Science.gov

Sample records for accelerometer activity counts

  1. ACCELEROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Pope, K.E.

    1958-11-25

    A device, commonly known as an accelerometer, is described which may be utllized for measuring acceleratlon with high sensitivity and accuracy tbroughout a relatively wlde range of values. In general, the accelerometer consists of an assembly, including an electric motor stator and a mass element located away from the axis of rotation of the stator, rotatably mounted on a support, and an electric motor rotor positioned within the stator and rotatable thereln. An electrlcal switching circuit controlled by the movement of the stator lntermittently energizes the rotor winding and retards move ment of the stator, and a centrifugal switch is rotatable with the rotor to operate upon attainment of a predetermined rotor rotational velocity.

  2. Classification of Sporting Activities Using Smartphone Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Edmond; Monaghan, David; O'Connor, Noel E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework that allows for the automatic identification of sporting activities using commonly available smartphones. We extract discriminative informational features from smartphone accelerometers using the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Despite the poor quality of their accelerometers, smartphones were used as capture devices due to their prevalence in today's society. Successful classification on this basis potentially makes the technology accessible to both elite and non-elite athletes. Extracted features are used to train different categories of classifiers. No one classifier family has a reportable direct advantage in activity classification problems to date; thus we examine classifiers from each of the most widely used classifier families. We investigate three classification approaches; a commonly used SVM-based approach, an optimized classification model and a fusion of classifiers. We also investigate the effect of changing several of the DWT input parameters, including mother wavelets, window lengths and DWT decomposition levels. During the course of this work we created a challenging sports activity analysis dataset, comprised of soccer and field-hockey activities. The average maximum F-measure accuracy of 87% was achieved using a fusion of classifiers, which was 6% better than a single classifier model and 23% better than a standard SVM approach. PMID:23604031

  3. A System for Monitoring Posture and Physical Activity Using Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- Accelerometers can be used to monitor physical activity in the home over prolonged periods. We describe a novel system for...processing schema in which these parameters are extracted is described. Keywords - physical activity , accelerometers, congestive heart failure, chronic...When monitoring the condition of patients with neurodegenerative or chronic diseases, a knowledge of their body movement and physical activity

  4. Physical activity using wrist-worn accelerometers: comparison of dominant and non-dominant wrist.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Olivier; Mikulovic, Jacques; Fardy, Paul S; Bui-Xuan, Gilles; Béghin, Laurent; Vanhelst, Jérémy

    2016-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in physical activity assessment between a wrist-worn accelerometer at the dominant or non-dominant arm. The secondary purpose was to assess the concurrent validity of measures of physical activity from the wrist-worn accelerometer and the waist-worn accelerometer. Forty adults wore three accelerometers simultaneously, one on the waist and one each on the non-dominant wrist and dominant wrist, respectively, for 24 consecutive hours of free-living conditions. Data were uploaded from the monitor to a computer following a 1-day test period. There were no significant differences in physical activity when comparing the dominant versus the non-dominant wrist, regardless of axis (P>0·05). Mean daily accelerometer output data from both wrists were strongly correlated with average counts per minute from the ActiGraph worn around the waist (r = 0·88, P<0·001). Findings suggest that the choice to wear the accelerometer on the non-dominant or dominant wrist has no impact on results. Data from this study contribute to the knowledge of how to best assess physical activity habits.

  5. Improving assessment of daily energy expenditure by identifying types of physical activity with a single accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, A G; Plasqui, G; Goris, A H C; Westerterp, K R

    2009-09-01

    Accelerometers are often used to quantify the acceleration of the body in arbitrary units (counts) to measure physical activity (PA) and to estimate energy expenditure. The present study investigated whether the identification of types of PA with one accelerometer could improve the estimation of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Total energy expenditure (TEE) of 15 subjects was measured with the use of double-labeled water. The physical activity level (PAL) was derived by dividing TEE by sleeping metabolic rate. Simultaneously, PA was measured with one accelerometer. Accelerometer output was processed to calculate activity counts per day (AC(D)) and to determine the daily duration of six types of common activities identified with a classification tree model. A daily metabolic value (MET(D)) was calculated as mean of the MET compendium value of each activity type weighed by the daily duration. TEE was predicted by AC(D) and body weight and by AC(D) and fat-free mass, with a standard error of estimate (SEE) of 1.47 MJ/day, and 1.2 MJ/day, respectively. The replacement in these models of AC(D) with MET(D) increased the explained variation in TEE by 9%, decreasing SEE by 0.14 MJ/day and 0.18 MJ/day, respectively. The correlation between PAL and MET(D) (R(2) = 51%) was higher than that between PAL and AC(D) (R(2) = 46%). We conclude that identification of activity types combined with MET intensity values improves the assessment of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Future studies could develop models to objectively assess activity type and intensity to further increase accuracy of the energy expenditure estimation.

  6. Optimal Placement of Accelerometers for the Detection of Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Ian; Kikhia, Basel; Nugent, Chris; Boytsov, Andrey; Hallberg, Josef; Synnes, Kåre; McClean, Sally; Finlay, Dewar

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an investigation to determine the optimal placement of accelerometers for the purpose of detecting a range of everyday activities. The paper investigates the effect of combining data from accelerometers placed at various bodily locations on the accuracy of activity detection. Eight healthy males participated within the study. Data were collected from six wireless tri-axial accelerometers placed at the chest, wrist, lower back, hip, thigh and foot. Activities included walking, running on a motorized treadmill, sitting, lying, standing and walking up and down stairs. The Support Vector Machine provided the most accurate detection of activities of all the machine learning algorithms investigated. Although data from all locations provided similar levels of accuracy, the hip was the best single location to record data for activity detection using a Support Vector Machine, providing small but significantly better accuracy than the other investigated locations. Increasing the number of sensing locations from one to two or more statistically increased the accuracy of classification. There was no significant difference in accuracy when using two or more sensors. It was noted, however, that the difference in activity detection using single or multiple accelerometers may be more pronounced when trying to detect finer grain activities. Future work shall therefore investigate the effects of accelerometer placement on a larger range of these activities. PMID:23867744

  7. Estimating Activity and Sedentary Behavior From an Accelerometer on the Hip or Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Mary E.; Haskell, William L.; Albinali, Fahd; Mota, Selene; Nawyn, Jason; Intille, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Previously the National Health and Examination Survey measured physical activity with an accelerometer worn on the hip for seven days, but recently changed the location of the monitor to the wrist. PURPOSE This study compared estimates of physical activity intensity and type with an accelerometer on the hip versus the wrist. METHODS Healthy adults (n=37) wore triaxial accelerometers (Wockets) on the hip and dominant wrist along with a portable metabolic unit to measure energy expenditure during 20 activities. Motion summary counts were created, then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine sedentary and activity intensity thresholds. Ambulatory activities were separated from other activities using the coefficient of variation (CV) of the counts. Mixed model predictions were used to estimate activity intensity. RESULTS The ROC for determining sedentary behavior had greater sensitivity and specificity (71% and 96%) at the hip than the wrist (53% and 76%), as did the ROC for moderate to vigorous physical activity on the hip (70% and 83%) versus the wrist (30% and 69%). The ROC for the CV associated with ambulation had a larger AUC at the hip compared to the wrist (0.83 and 0.74). The prediction model for activity energy expenditure (AEE) resulted in an average difference of 0.55 (+/− 0.55) METs on the hip and 0.82 (+/− 0.93) METs on the wrist. CONCLUSIONS Methods frequently used for estimating AEE and identifying activity intensity thresholds from an accelerometer on the hip generally do better than similar data from an accelerometer on the wrist. Accurately identifying sedentary behavior from a lack of wrist motion presents significant challenges. PMID:23247702

  8. Assessment of Differing Definitions of Accelerometer Nonwear Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Terry, James W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Measuring physical activity with objective tools, such as accelerometers, is becoming more common. Accelerometers measure acceleration multiple times within a given frequency and summarize this as a count over a pre-specified time period or epoch. The resultant count represents acceleration over the epoch length. Accelerometers eliminate biases…

  9. Validity of Using Tri-Axial Accelerometers to Measure Human Movement – Part II: Step Counts at a Wide Range of Gait Velocities

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Emma; Lugade, Vipul; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-01-01

    A subject-specific step counting method with a high accuracy level at all walking speeds is needed to assess the functional level of impaired patients. The study aim was to validate step counts and cadence calculations from acceleration data by comparison to video data during dynamic activity. Custom-built activity monitors, each containing one tri-axial accelerometer, were placed on the ankles, thigh, and waist of 11 healthy adults. ICC values were greater than 0.98 for video inter-rater reliability of all step counts. The activity monitoring system (AMS) algorithm demonstrated a median (interquartile range; IQR) agreement of 92% (8%) with visual observations during walking/jogging trials at gait velocities ranging from 0.1 m/s to 4.8 m/s, while FitBits (ankle and waist), and a Nike Fuelband (wrist) demonstrated agreements of 92% (36%), 93% (22%), and 33% (35%), respectively. The algorithm results demonstrated high median (IQR) step detection sensitivity (95% (2%)), positive predictive value (PPV) (99% (1%)), and agreement (97% (3%)) during a laboratory-based simulated free-living protocol. The algorithm also showed high median (IQR) sensitivity, PPV, and agreement identifying walking steps (91% (5%), 98% (4%), and 96% (5%)), jogging steps (97% (6%), 100% (1%), and 95% (6%)), and less than 3% mean error in cadence calculations. PMID:24656871

  10. Validity of using tri-axial accelerometers to measure human movement - Part II: Step counts at a wide range of gait velocities.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Emma; Lugade, Vipul; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-06-01

    A subject-specific step counting method with a high accuracy level at all walking speeds is needed to assess the functional level of impaired patients. The study aim was to validate step counts and cadence calculations from acceleration data by comparison to video data during dynamic activity. Custom-built activity monitors, each containing one tri-axial accelerometer, were placed on the ankles, thigh, and waist of 11 healthy adults. ICC values were greater than 0.98 for video inter-rater reliability of all step counts. The activity monitoring system (AMS) algorithm demonstrated a median (interquartile range; IQR) agreement of 92% (8%) with visual observations during walking/jogging trials at gait velocities ranging from 0.1 to 4.8m/s, while FitBits (ankle and waist), and a Nike Fuelband (wrist) demonstrated agreements of 92% (36%), 93% (22%), and 33% (35%), respectively. The algorithm results demonstrated high median (IQR) step detection sensitivity (95% (2%)), positive predictive value (PPV) (99% (1%)), and agreement (97% (3%)) during a laboratory-based simulated free-living protocol. The algorithm also showed high median (IQR) sensitivity, PPV, and agreement identifying walking steps (91% (5%), 98% (4%), and 96% (5%)), jogging steps (97% (6%), 100% (1%), and 95% (6%)), and less than 3% mean error in cadence calculations.

  11. Accelerometer Use in a Physical Activity Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Borradaile, Kelley E.; Lewis, Beth A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Longval, Jaime L.; Parisi, Alfred F.; Albrecht, Anna E.; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Jakicic, John M.; Papandonatos, George D.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n=63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age=47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16–0.48 and from 0.28–0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO2(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15–0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23–0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min=46.47, 95% CI=14.36–78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery. PMID:20723619

  12. Accelerometer use in a physical activity intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Melissa A; Borradaile, Kelley E; Lewis, Beth A; Whiteley, Jessica A; Longval, Jaime L; Parisi, Alfred F; Albrecht, Anna E; Sciamanna, Christopher N; Jakicic, John M; Papandonatos, George D; Marcus, Bess H

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n = 63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age = 47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16-0.48 and from 0.28-0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO(2)(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15-0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23 to 0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min = 46.47, 95% CI = 14.36-78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery.

  13. Use of Accelerometers to Measure Real-Life Physical Activity in Ambulatory Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fjeldstad, Anette S.; Pardo, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) may negatively affect individuals' participation in physical activity (PA). We used accelerometers to determine PA level in individuals with MS with varying degrees of disability as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) during regular daily activities. Methods: Participants wore an accelerometer from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. for 7 consecutive days. Activity counts recorded during this period were analyzed in 1-minute epochs and categorized into one of four PA levels: light, moderate, hard, and very hard. Results: The study cohort comprised 13 patients with MS and 12 controls. There were significant negative correlations for minutes spent in PA and EDSS measures on weekdays (r = −0.61), weekend (r = −0.64), and full week (r = −0.61) and number of steps taken on weekdays (r = −0.56), weekend (r = −0.80), and full-week average (r = −0.68). Significant positive correlations were found for minutes spent in light PA and EDSS score (r = 0.69). Significant negative correlations were found for minutes spent in moderate and hard PA and EDSS score. No significant difference was seen between the MS group and controls on any parameters (P > .05). Conclusions: This study showed that accelerometers can be used to objectively quantify PA levels in individuals with MS with different disability levels. This cohort demonstrated that the amount of PA is inversely proportional to the degree of physical disability. Collected data revealed not only the amount but also the intensity of PA performed in real-life circumstances. PMID:26472942

  14. Assessing Physical Activity in Children with Asthma: Convergent Validity between Accelerometer and Electronic Diary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floro, Josh N.; Dunton, Genevieve F.; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    Convergent validity of accelerometer and electronic diary physical activity data was assessed in children with asthma. Sixty-two participants, ages 9-18 years, wore an accelerometer and reported their physical activity level in quarter-hour segments every 2 hr using the Ambulatory Diary Assessment (ADA). Moderate validity was found between…

  15. Technical Reliability Assessment of the Actigraph GT1M Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Mota, Jorge; Esliger, Dale; Welk, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the Actigraph GT1M (Pensacola, FL, USA) accelerometer activity count and step functions. Fifty GT1M accelerometers were initialized to collect simultaneous acceleration counts and steps data using 15-sec epochs. All reliability testing was completed using a mechanical shaker plate to…

  16. Slice&Dice: Recognizing Food Preparation Activities Using Embedded Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cuong; Olivier, Patrick

    Within the context of an endeavor to provide situated support for people with cognitive impairments in the kitchen, we developed and evaluated classifiers for recognizing 11 actions involved in food preparation. Data was collected from 20 lay subjects using four specially designed kitchen utensils incorporating embedded 3-axis accelerometers. Subjects were asked to prepare a mixed salad in our laboratory-based instrumented kitchen environment. Video of each subject's food preparation activities were independently annotated by three different coders. Several classifiers were trained and tested using these features. With an overall accuracy of 82.9% our investigation demonstrated that a broad set of food preparation actions can be reliably recognized using sensors embedded in kitchen utensils.

  17. Validation of uniaxial and triaxial accelerometers for the assessment of physical activity in preschool children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the unique physical activity patterns of preschoolers, wearable electronic devices for quantitative assessment of physical activity require validation in this population. Study objective was to validate uniaxial and triaxial accelerometers in preschoolers. Room calorimetry was performed over 3...

  18. Real-time estimation of daily physical activity intensity by a triaxial accelerometer and a gravity-removal classification algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Kazunori; Oshima, Yoshitake; Hikihara, Yuki; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Tabata, Izumi; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2011-06-01

    We have recently developed a simple algorithm for the classification of household and locomotive activities using the ratio of unfiltered to filtered synthetic acceleration (gravity-removal physical activity classification algorithm, GRPACA) measured by a triaxial accelerometer. The purpose of the present study was to develop a new model for the immediate estimation of daily physical activity intensities using a triaxial accelerometer. A total of sixty-six subjects were randomly assigned into validation (n 44) and cross-validation (n 22) groups. All subjects performed fourteen activities while wearing a triaxial accelerometer in a controlled laboratory setting. During each activity, energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry, and physical activity intensities were expressed as metabolic equivalents (MET). The validation group displayed strong relationships between measured MET and filtered synthetic accelerations for household (r 0·907, P < 0·001) and locomotive (r 0·961, P < 0·001) activities. In the cross-validation group, two GRPACA-based linear regression models provided highly accurate MET estimation for household and locomotive activities. Results were similar when equations were developed by non-linear regression or sex-specific linear or non-linear regressions. Sedentary activities were also accurately estimated by the specific linear regression classified from other activity counts. Therefore, the use of a triaxial accelerometer in combination with a GRPACA permits more accurate and immediate estimation of daily physical activity intensities, compared with previously reported cut-off classification models. This method may be useful for field investigations as well as for self-monitoring by general users.

  19. Validity of the Actical accelerometer step-count function in children.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Richard R; Rosenkranz, Sara K; Weber, Casey

    2011-08-01

    This study sought to assess criterion validity of the Actical monitor step-count function in children via ankle and waist placement, compared with observed video recordings. Children attending a summer program (12 boys, 7 girls, mean age = 9.6yrs, range 7-11yrs) wore two synchronized Acticals, attached at the ankle (AA) and waist (AW). Children performed treadmill walking at varying speeds, and two research assistants counted steps using observed video recordings (OVR). Results showed high correlations for AW-OVR (r = .927, p < .001) and AA-OVR (r = .854, p < .001), but AW and AA were significantly lower than OVR (t > 11.2, p < .001). AW provided better step estimates than AA for step rates above 130 steps per minute. In contrast, AA was superior to AW for slow walking, and measured more steps during the (nontreadmill) program time. Overall, the Actical monitor showed good evidence of validity as a measure of steps in children for population-based studies.

  20. Evaluation of artificial neural network algorithms for predicting METs and activity type from accelerometer data: validation on an independent sample

    PubMed Central

    Lyden, Kate; Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Staudenmayer, John

    2011-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory provided a “proof of concept” for use of artificial neural networks (nnets) to estimate metabolic equivalents (METs) and identify activity type from accelerometer data (Staudenmayer J, Pober D, Crouter S, Bassett D, Freedson P, J Appl Physiol 107: 1330–1307, 2009). The purpose of this study was to develop new nnets based on a larger, more diverse, training data set and apply these nnet prediction models to an independent sample to evaluate the robustness and flexibility of this machine-learning modeling technique. The nnet training data set (University of Massachusetts) included 277 participants who each completed 11 activities. The independent validation sample (n = 65) (University of Tennessee) completed one of three activity routines. Criterion measures were 1) measured METs assessed using open-circuit indirect calorimetry; and 2) observed activity to identify activity type. The nnet input variables included five accelerometer count distribution features and the lag-1 autocorrelation. The bias and root mean square errors for the nnet MET trained on University of Massachusetts and applied to University of Tennessee were +0.32 and 1.90 METs, respectively. Seventy-seven percent of the activities were correctly classified as sedentary/light, moderate, or vigorous intensity. For activity type, household and locomotion activities were correctly classified by the nnet activity type 98.1 and 89.5% of the time, respectively, and sport was correctly classified 23.7% of the time. Use of this machine-learning technique operates reasonably well when applied to an independent sample. We propose the creation of an open-access activity dictionary, including accelerometer data from a broad array of activities, leading to further improvements in prediction accuracy for METs, activity intensity, and activity type. PMID:21885802

  1. Combining global positioning system and accelerometer data to determine the locations of physical activity in children.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, Nicolas M; Blossom, Jeff; Field, Alison E; Chiang, Sylvia R; Winickoff, Jonathan P; Kleinman, Ronald E

    2012-05-01

    National trends indicate that children and adolescents are not achieving sufficient levels of physical activity. Combining global positioning system (GPS) technology with accelerometers has the potential to provide an objective determination in locations where youth engage in physical activity. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal methods for collecting combined accelerometer and GPS data in youth, to best locate where children spend time and are physically active. A convenience sample of 24 mid-school children in Massachusetts was included. Accelerometers and GPS units were used to quantify and locate childhood physical activity over 5 weekdays and 2 weekend days. Accelerometer and GPS data were joined by time and mapped with a geographical information system (GIS) using ArcGIS software. Data were collected in winter, spring, summer in 2009-2010, collecting a total of 26,406 matched datapoints overall. Matched data yield was low (19.1% total), regardless of season (winter, 12.8%; spring, 30.1%; summer, 14.3%). Teacher-provided, pre-charged equipment yielded the most matched (30.1%; range: 10.1-52.3%) and greatest average days (6.1 days) of data. Across all seasons, children spent most of their time at home. Outdoor use patterns appeared to vary by season, with street use increasing in spring, and park and playground use increasing in summer. Children spent equal amounts of physical activity time at home and walking in the streets. Overall, the various methods for combining GPS and accelerometer data provided similarly low amounts of combined data. No combined GPS and accelerometer data collection method proved superior in every data return category, but use of GIS to map joined accelerometer and GPS data can demarcate childhood physical activity locations.

  2. Comparison of IPAQ-SF and Two Other Physical Activity Questionnaires with Accelerometer in Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Mäestu, Jarek; Lätt, Evelin; Jürimäe, Jaak; Vainik, Uku

    2017-01-01

    Self-report measures of physical activity (PA) are easy to use and popular but their reliability is often questioned. Therefore, the general aim of the present study was to investigate the association of PA questionnaires with accelerometer derived PA, in a sample of adolescent boys. In total, 191 pubertal boys (mean age 14.0 years) completed three self-report questionnaires and wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT1M) for 7 consecutive days. The PA questionnaires were: International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF), Tartu Physical Activity Questionnaire (TPAQ), and the Inactivity subscale from Domain-Specific Impulsivity (DSI) scale. All three questionnaires were significantly correlated with accelerometer derived MVPA: the correlations were 0.31 for the IPAQ-SF MVPA, 0.34 for the TPAQ MVPA and -0.29 for the DSI Inactivity scale. Nevertheless, none of the questionnaires can be used as a reliable individual-level estimate of MVPA in male adolescents. The boys underreported their MVPA in IPAQ-SF as compared to accelerometer-derived MVPA (respective averages 43 and 56 minutes); underreporting was more marked in active boys with average daily MVPA at least 60 minutes, and was not significant in less active boys. Conversely, MVPA index from TPAQ overestimated the MVPA in less active boys but underestimated it in more active boys. The sedentary time reported in IPAQ-SF was an underestimate as compared to accelerometer-derived sedentary time (averages 519 and 545 minutes, respectively). PMID:28056080

  3. Validity of wrist worn accelerometers and comparability between hip and wrist placement sites in estimating physical activity behaviour in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Hislop, Jane; Palmer, Nicole; Anand, Priya; Aldin, Tara

    2016-09-21

    Wrist-worn accelerometers can increase compliance with wearing accelerometers, however, several large scale studies continue to use hip-worn accelerometers and it is unclear how comparable data is from the two sites. The study aims were: to investigate agreement between wrist- and hip- worn accelerometers and to determine the validity of Johansson et al cut-points for wrist worn accelerometers in preschool children. A sample of 32 preschool children (21 boys, 4.2 (0.5) years, BMI 16.6 (1.1)) were videoed wearing GT3X+  accelerometers on their wrist and hip while they engaged in 1 h of free-play in their nursery. Children's activity were coded using, the children's activity rating scale (CARS): with CARS, level 1 'sedentary' and levels 2-5 were classified as time spent in total physical activity (TPA). Accelerometry data were processed using Johansson et al cut-points for the wrist data and Evenson et al cut-points for the hip data, into time spent in different intensities of physical activity (PA). The mean counts per minute (cpm) from the hip and wrist were compared. There was a strong correlation between the hip and wrist cpm (r  =  0.81, p  <  0.01) and total count data (r  =  0.83 p  <  0.01), however there was a large systematic bias with wide limits of agreement. Good agreement (mean difference (LOA) 1.1 (-9.9, 12.1) was found between the CARS estimate of TPA (29.5 (10.4) mins) and the wrist estimate, using the Johansson et al cut points (28.4 (9.8) mins). There was also a reasonable agreement between the hip estimates with the Evenson et al cut-points and Johansson et al estimate (mean difference (LOA):6.3 (-8.8, 21.4) mins. In conclusion, the findings suggest that the Johansson et al (2013 Pediatr. Obes. 10 1-6) cut-points applied to wrist worn accelerometers provides a valid estimate of TPA in preschool children and have reasonable agreement with Evenson et al cut-points applied to hip accelerometers.

  4. Physical Activity and Adiposity Markers at Older Ages: Accelerometer Vs Questionnaire Data

    PubMed Central

    Sabia, Séverine; Cogranne, Pol; van Hees, Vincent T.; Bell, Joshua A.; Elbaz, Alexis; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical activity is critically important for successful aging, but its effect on adiposity markers at older ages is unclear as much of the evidence comes from self-reported data on physical activity. We assessed the associations of questionnaire-assessed and accelerometer-assessed physical activity with adiposity markers in older adults. Design/Setting/Participants This was a cross-sectional study on 3940 participants (age range 60-83 years) of the Whitehall II study who completed a 20-item physical activity questionnaire and wore a wrist-mounted accelerometer for 9 days in 2012 and 2013. Measurements Total physical activity was estimated using metabolic equivalent hours/week for the questionnaire and mean acceleration for the accelerometer. Time spent in moderate-and-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was also assessed by questionnaire and accelerometer. Adiposity assessment included body mass index, waist circumference, and fat mass index. Fat mass index was calculated as fat mass/height² (kg/m²), with fat mass estimated using bioimpedance. Results Greater total physical activity was associated with lower adiposity for all adiposity markers in a dose-response manner. In men, the strength of this association was 2.4 to 2.8 times stronger with the accelerometer than with questionnaire data. In women, it was 1.9 to 2.3 times stronger. For MVPA, questionnaire data in men suggested no further benefit for adiposity markers past 1 hour/week of activity. This was not the case for accelerometer-assessed MVPA where, for example, compared with men undertaking <1 hour/week of accelerometer-assessed MVPA, waist circumference was 3.06 (95% confidence interval 2.06–4.06) cm lower in those performing MVPA 1–2.5 hours/week, 4.69 (3.47–5.91) cm lower in those undertaking 2.5–4 hours/week, and 7.11 (5.93–8.29) cm lower in those performing ≥4 hours/week. Conclusions The association of physical activity with adiposity markers in older adults was

  5. Activity recognition in planetary navigation field tests using classification algorithms applied to accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Ade, Carl; Broxterman, Ryan; Barstow, Thomas; Nelson, Thomas; Warren, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Accelerometer data provide useful information about subject activity in many different application scenarios. For this study, single-accelerometer data were acquired from subjects participating in field tests that mimic tasks that astronauts might encounter in reduced gravity environments. The primary goal of this effort was to apply classification algorithms that could identify these tasks based on features present in their corresponding accelerometer data, where the end goal is to establish methods to unobtrusively gauge subject well-being based on sensors that reside in their local environment. In this initial analysis, six different activities that involve leg movement are classified. The k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) algorithm was found to be the most effective, with an overall classification success rate of 90.8%.

  6. Intensity Classification Accuracy of Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activities in Chinese Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many ActiGraph accelerometer cutoff points and equations have been developed to classify children and youth's physical activity (PA) into different intensity levels. Using a sample from the Chinese City Children and Youth Physical Activity Study, this study was to develop new ActiGraph cutoff points for moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  7. Convergent Validity of Four Accelerometer Cutpoints with Direct Observation of Preschool Children's Outdoor Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahan, David; Nicaise, Virginie; Reuben, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: More than one fifth of American preschool-aged children are classified as overweight/obese. Increasing physical activity is one means of slowing/reversing progression to overweight or obesity. Measurement of physical activity in this age group relies heavily on motion sensors such as accelerometers. Output is typically interpreted through…

  8. Accelerometer tags: detecting and identifying activities in fish and the effect of sampling frequency.

    PubMed

    Broell, Franziska; Noda, Takuji; Wright, Serena; Domenici, Paolo; Steffensen, John Fleng; Auclair, Jean-Pierre; Taggart, Christopher T

    2013-04-01

    Monitoring and measuring the behaviour and movement of aquatic animals in the wild is typically challenging, though micro-accelerometer (archival or telemetry) tags now provide the means to remotely identify and quantify behavioural states and rates such as resting, swimming and migrating, and to estimate activity and energy budgets. Most studies use low-frequency (≤32 Hz) accelerometer sampling because of battery and data-archiving constraints. In this study we assessed the effect of sampling frequency (aliasing) on activity detection probability using the great sculpin (Myoxocephalus polyacanthoceaphalus) as a model species. Feeding strikes and escape responses (fast-start activities) and spontaneous movements among seven different great sculpin were triggered, observed and recorded using video records and a tri-axial accelerometer sampling at 100 Hz. We demonstrate that multiple parameters in the time and probability domains can statistically differentiate between activities with high detection (90%) and identification (80%) probabilities. Detection probability for feeding and escape activities decreased by 50% when sampling at <10 Hz. Our analyses illustrate additional problems associated with aliasing and how activity and energy-budget estimates can be compromised and misinterpreted. We recommend that high-frequency (>30 Hz) accelerometer sampling be used in similar laboratory and field studies. If battery and/or data storage is limited, we also recommend archiving the events via an on-board algorithm that determines the highest likelihood and subsequent archiving of the various event classes of interest.

