K.A.; Murer, D.

    2015-03-15

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the {sup 4}He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the {sup 4}He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For {sup 252}Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a {sup 252}Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  8. Pulsed neutrons: One year of experience with the new source at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, G. H.

    1983-05-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source based on a 500 MeV proton accelerator operating at 30 Hz and with an average proton current of ≈ 10 μA. Neutron scattering instruments for elastic scattering include two powder diffractometers, a single-crystal diffractometer based on the Laue method and employing a large (30 x 30 cm) position-sensitive scintillation detector, a small-angle diffractometer using a position-sensitive detector, and a polarized-neutron diffractometer which will utilize the spin-refrigerator device to obtain a beam of white polarized neutrons. For inelastic scattering we presently have the crystal-analyzer spectrometer, and two chopper spectrometers capable of providing monoenergetic incident neutron beams of between 100 and 600 meV. From its inception IPNS has been operating in a user mode and the selection of experiments is made by a Program Committee twice a year on the basis of the scientifi cmerit of submitted proposals.

  9. Comparison Between Digital and Analog Pulse Shape Discrimination Techniques For Neutron and Gamma Ray Separation

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejad; John K. Hartwell

    2005-11-01

    Recent advancement in digital signal processing (DSP) using fast processors and computer makes it possible to be used in pulse shape discrimination applications. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of using a DSP to distinguish between the neutrons and gamma rays by the shape of their pulses in a liquid scintillator detector (BC501), and have investigated pulse shape-based techniques to improve the resolution performance of room-temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. For the neutron/gamma discrimination, the advantage of using a DSP over the analog method is that in analog system two separate charge-sensitive ADC's are required. One ADC is used to integrate the beginning of the pulse risetime while the second ADC is for integrating the tail part. Using a DSP eliminates the need for separate ADCs as one can easily get the integration of two parts of the pulse from the digital waveforms. This work describes the performance of these DSP techniques and compares the results with the analog method.

  10. Performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, J.; Sobolev, Yu.; Beck, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Hampel, G.; Heil, W.; Kieser, R.; Reich, T.; Trautmann, N.; Ziegner, M.

    2014-04-01

    The performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz with a maximum peak energy of 10MJ is described. The solid deuterium converter with a volume of cm3 (8mol), which is exposed to a thermal neutron fluence of n/cm2, delivers up to 240000 UCN ( m/s) per pulse outside the biological shield at the experimental area. UCN densities of 10 cm3 are obtained in stainless-steel bottles of 10 L. The measured UCN yields compare well with the predictions from a Monte Carlo simulation developed to model the source and to optimize its performance for the upcoming upgrade of the TRIGA Mainz into a user facility for UCN physics.

  11. Overview of the IBA accelerator-based BNCT system.

    PubMed

    Forton, E; Stichelbaut, F; Cambriani, A; Kleeven, W; Ahlback, J; Jongen, Y

    2009-07-01

    During the last few years, IBA started the development of an accelerator-based BNCT system. The accelerator is a Dynamitron built by RDI in USA and will produce a 20 mA proton beam at 2.8 MeV. Neutrons will be produced by the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be nuclear reaction using a thin lithium target. The neutron energy spectrum will be tailored using a beam shaping assembly. This overview presents the current status of the system: after a description of every component, some design issues, solutions and experimental tests will be discussed.

  12. Correction: Spectroscopic characteristics of the OSIRIS near-backscattering crystal analyser spectrometer on the ISIS pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Telling, Mark T F; Campbell, Stuart I; Engberg, Dennis; Martín Y Marero, David; Andersen, Ken H

    2016-03-21

    Correction for 'Spectroscopic characteristics of the OSIRIS near-backscattering crystal analyser spectrometer on the ISIS pulsed neutron source' by Mark T. F. Telling et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2005, 7, 1255-1261.

  13. Understanding the physics limitations of PFNA — the nanosecond pulsed fast neutron analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1995-05-01

    The PFNA was conceived by Sawa, Gozani and Ryge, in late 1987 as a means to achieve the highest possible sensitivity for detecting small amounts of explosives concealed in luggage. This could be attained because 1) all the elements present in explosives, i.e., O,N,C (and H, indirectly) can be measured via the (n,n'γ) process with fast neutrons, 2) using nanosecond pulses of neutrons and the time-of-flight (TOF) technique, a full direct imaging of the elements and hence all present materials can be obtained, and 3) the TOF assures the best signal to background ratio, as the signal-stimulated γ-rays are measured before the background — neutron interacting in the detector environment — arrives. The PFNA technology has made great strides since the autumn of 1987. It enables the detection of narcotics, explosives, many hazardous materials and most dutiable goods carried in trucks and containers.

  14. Pulse profiles from spinning neutron stars in the Hartle-Thorne approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal E-mail: fozel@email.arizone.edu

    2014-09-10

    We present a new numerical algorithm for the calculation of pulse profiles from spinning neutron stars in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. Our approach allows us to formally take into account the effects of Doppler shifts and aberration, of frame dragging, as well as of the oblateness of the stellar surface and of its quadrupole moment. We confirm an earlier result that neglecting the oblateness of the neutron-star surface leads to ≅ 5%-30% errors in the calculated profiles and further show that neglecting the quadrupole moment of its spacetime leads to ≅ 1%-5% errors at a spin frequency of ≅ 600 Hz. We discuss the implications of our results for the measurements of neutron-star masses and radii with upcoming X-ray missions, such as NASA's NICER and ESA's LOFT.

  15. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-08-15

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed.

  16. A Fast Pulse, High Intensity Neutron Source Based Upon The Dense Plasma Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, M.; Bures, B.; Madden, R.; Blobner, F.; Elliott, K. Wilson

    2009-12-02

    Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC) has built a bench-top source of fast neutrons (approx10-30 ns, 2.45 MeV), that is portable and can be scaled to operate at approx100 Hz. The source is a Dense Plasma Focus driven by three different capacitor banks: a 40 J/30 kA/100 Hz driver; a 500 J/130 kA/2 Hz driver and a 3 kJ/350 kA/0.5 Hz driver. At currents of approx130 kA, this source produces approx1x10{sup 7} (DD) n/pulse. The neutron pulse widths are approx10-30 ns and may be controlled by adjusting the DPF electrode geometry and operating parameters. This paper describes the scaling of the fast neutron output with current from such a Dense Plasma Focus source. For each current and driver, different DPF head designs are required to match to the current rise-time, as the operating pressure and anode radius/shape are varied. Doping of the pure D{sub 2} gas fill with Ar or Kr was shown earlier to increase the neutron output. Results are discussed in the light of scaling laws suggested by prior literature.

  17. ASPUN: design for an Argonne super-intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Khoe, T.K.; Kustom, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Argonne pioneered the pulsed spallation neutron source with the ZING-P and IPNS-I concepts. IPNS-I is now a reliable and actively used source for pulsed spallation neutrons. The accelerator is a 500-MeV, 8 to 9 ..mu..a, 30-Hz rapid-cycling proton synchrotron. Other proton spallation sources are now in operation or in construction. These include KENS-I at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan, the WNR/PSR at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA, and the SNS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in England. Newer and bolder concepts are being developed for more-intense pulsed spallation neutron sources. These include SNQ at the KFA Laboratory in Juelich, Germany, ASTOR at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Physics in Switzerland, and ASPUN, the Argonne concept. ASPUN is based on the Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient concept. The design goal is to provide a time-averaged beam of 3.5 ma at 1100 MeV on a spallation target in intense bursts, 100 to 200 nanoseconds long, at a repetition rate of no more than 60 to 85 Hz.

  18. Time correlated measurements using plastic scintillators with neutron-photon pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Norman E., IV

    nuclear and radiological material. Moreover, the production of 3He isotope as a byproduct of security programs was drastically decreased. This isotope shortage coupled with the disadvantages of relying on a detector that requires neutron moderation before the detection of fission neutrons, poses a significant challenge in supporting the existing detection systems and the development of future technologies. To address this problem, a reliable and accurate alternative technology to detect neutrons emitted in fissions must be developed. One such alternative technology that shows promise in this application is the use of scintillators based on solid state materials (plastics) which are sensitive to fast neutrons. However, plastic scintillators are also sensitive to photons. Hence, it is necessary to separate the neutron signals from the photon signals, using the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. The PSD is based on the comparison of the pulse shapes of digitized signal waveforms. This approach allows for the measurement of fast neutrons without the necessity of their moderation. Because the fission spectrum neutrons are mainly fast, methods employing fast neutron detection are applicable for the assay of fissile materials. In addition, the average time of scintillation of the plastic medium is much shorter than those of the gaseous counters, thus allowing scintillation detectors to be used in high count rate environments. Furthermore, the temporal information of the fast neutron detection using multiple sensors enables the time correlation analysis of the fission neutron multiplicity. The study of time correlation measurements of fast neutrons using the array of plastic scintillators is the basis of this work. The array of four plastic scintillator detectors equipped with the digital data acquisition and analysis system was developed. The digital PSD analysis of detector signals "on-the-fly" was implemented for the array. The time coincidence measurement technique

  19. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Neutron sources: present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500+ MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-production efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: (i) fundamental neutron-nuclear research, (ii) nuclear-data acquisition, (iii) materials-damage studies, (iv) engineering test, and (v) biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections.

  1. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Malcolm J.; Agar, Stewart; Aspinall, Michael D.; Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie

    2016-10-01

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×107 per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm3 concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  2. Photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W. L.; Goulding, C. A.; Hollas, C. L.; Moss, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    The physics of photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) using the delayed neutron reinterrogation method is described in this paper. Two sets of active interrogation experiments were performed using a set of subcritical configurations of cocentric HEU metal hemishells. One set of measurements utilized a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator as the active source. The second set of measurements utilized a linear accelerator-based bremsstrahlung photon source as an active interrogation source. The neutron responses were measured for both sets of experiments. The operational details and results for both measurement sets are described.

  3. Monte Carlo code for neutron scattering instrumentation design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Daemen, L.; Fitzsimmons, M.; Hjelm, R.; Olah, G.; Roberts, J.; Seeger, P.; Smith, G.; Thelliez, T.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The development of next generation, accelerator based neutron sources calls for the design of new instruments for neutron scattering studies of materials. It will be necessary, in the near future, to evaluate accurately and rapidly the performance of new and traditional neutron instruments at short- and long-pulse spallation neutron sources, as well as continuous sources. We have developed a code that is a design tool to assist the instrument designer model new or existing instruments, test their performance, and optimize their most important features.

  4. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron e xperiments: detector dead time and apatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    In almost every detector counting system, a minimal dead time is required to record two successive events as two separated pulses. Due to the random nature of neutron interactions in the subcritical assembly, there is always some probability that a true neutron event will not be recorded because it occurs too close to the preceding event. These losses may become rather severe for counting systems with high counting rates, and should be corrected before any utilization of the experimental data. This report examines the dead time effects for the pulsed neutron experiments of the YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly. The nonparalyzable model is utilized to correct the experimental data due to dead time. Overall, the reactivity values are increased by 0.19$ and 0.32$ after the spatial corrections for the YALINA-Booster 36% and 21% configurations respectively. The differences of the reactivities obtained with He-3 long or short detectors at the same detector channel diminish after the dead time corrections of the experimental data for the 36% YALINA-Booster configuration. In addition, better agreements between reactivities obtained from different experimental data sets are also observed after the dead time corrections for the 21% YALINA-Booster configuration.

  5. Spectroscopic characteristics of the OSIRIS near-backscattering crystal analyser spectrometer on the ISIS pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Telling, Mark T F; Campbell, Stuart I; Engberg, Dennis; Marero, David Martín y; Andersen, Ken H

    2005-03-21

    The OSIRIS neutron instrument on the ISIS pulsed source now affords the option of high-resolution quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy. In this paper, the performance of OSIRIS is presented, with the spectroscopic characteristics of the instrument being discussed in terms of energy resolution, signal to background ratio and neutron count rate. Recent improvements to the spectrometer are described, in particular the effect of cooling the crystal analysers close to liquid helium temperature to enhance the sensitivity of the instrument. The performance of OSIRIS is also likened to back-scattering, crystal analyser spectrometers at other neutron sources.

  6. Irradiation Effects for the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-02-02

    At the request of Safety and Ecology Corporation of Tennessee, radiation effects of the proposed Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System have been examined. First, fissile cargo were examined to determine if a significant neutron signal would be observable during interrogation. Results indicated that ample multiplication would be seen for near critical bare targets. The water-reflected sphere showed relatively little multiplication. By implication, a fissile target shielded by hydrogenous cargo might not be detectable by neutron interrogation, particularly if reliance is placed on the neutron signal. The cargo may be detectable if use can be made of the ample increase in the photon signal. Second, dose rates were calculated at various locations within and just outside the facility building. These results showed that some dose rates may be higher than the target dose rate of 0.05 mrem/h. However, with limited exposure time, the total dose may be well below the allowed total dose. Lastly, estimates were made of the activation of structures and typical cargo. Most cargo will not be exposed long enough to be activated to levels of concern. On the other hand, portions of the structure may experience buildup of some radionuclides to levels of concern.

  7. The Impact of Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources on Condensed Matter Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, J. L.

    1993-03-01

    The exploitation of neutron scattering techniques in studies of the structure and dynamics of condensed matter has been one of the major scientific successes of the past 20 years. Based initially on high flux reactors, which produce continuous beams of neutrons, a wide range of pure and applied problems in physics, chemistry, biological sciences, engineering, materials and earth sciences have been tackled, and much new understanding gained. More recently, sources based on proton accelerators have been built, and their particular characteristics - all of which derive from the fact that sharp pulses of neutrons are produced at frequencies of between 20 and 50 Hz - explored. These characteristics, which allow science to be done that would be difficult, inefficient or impossible on a reactor source, have greatly widened the range of scientific problems that can be tackled using neutrons. This chapter gives examples from experiments performed on the most powerful such source - ISIS in the UK - and looks forward briefly to future developments in the next millenium.

  8. Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effects from Short-Pulse Lasers and Fusion Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Throop, A; Brown, Jr., C G; Kimbrough, J; Stowell, M L; White, D A; Song, P; Back, N; MacPhee, A; Chen, H; DeHope, W; Ping, Y; Maddox, B; Lister, J; Pratt, G; Ma, T; Tsui, Y; Perkins, M; O'Brien, D; Patel, P

    2009-03-06

    Our research focused on obtaining a fundamental understanding of the source and properties of EMP at the Titan PW(petawatt)-class laser facility. The project was motivated by data loss and damage to components due to EMP, which can limit diagnostic techniques that can be used reliably at short-pulse PW-class laser facilities. Our measurements of the electromagnetic fields, using a variety of probes, provide information on the strength, time duration, and frequency dependence of the EMP. We measure electric field strengths in the 100's of kV/m range, durations up to 100 ns, and very broad frequency response extending out to 5 GHz and possibly beyond. This information is being used to design shielding to mitigate the effects of EMP on components at various laser facilities. We showed the need for well-shielded cables and oscilloscopes to obtain high quality data. Significant work was invested in data analysis techniques to process this data. This work is now being transferred to data analysis procedures for the EMP diagnostics being fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition to electromagnetic field measurements, we measured the spatial and energy distribution of electrons escaping from targets. This information is used as input into the 3D electromagnetic code, EMSolve, which calculates time dependent electromagnetic fields. The simulation results compare reasonably well with data for both the strength and broad frequency bandwidth of the EMP. This modeling work required significant improvements in EMSolve to model the fields in the Titan chamber generated by electrons escaping the target. During dedicated Titan shots, we studied the effects of varying laser energy, target size, and pulse duration on EMP properties. We also studied the effect of surrounding the target with a thick conducting sphere and cube as a potential mitigation approach. System generated EMP (SGEMP) in coaxial cables does not appear to be a significant at Titan. Our results

  9. Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, R. K.; Niranjan, Ram; Mishra, P.; Srivastava, R.; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2013-06-01

    Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 ± 0.8) × 104 neutrons/pulse into 4π steradians with a pulse width of 15 ± 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 μF capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 μF, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of 3He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

  10. Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Rout, R. K.; Niranjan, Ram; Srivastava, R.; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.; Mishra, P.

    2013-06-15

    Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse into 4{pi} steradians with a pulse width of 15 {+-} 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 {mu}F capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 {mu}F, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of {sup 3}He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

  11. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P

    2011-09-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. PMID:21550259

  12. Pulse neutron subcritical K/sub EFF/ measurements on water flooded arrays of fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

    1980-07-01

    The pulsed neutron source technique has been utilized at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for some twenty years for measurement of subcritical reactivities of a variety of fuel systems. One area of application has included measurements of subcritical reactivities of water flooded arrays of fuel rods. This report summarizes these measurements. The theory behind the measurement process is reviewed and the instrumentation of the measurement system discussed. Also, four experiment programs are described in detail, illustrating system use and flexibility. Some changes are suggested for system improvements to speed up data collection and data reduction, and some possible areas of future application of the method are described.

  13. A compact post-acceleration beam chopper for a 4.5 MV Dynamitron pulsed neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Fujisawa, M.; Baba, M.; Iwasaki, T.; Iwasaki, S.; Sakamoto, R.; Hirakawa, N.; Sugiyama, K.

    1994-08-01

    A post-acceleration beam chopper (PACS) has been installed for a 4.5 MV Dynamitron accelerator to improve the energy resolution of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) experiments by shortening the duration of the ion beam pulses. The PACS sweeps the accelerated ion pulses across a chopping slit and eliminates the tails of the beam pulses. It operates sinusoidally at a frequency of 8 MHz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV peak to peak in synchronization with the accelerated ion pulses. The high voltage generator of the PACS was constructed of commercially available amplifiers and components, which realized easy maintenance and low cost. The PACS proved to be very effective to improve the pulse shape and has been applied for double-differential neutron emission cross section measurements.

  14. Time gating for energy selection and scatter rejection: High-energy pulsed neutron imaging at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Alicia; Schirato, Richard; McKigney, Edward; Hunter, James; Temple, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a linear accelerator in Los Alamos, New Mexico that accelerates a proton beam to 800 MeV, which then produces spallation neutron beams. Flight path FP15R uses a tungsten target to generate neutrons of energy ranging from several hundred keV to ~600 MeV. The beam structure has micropulses of sub-ns width and period of 1.784 ns, and macropulses of 625 μs width and frequency of either 50 Hz or 100 Hz. This corresponds to 347 micropulses per macropulse, or 1.74 x 104 micropulses per second when operating at 50 Hz. Using a very fast, cooled ICCD camera (Princeton Instruments PI-Max 4), gated images of various objects were obtained on FP15R in January 2015. Objects imaged included blocks of lead and borated polyethylene; a tungsten sphere; and a tungsten, polyethylene, and steel cylinder. Images were obtained in 36 min or less, with some in as little as 6 min. This is novel because the gate widths (some as narrow as 10 ns) were selected to reject scatter and other signal not of interest (e.g. the gamma flash that precedes the neutron pulse), which has not been demonstrated at energies above 14 MeV. This proof-of-principle experiment shows that time gating is possible above 14MeV and is useful for selecting neutron energy and reducing scatter, thus forming clearer images. Future work (simulation and experimental) is being undertaken to improve camera shielding and system design and to precisely determine optical properties of the imaging system.

  15. Pulsed, Photonuclear-induced, Neutron Measurements of Nuclear Materials with Composite Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    James Jones; Kevin Haskell; Rich Waston; William Geist; Jonathan Thron; Corey Freeman; Martyn Swinhoe; Seth McConchie; Eric Sword; Lee Montierth; John Zabriskie

    2011-07-01

    Active measurements were performed using a 10-MeV electron accelerator with inspection objects containing various nuclear and nonnuclear materials available at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility. The inspection objects were assembled from ZPPR reactor plate materials to evaluate the measurement technologies for the characterization of plutonium, depleted uranium or highly enriched uranium shielded by both nuclear and non-nuclear materials. A series of pulsed photonuclear, time-correlated measurements were performed with unshielded calibration materials and then compared with the more complex composite shield configurations. The measurements used multiple 3He detectors that are designed to detect fission neutrons between pulses of an electron linear accelerator. The accelerator produced 10-MeV bremsstrahlung X-rays at a repetition rate of 125 Hz (8 ms between pulses) with a 4-us pulse width. All inspected objects were positioned on beam centerline and 100 cm from the X-ray source. The time-correlated data was collected in parallel using both a Los Alamos National Laboratory-designed list-mode acquisition system and a commercial multichannel scaler analyzer. A combination of different measurement configurations and data analysis methods enabled the identification of each object. This paper describes the experimental configuration, the ZPPR inspection objects used, and the various measurement and analysis results for each inspected object.

  16. Key research issues in the pulsed fast-neutron analysis technique for cargo inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1994-07-01

    Non-invasive inspection systems based on the use of fast neutrons are being studied for the inspection of large cargo containers. A key advantage of fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are the primary constituents of explosives and narcotics. The high energy allows penetration of relatively large containers. The pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA) technique is currently the baseline system. A workshop on the PFNA technique involving industrial, government, and university participants was held at Argonne National Lab. in January 1994. The purpose of this workshop was to review the status of research on the key technical issues involved in PFNA, and to develop a list of those areas where additional modeling and/or experimentation were needed. The workshop also focused on development of a near-term experimental assessment program using existing prototypes and on development of a long-term test program at the Tacoma Testbed, where a PFNA prototype will be installed in 1995. A summary of conclusions reached at this workshop is presented. Results from analytic and Monte Carlo modeling of simplified PFNA systems are also presented.

  17. Key research issues in the pulsed fast-neutron analysis technique for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Yule, Thomas J.

    1994-10-01

    Non-invasive inspection systems based on the use of fast neutrons are being studied for the inspection of large cargo containers. A key advantage of fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are the primary constituents of explosives and narcotics. The high energy allows penetration of relatively large containers. The pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA) technique is currently the baseline system. A workshop on the PFNA technique involving industrial, government, and university participants was held at Argonne National Laboratory in January 1994. The purpose of this workshop was to review the status of research on the key technical issues involved in PFNA, and to develop a list of those areas where additional modeling and/or experimentation were needed. The workshop also focused on development of a near-term experimental assessment program using existing prototypes and on development of a long-term test program at the Tacoma Testbed, where a PFNA prototype will be installed in 1995. A summary of conclusions reached at this workshop is presented. Results from analytic and Monte Carlo modeling of simplified PFNA systems are also presented.

  18. Surviving to tell the tale : Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source from an ecosystem perspective.

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, C.; Office of The Director

    2010-07-01

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, seems to be one of puzzling ups and downs. For example, Argonne management, Department of Energy officials, and materials science reviewers continued to offer, then withdraw, votes of confidence even though the middling-sized IPNS produced high-profile research, including work that made the cover of Nature in 1987. In the midst of this period of shifting opinion and impressive research results, some Argonne materials scientists were unenthusiastic, members of the laboratory's energy physics group were key supporters, and materials scientists at another laboratory provided, almost fortuitously, a new lease on life. What forces shaped the puzzling life cycle of the IPNS? And what role - if any - did the moderate price tag and the development of scientific and technological ideas play in the course it took? To answer these questions this paper looks to an ecosystem metaphor for inspiration, exploring how opinions, ideas, and machinery emerged from the interrelated resource economies of Argonne, the DOE, and the materials science community by way of a tangled web of shifting group interactions. The paper will conclude with reflections about what the resulting focus on relationality explains about the IPNS story as well as the underlying dynamic that animates knowledge production at U.S. national laboratories.

  19. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination in plastic scintillators: Preparation and characterization of various compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Pauline; Hamel, Matthieu; Dehé-Pittance, Chrystèle; Rocha, Licinio; Pansu, Robert B.; Normand, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    This work deals with the preparation and evaluation of plastic scintillators for neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD). We succeeded in developing a plastic scintillator with good neutron/gamma discrimination properties in the range of what is already being commercialized. Several combinations of primary and secondary fluorophores were implemented in chemically modified polymers. These scintillators were fully characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy and under neutron irradiation. The materials proved to be stable for up to 5 years without any degradation of PSD properties. They were then classified in terms of their PSD capabilities and light yield. Our best candidate, 28.6 wt% of primary fluorophore with a small amount of secondary fluorophore, shows promising PSD results and is particularly suited to industrial development, because its preparation does not involve the use of expensive or exotic compounds. Furthermore, even at the highest prepared concentration, high stability over time was observed. As a proof of concept, one sample with dimensions 109 mm ∅×114 mm height (≈1 L) was prepared.