  9. Machine Learning Methods for Classifying Human Physical Activity from On-Body Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Mannini, Andrea; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2010-01-01

    The use of on-body wearable sensors is widespread in several academic and industrial domains. Of great interest are their applications in ambulatory monitoring and pervasive computing systems; here, some quantitative analysis of human motion and its automatic classification are the main computational tasks to be pursued. In this paper, we discuss how human physical activity can be classified using on-body accelerometers, with a major emphasis devoted to the computational algorithms employed for this purpose. In particular, we motivate our current interest for classifiers based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). An example is illustrated and discussed by analysing a dataset of accelerometer time series. PMID:22205862

  10. Using wearable cameras to categorise type and context of accelerometer-identified episodes of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accelerometers can identify certain physical activity behaviours, but not the context in which they take place. This study investigates the feasibility of wearable cameras to objectively categorise the behaviour type and context of participants’ accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Methods Adults were given an Actical hip-mounted accelerometer and a SenseCam wearable camera (worn via lanyard). The onboard clocks on both devices were time-synchronised. Participants engaged in free-living activities for 3 days. Actical data were cleaned and episodes of sedentary, lifestyle-light, lifestyle-moderate, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were identified. Actical episodes were categorised according to their social and environmental context and Physical Activity (PA) compendium category as identified from time-matched SenseCam images. Results There were 212 days considered from 49 participants from whom SenseCam images and associated Actical data were captured. Using SenseCam images, behaviour type and context attributes were annotated for 386 (out of 3017) randomly selected episodes (such as walking/transportation, social/not-social, domestic/leisure). Across the episodes, 12 categories that aligned with the PA Compendium were identified, and 114 subcategory types were identified. Nineteen percent of episodes could not have their behaviour type and context categorized; 59% were outdoors versus 39% indoors; 33% of episodes were recorded as leisure time activities, with 33% transport, 18% domestic, and 15% occupational. 33% of the randomly selected episodes contained direct social interaction and 22% were in social situations where the participant wasn’t involved in direct engagement. Conclusion Wearable camera images offer an objective method to capture a spectrum of activity behaviour types and context across 81% of accelerometer-identified episodes of activity. Wearable cameras represent the best objective method currently

  11. New Validated Thresholds for Various Intensities of Physical Activity in Adolescents Using the Actigraph Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhelst, Jeremy; Beghin, Laurent; Turck, Dominique; Gottrand, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and validate the new thresholds for various intensities of physical activity in adolescents using the Actigraph accelerometer. Sixty healthy participants aged 10-16 years were recruited. Forty participants participated in the calibration study whereas the others participated in the validation study.…

  12. A Comparison of Accelerometer Accuracy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Petroski, Gregory F; Markis, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Older adults' gait disorders present challenges for accurate activity monitoring. The current study compared the accuracy of accelerometer-detected to hand-tallied steps in 50 residential care/assisted living residents. Participants completed two walking trials wearing a Fitbit® Tracker and waist-, wrist-, and ankle-mounted Actigraph GT1M. Agreement between accelerometer and observed counts was calculated using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), accelerometer to observed count ratios, accelerometer and observed count differences, and Bland-Altman plots. Classification and Regression Tree analysis identified minimum gait speed thresholds to achieve accelerometer accuracy ≥0.80. Participants' mean age was 84.2 and gait speed was 0.64 m/s. All accelerometers underestimated true steps. Only the ankle-mounted GT1M demonstrated positive agreement with observed counts (CCC = 0.205). Thresholds for 0.80 accuracy were gait speeds ≥0.56 m/s for the Fitbit and gait speeds ≥0.71 m/s for the ankle-mounted GT1M. Gait speed and accelerometer placement affected activity monitor accuracy in older adults.

  13. Purpose in life is associated with physical activity measured by accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Stephanie A; Masters, Kevin S

    2016-06-01

    Previous research has shown that purpose in life, the belief that one's life is meaningful and goal-directed, is associated with greater engagement in self-reported physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between purpose in life and accelerometer-measured physical activity. Community volunteers (N = 104) completed measures of purpose in life and potential confounds and wore accelerometers for three consecutive days. Purpose in life was positively associated with objectively measured movement, moderate to vigorous physical activity, and with self-reported activity. These relationships were largely unchanged after controlling for potential confounds. These results suggest that purpose in life is a reliable correlate of physical activity.

  14. Identifying Active Travel Behaviors in Challenging Environments Using GPS, Accelerometers, and Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Katherine; Godbole, Suneeta; Marshall, Simon; Lanckriet, Gert; Staudenmayer, John; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active travel is an important area in physical activity research, but objective measurement of active travel is still difficult. Automated methods to measure travel behaviors will improve research in this area. In this paper, we present a supervised machine learning method for transportation mode prediction from global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data. Methods: We collected a dataset of about 150 h of GPS and accelerometer data from two research assistants following a protocol of prescribed trips consisting of five activities: bicycling, riding in a vehicle, walking, sitting, and standing. We extracted 49 features from 1-min windows of this data. We compared the performance of several machine learning algorithms and chose a random forest algorithm to classify the transportation mode. We used a moving average output filter to smooth the output predictions over time. Results: The random forest algorithm achieved 89.8% cross-validated accuracy on this dataset. Adding the moving average filter to smooth output predictions increased the cross-validated accuracy to 91.9%. Conclusion: Machine learning methods are a viable approach for automating measurement of active travel, particularly for measuring travel activities that traditional accelerometer data processing methods misclassify, such as bicycling and vehicle travel. PMID:24795875

  15. The association between park visitation and physical activity measured with accelerometer, GPS, and travel diary

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Orion T.; Moudon, Anne Vernez; Fesinmeyer, Megan D.; Zhou, Chuan; Saelens, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    Public parks are promoted as places that support physical activity (PA), but evidence of how park visitation contributes to overall PA is limited. This study observed adults living in the Seattle metropolitan area (n=671) for one week using accelerometer, GPS, and travel diary. Park visits, measured both objectively (GPS) and subjectively (travel diary), were temporally linked to accelerometer-measured PA. Park visits occurred at 1.4 per person-week. Participants who visited parks at least once (n=308) had an adjusted average of 14.3 (95% CI: 8.9, 19.6) minutes more daily PA than participants who did not visit a park. Even when park-related activity was excluded, park visitors still obtained more minutes of daily PA than non-visitors. Park visitation contributes to a more active lifestyle, but is not solely responsible for it. Parks may best serve to complement broader public health efforts to encourage PA. PMID:26798965

  16. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6 min bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE.

  17. A random forest classifier for the prediction of energy expenditure and type of physical activity from wrist and hip accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Lanckriet, Gert; Wing, David; Marshall, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Wrist accelerometers are being used in population level surveillance of physical activity (PA) but more research is needed to evaluate their validity for correctly classifying types of PA behavior and predicting energy expenditure (EE). In this study we compare accelerometers worn on the wrist and hip, and the added value of heart rate (HR) data, for predicting PA type and EE using machine learning. Forty adults performed locomotion and household activities in a lab setting while wearing three ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (left hip, right hip, non-dominant wrist) and a HR monitor (Polar RS400). Participants also wore a portable indirect calorimeter (COSMED K4b2), from which EE and metabolic equivalents (METs) were computed for each minute. We developed two predictive models: a random forest classifier to predict activity type and a random forest of regression trees to estimate METs. Predictions were evaluated using leave-one-user-out cross-validation. The hip accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 92.3% in predicting four activity types (household, stairs, walking, running), while the wrist accelerometer obtained an average accuracy of 87.5%. Across all 8 activities combined (laundry, window washing, dusting, dishes, sweeping, stairs, walking, running), the hip and wrist accelerometers obtained average accuracies of 70.2% and 80.2% respectively. Predicting METs using the hip or wrist devices alone obtained root mean square errors (rMSE) of 1.09 and 1.00 METs per 6-minute bout, respectively. Including HR data improved MET estimation, but did not significantly improve activity type classification. These results demonstrate the validity of random forest classification and regression forests for PA type and MET prediction using accelerometers. The wrist accelerometer proved more useful in predicting activities with significant arm movement, while the hip accelerometer was superior for predicting locomotion and estimating EE. PMID:25340969

  18. Methods to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from high-frequency wrist accelerometer measurements

    PubMed Central

    He, Shai; Hickey, Amanda; Sasaki, Jeffer; Freedson, Patty

    2015-01-01

    This investigation developed models to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from three-axis high-frequency wrist-worn accelerometer data. The models were developed and tested on 20 participants (n = 10 males, n = 10 females, mean age = 24.1, mean body mass index = 23.9), who wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer on their dominant wrist and an ActiGraph GT3X on the hip while performing a variety of scripted activities. Energy expenditure was concurrently measured by a portable indirect calorimetry system. Those calibration data were then used to develop and assess both machine-learning and simpler models with fewer unknown parameters (linear regression and decision trees) to estimate metabolic equivalent scores (METs) and to classify activity intensity, sedentary time, and locomotion time. The wrist models, applied to 15-s windows, estimated METs [random forest: root mean squared error (rSME) = 1.21 METs, hip: rMSE = 1.67 METs] and activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, hip: 60% correct) better than a previously developed model that used counts per minute measured at the hip. In a separate set of comparisons, the simpler decision trees classified activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, tree: 74% correct), sedentary time (random forest: 96% correct, decision tree: 97% correct), and locomotion time (random forest: 99% correct, decision tree: 96% correct) nearly as well or better than the machine-learning approaches. Preliminary investigation of the models' performance on two free-living people suggests that they may work well outside of controlled conditions. PMID:26112238

  19. Quality of GOCE accelerometer data and analysis with ionospheric dynamics during geomagnetically active days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinem Ince, Elmas; Fomichev, Victor; Floberghagen, Rune; Schlicht, Anja; Martynenko, Oleg; Pagiatakis, Spiros

    2016-07-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) was launched in March, 2009 and completed its mission with great success in November, 2011. GOCE data processing is challenging and not all the disturbances are removed from the gravitational field observations. The disturbances observed in GOCE Vyy gradients around magnetic poles are investigated by using external datasets. It is found that the amplitude of these disturbances increase during geomagnetically active days and can reach up to 5 times the expected noise level of the gradiometer. ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and Wind satellites measured electric field and interplanetary magnetic field components have shown that the disturbances observed in the polar regions agree with the increased solar activity. Moreover, equivalent ionospheric currents computed along ascending satellite tracks over North America and Greenland have shown a noticeable correlation with the cross-track and vertical currents and the pointing flux (ExB) components in the satellite cross track direction. Lastly, Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) electric field and neutral wind simulations have shown a strong correlation of the enhancement in the ionospheric dynamics during geomagnetically active days and disturbances measured by the GOCE accelerometers over high latitudes. This may be a result of imperfect instrumentation and in-flight calibration of the GOCE accelerometers for an increased geomagnetic activity or a real disturbance on the accelerometers. We use above listed external datasets to understand the causes of the disturbances observed in gravity gradients and reduce/ eliminate them by using response analyses in frequency domain. Based on our test transfer functions, improvement is possible in the quality of the gradients. Moreover, this research also confirms that the accelerometer measurements can be useful to understand the ionospheric dynamics and space weather forecasting.

  20. Accelerometer Cut-Points and Youth Physical Activity Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, Jorge; Valente, Monica; Aires, Luisa; Silva, Pedro; Santos, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, Jose Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to examine the effects of specific cut-off scoring points (on the estimated prevalence of meeting health-related guidelines for physical activity in youth) and, second, to document the differences in gender physical activity patterns according to two different cut-off points. The sample comprised 62…

  1. Long-Term Activity Recognition from Wristwatch Accelerometer Data *

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ceja, Enrique; Brena, Ramon F.; Carrasco-Jimenez, Jose C.; Garrido, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    With the development of wearable devices that have several embedded sensors, it is possible to collect data that can be analyzed in order to understand the user's needs and provide personalized services. Examples of these types of devices are smartphones, fitness-bracelets, smartwatches, just to mention a few. In the last years, several works have used these devices to recognize simple activities like running, walking, sleeping, and other physical activities. There has also been research on recognizing complex activities like cooking, sporting, and taking medication, but these generally require the installation of external sensors that may become obtrusive to the user. In this work we used acceleration data from a wristwatch in order to identify long-term activities. We compare the use of Hidden Markov Models and Conditional Random Fields for the segmentation task. We also added prior knowledge into the models regarding the duration of the activities by coding them as constraints and sequence patterns were added in the form of feature functions. We also performed subclassing in order to deal with the problem of intra-class fragmentation, which arises when the same label is applied to activities that are conceptually the same but very different from the acceleration point of view. PMID:25436652

  2. Long-term activity recognition from wristwatch accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ceja, Enrique; Brena, Ramon F; Carrasco-Jimenez, Jose C; Garrido, Leonardo

    2014-11-27

    With the development of wearable devices that have several embedded sensors, it is possible to collect data that can be analyzed in order to understand the user's needs and provide personalized services. Examples of these types of devices are smartphones, fitness-bracelets, smartwatches, just to mention a few. In the last years, several works have used these devices to recognize simple activities like running, walking, sleeping, and other physical activities. There has also been research on recognizing complex activities like cooking, sporting, and taking medication, but these generally require the installation of external sensors that may become obtrusive to the user. In this work we used acceleration data from a wristwatch in order to identify long-term activities. We compare the use of Hidden Markov Models and Conditional Random Fields for the segmentation task. We also added prior knowledge into the models regarding the duration of the activities by coding them as constraints and sequence patterns were added in the form of feature functions. We also performed subclassing in order to deal with the problem of intra-class fragmentation, which arises when the same label is applied to activities that are conceptually the same but very different from the acceleration point of view.

  3. Statistical approaches to account for missing values in accelerometer data: Applications to modeling physical activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Selene Yue; Nelson, Sandahl; Kerr, Jacqueline; Godbole, Suneeta; Patterson, Ruth; Merchant, Gina; Abramson, Ian; Staudenmayer, John; Natarajan, Loki

    2016-07-10

    Physical inactivity is a recognized risk factor for many chronic diseases. Accelerometers are increasingly used as an objective means to measure daily physical activity. One challenge in using these devices is missing data due to device nonwear. We used a well-characterized cohort of 333 overweight postmenopausal breast cancer survivors to examine missing data patterns of accelerometer outputs over the day. Based on these observed missingness patterns, we created psuedo-simulated datasets with realistic missing data patterns. We developed statistical methods to design imputation and variance weighting algorithms to account for missing data effects when fitting regression models. Bias and precision of each method were evaluated and compared. Our results indicated that not accounting for missing data in the analysis yielded unstable estimates in the regression analysis. Incorporating variance weights and/or subject-level imputation improved precision by >50%, compared to ignoring missing data. We recommend that these simple easy-to-implement statistical tools be used to improve analysis of accelerometer data.

  4. Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time Differ According to Education Level in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kantomaa, Marko T.; Tikanmäki, Marjaana; Kankaanpää, Anna; Vääräsmäki, Marja; Sipola-Leppänen, Marika; Ekelund, Ulf; Hakonen, Harto; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Tammelin, Tuija H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the association of education level with objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in young adults. Data from the Finnish ESTER study (2009–2011) (n = 538) was used to examine the association between educational attainment and different subcomponents of physical activity and sedentary time measured using hip-worn accelerometers (ActiGraph GT1M) for seven consecutive days. Overall physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), light-intensity physical activity and sedentary time were calculated separately for weekdays and weekend days. A latent profile analysis was conducted to identify the different profiles of sedentary time and the subcomponents of physical activity. The educational differences in accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary time varied according to the subcomponents of physical activity, and between weekdays and weekend days. A high education level was associated with high MVPA during weekdays and weekend days in both sexes, high sedentary time during weekdays in both sexes, and a low amount of light-intensity physical activity during weekdays in males and during weekdays and weekend days in females. The results indicate different challenges related to unhealthy behaviours in young adults with low and high education: low education is associated with a lack of MVPA, whereas high education is associated with a lack of light-intensity physical activity and high sedentary time especially during weekdays. PMID:27403958

  5. Reliability of accelerometer-determined physical activity and sedentary behavior in school-aged children: a 12-country study

    PubMed Central

    Barreira, T V; Schuna, J M; Tudor-Locke, C; Chaput, J-P; Church, T S; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Sarmiento, O L; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Focused on the accelerometer-determined physical activity and sedentary time metrics in 9–11-year-old children, we sought to determine the following: (i) number of days that are necessary to achieve reliable estimates (G⩾0.8); (ii) proportion of variance attributed to different facets (participants and days) of reliability estimates; and (iii) actual reliability of data as collected in The International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and Environment (ISCOLE). Methods: The analytical sample consisted of 6025 children (55% girls) from sites in 12 countries. Physical activity and sedentary time metrics measures were assessed for up to 7 consecutive days for 24 h per day with a waist-worn ActiGraph GT3X+. Generalizability theory using R software was used to investigate the objectives i and ii. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were computed using SAS PROC GLM to inform objective iii. Results: The estimated minimum number of days required to achieve a reliability estimate of G⩾0.8 ranged from 5 to 9 for boys and 3 to 11 for girls for light physical activity (LPA); 5 to 9 and 3 to 10, for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA); 5 to 10 and 4 to 10 for total activity counts; and 7 to 11 and 6 to 11 for sedentary time, respectively. For all variables investigated, the ‘participant' facet accounted for 30–50% of the variability, whereas the ‘days' facet accounted for ⩽5%, and the interaction (P × D) accounted for 50–70% of the variability. The actual reliability for boys in ISCOLE ranged from ICCs of 0.78 to 0.86, 0.73 to 0.85 and 0.72 to 0.86 for LPA, MVPA and total activity counts, respectively, and 0.67 to 0.79 for sedentary time. The corresponding values for girls were 0.80–0.88, 0.70–0.89, 0.74–0.86 and 0.64–0.80. Conclusions: It was rare that only 4 days from all participants would be enough to achieve desirable reliability estimates. However, asking participants to wear the device for 7 days and requiring

  6. Hierarchical classifier approach to physical activity recognition via wearable smartphone tri-axial accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Feridun; Maeder, Anthony; Basilakis, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity recognition has emerged as an active area of research which has drawn increasing interest from researchers in a variety of fields. It can support many different applications such as safety surveillance, fraud detection, and clinical management. Accelerometers have emerged as the most useful and extensive tool to capture and assess human physical activities in a continuous, unobtrusive and reliable manner. The need for objective physical activity data arises strongly in health related research. With the shift to a sedentary lifestyle, where work and leisure tend to be less physically demanding, research on the health effects of low physical activity has become a necessity. The increased availability of small, inexpensive components has led to the development of mobile devices such as smartphones, providing platforms for new opportunities in healthcare applications. In this study 3 subjects performed directed activity routines wearing a smartphone with a built in tri-axial accelerometer, attached on a belt around the waist. The data was collected to classify 11 basic physical activities such as sitting, lying, standing, walking, and the transitions in between them. A hierarchical classifier approach was utilised with Artificial Neural Networks integrated in a rule-based system, to classify the activities. Based on our evaluation, recognition accuracy of over 89.6% between subjects and over 91.5% within subject was achieved. These results show that activities such as these can be recognised with a high accuracy rate; hence the approach is promising for use in future work.

  7. Effect of Accelerometer Cut-Off Points on the Recommended Level of Physical Activity for Obesity Prevention in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dygrýn, Jan; Mitáš, Josef; Jakubec, Lukáš; Frömel, Karel

    2016-01-01

    There is no general consensus regarding which accelerometer cut-off point (CoP) is most acceptable to estimate the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in children and choice of an appropriate CoP primarily remains a subjective decision. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the influence of CoP selection on the mean MVPA and to define the optimal thresholds of MVPA derived from different accelerometer CoPs to avoid overweight/obesity and adiposity in children aged 7 to 12 years. Three hundred six children participated. Physical activity (PA) was monitored for seven consecutive days using an ActiGraph accelerometer (model GT3X) and the intensity of PA was estimated using the five most frequently published CoPs. Body adiposity was assessed using a multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. There was found a wide range of mean levels of MVPA that ranged from 27 (Puyau CoP) to 231 min∙d–1 (Freedson 2005 CoP). A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the optimal thresholds for counts per minute (cpm) and MVPA derived from the Puyau CoP was the most useful in classifying children according to their body mass index (BMI) and fat mass percentage (FM%). In the total sample, the optimal thresholds of the MVPA derived from the Puyau CoP were 22 and 23 min∙d–1 when the categories based on BMI and FM%, respectively, were used. The children who did not meet these optimal thresholds had a significantly increased risk of being overweight/obese (OR = 2.88, P < 0.01) and risk of having excess fat mass (OR = 2.41, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the decision of selecting among various CoPs significantly influences the optimal levels of MVPA. The Puyau CoP of 3 200 cmp seems to be the most useful for defining the optimal level of PA for pediatric obesity prevention. PMID:27723835

  8. Validation of Accelerometer Wear and Nonwear Time Classification Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Leena; Liu, Zhouwen; Matthews, Charles E.; Buchowski, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of movement monitors (accelerometers) for measuring physical activity (PA) in intervention and population-based studies is becoming a standard methodology for the objective measurement of sedentary and active behaviors and for validation of subjective PA self-reports. A vital step in PA measurements is classification of daily time into accelerometer wear and nonwear intervals using its recordings (counts) and an accelerometer-specific algorithm. Purpose To validate and improve a commonly used algorithm for classifying accelerometer wear and nonwear time intervals using objective movement data obtained in the whole-room indirect calorimeter. Methods We conducted a validation study of a wear/nonwear automatic algorithm using data obtained from 49 adults and 76 youth wearing accelerometers during a strictly monitored 24-h stay in a room calorimeter. The accelerometer wear and nonwear time classified by the algorithm was compared with actual wearing time. Potential improvements to the algorithm were examined using the minimum classification error as an optimization target. Results The recommended elements in the new algorithm are: 1) zero-count threshold during a nonwear time interval, 2) 90-min time window for consecutive zero/nonzero counts, and 3) allowance of 2-min interval of nonzero counts with the up/downstream 30-min consecutive zero counts window for detection of artifactual movements. Compared to the true wearing status, improvements to the algorithm decreased nonwear time misclassification during the waking and the 24-h periods (all P < 0.001). Conclusions The accelerometer wear/nonwear time algorithm improvements may lead to more accurate estimation of time spent in sedentary and active behaviors. PMID:20581716

  9. Accelerometer thresholds: Accounting for body mass reduces discrepancies between measures of physical activity for individuals with overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Raiber, Lilian; Christensen, Rebecca A G; Jamnik, Veronica K; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether accelerometer thresholds that are adjusted to account for differences in body mass influence discrepancies between self-report and accelerometer-measured physical activity (PA) volume for individuals with overweight and obesity. We analyzed 6164 adults from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2003-2006. Established accelerometer thresholds were adjusted to account for differences in body mass to produce a similar energy expenditure (EE) rate as individuals with normal weight. Moderate-, vigorous-, and moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA) durations were measured using established and adjusted accelerometer thresholds and compared with self-report. Durations of self-report were longer than accelerometer-measured MVPA using established thresholds (normal weight: 57.8 ± 2.4 vs 9.0 ± 0.5 min/day, overweight: 56.1 ± 2.7 vs 7.4 ± 0.5 min/day, and obesity: 46.5 ± 2.2 vs 3.7 ± 0.3 min/day). Durations of subjective and objective PA were negatively associated with body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.05). Using adjusted thresholds increased MVPA durations, and reduced discrepancies between accelerometer and self-report measures for overweight and obese groups by 6.0 ± 0.3 min/day and 17.7 ± 0.8 min/day, respectively (P < 0.05). Using accelerometer thresholds that represent equal EE rates across BMI categories reduced the discrepancies between durations of subjective and objective PA for overweight and obese groups. However, accelerometer-measured PA generally remained shorter than durations of self-report within all BMI categories. Further research may be necessary to improve analytical approaches when using objective measures of PA for individuals with overweight or obesity.

  10. Influence of Accelerometer Type and Placement on Physical Activity Energy Expenditure Prediction in Manual Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Tom Edward; Walhin, Jean-Philippe; Thompson, Dylan; Bilzon, James Lee John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the validity of two accelerometer devices, at two different anatomical locations, for the prediction of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs). Methods Seventeen MWUs (36 ± 10 yrs, 72 ± 11 kg) completed ten activities; resting, folding clothes, propulsion on a 1% gradient (3,4,5,6 and 7 km·hr-1) and propulsion at 4km·hr-1 (with an additional 8% body mass, 2% and 3% gradient) on a motorised wheelchair treadmill. GT3X+ and GENEActiv accelerometers were worn on the right wrist (W) and upper arm (UA). Linear regression analysis was conducted between outputs from each accelerometer and criterion PAEE, measured using indirect calorimetry. Subsequent error statistics were calculated for the derived regression equations for all four device/location combinations, using a leave-one-out cross-validation analysis. Results Accelerometer outputs at each anatomical location were significantly (p < .01) associated with PAEE (GT3X+-UA; r = 0.68 and GT3X+-W; r = 0.82. GENEActiv-UA; r = 0.87 and GENEActiv-W; r = 0.88). Mean ± SD PAEE estimation errors for all activities combined were 15 ± 45%, 14 ± 50%, 3 ± 25% and 4 ± 26% for GT3X+-UA, GT3X+-W, GENEActiv-UA and GENEActiv-W, respectively. Absolute PAEE estimation errors for devices varied, 19 to 66% for GT3X+-UA, 17 to 122% for GT3X+-W, 15 to 26% for GENEActiv-UA and from 17.0 to 32% for the GENEActiv-W. Conclusion The results indicate that the GENEActiv device worn on either the upper arm or wrist provides the most valid prediction of PAEE in MWUs. Variation in error statistics between the two devices is a result of inherent differences in internal components, on-board filtering processes and outputs of each device. PMID:25955304

  11. Validation of mercury tip-switch and accelerometer activity sensors for identifying resting and active behavior in bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jasmine Ware,; Rode, Karyn D.; Pagano, Anthony M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey; Charles T Robbins,; Joy Erlenbach,; Shannon Jensen,; Amy Cutting,; Nicole Nicassio-Hiskey,; Amy Hash,; Owen, Megan A.; Heiko Jansen,

    2015-01-01

    Activity sensors are often included in wildlife transmitters and can provide information on the behavior and activity patterns of animals remotely. However, interpreting activity-sensor data relative to animal behavior can be difficult if animals cannot be continuously observed. In this study, we examined the performance of a mercury tip-switch and a tri-axial accelerometer housed in collars to determine whether sensor data can be accurately classified as resting and active behaviors and whether data are comparable for the 2 sensor types. Five captive bears (3 polar [Ursus maritimus] and 2 brown [U. arctos horribilis]) were fitted with a collar specially designed to internally house the sensors. The bears’ behaviors were recorded, classified, and then compared with sensor readings. A separate tri-axial accelerometer that sampled continuously at a higher frequency and provided raw acceleration values from 3 axes was also mounted on the collar to compare with the lower resolution sensors. Both accelerometers more accurately identified resting and active behaviors at time intervals ranging from 1 minute to 1 hour (≥91.1% accuracy) compared with the mercury tip-switch (range = 75.5–86.3%). However, mercury tip-switch accuracy improved when sampled at longer intervals (e.g., 30–60 min). Data from the lower resolution accelerometer, but not the mercury tip-switch, accurately predicted the percentage of time spent resting during an hour. Although the number of bears available for this study was small, our results suggest that these activity sensors can remotely identify resting versus active behaviors across most time intervals. We recommend that investigators consider both study objectives and the variation in accuracy of classifying resting and active behaviors reported here when determining sampling interval.

  12. Modelling a response as a function of high-frequency count data: The association between physical activity and fat mass.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Nicole H; Mattocks, Calum; Faraway, Julian J; Greven, Sonja; Ness, Andy R

    2015-07-17

    Accelerometers are widely used in health sciences, ecology and other application areas. They quantify the intensity of physical activity as counts per epoch over a given period of time. Currently, health scientists use very lossy summaries of the accelerometer time series, some of which are based on coarse discretisation of activity levels, and make certain implicit assumptions, including linear or constant effects of physical activity. We propose the histogram as a functional summary for achieving a near lossless dimension reduction, comparability between individual time series and easy interpretability. Using the histogram as a functional summary avoids registration of accelerometer counts in time. In our novel method, a scalar response is regressed on additive multi-dimensional functional predictors, including the histogram of the high-frequency counts, and additive non-linear predictors for other continuous covariates. The method improves on the current state-of-the art, as it can deal with high-frequency time series of different lengths and missing values and yields a flexible way to model the physical activity effect with fewer assumptions. It also allows the commonly made modelling assumptions to be tested. We investigate the relationship between the response fat mass and physical activity measured by accelerometer, in data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Our method allows testing of whether the effect of physical activity varies over its intensity by gender, by time of day or by day of the week. We show that meaningful interpretation requires careful treatment of identifiability constraints in the light of the sum-to-one property of a histogram. We find that the (not necessarily causal) effect of physical activity on kg fat mass is not linear and not constant over the activity intensity.

  13. Accelerometer-derived activity correlates with volitional swimming speed in lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiem, J.D.; Dawson, J.W.; Gleiss, A.C.; Martins, E.G.; Haro, Alexander J.; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Danylchuk, A.J.; Wilson, R.P.; Cooke, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying fine-scale locomotor behaviours associated with different activities is challenging for free-swimming fish.Biologging and biotelemetry tools can help address this problem. An open channel flume was used to generate volitionalswimming speed (Us) estimates of cultured lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens Rafinesque, 1817) and these were paired withsimultaneously recorded accelerometer-derived metrics of activity obtained from three types of data-storage tags. This studyexamined whether a predictive relationship could be established between four different activity metrics (tail-beat frequency(TBF), tail-beat acceleration amplitude (TBAA), overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), and vectorial dynamic body acceleration(VeDBA)) and the swimming speed of A. fulvescens. Volitional Us of sturgeon ranged from 0.48 to 2.70 m·s−1 (0.51–3.18 bodylengths (BL) · s−1). Swimming speed increased linearly with all accelerometer-derived metrics, and when all tag types werecombined, Us increased 0.46 BL·s−1 for every 1 Hz increase in TBF, and 0.94, 0.61, and 0.94 BL·s−1 for every 1g increase in TBAA,ODBA, and VeDBA, respectively. Predictive relationships varied among tag types and tag-specific parameter estimates of Us arepresented for all metrics. This use of acceleration data-storage tags demonstrated their applicability for the field quantificationof sturgeon swimming speed.