  20. Pulsed neutron-beam focusing by modulating a permanent-magnet sextupole lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masako; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Tongu, Hiromu; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Mishima, Kenji; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Hirota, Katsuya; Otake, Yoshie; Seki, Yoshichika; Yamagata, Yutaka; Hino, Masahiro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Garbe, Ulf; Kennedy, Shane J.; Tung Lee, Wai; Andersen, Ken H.; Guerard, Bruno; Manzin, Giuliana; Geltenbort, Peter

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a compact permanent-magnet sextupole lens for neutrons that can focus a pulsed beam with a wide wavelength range-the maximum wavelength being more than double the minimum-while sufficiently suppressing the effect of chromatic aberration. The bore diameter is #x00F8;15 mm. Three units of a double-ring sextupole with a length of 66 mm are cascaded, resulting in a total length of 198 mm. The dynamic modulation range of the unit-averaged field gradient is 1.06 × 104-5.86 × 104Tm^{-2}. Permanent magnets and newly developed torque-canceling elements make the device compact, its production costs low, and its operation simpler than that of other magnetic lenses. The efficacy of this lens was verified using very cold neutrons. The diameter of the focused beam spots over the wavelength range of 27-55 Å was the same as that of the source aperture (2 mm diameter) when the magnification of the optical arrangement was unity. The total beam flux over this wavelength range was enhanced by a factor of 43. The focusing distance from the source to the detector was 1.84 m. In addition, in a demonstration of neutron image magnification, the image of a sample mask magnified by a factor of 4.1 was observed when the magnification of the optical arrangement was 5.0.

  1. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Marzec, B.

    1996-05-01

    The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the authors have made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

  2. INL Capabilities For Nuclear Data Measurements Using The Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Facility

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejad; D. W. Nigg; R.V.F. Janssens; B. J. Micklich; G. Ter-Akopian; J. D. Cole

    2005-07-01

    The relevant facts concerning the Argonne National Laboratory – Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (ANL/IPNS) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) apparatus for use at the ANL/IPNS facility to measure differential neutron interaction cross sections of interest for advanced reactor physics applications are presented. The INL apparatus, which consists of an array of multiple types of multiple detectors operated in coincidence, signal electronics, and a data acquisition system, is presented as an application of new means and methods to measure the relevant parameters described. The immediate measurement goals involve measurement of neutron induced interaction cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu with 241Pu, 241Am, with measurements for other nuclides of interest for advanced reactor physics applications to follow later. Specific uncertainties and error limits are presented and methods for controlling these uncertainties are described. The post experiment analysis using data sorts and data selection from a large, self-consistent data set to produce spectra that will be analyzed for direct results and used to determine cross sections is also discussed.

  3. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the author shave made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

  4. Deuterium Gas-Puff Z-pinch as a Source of Fast Ions Producing Intensive Pulse of Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, K.; Cikhardt, J.; Cikhardtova, B.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A.; Cherdizov, R.; Fursov, F.; Kokshenev, V.; Kovalchuk, B.; Kurmaev, N.; Labetsky, A.; Ratakhin, N.; Turek, K.

    2015-11-01

    A deuterium gas-puff with outer plasma shell has been examined on GIT-12 generator (on the current level of 3 MA) since 2013. Such a configuration caused more stable implosion at final stage of z-pinch. The consequence of this was a production of intensive pulses of fast ions. During last 4 campaigns in 2013-2015, fast ions were examined by several in-chamber diagnostics such as: stack detector (ion energy), pinhole camera (location of ion source), multi-pinhole camera (asymmetry and anisotropy of ion emission), and ion beam detector (dynamics of ion pulses). A CR-39 track detectors and also GAFCHROMIC HD-V2 films from these diagnostics will be presented. On the basis of obtained results, the solid sample for increasing of neutron yield up to 1e13 could be placed below the cathode mesh. Except of neutron yield, other properties such as: neutron energies (up to 33 MeV), neutron emission time (about 20 ns), and emission anisotropy of neutrons were measured. Such a short and intensive neutron pulse provides various applications. This work was supported by the MSMT project LH13283.

  5. Studies of neutronpulse shape discrimination in EJ-309 liquid scintillator using charge integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawełczak, I. A.; Ouedraogo, S. A.; Glenn, A. M.; Wurtz, R. E.; Nakae, L. F.

    2013-05-01

    Pulse shape discrimination capability based on the charge integration has been investigated for liquid scintillator EJ-309. The effectiveness of neutron-γ discrimination in 4-in. diameter and 3-in. thick EJ-309 cells coupled with 3-in. photomultiplier tubes has been carefully studied in the laboratory environment and compared to the commonly used EJ-301 liquid scintillator formulation. Influences of distortions in pulse shape caused by 13.7-m long cables necessary for some remote operations have been examined. The parameter space for an effective neutron-γ discrimination for these assays, such as position and width of a gate used for integration of the delayed light, has been explored.

  6. Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Rout, R K; Niranjan, Ram; Mishra, P; Srivastava, R; Rawool, A M; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2013-06-01

    Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 ± 0.8) × 10(4) neutrons∕pulse into 4π steradians with a pulse width of 15 ± 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 μF capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 μF, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of (3)He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling. PMID:23822341

  7. Accelerator based techniques for contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourvopoulos, George

    1994-05-01

    It has been shown that narcotics, explosives, and other contraband materials, contain various chemical elements such as H, C, N, O, P, S, and Cl in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from other innocuous substances. Neutrons and γ-rays have the ability to penetrate through various materials at large depths. They are thus able, in a non-intrusive way, to interrogate volumes ranging from suitcases to Sea-Land containers, and have the ability to image the object with an appreciable degree of reliability. Neutron induced reactions such as (n, γ), (n, n') (n, p) or proton induced γ-resonance absorption are some of the reactions currently investigated for the identification of the chemical elements mentioned above. Various DC and pulsed techniques are discussed and their advantages, characteristics, and current progress are shown. Areas where use of these methods is currently under evaluation are detection of hidden explosives, illicit drug interdiction, chemical war agents identification, nuclear waste assay, nuclear weapons destruction and others.

  8. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in plastic scintillators with digital PSD electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Simonson, Duane L.; Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Piqué, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is a common method to distinguish between pulses produced by gamma rays and neutrons in scintillator detectors. This technique takes advantage of the property of many scintillators that excitations by recoil protons and electrons produce pulses with different characteristic shapes. Unfortunately, many scintillating materials with good PSD properties have other, undesirable properties such as flammability, toxicity, low availability, high cost, and/or limited size. In contrast, plastic scintillator detectors are relatively low-cost, and easily handled and mass-produced. Recent studies have demonstrated efficient PSD in plastic scintillators using a high concentration of fluorescent dyes. To further investigate the PSD properties of such systems, mixed plastic scintillator samples were produced and tested. The addition of up to 30 wt. % diphenyloxazole (DPO) and other chromophores in polyvinyltoluene (PVT) results in efficient detection with commercial detectors. These plastic scintillators are produced in large diameters up to 4 inches by melt blending directly in a container suitable for in-line detector use. This allows recycling and reuse of materials while varying the compositions. This strategy also avoids additional sample handling and polishing steps required when using removable molds. In this presentation, results will be presented for different mixed-plastic compositions and compared with known scintillating materials

  9. Applying numerical simulations for estimating the spectral density of neutrons in the Martian surface after pulses of DAN irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varenikov, Aleksey; Starr, Richard; Jun, Insoo; Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) onboard the Mars Curiosity rover provides measurements of the dynamic albedo of thermal and epithermal neutrons induced by a pulsing generator of fast neutrons. The DAN instrument consists of neutron pulsing generator (DAN/PNG) electrically and logically combined with neutron detection system (DAN/DE). The major science objective of DAN instrument is to detect and provide a quantitative estimation of the hydrogen in the subsurface layer of Mars. At the current moment, after 150 solar days on the surface on Mars, DAN has made more than 50 active measurements. Preliminary results show a high variability of neutron signal. From one point of view it could be explained by different amounts of hydrogen in single/double layer model of Martian subsurface (H depth/abundance variability). From another point of view it depends on abundance distribution of other elements with large thermal neutron cross sections, such as Cl and Fe. In this case it is very important to know how exactly neutrons from PNG interact with soil underneath the rover. Modern calculation facilities let us model that. Results: Numerical simulation of DAN instrument is based on MCNPX model. Several thousands cells (cubes with 5cm size) were placed in a model with simple homogeneous layer we used in previous calculations. Total volume they covered is the cube with 6x6 meter square and 3 meter height. Neutron flux as a function of energy and time was measured in each cell, providing a dynamic picture of the moderation of neutrons in the subsurface layer. The soil was tested with different composition of hydrogen, as moderating nuclei, and Cl and Fe, as absorbing nuclei. By using this result it is possible to estimate the DAN footprint (size of spot on top of the modelling surface which gives a 95% percent of signal); how it depends on energy and time after generator pulse. References: [1] Mitrofanov I.G. et al. (2012), Space, 170, 559-582. [2] Grotzinger J

  10. Benchmark validation comparisons of measured and calculated delayed neutron detector responses for a pulsed photonuclear assessment technique

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; J. L. Jones; W. Y. Yoon; D. R. Norman; K. J. Haskell

    2007-08-01

    An MCNPX-based calculational methodology has been developed to numerically simulate the complex electron–photon–neutron transport problem for the active interrogation system known as the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technique. The PPA technique uses a pulsed electron accelerator to generate bremsstrahlung photons in order to fission nuclear materials. Delayed neutron radiation is then detected with helium-3 neutron detectors as evidence of the nuclear material presence. Two experimental tests were designed, setup and run to generate experimental data for benchmarking purposes. The first test irradiated depleted uranium in air, and the second test, depleted uranium in a simulated cargo container (plywood pallet), using 10 MeV electron pulses. Time-integrated, post-flash, delayed neutron counts were measured and compared to calculated count predictions in order to benchmark the calculational methodology and computer models. Comparisons between the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the delayed neutron detector responses resulted in reasonable experiment/calculated ratios of 1.42 and 1.06 for the two tests. High-enriched uranium (HEU) predictions were also made with the benchmarked models.

  11. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107-1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103-104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30-700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  12. Benchmark validation comparisons of measured and calculated delayed neutron detector responses for a pulsed photonuclear assessment technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterbentz, J. W.; Jones, J. L.; Yoon, W. Y.; Norman, D. R.; Haskell, K. J.

    2007-08-01

    An MCNPX-based calculational methodology has been developed to numerically simulate the complex electron-photon-neutron transport problem for the active interrogation system known as the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technique. The PPA technique uses a pulsed electron accelerator to generate bremsstrahlung photons in order to fission nuclear materials. Delayed neutron radiation is then detected with helium-3 neutron detectors as evidence of the nuclear material presence. Two experimental tests were designed, setup and run to generate experimental data for benchmarking purposes. The first test irradiated depleted uranium in air, and the second test, depleted uranium in a simulated cargo container (plywood pallet), using 10 MeV electron pulses. Time-integrated, post-flash, delayed neutron counts were measured and compared to calculated count predictions in order to benchmark the calculational methodology and computer models. Comparisons between the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the delayed neutron detector responses resulted in reasonable experiment/calculated ratios of 1.42 and 1.06 for the two tests. High-enriched uranium (HEU) predictions were also made with the benchmarked models.

  13. A pulsed spallation neutron source: Solution with a 1.25 GeV accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Van Steenbergen, A.

    1995-10-30

    As a possible alternative design approach for the 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS), the use of an intermediate energy Linac, in conjunction with two accumulator rings has been studied. The lower final beam energy necessitates the use of higher beam current. This disadvantage is greatly offset by the use of dc rings, reducing by an order of magnitude the RF requirements, simplifying greatly the ring magnets and associated power supplies, and eliminating the use of aperture demanding, impedance compensated, ceramic chambers. The reduced magnet/magnet power supply cost and reduction of ring beam energy, permits greater sophistication in ring lattice structure design, easing the beam injection configuration and permitting greater control over localizing unavoidable beam loss.

  14. Applications of pulsed neutron powder diffraction to actinide elements. [Pu-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Richardson, J.W.; Mueller, M.H.; Lander, G.H.; Goldstone, J.A.; Williams, A.; Kwei, G.H.; Von Dreele, R.B.; Faber, J. Jr.; Hitterman, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    We have been using the technique of pulsed neutron powder diffraction to study several problems in the physics and chemistry of the actinide elements. In these elements one often encounters very complex structures resulting from polymorphic transformations presumably induced by the presence of 5f-electrons. For example, at least five distinct structures of plutonium metal are found between room temperature and its melting point of 640/sup 0/C, and two of the structures are monoclinc. The determination of the crystal structure of beta-uranium (tetragonal, 30 atoms per unit cell) which has finnaly been shown to be centrosymmetric, after decades of uncertainty is discussed. Some preliminary results on the structure of alpha-plutonium (which confirm Zachariasen's original determination of the monoclinic structure) are presented. Pu-Al alloys were also studied. 12 refs., 18 figs.

  15. Initial increase, ''peaking effect'', in the internal friction of copper following pulsed neutron and electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H.M.; Parkin, D.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Hemsky, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Under certain experimental conditions the internal friction in metals can first increase and following prolonged irradiation decrease. Many models have been proposed to account for this ''peaking effect''; however, in many of the cases, no effort is made to distinguish between the influence of interstitials and/or vacancies. To determine the nature of the point defect responsible for the peaking effect in high purity copper, we have performed a series of pulsed irradiations using neutrons and electrons. In all of the experiments an initial very rapid rise in the internal friction and Young's modulus was observed. These data show that a fast diffusing defect is responsible for the peaking effect: i.e. the interstitial.

  16. Pulse-shape discrimination of the new plastic scintillators in neutron-gamma mixed field using fast digitizer card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jančář, A.; Kopecký, Z.; Dressler, J.; Veškrna, M.; Matěj, Z.; Granja, C.; Solar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently invented plastic scintillator EJ-299-33 enables pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and thus measurement of neutron and photon spectra in mixed fields. In this work we compare the PSD properties of EJ-299-33 plastic and the well-known NE-213 liquid scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator using the 3H(d, n)4He reaction. Pulses from the scintillators are processed by a newly developed digital measuring system employing the fast digitizer card. This card contains two AD converters connected to the measuring computer via 10 Gbps optical ethernet. The converters operate with a resolution of 12 bits and have two differential inputs with a sampling frequency 1 GHz. The resulting digital channels with different gains are merged into one composite channel with a higher digital resolution in a wide dynamic range of energies. Neutron signals are fully discriminated from gamma signals. Results are presented.

  17. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Frenje, J. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Tynan, G.; Beg, F. N.; Kodama, R.; Nakamura, H.; Lancaster, K. L.

    2011-10-15

    The generation of high-energy neutrons using laser-accelerated ions is demonstrated experimentally using the Titan laser with 360 J of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons from a CD{sub 2} foil. These are incident on a LiF foil and subsequently create high energy neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(d,xn) nuclear reaction (Q = 15 MeV). Radiochromic film and a Thomson parabola ion-spectrometer were used to diagnose the laser accelerated deuterons and protons. Conversion efficiency into protons was 0.5%, an order of magnitude greater than into deuterons. Maximum neutron energy was shown to be angularly dependent with up to 18 MeV neutrons observed in the forward direction using neutron time-of-flight spectrometry. Absolutely calibrated CR-39 detected spectrally integrated neutron fluence of up to 8 x 10{sup 8} n sr{sup -1} in the forward direction.

  18. TOF (time-of-flight) measurements of pulsed neutrons for texture analysis of low symmetry materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, A.C.; Vergamini, P.J.; Lujan, M. Jr. ); Wenk, H.R. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1989-01-01

    The single crystal diffractometer at LANSCE, SCD, provides and ideal capability for the study of preferred orientation in geological samples by time-of flight (TOF) measurement of pulsed neutrons. The 2-d position sensitive neutron detector with the large wave length range allows one to measure the complete distribution of intensities for several poles very quickly. Each histogram covers about {pi}{sup 2}/16 radians of reciprocal space and contains information from all possible poles visible with the wave length range used, usually about 0.5 to 5.0{Angstrom}. With this method complete pole figures of many lattice planes can be constructed from only 12 to 20 sample orientations as compared to over 1000 sample settings per lattice plane using conventional diffractometers. Pole figures from measurements of experimentally deformed standard samples of calcite and quartzite with known history of deformation provide information about deformation mechanisms and their temperature/strain history. This information can be applied to interpret preferred orientation of naturally deformed rocks. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Testing JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 Decay and Fission Yield Nuclear Data Libraries with Fission Pulse Neutron Emission and Decay Heat Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabellos, O.; de Fusco, V.; Diez de la Obra, C. J.; Martinez, J. S.; Gonzalez, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is to test the present status of Evaluated Nuclear Decay and Fission Yield Data Libraries to predict decay heat and delayed neutron emission rate, average neutron energy and neutron delayed spectra after a neutron fission pulse. Calculations are performed with JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1, and these are compared with experimental values. An uncertainty propagation assessment of the current nuclear data uncertainties is performed.

  20. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  1. Time-of-flight four-beam neutron reflectometer REFLEX at the high-flux pulsed reactor IBR-2: some polarized neutron reflectometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Korneev, Daniel A.; Chernenko, L. P.

    1992-11-01

    This paper discusses the new neutron reflectometer being built on the high flux pulsed reactor IBR-2 in Dubna. A new method is suggested for measuring and interpretation of data in the study of inhomogeneous (noncollinear) magnetization depth profile in thin films. It is important to take into account the surface roughness in the interpretation of the data from the measurements of the magnetic field penetration depth in superconductors.

  2. New sources and instrumentation for neutron science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alina

    2011-04-01

    Neutron-scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. Things like medicine, food, electronics, cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron-scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a multitude of different products, such as high-temperature superconductors, powerful lightweight magnets, stronger, lighter plastic products etc. Neutron scattering is one of the most effective ways to obtain information on both, the structure and the dynamics of condensed matter. Most of the world's neutron sources were built decades ago, and although the uses and demand for neutrons have increased throughout the years, few new sources have been built. The new construction, accelerator-based neutron source, the spallation source will provide the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. In this paper it will be described what neutrons are and what unique properties make them useful for science, how spallation source is designed to produce neutron beams and the experimental instruments that will use those beams. Finally, it will be described how past neutron research has affected our everyday lives and what we might expect from the most exciting future applications.

  3. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  4. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 2 workshop presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Alonso, J.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Pulsed Spallation Source study, this Workshop was convened to address ion-source technology`s present status with respect to the next-generation Pulsed Spallation Source in the 1-5 MW range for the neutron scattering community. Considerations of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) parameters and designs were included in the discussions throughout the Workshop. Ion-source requirements and actually-achieved performances were assessed, resulting in a determination of research and development requirements to bridge the gap. Part 1 of these Proceedings summarizes the Workshop; Part 2 contains viewgraphs of Workshop presentations.

  5. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  6. Large-Area Neutron Detector based on Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Makela, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    Prototypes of a Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber (LiPMIC) have been in development for the past two years for the purpose of providing large-area neutron detector. this system would be suitable for remote deployment for homeland security and counterterrorism needs at borders, ports, and nuclear facilities. A prototype of LiPMIC is expected to provide a similar level of performance to the current industry-standard, He-3 proportional counters, while keeping the initial cost of procurement down by an order of magnitude, especially where large numbers of detectors are required. The overall design aspect and the efficiency optimization process is discussed. Specifically, the MCNP simulations of a single-cell prototype were performed and benchmarked with the experimental results. MCNP simulations of a three dimensional array design show intrinsic efficiency comparable to that of an array of He-3 proportional counters. LiPMIC has shown steady progress toward fulfilling the design expectations and future design modification and optimization are discussed.

  7. Multielement analysis utilizing pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis for contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Vourvopoulos, George; Paschal, Jonathon; Dokhale, P. A.

    1999-10-01

    Pulsed Fast/Thermal Neutron Analysis (PFTNA) is being employed in such diverse applications as: on-line coal analysis, detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), detection of contraband drugs, characterization of unexploded ordnance, and detection of landmines. In this work, the current research in the utilization of PFTNA in detection of drugs and IEDs will be discussed. Man-portable PFTNA systems have been built and currently are undergoing field trials. These systems can be inserted in confined spaces such as the boiler of a ship or into a tanker truck filled with liquid. The PFTNA system provides information on the major and minor chemical elements which compose the interrogated object. By measuring the elemental content or ratios of various elements, this system can differentiate between innocuous materials and materials such as drugs and IEDs. In laboratory trials, the PFTNA system can measure the carbon to oxygen ratio to an accuracy of 15% within a 5 minute time period. In all cases, hidden drugs and IEDs are identified through the measurement of the elemental content of the object, and the comparison of expected and measured elemental ratios.

  8. Investigation of the vertical instability at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Dooling, J. C.; Harkay, K. C.; Kustom, R. L.; McMichael, G. E.

    2009-10-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron of the intense pulsed neutron source at Argonne National Laboratory normally operates at an average beam current of 14 to 15μA, accelerating protons from 50 to 450 MeV 30 times per second. The beam current is limited by a single-bunch vertical instability that occurs in the later part of the 14 ms acceleration cycle. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor data, two cases of vertical beam centroid oscillations were discovered. The oscillations start from the tail of the bunch, build up, and develop toward the head of the bunch. The development stops near the bunch center and oscillations remain localized in the tail for a relatively long time (2-4 ms, 1-2×104 turns). This vertical instability is identified as the cause of the beam loss. We compared this instability with a head-tail instability that was purposely induced by switching off sextupole magnets. It appears that the observed vertical instability is different from the classical head-tail instability.

  9. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  10. D-D neutron generator development at LBNL.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, J; Gicquel, F; Hahto, S K; King, M; Lou, T-P; Leung, K-N

    2005-01-01

    The plasma and ion source technology group in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing advanced, next generation D-D neutron generators. There are three distinctive developments, which are discussed in this presentation, namely, multi-stage, accelerator-based axial neutron generator, high-output co-axial neutron generator and point source neutron generator. These generators employ RF-induction discharge to produce deuterium ions. The distinctive feature of RF-discharge is its capability to generate high atomic hydrogen species, high current densities and stable and long-life operation. The axial neutron generator is designed for applications that require fast pulsing together with medium to high D-D neutron output. The co-axial neutron generator is aimed for high neutron output with cw or pulsed operation, using either the D-D or D-T fusion reaction. The point source neutron generator is a new concept, utilizing a toroidal-shaped plasma generator. The beam is extracted from multiple apertures and focus to the target tube, which is located at the middle of the generator. This will generate a point source of D-D, T-T or D-T neutrons with high output flux. The latest development together with measured data will be discussed in this article.

  11. Progress in development of the neutron profile monitor for the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, K. Kobuchi, T.; Isobe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Takada, E.; Uchida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Tomita, H.; Uritani, A.

    2014-11-15

    The neutron profile monitor stably operated at a high-count-rate for deuterium operations in the Large Helical Device has been developed to enhance the research on the fast-ion confinement. It is composed of a multichannel collimator, scintillation-detectors, and a field programmable gate array circuit. The entire neutron detector system was tested using an accelerator-based neutron generator. This system stably acquires the pulse data without any data loss at high-count-rate conditions up to 8 × 10{sup 5} counts per second.

  12. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  13. Construction and testing of a neutron and gamma spectrometry system using pulse shape discrimination with an organic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Robert S.

    1993-03-01

    The goal of this thesis was to construct and test a neutron detector to measure the energy spectrum of 1 to 14-MeV neutrons in the presence of gammas. A spectrometer based on the process of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was constructed, in which the scintillator NE-213 was used. The primary neutron/gamma sources used were 78-mCi and 4.7-Ci Pu-239Be sources, while 4.7-micro-Ci and 97.6-micro-Ci Na-22 gamma sources were used for energy calibration and additional testing of the detector. Proton recoil spectra and Compton electron spectra were unfolded with the neutron and gamma unfolding code FORIST to generate the incident neutron and gamma spectra, respectively. FORIST, which was written for a CDC computer, was modified to run on a VAX 6420. The experimental spectra were compared to those in the literature. The locations of the peaks in the Pu-239Be spectrum agreed with the literature to within 8.3%, the Pu-239Be gamma spectrum agreed to within 0.7%, while the Na-22 gamma spectrum agreed exactly. Uncertainties in the detection system and unfolding procedure are on the order of 5-10%. This thesis is intended to be a summary of the relevant literature and a user's guide to the PSD spectrometer.

  14. Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.

  15. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskij, K. I.; Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Shatokhin, V. L.; Isaev, A. A.; Martynenko, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10-3-10-1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed.

  16. Improved production log interpretation in horizontal wells using pulsed neutron logs

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, J.L.; Kohring, J.J.; North, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Production log flow profiles provide a valuable tool to evaluate well and reservoir performance. Horizontal wellbores and their associated completion designs present several challenges to profile interpretation for conventional production logging sensors and techniques. A unique approach combining pulsed neutron capture (PNC) log data with conventional production logging measurements is providing improved flow profile answers in slotted liner, horizontal well completions on the North Slope of Alaska. Identifying and eliminating undesirable gas production is one of the chief goals of production logging on the North Slope. This process becomes difficult in horizontal wellbores as fluid segregation affects the area investigated by the various logging sensors and also the velocities of the individual phases. Typical slotted liner completions further complicate analysis as fluids are able to flow in the liner/openhole annulus. Analysis of PNC log data provides two good qualitative indicators of formation permeability. The first technique is derived from the difference of the formation sigma response before and after injecting a high-capture cross-section borax solution. The second technique uses the difference of the formation sigma response and the formation porosity measured while injecting the formation with crude or seawater. Further analysis of PNC log runs show that the two techniques closely correlate with production flow profiles under solution gas-oil ratio (GOR) conditions. These two techniques in combination with conventional production logging measurements of temperature, capacitance, pressure, and spinner improve flow profile results. PNC results can be combined with temperature and pressure data in the absence of valid spinner data to provide an approximate flow profile. These techniques have been used to successfully determine profiles in both cemented and slotted liner completions with GORs in excess of 15,000 scf/bbl.