  14. Large Scale Population Assessment of Physical Activity Using Wrist Worn Accelerometers: The UK Biobank Study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Dan; Hammerla, Nils; Granat, Malcolm H.; van Hees, Vincent T.; Trenell, Michael I.; Owen, Christoper G.; Preece, Stephen J.; Peakman, Tim; Brage, Soren

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity has not been objectively measured in prospective cohorts with sufficiently large numbers to reliably detect associations with multiple health outcomes. Technological advances now make this possible. We describe the methods used to collect and analyse accelerometer measured physical activity in over 100,000 participants of the UK Biobank study, and report variation by age, sex, day, time of day, and season. Methods Participants were approached by email to wear a wrist-worn accelerometer for seven days that was posted to them. Physical activity information was extracted from 100Hz raw triaxial acceleration data after calibration, removal of gravity and sensor noise, and identification of wear / non-wear episodes. We report age- and sex-specific wear-time compliance and accelerometer measured physical activity, overall and by hour-of-day, week-weekend day and season. Results 103,712 datasets were received (44.8% response), with a median wear-time of 6.9 days (IQR:6.5–7.0). 96,600 participants (93.3%) provided valid data for physical activity analyses. Vector magnitude, a proxy for overall physical activity, was 7.5% (2.35mg) lower per decade of age (Cohen’s d = 0.9). Women had a higher vector magnitude than men, apart from those aged 45-54yrs. There were major differences in vector magnitude by time of day (d = 0.66). Vector magnitude differences between week and weekend days (d = 0.12 for men, d = 0.09 for women) and between seasons (d = 0.27 for men, d = 0.15 for women) were small. Conclusions It is feasible to collect and analyse objective physical activity data in large studies. The summary measure of overall physical activity is lower in older participants and age-related differences in activity are most prominent in the afternoon and evening. This work lays the foundation for studies of physical activity and its health consequences. Our summary variables are part of the UK Biobank dataset and can be used by researchers as

  15. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed.

  16. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age

    PubMed Central

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18–39, 40–64, 65 + years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of −0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of −0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81–1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  17. Development of an Accelerometer-Linked Online Intervention System to Promote Physical Activity in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Nicole; Bradlyn, Andrew; Thompson, Sharon K.; Yen, Sophia; Haritatos, Jana; Dillon, Fred; Cole, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Most adolescents do not achieve the recommended levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), placing them at increased risk for a diverse array of chronic diseases in adulthood. There is a great need for scalable and effective interventions that can increase MVPA in adolescents. Here we report the results of a measurement validation study and a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment testing the impact of Zamzee, an accelerometer-linked online intervention system that combines proximal performance feedback and incentive motivation features to promote MVPA. In a calibration study that parametrically varied levels of physical activity in 31 12-14 year-old children, the Zamzee activity meter was shown to provide a valid measure of MVPA (sensitivity in detecting MVPA = 85.9%, specificity = 97.5%, and r = .94 correspondence with the benchmark RT3 accelerometer system; all p < .0001). In a subsequent randomized controlled multi-site experiment involving 182 middle school-aged children assessed for MVPA over 6 wks, intent-to-treat analyses found that those who received access to the Zamzee intervention had average MVPA levels 54% greater than those of a passive control group (p < 0.0001) and 68% greater than those of an active control group that received access to a commercially available active videogame (p < .0001). Zamzee’s effects on MVPA did not diminish significantly over the course of the 6-wk study period, and were statistically significant in both females and males, and in normal- vs. high-BMI subgroups. These results provide promising initial indications that combining the Zamzee activity meter with online proximal performance feedback and incentive motivation features can positively impact MVPA levels in adolescents. PMID:26010359

  18. Accelerometer-Measured versus Self-Reported Physical Activity in College Students: Implications for Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Andrew; Van Hoomissen, Jacqueline; Lafrenz, Andrew; Julka, Deana L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the level of moderate-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) assessed via self-report and accelerometer in the college population, and to examine intrapersonal and contextual variables associated with physical activity (PA). Participants: Participants were 77 college students at a university in the northwest sampled…

  19. Comparison of Activity Type Classification Accuracy from Accelerometers Worn on the Hip, Wrists, and Thigh in Young, Apparently Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoye, Alexander H. K.; Pivarnik, James M.; Mudd, Lanay M.; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare accuracy of activity type prediction models for accelerometers worn on the hip, wrists, and thigh. Forty-four adults performed sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle, and exercise activities (14 total, 10 categories) for 3-10 minutes each in a 90-minute semi-structured laboratory protocol. Artificial neural…

  20. Accelerometer-Determined Physical Activity and Its Comparison with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire in a Sample of Nigerian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Oyeyemi, Adewale L.; Umar, Maimuna; Oguche, Friday; Aliyu, Salamatu U.; Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Accurate assessment of physical activity to identify current levels and changes within the population is dependent on the precision of the measurement tools. The aim of this study was to compare components of physical activity measured with an adapted version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Hausa IPAQ-SF) and the accelerometer in a sample of Nigeria adults. Methods One hundred and forty-four participants (Mean age = 32.6±9.9 years, 40.3% women) in a cross-sectional study wore an accelerometer for seven consecutive days and completed the Hausa IPAQ-SF questionnaire on the eighth day. Total physical activity, time spent in moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) and sedentary time assessed by Hausa IPAQ-SF and accelerometer were compared. The absolute and criterion- related validity of the Hausa IPAQ-SF was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis and Spearman Correlation Coefficients, respectively. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated to classify individuals according to the global standard guideline for sufficient physical activity. Results Compared with the accelerometer, higher time in MVPA and total physical activity were reported on the Hausa IPAQ-SF (p<0.001), while low to moderate correlations (Rs = 0.03–0.38) were found between the two methods. The 95% limits of agreement were wide between methods for total physical activity (−23019 to 20375 METmin.d−1) and sedentary time (−510 to 150 min.d−1). The sensitivity (76.2%) of Hausa IPAQ-SF to identify insufficiently active people was good, but its specificity (33.3%) to correctly classify sufficiently active people was low. Conclusions The Hausa IPAQ-SF overestimated components of physical activity among Nigerian adults, and demonstrated poor to moderate evidence of absolute and criterion validity. Further evaluation of IPAQ and other self-report physical activity instruments in other Africa populations could enhance accurate evaluation of physical activity data

  1. Accelerometer-determined physical activity and walking capacity in persons with Down syndrome, Williams syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nordstrøm, Marianne; Hansen, Bjørge Herman; Paus, Benedicte; Kolset, Svein Olav

    2013-12-01

    In this study we describe by use of accelerometers the total physical activity (PA), intensity pattern and walking capacity in 87 persons age 16-45 years with Down syndrome (DS), Williams syndrome (WS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Participants were recruited from all over Norway, and lived either with their parents or in community residences with support. On average the participants generated 294 counts per minute (cpm) or 6712 steps per day, with most of the day spent in sedentary activity, 522 min/day, followed by 212 min/day in light PA, 71 min/day in lifestyle activity and 27 min/day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Inactivity was prevalent, as only 12% meet the current Nordic recommendations for PA. When compared, no differences for total physical activity or time in MVPA were observed between the three groups. However, participant with DS spent a mean of 73 min/day less and 43 min/day less in sedentary activities compared to participants with PWS and WS, respectively, (p=0.011, 95% CI: -10.9; -80.1). In addition the DS-group spent a mean of 66 min/day more in light PA than the PWS-group and 41 min/day more than the WS-group, (p<0.001, 95% CI: 29.3; 79.7). Participants with PWS spent on average 30 min/day less in lifestyle activities compared to both participants with DS and WS, (p<0.001, 95% CI: -14.2; -45.4). No association between total PA and BMI were observed. Males were more active than females across all diagnoses. Males accumulated on average 85 counts per minutes more than females, (p=0.002, 95% CI: 33.3; 136.7), 2137 more steps per day, (p=0.002, 95% CI: 778; 3496). The mean walking capacity during six-minutes was 507 m (SD 112 m) for males and 466 m (SD 88 m) for females. Distance walked during testing decreased with 33.6 m when comparing normal or underweight participants to overweight participants, and 78.1 m when comparing overweight to obese participants (p<0.001 95% CI: -40.4; -85.8). When adjusted for BMI no differences in

  2. A National Survey of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior of Chinese City Children and Youth Using Accelerometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to objectively assess levels of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) of Chinese city children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old using accelerometers and to examine their differences by gender, age, grade, and weight status. Method: The PA and SB of 2,163 students in 4th grade through 11th grade…

  3. Validation of the Actigraph GT3X and ActivPAL Accelerometers for the Assessment of Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Youngdeok; Barry, Vaughn W.; Kang, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (a) the validity of two accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X [ActiGraph LLC, Pensacola, FL, USA] and activPAL [PAL Technologies Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland]) for the assessment of sedentary behavior; and (b) the variations in assessment accuracy by setting minimum sedentary bout durations against a proxy for direct observation using an…

  4. “Stepping Up” Activity Poststroke: Ankle-Positioned Accelerometer Can Accurately Record Steps During Slow Walking

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Tara D.; Simpson, Lisa A.; Lim, Shannon B.; Louie, Dennis R.; Parappilly, Beena; Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Zbogar, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Background As physical activity in people poststroke is low, devices that monitor and provide feedback of walking activity provide motivation to engage in exercise and may assist rehabilitation professionals in auditing walking activity. However, most feedback devices are not accurate at slow walking speeds. Objective This study assessed the accuracy of one accelerometer to measure walking steps of community-dwelling individuals poststroke. Design This was a cross-sectional study. Methods Two accelerometers were positioned on the nonparetic waist and ankle of participants (N=43), and walking steps from these devices were recorded at 7 speeds (0.3–0.9 m/s) and compared with video recordings (gold standard). Results When positioned at the waist, the accelerometer had more than 10% error at all speeds, except 0.8 and 0.9 m/s, and numerous participants recorded zero steps at 0.3 to 0.5 m/s. The device had 10% or less error when positioned at the ankle for all speeds between 0.4 and 0.9 m/s. Limitations Some participants were unable to complete the faster walking speeds due to their walking impairments and inability to maintain the requested walking speed. Conclusions Although not recommended by the manufacturer, positioning the accelerometer at the ankle (compared with the waist) may fill a long-standing need for a readily available device that provides accurate feedback for the altered and slow walking patterns that occur with stroke. PMID:26251478

  5. Accelerometer-measured daily physical activity related to aerobic fitness in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dencker, Magnus; Andersen, Lars B

    2011-06-01

    Maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2PEAK)) is generally considered to be the best single marker for aerobic fitness. While a positive relationship between daily physical activity and aerobic fitness has been established in adults, the relationship appears less clear in children and adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to summarise recently published data on the relationship between daily physical activity, as measured by accelerometers, and VO(2PEAK) in children and adolescents. A PubMed search was performed on 29 October 2010 to identify relevant articles. Studies were considered relevant if they included measurement of daily physical activity by accelerometry and related to a VO(2PEAK) either measured directly at a maximal exercise test or estimated from maximal power output. A total of nine studies were identified, with a total number of 6116 children and adolescents investigated. Most studies reported a low-to-moderate relationship (r = 0.10-0.45) between objectively measured daily physical activity and VO(2PEAK). No conclusive evidence exists that physical activity of higher intensities are more closely related to VO(2PEAK), than lower intensities.

  6. Measuring and validating physical activity and sedentary behavior comparing a parental questionnaire to accelerometer data and diaries.

    PubMed

    Bringolf-Isler, Bettina; Mäder, Urs; Ruch, Nicole; Kriemler, Susi; Grize, Leticia; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte

    2012-05-01

    Accurately measuring children's physical activity and their sedentary behavior is challenging. The present study compared 189 parental responses to a questionnaire surveying physical activity and sedentary behavior of children aged 6-14 years, to accelerometer outputs and time activity diaries for the same group. Responses were analyzed taking age, sex and maternal education into account. Correlation coefficients between questionnaire reports and accelerometer-based physical activity across all age groups were acceptable (up to r = .55). Yet, adjustment for age markedly attenuated these associations, suggesting concomitant influences of biological and behavioral processes linked to age. The comparisons of general time indications in the questionnaire with 24h-diary records suggested that parents tended to under- and over-report single activities, possibly due to social desirability. We conclude that physical activity questionnaires need to be designed for specific age groups and be administered in combination with objective measurements.

  7. A Combined sEMG and Accelerometer System for Monitoring Functional Activity in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Serge H.; Cheng, M. Samuel; Chang, Shey-Sheen; Moore, John; De Luca, Gianluca; Nawab, S. Hamid; De Luca, Carlo J.

    2010-01-01

    Remote monitoring of physical activity using body-worn sensors provides an alternative to assessment of functional independence by subjective, paper-based questionnaires. This study investigated the classification accuracy of a combined surface electromyographic (sEMG) and accelerometer (ACC) sensor system for monitoring activities of daily living in patients with stroke. sEMG and ACC data (eight channels each) were recorded from 10 hemiparetic patients while they carried out a sequence of 11 activities of daily living (identification tasks), and 10 activities used to evaluate misclassification errors (nonidentification tasks). The sEMG and ACC sensor data were analyzed using a multilayered neural network and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system to identify the minimal sensor configuration needed to accurately classify the identification tasks, with a minimal number of misclassifications from the nonidentification tasks. The results demonstrated that the highest sensitivity and specificity for the identification tasks was achieved using a subset of four ACC sensors and adjacent sEMG sensors located on both upper arms, one forearm, and one thigh, respectively. This configuration resulted in a mean sensitivity of 95.0%, and a mean specificity of 99.7% for the identification tasks, and a mean misclassification error of <10% for the nonidentification tasks. The findings support the feasibility of a hybrid sEMG and ACC wearable sensor system for automatic recognition of motor tasks used to assess functional independence in patients with stroke. PMID:20051332

  8. Garment-based detection of falls and activities of daily living using 3-axis MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyan, M. N.; Tay, Francis E. H.; Manimaran, M.; Seah, K. H. W.

    2006-04-01

    This paper studied the detection of falls and activities of daily living (ADL) with two objectives: (1) minimum number of sensors for a broad range of activities and (2) maximize the comfort of the wearer for long term use. We used a garment to provide long term comfort for the wearer, with a 3-axis MEMS accelerometer on the shoulder position, as a wearable platform. ADL were detected in time-frequency domain and summation of absolute peak values of 3-D acceleration signals was used as feature in fall detection. 6 male and female subjects performed approximately five-hour long experiment. Sensitivity of 94.98% and specificity of 98.83% for altogether 1495 activities were achieved. Our garment-based detection system fulfilled the objective of providing the comfort of the wearer in long term monitoring of falls and ADL with high sensitivity. In fall detection, our device can summon medical assistances via SMS (Short Message Service). This detection system can raise fall alarm (fall SMS) automatically to individuals to get a shortened interval of the arrival of assistance.

  9. Examining Non-Linear Associations between Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and All-Cause Mortality Using Segmented Cox Regression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Healthy adults are advised to perform at least 150 min of moderate-intensity physical activity weekly, but this advice is based on studies using self-reports of questionable validity. This study examined the dose-response relationship of accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality using segmented Cox regression to empirically determine the break-points of the dose-response relationship. Data from 7006 adult participants aged 18 or above in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey waves 2003–2004 and 2005–2006 were included in the analysis and linked with death certificate data using a probabilistic matching approach in the National Death Index through December 31, 2011. Physical activity and sedentary behavior were measured using ActiGraph model 7164 accelerometer over the right hip for 7 consecutive days. Each minute with accelerometer count <100; 1952–5724; and ≥5725 were classified as sedentary, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity, respectively. Segmented Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of time spent in sedentary behaviors, moderate-intensity physical activity, and vigorous-intensity physical activity and all-cause mortality, adjusted for demographic characteristics, health behaviors, and health conditions. Data were analyzed in 2016. During 47,119 person-year of follow-up, 608 deaths occurred. Each additional hour per day of sedentary behaviors was associated with a HR of 1.15 (95% CI 1.01, 1.31) among participants who spend at least 10.9 h per day on sedentary behaviors, and each additional minute per day spent on moderate-intensity physical activity was associated with a HR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.91, 0.96) among participants with daily moderate-intensity physical activity ≤14.1 min. Associations of moderate physical activity and sedentary behaviors on all-cause mortality were independent of each other. To conclude, evidence from

  10. Comparative evaluation of features and techniques for identifying activity type and estimating energy cost from accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Kate, Rohit J; Swartz, Ann M; Welch, Whitney A; Strath, Scott J

    2016-03-01

    Wearable accelerometers can be used to objectively assess physical activity. However, the accuracy of this assessment depends on the underlying method used to process the time series data obtained from accelerometers. Several methods have been proposed that use this data to identify the type of physical activity and estimate its energy cost. Most of the newer methods employ some machine learning technique along with suitable features to represent the time series data. This paper experimentally compares several of these techniques and features on a large dataset of 146 subjects doing eight different physical activities wearing an accelerometer on the hip. Besides features based on statistics, distance based features and simple discrete features straight from the time series were also evaluated. On the physical activity type identification task, the results show that using more features significantly improve results. Choice of machine learning technique was also found to be important. However, on the energy cost estimation task, choice of features and machine learning technique were found to be less influential. On that task, separate energy cost estimation models trained specifically for each type of physical activity were found to be more accurate than a single model trained for all types of physical activities.

  11. Accelerometer assessed moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and successful ageing: results from the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Menai, Mehdi; van Hees, Vincent T.; Elbaz, Alexis; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Séverine

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is key for successful ageing, but questions remain regarding the optimal physical activity pattern. We examined the cross-sectional association between physical activity and successful ageing using data on 3,749 participants (age range = 60–83years) of the Whitehall II study. The participants underwent a clinical assessment, completed a 20-item physical activity questionnaire, and wore a wrist-mounted accelerometer for 9 days. Successful ageing was defined as good cognitive, motor, and respiratory functioning, along with absence of disability, mental health problems, and major chronic diseases. Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) episodes assessed by accelerometer was classified as “short” (1–9.59 minutes) and “long” (≥10 minutes) bouts. Linear multivariate regression showed that successful agers (N = 789) reported 3.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.39–6.19) minutes more daily MVPA than other participants. Accelerometer data showed this difference to be 3.40 (95% CI:2.44–4.35) minutes for MVPA undertaken in short bouts, 4.16 (95% CI:3.11–5.20) minutes for long bouts, and 7.55 (95% CI:5.86–9.24) minutes for all MVPA bouts lasting 1 minute or more. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that participants undertaking ≥150 minutes of MVPA per week were more likely to be successful agers with both self-reported (Odd Ratio (OR) = 1.29,95% (CI):1.09–1.53) and accelerometer data (length bout ≥1 minute:OR = 1.92, 95%CI:1.60–2.30). Successful agers practice more MVPA, having both more short and long bouts, than non-successful agers. PMID:28367987

  12. Long-Term Objective Physical Activity Measurements using a Wireless Accelerometer Following Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Interbody Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a case of a patient who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (mi-TLIF) with objective physical activity measurements performed preoperatively and postoperatively at up to 12-months using wireless accelerometer technology. In the first postoperative month following surgery, the patient had reduced mobility, taking 2,397 steps over a distance of 1.8 km per day. However, the number of steps taken and distance travelled per day had returned to baseline levels by the second postoperative month. At one-year follow-up, the patient averaged 5,095 steps per day in the month over a distance of 3.8 km; this was a 60% improvement in both steps taken and distance travelled compared to the preoperative status. The use of wireless accelerometers is feasible in obtaining objective physical activity measurements before and after lumbar interbody fusion and may be applicable to other related spinal surgeries as well.

  13. Estimating daily walking distance of captive African elephants using an accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Emily S; Bercovitch, Fred B; Andrews, Jeff R M; Anderson, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Two central concerns for elephant husbandry and management are whether zoological enclosures are appropriately sized and the degree to which naturalistic exercise and activity are observed in such enclosures. In order to address these issues, accurate data on the daily walking distance of elephants both in situ and ex situ are necessary. We used an accelerometer, a pedometer that measures step count and activity level, to estimate walking distance in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) at the San Diego Zoo's Wild Animal Park. The accelerometer was worn simultaneously with a GPS unit that recorded actual walking distance. Estimates of walking distance were extrapolated from the accelerometer and compared with actual distances determined by GPS data. The accelerometer was found to overestimate step count, and subsequently walking distance, by including false counts of steps. Extrapolating walking distance based upon stride length measurements did not match actual GPS walking distance. However, activity level output from the accelerometer significantly correlated with actual GPS walking distance. In addition, we report that the rate of movement is comparable to that reported in other zoological settings. We provide a linear regression equation that can be utilized by other institutions to estimate daily walking distance of elephants in their collection who are outfitted with accelerometers.

  14. Effects of message framing on self-report and accelerometer-assessed physical activity across age and gender groups.

    PubMed

    Li, Kin-Kit; Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Fung, Helene H

    2014-02-01

    This study compared message-framing effects on physical activity (PA) across age and gender groups. Participants included 111 younger and 100 older adults (68% were women), randomly assigned to read gain-framed or loss-framed PA messages in promotion pamphlets, and who wore accelerometers for the following 14 days. Using regression analyses controlling for demographic and health factors, we found significant age-by-gender-by-framing interactions predicting self-report (B = -4.39, p = .01) and accelerometer-assessed PA (B = -2.44, p = .02) during the follow-up period. Gain-framed messages were more effective than loss-framed messages in promoting PA behaviors only among older men. We speculated that the age-related positivity effect, as well as the age and gender differences in issue involvement, explained the group differences in framing. In addition, more time availability and higher self-efficacy among older men might have contributed to the results.

  15. Equating accelerometer estimates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: in search of the Rosetta Stone.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Beets, Michael W; Byun, Wonwoo; Welk, Greg; Bottai, Matteo; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell

    2011-09-01

    No universally accepted ActiGraph accelerometer cutpoints for quantifying moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) exist. Estimates of MVPA from one set of cutpoints cannot be directly compared to MVPA estimates using different cutpoints, even when the same outcome units are reported (MVPA mind(-1)). The purpose of this study was to illustrate the utility of an equating system that translates reported MVPA estimates from one set of cutpoints into another, to better inform public health policy. Secondary data analysis. ActiGraph data from a large preschool project (N=419, 3-6-yr-olds, CHAMPS) was used to conduct the analyses. Conversions were made among five different published MVPA cutpoints for children: Pate (PT), Sirard (SR), Puyau (PY), Van Cauwengerghe (VC), and Freedson Equation (FR). A 10-fold cross-validation procedure was used to develop prediction equations using MVPA estimated from each of the five sets of cutpoints as the dependent variable, with estimated MVPA from one of the other four sets of cutpoints (e.g., PT MVPA predicted from FR MVPA). The mean levels of MVPA for the total sample ranged from 22.5 (PY) to 269.0 (FR) mind(-1). Across the prediction models (5 total), the median proportion of variance explained (R(2)) was 0.76 (range 0.48-0.97). The median absolute percent error was 17.2% (range 6.3-38.4%). The prediction equations developed here allow for direct comparisons between studies employing different ActiGraph cutpoints in preschool-age children. These prediction equations give public health researchers and policy makers a more concise picture of physical activity levels of preschool-aged children.

  16. Pinochle Poker: An Activity for Counting and Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wroughton, Jacqueline; Nolan, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Understanding counting rules is challenging for students; in particular, they struggle with determining when and how to implement combinations, permutations, and the multiplication rule as tools for counting large sets and computing probability. We present an activity--using ideas from the games of poker and pinochle--designed to help students…

  17. Accelerometer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Warner, Edward P

    1921-01-01

    In connection with the development of an accelerometer for measuring the loads on airplanes in free flight a study of the theory of such instruments has been made, and the results of this study are summarized in this report. A portion of the analysis deals particularly with the sources of error and with the limitations placed on the location of the instrument in the airplane. The discussion of the dynamics of the accelerometer includes a study of its theoretical motions and of the way in which they are affected by the natural period of vibration and by the damping, together with a report of some experiments on the effect of forced vibrations on the record.

  18. Superconducting Rebalance Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torti, R. P.; Gerver, M.; Leary, K. J.; Jagannathan, S.; Dozer, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-axis accelerometer which utilizes a magnetically-suspended, high-TC proof mass is under development. The design and performance of a single axis device which is stabilized actively in the axial direction but which utilizes ring magnets for passive radial stabilization is discussed. The design of a full six degree-of-freedom device version is also described.

  19. Sex differences in relationships between habitual physical activity and health in the elderly: practical implications for epidemiologists based on pedometer/accelerometer data from the Nakanojo Study.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yukitoshi; Shephard, Roy J

    2013-01-01

    We review sex differences in the relationship between habitual physical activity and health in the elderly, with particular reference to pedometer/accelerometer data from the Nakanojo Study. Maximal aerobic power, walking speed and habitual physical activity are 10-30% greater in men than in women. This reflects not only biological but also socio-cultural and environmental factors, with the latter becoming dominant as age advances. It implies a need for sex-specific thresholds of moderate activity. Overall health is associated with both the year-averaged daily step count (the best indicator in women) and the year-averaged daily duration of physical activity >3 metabolic equivalents (METs) (the best indicator in men). In both sexes, the threshold ranges of step count and/or duration of activity >3 METs associated with a reduced prevalence of health problems are: 4000-5000 steps/day and/or 5-7.5 min/day for impaired mental and psychosocial health, such as a depressed mood state and a poor health-related quality of life; 7000-8000 steps/day and/or 15-20 min/day for markers of aortic arteriosclerosis, osteoporosis, sarcopenia and poor physical fitness; and 8000-10,000 steps/day and/or 20-30 min/day for components of the metabolic syndrome, especially hypertension and hyperglycemia. Irrespective of sex, both the intensity and the total volume of physical activity are influenced by stressful life events, such as a partner's death, and immediate meteorological factors, particularly precipitation and mean ambient temperature, underlining the need for long-term measurement of activity patterns. These findings have practical implications for those who engage in epidemiological studies and/or design health promotional programs for the elderly.

  20. Total pollen counts do not influence active surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Schinko, Herwig; Neuberger, Manfred

    We investigated the temporal association of various aerosol parameters with pollen counts in the pollen season (April 2001) in Linz, Austria. We were especially interested in the relationship between active surface (or Fuchs' surface) because we had shown previously (Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 1737-1744) that this parameter during the same observation period was a better predictor for acute respiratory symptoms in school children (like wheezing, shortness of breath, and cough) and reduced lung function on the same day than particle mass (PM 10). While active surface is most sensitive for fine particles with a diameter of less than 100 nm it has no strict upper cut-off regarding particle size and so could eventually be influenced also by larger particles if their numbers were high. All particle mass parameters tested (TSP, PM 10, PM 1) were weakly ( r approximately 0.2) though significantly correlated with pollen counts but neither was active surface nor total particle counts (CPC). The weak association of particle mass and pollen counts was due mainly to similar diurnal variations and a linear trend over time. Only the mass of the coarse fraction (TSP minus PM 10) remained associated with pollen counts significantly after controlling for these general temporal patterns.

  1. Varying behavior of different window sizes on the classification of static and dynamic physical activities from a single accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Fida, Benish; Bernabucci, Ivan; Bibbo, Daniele; Conforto, Silvia; Schmid, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    Accuracy of systems able to recognize in real time daily living activities heavily depends on the processing step for signal segmentation. So far, windowing approaches are used to segment data and the window size is usually chosen based on previous studies. However, literature is vague on the investigation of its effect on the obtained activity recognition accuracy, if both short and long duration activities are considered. In this work, we present the impact of window size on the recognition of daily living activities, where transitions between different activities are also taken into account. The study was conducted on nine participants who wore a tri-axial accelerometer on their waist and performed some short (sitting, standing, and transitions between activities) and long (walking, stair descending and stair ascending) duration activities. Five different classifiers were tested, and among the different window sizes, it was found that 1.5 s window size represents the best trade-off in recognition among activities, with an obtained accuracy well above 90%. Differences in recognition accuracy for each activity highlight the utility of developing adaptive segmentation criteria, based on the duration of the activities.

  2. Accelerometer based solution for precision livestock farming: geolocation enhancement and animal activity identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrasson, G.; Llaria, A.; Marra, A.; Voaden, S.

    2016-07-01

    The rapid evolution of electronics and communication technologies in the last years has contributed to the expansion of Precision Livestock Farming applications. In this context, animal geolocation systems applied to extensive farming are interesting for farmers to optimize their daily work organization. Nevertheless, the deployment of these solutions implies several technical challenges which must be resolved, mainly the energy consumption and the suitability of the communication protocols. A recently developed solution that deals with these technical challenges is the e-Pasto platform, which is composed of low power geolocation devices embedded into collars that offer an energetic autonomy of at least seven months, completed with a visualization user interface. The autonomy is assured employing a duty-cycle operation that results in one geolocation position measurement per hour. This work studies the employ of accelerometers to overcome this limitation assuring, at the same time, the required autonomy for the geolocation device. The authors also propose an algorithm that processes the acceleration data in order to identify the steps of an individual. The whole solution (step identification and geolocation) has been validated by means of several experimental tests.

  3. A Comparison of Self-Report Scales and Accelerometer-Determined Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity Scores of Finnish School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gråstén, Arto; Watt, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The current article provides an important insight into measurement differences between two commonly used self-reports and accelerometer-determined moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) scores within matched samples across 1 school year. Participants were 998 fifth- through eighth-grade students who completed self-reports and 76 fifth- and…

  4. Automatic counting of microglial cell activation and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Beatriz I.; de Gracia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by the damage and death of the retinal ganglion cells. This disease results in vision loss and blindness. Any vision loss resulting from the disease cannot be restored and nowadays there is no available cure for glaucoma; however an early detection and treatment, could offer neuronal protection and avoid later serious damages to the visual function. A full understanding of the etiology of the disease will still require the contribution of many scientific efforts. Glial activation has been observed in glaucoma, being microglial proliferation a hallmark in this neurodegenerative disease. A typical project studying these cellular changes involved in glaucoma often needs thousands of images - from several animals - covering different layers and regions of the retina. The gold standard to evaluate them is the manual count. This method requires a large amount of time from specialized personnel. It is a tedious process and prone to human error. We present here a new method to count microglial cells by using a computer algorithm. It counts in one hour the same number of images that a researcher counts in four weeks, with no loss of reliability. PMID:27651757

  5. Mobility disability and the pattern of accelerometer-derived sedentary and physical activity behaviors in people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ezeugwu, Victor; Klaren, Rachel E.; A. Hubbard, Elizabeth; Manns, Patricia (Trish); Motl, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low physical activity and high sedentary behavior levels are major concerns in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and these differ depending on the level of mobility disability. However, the manner in which daily activity is accumulated is currently unknown in this population. Methods A secondary analysis was performed on a combined data set of persons with MS from two previous investigations of physical activity and symptomatic or quality of life outcomes in the United States over a two year period (2007–2009). Mobility disability status was determined using the Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) while activity behavior was objectively monitored using an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 days. Results Persons with MS who have mobility disability were involved in sedentary behavior, light and moderate intensity activity for 65%, 34% and 1% of the day, respectively compared to 60%, 37%, and 3%, respectively in those without mobility disability (p < 0.05). Breaks in sedentary time did not differ by mobility disability status. Compared to those without mobility disability, the average number of sedentary bouts longer than 30 min was greater in those with mobility disability (p = 0.016). Conclusion Persons with MS with mobility disability are less active, engage in more sedentary behavior and accumulate prolonged sedentary bouts. PMID:26844077

  6. Space vehicle accelerometer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The physics of accelerometer applications are reviewed, and details are given on accelerometer instruments and the principles of their operations. The functions to which accelerometers are applied are listed, and terms commonly used in accelerometer reports are defined. Criteria guides state what rule, limitation, or standard must be imposed on each essential design element to insure successful design. Elaboration of these criteria in the form of recommended practices show how to satisfy each of these criteria, with the best procedure described when possible.

  7. You can count on the motor cortex: Finger counting habits modulate motor cortex activation evoked by numbers

    PubMed Central

    Tschentscher, Nadja; Hauk, Olaf; Fischer, Martin H.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2012-01-01

    The embodied cognition framework suggests that neural systems for perception and action are engaged during higher cognitive processes. In an event-related fMRI study, we tested this claim for the abstract domain of numerical symbol processing: is the human cortical motor system part of the representation of numbers, and is organization of numerical knowledge influenced by individual finger counting habits? Developmental studies suggest a link between numerals and finger counting habits due to the acquisition of numerical skills through finger counting in childhood. In the present study, digits 1 to 9 and the corresponding number words were presented visually to adults with different finger counting habits, i.e. left- and right-starters who reported that they usually start counting small numbers with their left and right hand, respectively. Despite the absence of overt hand movements, the hemisphere contralateral to the hand used for counting small numbers was activated when small numbers were presented. The correspondence between finger counting habits and hemispheric motor activation is consistent with an intrinsic functional link between finger counting and number processing. PMID:22133748

  8. A study of community design, greenness, and physical activity in children using satellite, GPS and accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Almanza, Estela; Jerrett, Michael; Dunton, Genevieve; Seto, Edmund; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    This study examined relationships between greenness exposure and free-living physical activity behavior of children in smart growth and conventionally designed communities. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was used to quantify children's (n=208) greenness exposure at 30-s epoch accelerometer and GPS data points. A generalized linear mixed model with a kernel density smoothing term for addressing spatial autocorrelation was fit to analyze residential neighborhood activity data. Excluding activity at home and during school-hours, an epoch-level analysis found momentary greenness exposure was positively associated with the likelihood of contemporaneous moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). This association was stronger for smart growth residents who experienced a 39% increase in odds of MVPA for a 10th to 90th percentile increase in exposure to greenness (OR=1.39, 95% CI 1.36-1.44). An individual-level analysis found children who experienced >20 min of daily exposure to greener spaces (>90th percentile) engaged in nearly 5 times the daily rate of MVPA of children with nearly zero daily exposure to greener spaces (95% CI 3.09-7.20).

  9. Active Well Counting Using New PSD Plastic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hausladen, Paul; Newby, Jason; McElroy, Robert Dennis

    2015-11-01

    This report presents results and analysis from a series of proof-of-concept measurements to assess the suitability of segmented detectors constructed from Eljen EJ-299-34 PSD-plastic scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination capability for the purposes of quantifying uranium via active neutron coincidence counting. Present quantification of bulk uranium materials for international safeguards and domestic materials control and accounting relies on active neutron coincidence counting systems, such as the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL), that use moderated He-3 proportional counters along with necessarily low-intensity 241Am(Li) neutron sources. Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are a potentially superior technology to the existing AWCC and UNCL designs due to their spectroscopic capability and their inherently short neutron coincidence times that largely eliminate random coincidences and enable interrogation by stronger sources. One of the past impediments to the investigation and adoption of scintillation counters for the purpose of quantifying bulk uranium was the commercial availability of scintillators having the necessary neutron-gamma pulse-shape discrimination properties only as flammable liquids. Recently, Eljen EJ-299-34 PSD-plastic scintillator became commercially available. The present work is the first assessment of an array of PSD-plastic detectors for the purposes of quantifying bulk uranium. The detector panel used in the present work was originally built as the focal plane for a fast-neutron imager, but it was repurposed for the present investigation by construction of a stand to support the inner well of an AWCC immediately in front of the detector panel. The detector panel and data acquisition of this system are particularly well suited for performing active-well fast-neutron counting of LEU and HEU samples because the active detector volume is solid, the 241Am(Li) interrogating

  10. Accelerometer measured daily physical activity and sedentary pursuits–comparison between two models of the Actigraph and the importance of data reduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Very few validation studies have been performed between different generations of the commonly used Actigraph accelerometers. We compared daily physical activity data generated from the old generation Actigraph model 7164 with the new generation Actigraph GT1M accelerometer in 15 young females for eight consecutive days. We also investigated if different wear time thresholds had any impact on the findings. Minutes per day of moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA), vigorous physical activity (VPA) and very vigorous physical activity (VVPA) were calculated. Moreover, minutes of sedentary pursuits per day were calculated. Findings There were significant (P < 0.05) differences between the Actigraph 7164 and the GT1M concerning MVPA (61 ± 21vs. 56 ± 23 min/day), VPA (12 ± 8 vs. 9 ± 3 min/day) and VVPA (3.2 ± 3.0 vs. 0.3 ± 1.1 min/day). The different wear time thresholds had little impact on minutes per day in different intensities. Median minutes of sedentary pursuits per day ranged from 159 to 438 minutes depending on which wear time threshold was used (i.e. 10, 30 or 60 minutes), whereas very small differences were observed between the two different models. Conclusions Data from the old generation Actigraph 7164 and the new generation Actigraph GT1M accelerometers differ, where the Actigraph GT1M generates lower minutes spent in free living physical activity. Median minutes of sedentary pursuits per day are highly dependent on which wear time threshold that is used, and not by accelerometer model. PMID:24176143

  11. Prediction models discriminating between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities in children using a triaxial accelerometer with a gravity-removal physical activity classification algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hikihara, Yuki; Tanaka, Chiaki; Oshima, Yoshitake; Ohkawara, Kazunori; Ishikawa-Takata, Kazuko; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2014-01-01

    The aims of our study were to examine whether a gravity-removal physical activity classification algorithm (GRPACA) is applicable for discrimination between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities for various physical activities (PAs) of children and to prove that this approach improves the estimation accuracy of a prediction model for children using an accelerometer. Japanese children (42 boys and 26 girls) attending primary school were invited to participate in this study. We used a triaxial accelerometer with a sampling interval of 32 Hz and within a measurement range of ±6 G. Participants were asked to perform 6 nonlocomotive and 5 locomotive activities. We measured raw synthetic acceleration with the triaxial accelerometer and monitored oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production during each activity with the Douglas bag method. In addition, the resting metabolic rate (RMR) was measured with the subject sitting on a chair to calculate metabolic equivalents (METs). When the ratio of unfiltered synthetic acceleration (USA) and filtered synthetic acceleration (FSA) was 1.12, the rate of correct discrimination between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities was excellent, at 99.1% on average. As a result, a strong linear relationship was found for both nonlocomotive (METs = 0.013×synthetic acceleration +1.220, R2 = 0.772) and locomotive (METs = 0.005×synthetic acceleration +0.944, R2 = 0.880) activities, except for climbing down and up. The mean differences between the values predicted by our model and measured METs were -0.50 to 0.23 for moderate to vigorous intensity (>3.5 METs) PAs like running, ball throwing and washing the floor, which were regarded as unpredictable PAs. In addition, the difference was within 0.25 METs for sedentary to mild moderate PAs (<3.5 METs). Our specific calibration model that discriminates between nonlocomotive and locomotive activities for children can be useful to evaluate the sedentary to vigorous PAs

  12. Accelerometer steps/day translation of moderate-to-vigorous activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity (PA) guidelines are typically communicated in terms of duration, frequency, and intensity, e.g., 30 minutes/day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on at least 5 days/week. Step counters can be used to collect objective PA expressed as steps/day; howeverc the associat...

  13. The Impact of Gait Disability on the Calibration of Accelerometer Output in Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Accelerometer activity counts have been correlated with energy expenditure during treadmill walking among ambulatory adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined the effects of gait disability on 1) the association between rates of energy expenditure and accelerometer output in overground walking and 2) the calibration of accelerometer output for quantifying time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in people with MS. The sample consisted of 24 individuals with MS, of whom 10 reported gait disability based on Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) scores. The participants undertook three 6-minute periods of overground walking while wearing an accelerometer and a portable metabolic unit (K4b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy). In the first period of walking, the participants walked at a self-selected, comfortable speed. In the two subsequent walking periods, participants walked at speeds above and below (±0.5 mph) the comfortable walking speed, respectively. Strong linear relationships were observed between rates of accelerometer activity counts and energy expenditure during walking in the overall sample (R2 = 0.90) and subsamples with (R2 = 0.88) and without gait disability (R2 = 0.91). The slope of the relationship was significantly steeper in the subsample with gait disability (β= 0.0049) than in the subsample without gait disability (β= 0.0026). The difference in slopes resulted in a significantly lower cut-point for MVPA (1886 vs. 2717 counts/min) in those with gait disability. These findings provide a metabolic cut-point for quantifying time spent in MVPA in people with MS, both with and without gait disability. PMID:24453722

  14. Physical Activity Level and Sedentary Behaviors among Public School Children in Dakar (Senegal) Measured by PAQ-C and Accelerometer: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Adama; Thiam, Mbeugué; Idohou-Dossou, Nicole; Diongue, Ousmane; Mégné, Ndé; Diallo, Khady; Sembène, Pape Malick; Wade, Salimata

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity and sedentary lifestyles are major risk factors of childhood obesity. This study aimed to measure physical activity (PA) levels by accelerometer and Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C) among Senegalese school children and the relation with Body Mass Index (BMI) and body composition. Methodology: 156 pupils 8–11 years old were randomly selected in four elementary public schools of Dakar. BMI z-score was used to categorize children according to their weight status. PA was measured by PAQ-C in the 156 pupils and by accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X+, Pensacola, FL, USA) in a subsample of 42 children. Body composition was determined by deuterium dilution method. Results: PAQ-C results were comparable in the 156 and 42 pupils. The 42 pupils presented a light activity measured by accelerometer, while PAQ-C classified the majority of them (57%; n = 24) in the moderate PA level. Children spent most of their time (min/day) in sedentary activities and light activities than in moderate and intense activity levels. Accumulation of 60 min/day Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA) was achieved by 54.8% (n = 23) of the pupils. MVPA decreased in girls in relation to their body fatness. There was a significant difference in MVPA between boys and girls. Similarly, overweight/obese (45 ± 16 min/day) children had lower MVPA than their normal and underweight peers (88 ± 34 and 74 ± 36 min/day, respectively; p = 0.004). Conclusions: The two methods are inconsistent for measuring light and moderate PA levels. Although PAQ-C is an uncomplicated routine method, various activities were not adapted for genuine activities in Senegalese children and therefore needs to be validated in African children. PMID:27735876

  15. Comparison of the RT3 Research Tracker and Tritrac R3D accelerometers during a backpacking expedition by a single subject.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Dale

    2004-10-01

    This study compared the RT3 Research Tracker accelerometer and the Tritrac R3D accelerometer in a field setting. A six-day backpacking expedition (122.4 km in length) was completed by a single subject in the Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The overall correlation between the counts of vector magnitude activity for the RT3 and R3D was moderate (r =.75, p<.001), with the overall calculated bias [mean difference (RT3 minus R3D) and standard deviation of the differences] across all six days estimated at 235+/-436 vector magnitude activity counts. However, agreement between the instruments is problematic; the RT3 might be 201 activity counts below or 671 activity counts above the R3D in assessing physical activity during backpacking.

  16. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, H.F.

    1984-06-27

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  17. Multiple-stage integrating accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Devaney, Howard F.

    1986-01-01

    An accelerometer assembly is provided for use in activating a switch in response to multiple acceleration pulses in series. The accelerometer includes a housing forming a chamber. An inertial mass or piston is slidably disposed in the chamber and spring biased toward a first or reset position. A damping system is also provided to damp piston movement in response to first and subsequent acceleration pulses. Additionally, a cam, including a Z-shaped slot, and cooperating follower pin slidably received therein are mounted to the piston and the housing. The middle or cross-over leg of the Z-shaped slot cooperates with the follower pin to block or limit piston movement and prevent switch activation in response to a lone acceleration pulse. The switch of the assembly is only activated after two or more separate acceleration pulses are sensed and the piston reaches the end of the chamber opposite the reset position.

  18. Children’s Physical Activity Behavior during School Recess: A Pilot Study Using GPS, Accelerometer, Participant Observation, and Go-Along Interview

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Troelsen, Jens; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Schoolyards are recognized as important settings for physical activity interventions during recess. However, varying results have been reported. This pilot study was conducted to gain in-depth knowledge of children’s physical activity behavior during recess using a mixed-methods approach combining quantitative GPS and accelerometer measurements with qualitative go-along group interviews and participant observations. Data were collected during three weekdays in a public school in Denmark. Eighty-one children (47 girls) wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X) and GPS (QStarz BT-Q1000xt), sixteen children participated in go-along group interviews, and recess behavior was observed using an ethnographical participant observation approach. All data were analyzed separated systematically answering the Five W Questions. Children were categorized into Low, Middle and High physical activity groups and these groups were predominantly staying in three different locations during recess: school building, schoolyard and field, respectively. Mostly girls were in the building remaining in there because of a perceived lack of attractive outdoor play facilities. The children in the schoolyard were predominantly girls who preferred the schoolyard over the field to avoid the competitive soccer games on the field whereas boys dominated the field playing soccer. Using a mixed-methods approach to investigate children’s physical activity behavior during recess helped gain in-depth knowledge that can aid development of future interventions in the school environment. PMID:26859288

  19. Attention during active visual tasks: counting, pointing, or simply looking

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, John D.; Schnitzer, Brian S.; Gersch, Timothy M.; Dosher, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    Visual attention and saccades are typically studied in artificial situations, with stimuli presented to the steadily fixating eye, or saccades made along specified paths. By contrast, in the real world saccadic patterns are constrained only by the demands of the motivating task. We studied attention during pauses between saccades made to perform 3 free-viewing tasks: counting dots, pointing to the same dots with a visible cursor, or simply looking at the dots using a freely-chosen path. Attention was assessed by the ability to identify the orientation of a briefly-presented Gabor probe. All primary tasks produced losses in identification performance, with counting producing the largest losses, followed by pointing and then looking-only. Looking-only resulted in a 37% increase in contrast thresholds in the orientation task. Counting produced more severe losses that were not overcome by increasing Gabor contrast. Detection or localization of the Gabor, unlike identification, were largely unaffected by any of the primary tasks. Taken together, these results show that attention is required to control saccades, even with freely-chosen paths, but the attentional demands of saccades are less than those attached to tasks such as counting, which have a significant cognitive load. Counting proved to be a highly demanding task that either exhausted momentary processing capacity (e.g., working memory or executive functions), or, alternatively, encouraged a strategy of filtering out all signals irrelevant to counting itself. The fact that the attentional demands of saccades (as well as those of detection/localization) are relatively modest makes it possible to continually adjust both the spatial and temporal pattern of saccades so as to re-allocate attentional resources as needed to handle the complex and multifaceted demands of real-world environments. PMID:18649913

  20. A comprehensive evaluation of commonly used accelerometer energy expenditure and MET prediction equations.

    PubMed

    Lyden, Kate; Kozey, Sarah L; Staudenmeyer, John W; Freedson, Patty S

    2011-02-01

    Numerous accelerometers and prediction methods are used to estimate energy expenditure (EE). Validation studies have been limited to small sample sizes in which participants complete a narrow range of activities and typically validate only one or two prediction models for one particular accelerometer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of nine published and two proprietary EE prediction equations for three different accelerometers. Two hundred and seventy-seven participants completed an average of six treadmill (TRD) (1.34, 1.56, 2.23 ms(-1) each at 0 and 3% grade) and five self-paced activities of daily living (ADLs). EE estimates were compared with indirect calorimetry. Accelerometers were worn while EE was measured using a portable metabolic unit. To estimate EE, 4 ActiGraph prediction models were used, 5 Actical models, and 2 RT3 proprietary models. Across all activities, each equation underestimated EE (bias -0.1 to -1.4 METs and -0.5 to -1.3 kcal, respectively). For ADLs EE was underestimated by all prediction models (bias -0.2 to -2.0 and -0.2 to -2.8, respectively), while TRD activities were underestimated by seven equations, and overestimated by four equations (bias -0.8 to 0.2 METs and -0.4 to 0.5 kcal, respectively). Misclassification rates ranged from 21.7 (95% CI 20.4, 24.2%) to 34.3% (95% CI 32.3, 36.3%), with vigorous intensity activities being most often misclassified. Prediction equations did not yield accurate point estimates of EE across a broad range of activities nor were they accurate at classifying activities across a range of intensities (light <3 METs, moderate 3-5.99 METs, vigorous ≥ 6 METs). Current prediction techniques have many limitations when translating accelerometer counts to EE.

  1. Comparison of the RT3 Research Tracker and Tritrac R3D accelerometers.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Dale; Gotshall, Robert; McArthur, Trisha

    2003-10-01

    This study compared the RT3 Research Tracker accelerometer to the Tritrac R3D accelerometer in both laboratory and field settings and tested the hypothesis that the RT3 records higher physical activity counts and smaller standard deviations than the R3D. The RT3 is relatively new and untested and its concurrent validity with existing instruments and physical activity needs to be assessed before being used in research. In this study the RT3 had higher average recordings of physical activity counts in all of the nine testing situations than the R3D. However, in terms of agreement between the instruments, the RT3 might be 582 below or 1,236 above (activity counts) the R3D in assessing physical activity. These results do not establish that the RT3 is more consistently measuring higher physical activity counts than the R3D. Comparing vector magnitude with oxygen consumption and heart rate across the 0% grade testing conditions indicated that the RT3 and R3D are sensitive to changes in various intensities of level ambulation. When the 5%, 10%, and 15% grade on the treadmill protocols were analyzed, low correlations between oxygen consumption and heart rate with vector magnitude responses were found for both the RT3 and R3D. Differences in agreement between the RT3 and R3D did not vary in any systematic way over the range in testing conditions which substantiates that the RT3 and R3D accelerometers are sensitive on flat surfaces but are insensitive to changes in grade.

  2. Exercise Counts: How Many Calories Will Your Activity Burn?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Eat Healthy and Get Active Get Active Exercise Activity Calculator How many calories will your activity ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News and Stories Glossary For Health Care Professionals ...

  3. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  4. Effects of a canine Elizabethan collar on ambulatory electrocardiogram recorded by a Holter recording system and spontaneous activities measured continuously by an accelerometer in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Tokuriki, M

    2000-05-01

    Ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) has been recorded in dogs wearing a jacket to protect a Holter recording system, but the jacket was often damaged by dogs. We compared ECG recorded by a Holter recording system and spontaneous activity measured by an accelerometer in Beagle dogs with or without an Elizabethan collar. There were few significant differences in mean values (per hr) of the heart rate and the amount of spontaneous activity between dogs with or without the Elizabethan collar. Mean values (per 23 hr) of them had no significant difference between them. We concluded that the Elizabethan collar did not have any effect on ambulatory ECG and canine movements and was effective to protect the recording apparatus.

  5. Objective reports versus subjective perceptions of crime and their relationships to accelerometer-measured physical activity in Hispanic caretaker-child dyads.

    PubMed

    van Bakergem, Margaret; Sommer, Evan C; Heerman, William J; Hipp, James Aaron; Barkin, Shari L

    2017-02-01

    Crime and safety are commonly cited barriers to physical activity (PA). We had three objectives, 1) describe the association between objective crime measures and perceptions of crime, 2) analyze the relationships between each type of crime and accelerometer-measured physical activity in caretakers and young children (ages 3-5years), and 3) explore for early gender differences in the relationship between crime and physical activity in young children. Data are from the cross-sectional baseline data of an ongoing randomized controlled trial in Nashville, Tennessee spanning September 2012 through May 2014. Data was analyzed from 480 Hispanic dyads (adult caretaker and 3-5year old child). Objective crime rate was assessed in ArcGIS and perception of crime was measured by caretaker agreement with the statement "The crime rate in my neighborhood makes it unsafe to go on walks." The primary outcome was accelerometer-measured physical activity over seven consecutive days. Objective and perceived crime were significantly positively correlated. Caretaker vigorous PA was significantly related to perceptions of crime; however, its relationship to objective crime was not significant. Child PA was not significantly related to caretaker perceptions of crime. However, interactions suggested that the relationship between crime rate and PA was significantly more negative for girls than for boys. Objective and subjective measures of crime rate are expected to be important correlates of PA, but they appear to have complex relationships that are different for adults than they are for young children, as well as for young girls compared to boys, and research has produced conflicting findings.

  6. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  7. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  8. Authentic active learning activities demonstrating the use of serial dilutions and plate counts.

    PubMed

    March, Jordon K; Jensen, Kyle C; Porter, Nathan T; Breakwell, Donald P

    2011-01-01

    Serial dilution and plate counting is often taught in courses for both microbiology and allied health students. Lecture examples and examination questions addressing how the method is used can sometimes be contrived: artificial data sets may have little or no meaning other than to have students perform a calculation. Here we provide a set of activities employing data sets acquired from the primary literature. Our objective was to have the students think critically about a real scenario in which serial dilution and plate count was used. Each activity requires students to read a paragraph describing the study, predict the results, perform the appropriate calculations, and then evaluate the results in light of their predictions. To test the efficacy of these activities, a pretest quiz was given to approximately 100 students in an allied health/general microbiology course. After a lecture on how microbes are enumerated, students were given a different quiz. The class was then divided randomly into groups of three or four students and assigned one of the activities. A postactivity quiz was also administered. Approximately two weeks later, a serial dilution/plate count question was used on an examination and served as a final posttest. Standardized learning gains were calculated for the quiz administered after each learning activity. Even though learning gains were significantly higher after the lecture, there was also a significant improvement between the lecture and the activity. Using an exercise based on an authentic set of data significantly improved student learning gains, and is a useful practice for teaching microbiology.

  9. Authentic Active Learning Activities Demonstrating the Use of Serial Dilutions and Plate Counts

    PubMed Central

    March, Jordon K.; Jensen, Kyle C.; Porter, Nathan T.; Breakwell, Donald P.

    2011-01-01

    Serial dilution and plate counting is often taught in courses for both microbiology and allied health students. Lecture examples and examination questions addressing how the method is used can sometimes be contrived: artificial data sets may have little or no meaning other than to have students perform a calculation. Here we provide a set of activities employing data sets acquired from the primary literature. Our objective was to have the students think critically about a real scenario in which serial dilution and plate count was used. Each activity requires students to read a paragraph describing the study, predict the results, perform the appropriate calculations, and then evaluate the results in light of their predictions. To test the efficacy of these activities, a pretest quiz was given to approximately 100 students in an allied health/general microbiology course. After a lecture on how microbes are enumerated, students were given a different quiz. The class was then divided randomly into groups of three or four students and assigned one of the activities. A postactivity quiz was also administered. Approximately two weeks later, a serial dilution/plate count question was used on an examination and served as a final posttest. Standardized learning gains were calculated for the quiz administered after each learning activity. Even though learning gains were significantly higher after the lecture, there was also a significant improvement between the lecture and the activity. Using an exercise based on an authentic set of data significantly improved student learning gains, and is a useful practice for teaching microbiology. PMID:23653759

  10. Validation of a wireless accelerometer network for energy expenditure measurement.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H K; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a wireless network of accelerometers and compare it to a hip-mounted accelerometer for predicting energy expenditure in a semi-structured environment. Adults (n = 25) aged 18-30 engaged in 14 sedentary, ambulatory, exercise, and lifestyle activities over a 60-min protocol while wearing a portable metabolic analyser, hip-mounted accelerometer, and wireless network of three accelerometers worn on the right wrist, thigh, and ankle. Participants chose the order and duration of activities. Artificial neural networks were created separately for the wireless network and hip accelerometer for energy expenditure prediction. The wireless network had higher correlations (r = 0.79 vs. r = 0.72, P < 0.01) but similar root mean square error (2.16 vs. 2.09 METs, P > 0.05) to the hip accelerometer. Measured (from metabolic analyser) and predicted energy expenditure from the hip accelerometer were significantly different for the 3 of the 14 activities (lying down, sweeping, and cycle fast); conversely, measured and predicted energy expenditure from the wireless network were not significantly different for any activity. In conclusion, the wireless network yielded a small improvement over the hip accelerometer, providing evidence that the wireless network can produce accurate estimates of energy expenditure in adults participating in a range of activities.

  11. Moderating effects of age, gender and education on the associations of perceived neighborhood environment attributes with accelerometer-based physical activity: The IPEN adult study.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Delfien; Cerin, Ester; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Salvo, Deborah; Christiansen, Lars B; Macfarlane, Duncan; Owen, Neville; Mitas, Josef; Troelsen, Jens; Aguinaga-Ontoso, Ines; Davey, Rachel; Reis, Rodrigo; Sarmiento, Olga L; Schofield, Grant; Conway, Terry L; Sallis, James F

    2015-11-01

    The study's purpose was to examine age, gender, and education as potential moderators of the associations of perceived neighborhood environment variables with accelerometer-based moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Data were from 7273 adults from 16 sites (11 countries) that were part of a coordinated multi-country cross-sectional study. Age moderated the associations of perceived crime safety, and perceiving no major physical barriers to walking, with MVPA: positive associations were only found in older adults. Perceived land use mix-access was linearly (positive) associated with MVPA in men, and curvilinearly in women. Perceived crime safety was related to MVPA only in women. No moderating relationships were found for education. Overall the associations of adults' perceptions of environmental attributes with MVPA were largely independent of the socio-demographic factors examined. These findings are encouraging, suggesting that efforts to optimize the perceived built and social environment may act in a socially-equitable manner to facilitate MVPA.

  12. Sampling frequency affects the processing of Actigraph raw acceleration data to activity counts.

    PubMed

    Brønd, Jan Christian; Arvidsson, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    ActiGraph acceleration data are processed through several steps (including band-pass filtering to attenuate unwanted signal frequencies) to generate the activity counts commonly used in physical activity research. We performed three experiments to investigate the effect of sampling frequency on the generation of activity counts. Ideal acceleration signals were produced in the MATLAB software. Thereafter, ActiGraph GT3X+ monitors were spun in a mechanical setup. Finally, 20 subjects performed walking and running wearing GT3X+ monitors. Acceleration data from all experiments were collected with different sampling frequencies, and activity counts were generated with the ActiLife software. With the default 30-Hz (or 60-Hz, 90-Hz) sampling frequency, the generation of activity counts was performed as intended with 50% attenuation of acceleration signals with a frequency of 2.5 Hz by the signal frequency band-pass filter. Frequencies above 5 Hz were eliminated totally. However, with other sampling frequencies, acceleration signals above 5 Hz escaped the band-pass filter to a varied degree and contributed to additional activity counts. Similar results were found for the spinning of the GT3X+ monitors, although the amount of activity counts generated was less, indicating that raw data stored in the GT3X+ monitor is processed. Between 600 and 1,600 more counts per minute were generated with the sampling frequencies 40 and 100 Hz compared with 30 Hz during running. Sampling frequency affects the processing of ActiGraph acceleration data to activity counts. Researchers need to be aware of this error when selecting sampling frequencies other than the default 30 Hz.

  13. SenseWearMini and Actigraph GT3X Accelerometer Classification of Observed Sedentary and Light-Intensity Physical Activities in a Laboratory Setting.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Lynne M; Goldsmith, Charles H; Leung, April Y F; Li, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of SenseWear Mini (SWm) and Actigraph GT3X (AG3) accelerometers to differentiate between healthy adults' observed sedentary and light activities in a laboratory setting. Methods: The 22 participants (15 women, 7 men), ages 19 to 72 years, wore SWm and AG3 monitors and performed five sedentary and four light activities for 5 minutes each while observed in a laboratory setting. Performance was examined through comparisons of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Correct identification of both types of activities was examined using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: Both monitors demonstrated excellent ability to identify sedentary activities (sensitivity>0.89). The SWm monitor was better at identifying light activities (specificity 0.61-0.71) than the AG3 monitor (specificity 0.27-0.47) and thus also showed a greater ability to correctly identify both sedentary and light activities (SWm AUC 0.84; AG3 AUC 0.62-0.73). Conclusions: SWm may be a more suitable monitor for detecting time spent in sedentary and light-intensity activities. This finding has clinical and research relevance for evaluation of time spent in lower intensity physical activities by sedentary adults.