  17. High repetition-rate neutron generation by several-mJ, 35 fs pulses interacting with free-flowing D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, J.; Petrov, G. M.; Nees, J. A.; He, Z.-H.; Hammig, M. D.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Using several-mJ energy pulses from a high-repetition rate (1/2 kHz), ultrashort (35 fs) pulsed laser interacting with a ˜ 10 μm diameter stream of free-flowing heavy water (D2O), we demonstrate a 2.45 MeV neutron flux of 105/s. Operating at high intensity (of order 1019 W/cm2), laser pulse energy is efficiently absorbed in the pre-plasma, generating energetic deuterons. These collide with deuterium nuclei in both the bulk target and the large volume of low density D2O vapor surrounding the target to generate neutrons through d ( d , n ) 3 He reactions. The neutron flux, as measured by a calibrated neutron bubble detector, increases as the laser pulse energy is increased from 6 mJ to 12 mJ. A quantitative comparison between the measured flux and the results derived from 2D-particle-in-cell simulations shows comparable neutron fluxes for laser characteristics similar to the experiment. The simulations reveal that there are two groups of deuterons. Forward moving deuterons generate deuterium-deuterium fusion reactions in the D2O stream and act as a point source of neutrons, while backward moving deuterons propagate through the low-density D2O vapor filled chamber and yield a volumetric source of neutrons.

  18. A 10(9) neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R K; Srivastava, R; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 10(8) neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head. PMID:27036774

  19. A 10(9) neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R K; Srivastava, R; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 10(8) neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head.

  20. Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

  1. Specific contributions of the Dutch programme ``RAS'' towards accelerator-based transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, K.; Franken, W. M. P.; Bultman, J. H.; Heil, J. A.; Koning, A. J.

    1995-09-01

    Accelerator-based transmutation is being studied by ECN within its general nuclear waste transmutation programme RAS. In this paper the following contributions are presented: 1) Evaluation of cross sections at intermediate energies, within an international frame given by NEA, 2) Cell calculations on the equilibration of transuranium actinides in thermal molten-salt transmuters, 3) Irradiation facilities at the European research reactor HFR in Petten, which have been constructed with the purpose to demonstrate and investigate the transmutation of waste in a high neutron flux, 4) Studies of accelerator-based neutron generating systems to transmute neptunium and technetium, 5) Comparison of several systems on the basis of criteria for successful nuclear waste-management.

  2. An algorithm for charge-integration, pulse-shape discrimination and estimation of neutron/photon misclassification in organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polack, J. K.; Flaska, M.; Enqvist, A.; Sosa, C. S.; Lawrence, C. C.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    Organic scintillators are frequently used for measurements that require sensitivity to both photons and fast neutrons because of their pulse shape discrimination capabilities. In these measurement scenarios, particle identification is commonly handled using the charge-integration pulse shape discrimination method. This method works particularly well for high-energy depositions, but is prone to misclassification for relatively low-energy depositions. A novel algorithm has been developed for automatically performing charge-integration pulse shape discrimination in a consistent and repeatable manner. The algorithm is able to estimate the photon and neutron misclassification corresponding to the calculated discrimination parameters, and is capable of doing so using only the information measured by a single organic scintillator. This paper describes the algorithm and assesses its performance by comparing algorithm-estimated misclassification to values computed via a more traditional time-of-flight estimation. A single data set was processed using four different low-energy thresholds: 40, 60, 90, and 120 keVee. Overall, the results compared well between the two methods; in most cases, the algorithm-estimated values fell within the uncertainties of the TOF-estimated values.

  3. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John

    2014-04-24

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  4. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Carpenter, John

    2016-07-12

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  5. High resolution Bragg edge transmission spectroscopy at pulsed neutron sources: Proof of principle experiments with a neutron counting MCP detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Kockelmann, W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2011-05-01

    The high spatial and temporal resolution of a neutron counting detector using microchannel plates (MCPs) combined with Medipix2/Timepix readout can substantially improve the spatial resolution of neutron transmission spectroscopy, as shown in our proof-of-principle experiments. Provided that the neutron fluence and data acquisition time are sufficient, transmission spectra can be acquired in each 55×55 μm2 pixel of the detector, allowing high spatial resolution mapping of Bragg edge positions. Our first experiment demonstrates that energy resolution as high as ΔE/E<1% or ΔE<4 mÅ can be achieved. Variation of the residual strain in a well-characterized VAMAS round robin shrink-fitted Al ring-and-plug sample was measured with ˜200 microstrain resolution through an accurate mapping of the first (1 1 1) Bragg edge. The measured stress profile agrees well with the expected values for that particular sample. More developments on the detector processing electronics are required in order to reduce the data acquisition times by enabling simultaneous measurements of spectra in a wide energy range covering multiple Bragg edges.

  6. Treatment planning capability assessment of a beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M S; González, S J; Burlon, A A; Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT) a theoretical study was performed to assess the treatment planning capability of different configurations of an optimized beam shaping assembly for such a facility. In particular this study aims at evaluating treatment plans for a clinical case of Glioblastoma.

  7. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  8. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  9. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. PMID:24345525

  10. A bright neutron source driven by relativistic transparency of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M.; Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Merrill, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties and excite nuclear reactions with a large field of applications. It has been stated over the last years, that there is a growing need for intense, pulsed neutron sources, either fast or moderated neutrons for the scientific community. Accelerator based spallation sources provide unprecedented neutron fluxes, but could be complemented by novel sources with higher peak brightness that are more compact. Lasers offer the prospect of generating a very compact neutron source of high peak brightness that could be linked to other facilities more easily. We present experimental results on the first short pulse laser driven neutron source powerful enough for applications in radiography. For the first time an acceleration mechanism (BOA) based on the concept of relativistic transparency has been used to generate neutrons. This mechanism not only provides much higher particle energies, but also accelerated the entire target volume, thereby circumventing the need for complicated target treatment and no longer limited to protons as an intense ion source. As a consequence we have demonstrated a new record in laser-neutron production, not only in numbers, but also in energy and directionality based on an intense deuteron beam. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies in excess of 100 MeV and showed pronounced directionality, which makes then extremely useful for a variety of applications. The results also address a larger community as it paves the way to use short pulse lasers as a neutron source. They can open up neutron research to a broad academic community including material science, biology, medicine and high energy density physics as laser systems become more easily available to universities and therefore can complement large scale facilities like reactors or particle accelerators. We believe that this has the potential to increase the user community for neutron research largely.

  11. Neutron-Induced Partial Gamma-Ray Cross-Section Measurements on 238U Using a Monoenergetic and Pulsed Beam at TUNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Pedroni, R. S.; Weisel, G. J.; Becker, J. A.; Fotiades, N.; Lantuejoul, I.

    2005-04-01

    An experimental program is being developed at TUNL to study (n,2n) excitation functions on actinide nuclei using monoenergetic neutrons in the 5 to 18 MeV energy range with the goal of improving the partial cross-section data for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. Measurements have been performed on a ^238U target in the TUNL shielded neutron source area using a pulsed neutron beam with incident neutron energies of 6, 8, 10, and 14 MeV. The emitted gamma rays were measured using different types of HPGe detectors. The pulsed beam permitted the use of time-of-flight techniques to distinguish (n,2n) events from background events. Experimental techniques and analysis of the measurements will be presented.

  12. Method of using deuterium-cluster foils for an intense pulsed neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Yang, Xiaoling

    2013-09-03

    A method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: providing a converter foil comprising deuterium clusters; focusing a laser on the foil with power and energy sufficient to cause deuteron ions to separate from the foil; and striking a surface of a target with the deuteron ions from the converter foil with energy sufficient to cause neutron production by a reaction selected from the group consisting of D-D fusion, D-T fusion, D-metal nuclear spallation, and p-metal. A further method is provided for assembling a plurality of target assemblies for a target injector to be used in the previously mentioned manner. A further method is provided for producing neutrons, comprising: splitting a laser beam into a first beam and a second beam; striking a first surface of a target with the first beam, and an opposite second surface of the target with the second beam with energy sufficient to cause neutron production.

  13. Analysis and simulation of a small-angle neutron scattering instrument on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.; Hjelm, R.P.; Lujan, M. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    We studied the design and performance of a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument for a proposed 1 MW, 60 Hz long pulsed spallation source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). An analysis of the effects of source characteristics and chopper performance combined with instrument simulations using the LANSCE Monte Carlo instrument simulations package shows that the T{sub 0} chopper should be no more than 5 m from the source with the frame overlap and frame definition choppers at 5.6 and greater than 7 m, respectively. The study showed that an optimal pulse structure has an exponential decaying tail with {tau} {approx} 750 {mu}s. The Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the LPSS SANS, showing that an optimal length is 18 m. The simulations show that an instrument with variable length is best to match the needs of a given measurement. The performance of the optimized LPSS instrument was found to be comparable with present world standard instruments.

  14. VERITAS: a high-flux neutron reflectometer with vertical sample geometry for a long pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Menelle, A.; Ott, F.; Medic, Z.

    2016-04-01

    An instrument concept of a reflectometer with a vertical sample geometry fitted to the long pulse structure of a spallation source, called “VERITAS” at the ESS, is presented. It focuses on designing a reflectometer with high intensity at the lowest possible background following the users' demand to investigate thin layers or interfacial areas in the sub-nanometer length scale. The high intensity approach of the vertical reflectometer fits very well to the long pulse structure of the ESS. Its main goal is to deliver as much usable intensity as possible at the sample position and be able to access a reflectivity range of 8 orders of magnitude and more. The concept assures that the reflectivity measurements can be performed in its best way to maximize the flux delivered to the sample. The reflectometer is optimized for studies of (magnetic) layers having thicknesses down to 5Å and a surface area of 1x1cm2. With reflectivity measurements the depth-resolved, laterally averaged chemical and magnetic profile can be investigated. By using polarised neutrons, additional vector information on the in-plane magnetic correlations (off-specular scattering at the pm length scale, GISANS at the nm length scale) can be studied. The full polarisation analysis could be used for soft matter samples to correct for incoherent scattering which is presently limiting neutron reflectivity studies to a reflectivity range on the order of 10-6.

  15. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  16. Study of deep level characteristics in the neutrons irradiated Si structures by combining pulsed and steady-state spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Kalendra, V.; Ceponis, T.; Uleckas, A.; Tekorius, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Velicka, A.

    2012-11-01

    The standard methods, such as capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (C-DLTS) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques are unsuitable for the analysis of heavily irradiated devices. In this work, therefore, several steady-state and pulsed techniques have been combined to comprehensively evaluate parameters of radiation defects and functional characteristics of the irradiated Si pin detectors. In order to understand defects created by radiation and evaluate their evolution with fluence, C-DLTS and TSC techniques have been employed to make a baseline identification of the radiation induced traps after irradiation with a rather small neutron fluence of 1012 cm-2. The steady-state photo-ionization spectroscopy (PIS) technique has been involved to correlate thermal- and photo- activation energies for definite radiation defects. A contactless technique for simultaneous measurements of the carrier lifetime and the parameters of deep levels based on microwave probed pulsed photo-conductivity (MW-PC) spectroscopy has been applied to correlate carrier capture cross-sections and densities of the identified different radiation defects. A technique for spectroscopy of deep levels in junction structures (BELIV) based on measurements of barrier capacitance charging current transient changes due to additional spectrally resolved pulsed illumination has been applied to evaluate the functional characteristics of the irradiated diodes. Pulsed spectroscopic measurements were implemented by combining the analysis of generation current and of barrier capacitance charging transients modified by a single fs pulse of illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator of varied wavelength in the range from 0.5 to 10 μm. Several deep levels with activation energy in the range of 0.18-0.8 eV have been resolved from spectral analysis in the samples of Si grown by magnetic field applied Czochralski (MCz) technology.

  17. Effect of pulsed dose in simultaneous and sequential irradiation of V-79 cells by 14. 8-MeV neutrons and /sup 60/Co photons

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-09-01

    The effect of irradiating V-79 Chinese hamster cells with a mixture of 40% 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60% /sup 69/Co photons with simultaneous or sequential exposures is investigated. Sample doses are obtained by irradiating cells with alternating 3-min pulses of neutrons and photons (in the sequential case) or with mixed neutrons and photons followed by equal beam-off periods to ensure equal total exposure times for sequential and simultaneous irradiations. Differences between the survival results under each beam configuration that are consistent with previous observations with nonpulsed irradiations are observed.

  18. Effect of pulsed dose in simultaneous and sequential irradiation of V-79 cells by 14. 8 MeV neutrons and /sup 60/Co photons

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, P.D.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Gould, M.N.; Schell, M.C.; Pearson, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of irradiating V-79 Chinese hamster ovary cells with a mixture of 40% 14.8-MeV neutrons and 60% /sup 60/Co photons with simultaneous or sequential exposures is investigated. Target doses are obtained by irradiating cell samples with 3-minute-long pulses of alternating neutrons and photons (in the sequential case) or with mixed neutrons and photons followed by equal beam-off periods to insure equal total-exposure times for sequenced and simultaneous irradiations. We observe qualitative differences between the survival results under each beam configuration that confirms earlier observations.

  19. Data acquisition system with pulse height capability for the TOFED time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Zhang, X.; Du, T. F.; Hu, Z. M.; Cui, Z. Q.; Ge, L. J.; Xie, X. F.; Yuan, X.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-11-15

    A new time-of-flight neutron spectrometer TOFED has been constructed for installation at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A data acquisition system combining measurements of flight time and energy from the interaction of neutrons with the TOFED scintillators has been developed. The data acquisition system can provide a digitizing resolution better than 1.5% (to be compared with the >10% resolution of the recoil particle energy in the plastic scintillators) and a time resolution <1 ns. At the same time, it is compatible with high count rate event recording, which is an essential feature to investigate phenomena occurring on time scales faster than the slowing down time (≈100 ms) of the beam ions in the plasma. Implications of these results on the TOFED capability to resolve fast ion signatures in the neutron spectrum from EAST plasmas are discussed.

  20. Data acquisition system with pulse height capability for the TOFED time-of-flight neutron spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z J; Peng, X Y; Zhang, X; Du, T F; Hu, Z M; Cui, Z Q; Ge, L J; Xie, X F; Yuan, X; Gorini, G; Nocente, M; Tardocchi, M; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H; Chen, J X; Fan, T S

    2014-11-01

    A new time-of-flight neutron spectrometer TOFED has been constructed for installation at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A data acquisition system combining measurements of flight time and energy from the interaction of neutrons with the TOFED scintillators has been developed. The data acquisition system can provide a digitizing resolution better than 1.5% (to be compared with the >10% resolution of the recoil particle energy in the plastic scintillators) and a time resolution <1 ns. At the same time, it is compatible with high count rate event recording, which is an essential feature to investigate phenomena occurring on time scales faster than the slowing down time (≈100 ms) of the beam ions in the plasma. Implications of these results on the TOFED capability to resolve fast ion signatures in the neutron spectrum from EAST plasmas are discussed.

  1. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  2. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors pro...

  3. First Imaging Experiment of a Lithium Ion Battery by a Pulsed Neutron Beam at J-PARC/MLF/BL09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, Koichi; Yonemura, Masao; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Parker, Joseph. Don.; Tanimori, Toru; Kamiyama, Takashi

    We obtain the transmission image of a commercial lithium ion (Li-ion) battery using a pulsed neutron beam at the beamline 09 of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. The purpose of this study is to improve the performance of the Li-ion battery by nondestructive observation of its charging and discharging. The transmission images for three charge states (3.2 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V) reveal differences between these three states, which we attribute to electrolyte migration. The transmission spectra show Bragg edges originating from the electrodes, current collectors, and battery vessel. Although the battery as a whole has the expected relation between the charge accumulation and the quantity of lithium amounts in the positive and negative electrodes, a portion of the battery deviates from this relation, which may imply a position dependent charging in the battery.

  4. Laser ion acceleration and neutron source in short-pulse solid- nanoparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, K.; Watari, T.; Matsukado, K.; Sekine, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Takagi, M.; Satoh, N.; Kawashima, T.; Kan, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose both an efficient neutron source and an extremely high energy proton source using solid CD and CH nano-particles, respectively, irradiated by an intense laser light. With a use of 3-d PIC simulations, we obtain an optimum CD radius for a neutron source, 250 nm and required laser field of a=eE/mωc ≈ 2, which results in D-D reaction rate of <σv> = 2x10-16 cm3/s, corresponding to an effective deuteron temperature of 500 keV to 1MeV. Reduction of neutron yield by pre-expansion is discussed. In a range of a ≈100, laser radiation pressure surrounding the particles accelerates electrons in the forward direction. Protons following the electrons become directional high energy, for example, proton energy of 450 MeV is obtained within 130 fs in CH particle interaction with 700 nm in radius. More than 10% of total protons in CH-particles are accelerated forward. Proton energy continuously increases with time and with the increase of particle size and the direction is also collimated with time.

  5. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-08-12

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

  6. Pulsed-Neutron-Gamma (PNG) saturation monitoring at the Ketzin pilot site considering displacement and evaporation/precipitation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Gunther; Henninges, Jan

    2013-04-01

    The storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in saline aquifers is a promising option to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere and to mitigate global climate change. During the proposed CO2 injection process, application of suitable techniques for monitoring of the induced changes in the subsurface is required. Existing models for the spreading of the CO2, as well as mixing of the different fluids associated with saturation changes or resulting issues from mutual solubility between brine and CO2, need to be checked. For well logging in cased boreholes, which would be the standard situation encountered under the given conditions, only a limited number of techniques like pulsed neutron-gamma (PNG) logging are applicable. The PNG technique uses controlled neutron bursts, which interact with the nuclei of the surrounding borehole and formation. Due to the collision with these neutrons, atoms from the surrounding environment emit gamma rays. The main PNG derived parameter is the capture cross section (Σ) which is derived from the decline of gamma rays with time from neutron capture processes. The high Σ contrast between brine and CO2 results in a high sensitivity to evaluate saturation changes. This makes PNG monitoring favourable for saturation profiling especially in time-lapse mode. Previously, the conventional PNG saturation model based on a displacement process has been used for PNG interpretation in different CO2 storage projects in saline aquifers. But in addition to the displacement process, the mutual solubility between brine and CO2 adds further complex processes like evaporation and salt precipitation, which are not considered in PNG saturation models. These evaporation and precipitation processes are relevant in the vicinity of an injection well, where dry CO2 enters the reservoir. The Σ brine value depends strongly on the brine salinity e.g. its chlorine content which makes PNG measurements suitable for evaporation and salt precipitation

  7. Plastic scintillator with effective pulse shape discrimination for neutron and gamma detection

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Carman, M Leslie; Cherepy, Nerine; Glenn, Andrew M.; Hamel, Sebastien; Payne, Stephen A.; Rupert, Benjamin L.

    2016-04-12

    In one embodiment, a scintillator material includes a polymer matrix; and a primary dye in the polymer matrix, the primary dye being a fluorescent dye, the primary dye being present in an amount of 5 wt % or more; wherein the scintillator material exhibits an optical response signature for neutrons that is different than an optical response signature for gamma rays. In another embodiment, a scintillator material includes a polymer matrix; and a primary dye in the polymer matrix, the primary dye being a fluorescent dye, the primary dye being present in an amount greater than 10 wt %.

  8. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  9. BNL accelerator-based radiobiology facilities.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, D I

    2001-01-01

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40-3000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10(10) to 10(11) ions per pulse. The BAF Project will be described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans will be presented.

  10. Inelastic scattering research at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Carlile, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The brief was, with respect to the LPSS bench mark design supplied (60 Hz, 1 MW, Imsec proton pulse, with a split, non-fissile target and 4 moderators in a flux trap geometry design), to identify a set of instruments, and to assess their performance with respect to existing spectrometers on other sources. Any modifications to the existing instruments which would make them more effective on the bench-mark source, or conversely, any modifications to the source bench-mark required by the proposed instruments were to be identified, as were any uncertainties in the estimated performances, or any R & D needed to make the proposed instruments viable. Any new instrument concepts specifically matched to the long pulse itself were to be identified and assessed. This process was to result in an indicative list of instruments for the source. A figure of around 10 spectrometers was to be aimed for.

  11. Recent Performance and Ignition Tests of the pulsed SNS H- Source for 1-MW Neutron Production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P; Han, Baoxi; Murray, Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Piller, Chip; Santana, Manuel; Welton, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H- beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ~0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H- beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation.

  12. Recent performance and ignition tests of the pulsed SNS H- source for 1-MW neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2015-04-01

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H- beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ˜0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H- beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor this article has been updated to include References 3-13, which were present in the author's original submission but were lost during manuscript processing in the Proceedings Editor's office. The updated article was published on 5 May 2015.

  13. DETECTORS FOR ACCELERATOR-BASED NUCLEAR SECURITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Stave, Sean C.; Miller, Erin A.

    2015-08-31

    We present of review of detector systems used in accelerator-based national security applications. In gen-eral, the detectors used for these applications are also used in passive measurements. The critical difference is that detector systems for accelerator-based applications in general need to discriminate beam-generated background from the intended signal. Typical techniques to remove background include shielding, timing, selection of sensitive materials, and choice of accelerator.

  14. 350 keV accelerator based PGNAA setup to detect nitrogen in bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Al-Matouq, Faris A.; Khiari, F. Z.; Gondal, M. A.; Rehman, Khateeb-ur; Isab, A. A.; Raashid, M.; Dastageer, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen concentration was measured in explosive and narcotics proxy material, e.g. anthranilic acid, caffeine, melamine, and urea samples, bulk samples through thermal neutron capture reaction using 350 keV accelerator based prompt gamma ray neutron activation (PGNAA) setup. Intensity of 2.52, 3.53-3.68, 4.51, 5.27-5.30 and 10.38 MeV prompt gamma rays of nitrogen from the bulk samples was measured using a cylindrical 100 mm×100 mm (diameter×height ) BGO detector. Inspite of interference of nitrogen gamma rays from bulk samples with capture prompt gamma rays from BGO detector material, an excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated yields of nitrogen gamma rays has been obtained. This is an indication of the excellent performance of the PGNAA setup for detection of nitrogen in bulk samples.

  15. Design of a beam shaping assembly and preliminary modelling of a treatment room for accelerator-based BNCT at CNEA.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Girola, S; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J; Sánchez, G

    2011-12-01

    This work reports on the characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly (BSA) prototype and on the preliminary modelling of a treatment room for BNCT within the framework of a research programme for the development and construction of an accelerator-based BNCT irradiation facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The BSA prototype constructed has been characterised by means of MCNP simulations as well as a set of experimental measurements performed at the Tandar accelerator at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina.

  16. Magnetically insulated diode for generating pulsed neutron and gamma ray emissions

    DOEpatents

    Kuswa, Glenn W.; Leeper, Ramon J.

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically insulated diode employs a permanent magnet to generate a magnetic insulating field between a spaced anode and cathode in a vacuum. An ion source is provided in the vicinity of the anode and used to liberate ions for acceleration toward the cathode. The ions are virtually unaffected by the magnetic field and are accelerated into a target for generating an nuclear reaction. The ions and target material may be selected to generate either neutrons or gamma ray emissions from the reaction of the accelerated ions and the target. In another aspect of the invention, a field coil is employed as part of one of the electrodes. A plasma prefill is provided between the electrodes prior to the application of a pulsating potential to one of the electrodes. The field coil multiplies the applied voltage for high diode voltage applications. The diode may be used to generate a .sup.7 Li(p,.gamma.).sup.8 Be reaction to produce 16.5 MeV gamma emission.

  17. Magnetically insulated diode for generating pulsed neutron and gamma ray emissions

    DOEpatents

    Kuswa, G.W.; Leeper, R.J.

    1984-08-16

    A magnetically insulated diode employs a permanent magnet to generate a magnetic insulating field between a spaced anode and cathode in a vacuum. An ion source is provided in the vicinity of the anode and used to liberate ions for acceleration toward the cathode. The ions are virtually unaffected by the magnetic field and are accelerated into a target for generating a nuclear reaction. The ions and target material may be selected to generate either neutrons or gamma ray emissions from the reaction of the accelerated ions and the target. In another aspect of the invention, a field coil is employed as part of one of the electrodes. A plasma prefill is provided between the electrodes prior to the application of a pulsating potential to one of the electrodes. The field coil multiplies the applied voltage for high diode voltage applications. The diode may be used to generate a /sup 7/Li(p,..gamma..)/sup 8/Be reaction to produce 16.5 MeV gamma emission.

  18. Physics of nanosecond pulsed fast neutron analysis (PFNA) applications to non intrusive inspection - a paper in memory of Zdzislaw Piotr Sawa

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, T.