  14. Characterizing performance of ultra-sensitive accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebesta, Henry

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of methodology and test results pertaining to the characterization of ultra sensitive accelerometers. Two issues are of primary concern. The terminology ultra sensitive accelerometer is used to imply instruments whose noise floors and resolution are at the state of the art. Hence, the typical approach of verifying an instrument's performance by measuring it with a yet higher quality instrument (or standard) is not practical. Secondly, it is difficult to find or create an environment with sufficiently low background acceleration. The typical laboratory acceleration levels will be at several orders of magnitude above the noise floor of the most sensitive accelerometers. Furthermore, this background must be treated as unknown since the best instrument available is the one to be tested. A test methodology was developed in which two or more like instruments are subjected to the same but unknown background acceleration. Appropriately selected spectral analysis techniques were used to separate the sensors' output spectra into coherent components and incoherent components. The coherent part corresponds to the background acceleration being measured by the sensors being tested. The incoherent part is attributed to sensor noise and data acquisition and processing noise. The method works well for estimating noise floors that are 40 to 50 dB below the motion applied to the test accelerometers. The accelerometers being tested are intended for use as feedback sensors in a system to actively stabilize an inertial guidance component test platform.

  15. A model to estimate the potential for a physical activity-induced reduction in healthcare costs for the elderly, based on pedometer/accelerometer data from the Nakanojo Study.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yukitoshi; Shephard, Roy J

    2011-09-01

    The rising healthcare costs associated with an aging population have become an urgent fiscal problem. However, evidence of the efficacy of preventive programmes is limited, since almost all studies have involved only small numbers of highly selected participants. This article examines potential physical activity-induced decreases in healthcare expenses, applying a theoretical model to the Nakanojo Study of habitual physical activity and health in an entire elderly community. The Nakanojo Study has shown substantial associations of health with both step count and the duration of moderate effort (intensity >3 metabolic equivalents [METs]). Participants are classed as 'dependent' (n = 800) or 'independent' (n = 4400); the latter category is divided arbitrarily into quartiles, based on physical activity patterns (Q1-Q4; n = 1100 for each quartile). The five groups show a graded prevalence of various morbidities, including dependency, depression, osteoporosis, fractures, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, ischaemic heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, cancer and dementia. Consequently, annual healthcare expenditures (based on 2009 published Japanese costs associated with each of these conditions) differ by about yen (¥)197 900 ($US1979) per person between dependent individuals and those in group Q1, ¥20 700 ($US207) between Q1 and Q2, ¥14 600 ($US146) between Q2 and Q3, and ¥5300 ($US53) between Q3 and Q4. Accepting a causal relationship between physical activity and health, and assuming that an increase in physical activity induces a benefit that is uniform across conditions and diseases, respective morbidity prevalences and associated healthcare costs seem likely to decrease as physical activity increases. Thus, if the physical activity of only 5% of each group could be increased by a single ranking (pedometer/accelerometer scores of 2000 steps/day and 5-10 min/day at >3 METs and/or an adjusted questionnaire score of 10 MET

  16. Counting on People: Elementary Population and Environmental Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Pamela; Scullard, Anne

    This activity book serves as a primer on population dynamics and environmental impacts. It is designed to show young students their connections to other people, all living things, and the environment that surrounds them. While the kit is designed for use with students in grades 1-6, many of the activities are more appropriate for upper elementary…

  17. Low G accelerometer testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Eight different types of low-g accelerometer tests are covered on the Bell miniature electrostatically suspended accelerometer (MESA) which is known to be sensitive to less than 10 to the minus 7th power earth's gravity. These tests include a mass attracting scheme, Leitz dividing head, Wild theodolite, precision gage blocks, precision tiltmeters, Hilger Watts autocollimator, Razdow Mark 2 autocollimator, and laser interferometer measuring system. Each test is described and a comparison of the results is presented. The output of the MESA was as linear and consistent as any of the available devices were capable of measuring. Although the extent of agreement varied with the test equipment used, it can only be concluded that the indicated errors were attributable to the test equipment coupled with the environmental conditions.

  18. Improved Signal Processing Technique Leads to More Robust Self Diagnostic Accelerometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger; Lekki, John; Jaros, Dave; Riggs, Terrence; Evans, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) is a sensor system designed to actively monitor the health of an accelerometer. In this case an accelerometer is considered healthy if it can be determined that it is operating correctly and its measurements may be relied upon. The SDA system accomplishes this by actively monitoring the accelerometer for a variety of failure conditions including accelerometer structural damage, an electrical open circuit, and most importantly accelerometer detachment. In recent testing of the SDA system in emulated engine operating conditions it has been found that a more robust signal processing technique was necessary. An improved accelerometer diagnostic technique and test results of the SDA system utilizing this technique are presented here. Furthermore, the real time, autonomous capability of the SDA system to concurrently compensate for effects from real operating conditions such as temperature changes and mechanical noise, while monitoring the condition of the accelerometer health and attachment, will be demonstrated.

  19. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  20. Levitated micro-accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Peter, Frank J.; Kinney, Ragon D.; Gilkey, Jeffrey C.

    2004-06-01

    The objective is a significant advancement in the state-of-the-art of accelerometer design for tactical grade (or better) applications. The design goals are <1 milli-G bias stability across environments and $200 cost. This quantum leap in performance improvement and cost reduction can only be achieved by a radical new approach, not incremental improvements to existing concepts. This novel levitated closed-loop accelerometer is implemented as a hybrid micromachine. The hybrid approach frees the designer from the limitations of any given monolithic process and dramatically expands the available design space. The design can be tailored to the dynamic range, resolution, bandwidth, and environmental requirements of the application while still preserving all of the benefits of monolithic MEMS fabrication - extreme precision, small size, low cost, and low power. An accelerometer was designed and prototype hardware was built, driving the successful development and refinement of several 'never been done before' fabrication processes. Many of these process developments are commercially valuable and are key enablers for the realization of a wide variety of useful micro-devices. While controlled levitation of a proof mass has yet to be realized, the overall design concept remains sound. This was clearly demonstrated by the stable and reliable closed-loop control of a proof mass at the test structure level. Furthermore, the hybrid MEMS implementation is the most promising approach for achieving the ambitious cost and performance targets. It is strongly recommended that Sandia remain committed to the original goal.

  1. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  2. Calibration and Cross-Validation of the ActiGraph wGT3X+ Accelerometer for the Estimation of Physical Activity Intensity in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    McGarty, Arlene M.; Penpraze, Victoria; Melville, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Valid objective measurement is integral to increasing our understanding of physical activity and sedentary behaviours. However, no population-specific cut points have been calibrated for children with intellectual disabilities. Therefore, this study aimed to calibrate and cross-validate the first population-specific accelerometer intensity cut points for children with intellectual disabilities. Methods Fifty children with intellectual disabilities were randomly assigned to the calibration (n = 36; boys = 28, 9.53±1.08yrs) or cross-validation (n = 14; boys = 9, 9.57±1.16yrs) group. Participants completed a semi-structured school-based activity session, which included various activities ranging from sedentary to vigorous intensity. Direct observation (SOFIT tool) was used to calibrate the ActiGraph wGT3X+, which participants wore on the right hip. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses determined the optimal cut points for sedentary, moderate, and vigorous intensity activity for the vertical axis and vector magnitude. Classification agreement was investigated using sensitivity, specificity, total agreement, and Cohen’s kappa scores against the criterion measure of SOFIT. Results The optimal (AUC = .87−.94) vertical axis cut points (cpm) were ≤507 (sedentary), 1008−2300 (moderate), and ≥2301 (vigorous), which demonstrated high sensitivity (81−88%) and specificity (81−85%). The optimal (AUC = .86−.92) vector magnitude cut points (cpm) of ≤1863 (sedentary), 2610−4214 (moderate), and ≥4215 (vigorous) demonstrated comparable, albeit marginally lower, accuracy than the vertical axis cut points (sensitivity = 80−86%; specificity = 77−82%). Classification agreement ranged from moderate to almost perfect (κ = .51−.85) with high sensitivity and specificity, and confirmed the trend that accuracy increased with intensity, and vertical axis cut points provide higher classification agreement than vector magnitude cut points

  3. Comparison of two HPGe counting system used in activation studies for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Szücs, T.; Kiss, G. G.; Fülöp, Zs.

    2014-05-09

    The activation method is a widely used technique to measure charged-particle induced cross sections for astrophys-ical applications. This two step technique is used for example to measure alpha-induced cross sections in γ-process related studies. The first step – in which a target is irradiated with a proton/alpha beam – is followed by the determination of the produced activity. Especially in p-process related studies in the heavier mass range, the produced radioactive nuclei decays mainly with electron-capture, resulting intense x-rays. The activity of the reaction products hence can be determine via the counting of these x-rays, and not only by counting the usually much weaker γ-rays. In this paper we compare the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of two High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors used for x- and γ-ray counting in activation experiments.

  4. Active neutron coincidence counting for the assay of MTR fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, R.

    1983-02-01

    The active well coincidence counter (AWCC) and the neutron coincidence collar (CC) were investigated for their suitability to assay materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel elements. The AWCC was used with its special insert to hold the fuel element and interrogation source. The CC was modified by the addition of polyethylene liners 2.5 cm (1 in.) thick on the sides. For a typical MTR element (approx. 220 g /sup 235/U) and 1000-s count times, statistical errors were approx. 1.6% for the CC and approx. 0.6% for AWCC. For either instrument, the change in count rate corresponding to the removal or addition of one fuel plate (with an 18-plate element) was approx. 3.8%; thus, either instrument can detect removal of one plate. The AWCC can also detect removal of one plate in count times that are considerably less than 1000 s. Various functions were investigated to fit the coincidence count rate vs /sup 235/U mass curve for the AWCC. Programs have been written for the Hewlett-Packard HP-97 calculator to calculate the calibration constants of these functions by a least-squares technique. Coincidence count rates in the AWCC depend on the orientation of the plates of the fuel elements because of the counting efficiency variation in the insert. To lessen this dependence, the MTR element should be counted with its plates positioned vertically, that is, parallel to the radius of the device. For the collar, the effect of plate orientation is much smaller.

  5. Public transit generates new physical activity: Evidence from individual GPS and accelerometer data before and after light rail construction in a neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

    PubMed

    Miller, Harvey J; Tribby, Calvin P; Brown, Barbara B; Smith, Ken R; Werner, Carol M; Wolf, Jean; Wilson, Laura; Oliveira, Marcelo G Simas

    2015-11-01

    Poor health outcomes from insufficient physical activity (PA) are a persistent public health issue. Public transit is often promoted for positive influence on PA. Although there is cross-sectional evidence that transit users have higher PA levels, this may be coincidental or shifted from activities such as recreational walking. We use a quasi-experimental design to test if light rail transit (LRT) generated new PA in a neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Participants (n=536) wore Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and accelerometers before (2012) and after (2013) LRT construction. We test within-person differences in individuals' PA time based on changes in transit usage pre- versus post-intervention. We map transit-related PA to detect spatial clustering of PA around the new transit stops. We analyze within-person differences in PA time based on daily transit use and estimate the effect of daily transit use on PA time controlling for socio-demographic variables. Results suggest that transit use directly generates new PA that is not shifted from other PA. This supports the public health benefits from new high quality public transit such as LRT.

  6. Public transit generates new physical activity: Evidence from individual GPS and accelerometer data before and after light rail construction in a neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Harvey J.; Tribby, Calvin P.; Brown, Barbara B.; Smith, Ken R.; Werner, Carol M.; Wolf, Jean; Wilson, Laura; Simas Oliveira, Marcelo G.

    2015-01-01

    Poor health outcomes from insufficient physical activity (PA) are a persistent public health issue. Public transit is often promoted for positive influence on PA. Although there is cross-sectional evidence that transit users have higher PA levels, this may be coincidental or shifted from activities such as recreational walking. We use a quasi-experimental design to test if light rail transit (LRT) generated new PA in a neighborhood of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Participants (n=536) wore Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and accelerometers before (2012) and after (2013) LRT construction. We test within-person differences in individuals’ PA time based on changes in transit usage pre- versus post-intervention. We map transit-related PA to detect spatial clustering of PA around the new transit stops. We analyze within-person differences in PA time based on daily transit use and estimate the effect of daily transit use on PA time controlling for socio-demographic variables. Results suggest that transit use directly generates new PA that is not shifted from other PA. This supports the public health benefits from new high quality public transit such as LRT. PMID:26340643

  7. Predicting Human Movement with Multiple Accelerometers Using Movelets

    PubMed Central

    He, Bing; Bai, Jiawei; Zipunnikov, Vadim V.; Koster, Annemarie; Caserotti, Paolo; Lange-Maia, Brittney; Glynn, Nancy W.; Harris, Tamara B.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The study aims were: 1) to develop transparent algorithms that use short segments of training data for predicting activity types; and 2) to compare prediction performance of proposed algorithms using single accelerometers and multiple accelerometers. Methods Sixteen participants (age, 80.6 yr (4.8 yr); BMI, 26.1 kg·m−2 (2.5 kg·m−2)) performed fifteen life-style activities in the laboratory, each wearing three accelerometers at the right hip, left and right wrists. Triaxial accelerometry data were collected at 80 Hz using Actigraph GT3X+. Prediction algorithms were developed, which, instead of extracting features, build activity specific dictionaries composed of short signal segments called movelets. Three alternative approaches were proposed to integrate the information from the multiple accelerometers. Results With at most several seconds of training data per activity, the prediction accuracy at the second-level temporal resolution was very high for lying, standing, normal/fast walking, and standing up from a chair (the median prediction accuracy ranged from 88.2% to 99.9% based on the single-accelerometer movelet approach). For these activities wrist-worn accelerometers performed almost as well as hip-worn accelerometers (the median difference in accuracy between wrist and hip ranged from −2.7% to 5.8%). Modest improvements in prediction accuracy were achieved by integrating information from multiple accelerometers. Discussion and conclusions It is possible to achieve high prediction accuracy at the secondlevel temporal resolution with very limited training data. To increase prediction accuracy from the simultaneous use of multiple accelerometers, a careful selection of integrative approaches is required. PMID:25134005

  8. Physical activity, white blood cell count, and lung cancer risk in a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Brian L; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Lee, Kristine E; Hampton, John M

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that physical activity may lower lung cancer risk. The association of physical activity with reduced chronic inflammation provides a potential mechanism, yet few studies have directly related inflammatory markers to cancer incidence. The relation among physical activity, inflammation, and lung cancer risk was evaluated in a prospective cohort of 4,831 subjects, 43 to 86 years of age, in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. A total physical activity index was created by summing up kilocalories per week from sweat-inducing physical activities, city blocks walked, and flights of stairs climbed. Two inflammatory markers, WBC count and serum albumin, were measured at the baseline examination. During an average of 12.8 years of follow-up, 134 incident cases of lung cancer were diagnosed. After multivariable adjustment, participants in the highest tertile of total physical activity index had a 45% reduction in lung cancer risk compared with those in the lowest tertile (hazard ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.35-0.86). Participants with WBC counts in the upper tertile (>or=8 x 10(3)/microL) were 2.81 (95% confidence interval, 1.58-5.01) times as likely to develop lung cancer as those with counts in the lowest tertile (<6.4 x 10(3)/microL). Serum albumin was not related to lung cancer risk. There was no evidence that inflammation mediated the association between physical activity and lung cancer risk, as the physical activity risk estimates were essentially unchanged after adjustment for WBC count. Although the potential for residual confounding by smoking could not be eliminated, these data suggest that physical activity and WBC count are independent risk factors for lung cancer.

  9. Smartphone MEMS accelerometers and earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Q.; Allen, R. M.; Schreier, L.; Kwon, Y. W.

    2015-12-01

    The low cost MEMS accelerometers in the smartphones are attracting more and more attentions from the science community due to the vast number and potential applications in various areas. We are using the accelerometers inside the smartphones to detect the earthquakes. We did shake table tests to show these accelerometers are also suitable to record large shakings caused by earthquakes. We developed an android app - MyShake, which can even distinguish earthquake movements from daily human activities from the recordings recorded by the accelerometers in personal smartphones and upload trigger information/waveform to our server for further analysis. The data from these smartphones forms a unique datasets for seismological applications, such as earthquake early warning. In this talk I will layout the method we used to recognize earthquake-like movement from single smartphone, and the overview of the whole system that harness the information from a network of smartphones for rapid earthquake detection. This type of system can be easily deployed and scaled up around the global and provides additional insights of the earthquake hazards.

  10. Using accelerometers and global positioning system devices to assess gender and age differences in children’s school, transport, leisure and home based physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge on domain-specific physical activity (PA) has the potential to advance public health interventions and inform new policies promoting children’s PA. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess domains (leisure, school, transport, home) and subdomains (e.g., recess, playgrounds, and urban green space) for week day moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) using objective measures and investigate gender and age differences. Methods Participants included 367 Danish children and adolescents (11–16 years, 52% girls) with combined accelerometer and Global Positioning System (GPS) data (mean 2.5 days, 12.7 hrs/day). The Personal Activity and Location Measurement System and a purpose-built database assessed data in 15-second epochs to determine PA and assign epochs to 4 domains and 11 subdomains. Frequencies and proportions of time spent in MVPA were determined and differences assessed using multi-level modeling. Results More than 90% of MVPA was objectively assigned to domains/subdomains. Boys accumulated more MVPA overall, in leisure, school and transport (all p < 0.05). Children compared with adolescents accumulated more MVPA, primarily through more school MVPA (p < 0.05). Boys spent a large proportion of time accumulating MVPA in playgrounds, active transport, Physical Education, sports facilities, urban green space and school grounds. Girls spent a significant proportion of time accumulating MVPA in active transport and playgrounds. No gender or age differences were found in the home domain. Conclusions Large variations were found in PA frequency and intensity across domains/subdomains. Significant gender differences were found, with girls being less active in almost all domains and subdomains. Objectively measured patterns of PA across domains/subdomains can be used to better tailor PA interventions and inform future policies for promoting child PA. PMID:24457029

  11. Making Online Instruction Count: Statistical Reporting of Web-Based Library Instruction Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottorff, Tim; Todd, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Statistical reporting of library instruction (LI) activities has historically focused on measures relevant to face-to-face (F2F) settings. However, newer forms of LI conducted in the online realm may be difficult to count in traditional ways, leading to inaccurate reporting to both internal and external stakeholders. A thorough literature review…

  12. Pedometer-Measured Physical Activity of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Predicting Weekly Step Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Viviene A.; Stanish, Heidi I.

    2009-01-01

    Pedometers are objective, inexpensive, valid, and reliable measures of physical activity. The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate average weekly step counts was investigated. Seven days of pedometer data were collected from 154 ambulatory men and women ("ns" = 88 and 66, respectively) with intellectual disability.…

  13. Single-Axis Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor); Capo-Lugo, Pedro A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single-axis accelerometer includes a housing defining a sleeve. An object/mass is disposed in the sleeve for sliding movement therein in a direction aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A first piezoelectric strip, attached to a first side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The first piezoelectric strip includes a first strip of a piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A second piezoelectric strip, attached to a second side of the object and to the housing, is longitudinally aligned with the sleeve's longitudinal axis. The second piezoelectric strip includes a second strip of the piezoelectric material with carbon nanotubes substantially aligned along a length thereof. A voltage sensor is electrically coupled to at least one of the first and second piezoelectric strips.

  14. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Testing on the C-17 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. To demonstrate the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The SDA attachment conditions were varied from fully tight to loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first.

  15. An improved liquid scintillation counting method for the determination of gross alpha activity in groundwater wells.

    PubMed

    Ruberu, Shiyamalie R; Liu, Yun-Gang; Perera, S Kusum

    2008-10-01

    A liquid scintillation counting (LSC) method having several advantages over the gas proportional counting (GPC) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 900.0 for the detection of gross alpha activity in drinking water was evaluated in this study. The improved method described here involves the use of nitromethane as the quench agent for establishing counting efficiencies and spillover factors, and it minimizes sample preparation. It has the advantage of achieving the regulatory detection limit of 111 mBq L(-1) with short count times (100 min) and small sample aliquot sizes. A thorough method validation study was performed by testing field samples ranging in total dissolved solids (TDS) from 0.3 mg L(-1) to 1,000 mg L(-1) and spiking each matrix from 194 mBq L(-1) to 11.6 Bq L(-1). Comparable method precision and accuracy was observed on the two types of LSC instruments tested, Perkin Elmer Quantulus 1220 and Packard 2550, with the former giving better performance. Data presented demonstrate that this efficient and high throughput LSC method is suitable for groundwater samples in excess of 1,000 mg L(-1) of TDS in contrast with the 500 mg L(-1) limit by the routine GPC method. Groundwater wells across the state of California were sampled, analyzed for gross alpha activity using the EPA- approved method and the improved LSC method, and the results were compared.

  16. Association between Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity and Objectively Measured Hearing Sensitivity among U.S. Adults with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Gilham, Ben; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between objectively measured physical activity and hearing sensitivity among a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults with diabetes. Method: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. One hundred eighty-four U.S. adults with diabetes…

  17. Physical Activity Assessment Between Consumer- and Research-Grade Accelerometers: A Comparative Study in Free-Living Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Winfree, Kyle N; Pohlig, Ryan T; Papas, Mia A

    2016-01-01

    Background Wearable activity monitors such as Fitbit enable users to track various attributes of their physical activity (PA) over time and have the potential to be used in research to promote and measure PA behavior. However, the measurement accuracy of Fitbit in absolute free-living conditions is largely unknown. Objective To examine the measurement congruence between Fitbit Flex and ActiGraph GT3X for quantifying steps, metabolic equivalent tasks (METs), and proportion of time in sedentary activity and light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity PA in healthy adults in free-living conditions. Methods A convenience sample of 19 participants (4 men and 15 women), aged 18-37 years, concurrently wore the Fitbit Flex (wrist) and ActiGraph GT3X (waist) for 1- or 2-week observation periods (n=3 and n=16, respectively) that included self-reported bouts of daily exercise. Data were examined for daily activity, averaged over 14 days and for minutes of reported exercise. Average day-level data included steps, METs, and proportion of time in different intensity levels. Minute-level data included steps, METs, and mean intensity score (0 = sedentary, 3 = vigorous) for overall reported exercise bouts (N=120) and by exercise type (walking, n=16; run or sports, n=44; cardio machine, n=20). Results Measures of steps were similar between devices for average day- and minute-level observations (all P values > .05). Fitbit significantly overestimated METs for average daily activity, for overall minutes of reported exercise bouts, and for walking and run or sports exercises (mean difference 0.70, 1.80, 3.16, and 2.00 METs, respectively; all P values < .001). For average daily activity, Fitbit significantly underestimated the proportion of time in sedentary and light intensity by 20% and 34%, respectively, and overestimated time by 3% in both moderate and vigorous intensity (all P values < .001). Mean intensity scores were not different for overall minutes of exercise or for run or

  18. Accuracy of StepWatch™ and ActiGraph Accelerometers for Measuring Steps Taken among Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sandroff, Brian M.; Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Ensari, Ipek; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Klaren, Rachel E.; Balantrapu, Swathi; Riskin, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There has been increased interest in the objective monitoring of free-living walking behavior using accelerometers in clinical research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). The current investigation examined and compared the accuracy of the StepWatch activity monitor and ActiGraph model GT3X+ accelerometer for capturing steps taken during various speeds of prolonged, over-ground ambulation in persons with MS who had mild, moderate, and severe disability. Methods Sixty-three persons with MS underwent a neurological examination for generation of an EDSS score and undertook two trials of walking on the GAITRite electronic walkway. Participants were fitted with accelerometers, and undertook three modified six-minute walk (6MW) tests that were interspersed with 10–15 minutes of rest. The first 6MW was undertaken at a comfortable walking speed (CWS), and the two remaining 6MW tests were undertaken above (faster walking speed; FWS) or below (slower walking speed; SWS) the participant's CWS. The actual number of steps taken was counted through direct observation using hand-tally counters. Results The StepWatch activity monitor (99.8%–99.9%) and ActiGraph model GT3X+ accelerometer (95.6%–97.4%) both demonstrated highly accurate measurement of steps taken under CWS and FWS conditions. The StepWatch had better accuracy (99.0%) than the ActiGraph (95.5%) in the overall sample under the SWS condition, and this was particularly apparent in those with severe disability (StepWatch: 95.7%; ActiGraph: 87.3%). The inaccuracy in measurement for the ActiGraph was associated with alterations of gait (e.g., slower gait velocity, shorter step length, wider base of support). Conclusions This research will help inform the choice of accelerometer to be adopted in clinical trials of MS wherein the monitoring of free-living walking behavior is of particular value. PMID:24714028

  19. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  20. Radioactivity of Potassium Solutions: A Comparison of Calculated Activity to Measured Activity from Gross Beta Counting and Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2005-07-26

    In order to determine if the measured beta activity for a solution containing potassium was exactly as predicted, particularly since the CES gas counter is not calibrated specifically with K-40, an experiment was conducted to compare measured activities from two radioanalytical methods (gamma spectroscopy and gas proportional counting) to calculated activities across a range of potassium concentrations. Potassium, being ubiquitous and naturally radioactive, is a well-known and common interference in gross beta counting methods. By measuring the observed beta activity due to K-40 in potassium-containing solutions across a wide range of concentrations, it was found that the observed beta activity agrees well with the beta activity calculated from the potassium concentration measured by standard inorganic analytical techniques, such as ICP-OES, and that using the measured potassium concentration to calculate the expected beta activity, and comparing this to the observed beta activity to determine if potassium can account for all the observed activity in a sample, is a valid technique. It was also observed that gamma spectroscopy is not an effective means of measuring K-40 activity below approximately 700 pCi/L, which corresponds to a solution with approximately 833 mg/L total potassium. Gas proportional counting for gross beta activity has a much lower detection limit, typically 20-50 picoCi/L for a liquid low in total dissolved solids, which corresponds to a potassium concentration of approximately 30-70 ppm K.

  1. Development of an Absolute Gas-Counting Capability for Low to Medium Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard M.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ely, James H.; Day, Anthony R.; Hayes, James C.; Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Mace, Emily K.; Merriman, Jason H.; Overman, Cory T.; Seifert, Allen

    2013-11-01

    ABSTRACT Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a capability to measure the absolute activity concentration of various gaseous radionuclides using length-compensated proportional-counting methods. This capability will enable the validation and use of low-level, gaseous radionuclide calibration standards for use in PNNL’s shallow underground laboratory. Two sets of unequal length proportional counters have been fabricated. These detector assemblies operate on a static gas-fill principle, in contrast to continuous, flow-through configurations. One set of three counters has been fabricated using ultra-low background (ULB) electroformed copper and low-background fabrication methods. Once fully operational, these ULB counters will be used in PNNL’s shallow underground counting laboratory for analysis of gases with low activity concentrations < 1 Bq/cc. A second set of four unequal length counters has been fabricated from Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity Copper (OFHC) using similar low-background cleaning and assembly methods. These OFHC counters will be operated above ground in the analysis of gases with activity concentrations in the range of 1-10 Bq/cc. A gas delivery system is being developed to actively mix the analyte gas with an appropriate amount of count-gas and uniformly deliver it to the counters with high accuracy and repeatability. A description of both detector assemblies and gas delivery system will be given along with a preliminary uncertainty analysis of a simulated 0.05 Bq/cm3 gas measurement.

  2. Context-Specific Outdoor Time and Physical Activity among School-Children Across Gender and Age: Using Accelerometers and GPS to Advance Methods

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Being outdoors has a positive influence on health among children. Evidence in this area is limited and many studies have used self-reported measures. Objective context-specific assessment of physical activity patterns and correlates, such as outdoor time, may progress this field. Aims: To employ novel objective measures to assess age and gender differences in context-specific outdoor weekday behavior patterns among school-children [outdoor time and outdoor moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] and to investigate associations between context-specific outdoor time and MVPA. Methods: A total of 170 children had at least one weekday of 9 h combined accelerometer and global positioning system data and were included in the analyses. The data were processed using the personal activity and location measurement system (PALMS) and a purpose-built PostgreSQL database resulting in context-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA, and overall daily MVPA. In addition, 4 domains (leisure, school, transport, and home) and 11 subdomains (e.g., urban green space and sports facilities) were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association between outdoor time and MVPA. Results: Girls compared to boys had fewer outdoor minutes (p < 0.05), spent a smaller proportion of their overall daily time outdoors (p < 0.05), had fewer outdoor MVPA minutes during the day (p < 0.001) and in 11 contexts. Children compared to adolescents had more outdoor minutes (p < 0.05). During school and within recess, children compared to adolescents had more outdoor MVPA (p < 0.001) and outdoor time (p < 0.001). A 1-h increase in outdoor time was associated with 9.9 more minutes of MVPA (p < 0.001). Conclusion: A new methodology to assess the context-specific outdoor time and physical activity patterns has been developed and can be expanded to other populations. Different context

  3. Design and fabrication of wireless remotely readable MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Subramanian, Hareesh; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1997-11-01

    The integration of MEMS, SAW devices and required microelectronics and conformal antenna to realize a programmable wireless accelerometer is presented in this paper. This unique combination of technologies results in a novel accelerometer that can be remotely sensed by a microwave system with the advantage of no power requirements at the sensor site. The microaccelerometer presented is simple in construction and easy to manufacture with existing silicon micromachining techniques. The relatively small size of the sensor makes it an ideal conformal sensor. The accelerometer finds application as air bag deployment sensors, vibration sensors for noise control, deflection and strain sensors, inertial and dimensional positioning systems, ABS/traction control, smart suspension, active roll stabilization and four wheel steering. The wireless accelerometer is very attractive to study the response of a 'dummy' in automobile crash test.