    1994-12-31

    The PFNA was conceived by Z.P. Sawa, T. Gozani and P. Ryge, in late 1987 as a means to achieve the highest possible sensitivity for detecting small amounts of explosives concealed in luggage. This could be attained because (1) all the elements present in explosives, i.e., O, N, C (and H, indirectly) can be measured via the (n,n`{gamma}) process with fast neutrons, (2) using ns pulses of neutrons and the time of flight (TOF) technique, a full direct imaging of the elements and hence all present materials can be obtained, and (3) the TOF assures the best signal to background ratio, as the signal-stimulated {gamma}-rays are measured before the background--neutron interacting in the detector environment--arrives. The PFNA technology has made great strides since the autumn of 1987. It enables the detection of narcotics, explosives, hazardous materials and most dutiable goods carried in trucks and containers.

  19. Comments on the possibility of cavitation in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter J.M.

    1996-06-01

    When short pulses of protons strike the volume of a liquid target, the rapid heating produces a pressurized region which relaxes as the pressure wave propagates outward. Skala and Bauer have modeled the effects of the pressure wave impinging on the container walls of a liquid mercury target under ESS conditions. They find that high pressures and high wall stresses result if the medium is uniform, nearly incompressible liquid. The pressure and the stresses are much reduced if the liquid contains bubbles of helium, due to their high compressibility. However, according to the calculation, the pressure still reaches an atmosphere or so at the surface, which reflects the compressive wave as a rarefaction wave of the same magnitude. Even such modest underpressures can lead to the growth of bubbles (cavitation) at or near the surface, which can collapse violently and erode the container surface. It is necessary to avoid this. Leighton provides a wide ranging discussion of pressure waves in bubbly media, which may provide insights into the nature and control of cavitation phenomena. The paper surveys some of the relevant information from that source.

  20. Neutrons for technology and science

    SciTech Connect

    Aeppli, G.

    1995-10-01

    We reviewed recent work using neutrons generated at nuclear reactors an accelerator-based spallation sources. Provided that large new sources become available, neutron beams will continue to have as great an impact on technology and science as in the past.

  1. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco, R.; Ghiglino, A.; de Vicente, J. P.; Sordo, F.; Terrón, S.; Magán, M.; Perlado, J. M.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final keff value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle.

  2. Ion heating and thermonuclear neutron production from high-intensity subpicosecond laser pulses interacting with underdense plasmas.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, S; Najmudin, Z; Malka, V; Krushelnick, K; Marle, C; Walton, B; Wei, M S; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E

    2002-10-14

    Thermonuclear fusion neutrons produced by D(d,n)3He reactions have been measured from the interaction of a high-intensity laser with underdense deuterium plasmas. For an input laser energy of 62 J, more than (1.0+/-0.2)x10(6) neutrons with a mean kinetic energy of (2.5+/-0.2) MeV were detected. These neutrons were observed to have an isotropic angular emission profile. By comparing these measurements with those using a secondary solid CD2 target it was determined that neutrons are produced from direct ion heating during this interaction.

  3. Software realization of real-time neutrons and {gamma}-rays pulse shape discrimination using CUDA platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbasin, V. A.; Ivanov, A. I.; Pedash, V. Y.

    2011-07-01

    The two pulse shape discrimination methods were implemented in real-time. The pulse gradient analysis method was implemented programmatically on PC. The method based on artificial neural network was programmatically implemented using CUDA platform. It is shown that both implementations can provide up to 10{sup 6} pulses per second processing performance. The results for pulse shape discrimination using polycrystalline stilbene and LiF detectors were shown. (authors)

  4. Non-invasive measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most current techniques of setting crop irrigation schedules use invasive, labor-intensive soil-water content measurements. We developed a cart-mounted neutron probe capable of non-invasive measurements of volumetric soil moisture contents. The instrument emits neutrons which are captured by hydroge...

  5. A proposed three-phase counting system for the in vivo measurement of the major elements using pulsed 14 MeV neutrons.

    PubMed

    Mitra, S; Sutcliffe, J F; Hill, G L

    1990-01-01

    It is proposed to employ a pulsed source of 14 MeV neutrons for in vivo activation analysis. This would permit the differentiation, with time, of the resulting gamma ray emission into three separate spectra, according to the type of nuclear reaction and mode of decay. The three-phase counting has been divided into approximately 10 microseconds during "beam-on," and 200 and 800 microseconds during "beam-off." Measurements of the major elements, C, N, O, Cl, and P, to give nutritionally-important body compartments of total body fat, protein, water, minerals, and extracellular water, thus is expected with a single scan.

  6. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  7. Neutron chopper development at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, M.; Lewis, L.; Tepper, S.; Silver, R.N.; Heffner, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on neutron chopper systems for the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center pulsed spallation neutron source. This includes the development of 600+ Hz active magnetic bearing neutron chopper and a high speed control system designed to operate with the Proton Storage Ring to phase the chopper to the neutron source. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Neutron Resonance Radiography for Explosives Detection: Technical Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Raas, W L; Blackburn, B; Boyd, E; Hall, J M; Kohse, G; Lanza, R; Rusnak, B; Watterson, J W

    2005-11-09

    Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (NRR) has recently become a focus of investigation as a supplement to conventional x-ray systems as a non-invasive, non-destructive means of detecting explosive material concealed in checked luggage or cargo containers at airports. Using fast (1-6 MeV) neutrons produced by the D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction, NRR provides both an imaging capability and the ability to determine the chemical composition of materials in baggage or cargo. Elemental discrimination is achieved by exploiting the resonance features of the neutron cross-section for oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen. Simulations have shown the effectiveness of multiple-element NRR through Monte Carlo transport methods; this work is focused on the development of a prototype system that will incorporate an accelerator-based neutron source and a neutron detection and imaging system to demonstrate the realistic capabilities of NRR in distinguishing the elemental components of concealed objects. Preliminary experiments have exposed significant technical difficulties unapparent in simulations, including the presence of image contamination from gamma ray production, the detection of low-fluence fast neutrons in a gamma field, and the mechanical difficulties inherent in the use of thin foil windows for gas cell confinement. To mitigate these concerns, a new gas target has been developed to simultaneously reduce gamma ray production and increase structural integrity in high flux gas targets. Development of a neutron imaging system and neutron counting based on characteristic neutron pulse shapes have been investigated as a means of improving signal to noise ratios, reducing irradiation times, and increasing the accuracy of elemental determination.

  9. How Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source came to life and gained its niche : the view from an ecosystem perspective.

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, C.; Office of The Director

    2008-02-25

    At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to have followed a puzzling course. When researchers first proposed their ideas for an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, the project seemed so promising that both Argonne managers and officials at the laboratory's funding agency, the Department of Energy (DOE), suggested that it be made larger and more expensive. But then, even though prototype building, testing, and initial construction went well a group of prominent DOE reviewers recommended in fall 1980 that it be killed, just months before it had been slated to begin operation, and DOE promptly accepted the recommendation. In response, Argonne's leadership declared the project was the laboratory's top priority and rallied to save it. In late 1982, thanks to another review panel led by the same scientist who had chaired the panel that had delivered the death sentence, the project was granted a reprieve. However, by the late 1980s, the IPNS was no longer top priority within the international materials science community, at Argonne, or within the DOE budget because prospects for another, larger materials science accelerator emerged. At just this point, the facility started to produce exciting scientific results. For the next two decades, the IPNS, its research, and its experts became valued resources at Argonne, within the U.S. national laboratory system, and within the international materials science community. Why did this Argonne project prosper and then almost suffer premature death, even though it promised (and later delivered) good science? How was it saved and how did it go on to have a long, prosperous life for more than a quarter of a century? In particular, what did an expert assessment of the quality of IPNS science have to do with its fate? Getting answers to such questions is important. The U.S. government spends a lot

  10. Simulation of a suite of generic long-pulse neutron instruments to optimize the time structure of the European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lefmann, Kim; Kleno, Kaspar H.; Holm, Sonja L.; Sales, Morten; Birk, Jonas Okkels; Hansen, Britt R.; Knudsen, Erik; Willendrup, Peter K.; Lieutenant, Klaus; Moos, Lars von; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-05-15

    We here describe the result of simulations of 15 generic neutron instruments for the long-pulsed European Spallation Source. All instruments have been simulated for 20 different settings of the source time structure, corresponding to pulse lengths between 1 ms and 2 ms; and repetition frequencies between 10 Hz and 25 Hz. The relative change in performance with time structure is given for each instrument, and an unweighted average is calculated. The performance of the instrument suite is proportional to (a) the peak flux and (b) the duty cycle to a power of approximately 0.3. This information is an important input to determining the best accelerator parameters. In addition, we find that in our simple guide systems, most neutrons reaching the sample originate from the central 3-5 cm of the moderator. This result can be used as an input in later optimization of the moderator design. We discuss the relevance and validity of defining a single figure-of-merit for a full facility and compare with evaluations of the individual instrument classes.

  11. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, J. R.; Devan, J. H.; Keiser, J. R.; Klueh, R. L.; Eatherly, W. P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF2 molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  12. Radiation shielding and patient organ dose study for an accelerator- based BNCT Facility at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Costes, S.V.; Vujic, J.; Donahue, R.J.

    1996-10-24

    This study considers the radiation safety aspects of several designs discussed in a previous report of an accelerator-based source of neutrons, based on the [sup 7]Li(p,n) reaction, for a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). determines the optimal radiation shield thicknesses for the patient treatment room. Since this is an experimental facility no moderator or reflector is considered in the bulk wall shield design. This will allow the flexibility of using any postulated moderator/reflector design and assumes sufficient shielding even in the absence of a moderator/reflector. In addition the accelerator is assumed to be capable of producing 100 mA of 2.5 MeV proton beam current. The addition of 1% and 2% [sup 10]B (by weight) to the concrete is also investigated. The second part of this paper determines the radiation dose to the major organs of a patient during a treatment. Simulations use the MIRD 5 anthropomorphic phantom to calculate organ doses from a 20 mA proton beam assuming various envisioned moderator/reflector in place. Doses are tabulated by component and for a given uniform [sup 10]B loading in all organs. These are presented in for a BeO moderator and for an Al/AlF[sub 3] moderator. Dose estimates for different [sup 10]B loadings may be scaled.

  13. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  14. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; DeVan, J.H.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1995-03-01

    Accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) refers to a concept for a system that uses a blanket assembly driven by a source of neutrons produced when high-energy protons from an accelerator strike a heavy metal target. One application for such a system is called Accelerator-Based Plutonium Conversion, or ABC. Currently, the version of this concept being proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory features a liquid lead target material and a blanket fuel of molten fluorides that contain plutonium. Thus, the materials to be used in such a system must have, in addition to adequate mechanical strength, corrosion resistance to molten lead, corrosion resistance to molten fluoride salts, and resistance to radiation damage. In this report the corrosion properties of liquid lead and the LiF-BeF{sub 2} molten salt system are reviewed in the context of candidate materials for the above application. Background information has been drawn from extensive past studies. The system operating temperature, type of protective environment, and oxidation potential of the salt are shown to be critical design considerations. Factors such as the generation of fission products and transmutation of salt components also significantly affect corrosion behavior, and procedures for inhibiting their effects are discussed. In view of the potential for extreme conditions relative to neutron fluxes and energies that can occur in an ADTT, a knowledge of radiation effects is a most important factor. Present information for potential materials selections is summarized.

  15. Fifty years of accelerator based physics at Chalk River

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, John W.

    1999-04-26

    The Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. was a major centre for Accelerator based physics for the last fifty years. As early as 1946, nuclear structure studies were started on Cockroft-Walton accelerators. A series of accelerators followed, including the world's first Tandem, and the MP Tandem, Superconducting Cyclotron (TASCC) facility that was opened in 1986. The nuclear physics program was shut down in 1996. This paper will describe some of the highlights of the accelerators and the research of the laboratory.

  16. LGB neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    The double pulse signature of the Gadolinium Lithium Borate Cerium doped plastic detector suggests its effectiveness for analyzing neutrons while providing gamma ray insensitivity. To better understand this detector, a californium gamma/neutron time of flight facility was constructed in our lab. Reported here are efforts to understand the properties and applications of the LGB detector with regards to neutron spectroscopy.

  17. Behavioral-performance effects from a high-neutron, low-gamma radiation pulse exposure. Final report June-December 81

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.C.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Hardy, K.A.; Hughes, D.; Yarbrough, B.

    1982-12-01

    A self-paced, 3-light, 3-lever discrete avoidance behavioral task was initiated to study the behavioral performance effects of a high-neutron, low-gamma radiation pulse exposure (550-650 rads, 5.5:1 n/g ratio). Eight rhesus monkey subjects performed the task for 4 hours (3 1/2 hours postexposure). The subjects were monitored daily for 3 days postexposure. For the exposure day only, five subjects had a decrease in correct responses, seven had increased reaction times, and six experienced productive emesis within 3 1/2 hours, although the performance degradations were not severe. An extrapolation to human performance indicates that time-critical tasks (e.g., aircraft landing on a carrier) could be significantly impaired.

  18. Gamma/neutron analysis for SNM signatures at high-data rates(greater than 107 cps) for single-pulse active interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Forman L.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.

    2011-04-26

    We are developing a high data gamma/neutron spectrometer suitable for active interrogation of special nuclear materials (SNM) activated by a single burst from an intense source. We have tested the system at Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Mercury pulsed-power facility at distances approaching 10 meters from a depleted uranium (DU) target. We have found that the gamma-ray field in the target room 'disappears' 10 milliseconds after the x-ray flash, and that gamma ray spectroscopy will then be dominated by isomeric states/beta decay of fission products. When a polyethylene moderator is added to the DU target, a time-dependent signature of the DU is produced by thermalized neutrons. We observe this signature in gamma-spectra measured consecutively in the 0.1-1.0 ms time range. These spectra contain the Compton edge line (2.2 MeV) from capture in hydrogen, and a continuous high energy gamma-spectrum from capture or fission in minority constituents of the DU.

  19. Neutron Beams from Deuteron Breakup at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Bleuel, D.L.; Bernstein, L.; Braquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.; Thompson, I.; Wilson, B.

    2007-07-31

    Accelerator-based neutron sources offer many advantages, in particular tunability of the neutron beam in energy and width to match the needs of the application. Using a recently constructed neutron beam line at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, tunable high-intensity sources of quasi-monoenergetic and broad spectrum neutrons from deuteron breakup are under development for a variety of applications.

  20. New analytic 1D pn junction diode transient photocurrent solutions following ionizing radiation and including time-dependent carrier lifetime degradation from a non-concurrent neutron pulse.

    SciTech Connect

    Axness, Carl L.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert

    2010-07-01

    Circuit simulation codes, such as SPICE, are invaluable in the development and design of electronic circuits in radiation environments. These codes are often employed to study the effect of many thousands of devices under transient current conditions. Device-scale simulation codes are commonly used in the design of individual semiconductor components, but computational requirements limit their use to small-scale circuits. Analytic solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation, an approximation to the carrier transport equations, may be used to characterize the transient currents at nodes within a circuit simulator. We present new analytic transient excess carrier density and photocurrent solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation for 1-D abrupt-junction pn diodes. These solutions incorporate low-level radiation pulses and take into account a finite device geometry, ohmic fields outside the depleted region, and an arbitrary change in the carrier lifetime due to neutron irradiation or other effects. The solutions are specifically evaluated for the case of an abrupt change in the carrier lifetime during or after, a step, square, or piecewise linear radiation pulse. Noting slow convergence of the Fourier series solutions for some parameters sets, we evaluate portions of the solutions using closed-form formulas, which result in a two order of magnitude increase in computational efficiency.

  1. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  2. Dynamical analysis of an accelerator-based fluid-fueled subcritical radioactive waste burning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, Michael Louis, Jr.

    The recent revival of interest in accelerator-driven subcritical fluid-fueled systems is documented. Several important applications of these systems are mentioned. In particular, new applications have focused on the destruction of high-level radioactive waste. Systems can be designed to quickly destroy the actinides and long-lived fission products from light water reactor fuel, weapons plutonium, and other high-level defense wastes. The proposed development of these systems is used to motivate the need for the development of dynamic analysis methods for their nuclear kinetics. A physical description of the Los Alamos Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) concept is provided. This system is used as the basis for the kinetics study in this research. The current approach to the dynamic simulation of an accelerator-driven subcritical fluid-fueled system includes three elements: A discrete ordinates model is used to calculate the flux distribution for the source-driven system; A nodal convection model is used to calculate time-dependent isotope and temperature distributions which impact reactivity; A nodal importance weighting model is used to calculate the reactivity impact of temperature and isotope distributions and to feed this information back to the time-dependent nodal convection model. Specific transients which have been analyzed with the current modeling system are discussed. These transients include loss-of-flow and loss-of-cooling accidents, xenon and samarium transients, and cold-plug and overfueling events. The results of various transients have uncovered unpredictable behavior, unresolved design issues, and the need for active control. Modest initiating events can cause significant swings in system temperature and power. The circulation of the fluid fuel can lead to oscillations on the relatively short scale of the loop circulation time. The system responds quickly to reactivity changes because the large neutron source overwhelms the damping effect of delayed

  3. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  4. Photon doses in NPL standard neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Roberts, N J; Horwood, N A; McKay, C J

    2014-10-01

    Standard neutron fields are invariably accompanied by a photon component due to the neutron-generating reactions and secondary neutron interactions in the surrounding environment. A set of energy-compensated Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and electronic personal dosemeters (EPDs) have been used to measure the photon dose rates in a number of standard radionuclide and accelerator-based neutron fields. The GM tubes were first characterised in standard radioisotope and X-ray photon fields and then modelled using MCNP to determine their photon dose response as a function of energy. Values for the photon-to-neutron dose equivalent ratios are presented and compared with other published values.

  5. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, R.B.; Tyree, W.H.

    1982-03-03

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  6. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, Roger B.; Tyree, William H.

    1984-12-18

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  7. Recent performance and ignition tests of the pulsed SNS H{sup −} source for 1-MW neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Martin P. Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Welton, R. F.

    2015-04-08

    After acquiring several reliable spare targets, SNS ramped the beam power from 850 kW to 1.4 MW, which required an increase in H{sup −} beam pulse length from 0.88 to 1.0 ms at 60 Hz. This increase initially produced slow 2-MHz power ramp-ups and, after several weeks of uninterrupted operation, it produced plasma outages every time the pulse length was raised above ∼0.95 ms. Similar outages were previously observed towards the end of long service cycles, which were believed to indicate that the breakdown voltage of the high purity hydrogen started to exceed the induced electric fields. In 2011 the RF was reconfigured to start with 10 cycles of 1.96 MHz, which yielded the shortest H{sup −} beam rise times and apparently eliminated those plasma outages. The new, pulse-length dependent outages were eliminated by increasing the initial frequency to 1.985 MHz. However, careful frequency studies are unable to justify this frequency. In addition, the paper discusses the issues and solutions for the electron-dump voltage, which starts to sag and become unstable after several weeks of high current operation. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor this article has been updated to include References 3–13, which were present in the author’s original submission but were lost during manuscript processing in the Proceedings Editor's office. The updated article was published on 5 May 2015.

  8. On the origin of sub-TeV gamma-ray pulsed emission from rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.

    2012-08-01

    Intriguing sub-TeV tails in the pulsed γ-ray emission from the Crab pulsar have recently been discovered by the Major Atmospheric Gamma-Ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope and Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) collaborations. These were not clearly predicted by any pulsar model. At present, it is argued that this emission is produced by electrons in the inverse Compton process that occur either in the outer gap of the pulsar magnetosphere or in the pulsar wind region at some distance from the light cylinder. We analyse another scenario, which is consistent with the basic features of this enigmatic emission. It is proposed that this emission is caused by electrons accelerated very close to the light cylinder where the e± plasma cannot saturate the induced huge electric fields. Electrons reach energies sufficient for the production of hard γ-ray spectra in the curvature radiation process. Because of different curvature radii of the leading and trailing magnetic field lines, the γ-ray spectra from separate pulses should extend to different maximum energies. The scenario can also explain the lower-level γ-ray emission from the interpulse region (between P1 and P2) observed in the light curve of the Crab pulsar. Moreover, we argue that pulsars with parameters close to the Vela pulsar should also show pulsed emission, with the cut-off clearly at lower energies (˜50 GeV) than that observed for the Crab pulsar. However, such tail emission is not expected in pulsars with parameters close to the Geminga pulsar. The model also predicts the tail γ-ray emission extending up to ˜50 GeV from some millisecond pulsars with extreme parameters, such as PSR J0218+4243 and PSR J1823-3021A.

  9. Non-invasive Field Measurements of Soil Water Content Using a Pulsed 14 MeV Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra S.; Wielopolski L.; Omonode, R.; Novak, J.; Frederick, J.; Chan, A.

    2012-01-26

    Current techniques of soil water content measurement are invasive and labor-intensive. Here, we demonstrate that an in situ soil carbon (C) analyzer with a multi-elemental analysis capability, developed for studies of terrestrial C sequestration, can be used concurrently to non-invasively measure the water content of large-volume ({approx}0.3 m{sup 3}) soil samples. Our objectives were to investigate the correlations of the hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) signals with water to the changes in the soil water content in laboratory experiments, and in an agricultural field. Implementing prompt gamma neutron activation analyses we showed that in the field, the signal from the H nucleus better indicates the soil water content than does that from the O nucleus. Using a field calibration, we were able to use the H signal to estimate a minimum detectable change of {approx}2% volumetric water in a 0-30 cm depth of soil.

  10. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

    PubMed

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary; Aleksandrov, Alexander; Blokland, Willem

    2011-02-14

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 μrad (horizontal) to 4 μrad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm × 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  11. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary D; Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Blokland, Willem

    2011-01-01

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 rad (horizontal) to 4 rad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  12. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  13. Neutron capture therapies

    DOEpatents

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  14. Plans for a Collaboratively Developed Distributed Control System for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, W.R.; Gurd, D.P.; Hammonds, J.; Lewis, S.A.; Smith, J.D.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source to be built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The facility has five major sections - a ''front end'' consisting of a 65 keV H{sup -} ion source followed by a 2.5 MeV RFQ; a 1 GeV linac; a storage ring; a 1MW spallation neutron target (upgradeable to 2 MW); the conventional facilities to support these machines and a suite of neutron scattering instruments to exploit them. These components will be designed and implemented by five collaborating institutions: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Front End), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Linac); Brookhaven National Laboratory (Storage Ring); Argonne National Laboratory (Instruments); and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Neutron Source and Conventional Facilities). It is proposed to implement a fully integrated control system for all aspects of this complex. The system will be developed collaboratively, with some degree of local autonomy for distributed systems, but centralized accountability. Technical integration will be based upon the widely-used EPICS control system toolkit, and a complete set of hardware and software standards. The scope of the integrated control system includes site-wide timing and synchronization, networking and machine protection. This paper discusses the technical and organizational issues of planning a large control system to be developed collaboratively at five different institutions, the approaches being taken to address those issues, as well as some of the particular technical challenges for the SNS control system.

  15. Subpanel on accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Neutrinos are among nature`s fundamental constituents, and they are also the ones about which we know least. Their role in the universe is widespread, ranging from the radioactive decay of a single atom to the explosions of supernovae and the formation of ordinary matter. Neutrinos might exhibit a striking property that has not yet been observed. Like the back-and-forth swing of a pendulum, neutrinos can oscillate to-and-from among their three types (or flavors) if nature provides certain conditions. These conditions include neutrinos having mass and a property called {open_quotes}mixing.{close_quotes} The phenomenon is referred to as neutrino oscillations. The questions of the origin of neutrino mass and mixing among the neutrino flavors are unsolved problems for which the Standard Model of particle physics holds few clues. It is likely that the next critical step in answering these questions will result from the experimental observation of neutrino oscillations. The High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on Accelerator-Based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments was charged to review the status and discovery potential of ongoing and proposed accelerator experiments on neutrino oscillations, to evaluate the opportunities for the U.S. in this area of physics, and to recommend a cost-effective plan for pursuing this physics, as appropriate. The complete charge is provided in Appendix A. The Subpanel studied these issues over several months and reviewed all the relevant and available information on the subject. In particular, the Subpanel reviewed the two proposed neutrino oscillation programs at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The conclusions of this review are enumerated in detail in Chapter 7 of this report. The recommendations given in Chapter 7 are also reproduced in this summary.

  16. Neutron Activation and Thermoluminescent Detector Responses to a Bare Pulse of the CEA Valduc SILENE Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Celik, Cihangir; McMahan, Kimberly L.; Lee, Yi-kang; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Authier, Nicolas; Piot, Jerome; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2015-09-01

    This benchmark experiment was conducted as a joint venture between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the US and the Centre de Valduc in France planned this experiment. The experiment was conducted on October 11, 2010 in the SILENE critical assembly facility at Valduc. Several other organizations contributed to this experiment and the subsequent evaluation, including CEA Saclay, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (NSC), Babcock International Group in the United Kingdom, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this experiment was to measure neutron activation and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) doses from a source similar to a fissile solution critical excursion. The resulting benchmark can be used for validation of computer codes and nuclear data libraries as required when performing analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). A secondary goal of this experiment was to qualitatively test performance of two CAAS detectors similar to those currently and formerly in use in some US DOE facilities. The detectors tested were the CIDAS MkX and the Rocky Flats NCD-91. These detectors were being evaluated to determine whether they would alarm, so they were not expected to generate benchmark quality data.