  4. Calibration and Validation of a Wrist- and Hip-Worn Actigraph Accelerometer in 4-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Elin; Larisch, Lisa-Marie; Marcus, Claude; Hagströmer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To determine time spent at different physical activity intensities, accelerometers need calibration. The aim of this study was to develop and cross-validate intensity thresholds for the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer for wrist and hip placement in four-year-old children. Methods In total 30 children (49 months, SD 3.7) were recruited from five preschools in Stockholm. Equipped with an accelerometer on the wrist and another on the hip, children performed three indoor activities and one free-play session while being video recorded. Subsequently, physical activity intensity levels were coded every 5th second according to the Children’s Activity Rating Scale. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves was used to develop wrist and hip intensity thresholds, the upper threshold for sedentary, and lower threshold for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), for the vertical axis (VA) and for the vector magnitude (VM). A leave-one-out method was used to cross-validate the thresholds. Results Intensity thresholds for wrist placement were ≤ 178 (VA) and ≤ 328 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 871 (VA) and ≥ 1393 (VM) counts/5 seconds for MVPA. The corresponding thresholds for hip placement were ≤ 43 (VA) and ≤ 105 (VM) for sedentary and ≥ 290 (VA) and ≥ 512 (VM) for MVPA. The quadratic weighted Kappa was 0.92 (95% CI 0.91–0.93) (VA) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.94–0.96) (VM) for the wrist-worn accelerometer and 0.76 (98% CI 0.74–0.77) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.87) for the hip-worn. Conclusion Using wrist placement and the VM when measuring physical activity with accelerometry in 4-year-old children is recommended. PMID:27617962

  5. The LISA accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.

    2003-10-01

    In the frame of investigating the fundamental nature of gravity, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission could open the way to a new kind of observations unreachable from ground. The experiment, based on a V-formation of six drag-free spacecraft, uses the cubic proof masses of inertial sensors to reflect the laser light, acting as reference mirrors of a 5 × 10 9 m arm length interferometer. The proof masses are also used as inertial references for the drag-free control of the spacecraft which constitute in return a shield against external forces. Derived from space electrostatic accelerometers developed at ONERA, such as GRADIO for the ESA ARISTOTELES and now GOCE mission (Bernard and Touboul, 1991), the proposed LISA sensor should shield its proof mass from any accelerometric disturbance at a level of 10 -15ms-2Hz- 1/2. The accurate capacitive sensing of the mass provides its position relative to the satellite with a resolution better than 10 -9m Hz- 1/2 in order to control the satellite orbit and to minimise the disturbances induced by the satellite self gravity or by the proof mass charge. The sensor configuration and accomodation has to be specifically optimised for the mission requirements. Fortunately, the sensor will benefit from the thermal stability of the LISA optical bench environment, i.e. 10 -6K Hz- 1/2, and of the selected materials that exhibit a very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), ensuring a high geometrical stability. Apart from the modeling and the evaluation of the flight characteristics, the necessary indirect ground demonstration of the performance and the interfaces with the drag-free control will have to be considered in detail in the future.

  6. Primary activity measurements with 4pigamma NaI(Tl) counting and Monte Carlo calculated efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Youcef; Spring, Philippe; Bailat, Claude; Decombaz, Marc; Triscone, Gilles; Gostely, Jean-Jacques; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Bochud, François O

    2007-05-01

    The radioactive concentrations of (18)F, (88)Y and (152)Eu solutions and the activity of (222)Rn gas ampoules are measured using a primary method involving 4pigamma NaI(Tl) integral counting with a well-type NaI(Tl) detector and efficiencies computed by Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations use the GEANT code coupled with a routine (sch2for), which generates randomly the decay paths and emissions depending on the decay scheme parameters. The resulting radioactive concentrations of (88)Y, (152)Eu and (18)F are found to agree with those measured with other primary measurement methods, such as 4pi (beta, e, X)-gamma coincidence counting or liquid scintillation counting. Results of the determination of the activity of (222)Rn gas ampoules by this method also match the results of an absolute standardisation technique in which radon is condensed onto a cold surface and its alpha-emissions are detected through an accurately specified solid angle.

  7. Fast determination of ⁹⁰Sr/⁹⁰Y activity in milk by Cherenkov counting.

    PubMed

    Tsroya, S; Dolgin, B; German, U; Pelled, O; Alfassi, Z B

    2013-12-01

    Cherenkov counting of the ⁹⁰Sr/⁹⁰Y pure beta emitters is an attractive method for ⁹⁰Sr activity determination, but the color quenching effect may be significant, especially for strongly colored or semi-opaque media. A quench correction method based on the external source of some liquid scintillation systems (named ESAR - external source area ratio) was proposed and checked for aqueous solutions and was proved to be effective also for urine samples. In the present work, the application of the ESAR method for fast determination of ⁹⁰Sr/⁹⁰Y activity in milk samples is described.

  8. Flow cytometric assessment of activation of peripheral blood platelets in dogs with normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis. Their activation has not yet been evaluated in healthy dogs with a normal and low platelet count. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of activators on platelet activation in dogs with a normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. 72 clinically healthy dogs were enrolled. Patients were allocated into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with a normal platelet count, group 2 included 22 dogs with a platelet count between 100 and 200×109/l and group 3 consisted of 20 dogs with a platelet count lower than 100×109/l. Platelet rich-plasma (PRP) was obtained from peripheral blood samples using tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) as anticoagulant. Next, platelets were stimulated using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or thrombin, stabilized using procaine or left unstimulated. The expression of CD51 and CD41/CD61 was evaluated. Co-expression of CD41/CD61 and Annexin V served as a marker of platelet activation. The expression of CD41/CD61 and CD51 did not differ between the 3 groups. Thrombin-stimulated platelets had a significantly higher activity in dogs with a normal platelet count than in dogs with asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Procaine inhibited platelet activity in all groups. In conclusion, activation of platelets of healthy dogs in vitro varied depending on the platelet count and platelet activator.

  9. A very low noise monolithic Horizontal accelerometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Alessandro; Takamori, Akiteru; Cella, Giancarlo; Fidecaro, Francesco; Francesconi, Mario; Desalvo, Riccardo; Sannibale, Virginio

    2000-04-01

    We present a new low noise, low frequency, horizontal accelerometer. The mechanical design and the machining process aim to improve the sensitivity in the frequency region between 0.01 and 1 Hz, where metal internal friction and thermal elastic effects become critical. The accelerometer mechanics is shaped as a small folded pendulum in order to obtain a very low resonant frequency and low mechanical losses. A folded pendulum is essentially a mass suspended on one side by a simple pendulum and on the other by an inverted pendulum working antagonistically. The straight pendulum positive gravitational spring constant is balanced by the inverted pendulum’s negative one; by changing the center of mass position one can lower arbitrarily the resonant frequency. The only dissipation is in the anelasticity of the mechanical flex joint and in the readout/actuation system. If the spring constant is minimised, the mechanical losses are minimal. The monolithic design of the accelerometer eliminates the stick-and-slip friction localised in the flexure clamps. Low stiffness, 10 micron thick flex joints are achieved by EDM and electropolishing. The instrument is equipped with a low capacitance position sensor; the signal from the sensor is filtered by a PID controller and fed back to the mass through capacitive force actuator for feedback closed-loop operation. The sensor noise matches the expected thermal noise performances, 10-12 m/√Hz , with measuring range of a few microns. The expected sensitivity, less than 10-11 m/ s^2 / √Hz around 150 mHz, is a factor 30 below the state of the art limit. This accelerometer was designed to be integrated in the active control of the LIGO II mirror seismic isolators.

  10. Processing of multi-satellite accelerometer data for thermospheric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornbos, Eelco; Visser, Pieter N. A. M.; van Helleputte, Tom; van den Ijssel, Jose; Foerster, Matthias; Luehr, Hermann; Rees, David; Koppenwallner, Georg; Fritsche, Bent; Kern, Michael; Haagmans, Roger

    Satellite accelerometers, such as those carried on the CHAMP and GRACE satellites, provide valuable data for improving our knowledge of thermosphere density and winds. These data are now available over a full range of solar activity conditions and over a wide range of heights and local times. The fact that the CHAMP and GRACE accelerometer data sets are largely overlapping in time offers the opportunity to study their synergy. Continuity of this multisatellite accelerometer data set will be provided by ESA's Swarm mission, a constellation of three satellites for studying the Earth's magnetic field. This overview will cover both the processing steps required for converting accelerometer data into density and wind data, and the scientific investigations resulting from this data. Scientific investigations that make use of the accelerometer data sets include comparisons with and adjustment of empirical and physical thermosphere models, studies of the response of the thermosphere on geomagnetic storm conditions and characterization of thermospheric structures by analysis of long-term averages. Accelerometer calibration errors and attitude errors in the satellite aerodynamic model can be largely reduced by making use of data from the satellite's GPS receivers and star cameras. However, considerable uncertainties remain due to insufficient knowledge of the in-track wind speed, the gas-surface interaction and cross-track calibration. These uncertainties can be characterized by using error analysis, by comparing different processing approaches and by comparisons with force models.

  11. Measurement of Impact Acceleration: Mouthpiece Accelerometer Versus Helmet Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael; Halstead, P. David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Barlow, David

    2007-01-01

    Context: Instrumented helmets have been used to estimate impact acceleration imparted to the head during helmet impacts. These instrumented helmets may not accurately measure the actual amount of acceleration experienced by the head due to factors such as helmet-to-head fit. Objective: To determine if an accelerometer attached to a mouthpiece (MP) provides a more accurate representation of headform center of gravity (HFCOG) acceleration during impact than does an accelerometer attached to a helmet fitted on the headform. Design: Single-factor research design in which the independent variable was accelerometer position (HFCOG, helmet, MP) and the dependent variables were g and Severity Index (SI). Setting: Independent impact research laboratory. Intervention(s): The helmeted headform was dropped (n = 168) using a National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) drop system from the standard heights and impact sites according to NOCSAE test standards. Peak g and SI were measured for each accelerometer position during impact. Main Outcome Measures: Upon impact, the peak g and SI were recorded for each accelerometer location. Results: Strong relationships were noted for HFCOG and MP measures, and significant differences were seen between HFCOG and helmet g measures and HFCOG and helmet SI measures. No statistically significant differences were noted between HFCOG and MP g and SI measures. Regression analyses showed a significant relationship between HFCOG and MP measures but not between HFCOG and helmet measures. Conclusions: Upon impact, MP acceleration (g) and SI measurements were closely related to and more accurate in measuring HFCOG g and SI than helmet measurements. The MP accelerometer is a valid method for measuring head acceleration. PMID:17597937

  12. Accelerometer-measured physical activity is not associated with two-year weight change in African-origin adults from five diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Kliethermes, Stephanie; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Tong, Liping; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E.; Lambert, Estelle V.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon A.; Shoham, David A.; Cao, Guichan; Brage, Soren; Ekelund, Ulf; Cooper, Richard S.; Luke, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasing population-levels of physical activity (PA) is a controversial strategy for managing the obesity epidemic, given the conflicting evidence for weight loss from PA alone per se. We measured PA and weight change in a three-year prospective cohort study in young adults from five countries (Ghana, South Africa, Jamaica, Seychelles and USA). Methods A total of 1,944 men and women had baseline data, and at least 1 follow-up examination including measures of anthropometry (weight/BMI), and objective PA (accelerometer, 7-day) following the three-year study period. PA was explored as 1-minute bouts of moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA) as well as daily sedentary time. Results At baseline; Ghanaian and South African men had the lowest body weights (63.4 ± 9.5, 64.9 ± 11.8 kg, respectively) and men and women from the USA the highest (93.6 ± 25.9, 91.7 ± 23.4 kg, respectively). Prevalence of normal weight ranged from 85% in Ghanaian men to 29% in USA men and 52% in Ghanaian women to 15% in USA women. Over the two-year follow-up period, USA men and Jamaican women experienced the smallest yearly weight change rate (0.1 ± 3.3 kg/yr; −0.03 ± 3.0 kg/yr, respectively), compared to South African men and Ghanaian women greatest yearly change (0.6.0 ± 3.0 kg/yr; 1.22 ± 2.6 kg/yr, respectively). Mean yearly weight gain tended to be larger among normal weight participants at baseline than overweight/obese at baseline. Neither baseline MVPA nor sedentary time were associated with weight gain. Using multiple linear regression, only baseline weight, age and gender were significantly associated with weight gain. Discussion From our study it is not evident that higher volumes of PA alone are protective against future weight gain, and by deduction our data suggest that other environmental factors such as the food environment may have a more critical role. PMID:28133575

  13. Detection of anomalous reactor activity using antineutrino count evolution over the course of a reactor cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, Vera; Bernstein, Adam

    2011-06-01

    This paper analyzes the sensitivity of antineutrino count rate measurements to changes in the fissile content of civil power reactors. Such measurements may be useful in IAEA reactor safeguards applications. We introduce a hypothesis testing procedure to identify statistically significant differences between the antineutrino count rate evolution of a standard 'baseline' fuel cycle and that of an anomalous cycle, in which plutonium is removed and replaced with an equivalent fissile worth of uranium. The test would allow an inspector to detect anomalous reactor activity, or to positively confirm that the reactor is operating in a manner consistent with its declared fuel inventory and power level. We show that with a reasonable choice of detector parameters, the test can detect replacement of 82 kg of plutonium in 90 days with 95% probability, while controlling the false positive rate at 5%. We show that some improvement on this level of sensitivity may be obtained by various means, including use of the method in conjunction with existing reactor safeguards methods. We also identify a necessary and sufficient minimum daily antineutrino count rate and a maximum tolerable background rate to achieve the quoted sensitivity, and list examples of detectors in which such rates have been attained.

  14. Primary activity measurements with a 4πβ-4πγ coincidence counting system.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Youcef; Bailat, Claude J; Bochud, François O

    2012-01-01

    The radioactive concentrations of (166m)Ho, (134)Cs and (133)Ba solutions have been standardised using a 4πβ-4πγ coincidence counting system we have recently set up. The detection in the beta channel is performed using various geometries of a UPS-89 plastic scintillator optically coupled to a selected low-noise 1in. diameter photomultiplier tube. The light-tight thin capsule that encloses this beta detector is housed within the well of a 5in.×5in. NaI(Tl) monocrystal detector. The beta detection efficiency can be varied either by optical filtering or electronic discrimination when the electrons loose all their energy in the plastic scintillator. This 4πβ-4πγ coincidence system improves on our 4πβ(PC)-γ system in that its sample preparation is less labour intensive, it yields larger beta- and gamma-counting efficiencies thus enabling the standardisation of low activity sources with good statistics in reasonable time, and it makes standardising short-lived radionuclides easier. The resulting radioactive concentrations of (166m)Ho, (134)Cs and (133)Ba are found to agree with those measured with other primary measurement methods thus validating our 4πβ-4πγ coincidence counting system.

  15. Development of a quartz digital accelerometer for environmental sensing and navigation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, W.J.; Vianco, P.T.

    1993-03-01

    A quartz digital accelerometer has been developed which uses double ended tuning forks as the active sensing elements. The authors have demonstrated the ability of this accelerometer to be capable of acceleration measurements between {+-}150G with {+-}0.5G accuracy. They have further refined the original design and assembly processes to produce accelerometers with < 1mG stability in inertial measurement applications. This report covers the development, design, processing, assembly, and testing of these devices.

  16. Moderating effects of age, gender and education on the associations of perceived neighborhood environment attributes with accelerometer-based physical activity: the IPEN Adult study Moderating effects of age, gender and education on the associations of perceived neighborhood environment attributes with accelerometer-based physical activity: the IPEN Adult study

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Delfien; Cerin, Ester; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Salvo, Deborah; Christiansen, Lars B; Macfarlane, Duncan; Owen, Neville; Mitas, Josef; Troelsen, Jens; Aguinaga-Ontoso, Ines; Davey, Rachel; Reis, Rodrigo; Sarmiento, Olga L; Schofield, Grant; Conway, Terry L; Sallis, James F

    2015-01-01

    The study's purpose was to examine age, gender, and education as potential moderators of the associations of perceived neighborhood environment variables with accelerometer-based moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Data were from 7273 adults from 16 sites (11 countries) that were part of a coordinated multi-country cross-sectional study. Age moderated the associations of perceived crime safety, and perceiving no major physical barriers to walking, with MVPA: positive associations were only found in older adults. Perceived land use mix-access was linearly (positive) associated with MVPA in men, and curvilinearly in women. Perceived crime safety was related to MVPA only in women. No moderating relationships were found for education. Overall the associations of adults’ perceptions of environmental attributes with MVPA were largely independent of the socio-demographic factors examined. These findings are encouraging, suggesting that efforts to optimize the perceived built and social environment may act in a socially-equitable manner to facilitate MVPA. PMID:26454247

  17. Wearable accelerometer in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toshiyo

    2005-01-01

    To improve the equality of life, we must prevent the falls in both healthy elderly and patients with the cerebrovascular diseases. Wearable accelerometer was applied to monitor. In this paper, we introduced two different clinical applications. On is fall detector and the other is monitoring device for screening test. 1) We have developed body-worn accelerometer with data loggers and monitored the daily of life in patient with Parkinson disease. The patients wore the device and monitored falls while walking and standing. As a result, we could obtain fall times for a long period. 2) The ability of walking and standing have been evaluated by Timed up & go test. We used telemetry with accelerometer. The stability of walking could be evaluated by the acceleration signals. The simple body-won device can be useful for fall study.

  18. In-fiber integrated accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Yang, Jun; Li, Xingliang; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Zhou, Ai; Yuan, Libo

    2011-06-01

    A compact in-fiber integrated fiber-optic Michelson interferometer based accelerometer is proposed and investigated. In the system, the sensing element consists of a twin-core fiber acting as a bending simple supported beam. By demodulating the optical phase shift, we obtain that the acceleration is proportional to the force applied on the central position of the twin-core fiber. A simple model has been established to calculate the sensitivity and resonant frequency. The experimental results show that such an accelerometer has a sensitivity of 0.09 rad/g at the resonant frequency of 680 Hz.

  19. Lysozyme activity and L(+)-lactic acid production in saliva in schoolchildren with high Lactobacillus counts.

    PubMed

    Twetman, S; Dahllöf, G; Wikner, S

    1987-04-01

    Out of 374 schoolchildren, aged 13-15 yr, 42 with high counts of salivary lactobacilli (greater than or equal to 10(5] were selected for this study. Lysozyme activity in saliva and L(+)-lactic acid (LA) production after addition of glucose were determined. The mean values of lysozyme activity and LA concentration were 19.4 micrograms/ml and 1.4 mmol/l respectively. The levels of LA produced without addition of glucose were less than 0.2 mmol/l. The results showed a statistically significant (P less than 0.05) negative correlation between lysozyme activity and the levels of LA produced. The findings of this study suggest that lysozyme may be of importance in limiting acid production in saliva.

  20. Single point optical calibration of accelerometers at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Bev

    2006-06-01

    Typical accelerometer calibrations by laser interferometer are performed by measuring displacement at three places on the shaker table. Each of these measurements, made along the perimeter of the accelerometer, requires repositioning and realigning of the interferometer. This is done to approximate the actual displacement of the accelerometer. Using a dual-coil shaker with a small moving element and two coaxially-located and rigidly-attached mounting tables allows placing the accelerometer on one table and measuring displacement directly on the center axis of the second table. This was found to work effectively at lower frequencies, up to about 5 kHz, with mounting tables of conventional materials such as stainless steel. However, for higher frequencies the use of steel results in unwanted relative motion between the two mounting tables. Mounting tables of beryllium with nickel coating have been used at NIST to overcome this difficulty. This paper shows the calibration results of single point, on-axis measurements, using fringe counting and sine-approximation methods. The results compare favorably with three point measurements made by fringe disappearance using a conventional piezo-electric shaker at frequencies up to 15 kHz.

  1. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  2. Urinary CD8+ T-cell counts discriminate between active and inactive lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe and frequent manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Early detection of initial renal manifestations and relapses during follow-up is pivotal to prevent loss of renal function. Apart from renal biopsies, current urinary and serological diagnostic tests fail to accurately demonstrate the presence of active LN. Previously, we demonstrated that effector memory T-cells (CD45RO+CCR7-;TEM) migrate into the urine during active LN. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of urinary T-cells in comparison with traditional markers of active LN. Methods T-cells in the urine during active LN and remission were investigated. Twenty-two, in most cases biopsy-proven, active LN patients and 24 SLE patients without active LN were enrolled and serial measurements were performed in 16 patients. Results Analysis of the urinary sediment in active renal disease showed an increased number of CD8+ T-cells and absence of these cells during remission. Enumerating T-cell counts in LN patients with a history of renal involvement was a superior marker of active LN in comparison to traditional markers, such as proteinuria and s-creatinine. Conclusions In conclusion, urinary T-cells, in particular CD8+ T cells, are a promising marker to assess renal activity in LN patients, in particular in those with prior renal involvement. PMID:23445537

  3. Radon-gas extraction and counting system for analyzing radon and radium in groundwater in seismically active areas

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.

    1980-12-08

    A high concentration of radon in groundwater has attracted recent attention as a precursor of seismic activity. We have constructed a system that extracts and counts radon gas from solid, liquid, and gas samples. The radon is extracted in a closed system onto activated charcoal. The desorbed radon is then measured in a phosphored acrylic cell by scintillation counting of gross alpha radiation. The efficiency of the total system (extraction plus counting) is 90 +- 3% or better. Compact design and sturdy construction make the system completely portable and well suited to field operations in remote loations. Results are given for radon and radium in groundwaters in the Livermore area.

  4. Metabolic activity of bacterial cell enumerated by direct viable count. [Escherichia coli; Salmonella enteritidis

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporation radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-/sup 3/H) thymidine or (U-/sup 14/C) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca. 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  5. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  6. Variometric Tests for Accelerometer Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Urso, M. G.; Barbati, N.

    2012-07-01

    This paper has been re-published as: VARIOMETRIC TESTS FOR ACCELEROMETER SENSORS M. G. D'Urso and N. Barbati ISPRS Annals of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences, I-4, 2012 Page(s) 315-320

  7. An active drop counting device using condenser microphone for superheated emulsion detector

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Mala; Marick, C.; Kanjilal, D.; Saha, S.

    2008-11-15

    An active device for superheated emulsion detector is described. A capacitive diaphragm sensor or condenser microphone is used to convert the acoustic pulse of drop nucleation to electrical signal. An active peak detector is included in the circuit to avoid multiple triggering of the counter. The counts are finally recorded by a microprocessor based data acquisition system. Genuine triggers, missed by the sensor, were studied using a simulated clock pulse. The neutron energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source was measured using the device with R114 as the sensitive liquid and compared with the calculated fission neutron energy spectrum of {sup 252}Cf. Frequency analysis of the detected signals was also carried out.

  8. Thermospheric density and winds from GRACE accelerometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Minkang; Tapley, Byron D.; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Ries, John C.

    The high-accuracy accelerometer data carried by the GRACE satellites represents the best measurements of the total surface forces acting on the spacecraft, including atmospheric drag, solar and earth radiation pressure. The GRACE accelerometer data are particularly well suited for exploring the variation in the thermospheric density and winds in response to changes in the solar and magnetic activity. In this study, the total atmospheric neutral density and winds are derived from analysis of the accelerometer data over a six-year period starting August 2002, which spans the complete range of solar activity. This paper will present the comparison of the six-year GRACE density with several density models, including DTM-78, NRLMSIS-00, JB2006 and HASDM. The GRACE-derived thermospheric winds will be compared with the HWM-93 model.

  9. Frequency Count Attribute Oriented Induction of Corporate Network Data for Mapping Business Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanutama, Lukas

    2014-03-01

    Companies increasingly rely on Internet for effective and efficient business communication. As Information Technology infrastructure backbone for business activities, corporate network connects the company to Internet and enables its activities globally. It carries data packets generated by the activities of the users performing their business tasks. Traditionally, infrastructure operations mainly maintain data carrying capacity and network devices performance. It would be advantageous if a company knows what activities are running in its network. The research provides a simple method of mapping the business activity reflected by the network data. To map corporate users' activities, a slightly modified Attribute Oriented Induction (AOI) approach to mine the network data was applied. The frequency of each protocol invoked were counted to show what the user intended to do. The collected data was samples taken within a certain sampling period. Samples were taken due to the enormous data packets generated. Protocols of interest are only Internet related while intranet protocols are ignored. It can be concluded that the method could provide the management a general overview of the usage of its infrastructure and lead to efficient, effective and secure ICT infrastructure.

  10. Cross-Section Measurements via the Activation Technique at the Cologne Clover Counting Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Felix; Mayer, Jan; Netterdon, Lars; Scholz, Philipp; Zilges, Andreas

    The activation technique is a widely used method for the determination of cross-section values for charged-particle induced reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. Since network calculations of nucleosynthesis processes often depend on reaction rates calculated in the scope of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model, these cross-sections can be used to improve the nuclear-physics input-parameters like optical-model potentials (OMP), γ-ray strength functions, and nuclear level densities. In order to extend the available experimental database, the 108Cd(α, n)111Sn reaction cross section was investigated at ten energies between 10.2 and 13.5 MeV. As this reaction at these energies is almost only sensitive on the α-decay width, the results were compared to statistical model calculations using different models for the α-OMP. The irradiation as well as the consecutive γ-ray counting were performed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of the University of Cologne using the 10 MV FN-Tandem accelerator and the Cologne Clover Counting Setup. This setup consists of two clover- type high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in a close face-to-face geometry to cover a solid angle of almost 4π.

  11. Classification accuracy of the wrist-worn GENEA accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Whitney A.; Bassett, David R.; Thompson, Dixie L.; Freedson, Patty S.; Staudenmayer, John W.; John, Dinesh; Steeves, Jeremy A.; Conger, Scott A.; Ceaser, Tyrone; Howe, Cheryl A.; Sasaki, Jeffer E.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether the published left-wrist cut-points for the triaxial GENEA accelerometer, are accurate for predicting intensity categories during structured activity bouts. Methods A convenience sample of 130 adults wore a GENEA accelerometer on their left wrist while performing 14 different lifestyle activities. During each activity, oxygen consumption was continuously measured using the Oxycon mobile. Statistical analysis used Spearman's rank correlations to determine the relationship between measured and estimated intensity classifications. Cross tabulation tables were constructed to show under- or over-estimation of misclassified intensities. One-way chi-square tests were used to determine whether the intensity classification accuracy for each activity differed from 80%. Results For all activities the GENEA accelerometer-based physical activity monitor explained 41.1% of the variance in energy expenditure. The intensity classification accuracy was 69.8% for sedentary activities, 44.9% for light activities, 46.2% for moderate activities, and 77.7% for vigorous activities. The GENEA correctly classified intensity for 52.9% of observations when all activities were examined; this increased to 61.5% with stationary cycling removed. Conclusion A wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer has modest intensity classification accuracy across a broad range of activities, when using the cut-points of Esliger et al. Although the sensitivity and specificity are less than those reported by Esliger et al., they are generally in the same range as those reported for waist-worn, uniaxial accelerometer cut-points. PMID:23584403

  12. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, G; Labanca, I; Rech, I; Gulinatti, A; Ghioni, M

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  13. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, G.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  14. An accelerometer-based system for elite athlete swimming performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Neil P.; Anderson, Megan E.; James, Daniel A.

    2005-02-01

    The measurement of sport specific performance characteristics is an important part of an athletes training and preparation for competition. Thus automated measurement, extraction and analysis of performance measures is desired and addressed in this paper. A tri-axial accelerometer based system was located on the lower back or swimmers to record acceleration profiles. The accelerometer system contained two ADXL202 bi-axial accelerometers positioned perpendicular to one another, and can store over 6 hours of data at 150Hz per channel using internal flash memory. The simultaneous collection of video and electronics touch pad timing was used to validate the algorithm results. Using the tri-axial accelerometer data, algorithms have been developed to derive lap times and stroke count. Comparison against electronic touch pad timing against accelerometer lap times has produced results with a typical error of better than +/-0.5 seconds. Video comparison of the stroke count algorithm for freestyle also produced results with an average error of +/-1 stroke. The developed algorithms have a higher level of reliability compared to hand timed and counted date that is commonly used during training.

  15. Nonlinear fractal dynamics of human colonic pressure activity based upon the box-counting method.

    PubMed

    Yan, Rongguo; Guo, Xudong

    2013-01-01

    The computational fractal dimension of human colonic pressure activity acquired by a telemetric capsule robot under normal physiological conditions was studied using the box-counting method. The fractal dimension is a numeric value that quantifies to measure how rough the signal is from nonlinear dynamics, rather than its amplitude or other linear statistical features. The colonic pressure activities from the healthy subject during three typical periods were analysed. The results showed that the activity might be fractal with a non-integer fractal dimension after it being integrated over time using the cumsum method, which was never revealed before. Moreover, the activity (after it being integrated) acquired soon after wakening up was the roughest (also the most complex one) with the largest fractal dimension, closely followed by that acquired during sleep with that acquired long time after awakening up (in the daytime) ranking third with the smallest fractal dimension. Fractal estimation might provide a new method to learn the nonlinear dynamics of human gastrointestinal pressure recordings.

  16. The ISA accelerometer for BepiColombo mission .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.

    The Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) will give a fundamental contribution to the Radio Science Experiments of BepiColombo mission, enabling substantial improvement of the knowledge of Mercury's orbit and rotation, and of the relativistic dynamics in the solar system. ISA is a three-axis accelerometer devoted to the measurement of the non-gravitational acceleration of Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), whose knowledge is important in order to fully exploit the quality of the tracking data. ISA shall have an intrinsic noise level of (10^{-9} m/s^2/&sqrt;{Hz}) in the (3 \\cdot 10^{-5}) Hz to (10^{-1}) Hz frequency range, to guarantee the fulfilment of the RSE scientific goals. A comprehensive presentation of ISA accelerometer is given, including details about its scientific and technological features, the updated measurement error budget, the ongoing experimental activities and foreseen calibration and science operations strategies.

  17. Helmsman’s Recording Accelerometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Silage , Principal Electrical Engineer Mitchell B. Oslon, Research Engineer Conrad Technologies, Inc. Station Square One, Suite 102 Paoli, PA 19301...SUBTITLE Helmsman’s Recording Accelerometer 6. AUTHOR(S) Donald F. DeCleene Mitchell B. Oslon Dennis A. Silage 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...58,1995. McCreight, K. K., "Assessing the Seaworthiness of SWATH Ships," SNAME Transactions, vol. 95, pp. 189-214,1987. Silage , D., Hartmann, B

  18. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  19. A PILOT STUDY USING AN ACCELEROMETER TO EVALUATE A CAREGIVER'S INTERPRETATION OF AN INFANT OR TODDLER'S ACTIVITY LEVEL AS RECORDED IN A TIME ACTIVITY DIARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking a young child's activity pattern data with samples that are collected during an exposure assessment is important in evaluating uptake dose rates associated with environmental contaminant exposures. A pilot study (N=9) was performed to test how well categorical activity-le...

  20. Activity Counts: The Effect of Swimming Activity on Quantity Discrimination in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Laplaza, Luis M.; Gerlai, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Human infants and non-human animals can discriminate the larger of two sets of discrete items. This quantity discrimination may be based upon the number of items, or upon non-numerical variables of the sets that co-vary with number. We have demonstrated that angelfish select the larger of two shoals of conspecifics without using inter-fish distance or space occupied by the stimuli as cues. However, density appeared to influence the choice between large shoals. Here, we examine the role of another non-numerical cue, swimming activity of the stimulus fish, in quantity discrimination by angelfish. To control this variable, we varied the water temperature of the stimulus aquaria or restricted the space occupied by each fish in the stimulus shoals. We used the previously successfully discriminated contrasts consisting of large (10 vs. 5) and small (3 vs. 2) shoals. We also studied whether more active or less active shoals are preferred in case of equally sized shoals (10 vs. 10, 5 vs. 5, and 3 vs. 3). When differences in stimulus fish activity were minimized by temperature manipulation we found angelfish to prefer the larger shoal in the 3 vs. 2 comparison, but not in the 10 vs. 5 comparison. When activity was controlled by space restriction, angelfish preferred the larger shoal in both numerical contrasts. These results imply that the overall activity level of the contrasted shoals is not a necessary condition for small shoals discrimination in angelfish. On the other hand, the results obtained for the large shoals, together with results obtained in the control treatments (equal numerical contrasts and differing activity levels), suggest that activity is a sufficient condition for discrimination when large shoals are involved. Further experiments are needed to evaluate the influence of other continuous variables, and to assess whether the mechanisms underlying performance are comparable to those suggested for other animals. PMID:23162518

  1. Six Degree Freedom Optical Fiber Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazo, Rogerio Moreira; dos Reis Ribeiro, Erik; Nunes, Marcelo Buonocore; Barbosa, Carmem Lucia; de Siqueira Ferreira, Jorge Luis; de Barros Caldas, Tales; dos Santos, Josemir Coelho; de Arruda, Josiel Urbaninho

    2008-10-01

    Linear accelerations measurements are needed in many applications, as industry, military, aircrafts, space navigation, robotics and others. Actually, the most usual solutions to measure linear accelerations are three piezoelectric sensors used in orthogonal mounting, or MEM's sensors chips. Angular accelerations also are interesting to control and stabilize structures, like satellites and servo motors. It is possible to measure angular accelerations in two ways: direct measurement (using special sensors), or indirect measurements (obtaining acceleration of the angular velocity information) [1]. This work intends to present the structural and optical requirements of a six degree freedom opto-mechanical accelerometer based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG). With this sensor, it will be possible the direct measurement of three axial accelerations, and of three angular accelerations, with unlimited rotation angle, using one single proof mass. The FBG's are used as strain sensors and sustaining elements of the proof mass in the structure. Simulations have demonstrated that cross influences of 10 parts per million at worst case are possible. This kind of accelerometer may be used in navigation control, structural monitoring, satellite stabilization, guidance control and harsh environments, for example. The project requirements include the wavelength of FBG's, pre-strain and length of active segment of optical fibers, dimensions, material and structure of inertial proof mass and position of the fibers in the sustaining structure

  2. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  3. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  4. Validity and Reliability of Fitbit Flex for Step Count, Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity and Activity Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Sushames, Ashleigh; Edwards, Andrew; Thompson, Fintan; McDermott, Robyn; Gebel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the validity and reliability of the Fitbit Flex against direct observation for measuring steps in the laboratory and against the Actigraph for step counts in free-living conditions and for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and activity energy expenditure (AEE) overall. Methods Twenty-five adults (12 females, 13 males) wore a Fitbit Flex and an Actigraph GT3X+ during a laboratory based protocol (including walking, incline walking, running and stepping) and free-living conditions during a single day period to examine measurement of steps, AEE and MVPA. Twenty-four of the participants attended a second session using the same protocol. Results Intraclass correlations (ICC) for test-retest reliability of the Fitbit Flex were strong for walking (ICC = 0.57), moderate for stair stepping (ICC = 0.34), and weak for incline walking (ICC = 0.22) and jogging (ICC = 0.26). The Fitbit significantly undercounted walking steps in the laboratory (absolute proportional difference: 21.2%, 95%CI 13.0–29.4%), but it was more accurate, despite slightly over counting, for both jogging (6.4%, 95%CI 3.7–9.0%) and stair stepping (15.5%, 95%CI 10.1–20.9%). The Fitbit had higher coefficients of variation (Cv) for step counts compared to direct observation and the Actigraph. In free-living conditions, the average MVPA minutes were lower in the Fitbit (35.4 minutes) compared to the Actigraph (54.6 minutes), but AEE was greater from the Fitbit (808.1 calories) versus the Actigraph (538.9 calories). The coefficients of variation were similar for AEE for the Actigraph (Cv = 36.0) and Fitbit (Cv = 35.0), but lower in the Actigraph (Cv = 25.5) for MVPA against the Fitbit (Cv = 32.7). Conclusion The Fitbit Flex has moderate validity for measuring physical activity relative to direct observation and the Actigraph. Test-rest reliability of the Fitbit was dependant on activity type and had greater variation between sessions compared to the Actigraph. Physical

  5. Dynamics of erythrocyte count, hemoglobin, and catalase activity in rat blood in hypokinesia, muscular activity and restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneyeva, G. V.; Potapovich, G. M.; Voloshko, N. A.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted to prove that muscular exertion (in this instance swimming) of different duration and intensity, as well as hypodynamia, result in an increase of hemoglobin and number of red blood cells in peripheral blood rats. Catalase activity increased with an increase in the duration of swimming, but only up to 6 hr; with 7-9 hr of swimming as well as in hypodynamia, catalase activity decreased. It was also observed that under hypodynamia as well as in 3, 5 and 6 hr exertion (swimming) the color index of blood decreased. Pressure chamber treatment (for 8 min each day for one week), alternating a 2 min negative pressure up to 35 mm Hg with 1 min positive pressure, increased the erythrocyte count and hemoglobin content.

  6. Examining the utility of a bite-count-based measure of eating activity in free-living human beings.

    PubMed

    Scisco, Jenna L; Muth, Eric R; Hoover, Adam W

    2014-03-01

    The obesity epidemic has triggered a need for novel methods for measuring eating activity in free-living settings. Here, we introduce a bite-count method that has the potential to be used in long-term investigations of eating activity. The purpose of our observational study was to describe the relationship between bite count and energy intake and determine whether there are sex and body mass index group differences in kilocalories per bite in free-living human beings. From October 2011 to February 2012, 77 participants used a wrist-worn device for 2 weeks to measure bite count during 2,975 eating activities. An automated self-administered 24-hour recall was completed daily to provide kilocalorie estimates for each eating activity. Pearson's correlation indicated a moderate, positive correlation between bite count and kilocalories (r=0.44; P<0.001) across all 2,975 eating activities. The average per-individual correlation was 0.53. A 2 (sex)×3 (body mass index group: normal, overweight, obese) analysis of variance indicated that men consumed 6 kcal more per bite than women on average. However, there were no body mass index group differences in kilocalories per bite. This was the longest study of a body-worn sensor for monitoring eating activity of free-living human beings to date, which highlights the strong potential for this method to be used in future, long-term investigations.

  7. Energy Expenditure in Playground Games in Primary School Children Measured by Accelerometer and Heart Rate Monitors.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, Jorge Cañete; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Sánchez-López, Mairena; Arias-Palencia, Natalia; Fonseca, Juan Fernando Ortega; Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo

    2017-04-07

    The aim of this study was to examine the energy expenditure (EE) measured using indirect calorimetry (IC) during playground games and to assess the validity of heart rate (HR) and accelerometry counts as indirect indicators of EE in children´s physical activity games. 32 primary school children (9.9 ± 0.6 years old, 19.8 ± 4.9 kg · m(-2) BMI and 37.6 ± 7.2 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) VO2max). Indirect calorimetry (IC), accelerometry and HR data were simultaneously collected for each child during a 90 min session of 30 playground games. Thirty-eight sessions were recorded in 32 different children. Each game was recorded at least in three occasions in other three children. The inter-subject coefficient of variation within a game was 27% for IC, 37% for accelerometry and 13% for HR. The overall mean EE in the games was 4.2 ± 1.4 kcals · min(-1) per game, totaling to 375 ± 122 kcals/per 90 min/session. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and accelerometer counts was 0.48 (p=0.026) for endurance games and 0.21 (p=0.574) for strength games. The correlation coefficient between indirect calorimetry and HR was 0.71 (p=0.032) for endurance games and 0.48 (p=0.026) for strength games. Our data indicate that both accelerometer and HR monitors are useful devices for estimating EE during endurance games, but only HR monitors estimates are accurate for endurance games.

  8. WBC count

    MedlinePlus

    Leukocyte count; White blood cell count ... blood is 4,500 to 11,000 white blood cells per microliter (mcL) or 4.5 to 11. ... LOW WHITE BLOOD CELL (WBC) COUNT A low number of WBCs is called leukopenia. A WBC count below 4500 is below normal ...

  9. Activated systemic inflammatory response at diagnosis reduces lymph node count in colonic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Rory P; Murphy, Brenda; Larkin, John O; Mehigan, Brian J; McCormick, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate a link between lymph node yield and systemic inflammatory response in colon cancer. METHODS A prospectively maintained database was interrogated. All patients undergoing curative colonic resection were included. Neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and albumin were used as markers of SIR. In keeping with previously studies, NLR ≥ 4, albumin < 35 was used as cut off points for SIR. Statistical analysis was performed using 2 sample t-test and χ2 tests where appropriate. RESULTS Three hundred and two patients were included for analysis. One hundred and ninety-five patients had NLR < 4 and 107 had NLR ≥ 4. There was no difference in age or sex between groups. Patients with NLR of ≥ 4 had lower mean lymph node yields than patients with NLR < 4 [17.6 ± 7.1 vs 19.2 ± 7.9 (P = 0.036)]. More patients with an elevated NLR had node positive disease and an increased lymph node ratio (≥ 0.25, P = 0.044). CONCLUSION Prognosis in colon cancer is intimately linked to the patient’s immune response. Assuming standardised surgical technique and sub specialty pathology, lymph node count is reduced when systemic inflammatory response is activated. PMID:27574555

  10. Accelerometer and strain gage evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerman, D. J.; Madsen, M. M.; Uncapher, W. L.; Stenberg, D. R.; Bronowski, D. R.

    1991-06-01

    This document describes the method developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to evaluate transducer used in the design certification testing of nuclear material shipping packages. This testing project was performed by SNL for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). This evaluation is based on the results of tests conducted to measure ruggedness, failure frequency, repeatability, and manufacturers' calibration data under both field and laboratory conditions. The results of these tests are provided and discussed. The transducer were selected for testing by surveying cask contractors and testing facilities. Important insights relating to operational characteristics of accelerometer types were gained during field testing.

  11. Understanding walking activity in multiple sclerosis: step count, walking intensity and uninterrupted walking activity duration related to degree of disability.

    PubMed

    Neven, An; Vanderstraeten, Annelien; Janssens, Davy; Wets, Geert; Feys, Peter

    2016-09-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), physical activity (PA) is most commonly measured as number of steps, while also walking intensity and walking activity duration are keys for a healthy lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) the number of steps persons with MS (PwMS) take; (2) the number of steps they take at low and moderate intensity; and (3) their walking activity duration for 2, 3, 6, 10, 12 and 14 uninterrupted minutes; all related to the degree of disability. 64 PwMS participated, distinguished in a mild (n = 31) and moderate MS subgroup (n = 34) based on their ambulatory dysfunction (Disease Steps). Standardized clinical tests were performed, and step data from the StepWatch Activity Monitor were collected for seven consecutive days. The results showed that (1) step count in PwMS was lower than PA recommendations, and is negatively influenced by a higher disability degree. (2) No walking was registered during 77 % of the day. PwMS are making steps for 22 % at low and only 1 % at moderate intensity. (3) Both MS subgroups rarely walk for more than six uninterrupted minutes, especially not at moderate intensity. PwMS need to be encouraged to make steps at moderate intensity, and to make steps for longer periods of time (minimal ten uninterrupted minutes).

  12. Superconducting six-axis accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new superconducting accelerometer, capable of measuring both linear and angular accelerations, is under development at the University of Maryland. A single superconducting proof mass is magnetically levitated against gravity or any other proof force. Its relative positions and orientations with respect to the platform are monitored by six superconducting inductance bridges sharing a single amplifier, called the Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The six degrees of freedom, the three linear acceleration components and the three angular acceleration components, of the platform are measured simultaneously. In order to improve the linearity and the dynamic range of the instrument, the demodulated outputs of the SQUID are fed back to appropriate levitation coils so that the proof mass remains at the null position for all six inductance bridges. The expected intrinsic noise of the instrument is 4 x 10(exp -12)m s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for linear acceleration and 3 x 10(exp -11) rad s(exp -2) Hz(exp -1/2) for angular acceleration in 1-g environment. In 0-g, the linear acceleration sensitivity of the superconducting accelerometer could be improved by two orders of magnitude. The design and the operating principle of a laboratory prototype of the new instrument is discussed.

  13. Display-And-Alarm Circuit For Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Compact accelerometer assembly consists of commercial accelerometer retrofit with display-and-alarm circuit. Provides simple means for technician attending machine to monitor vibrations. Also simpifies automatic safety shutdown by providing local alarm or shutdown signal when vibration exceeds preset level.

  14. Micromachined high-g accelerometers: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, V.; Li, H.; Jianmin, M.

    2015-03-01

    This Topical Review reviews research and commercial development of high-g micromachined accelerometers. Emphasis is placed on different high-g sensing schemes and popular design templates used to achieve high-g sensing. Additionally, trends in high-g micromachined accelerometer development both in research and in the market are discussed.

  15. Total Lymphocyte Count and Haemoglobin Concentration Combined as a Surrogate Marker for Initiating Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in a Resource-limited Setting as against CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Dhamangaonkar, AC; Mathew, A; Pazare, AR

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To find a sensitive and low-cost surrogate marker for CD4 count for initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) [CD4 < 200 /mm3], in the form of total lymphocyte count (TLC) < 1200 /mm3 combined with haemoglobin (Hb) with multiple Hb cut-offs. Method: Two hundred and three consecutive treatment-naïve adult HIV positive outpatients attending the virology clinic in World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage 1, 2 or 3 were enrolled in the study. Their complete blood counts and CD4 counts were done. Descriptive statistics was done by two methods correlating TLC alone with CD4 and the other using combined marker of TLC and Hb with CD4 count. Result: Total lymphocyte count alone did not correlate well with CD4 counts (r = 0.13; p = 0.065). Sensitivity of TLC < 1200 /mm3 to predict CD4 < 200 /mm3 was low (23.27%) and the sensitivity of the combined marker (TLC + Hb) increased with higher Hb cut-offs. Conclusion: Adding Hb to TLC markedly improved the sensitivity of the marker to predict CD4 count < 200/mm3. We also recommend a trade-off Hb cut-off of 10.5 g/dL for optimum sensitivity and specificity in this population subset. PMID:25781283

  16. Validation study of Polar V800 accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Vicente, Adrián; De Cocker, Katrien; Garatachea, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Background The correct quantification of physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in daily life is an important target for researchers and professionals. The objective of this paper is to study the validity of the Polar V800 for the quantification of PA and the estimation of EE against the ActiGraph (ActiTrainer) in healthy young adults. Methods Eighteen Caucasian active people (50% women) aged between 19–23 years wore an ActiTrainer on the right hip and a Polar V800 on the preferred wrist during 7 days. Paired samples t-tests were used to analyze differences in outcomes between devices, and Pearson’s correlation coefficients to examine the correlation between outcomes. The agreement was studied using the Bland-Altman method. Also, the association between the difference and the magnitude of the measurement (heteroscedasticity) was examined. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC value) were calculated to evaluate the ability of the devices to accurately define a person who fulfills the recommendation of 10,000 daily steps. Results The devices significantly differed from each other on all outcomes (P<0.05), except for Polar V800’s alerts vs. ActiTrainer’s 1 hour sedentary bouts (P=0.595) and Polar V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time (P=0.484). Heteroscedasticity analyses were significant for all outcomes, except for Kcal and sitting time. The ROC-AUC value was fair (0.781±0.048) and the sensitivity and specificity was 98% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions The Polar V800 accelerometer has a comparable validity to the accelerometer in free-living conditions, regarding “1 hour sedentary bouts” and “V800’s walking time vs. ActiTrainer’s lifestyle time” in young adults. PMID:27570772

  17. GPS-Based Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination Using Accelerometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHelleputte, Tom; Visser, Pieter

    2007-01-01

    a few centimeters with respect to high-quality JPL reference orbits. This shows a slightly better consistency compared to the case when using force models. A purely dynamic orbit, without estimating empirical accelerations thus only adjusting six state parameters and the bias and scale factors, gives an orbit fit for the GRACE B test case below the decimeter level. The in orbit calibrated accelerometer observations can be used to validate the modelled accelerations and estimated empirical accelerations computed with the GHOST tools. In along track direction they show the best resemblance, with a mean correlation coefficient of 93% for the same period. In radial and normal direction the correlation is smaller. During days of high solar activity the benefit of using accelerometer observations is clearly visible. The observations during these days show fluctuations which the modelled and empirical accelerations can not follow.

  18. Mapping cyclist activity and injury risk in a network combining smartphone GPS data and bicycle counts.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Jillian; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Morency, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the modal share of cycling has been growing in North American cities. With the increase of cycling, the need of bicycle infrastructure and road safety concerns have also raised. Bicycle flows are an essential component in safety analysis. The main objective of this work is to propose a methodology to estimate and map bicycle volumes and cyclist injury risk throughout the entire network of road segments and intersections on the island of Montreal, achieved by combining smartphone GPS traces and count data. In recent years, methods have been proposed to estimate average annual daily bicycle (AADB) volume and injury risk estimates at both the intersection and segment levels using bicycle counts. However, these works have been limited to small samples of locations for which count data is available. In this work, a methodology is proposed to combine short- and long-term bicycle counts with GPS data to estimate AADB volumes along segments and intersections in the entire network. As part of the validation process, correlation is observed between AADB values obtained from GPS data and AADB values from count data, with R-squared values of 0.7 for signalized intersections, 0.58 for non-signalized intersections and between 0.48 and 0.76 for segments with and without bicycle infrastructure. The methodology is also validated through the calibration of safety performance functions using both sources of AADB estimates, from counts and from GPS data. Using the validated AADB estimates, the factors associated with injury risk were identified using data from the entire population of intersections and segments throughout Montreal. Bayesian injury risk maps are then generated and the concentrations of expected injuries and risk at signalized intersections are identified. Signalized intersections, which are often located at the intersection of major arterials, witness 4 times more injuries and 2.5 times greater risk than non-signalized intersections. A similar

  19. GRADIO three-axis electrostatic accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1987-01-01

    Dedicated accelerometers for satellite gravity gradiometry (GRADIO project) are described. The design profits from experience acquired with the CACTUS accelerometer payload of the satellite CASTOR-D5B and studies of highly accurate accelerometers for inertial navigation. The principle of operation, based on a three-axis electrostatic suspension of a cubic proof mass, is well suited for the measurements of accelerations less than 0.0001 m/sec/sec. A resolution better than 10 to the minus 11th power m/sec/sec/sq root Hz is expected.

  20. Hybridizing matter-wave and classical accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lautier, J.; Volodimer, L.; Hardin, T.; Merlet, S.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.; Landragin, A.

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a hybrid accelerometer that benefits from the advantages of both conventional and atomic sensors in terms of bandwidth (DC to 430 Hz) and long term stability. First, the use of a real time correction of the atom interferometer phase by the signal from the classical accelerometer enables to run it at best performance without any isolation platform. Second, a servo-lock of the DC component of the conventional sensor output signal by the atomic one realizes a hybrid sensor. This method paves the way for applications in geophysics and in inertial navigation as it overcomes the main limitation of atomic accelerometers, namely, the dead times between consecutive measurements.

  1. Minimum detectable activity concentration in direct alpha spectrometry from outdoor air samples: continuous monitoring versus separate sampling and counting.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, R; Siiskonen, T

    2006-02-01

    Rapid method for identifying the presence of alpha particle emitting radionuclides in outdoor air is of paramount importance should a nuclear or radiological incident occur. Minimum detectable activity concentrations of U, U, Pu, and Pu in outdoor air are calculated for two direct alpha spectrometry methods: continuous air monitoring is compared with separate sampling and subsequent alpha particle counting in a vacuum chamber. The radon progeny activity concentration typical for outdoor air and the effects for the alpha particle spectra caused by the properties of the filter and the aerosol particles are taken into account using measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Continuous air monitoring is a faster method for identifying the presence of (trans)uranium elements when their activity concentration is considerably higher than the typical detection limit. Separate sampling and counting in a vacuum chamber is a more sensitive method when concentrations are close to the detection limit and when the duration of the sampling-counting cycle is greater than approximately 2 h. The method may serve as a tool for rapid field measurements.

  2. Valid detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving with two accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Kooijmans, H; Horemans, H L D; Stam, H J; Bussmann, J B J

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed whether self-propelled wheelchair driving can be validly detected by a new method using a set of two commonly used accelerometers.In a rehabilitation centre, 10 wheelchair-bound persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) (aged 29-63 years) performed a series of representative daily activities according to a protocol including self-propelled wheelchair driving and other activities. Two ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers were used; one was attached at the wrist, the other to the spokes of the wheelchair wheel. Based on the movement intensity of the two accelerometers, a custom-made algorithm in MatLab differentiated between self-propelled wheelchair driving and other activities (e.g. being pushed or arm movements not related to wheelchair driving). Video recordings were used for reference. Validity scores between the accelerometer output and the video analyses were expressed in terms of agreement, sensitivity and specificity scores.Overall agreement for the detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving was 85%; sensitivity was 88% and specificity 83%. Disagreement between accelerometer output and video analysis was largest for wheelchair driving at very low speed on a treadmill, wheelchair driving on a slope on a treadmill, and being pushed in the wheelchair whilst making excessive arm movements.Valid detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving is provided by two accelerometers and a simple algorithm. Disagreement with the video analysis was largest during three atypical daily activities.

  3. Application of Accelerometer Data to Mars Odyssey Aerobraking and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolson, R. H.; Keating, G. M.; George, B. E.; Escalera, P. E.; Werner, M. R.; Dwyer, A. M.; Hanna, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Aerobraking was an enabling technology for the Mars Odyssey mission even though it involved risk due primarily to the variability of the Mars upper atmosphere. Consequently, numerous analyses based on various data types were performed during operations to reduce these risk and among these data were measurements from spacecraft accelerometers. This paper reports on the use of accelerometer data for determining atmospheric density during Odyssey aerobraking operations. Acceleration was measured along three orthogonal axes, although only data from the component along the axis nominally into the flow was used during operations. For a one second count time, the RMS noise level varied from 0.07 to 0.5 mm/s2 permitting density recovery to between 0.15 and 1.1 kg per cu km or about 2% of the mean density at periapsis during aerobraking. Accelerometer data were analyzed in near real time to provide estimates of density at periapsis, maximum density, density scale height, latitudinal gradient, longitudinal wave variations and location of the polar vortex. Summaries are given of the aerobraking phase of the mission, the accelerometer data analysis methods and operational procedures, some applications to determining thermospheric properties, and some remaining issues on interpretation of the data. Pre-flight estimates of natural variability based on Mars Global Surveyor accelerometer measurements proved reliable in the mid-latitudes, but overestimated the variability inside the polar vortex.

  4. Multiple imputation of completely missing repeated measures data within person from a complex sample: application to accelerometer data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benmei; Yu, Mandi; Graubard, Barry I; Troiano, Richard P; Schenker, Nathaniel

    2016-12-10

    The Physical Activity Monitor component was introduced into the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to collect objective information on physical activity including both movement intensity counts and ambulatory steps. Because of an error in the accelerometer device initialization process, the steps data were missing for all participants in several primary sampling units, typically a single county or group of contiguous counties, who had intensity count data from their accelerometers. To avoid potential bias and loss in efficiency in estimation and inference involving the steps data, we considered methods to accurately impute the missing values for steps collected in the 2003-2004 NHANES. The objective was to come up with an efficient imputation method that minimized model-based assumptions. We adopted a multiple imputation approach based on additive regression, bootstrapping and predictive mean matching methods. This method fits alternative conditional expectation (ace) models, which use an automated procedure to estimate optimal transformations for both the predictor and response variables. This paper describes the approaches used in this imputation and evaluates the methods by comparing the distributions of the original and the imputed data. A simulation study using the observed data is also conducted as part of the model diagnostics. Finally, some real data analyses are performed to compare the before and after imputation results. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Does a waist-worn ActiGraph accelerometer quantify community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Socie, Michael J; Boes, Morgan K; Sandroff, Brian M; Motl, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Accelerometry has been recognized as a method of objectively measuring community ambulation in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the assumption that walking itself serves as a major contributor to the accelerometer signal has yet to be tested. This study examined the assumption that community-based walking is a primary contributor to accelerometer output in MS. Ambulatory persons (5 males/17 females; 13 without aid/9 with aid) with MS wore a triaxial accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X, Health One Technologies; Fort Walton Beach, Florida) as well as an IDEEA system (MiniSun, Inc; Fresno, Florida) over the course of a single day. Outcome measures for the accelerometer included movement counts/hour for the vertical, anterior-posterior, and mediolateral axes. Outcomes for the IDEEA system included percent time walking, sitting, and standing, as well as walking speed. Pearson product correlations (r) were used to examine the associations between outcomes from the accelerometer and IDEEA system. Significant correlations were observed between percent walking time and movement counts/hour along the vertical (r = 0.84) and anterior-posterior (r = 0.69) axes. Significant correlations were further noted between movement counts/hour along the vertical axis and walking speed (r = 0.45) and self-report walking impairment (r = -0.50) and disability (r = -0.46). Such observations further support accelerometry as an objective marker of community ambulation in persons with MS.

  6. Evaluation of Low-Cost, Objective Instruments for Assessing Physical Activity in 10-11-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Teresa L.; Brusseau, Timothy; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; McClain, James J.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2011-01-01

    This study compared step counts detected by four, low-cost, objective, physical-activity-assessment instruments and evaluated their ability to detect moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) compared to the ActiGraph accelerometer (AG). Thirty-six 10-11-year-old children wore the NL-1000, Yamax Digiwalker SW 200, Omron HJ-151, and Walk4Life…

  7. Accelerometer Measurements in the Amusement Park.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reno, Charles; Speers, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of the Texas Instruments' calculator-based laboratory (CBL) and Vernier accelerometer for measuring the vector sum of the gravitational field and the acceleration of amusement park rides. (JRH)

  8. Use of a Wireless Network of Accelerometers for Improved Measurement of Human Energy Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2014-01-01

    Single, hip-mounted accelerometers can provide accurate measurements of energy expenditure (EE) in some settings, but are unable to accurately estimate the energy cost of many non-ambulatory activities. A multi-sensor network may be able to overcome the limitations of a single accelerometer. Thus, the purpose of our study was to compare the abilities of a wireless network of accelerometers and a hip-mounted accelerometer for the prediction of EE. Thirty adult participants engaged in 14 different sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle and exercise activities for five minutes each while wearing a portable metabolic analyzer, a hip-mounted accelerometer (AG) and a wireless network of three accelerometers (WN) worn on the right wrist, thigh and ankle. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were created separately for the AG and WN for the EE prediction. Pearson correlations (r) and the root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated to compare criterion-measured EE to predicted EE from the ANNs. Overall, correlations were higher (r = 0.95 vs. r = 0.88, p < 0.0001) and RMSE was lower (1.34 vs. 1.97 metabolic equivalents (METs), p < 0.0001) for the WN than the AG. In conclusion, the WN outperformed the AG for measuring EE, providing evidence that the WN can provide highly accurate estimates of EE in adults participating in a wide range of activities.