  17. Variable neutron star free precession in Hercules X-1 from evolution of RXTE X-ray pulse profiles with phase of the 35-d cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, K.; Shakura, N.; Staubert, R.; Kochetkova, A.; Klochkov, D.; Wilms, J.

    2013-10-01

    Accretion of matter on to the surface of a freely precessing neutron star (NS) with a complex non-dipole magnetic field can explain the change of X-ray pulse profiles of Her X-1 observed by RXTE with the phase of the 35-d cycle. We demonstrate this using all available measurements of X-ray pulse profiles in the 9-13 keV energy range obtained with the RXTE/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). The measured profiles guided the elaboration of a geometrical model and the definition of locations of emitting poles, arcs and spots on the NS surface which satisfactorily reproduce the observed pulse profiles and their dependence on free precession phase. We have found that the observed trend of the times of the 35-d turn-ons on the O-C diagram, which can be approximated by a collection of consecutive linear segments around the mean value, can be described by our model by assuming a variable free precession period, with a fractional period change of about a few per cent. Under this assumption and using our model, we have found that the times of phase zero of the NS free precession (which we identify with the maximum separation of the brightest spot on the NS surface with the NS spin axis) occur about 1.6 d after the mean turn-on times inside each `stable' epoch, producing a linear trend on the O-C diagram with the same slope as the observed times of turn-ons. We propose that the 2.5 per cent changes in the free precession period that occur on time scales of several to tens of 35-d cycles can be related to wandering of the principal inertia axis of the NS body due to variations in the patterns of accretion on to the NS surface. The closeness of periods of the disc precession and the NS free precession can be explained by the presence of a synchronization mechanism in the system, which modulates the dynamical interaction of the gas streams and the accretion disc with the NS free precession period.

  18. Tunable Laser Plasma Accelerator based on Longitudinal Density Tailoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shiraishi, Satomi; Sokollik, Thomas; Benedetti, Carlo; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-15

    Laser plasma accelerators have produced high-quality electron beams with GeV energies from cm-scale devices and are being investigated as hyperspectral fs light sources producing THz to {gamma}-ray radiation and as drivers for future high-energy colliders. These applications require a high degree of stability, beam quality and tunability. Here we report on a technique to inject electrons into the accelerating field of a laser-driven plasma wave and coupling of this injector to a lower-density, separately tunable plasma for further acceleration. The technique relies on a single laser pulse powering a plasma structure with a tailored longitudinal density profile, to produce beams that can be tuned in the range of 100-400 MeV with percent-level stability, using laser pulses of less than 40 TW. The resulting device is a simple stand-alone accelerator or the front end for a multistage higher-energy accelerator.

  19. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  20. Gamma ray emission from spheres pulsed with D-T neutrons: Results of May 1987 experiments at RTNS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, E.; Hansen, L.F.; Howerton, R.J.; Komoto, T.T.; Pohl, B.A.

    1987-11-01

    Subsequent to the analysis of the June 1986 series of experiments at RTNS-1, we thought it sensible to repeat some of the experiments with greater care given to the high energy portions of the effluent gamma ray spectra. In addition, some new materials were recommended for study, such as silicon. And since among our earlier experiments we observed data which was not highly reproducible, repeated runs would provide a quantitative assessment of the precision of the experiments. Accordingly, we followed the procedure outlined in UCID-20884. First, we calibrated the NE-213 detector with standard gamma ray sources and checked for linearity of pulse height with energy deposited by electrons. We then conducted experiments at RTNS-1, using spherical configurations of C, Si, Al, H/sub 2/O, N/sub 2/,Ti, Fe, and C/sub 2/F/sub 4/. The H/sub 2/O was contained in a modified glass flask, while the liquid nitrogen was held in a double-walled steel dewar. 25 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  2. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  3. Coupled moderator neutronics

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1995-12-01

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source.

  4. Accelerator-based fusion with a low temperature target

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R. E.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-19

    Neutron generators are in use in a number of scientific and commercial endeavors. They function by triggering fusion reactions between accelerated ions (usually deuterons) and a stationary cold target (e.g., containing tritium). This setup has the potential to generate energy. It has been shown that if the energy transfer between injected ions and target electrons is sufficiently small, net energy gain can be achieved. Three possible avenues are: (a) a hot target with high electron temperature, (b) a cold non-neutral target with an electron deficiency, or (c) a cold target with a high Fermi energy. A study of the third possibility is reported in light of recent research that points to a new phase of hydrogen, which is hypothesized to be related to metallic hydrogen. As such, the target is considered to be composed of nuclei and delocalized electrons. The electrons are treated as conduction electrons, with the average minimum excitation energy being approximately equal to 40% of the Fermi energy. The Fermi energy is directly related to the electron density. Preliminary results indicate that if the claimed electron densities in the new phase of hydrogen were achieved in a target, the energy transfer to electrons would be small enough to allow net energy gain.

  5. Accelerator-based fusion with a low temperature target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. E.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Neutron generators are in use in a number of scientific and commercial endeavors. They function by triggering fusion reactions between accelerated ions (usually deuterons) and a stationary cold target (e.g., containing tritium). This setup has the potential to generate energy. It has been shown that if the energy transfer between injected ions and target electrons is sufficiently small, net energy gain can be achieved. Three possible avenues are: (a) a hot target with high electron temperature, (b) a cold non-neutral target with an electron deficiency, or (c) a cold target with a high Fermi energy. A study of the third possibility is reported in light of recent research that points to a new phase of hydrogen, which is hypothesized to be related to metallic hydrogen. As such, the target is considered to be composed of nuclei and delocalized electrons. The electrons are treated as conduction electrons, with the average minimum excitation energy being approximately equal to 40% of the Fermi energy. The Fermi energy is directly related to the electron density. Preliminary results indicate that if the claimed electron densities in the new phase of hydrogen were achieved in a target, the energy transfer to electrons would be small enough to allow net energy gain.

  6. Boron nitride solid state neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2004-04-27

    The present invention describes an apparatus useful for detecting neutrons, and particularly for detecting thermal neutrons, while remaining insensitive to gamma radiation. Neutrons are detected by direct measurement of current pulses produced by an interaction of the neutrons with hexagonal pyrolytic boron nitride.

  7. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (∼1 m), high-current (∼1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields – in between plasma shots – to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ∼5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  8. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Zachary S; Barnard, Harold S; Lanza, Richard C; Sorbom, Brandon N; Stahle, Peter W; Whyte, Dennis G

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (~1 m), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields--in between plasma shots--to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ~5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  9. Accelerator-based radiation sources for next-generation radiobiological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVeaux, Linda C.; Wells, Douglas P.; Hunt, Alan; Webb, Tim; Beezhold, Wendland; Harmon, J. Frank

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) of Idaho State University has developed a unique radiation research facility to answer next-generation radiobiological questions. The IAC has 10 operating research accelerators. These include continuously delivered radiation beams such as a 950 keV electron beam and a 2 MeV light-ion Van de Graaff. The IAC also has a number of pulsed electron linacs which range in energy from 4 to 40 MeV. The most intense amongst them deliver peak dose rates greater than 10 12 Gy/s. The operational flexibility of pulsed electron linacs allows control of peak and average dose rate, pulse separation and total dose over many orders of magnitude in these parameters. These high dose rates also allow delivery of large doses on time scales that are very small when compared to biological responses. The spectrum of particle beams that the IAC can deliver includes alphas, protons, neutrons, electrons (betas), and gammas (X-rays). Current radiobiological research at the IAC is focused upon radiation effects in unicellular organisms. The effectiveness of extremely high dose rate electron irradiation for the neutralization of microbes is being investigated. Concurrently, we are characterizing the survival mechanisms employed by microbes when exposed to these extremely high doses and dose rates. We have isolated strains from several diverse species that show increased radiation-resistance over normal populations. In addition, we were the first to demonstrate radiation-induced Bystander effects in unicellular organisms. Because of the numerous and diverse accelerators at the IAC, these and many other novel radiobiological investigations are readily attainable.

  10. Illuminating the past: the neutron as a tool in archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockelmann, W.; Kirfel, A.; Siano, S.; Frost, C. D.

    2004-03-01

    Neutrons can be produced in nuclear reactions and used as very versatile probes for condensed matter research. Since their introduction in the 1950s neutron scattering techniques have evolved to be very powerful tools for investigating the properties of condensed matter. Here we present the concept of neutron diffraction and how this technique can be used to address problems in archaeology facilitated by accelerator-based neutron sources like ISIS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire. The great beauty of neutrons for the archaeologist is that they allow non-destructive testing of intact and original archaeological artifacts and museum objects.

  11. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge–Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  12. Electron energy and electron trajectories in an inverse free-electron laser accelerator based on a novel electrostatic wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikrah, M.; Jafari, S.

    2016-06-01

    We expand here a theory of a high-gradient laser-excited electron accelerator based on an inverse free-electron laser (inverse-FEL), but with innovations in the structure and design. The electrostatic wiggler used in our scheme, namely termed the Paul wiggler, is generated by segmented cylindrical electrodes with applied oscillatory voltages {{V}\\text{osc}}(t) over {{90}\\circ} segments. The inverse-FEL interaction can be described by the equations that govern the electron motion in the combined fields of both the laser pulse and Paul wiggler field. A numerical study of electron energy and electron trajectories has been made using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results indicate that the electron attains a considerable energy at short distances in this device. It is found that if the electron has got sufficient suitable wiggler amplitude intensities, it can not only gain higher energy in longer distances, but also can retain it even after the passing of the laser pulse. In addition, the results reveal that the electron energy gains different peaks for different initial axial velocities, so that a suitable small initial axial velocity of e-beam produces substantially high energy gain. With regard to the transverse confinement of the electron beam in a Paul wiggler, there is no applied axial guide magnetic field in this device.

  13. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  14. Count rate limitations in pulsed accelerator fields

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, Alan L

    2010-12-15

    This paper discusses various concepts involved in the counting losses of pulse-counting health physics instrumentation when used within the pulsed radiation environments of typical accelerator fields, in order to pre-establish appropriate limitations in use. Discussed are the 'narrow' pulse and the 'wide' pulse cases, the special effect of neutron moderating assemblies, and the effect of pulse microstructure on the counting losses of the pulse-counting instrumentation. Examples are provided which highlight the various concepts and limitations.

  15. The continued development of the Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R. F.; Carmichael, J.; Fuga, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Han, B.; Kang, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T.; Potter, K. G.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Desai, N. J.

    2010-02-15

    The U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based, pulsed neutron-scattering facility, currently in the process of ramping up neutron production. In order to ensure that the SNS will meet its operational commitments as well as provide for future facility upgrades with high reliability, we are developing a rf-driven, H{sup -} ion source based on a water-cooled, ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber. To date, early versions of this source have delivered up to 42 mA to the SNS front end and unanalyzed beam currents up to {approx}100 mA (60 Hz, 1 ms) to the ion source test stand. This source was operated on the SNS accelerator from February to April 2009 and produced {approx}35 mA (beam current required by the ramp up plan) with availability of {approx}97%. During this run several ion source failures identified reliability issues, which must be addressed before the source re-enters production: plasma ignition, antenna lifetime, magnet cooling, and cooling jacket integrity. This report discusses these issues, details proposed engineering solutions, and notes progress to date.

  16. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  17. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  18. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  19. Neutron scattering instrumentation for biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-12-31

    Conventional wisdom holds that since biological entities are large, they must be studied with cold neutrons, a domain in which reactor sources of neutrons are often supposed to be pre-eminent. In fact, the current generation of pulsed spallation neutron sources, such as LANSCE at Los Alamos and ISIS in the United Kingdom, has demonstrated a capability for small angle scattering (SANS) - a typical cold- neutron application - that was not anticipated five years ago. Although no one has yet built a Laue diffractometer at a pulsed spallation source, calculations show that such an instrument would provide an exceptional capability for protein crystallography at one of the existing high-power spoliation sources. Even more exciting is the prospect of installing such spectrometers either at a next-generation, short-pulse spallation source or at a long-pulse spallation source. A recent Los Alamos study has shown that a one-megawatt, short-pulse source, which is an order of magnitude more powerful than LANSCE, could be built with today`s technology. In Europe, a preconceptual design study for a five-megawatt source is under way. Although such short-pulse sources are likely to be the wave of the future, they may not be necessary for some applications - such as Laue diffraction - which can be performed very well at a long-pulse spoliation source. Recently, it has been argued by Mezei that a facility that combines a short-pulse spallation source similar to LANSCE, with a one-megawatt, long-pulse spallation source would provide a cost-effective solution to the global shortage of neutrons for research. The basis for this assertion as well as the performance of some existing neutron spectrometers at short-pulse sources will be examined in this presentation.

  20. Recent re-measurement of neutron and gamma-ray spectra 1080 meters from the APRD (Army Pulse Radiation Division) critical facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, H. A.; Hoffarth, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Previously reported measurements of long-range air-transported neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the fast-critical facility at the US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground have been supplemented recently at the 1080-meter position. The results of these determinations are presented herein and compared to several recent calculations from other research establishments. In addition, a summary of all dosimetric measurements obtained in the period 1979-1982 are appended, as are new determinations of APRD soil composition. Integral quantities such as neutron and gamma-ray kermas are very well predicted by the latest calculations, however there still exist significant spectral differences. At short ranges calculated neutron spectra are somewhat softer than experimental measurements, but at the farthest range of 1080 meters agreement is surprisingly good. Gamma-ray spectra remain well-calculated at all ranges.

  1. PRODUCTION AND APPLICATIONS OF NEUTRONS USING PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester

    2009-11-01

    Advances in neutron science have gone hand in hand with the development and of particle accelerators from the beginning of both fields of study. Early accelerator systems were developed simply to produce neutrons, allowing scientists to study their properties and how neutrons interact in matter, but people quickly realized that more tangible uses existed too. Today the diversity of applications for industrial accelerator-based neutron sources is high and so to is the actual number of instruments in daily use is high, and they serve important roles in the fields where they're used. This chapter presents a technical introduction to the different ways particle accelerators are used to produce neutrons, an historical overview of the early development of neutron-producing particle accelerators, a description of some current industrial accelerator systems, narratives of the fields where neutron-producing particle accelerators are used today, and comments on future trends in the industrial uses of neutron producing particle accelerators.

  2. Measurement of delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gundorin, N. A.; Zhdanova, K. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pikelner, L. B. Rebrova, N. V.; Salamatin, I. M.; Smirnov, V. I.; Furman, V. I.

    2007-06-15

    The delayed-neutron yield from thermal-neutron-induced fission of the {sup 237}Np nucleus was measured using a sample periodically exposed to a pulsed neutron beam with subsequent detection of neutrons during the time intervals between pulses. The experiment was realized on an Isomer-M setup mounted in the IBR-2 pulsed reactor channel equipped with a mirror neutron guide. The setup and the experimental procedure are described, the background sources are thoroughly analyzed, and the experimental data are presented. The total delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons is {nu}{sub d} = 0.0110 {+-} 0.0009. This study was performed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna)

  3. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, Thomas, E

    2006-03-14

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.

  4. Planetary Geochemistry Techniques: Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-03-01

    The Probing in situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument uses a pulsed neutron generator and neutron and gamma-ray detectors to measure the surface and subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies without the need for drilling.

  5. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1987-01-01

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  6. Basic concepts underlying fast-neutron-based contraband interrogation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    All accelerator-based fast-neutron contraband interrogation systems have many closely interrelated subsystems, whose performance parameters will be critically interdependent. For optimal overall performance, a systems analysis design approach is required. This paper provides a general overview of the interrelationships and the tradeoffs to be considered for optimization of nonaccelerator subsystems.

  7. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Erkkila, Bruce H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  8. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  9. An in-phantom comparison of neutron fields for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Woollard, J.E.; Blue, T.E.; Capala, J.

    1998-01-01

    Previously, the authors have developed the in-phantom neutron field assessment parameters T and D (Tumor) for the evaluation of epithermal neutron fields for use in BNCT. These parameters are based on an energy-spectrum-dependent neutron normal-tissue RBE and the treatment planning methodology of Gahbauer and his co-workers, which includes the effects of dose fractionation. In this paper, these neutron field assessment parameters were applied to The Ohio State University (OSU) design of an Accelerator Based Neutron Source (ABNS) (hereafter called the OSU-ABNS) and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal neutron beam (hereafter called the BMRR-ENB), in order to judge the suitability of the OSU-ABNS for BNCT. The BMRR-ENB was chosen as the basis for comparison because it is presently being used in human clinical trials of BNCT and because it is the standard to which other neutron beams are most often compared.

  10. Picosecond Neutron Yields from Ultra-Intense Laser-Target Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, C. Leland; Fuchs, Julien

    2009-11-01

    High-flux neutron sources for neutron imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator-based (Spallation Neutron Source) and reactor-based (High Flux Isotope Reactor) neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultra-intense (> 10^18 W/cm^2) laser-target interactions to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons. Here we examine the feasibility of a source based on current (LULI) and upcoming laser facility capabilities. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. The parameters of the deuteron beam are well understood from laser-plasma and laser-target studies relevant to fast-ignition fusion. Expected neutron yields are presented in comparison to conventional neutron sources, previous experimental neutron yields, and within the context of neutron shielding safety requirements.

  11. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications.

  12. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications. PMID:26278347

  13. On the features of bursts of neutrons, hard x-rays and alpha-particles in the pulse vacuum discharge with a virtual cathode and self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Samoylov, I. S.; Ostashev, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we continue the discussion of the experimental results on the yield of DD neutrons and hard x-rays in the nanosecond vacuum discharge (NVD) with a virtual cathode, which was started in the previous article of this issue, and previously (Kurilenkov Y K et al 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4375). We have considered here the regimes of very dense interelectrode aerosol ensembles, in which diffusion of even hard x-rays is found. The yield of DD neutrons in these regimes is conditioned not only by the head-on deuteron-deuteron collisions in the potential well of virtual cathode, but also by the channel of “deuteron-deuterium cluster” reaction, which exceeds overall yield of neutrons per a shot by more than an order of magnitude, bringing it up to ∼ 107/(4π). Very bright bursts of hard x-rays are also represented and discussed here. Presumably, their nature may be associated with the appearance in the NVD of some properties of random laser in the x-ray spectrum. Good preceding agreeing of the experiment on the DD fusion in the NVD with its particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations provides a basis to begin consideration of nuclear burning “proton-boron” in the NVD, which will be accompanied by the release of alpha particles only. With this objective in view, there has been started the PIC-simulation of aneutronic burning of p-B11, and its preliminary results are presented.

  14. Epithermal neutron instrumentation at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorini, G.; Festa, G.; Andreani, C.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of pulsed neutron sources makes available high epithermal neutron fluxes (in the energy range between 500 meV and 100 eV). New dedicated instrumentation, such as Resonance Detectors, was developed at ISIS spallation neutron source in the last years to apply the specific properties of this kind of neutron beam to the study of condensed matter. New detection strategies like Filter Difference method and Foil Cycling Technique were also developed in parallel to the detector improvement at the VESUVIO beamline. Recently, epithermal neutron beams were also used at the INES beamline to study elemental and isotopic composition of materials, with special application to cultural heritage studies. In this paper we review a series of epithermal neutron instrumentation developed at ISIS, their evolution over time and main results obtained.

  15. NEUTRON MEASURING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Friedlander, G.; Gofman, J.W.

    1958-07-29

    A fast neutron fission detecting apparatus is described consisting of a source of fast neutrons, an ion chamber containing air, two electrodes within the ion chamber in confronting spaced relationship, a high voltage potential placed across the electrodes, a shield placed about the source, and a suitable pulse annplifier and recording system in the electrode circuit to record the impulse due to fissions in a sannple material. The sample material is coated onto the active surface of the disc electrode and shielding means of a material having high neutron capture capabilities for thermal neutrons are provided in the vicinity of the electrodes and about the ion chamber so as to absorb slow neutrons of thermal energy to effectively prevent their diffusing back to the sample and causing an error in the measurement of fast neutron fissions.

  16. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  17. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  18. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  19. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  20. Improvement of the cold neutron beam line (CN-3) in KUR for neutron optical device development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Yuji; Hino, Masahiro; Tasaki, Seiji; Ebisawa, Toru; Maruyama, Ryuji; Horie, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    The cold neutron beam line CN-3 in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is being renewed for dedicating to the development of neutron optical devices. CN-3 has a supermirror guide tube with the cross-section of 20 mm (width)× 90 mm (height), and the wide-band neutron spectrum is available. New beam lines are prepared for both time-of-flight (TOF) and monochromatic experiments including a neutron reflectivity measurement. It has a polarized neutron option with a very low magnetic field to cope with polarized neutron devices. In particular, the TOF mode will be used for developing devices, which are suitable for pulsed neutron sources. Cold neutron radiography is also available within a space of 1 m×0.8 m. A neutron imaging plate system is prepared as the neutron imaging detection.

  1. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S G; Carpenter, J M; Prael, R E

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  2. MCNP: Neutron benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, D.J.; Cardon, D.A.; Uhle, J.L.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-11-01

    The recent widespread and increased use of radiation transport codes has produced greater user and institutional demand for assurances that such codes give correct results. Responding to these requirements for code validation, the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code MCNP has been tested on criticality, pulsed sphere, and shielding neutron problem families. Results for each were compared to experimental data. MCNP successfully predicted the experimental results of all three families within the expected data and statistical uncertainties. These successful predictions demonstrate that MCNP can successfully model a broad spectrum of neutron transport problems. 18 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Caldwell, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Langenbrunner, J.; Hsu, H. H.; Huff, M. A.; Batha, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Garbett, W. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; Bernstein, L.; and others

    2012-05-15

    A new deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [{sup 3}H(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He/{sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He] value of (4.2 {+-} 2.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement, conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester, was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov {gamma}-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values, which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICF D-T {gamma}-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-{sup 3}He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [{sup 3}He(d, {gamma}){sup 5}Li/{sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results, and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ{gamma}-ray detector calibration using neutron-induced {gamma}-rays. Also, by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures, we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2-9 keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the {sup 5}He and {sup 5}Li systems resulting from D-T and D-{sup 3}He fusion, respectively, and result in improved ICF {gamma}-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition

  4. Neutron kinetics in moderators and SNM detection through epithermal-neutron-induced fissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; King, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Extension of the well-established Differential Die Away Analysis (DDAA) into a faster time domain, where more penetrating epithermal neutrons induce fissions, is proposed and demonstrated via simulations and experiments. In the proposed method the fissions stimulated by thermal, epithermal and even higher-energy neutrons are measured after injection of a narrow pulse of high-energy 14 MeV (d,T) or 2.5 MeV (d,D) source neutrons, appropriately moderated. The ability to measure these fissions stems from the inherent correlation of neutron energy and time ("E-T" correlation) during the process of slowing down of high-energy source neutrons in common moderating materials such as hydrogenous compounds (e.g., polyethylene), heavy water, beryllium and graphite. The kinetic behavior following injection of a delta-function-shaped pulse (in time) of 14 MeV neutrons into such moderators is studied employing MCNPX simulations and, when applicable, some simple "one-group" models. These calculations served as a guide for the design of a source moderator which was used in experiments. Qualitative relationships between slowing-down time after the pulse and the prevailing neutron energy are discussed. A laboratory system consisting of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a polyethylene-reflected Be moderator, a liquid scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and a two-parameter E-T data acquisition system was set up to measure prompt neutron and delayed gamma-ray fission signatures in a 19.5% enriched LEU sample. The measured time behavior of thermal and epithermal neutron fission signals agreed well with the detailed simulations. The laboratory system can readily be redesigned and deployed as a mobile inspection system for SNM in, e.g., cars and vans. A strong pulsed neutron generator with narrow pulse (<75 ns) at a reasonably high pulse frequency could make the high-energy neutron induced fission modality a realizable SNM detection technique.

  5. A high repetition rate plasma focus for neutron interrogation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bures, Brian; Krishnan, Mahadevan; James, Colt; Madden, Robert; Hennig, Wolfgang; Breus, Dimitry; Asztalos, Stephen; Sabourov, Konstantin; Lane, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    A fast pulsed neutron source enables identification and ranging of contraband nuclear material using time-of-flight separation of the probe neutron pulse from the fission induced emission quanta. Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation has demonstrated a 1 Hz plasma focus neutron source that uses an impedance matching transformer to better couple the power from the driver to the dynamic pinch load. For a 24 kV primary charge, the system produces a 61 kA peak current with a neutron yield up to 5 ×105 neutrons/pulse at 1 Hz. Experiments are described in which induced 845 keV gamma emission from iron targets (by 2.45 MeV DD neutrons) was separated (by time of flight) from the 20-30 ns probe neutron pulses. Monte Carlo simulations are used to optimize the concept for a fieldable system. Work supported by US Department of Homeland Security (DNDO) and by the US Air Force (KAFB).

  6. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  7. Panorama of new generation of accelerator based short wavelength coherent light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The newly developed intense short wavelength light sources (from Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) to X-rays) have open the path to the exploration of matter for revealing structures and electronic processes and for following their evolution in time. After drawing the panorama of existing accelerator based short wavelength light sources, the new trends of evolution of short wavelengths FEL are described, with some illustrations with the example of the LUNEX5 (free electron Laser a New accelerator for the Exploitation of X-ray radiation of 5th generation) demonstrator project of advanced compact Free Electron Laser.

  8. Methods for Neutron Spectrometry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1961-01-09

    The appropriate theories and the general philosophy of methods of measurement and treatment of data neutron spectrometry are discussed. Methods of analysis of results for liquids using the Van Hove formulation, and for crystals using the Born-von Karman theory, are reviewed. The most useful of the available methods of measurement are considered to be the crystal spectrometer methods and the pulsed monoenergetic beam/time-of-flight method. Pulsed-beam spectrometers have the advantage of higher counting rates than crystal spectrometers, especially in view of the fact that simultaneous measurements in several counters at different angles of scattering are possible in pulsed-beam spectrometers. The crystal spectrometer permits several valuable new types of specialized experiments to be performed, especially energy distribution measurements at constant momentum transfer. The Chalk River triple-axis crystal-spectrometer is discussed, with reference to its use in making the specialized experiments. The Chalk River rotating crystal (pulsed-beam) spectrometer is described, and a comparison of this type instrument with other pulsed-beam spectrometers is made. A partial outline of the theory of operation of rotating-crystal spectrometers is presented. The use of quartz-crystal filters for fast neutron elimination and for order elimination is discussed. (auth)

  9. Pedestrian movement analysis in transfer station corridor: Velocity-based and acceleration-based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Jian; Hu, Yongkai; Ran, Bin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, pedestrians are classified into aggressive and conservative ones by their temper. Aggressive pedestrians' walking through crowd in transfer station corridor is analyzed. Treating pedestrians as particles, this paper uses the modified social force model (MSFM) as the building block, where forces involve self-driving force, repulsive force and friction force. The proposed model in this paper is a discrete model combining the MSFM and cellular automata (CA) model, where the updating rules of the CA are redefined with MSFM. Due to the continuity of values generated by the MSFM, we use the fuzzy logic to discretize the continuous values into cells pedestrians can move in one step. With the observation that stimulus around pedestrians influences their acceleration directly, an acceleration-based movement model is presented, compared to the generally reviewed velocity-based movement model. In the acceleration-based model, a discretized version of kinematic equation is presented based on the acceleration discretized with fuzzy logic. In real life, some pedestrians would rather keep their desired speed and this is also mimicked in this paper, which is called inertia. Compared to the simple triangular membership function, a trapezoidal membership function and a piecewise linear membership function are used to capture pedestrians' inertia. With the trapezoidal and the piecewise linear membership function, many overlapping scenarios should be carefully handled and Dubois and Prade's four-index method is used to completely describe the relative relationship of fuzzy quantities. Finally, a simulation is constructed to demonstrate the effect of our model.

  10. Polarized neutrons and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, R.; Endoh, Y.; Felcher, G.; Majkrzak, C.; Mezei, F.; Pynn, R.; Shirane, G.

    1985-01-01

    The role of polarized neutrons in the study of magnetic and nonmagnetic materials is discussed. magnetic structure, spin density, nuclear magnetism and spin dynamics are listed as magnetic properties which may be accessed by polarized neutrons. Low dimensional magnets, disordered magnetic systems, surface magnetism are discussed as well as topography and depolarization. Polarization techniques are discussed for both study state and pulsed modes. 4 refs. (WRF)

  11. Pulse-to-pulse Diagnostics at High Reprate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Bertram; Kovalev, Sergey; Golz, Torsten; Stojanovich, Nikola; Fisher, Alan; Kampfrath, Tobias; Gensch, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Femtosecond level diagnostic and control of sub-picosecond electron bunches is an important topic in modern accelerator research. At the same time new linear electron accelerators based on quasi-CW SRF technology will be the drivers of many future 4th Generation lightsources such as X-ray free electron lasers. A high duty cycle, high stability and online pulse to pulse diagnostic at these new accelerators are crucial ingredients to the success of these large scale facilities. A novel THz based online monitor concept is presented that has the potential to give access to pulse to pulse information on bunch form, arrival time and energy at high repetition rate and down to sub pC charges. We furthermore show experimentally that pulse to pulse arrival time measurements can be used to perform pump-probe experiments with a temporal resolution in the few-fs regime and an exceptional dynamic range. Our scheme has been tested at the superradiant test facility TELBE, but can be readily transferred to other SRF accelerator driven photon sources, such as X-FELs.

  12. New Organic Scintillators for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanowska, Joanna; Szczeniak, Tomasz

    2010-01-05

    This paper present the current work on neutron detection in Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies. Lately, we have focused our research on the development of new organic scintillators including liquid scintillators for neutron detection and associated measurements. We measured liquid scintillators (also {sup 10}B-doped for thermal neutron detection){sup 3}He tubes, composites, etc. Response of the following detectors on thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma radiation - the pulse shape discrimination (PSD)- has been mainly performed by means of a zero-crossing (ZC) method.

  13. Neutron coincidence detectors employing heterogeneous materials

    DOEpatents

    Czirr, J. Bartley; Jensen, Gary L.

    1993-07-27

    A neutron detector relies upon optical separation of different scintillators to measure the total energy and/or number of neutrons from a neutron source. In pulse mode embodiments of the invention, neutrons are detected in a first detector which surrounds the neutron source and in a second detector surrounding the first detector. An electronic circuit insures that only events are measured which correspond to neutrons first detected in the first detector followed by subsequent detection in the second detector. In spectrometer embodiments of the invention, neutrons are thermalized in the second detector which is formed by a scintillator-moderator and neutron energy is measured from the summed signals from the first and second detectors.

  14. Neutron lab hits second target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2008-07-01

    In ancient Egyptian mythology, Isis was the mother goddess from whom all beginnings arose. Although the ISIS facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire, UK, has no connections with ancient Egypt, it was so named because it marked the beginning for the field of "pulsed neutron science". Completed in 1984, ISIS remains Europe's only source of pulsed neutron beams and currently has over 20 beamlines that cater for a range of experiments from condensed-matter physics to biomedicine. Some 9000 papers have been published in the last 20 years based on work carried at the facility.

  15. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  16. Surface Mounted Neutron Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2012-10-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) base reaction pulsed neutron generator packaged in a flat computer chip shape of 1.54 cm (0.600 in) wide by 3.175 cm (1.25 in) length and 0.3 cm (0.120 in) thick has been successfully demonstrated to produce 14 MeV neutrons at a rate of 10^9 neutrons per second. The neutron generator is based on a deuterium ion beam accelerated to impact a tritium loaded target. The accelerating voltage is in the 15 to 20 kV in a 3 mm (0.120 in) gap, the ion beam is shaped by using a lens design to produce a flat ion beam that conforms to the flat rectangular target. The ion source is a simple surface mounted deuterium filled titanium film with a fused gap that operates at a current-voltage design to release the deuterium during a pulse length of about 1 μs. We present the general description of the working prototypes, which we have labeled the ``NEUTRISTOR.''[4pt] Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Work funded by the LDRD office.

  17. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  18. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Hunter, James F.; Schirato, Richard C.; Vogel, Sven C.; Swift, Alicia L.; Ickes, Timothy Lee; Ward, William Carl; Losko, Adrian Simon; Tremsin, Anton; Sevanto, Sanna Annika; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee Thoresen; Malone, Michael

    2015-10-29

    Thermal, epithermal, and high-energy neutrons are available from two spallation sources at the 800 MeV proton accelerator. Improvements in detectors and computing have enabled new capabilities that use the pulsed beam properties at LANSCE; these include amorphous Si (aSi) detectors, intensified charge-coupled device cameras, and micro-channel plates. Applications include water flow in living specimens, inclusions and fission products in uranium oxide, and high-energy neutron imaging using an aSi flat panel with ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen. images of a metal/plastic cylinder from photons, low-energy and high-energy neutrons are compared.

  19. Variations in lithium target thickness and proton energy stability for the near-threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Bengua, Gerard; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    2007-02-01

    The usable range of thickness for the solid lithium target in the accelerator-based neutron production for BNCT via the near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction was investigated. While the feasibility of using a (7)Li-target with thickness equal to that which is required to slow down a mono-energetic 1.900 MeV incident proton to the 1.881 MeV threshold of the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction (i.e., t(min) = 2.33 microm) has already been demonstrated, dosimetric properties of neutron fields from targets greater than t(min) were assessed as thicker targets would last longer and offer more stable neutron production. Additionally, the characteristics of neutron fields generated by (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be for Gaussian incident protons with mean energy of 1.900 MeV were evaluated at a (7)Li-target thickness t(min). The main evaluation index applied in this study was the treatable protocol depth (TPD) which corresponds to the depth in an irradiated medium that satisfies the requirements of the adapted dose protocol. A maximum TPD (TPD(max)) was obtained for each irradiation condition from the relationship between the TPD and the thickness of boron dose enhancer (BDE) used. For a mono-energetic 1.900 MeV proton beam, the deepest TPD(max) of 3.88 cm was attained at the (7)Li-target thickness of t(min) and a polyethylene BDE of 1.10 cm. When the intended TPD for a BNCT clinical treatment is shallower than the deepest TPD(max), the usable (7)Li-target thickness would be between t(min) and an upper limit t(upper) whose value depends on the BDE thickness used. In terms of the effect of stability of the incident proton energy, Gaussian incident proton energies stable to within +/-10 keV of 1.900 MeV were found to be feasible for the neutron production via the near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for BNCT provided that a suitable BDE is used.

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the liquid mercury target for the national spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Haines, J.R.; Rogers, M.

    1997-04-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is a high-energy, accelerator-based spallation neutron source being designed by a multi-laboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve very high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. The NSNS is proposed to have a 1 MW beam of high-energy ({approximately}1 GeV) protons upgradable to 5 MW and operating at 60 Hz with a pulse duration of 0.5 {mu}s. Peak steady-state power density in the target is about 640 MW/m{sup 3} for 1 MW, whereas the pulse instantaneous peak power density is as high as 22,000 GW/m{sup 3}. The local peak temperature rise for a single pulse over it`s time-averaged value is only 6{degrees}C, but the rate of this temperature rise during the pulse is extremely fast ({approximately}12 million {degrees}C/s). In addition to the resulting thermal shock and materials compatibility concerns, key feasibility issues for the target are related to its thermal-hydraulic performance. These include proper flow distribution, flow reversals and stagnation zones, possible {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes}, cooling of the beam {open_quotes}window{close_quotes}, and the challenge of mitigating the effects of thermal shock through possible injection of helium bubbles. An analytic approach was used on the PC spreadsheet EXCEL to evaluate target design options and to determine the global T/H parameters in the current concept. The general computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX was used to simulate the detailed time-averaged two-dimensional thermal and flow distributions in the liquid mercury. In this paper, an overview of the project and the results of this preliminary work are presented. Heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury under wetting and non-wetting conditions are discussed, and future directions of the program in T/H analysis and R&D are outlined.

  1. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    M. LYNCH; S. KWON; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within {+-}0.5% and {+-}0.5{sup o} [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin.

  2. Extending PowerPack for Profiling and Analysis of High Performance Accelerator-Based Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bo; Chang, Hung-Ching; Song, Shuaiwen; Su, Chun-Yi; Meyer, Timmy; Mooring, John; Cameron, Kirk

    2014-12-01

    Accelerators offer a substantial increase in efficiency for high-performance systems offering speedups for computational applications that leverage hardware support for highly-parallel codes. However, the power use of some accelerators exceeds 200 watts at idle which means use at exascale comes at a significant increase in power at a time when we face a power ceiling of about 20 megawatts. Despite the growing domination of accelerator-based systems in the Top500 and Green500 lists of fastest and most efficient supercomputers, there are few detailed studies comparing the power and energy use of common accelerators. In this work, we conduct detailed experimental studies of the power usage and distribution of Xeon-Phi-based systems in comparison to the NVIDIA Tesla and at SandyBridge.

  3. Current Status of the IAP NASU Accelerator-Based Analytical Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhay, O. M.; Drozdenko, A. A.; Zakharets, M. I.; Ignat'ev, I. G.; Kramchenkov, A. B.; Miroshnichenko, V. I.; Ponomarev, A. G.; Storizhko, V. E.

    Accelerator-based analytical facility (AAF) of the Institute of Applied Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine is described. The research facility is based on a compact single ended machine with the maximum accelerating potential of 2 MV. The facility has five analytical end-stations: an scanning ion microprobe end-station with spatial resolution of less than 2 μm, a high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry end-station with a magnetic spectrometer (ΔE/E<1.5×10-3), end-station for elastic recoil detection analysis equipped with an electrostatic spectrometer (ΔE/E<1.5×10-3), end-station for particle induced gamma ray spectroscopy, and an ion induced luminescence end-station. Key specifications of the end-stations and their potential features are given.

  4. About the scheme of the infrared FEL system for the accelerator based on HF wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kabanov, V.S.; Dzergach, A.I.

    1995-12-31

    Accelerators, based on localization of plasmoids in the HF wells (RF traps) of the axially-symmetric electromagnetic field E {sub omn} in an oversized (m,n>>1) resonant system, can give accelerating gradients {approximately}100 kV/{lambda}, e.g. 10 GV/m if {lambda}=10 {mu}m. One of possible variants of HF feeding for these accelerators is based on using the powerful infrared FEL System with 2 frequencies. The corresponding FEL`s may be similar to the Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL ({lambda}{sub 1,2}{approximately}10 pm, e-beam energy {approximately}15 MeV, e-beam current {approximately}100 A). Their power is defined mainly by the HF losses in the resonant system of the supposed accelerator.

  5. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  6. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Sved, J.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ``reflector`` dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ``pinched`` in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate {approximately}10{sup 6} neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are {approximately}30{micro}s, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented.

  7. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  8. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  9. Cosmic ray neutron background reduction using localized coincidence veto neutron counting

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, Howard O.; Bourret, Steven C.; Krick, Merlyn S.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to both the apparatus and method for increasing the sensitivity of measuring the amount of radioactive material in waste by reducing the interference caused by cosmic ray generated neutrons. The apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of neutron detectors, each of the detectors including means for generating a pulse in response to the detection of a neutron; and (b) means, coupled to each of the neutrons detectors, for counting only some of the pulses from each of the detectors, whether cosmic ray or fission generated. The means for counting includes a means that, after counting one of the pulses, vetos the counting of additional pulses for a prescribed period of time. The prescribed period of time is between 50 and 200 .mu.s. In the preferred embodiment the prescribed period of time is 128 .mu.s. The veto means can be an electronic circuit which includes a leading edge pulse generator which passes a pulse but blocks any subsequent pulse for a period of between 50 and 200 .mu.s. Alternately, the veto means is a software program which includes means for tagging each of the pulses from each of the detectors for both time and position, means for counting one of the pulses from a particular position, and means for rejecting those of the pulses which originate from the particular position and in a time interval on the order of the neutron die-away time in polyethylene or other shield material. The neutron detectors are grouped in pods, preferably at least 10. The apparatus also includes means for vetoing the counting of coincidence pulses from all of the detectors included in each of the pods which are adjacent to the pod which includes the detector which produced the pulse which was counted.

  10. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; English, G.; Firestone, R.; Giquel, F.; King, M.; Leung, K-N.; Sun, M.

    2003-12-31

    A wide variety of applications ranging from medical (BNCT, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) and basic science (neutron imaging, material studies) to homeland security (explosive detection and nuclear material non-proliferation) are in need of compact, high flux neutron generators. The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing various neutron generators for these applications. These neutron generators employed either the D-D or the D-T fusion reaction for the neutron production. The deuterium or deuterium-tritium gas mixture is ionized in an RF-driven plasma source. The ions are then accelerated to {approx}100 keV energy using high current, high voltage DC-power supply to a target where the 2.45 MeV (for D-D reaction) or 14 MeV (for the D-T reaction) neutrons are generated. The development of two different types of neutron tubes are being discussed in this presentation, namely compact, pulsed operation neutron generators and cw, high yield neutron generators. These generators are currently operating at D-D neutron yields of 108 n/s and 109 n/s respectively. A facility, incorporating the larger neutron generator, has been constructed for Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) measurements.

  11. Superconducting thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Pietropaolo, A.; Celentano, G.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Vannozzi, A.

    2016-09-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium nitride (NbN) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle is well described by a hot spot mechanism: upon the occurrence of the nuclear reactions n + 10B → α + 7Li + 2.8 MeV, the energy released by the secondary particles into the strip induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T below 11K and current-biased below the critical current IC, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed and compared to those of a borated Nb superconducting strip.

  12. First calibration of the Canadian high-energy neutron spectrometry system with HAWK TEPC and Liulin at PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M.; Lewis, B. J.; Smith, M. B.; Zhang, M.; Ing, H.

    The Canadian high-energy neutron spectrometry system CHENSS was constructed for the Canadian Space Agency CSA to measure accurately the neutron spectrum in low-Earth orbit A large specially formulated viscoelastic scintillator uses proton recoil and good pulse-shape discrimination to measure from a few MeV to about 100 MeV With delays in the NASA flight schedule for the shuttle opportunities exist to calibrate the CHENSS at up to three reference calibration fields Measurements were taken at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt PTB in late 2005 and similar calibrations are planned at Institut de Physique Nucl e aire of the Universit e catholique de Louvain UCL and the iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences In separate exposures two spectrometers a HAWK tissue equivalent proportional counter TEPC and a Liulin and an Eberline FH41B-10 gamma-ray and neutron-sensitive meter used for airborne cosmic radiation measurements were calibrated for comparison The CHENSS HAWK and Liulin were subjected to 2 5 5 0 14 8 and 19 0 MeV neutrons with fluence measurements taken by PTB staff In addition since the HAWK and Liulin are capable of measuring the total dose equivalent they were also calibrated with PTB s Cs-137 and Cf-252 sources The results of these calibrations and comparison with all of the equipment will be reported in the paper The knowledge gained from this first calibration effort will be beneficial for the CHENSS when flown in a GAS can on a future shuttle flight as well as for the HAWK Liulin and FH41B-10 used

  13. Combination neutron-gamma ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Stuart, Travis P.; Tipton, Wilbur J.

    1976-10-26

    A radiation detection system capable of detecting neutron and gamma events and distinguishing therebetween. The system includes a detector for a photomultiplier which utilizes a combination of two phosphor materials, the first of which is in the form of small glass beads which scintillate primarily in response to neutrons and the second of which is a plastic matrix which scintillates in response to gammas. A combination of pulse shape and pulse height discrimination techniques is utilized to provide an essentially complete separation of the neutron and gamma events.

  14. Cooperative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Michael; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the concept of cooperative (COOP) pulses which are designed to compensate each other's imperfections. In multi-scan experiments, COOP pulses can cancel undesired signal contributions, complementing and generalizing phase cycles. COOP pulses can be efficiently optimized using an extended version of the optimal-control-based gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm. The advantage of the COOP approach is experimentally demonstrated for broadband and band-selective pulses.

  15. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium

    SciTech Connect

    Roshan, M. V.; Springham, S. V.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Krishnan, M.

    2010-08-15

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f{sub n}{approx}4.1x10{sup -4} with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10{sup 8} neutrons per discharge.

  16. Drug and tobacco detection using neutron transmission/attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas G.

    1994-10-01

    A neutron transmission/attenuation spectrometer has been used to obtain the neutron attenuation signature of cocaine, heroin, hashish, methamphetamine, pipe tobacco and chewing tobacco. A pulsed `white neutron' source was created by bombarding a thick beryllium target with a 5 MeV pulsed deuteron beam. The neutron intensity was measured from about 0.75 MeV to about 4 MeV with the suitcase in and out of the neutron beam to determine the neutron attenuation. Experiments were performed for drugs and tobacco alone and when imbedded in an `average suitcase'. The experimentally determined neutron attenuation curves were used to determine the atomic ratios C/O, N/O, and H/C through the samples using measured neutron cross sections.

  17. Count rate limitations for pulse-counting instrumentation in pulsed accelerator fields.

    PubMed

    Justus, Alan L

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various concepts involved in the counting losses of pulse-counting health physics instrumentation when used within the pulsed radiation environments of typical accelerator fields in order to preestablish appropriate limitations in use. Discussed are the "narrow" pulse and the "wide" pulse cases, the special effect of neutron moderating assemblies, and the effect of pulse fine microstructure on the counting losses of the pulse-counting instrumentation. In the narrow-pulse case, the accelerator pulse width is less than or equal to the instrument's dead time; whereas in the wide-pulse case, the accelerator pulse width is significantly longer than the instrument's dead time. Examples are provided that highlight the various concepts and limitations.

  18. Basic concepts underlying fast-neutron-based contraband interrogation technology. A systems viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Guenther, P.T.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    All accelerator-based fast-neutron contraband interrogation systems have many closely interrelated subsystems, whose performance parameters will be critically interdependent. For optimal overall performance, a systems analysis design approach is required. This paper provides a general overview of the interrelationships and the tradeoffs to be considered for optimization of nonaccelerator subsystems.

  19. Narcotics detection using fast-neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in luggage and cargo containers. This paper discusses two different fast-neutron techniques. The first uses a pulsed accelerator or sealed-tube source to produce monoenergetic fast neutrons. Gamma rays characteristic of carbon and oxygen are detected and the elemental densities determined. Spatial localization is accomplished by either time of flight or collimators. This technique is suitable for examination of large containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays. The second technique uses an accelerator to produce nanosecond pulsed beams of deuterons that strike a target to produce a pulsed beam of neutrons with a continuum of energies. Elemental distributions are obtained by measuring the neutron spectrum after the source neutrons pass through the items being interrogated. Spatial variation of elemental densities is obtained by tomographic reconstruction of projection data obtained for three to five angles and relatively low (2 cm) resolution. This technique is best suited for examination of luggage or small containers with average neutron transmissions greater than about 0.01. Analytic and Monte-Carlo models are being used to investigate the operational characteristics and limitations of both techniques.

  20. PULSE SORTER

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-07-29

    An apparatus is described for counting and recording the number of electrical pulses occurring in each of a timed sequence of groups of pulses. The particular feature of the invention resides in a novel timing circuit of the univibrator type which provides very accurately timed pulses for opening each of a series of coincidence channels in sequence. The univibrator is shown incorporated in a pulse analyzing system wherein a series of pulse counting channels are periodically opened in order, one at a time, for a predetermtned open time interval, so that only one channel will be open at the time of occurrence of any of the electrical pulses to be sorted.

  1. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGES

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Crawford, C.; Tito, T. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Iverson, E. B.; Mahurin, R.; Snow, W. M.

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  2. Direct nn-Scattering Measurement With the Pulsed Reactor YAGUAR

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, G. E.; Furman, W. I.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzichka, A. Yu.; Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Chernuhin, Yu. I.; Levakov, B. G.; Litvin, V. I.; Lyzhin, A. E.; Magda, E. P.; Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W

    2005-01-01

    Although crucial for resolving the issue of charge symmetry in the nuclear force, direct measurement of nn-scattering by colliding free neutrons has never been performed. At present the Russian pulsed reactor YAGUAR is the best neutron source for performing such a measurement. It has a through channel where the neutron moderator is installed. The neutrons are counted by a neutron detector located 12 m from the reactor. In preliminary experiments an instantaneous value of 1.1 × 1018/cm2s was obtained for the thermal neutron flux density. The experiment will be performed by the DIANNA Collaboration as International Science & Technology Center (ISTC) project No. 2286. PMID:27308126

  3. Shock temperature measurement using neutron resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, V W; Bowman, J David; Funk, D J; Morgan, G L; Rabie, R L; Ragan, C E; Quintana, J P; Stacy, H L

    2005-04-01

    We report a direct measurement of temperature in a shocked metal using Doppler broadening of neutron resonances. The 21.1-eV resonance in 182W was used to measure the temperature in molybdenum shocked to approximately 63 GPa. An explosively launched aluminum flyer produced a planar shock in a molybdenum target that contained a 1-mm thick layer doped with 1.7 at. %(182)W. A single neutron pulse, containing resonant neutrons of less than 1 mus duration, probed the shocked material. Fits to the neutron time-of-flight data were used to determine the temperature of the shocked molybdenum.

  4. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  5. Neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Andrew C; Jardret, Vincent D

    2009-04-07

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  6. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium: Plant layout study and related design issues

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, B.S.; Fontana, M.H.; Krakowski, R.A.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Davidson, J.W.; Sailor, W.C.; Williamson, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    In preparation for and in support of a detailed R and D Plan for the Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) of weapons plutonium, an ABC Plant Layout Study was conducted at the level of a pre-conceptual engineering design. The plant layout is based on an adaptation of the Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) detailed conceptual design that was completed in the early 1070s. Although the ABC Plant Layout Study included the Accelerator Equipment as an essential element, the engineering assessment focused primarily on the Target; Primary System (blanket and all systems containing plutonium-bearing fuel salt); the Heat-Removal System (secondary-coolant-salt and supercritical-steam systems); Chemical Processing; Operation and Maintenance; Containment and Safety; and Instrumentation and Control systems. Although constrained primarily to a reflection of an accelerator-driven (subcritical) variant of MSBR system, unique features and added flexibilities of the ABC suggest improved or alternative approaches to each of the above-listed subsystems; these, along with the key technical issues in need of resolution through a detailed R&D plan for ABC are described on the bases of the ``strawman`` or ``point-of-departure`` plant layout that resulted from this study.

  7. Fuel retention measurements in Alcator C-Mod using accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Lanza, Richard C.; Lipschultz, Bruce; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the first in situ time- and space-resolved measurements of deuterium (D) fuel retention in plasma-facing component (PFC) surfaces using Accelerator-based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. AIMS is a novel in situ materials diagnostic technique based on the spectroscopic analysis of nuclear reaction products induced in PFC surfaces using an ∼MeV beam of deuterons from a compact linear accelerator in between plasma shots. AIMS measurements of D retention on inner wall PFCs were acquired during diverted and limited plasma operations and during wall conditioning experiments. Intershot measurements demonstrate the local erosion and codeposition of boron films on PFC surfaces with a constant D / B ratio. This is consistent with previous results suggesting that D codeposition with boron is insufficient to account for the net retention observed in Alcator C-Mod. Changes in deuterium concentration during boronization, electron cyclotron and glow cleanings were also measured.

  8. A comparison of public datasets for acceleration-based fall detection.

    PubMed

    Igual, Raul; Medrano, Carlos; Plaza, Inmaculada

    2015-09-01

    Falls are one of the leading causes of mortality among the older population, being the rapid detection of a fall a key factor to mitigate its main adverse health consequences. In this context, several authors have conducted studies on acceleration-based fall detection using external accelerometers or smartphones. The published detection rates are diverse, sometimes close to a perfect detector. This divergence may be explained by the difficulties in comparing different fall detection studies in a fair play since each study uses its own dataset obtained under different conditions. In this regard, several datasets have been made publicly available recently. This paper presents a comparison, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, of these public fall detection datasets in order to determine whether they have an influence on the declared performances. Using two different detection algorithms, the study shows that the performances of the fall detection techniques are affected, to a greater or lesser extent, by the specific datasets used to validate them. We have also found large differences in the generalization capability of a fall detector depending on the dataset used for training. In fact, the performance decreases dramatically when the algorithms are tested on a dataset different from the one used for training. Other characteristics of the datasets like the number of training samples also have an influence on the performance while algorithms seem less sensitive to the sampling frequency or the acceleration range. PMID:26233258

  9. Accelerator-based techniques for the support of senior-level undergraduate physics laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. R.; Clark, J. C.; Isaacs-Smith, T.

    2001-07-01

    Approximately three years ago, Auburn University replaced its aging Dynamitron accelerator with a new 2MV tandem machine (Pelletron) manufactured by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). This new machine is maintained and operated for the University by Physics Department personnel, and the accelerator supports a wide variety of materials modification/analysis studies. Computer software is available that allows the NEC Pelletron to be operated from a remote location, and an Internet link has been established between the Accelerator Laboratory and the Upper-Level Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory in the Physics Department. Additional software supplied by Canberra Industries has also been used to create a second Internet link that allows live-time data acquisition in the Teaching Laboratory. Our senior-level undergraduates and first-year graduate students perform a number of experiments related to radiation detection and measurement as well as several standard accelerator-based experiments that have been added recently. These laboratory exercises will be described, and the procedures used to establish the Internet links between our Teaching Laboratory and the Accelerator Laboratory will be discussed.

  10. Design study of double-layer beam trajectory accelerator based on the Rhodotron structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Iraj; Poursaleh, Ali Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the conceptual design of a new structure of industrial electron accelerator based on the Rhodotron accelerator is presented and its properties are compared with those of Rhodotron-TT200 accelerator. The main goal of this study was to reduce the power of RF system of accelerator at the same output electron beam energy. The main difference between the new accelerator structure with the Rhodotron accelerator is the length of the coaxial cavity that is equal to the wavelength at the resonant frequency. Also two sets of bending magnets were used around the acceleration cavity in two layers. In the new structure, the beam crosses several times in the coaxial cavity by the bending magnets around the cavity at the first layer and then is transferred to the second layer using the central bending magnet. The acceleration process in the second layer is similar to the first layer. Hence, the energy of the electron beam will be doubled. The electrical power consumption of the RF system and magnet system were calculated and simulated for the new accelerator structure and TT200. Comparing the calculated and simulated results of the TT200 with those of experimental results revealed good agreement. The results showed that the overall electrical power consumption of the new accelerator structure was less than that of the TT200 at the same energy and power of the electron beam. As such, the electrical efficiency of the new structure was improved.

  11. A comparison of public datasets for acceleration-based fall detection.

    PubMed

    Igual, Raul; Medrano, Carlos; Plaza, Inmaculada

    2015-09-01

    Falls are one of the leading causes of mortality among the older population, being the rapid detection of a fall a key factor to mitigate its main adverse health consequences. In this context, several authors have conducted studies on acceleration-based fall detection using external accelerometers or smartphones. The published detection rates are diverse, sometimes close to a perfect detector. This divergence may be explained by the difficulties in comparing different fall detection studies in a fair play since each study uses its own dataset obtained under different conditions. In this regard, several datasets have been made publicly available recently. This paper presents a comparison, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, of these public fall detection datasets in order to determine whether they have an influence on the declared performances. Using two different detection algorithms, the study shows that the performances of the fall detection techniques are affected, to a greater or lesser extent, by the specific datasets used to validate them. We have also found large differences in the generalization capability of a fall detector depending on the dataset used for training. In fact, the performance decreases dramatically when the algorithms are tested on a dataset different from the one used for training. Other characteristics of the datasets like the number of training samples also have an influence on the performance while algorithms seem less sensitive to the sampling frequency or the acceleration range.

  12. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  13. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  14. Pulse Oximetry

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.thoracic.org amount of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) that are in your blood. To get an ... Also, a pulse oximeter does not measure your carbon dioxide level. How accurate is the pulse oximeter? The ...

  15. Accelerator-based transmuter-breeder and energy producer from transuranic actinides and thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Batskikh, Guennadii I.; Fedotov, Arkadii P.; Murin, Boris P.; Vassil'kov, Ratmir G.

    1995-09-15

    A concept of an accelerator-driven subcritical blanket with Pb or molten salt (heavy chloride) as the primary target, a graphite moderator-reflector to produce high-density thermal neutron fluxes and a fluid fuel carrying TUA actinides and Th-U, is being studied at MRTI. A driver is CW H{sup +}/H{sup -} linac: 1 GeV, 200 mA, SIU-DTL-D and W structure energized by regotron as RF power supply.

  16. Two neutron correlations in photo-fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, D. S.; Kosinov, O.; Forest, T.; Burggraf, J.; Stave, S.; Warren, G.; Starovoitova, V.

    2016-09-01

    A large body of experimental work has established the strong kinematical correlation between fission fragments and fission neutrons. Here, we report on the progress of investigations of the potential for strong two neutron correlations arising from the nearly back-to-back nature of the two fission fragments that emit these neutrons in the photo-fission process. In initial measurements, a pulsed electron linear accelerator was used to generate bremsstrahlung photons that impinged upon an actinide target, and the energy and opening angle distributions of coincident neutrons were measured using a large acceptance neutron detector array. A planned comprehensive set of measurements of two neutron correlations in the photo-fission of actinides is expected to shed light on several fundamental aspects of the fission process including the multiplicity distributions associated with the light and heavy fission fragments, the nuclear temperatures of the fission fragments, and the mass distribution of the fission fragments as a function of energy released. In addition to these measurements providing important nuclear data, the unique kinematics of fission and the resulting two neutron correlations have the potential to be the basis for a new tool to detect fissionable materials. A key technical challenge of this program arises from the need to perform coincidence measurements with a low duty factor, pulsed electron accelerator. This has motivated the construction of a large acceptance neutron detector array, and the development of data analysis techniques to directly measure uncorrelated two neutron backgrounds.

  17. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  18. Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Technique: CY 04 Year-end Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jones; W.Y. Yoon; K.J. Haskell; D.R. Norman; J.M. Zabriskie; J.W. Sterbentz; S.M. Watson; J.T. Johnson; B.D. Bennett; R.W. Watson; K. L. Folkman

    2005-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), along with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), are developing an electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technology for the detection of smuggled nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo transportation containers. This CY04 report describes the latest developments and progress with the development of the Pulsed, Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) nuclear material inspection ystem, such as: (1) the identification of an optimal range of electron beam energies for interrogation applications, (2) the development of a new “cabinet safe” electron accelerator (i.e., Varitron II) to assess “cabinet safe-type” operations, (3) the numerical and experimental validation responses of nuclear materials placed within selected cargo configurations, 4) the fabrication and utilization of Calibration Pallets for inspection technology performance verification, 5) the initial technology integration of basic radiographic “imaging/mapping” with induced neutron and gamma-ray detection, 6) the characterization of electron beam-generated photon sources for optimal performance, 7) the development of experimentallydetermined Receiver-Operator-Characterization curves, and 8) several other system component assessments. This project is supported by the Department of Homeland Security and is a technology component of the Science & Technology Active Interrogation Portfolio entitled “Photofission-based Nuclear Material Detection and Characterization.”

  19. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  1. Status of the Prototype Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    Prototype Photonuclear Inspection Technoloby - An

    2007-08-01

    Prototype Photonuclear Inspection Technology – An Integrated Systems Approach* James L. Jonesa, Daren R. Normana, Kevin J. Haskella, James W. Sterbentza, Woo Y. Yoona, Scott M. Watsona, James T. Johnsona, John M. Zabriskiea, Calvin E. Mossb, Frank Harmonc a – Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625-2802, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2802 b – Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS B228, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87585 c – Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Dr., Pocatello, Idaho 83201 Active interrogation technologies are being pursued in order to address many of today’s challenging inspection requirements related to both nuclear and non-nuclear material detection. The Idaho National Laboratory, along with the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Idaho State University’s Idaho Accelerator Center, continue to develop electron accelerator-based, photonuclear inspection technologies for the detection of shielded nuclear material within air-, rail-, and especially, maritime-cargo containers. This paper presents an overview and status of the prototype Pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) inspection system and its ability to detect shielded nuclear material by focusing on the integration of three major detection system components: delayed neutron measurement, delayed gamma-ray measurements, and a transmission, gray-scale mapping for shield material detection. Areas of future development and advancement within each detection component will be presented. *Supported in part by the Department of Homeland Security under DOE-ID Contract Number DE-AC07-99ID13727. POC: James L. Jones, 208-526-1730

  2. Characterizing a Model of Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Based on Wave Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Velli, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the nature of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration is a key goal in solar and heliospheric research. While there have been many theoretical advances in both topics, including suggestions that they may be intimately related, the inherent scale coupling and complexity of these phenomena limits our ability to construct models that test them on a fundamental level for realistic solar conditions. At the same time, there is an ever increasing impetus to improve our spaceweather models, and incorporating treatments for these processes that capture their basic features while remaining tractable is an important goal. With this in mind, I will give an overview of our exploration of a wave-turbulence driven (WTD) model for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration based on low-frequency Alfvénic turbulence. Here we attempt to bridge the gap between theory and practical modeling by exploring this model in 1D HD and multi-dimensional MHD contexts. The key questions that we explore are: What properties must the model possess to be a viable model for coronal heating? What is the influence of the magnetic field topology (open, closed, rapidly expanding)? And can we simultaneously capture coronal heating and solar wind acceleration with such a quasi-steady formulation? Our initial results suggest that a WTD based formulation performs adequately for a variety of solar and heliospheric conditions, while significantly reducing the number of free parameters when compared to empirical heating and solar wind models. The challenges, applications, and future prospects of this type of approach will also be discussed.

  3. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  4. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  5. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  6. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device

    PubMed Central

    Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A.; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)3He and D(d,n)3He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the 9Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima. PMID:26273118

  7. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  8. Scintillating-glass-fiber neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.; Brite, D. W.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Craig, R. A.; Geelhood, B. D.; Goldman, D. S.; Griffin, J. W.; Perkins, R. W.; Reeder, P. L.; Richey, W. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; Warner, R. A.; Wogman, N. A.; Weber, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched 6Li, these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over 3He or BF 3 proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths ( {1}/{e}) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  9. Frontiers of neutron scattering in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuji

    1986-03-01

    Current neutron works representing frontiers of neutron scattering in Japan are surveyed. Only those works which either become possible with or have contributed significantly to new techniques and new instrumentations originated in Japan are selected because of the limited space and by the author's choice. Those works performed in the reactor centers (JAERI and KUR) in Japan, as well as in the two high flux reactor centers in the U.S. (BNL and ORNL), which are two coordinating institutions under the U.S.-Japan cooperative neutron scattering research program, and in Japan's spallation pulsed neutron facilities (KENS) are equally stressed for their contributions. Brief accounts of the new projects to renovate neutron sources and neutron facilities in Japan are also included.

  10. Neutron energy measurements in emergency response applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Guss, Paul; Hornish, Michael; Wilde, Scott; Stampahar, Tom; Reed, Michael

    2009-08-01

    We present significant results in recent advances in the measurement of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of importance. At the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) of National Security Technologies, LLC, a series of materials, viz., liquid organic scintillator (LOS), Lithium Gadolinium Borate (LGB) or Li6Gd(BO3)3 in a plastic matrix, a recently developed crystal of Cesium Lithium Yttrium Chloride, Cs2LiYCl6: Ce (called CLYC)[1], and normal plastic scintillator (BC-408) with 3He tubes have been used to study their effectiveness as a portable neutron energy spectrometer. Comparisons illustrating the strengths of the various materials will be provided. Of these materials, LGB offers the ability to tailor its response to the neutron spectrum by varying the isotopic composition of the key constituents (Lithium, Gadolinium [Yttrium], and Boron). All three of the constituent elements possess large neutron capture cross section isotopes for highly exothermic reactions. These compounds of composition Li6Gd(Y)(BO3)3 can be activated by Cerium ions Ce3+. CLYC, on the other hand, has a remarkable gamma response in addition to superb neutron discrimination, comparable to that of Europium-doped Lithium Iodide (6LiI: Eu). Comparing these two materials, CLYC has higher light output (4500 phe/MeV) than that from 6LiI: Eu and shows better energy resolution for both gamma and neutron pulse heights. Using CLYC, gamma energy pulses can be discriminated from the neutron signals by simple pulse height separation. For the cases of both LGB and LOS, careful pulse shape discrimination is needed to separate the gamma energy signals from neutron pulses. Both analog and digital

  11. Demonstration by pulsed neutron scattering that the arrangement of the Fab and Fc fragments in the overall structures of bovine IgG1 and IgG2 in solution is similar.

    PubMed Central

    Mayans, M O; Coadwell, W J; Beale, D; Symons, D B; Perkins, S J

    1995-01-01

    The bovine IgG1 and IgG2 isotypes exhibit large differences in effector functions. To examine the structural basis for this, the 12-domain structures of IgG1 and IgG2 were investigated by pulsed neutron scattering using a recently developed camera LOQ. This method reports on the average relative disposition in solution of the Fab and Fc fragments in IgG. The radii of gyration (RG) were found to be similar at 5.64 and 5.71 nm for IgG1 and IgG2 respectively in 100% 2H2O buffers. The two cross-sectional radii of gyration (RXS) were also similar at 2.38-2.41 and 0.98-1.02 nm. Similar values were obtained for porcine IgG. Both bovine IgG1 and IgG2 possess similar overall solution structures, despite sequence differences at the hinge region at the centre of their structures. An automated computer survey of possible IgG structures was developed, in which coordinates for the two Fab fragments were displaced in a two-dimensional plane relative to those of the Fc fragment in 0.25 nm steps. The scattering curves calculated from these structures were found to be sensitive to relative displacements of the three fragments, but not on their rotational orientation about their longest axes. Good agreement with the solution scattering data was obtained with a planar IgG model in which the C-terminus of the CH1 domain of Fab was 3.6 nm from the N-terminus of Fc in both IgG1 and IgG2, with a precision of 0.7 nm. Energy refinement showed that this spatial separation is compatible with the hinge sequences of bovine IgG1 and IgG2. The results show that multidomain protein structures can be modelled using LOQ data, and that a long hinge sequence does not necessarily reflect a large distance between Fab and Fc. The steric accessibility of Fc sites for interactions with cell-surface Fc receptors and C1q of complement is shown to be generally similar for IgG1 and IgG2, and the difference in effector function between IgG1 and IgG2 is probably based on deletions in the IgG2 hinge sequence

  12. Pulsed Neurton Elemental On-Line Material Analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Vourvopoulos, George

    2002-08-20

    An on-line material analyzer which utilizes pulsed neutron generation in order to determine the composition of material flowing through the apparatus. The on-line elemental material analyzer is based on a pulsed neutron generator. The elements in the material interact with the fast and thermal neutrons produced from the pulsed generator. Spectra of gamma-rays produced from fast neutrons interacting with elements of the material are analyzed and stored separately from spectra produced from thermal neutron reactions. Measurements of neutron activation takes place separately from the above reactions and at a distance from the neutron generator. A primary passageway allows the material to flow through at a constant rate of speed and operators to provide data corresponding to fast and thermal neutron reactions. A secondary passageway meters the material to allow for neutron activation analysis. The apparatus also has the capability to determine the density of the flowed material. Finally, the apparatus continually utilizes a neutron detector in order to normalize the yield of the gamma ray detectors and thereby automatically calibrates and adjusts the spectra data for fluctuations in neutron generation.

  13. Comparison of neutron-based technologies for the detection of contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Siraj M.

    1994-03-01

    Results of a comparative study of the figure of merit (FOM) for various techniques for the detection of explosives and narcotics using neutrons as the interrogating radiation are presented. The calculations use the flux and energy of neutrons, the cross sections of nuclear reactions, the type and quantity of target material, the geometry of the detection system and the efficiency of the neutron and (gamma) ray detectors for arriving at the FOM of the detection systems based on neutron elastic scatter, associated particle imaging, pulsed fast neutron analysis, and pulsed fast-thermal neutron analysis.

  14. A Project of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy System based on a Proton Linac Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshikai; Asano, Kenji; Arakawa, Akihiro; Fukuchi, Shin; Hiraga, Fujio; Kimura, Kenju; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Kubota, Michio; Kumada, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Sakae, Takeji; Saitoh, Kimiaki; Shibata, Tokushi; Yoshioka, Masakazu

    At present, the clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are being performed at research reactor facilities. However, an accelerator based BNCT has a merit that it can be built in a hospital. So, we just launched a development project for the BNCT based on an accelerator in order to establish and to spread the BNCT as an effective therapy in the near future. In the project, a compact proton linac installed in a hospital will be applied as a neutron source, and energy of the proton beam is planned to be less than about 10 MeV to reduce the radioactivity. The BNCT requires epithermal neutron beam with an intensity of around 1x109 (n/cm2/sec) to deliver the therapeutic dose to a deeper region in a body and to complete the irradiation within an hour. From this condition, the current of the proton beam required is estimated to be a few mA on average. Enormous heat deposition in the target is a big issue. We are aiming at total optimization of the accelerator based BNCT from the linac to the irradiation position. Here, the outline of the project is introduced and the moderator design is presented.

  15. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, Robert Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John; Licea, Angel

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  16. Temperature-tuned Maxwell-Boltzmann neutron spectra for kT ranging from 30 up to 50 keV for nuclear astrophysics studies.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernández, G; Mastinu, P F; Praena, J; Dzysiuk, N; Capote Noy, R; Pignatari, M

    2012-08-01

    The need of neutron capture cross section measurements for astrophysics motivates present work, where calculations to generate stellar neutron spectra at different temperatures are performed. The accelerator-based (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction is used. Shaping the proton beam energy and the sample covering a specific solid angle, neutron activation for measuring stellar-averaged capture cross section can be done. High-quality Maxwell-Boltzmann neutron spectra are predicted. Assuming a general behavior of the neutron capture cross section a weighted fit of the spectrum to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions is successfully introduced.

  17. Assessing the Feasibility of Using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; J. W. Sterbentz

    2012-07-01

    Neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) is an active-interrogation nondestructive assay (NDA) technique capable of assaying spent nuclear fuel to determine plutonium content. Prior experimental work has definitively shown the technique capable of assaying plutonium isotope composition in spent-fuel pins to a precision of approximately 3%, with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. As a Grand Challenge to investigate NDA options for assaying spent fuel assemblies (SFAs) in the commercial fuel cycle, Idaho National Laboratory has explored the feasibility of using NRTA to assay plutonium in a whole SFA. The goal is to achieve a Pu assay precision of 1%. The NRTA technique uses low-energy neutrons from 0.1-40 eV, at the bottom end of the actinide-resonance range, in a time-of-flight arrangement. Isotopic composition is determined by relating absorption of the incident neutrons to the macroscopic cross-section of the actinides of interest in the material, and then using this information to determine the areal density of the isotopes in the SFA. The neutrons used for NRTA are produced using a pulsed, accelerator-based neutron source. Distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239,240,241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Based on extensive modeling of the problem using Monte Carlo-based simulation codes, our preliminary results suggest that by rotating an SFA to acquire four symmetric views, sufficient neutron transmission can be achieved to assay a SFA. In this approach multiple scan information for the same pins may also be unfolded to potentially allow the determination of plutonium for sub-regions of the assembly. For a 17 ? 17 pressurized water reactor SFA, a simplistic preliminary

  18. Evaluation of thermal neutron irradiation field using a cyclotron-based neutron source for alpha autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Mitsumoto, T; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Nakagawa, Y; Watanabe, T; Fujimoto, N; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2014-06-01

    It is important to measure the microdistribution of (10)B in a cell to predict the cell-killing effect of new boron compounds in the field of boron neutron capture therapy. Alpha autoradiography has generally been used to detect the microdistribution of (10)B in a cell. Although it has been performed using a reactor-based neutron source, the realization of an accelerator-based thermal neutron irradiation field is anticipated because of its easy installation at any location and stable operation. Therefore, we propose a method using a cyclotron-based epithermal neutron source in combination with a water phantom to produce a thermal neutron irradiation field for alpha autoradiography. This system can supply a uniform thermal neutron field with an intensity of 1.7×10(9) (cm(-2)s(-1)) and an area of 40mm in diameter. In this paper, we give an overview of our proposed system and describe a demonstration test using a mouse liver sample injected with 500mg/kg of boronophenyl-alanine.

  19. The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Sun Zaijing

    2013-04-19

    One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

  20. A compact ion source and accelerator based on a piezoelectric driver

    SciTech Connect

    Norgard, P.; Kovaleski, S. D.; VanGordon, J. A.; Baxter, E. A.; Gall, B. B.; Kwon, Jae Wan; Kim, Baek Hyun; Dale, G. E.

    2013-04-19

    Compact ion sources and accelerators using piezoelectric devices for the production of energetic ion beams are being evaluated. A coupled source-accelerator is being tested as a neutron source to be incorporated into oil-well logging diagnostics. Two different ion sources are being investigated, including a piezoelectric transformer-based plasma source and a silicon-based field ion source. The piezoelectric transformer plasma ion source uses a cylindrical, resonantly driven piezoelectric crystal to produce high voltage inside a confined volume filled with low pressure deuterium gas. The plasma generated in the confined chamber is ejected through a small aperture into an evacuated drift region. The silicon field ion source uses localized electric field enhancement produced by an array of sharp emitters etched into a silicon blank to produce ions through field desorption ionization. A second piezoelectric device of a different design is used to generate an accelerating potential on the order of 130 kV; this potential is applied to a deuterated target plate positioned perpendicular to the ion stream produced by either plasma source. This paper discusses the results obtained by the individual components as they relate to the final neutron source.

  1. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  2. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  3. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G.

    2012-06-19

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  4. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  5. Linear Accelerator-Based Intensity-Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation Technique for Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies: A Dosimetric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yeginer, Mete; Roeske, John C.; Radosevich, James A.; Aydogan, Bulent

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric feasibility of linear accelerator-based intensity-modulated total marrow irradiation (IM-TMI) in patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Linear accelerator-based IM-TMI treatment planning was performed for 9 patients using the Eclipse treatment planning system. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, except for the forearms and hands. Organs at risk (OAR) to be spared included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, brain, eyes, oral cavity, and bowel and were contoured by a physician on the axial computed tomography images. The three-isocenter technique previously developed by our group was used for treatment planning. We developed and used a common dose-volume objective method to reduce the planning time and planner subjectivity in the treatment planning process. Results: A 95% PTV coverage with the 99% of the prescribed dose of 12 Gy was achieved for all nine patients. The average dose reduction in OAR ranged from 19% for the lungs to 68% for the lenses. The common dose-volume objective method decreased the planning time by an average of 35% and reduced the inter- and intra- planner subjectivity. Conclusion: The results from the present study suggest that the linear accelerator-based IM-TMI technique is clinically feasible. We have demonstrated that linear accelerator-based IM-TMI plans with good PTV coverage and improved OAR sparing can be obtained within a clinically reasonable time using the common dose-volume objective method proposed in the present study.

  6. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons using a CLYC array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Tristan; Doucet, E.; Chowdhury, P.; Lister, C. J.; Wilson, G. L.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S.

    2015-10-01

    CLYC scintillators, which have dual neutron and gamma response, have recently ushered in the possibility of fast neutron spectroscopy without time-of-flight (TOF). A 16-element array of 1'' x 1'' 6Li-depleted CLYC crystals, where pulse-shape-discrimination is achieved via digital pulse processing, has been commissioned at UMass Lowell. In an experiment at LANSCE, high energy neutrons were used to bombard 56Fe and 238U targets, in order to measure elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections as a function of energy and angle with the array. The array is placed very close to the targets for enhanced geometrical solid angles for scattered neutrons compared to standard neutron-TOF measurements. A pulse-height spectrum of scattered neutrons in the detectors is compared to the energy of the incident neutrons, which is measured via the TOF of the pulsed neutrons from the source to the detectors. Recoil corrections are necessary to combine the energy spectra from all the detectors to obtain angle-integrated elastic and inelastic cross-sections. The detection techniques, analysis procedures and results will be presented. Supported by NNSA-SSAA program through DOE Grant DE-NA00013008.

  7. Pulse Voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojek, Zbigniew

    The idea of imposing potential pulses and measuring the currents at the end of each pulse was proposed by Barker in a little-known journal as early as in 1958 [1]. However, the first reliable trouble-free and affordable polarographs offering voltammetric pulse techniques appeared on the market only in the 1970s. This delay was due to some limitations on the electronic side. In the 1990s, again substantial progress in electrochemical pulse instrumentation took place. This was related to the introduction of microprocessors, computers, and advanced software.

  8. Development of target system for intense neutron source of p-Li reaction.

    PubMed

    Kamada, So; Takada, Masashi; Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Imaseki, Hitoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Fujii, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaru; Sato, Hitoshi; Higashimata, Atsushi; Arai, Seiji

    2014-06-01

    A target cooling system was developed for an intense neutron source of p-Li reaction. The system consists of target cooling devices and protection devices for lithium evaporation. A pin-structure cooling device was developed to enhance cooling power. Functional graded material was utilized for the evaporation of lithium. Test experiments were performed by using the neutron exposure accelerator system for biological effect experiments (NASBEE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. The target system was confirmed to be applicable for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  9. Neutron multiplicity analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    I describe the capabilities of the EXCOM (EXcel based COincidence and Multiplicity) calculation tool which is used to analyze experimental data or simulated neutron multiplicity data. The input to the program is the count-rate data (including the multiplicity distribution) for a measurement, the isotopic composition of the sample and relevant dates. The program carries out deadtime correction and background subtraction and then performs a number of analyses. These are: passive calibration curve, known alpha and multiplicity analysis. The latter is done with both the point model and with the weighted point model. In the current application EXCOM carries out the rapid analysis of Monte Carlo calculated quantities and allows the user to determine the magnitude of sample perturbations that lead to systematic errors. Neutron multiplicity counting is an assay method used in the analysis of plutonium for safeguards applications. It is widely used in nuclear material accountancy by international (IAEA) and national inspectors. The method uses the measurement of the correlations in a pulse train to extract information on the spontaneous fission rate in the presence of neutrons from ({alpha},n) reactions and induced fission. The measurement is relatively simple to perform and gives results very quickly ({le} 1 hour). By contrast, destructive analysis techniques are extremely costly and time consuming (several days). By improving the achievable accuracy of neutron multiplicity counting, a nondestructive analysis technique, it could be possible to reduce the use of destructive analysis measurements required in safeguards applications. The accuracy of a neutron multiplicity measurement can be affected by a number of variables such as density, isotopic composition, chemical composition and moisture in the material. In order to determine the magnitude of these effects on the measured plutonium mass a calculational tool, EXCOM, has been produced using VBA within Excel. This

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  12. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  13. High voltage supply for neutron tubes in well logging applications

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D. Russell

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage supply is provided for a neutron tube used in well logging. The "biased pulse" supply of the invention combines DC and "full pulse" techniques and produces a target voltage comprising a substantial negative DC bias component on which is superimposed a pulse whose negative peak provides the desired negative voltage level for the neutron tube. The target voltage is preferably generated using voltage doubling techniques and employing a voltage source which generates bipolar pulse pairs having an amplitude corresponding to the DC bias level.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  15. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  16. Improved Detection of Fast Neutrons with Solid-State Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzakis, J.; Hassan, S. M.; Clark, E. L.; Talebitaher, A.; Lee, P.

    2014-02-01

    There is an increasing requirement for alternative and improved detection of fast neutrons due to the renewed interest in neutron diagnostics applications. Some applications require heavily shielded neutron sources that emit a substantial proportion of their emission as fast neutrons and so require high performance fast neutron detectors. In some applications, the detection of neutron bursts from pulsed neutron sources has to be synchronized to the repetition rate of the source. Typical fast neutron detectors incorporate scintillators that are sensitive to all kinds of ionizing radiations as well as neutrons, and their efficiency is low. In this paper, we present a device based on the principle of neutron activation coupled to solid-state p-i-n diodes connected to a charge amplifier. The charge amplifier is specially developed to operate with high capacitance detectors and has been optimized by the aid of the SPICE program. A solid-state pulse shaping filter follows the charge amplifier, as an inexpensive solution, capable to provide pulses that can be counted by a digital counter.

  17. Status of the Neutron Imaging and Diffraction Instrument IMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockelmann, Winfried; Burca, Genoveva; Kelleher, Joe F.; Kabra, Saurabh; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Sykora, Jeff; Pooley, Daniel E.; Nightingale, Jim B.; Aliotta, Francesco; Ponterio, Rosa C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Tresoldi, Dario; Vasi, Cirino; McPhate, Jason B.; Tremsin, Anton S.

    A cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument, IMAT, is currently being constructed at the ISIS second target station. IMAT will capitalize on time-of-flight transmission and diffraction techniques available at a pulsed neutron source. Analytical techniques will include neutron radiography, neutron tomography, energy-selective neutron imaging, and spatially resolved diffraction scans for residual strain and texture determination. Commissioning of the instrument will start in 2015, with time-resolving imaging detectors and two diffraction detector prototype modules. IMAT will be operated as a user facility for material science applications and will be open for developments of time-of-flight imaging methods.

  18. Neutron Diagnostics for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Cris W.; Berggren, R.; Caldwell, S.; Chrien, R. C.; Cverna, F.; Faulkner, J.; Mack, J. M.; Morgan, G. L.; Murphy, T. J.; Oertel, J. A.; Tegtmeier, J.; Walton, R.; Wilke, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Young, C. S.

    1999-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be a pre-emminent facility for research on burning plasmas. Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing a focus area of coordinating fusion reaction product diagnostics on NIF and studying fusion burn. We will be developing ``core'' diagnostics for NIF including neutron time-of-flight and single-hit systems for ion temperature and neutron spectra, measurements of ``bang-time'' (time of fusion burn relative to start of laser pulse), and support for activation measurements for high-yield and radiochemical analysis. We are also developing advanced Phase 2 diagnostics including a gas Cerenkov burn history diagnostic and work on apertures and detectors for neutron imaging. This will include tests of these diagnostic systems on the OMEGA laser in the coming years. The measurement requirements and system descriptions of these NIF diagnostics will be described. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-36.

  19. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  20. Scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect with longitudinally polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, B. E.; Lee, W.-T.; Motrunich, O. I.; Werner, S. A.

    1999-12-01

    In the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, a charged particle (electron) interacts with the scalar electrostatic potential U in the field-free (i.e., force-free) region inside an electrostatic cylinder (Faraday cage). Using a perfect single-crystal neutron interferometer we have performed a ''dual'' scalar Aharonov-Bohm experiment by subjecting polarized thermal neutrons to a pulsed magnetic field. The pulsed magnetic field was spatially uniform, precluding any force on the neutrons. Aligning the direction of the pulsed magnetic field to the neutron magnetic moment also rules out any classical torque acting to change the neutron polarization. The observed phase shift is purely quantum mechanical in origin. A detailed description of the experiment, performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, and its interpretation is given in this paper. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  1. Study of ``neutron bursts'' with Mexico City neutron monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenkin, Yu. V.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.

    2001-11-01

    A search was made for abnormal high multiplicity neutron events, with the combined array of a 6NM64 neutron supermonitor and eight plastic scintillators installed in México City. Some evidences were presented in the last years for such events [Akad. Nauk, Ser. Fiz. 61 (3) (1997) 486; Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 75A (1999) 333], but their existence was not established beyond any doubt, nor the conditions under which they occur. Our results show the existence of very high multiplicity events in coincidence with high counting rates of the plastic scintillators during several milliseconds. A detailed consideration of the experiment and data on the multiplicities as well as the temporal distributions of the pulses are presented. We propose that the explanation of the peculiar pulse time distributions in the detectors in such events may be found in neutron physics known processes rather than in delayed extensive air showers (EAS) component phenomena as claimed in [Nucl. Phys. B (Proc. Suppl.) 75A (1999) 333]. On the other hand, the origin of these EAS with very high multiplicity of neutrons is a question that remains unanswered.

  2. Preliminary detector design ST862-prototype neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.D.; Affinito, J.D.; Sisk, D.R.

    1993-12-01

    The detection of fast neutrons has been accomplished with commercially available liquid scintillators in detectors. Liquid scintillators discriminate fast neutrons from gamma radiation by discarding pulses with short decay constants. However, pulse-timing methods require expensive, bulky equipment and a high degree of technical sophistication in the user. Researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory have developed a new class of scintillating material, polymerizing crystals of CaF{sub 2}(Eu) and liquid acrylate monomers with matched indexes of refraction. The new detectors avoid the pulse-timing methods of liquid detectors and allow detectors to be large and relatively light. Fast neutrons can be discriminated from gamma radiation solely on the basis of pulse height (i.e., energy deposition). Using these detectors, a hand-held neutron detection instrument is proposed that can operate on battery power for 8 to 12 hours and be easily used in field conditions for surveying vehicles and structures.

  3. The Spallation Neutron Source Beam Commissioning and Initial Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Stuart; Aleksandrov, Alexander V.; Allen, Christopher K.; Assadi, Saeed; Bartoski, Dirk; Blokland, Willem; Casagrande, F.; Campisi, I.; Chu, C.; Cousineau, Sarah M.; Crofford, Mark T.; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Deibele, Craig E.; Dodson, George W.; Feshenko, A.; Galambos, John D.; Han, Baoxi; Hardek, T.; Holmes, Jeffrey A.; Holtkamp, N.; Howell, Matthew P.; Jeon, D.; Kang, Yoon W.; Kasemir, Kay; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kravchuk, L.; Long, Cary D.; McManamy, T.; Pelaia, II, Tom; Piller, Chip; Plum, Michael A.; Pogge, James R.; Purcell, John David; Shea, T.; Shishlo, Andrei P; Sibley, C.; Stockli, Martin P.; Stout, D.; Tanke, E.; Welton, Robert F; Zhang, Y.; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2015-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator delivers a one mega-Watt beam to a mercury target to produce neutrons used for neutron scattering materials research. It delivers ~ 1 GeV protons in short (< 1 us) pulses at 60 Hz. At an average power of ~ one mega-Watt, it is the highest-powered pulsed proton accelerator. The accelerator includes the first use of superconducting RF acceleration for a pulsed protons at this energy. The storage ring used to create the short time structure has record peak particle per pulse intensity. Beam commissioning took place in a staged manner during the construction phase of SNS. After the construction, neutron production operations began within a few months, and one mega-Watt operation was achieved within three years. The methods used to commission the beam and the experiences during initial operation are discussed.

  4. Slower, colder, longer : prospects for a very cold neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B. J.; Carpenter, J. M.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    2007-01-01

    The motivation for our study is to establish the prospects for a neutron source providing intense pulsed beams with spectra as cold as is realistic. The scientific motivation is to serve applications in nanoscience, biology and technology.

  5. New organic crystals for pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, G; Zaitseva, N; Cherepy, N; Newby, J; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2008-07-16

    Efficient, readily-available, low-cost, high-energy neutron detectors can play a central role in detecting illicit nuclear weapons since neutrons are a strong indication for the presence of fissile material such as Plutonium and Highly-Enriched Uranium. The main challenge in detecting fast neutrons consists in the discrimination of the signal from the gamma radiation background. At present, the only well-investigated organic crystal scintillator for fast neutron detection, in a n/{gamma} mixed field, is stilbene, which while offering good pulse shape discrimination, is not widely used because of its limited availability and high cost. In this work we report the results of our studies made with a number of new organic crystals, which exhibit pulse shape discrimination for detection of fast neutrons. In particular 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene features a light yield higher than anthracene and a Figure of Merit (FOM) for the pulse shape discrimination better than stilbene. New crystals are good candidates for the low-cost solution growth method, thus representing promising organic scintillators for widespread deployment for high-energy neutron detection.

  6. PULSE AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-06-17

    The improvement of pulse amplifiers used with scintillation detectors is described. The pulse amplifier circuit has the advantage of reducing the harmful effects of overloading cause by large signal inputs. In general the pulse amplifier circuit comprises two amplifier tubes with the input pulses applied to one amplifier grid and coupled to the second amplifier tube through a common cathode load. The output of the second amplifier is coupled from the plate circuit to a cathode follower tube grid and a diode tube in connected from grid to cathode of the cathode follower tube. Degenerative feedback is provided in the second amplifier by coupling a signal from the cathode follower cathode to the second amplifier grid. The circuit proqides moderate gain stability, and overload protection for subsequent pulse circuits.

  7. PREFACE: 6th Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to a subset of papers related to the work presented at the 6th edition of the international Workshop on Infrared Spectroscopy and Microscopy with Accelerator-Based Sources (WIRMS), held in Trieste, Italy, September 4-8 2011. Previous editions of the conference were held in Porquerolles (France), Lake Tahoe (USA), Rathen (Germany), Awaji (Japan), and Banff (Canada). This edition was organized and chaired by Stefano Lupi (Roma La Sapienza) and co-chaired by Andrea Perucchi (Elettra), with the support of the Italian Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, which was honored to host the WIRMS workshop in its tenth anniversary. The 6th WIRMS edition addressed several different topics, ranging from biochemistry to strongly correlated materials, from geology to conservation science, and from forensics to the study of cometary dusts. Representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities. This edition was attended by 88 participants, including representatives from the infrared scientific programs at synchrotron light sources and free-electron-laser facilities, who enjoyed the stimulating scientific presentations, several detailed discussions, and the beautiful weather and scenery of the Trieste gulf. Participants came from 16 different nations and four continents, including many young scientists, six of which were supported by the organizers. There were 45 scientific talks divided in 11 sessions: Facilities, Microspectroscopy (I, II, III), Time-Resolved Spectroscopies, Extreme Conditions, Condensed Matter, Near-Field, Imaging, THz Techniques and High-Resolution Spectroscopy. 37 posters were also presented at two very lively evening poster sessions. We would like to use the opportunity of writing this preface to thank all the participants of the workshop for the very high level of their scientific contribution and for the very friendly atmosphere

  8. Grazing-Incidence Neutron Optics based on Wolter Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of grazing-incidence neutron imaging optics based on the Wolter geometries have been successfully demonstrated. Biological microscopy, neutron radiography, medical imaging, neutron crystallography and boron neutron capture therapy would benefit from high resolution focusing neutron optics. Two bounce optics can also be used to focus neutrons in SANS experiments. Here, the use of the optics would result in lower values of obtainable scattering angles. The high efficiency of the optics permits a decrease in the minimum scattering vector without lowering the neutron intensity on sample. In this application, a significant advantage of the reflective optics over refractive optics is that the focus is independent of wavelength, so that the technique can be applied to polychromatic beams at pulsed neutron sources.

  9. Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.; Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  10. Superheavy Elements Production in High Intensive Neutron Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Panov, I. V.

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of superheavy elements production in high intensive neutron fluxes is being studied. A model of the transuranium isotopes production under conditions of pulse nucleosynthesis in a neutron flux with densities of up to ~1025 neutron/cm2 is considered. The pulse process allows us to divide it in time into two stages: the process of multiple neutron captures (with t < 10-6 s) and the subsequent β-decay of neutron-rich nuclei. The modeling of the transuranium yields takes into account the adiabatic character of the process, the probability of delayed fission, and the emission of delayed neutrons. A target with a binary composition of 238U and 239Pu, 248Cm, and 251Cf isotopes is used to predict the yields of heavy and superheavy isotopes.

  11. Active Neutron Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-05-01

    Portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) may be used to interrogate suspicious items to detect, characterize, and quantify the presence fissionable material based upon the measurement of prompt and/or delayed emissions of neutrons and/or photons resulting from fission. The small size (<0.2 m3), light weight (<12 kg), and low power consumption (<50 W) of modern ENGs makes them ideally suited for use in field situations, incorporated into systems carried by 2-3 individuals under rugged conditions. At Idaho National Laboratory we are investigating techniques and portable equipment for performing active neutron interrogation of moderate sized objects less than ~2-4 m3 to detect shielded fissionable material. Our research in this area relies upon the use of pulsed deuterium-tritium ENGs and the measurement of die-away prompt fission neutrons and other neutron signatures in-between neutron pulses from the ENG and after the ENG is turned off.

  12. Accelerator-based electron beam technologies for modification of bipolar semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Y. S.; Surma, A. M.; Lagov, P. B.; Fomenko, Y. L.; Geifman, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    Radiation processing technologies for static and dynamic parameters modification of silicon bipolar semiconductor devices implemented. Devices of different classes with wide range of operating currents (from a few mA to tens kA) and voltages (from a few volts to 8 kV) were processed in large scale including power diodes and thyristors, high-frequency bipolar and IGBT transistors, fast recovery diodes, pulsed switching diodes, precise temperature- compensated Zener diodes (in general more than fifty 50 device types), produced by different enterprises. The necessary changes in electrical parameters and characteristics of devices caused by formation in the device structures of electrically active and stable in the operating temperature range sub-nanoscale recombination centres. Technologies implemented in the air with high efficiency and controllability, and are an alternative to diffusion doping of Au or Pt, γ-ray, proton and low-Z ion irradiation.

  13. Radio Detection of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Brandon; Cardena, Brett; Dispoto, Dana; Papadopoulos, Joanna; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Neutron star binary systems lose energy through gravitational radiation, and eventually merge. The gravitational radiation from the merger can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). It is expected that a transient radio pulse will also be produced during the merger event. Detection of such radio transients would allow for LIGO to search for signals within constrained time periods. We calculate the LWA-1 detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers. We calculate the detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers for the Long Wavelength Array and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array.

  14. Observations of Neutron Stars with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an approved NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity that will be deployed as an attached payload on the International Space Station in August of 2016. By virtue of its unprecedented combination of throughput and fast timing capabilities, NICER will enable an empirical determination of the neutron star equation of state via realistic modeling of the pulsed X-ray radiation from millisecond pulsars. In this talk, I will describe the NICER instrument and measurement techniques it will employ, as well as the expected constraints on neutron star structure, and by extension the behavior of matter at supra-nuclear densities.

  15. Compact neutron imaging system using axisymmetric mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Khaykovich, Boris; Moncton, David E; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Ramsey, Brian D; Engelhaupt, Darell E

    2014-05-27

    A dispersed release of neutrons is generated from a source. A portion of this dispersed neutron release is reflected by surfaces of a plurality of nested, axisymmetric mirrors in at least an inner mirror layer and an outer mirror layer, wherein the neutrons reflected by the inner mirror layer are incident on at least one mirror surface of the inner mirror layer N times, wherein N is an integer, and wherein neutrons reflected by the outer mirror are incident on a plurality of mirror surfaces of the outer layer N+i times, where i is a positive integer, to redirect the neutrons toward a target. The mirrors can be formed by a periodically reversed pulsed-plating process.

  16. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVan, J. H.; DiStefano, J. R.; Eatherly, W. P.; Keiser, J. R.; Klueh, R. L.

    1995-09-01

    A Molten-Salt Reactor Program for civilian power applications was initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1956. In 1965 the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) went critical and was successfully operated for several years. Operation of the MSRE revealed two deficiencies in the Hastelloy N alloy that had been developed specifically for molten-salt systems. The alloy embrittled at elevated temperatures as a result of exposure to thermal neutrons (radiation damage) and grain boundary embrittlement occurred in materials exposed to fuel salt. Intergranular cracking was found to be associated with fission products, viz. tellurium. An improved Hastelloy N composition was subsequently developed that had better resistance to both of these problems. However, the discovery that fission product cracking could be significantly decreased by making the salt sufficiently reducing offers the prospect of improved compatibility with molten salts containing fission products and resistance to radiation damage in ABC applications. Recommendations are made regarding the types of corrosion tests and mechanistic studies needed to qualify materials for operation with PuF3-containing molten salts.

  17. Materials considerations for molten salt accelerator-based plutonium conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Eatherly, W.P.; Keiser, J.R.; Klueh, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    A Molten-Salt Reactor Program for power applications was initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1956. In 1965 the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) went critical and was successfully operated for several years. Operation of the MSRE revealed two deficiencies in the Hastelloy N alloy that had been developed specifically for molten-salt systems. The alloy embrittled at elevated temperatures as a result of exposure to thermal neutrons (radiation damage) and grain boundary embrittlement occurred in materials to fuel salt. Intergranular cracking was found to be associated with fission products, viz. tellurium. An improved Hastelloy N composition was subsequently developed that had better resistance to both of these problems. However, the discovery that fission product cracking could be significantly decreased by making the salt sufficiently reducing offers the prospect of improved compatibility with molten salts containing fission products and resistance to radiation damage in ABC applications. Recommendations are made regarding the types of corrosion tests and mechanistic studies needed to qualify materials for operation with PuF{sub 3}-containing molten salts.

  18. Application of Bayes' theorem for pulse shape discrimination

    DOE PAGES

    Marleau, Peter; Monterial, Mateusz; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-06-14

    A Bayesian approach is proposed for pulse shape discrimination of photons and neutrons in liquid organic scinitillators. Instead of drawing a decision boundary, each pulse is assigned a photon or neutron confidence probability. In addition, this allows for photon and neutron classification on an event-by-event basis. The sum of those confidence probabilities is used to estimate the number of photon and neutron instances in the data. An iterative scheme, similar to an expectation-maximization algorithm for Gaussian mixtures, is used to infer the ratio of photons-to-neutrons in each measurement. Therefore, the probability space adapts to data with varying photon-to-neutron ratios. Amore » time-correlated measurement of Am–Be and separate measurements of 137Cs, 60Co and 232Th photon sources were used to construct libraries of neutrons and photons. These libraries were then used to produce synthetic data sets with varying ratios of photons-to-neutrons. Probability weighted method that we implemented was found to maintain neutron acceptance rate of up to 90% up to photon-to-neutron ratio of 2000, and performed 9% better than the decision boundary approach. Furthermore, the iterative approach appropriately changed the probability space with an increasing number of photons which kept the neutron population estimate from unrealistically increasing.« less

  19. Application of Bayes' theorem for pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Marleau, Peter; Monterial, Mateusz; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-06-14

    A Bayesian approach is proposed for pulse shape discrimination of photons and neutrons in liquid organic scinitillators. Instead of drawing a decision boundary, each pulse is assigned a photon or neutron confidence probability. In addition, this allows for photon and neutron classification on an event-by-event basis. The sum of those confidence probabilities is used to estimate the number of photon and neutron instances in the data. An iterative scheme, similar to an expectation-maximization algorithm for Gaussian mixtures, is used to infer the ratio of photons-to-neutrons in each measurement. Therefore, the probability space adapts to data with varying photon-to-neutron ratios. A time-correlated measurement of Am–Be and separate measurements of 137Cs, 60Co and 232Th photon sources were used to construct libraries of neutrons and photons. These libraries were then used to produce synthetic data sets with varying ratios of photons-to-neutrons. Probability weighted method that we implemented was found to maintain neutron acceptance rate of up to 90% up to photon-to-neutron ratio of 2000, and performed 9% better than the decision boundary approach. Furthermore, the iterative approach appropriately changed the probability space with an increasing number of photons which kept the neutron population estimate from unrealistically increasing.

  20. The spectrum of neutrons at 60 hg m(-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The rate of neutron interactions was measured for the energy range 7.5 to 60 MeV, using a 3.85 kg cell of liquid scintillator. The neutrons are selected by pulse shape discrimination, with anticoincidence counters used to reduce interference from muons transversing the scintillator. The observed flux is interpreted in terms of neutrons produced from environmental uranium and thorium, those resulting from the capture of negative muons in nuclei and those from fast muon interactions.