  9. Use of a Wireless Network of Accelerometers for Improved Measurement of Human Energy Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Montoye, Alexander H.; Dong, Bo; Biswas, Subir; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2014-01-01

    Single, hip-mounted accelerometers can provide accurate measurements of energy expenditure (EE) in some settings, but are unable to accurately estimate the energy cost of many non-ambulatory activities. A multi-sensor network may be able to overcome the limitations of a single accelerometer. Thus, the purpose of our study was to compare the abilities of a wireless network of accelerometers and a hip-mounted accelerometer for the prediction of EE. Thirty adult participants engaged in 14 different sedentary, ambulatory, lifestyle and exercise activities for five minutes each while wearing a portable metabolic analyzer, a hip-mounted accelerometer (AG) and a wireless network of three accelerometers (WN) worn on the right wrist, thigh and ankle. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were created separately for the AG and WN for the EE prediction. Pearson correlations (r) and the root mean square error (RMSE) were calculated to compare criterion-measured EE to predicted EE from the ANNs. Overall, correlations were higher (r = 0.95 vs. r = 0.88, p < 0.0001) and RMSE was lower (1.34 vs. 1.97 metabolic equivalents (METs), p < 0.0001) for the WN than the AG. In conclusion, the WN outperformed the AG for measuring EE, providing evidence that the WN can provide highly accurate estimates of EE in adults participating in a wide range of activities. PMID:25530874

  10. Validity of the New Lifestyles NL-1000 Accelerometer for Measuring Time Spent in Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMinn, David; Rowe, David A.; Stark, Michelle; Nicol, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Current interest in promoting physical activity in the school environment necessitates an inexpensive, accurate method of measuring physical activity in such settings. Additionally, it is recognized that physical activity must be of at least moderate intensity in order to yield substantial health benefits. The purpose of the study, therefore, was…

  11. Metabolic Thresholds and Validated Accelerometer Cutoff Points for the Actigraph GT1M in Young Children Based on Measurements of Locomotion and Play Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimmy, Gerda; Dossegger, Alain; Seiler, Roland; Mader, Urs

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine metabolic thresholds and subsequent activity intensity cutoff points for the ActiGraph GT1M with various epochs spanning from 5 to 60 sec in young children. Twenty-two children, aged 4 to 9 years, performed 10 different activities including locomotion and play activities. Energy expenditure was…

  12. Optomechanical accelerometers and gravity gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman Cervantes, F.; Pratt, J. R.; Taylor, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Compact optical cavities can be combined with highly stable mechanical oscillators to yield accelerometers and gravity gradiometers of exquisite sensitivity, which are also traceable to the SI.We have incorporated Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic micro-cavities onto low-loss monolithic fused-silica mechanical oscillators for gradiometry, acceleration, and force sensing. These devices consist solely of a glass oscillator and fiber optics to inject and read out the coherent optical signal, making them very simple and compatible with space applications.We have demonstrated displacement sensitivities better than 200 am/√Hz with these fiber-optic micro-sensors. This translates into broadband acceleration noise floors below 100 nano-g/√Hz over a 10kHz, when combined with compact high frequency mechanical oscillators. Similarly, we have developed monolithic oscillators with resonance frequencies near and below 10 Hz, yielding measurement sensitivities better than 10-9 m/s2.We will introduce our sensor concepts and present results on our fiber-optic displacement sensors and novel optomechanical devices.

  13. Optomechanical accelerometers and gravity gradiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Compact optical cavities can be combined with highly stable mechanical oscillators to yield accelerometers and gravity gradiometers of exquisite sensitivity, which are also traceable to the SI. We have incorporated Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic micro-cavities onto low-loss monolithic fused-silica mechanical oscillators for gradiometry, acceleration, and force sensing. These devices consist solely of a glass oscillator and fiber optics to inject and read out the coherent optical signal, making them very simple and compatible with space applications. We have demonstrated displacement sensitivities better than 200 am/√Hz with these fiber-optic micro-sensors. This translates into broadband acceleration noise floors below 100 nano-g/√Hz over a 10kHz, when combined with compact high frequency mechanical oscillators. Similarly, we have developed monolithic oscillators with resonance frequencies near and below 10 Hz, yielding measurement sensitivities better than 10-9 m/s2. We will introduce our sensor concepts and present results on our fiber-optic displacement sensors and novel optomechanical devices.

  14. High G MEMS integrated accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Barron, C.C.; Montague, S.; Smith, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Christenson, T.R.; Bateman, V.I.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a surface micromachined accelerometer for measuring very high levels of acceleration (up to 50,000 G). Both the mechanical and electronic portions of the sensor were integrated on a single substrate using a process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In this process, the mechanical components of the sensor were first fabricated at the bottom of a trench etched into the water substrate. The trench was then filled with oxide and sealed to protect the mechanical components during subsequent microelectronics processing. The wafer surface was then planarized in preparation for CMOS processing using Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP). Next, the CMOS electronics were fabricated on areas of the wafer adjacent to the embedded structures. Finally, the mechanical structures were released and the sensor tested. The mechanical structure of the sensor consisted of two polysilicon plate masses suspended by multiple springs (cantilevered beam structures) over corresponding polysilicon plates fixed to the substrate to form two parallel plate capacitors. The first polysilicon plate mass was suspended using compliant springs (cantilever beams) and acted as a variable capacitor during sensor acceleration. The second polysilicon plate mass was suspended using very stiff springs and acted as a fixed capacitor during acceleration. Acceleration was measured by comparing the capacitance of the variable capacitor (compliant suspension) with the fixed capacitance (stiff suspension).

  15. Determination of 90Sr-90Y activity in urine samples by using Cherenkov counting.

    PubMed

    Tsroya, S; German, U; Pelled, O; Katorza, E; Alfassi, Z B

    2013-03-01

    Cherenkov counting of the (90)Sr-(90)Y pure beta emitters in aqueous samples is an attractive method; but color quenching correction is needed, this being especially significant for urine which is characterized by a strong coloration. A quench correction method based on the external source of some liquid scintillation systems (named ESAR-External Source Area Ratio) was proposed for aqueous solutions. In the present work, the application of the ESAR method for determination of (90)Sr-(90)Y in human urine samples is described.

  16. Continuous daily assessment of multiple sclerosis disability using remote step count monitoring.

    PubMed

    Block, V J; Lizée, A; Crabtree-Hartman, E; Bevan, C J; Graves, J S; Bove, R; Green, A J; Nourbakhsh, B; Tremblay, M; Gourraud, P-A; Ng, M Y; Pletcher, M J; Olgin, J E; Marcus, G M; Allen, D D; Cree, B A C; Gelfand, J M

    2017-02-01

    Disability measures in multiple sclerosis (MS) rely heavily on ambulatory function, and current metrics fail to capture potentially important variability in walking behavior. We sought to determine whether remote step count monitoring using a consumer-friendly accelerometer (Fitbit Flex) can enhance MS disability assessment. 99 adults with relapsing or progressive MS able to walk ≥2-min were prospectively recruited. At 4 weeks, study retention was 97% and median Fitbit use was 97% of days. Substudy validation resulted in high interclass correlations between Fitbit, ActiGraph and manual step count tally during a 2-minute walk test, and between Fitbit and ActiGraph (ICC = 0.76) during 7-day home monitoring. Over 4 weeks of continuous monitoring, daily steps were lower in progressive versus relapsing MS (mean difference 2546 steps, p < 0.01). Lower average daily step count was associated with greater disability on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) (p < 0.001). Within each EDSS category, substantial variability in step count was apparent (i.e., EDSS = 6.0 range 1097-7152). Step count demonstrated moderate-strong correlations with other walking measures. Lower average daily step count is associated with greater MS disability and captures important variability in real-world walking activity otherwise masked by standard disability scales, including the EDSS. These results support remote step count monitoring as an exploratory outcome in MS trials.

  17. Characteristics associated with requested and required accelerometer wear in children

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sian L; Kipping, Ruth R; Jago, Russell; Brown, Judith; Hucker, Daniel; Blackett, Ali; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate characteristics associated with wearing an accelerometer for the required and requested time among 8-year-old to 10-year-old children. Design Cross-sectional. Setting 60 Bristol and North Somerset primary schools taking part in the ‘Active for Life Year 5’ randomised controlled trial (RCT) in 2011. Participants 2048 children, aged 8–10 years, invited to wear an accelerometer for 5 days of recording. Primary outcome measure Numbers meeting required wear-time for inclusion in main RCT analysis (≥8 h/day ≥3 days) and numbers meeting requested wear-time (≥8 h/day for all 5 days). Results 817 (40%) of the children wore the accelerometer for the requested time and 1629 (80%) for the required time. In adjusted multivariable analyses the odds of wearing the accelerometer for the required time were greater in females as compared with males (OR 1.76 (1.42–2.18)), those with higher scores for reporting their mother restricted time on sedentary behaviours (1.26 (1.04–1.52) per increase of 1 on a 1–4 scale) and in children from schools with larger year group sizes (1.01 (1.00–1.02) per additional child). Living in a neighbourhood with higher levels of deprivation (0.49 (0.33–0.72) comparing highest to lowest third of the deprivation score) or reporting higher levels of weekday outdoor play (0.97 (0.94, 1.00) per 30 min more) were associated with reduced odds of meeting required time. Results were essentially the same for requested wear-time. Other characteristics, including child body mass index, were not associated with required or requested wear-time. Conclusions Only 40% of children wore the accelerometer for the requested time but 80% fulfilled the required criteria to be included in the main study analyses. Knowing which characteristics are associated with accelerometer wear could help target interventions to increase wear-time. PMID:23975106

  18. Microelectromechanical Resonant Accelerometer Designed with a High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Su, Yan; Shi, Qin; Qiu, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental evaluation of a silicon micro-machined resonant accelerometer (SMRA). This type of accelerometer works on the principle that a proof mass under acceleration applies force to two double-ended tuning fork (DETF) resonators, and the frequency output of two DETFs exhibits a differential shift. The dies of an SMRA are fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) processing and wafer-level vacuum packaging. This research aims to design a high-sensitivity SMRA because a high sensitivity allows for the acceleration signal to be easily demodulated by frequency counting techniques and decreases the noise level. This study applies the energy-consumed concept and the Nelder-Mead algorithm in the SMRA to address the design issues and further increase its sensitivity. Using this novel method, the sensitivity of the SMRA has been increased by 66.1%, which attributes to both the re-designed DETF and the reduced energy loss on the micro-lever. The results of both the closed-form and finite-element analyses are described and are in agreement with one another. A resonant frequency of approximately 22 kHz, a frequency sensitivity of over 250 Hz per g, a one-hour bias stability of 55 μg, a bias repeatability (1σ) of 48 μg and the bias-instability of 4.8 μg have been achieved. PMID:26633425

  19. CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.; Colombo, O. L.; Ray, Richard D.; Thompson, B.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, Teresa A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) to be launched in the later part of '01) that combine a new generation of GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers, a high precision three axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and SLR tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the surface forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies. Gravity field modeling status and plans will be discussed.

  20. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  1. Comparison of linear and non-linear models for predicting energy expenditure from raw accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Montoye, Alexander H K; Begum, Munni; Henning, Zachary; Pfeiffer, Karin A

    2017-02-01

    This study had three purposes, all related to evaluating energy expenditure (EE) prediction accuracy from body-worn accelerometers: (1) compare linear regression to linear mixed models, (2) compare linear models to artificial neural network models, and (3) compare accuracy of accelerometers placed on the hip, thigh, and wrists. Forty individuals performed 13 activities in a 90 min semi-structured, laboratory-based protocol. Participants wore accelerometers on the right hip, right thigh, and both wrists and a portable metabolic analyzer (EE criterion). Four EE prediction models were developed for each accelerometer: linear regression, linear mixed, and two ANN models. EE prediction accuracy was assessed using correlations, root mean square error (RMSE), and bias and was compared across models and accelerometers using repeated-measures analysis of variance. For all accelerometer placements, there were no significant differences for correlations or RMSE between linear regression and linear mixed models (correlations: r  =  0.71-0.88, RMSE: 1.11-1.61 METs; p  >  0.05). For the thigh-worn accelerometer, there were no differences in correlations or RMSE between linear and ANN models (ANN-correlations: r  =  0.89, RMSE: 1.07-1.08 METs. Linear models-correlations: r  =  0.88, RMSE: 1.10-1.11 METs; p  >  0.05). Conversely, one ANN had higher correlations and lower RMSE than both linear models for the hip (ANN-correlation: r  =  0.88, RMSE: 1.12 METs. Linear models-correlations: r  =  0.86, RMSE: 1.18-1.19 METs; p  <  0.05), and both ANNs had higher correlations and lower RMSE than both linear models for the wrist-worn accelerometers (ANN-correlations: r  =  0.82-0.84, RMSE: 1.26-1.32 METs. Linear models-correlations: r  =  0.71-0.73, RMSE: 1.55-1.61 METs; p  <  0.01). For studies using wrist-worn accelerometers, machine learning models offer a significant improvement in EE prediction

  2. A Count Model to Study the Correlates of 60 Min of Daily Physical Activity in Portuguese Children

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Alessandra; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Santos, Daniel; Pereira, Sara; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Chaves, Raquel; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Maia, José

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present data on Portuguese children (aged 9–11 years) complying with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) guidelines, and to identify the importance of correlates from multiple domains associated with meeting the guidelines. Physical activity (PA) was objectively assessed by accelerometry throughout seven days on 777 children. A count model using Poisson regression was used to identify the best set of correlates that predicts the variability in meeting the guidelines. Only 3.1% of children met the recommended daily 60 min of MVPA for all seven days of the week. Further, the Cochrane–Armitage chi-square test indicated a linear and negative trend (p < 0.001) from none to all seven days of children complying with the guidelines. The count model explained 22% of the variance in meeting MVPA guidelines daily. Being a girl, having a higher BMI, belonging to families with higher income, sleeping more and taking greater time walking from home to a sporting venue significantly reduced the probability of meeting daily recommended MVPA across the seven days. Furthermore, compared to girls, increasing sleep time in boys increased their chances of compliance with the MVPA recommendations. These results reinforce the relevance of considering different covariates’ roles on PA compliance when designing efficient intervention strategies to promote healthy and active lifestyles in children. PMID:25730296

  3. The Relationship of Actigraph Accelerometer Cut-Points for Estimating Physical Activity with Selected Health Outcomes: Results from NHANES 2003-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Lee, Hyo; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Crespo, Carlos J.; Andersen, Ross E.; Smit, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of child and adult cut-points on physical activity (PA) intensity, the prevalence of meeting PA guidelines, and association with selected health outcomes. Participants (6,578 adults greater than or equal to 18 years, and 3,174 children and adolescents less than or equal to 17 years) from the…

  4. RBC count

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow disease that causes abnormal increase in RBCs ( polycythemia vera ) Your RBC count will increase for several ... Multiple myeloma Myelofibrosis Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) Peripheral Polycythemia vera Renal cell carcinoma Splenomegaly Transfusion reaction - hemolytic ...

  5. Reticulocyte count

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - reticulocyte ... A higher than normal reticulocytes count may indicate: Anemia due to red blood cells being destroyed earlier than normal ( hemolytic anemia ) Bleeding Blood disorder in a fetus or newborn ( ...

  6. Electret accelerometers: physics and dynamic characterization.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, J; Haberzettl, S; Motz, T; Sessler, G M

    2011-06-01

    Electret microphones are produced in numbers that significantly exceed those for all other microphone types. This is due to the fact that air-borne electret sensors are of simple and low-cost design but have very good acoustical properties. In contrast, most of the discrete structure-borne sound sensors (or accelerometers) are based on the piezoelectric effect. In the present work, capacitive accelerometers utilizing the electret principle were constructed, built, and characterized. These electret accelerometers comprise a metallic seismic mass, covered by an electret film, a ring of a soft cellular polymer supplying the restoring force, and a metallic backplate. These components replace membrane, spacer, and back electrode, respectively, of the electret microphone. An adjustable static pressure to the seismic mass is generated by two metal springs. The dynamic characterization of the accelerometers was carried out by using an electrodynamic shaker and an external charge or voltage amplifier. Sensors with various seismic masses, air gap distances, and electret voltages were investigated. Charge sensitivities from 10 to 40 pC/g, voltage sensitivities from 600 to 2000 mV/g, and resonance frequencies from 3 to 1.5 kHz were measured. A model describing both the charge and the voltage sensitivity is presented. Good agreement of experimental and calculated values is found. The experimental results show that sensitive, lightweight, and inexpensive electret accelerometers can be built.

  7. Tower counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  8. Determination of specific activity of iron-55 by spectrophotometry and liquid scintillation counting with bathophenanthroline complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, C.; Hoshi, M.; Tachikawa, E.

    1985-12-01

    A method for determining the macroscopic amount of iron and its radioactivity (/sup 55/Fe) in radioactive corrosion products was established with a single chemical procedure. The iron was first extracted into a liquid scintillator (2,5-diphenyloxazole-xylene) as an ion associate of iron bathophenanthroline (BPT) complex and perchlorate at pH 3-8, followed by measurement of its radioactivity by a liquid scintillation counter and its absorbance by a spectrophotometer. The absorption maximum and molar absorptivity (epsilon) of the complex were 535 nm and 22,000, respectively. The system conforms to Beer's law at concentrations of up to 30 ..mu..g of iron in 10 mL of organic phase. The counting efficiency of the extracted /sup 55/Fe was found to be 60%. Although /sup 60/Co is extracted into the PPO-xylene together with /sup 5/)2%Fe, it is separated from /sup 55/Fe by back extraction with 0.005 M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (pH 6.0) into the aqueous phase. The effects of other foreign elements and radionuclides were also examined. The proposed method was successfully applied to analysis of radioactive corrosion products. 21 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Active books: the design of an implantable stimulator that minimizes cable count using integrated circuits very close to electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Demosthenous, Andreas; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne; Jiang, Dai; Donaldson, Nick

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated stimulator that can be embedded in implantable electrode books for interfacing with nerve roots at the cauda equina. The Active Book overcomes the limitation of conventional nerve root stimulators which can only support a small number of stimulating electrodes due to cable count restriction through the dura. Instead, a distributed stimulation system with many tripole electrodes can be configured using several Active Books which are addressed sequentially. The stimulator was fabricated in a 0.6-μm high-voltage CMOS process and occupies a silicon area of 4.2 × 6.5 mm(2). The circuit was designed to deliver up to 8 mA stimulus current to tripole electrodes from an 18 V power supply. Input pad count is limited to five (two power and three control lines) hence requiring a specific procedure for downloading stimulation commands to the chip and extracting information from it. Supported commands include adjusting the amplitude of stimulus current, varying the current ratio at the two anodes in each channel, and measuring relative humidity inside the chip package. In addition to stimulation mode, the chip supports quiescent mode, dissipating less than 100 nA current from the power supply. The performance of the stimulator chip was verified with bench tests including measurements using tripoles in saline.

  10. Reliability and Validity of Objective Measures of Physical Activity in Youth With Cerebral Palsy Who Are Ambulatory

    PubMed Central

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria; Lennon, Nancy; George, Ameeka; Forman, Jeffrey; Trost, Stewart G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical therapy for youth with cerebral palsy (CP) who are ambulatory includes interventions to increase functional mobility and participation in physical activity (PA). Thus, reliable and valid measures are needed to document PA in youth with CP. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inter-instrument reliability and concurrent validity of 3 accelerometer-based motion sensors with indirect calorimetry as the criterion for measuring PA intensity in youth with CP. Methods Fifty-seven youth with CP (mean age=12.5 years, SD=3.3; 51% female; 49.1% with spastic hemiplegia) participated. Inclusion criteria were: aged 6 to 20 years, ambulatory, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I through III, able to follow directions, and able to complete the full PA protocol. Protocol activities included standardized activity trials with increasing PA intensity (resting, writing, household chores, active video games, and walking at 3 self-selected speeds), as measured by weight-relative oxygen uptake (in mL/kg/min). During each trial, participants wore bilateral accelerometers on the upper arms, waist/hip, and ankle and a portable indirect calorimeter. Intraclass coefficient correlations (ICCs) were calculated to evaluate inter-instrument reliability (left-to-right accelerometer placement). Spearman correlations were used to examine concurrent validity between accelerometer output (activity and step counts) and indirect calorimetry. Friedman analyses of variance with post hoc pair-wise analyses were conducted to examine the validity of accelerometers to discriminate PA intensity across activity trials. Results All accelerometers exhibited excellent inter-instrument reliability (ICC=.94–.99) and good concurrent validity (rho=.70–.85). All accelerometers discriminated PA intensity across most activity trials. Limitations This PA protocol consisted of controlled activity trials. Conclusions Accelerometers provide valid and reliable

  11. Designing Electrostatic Accelerometers for Next Gravity Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Foulon, Bernard; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent

    2016-04-01

    Square cuboid electrostatic accelerometers sensor core have been used in various combinations in recent and still flying missions (CHAMP, GRACE, GOCE). ONERA is now in the process of delivering such accelerometers for the GRACE Follow-On mission. The goal is to demonstrate the performance benefits of an interferometry laser ranging method for future low-low satellite to satellite missions. The electrostatic accelerometer becoming thus the system main performance limiter, we propose for future missions a new symmetry which will allow for three ultrasensitive axes instead of two. This implies no performance ground testing, as the now cubic proof-mass will be too heavy, but only free fall tests in catapult mode, taking advantage of the additional microgravity testing time offered by the updated ZARM tower. The updated mission will be in better adequacy with the requirements of a next generation of smaller and drag compensated micro-satellites. In addition to the measurement of the surface forces exerted on the spacecraft by the atmospheric drag and by radiation pressures, the accelerometer will become a major part of the attitude and orbit control system by acting as drag free sensor and by accurately measuring the angular accelerations. ONERA also works on a hybridization of the electrostatic accelerometer with an atomic interferometer to take advantage of the absolute nature of the atomic interferometer acceleration measurement and its great accuracy in the [5-100] mHz bandwidth. After a description of the improvement of the GRACE-FO accelerometer with respect to the still in-orbit previous models and a status of its development, the presentation will describe the new cubic configuration and how its operations and performances can be verified in the Bremen drop tower.

  12. Reliability and validity of the tritrac-R3D accelerometer during backpacking: a case study.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, D; Dalleck, L

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated the utility of the Tritrac-R3D accelerometer as a reliable and valid instrument in the quantification of physical activity while backpacking in the field and to evaluate heart-rate responses and oxygen consumption to assess the feasibility of using the Tritrac-R3D to estimate caloric expenditure. Two 7-day backpacking expeditions were conducted in two consecutive years by a single subject at Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The average hiking heart rate ranged front 60% to 77% HRmax during the expeditions. The average rate of estimated caloric cost ranged from 6.8 to 11.7 kcals x min.(-1) (equivalent to 408 to 702 kcals x hr.(-1)), indicating a relatively moderate to high level of exertion. The Tritrac had adequate consistency and reliability in the field between the two expeditions in recorded activity counts. The Tritrac underestimated caloric expenditure during backpacking with changes in terrain, and hiking speed contributed to even greater disparity in accuracy.

  13. Penguin head movement detected using small accelerometers: a proxy of prey encounter rate.

    PubMed

    Kokubun, Nobuo; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Shin, Hyoung-Chul; Naito, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Akinori

    2011-11-15

    Determining temporal and spatial variation in feeding rates is essential for understanding the relationship between habitat features and the foraging behavior of top predators. In this study we examined the utility of head movement as a proxy of prey encounter rates in medium-sized Antarctic penguins, under the presumption that the birds should move their heads actively when they encounter and peck prey. A field study of free-ranging chinstrap and gentoo penguins was conducted at King George Island, Antarctica. Head movement was recorded using small accelerometers attached to the head, with simultaneous monitoring for prey encounter or body angle. The main prey was Antarctic krill (>99% in wet mass) for both species. Penguin head movement coincided with a slow change in body angle during dives. Active head movements were extracted using a high-pass filter (5 Hz acceleration signals) and the remaining acceleration peaks (higher than a threshold acceleration of 1.0 g) were counted. The timing of head movements coincided well with images of prey taken from the back-mounted cameras: head movement was recorded within ±2.5 s of a prey image on 89.1±16.1% (N=7 trips) of images. The number of head movements varied largely among dive bouts, suggesting large temporal variations in prey encounter rates. Our results show that head movement is an effective proxy of prey encounter, and we suggest that the method will be widely applicable for a variety of predators.

  14. Passive Accelerometer System Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1997-01-01

    The Passive Accelerometer System (PAS) is a simple moving ball accelerometer capable of measuring the small magnitude steady relative acceleration that occurs in a low earth orbit spacecraft due to atmospheric drag and the earth's gravity gradient. The acceleration is measured by recording the average velocity of the spherical ball over a suitable time increment. A modified form of Stokes law is used to convert the average velocity into an acceleration. PAS was used to measure acceleration on the MIR space station and on the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1). The PAS measurement on MIR revealed remarkably low acceleration levels in the SPEKTR module.

  15. Relationship of ethnicity and CD4 Count with glucose metabolism among HIV patients on Highly-Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV patients on HAART are prone to metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, lipodystrophy and diabetes. This study purports to investigate the relationship of ethnicity and CD4+ T cell count attained after stable highly-active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) with glucose metabolism in hyperrtriglyceridemic HIV patients without a history of diabetes. Methods Demographic, anthropometric, clinical, endocrinologic, energy expenditure and metabolic measures were obtained in 199 multiethnic, healthy but hypertriglyceridemic HIV-infected patients [46% Hispanic, 17% African-American, 37% Non-Hispanic White (NHW)] on stable HAART without a history of diabetes. The relationship of glucose and insulin responses to ethnicity, CD4 strata (low (<300/cc) or moderate-to-high (≥ 300/cc)), and their interaction was determined. Results African-Americans had significantly greater impairment of glucose tolerance (P < 0.05) and HbA1c levels (P < .001) than either Hispanics or NHWs. In multivariate models, after adjusting for confounders (age, sex, HIV/HAART duration, smoking, obesity, glucose, insulin and lipids), African-Americans and Hispanics had significantly higher HbA1c and 2-hour glucose levels than NHW’s. Demonstrating a significant interaction between ethnicity and CD4 count (P = 0.023), African Americans with CD4 <300/cc and Hispanics with CD4 ≥300/cc had the most impaired glucose response following oral glucose challenge. Conclusions Among hypertriglyceridemic HIV patients on HAART, African-Americans and Hispanics are at increased risk of developing diabetes. Ethnicity also interacts with CD4+ T cell count attained on stable HAART to affect post-challenge glycemic response. PMID:23607267

  16. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  17. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  18. Math Strategies You Can Count On: Tools & Activities to Build Math Appreciation, Understanding & Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsten, Char

    2005-01-01

    This book offers classroom-tested activities designed to make even the most reluctant learners crazy about math. Appealing to everyone from sports fans to readers, future fashion designers to budding musicians, the activities presented in this book offer ways to develop a deep-rooted love and appreciation of math in every student. Teachers are…

  19. Narrative increases step counts during active video game play among children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Active video games (AVGs) capable of inducing physical activity (PA) level offer a novel alternative to child obesity. Unfortunately, children's motivation to play AVG decreases quickly, underscoring the need to find new methods to maintain their engagement. According to narrative transportation th...

  20. Validation of the Actical Accelerometer in Multiethnic Preschoolers: The Children's Healthy Living (CHL) Program

    PubMed Central

    Ettienne, Reynolette; Li, Fenfang; Su, Yuhua; McGlone, Katalina; Luick, Bret; Tachibana, Alvin; Carran, Christina; Mercado, Jobel; Novotny, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the Actical accelerometer for measuring physical activity (PA) in preschool children of mixed ethnicity, compared with direct observation via a modified System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) protocol and proxy parental reports (PA Logs). Fifty children in Hawai‘i wore wrist-mounted accelerometers for two 7-day periods with a washout period between each week. Thirty children were concurrently observed using SOFIT. Parents completed PA Logs for three days. Reliability and validity were measured by intra-class correlation coefficient and proportions of agreement concurrently. There was slight agreement (proportion of agreement: 82%; weighted Kappa=.17, P <.001) between the accelerometer and SOFIT as well as between the accelerometer and the PA Logs (proportions of agreement: 40%; weighted Kappa=0.15, P <.001). PA logs underestimated the PA levels of the children, while the Actical was found to be valid and reliable for estimating PA levels of multiethnic, mixed ethnicity preschoolers. These findings suggest that accelerometers can be objective, valid, and accurate physical activity assessment tools compared to conventional PA logs and subjective reports of activity for preschool children of mixed ethnicity. PMID:27099804

  1. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  2. Size counts: evolutionary perspectives on physical activity and body size from early hominids to modern humans.

    PubMed

    Leonard, William R

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines the evolutionary origins of human dietary and activity patterns, and their implications for understanding modern health problems. Humans have evolved distinctive nutritional characteristics associated the high metabolic costs of our large brains. The evolution of larger hominid brain size necessitated the adoption of foraging strategies that both provided high quality foods, and required larger ranges and activity budgets. Over time, human subsistence strategies have become ever more efficient in obtaining energy with minimal time and effort. Today, populations of the industrialized world live in environments characterized by low levels of energy expenditure and abundant food supplies contributing to growing rates of obesity. Analyses of trends in dietary intake and body weight in the US over the last 50 years indicate that the dramatic rise in obesity cannot be explained solely by increased energy consumption. Rather, declines in activity are also important. Further, we find that recent recommendations on physical activity have the potential to bring daily energy expenditure levels of industrialized societies surprisingly close to those observed among subsistence-level populations. These findings highlight the importance of physical activity in promoting nutritional health and show the utility of evolutionary approaches for developing public health recommendations.

  3. Dual Accelerometer Usage Strategy for Onboard Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, Renato; D'Souza, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a dual accelerometer usage strategy for onboard space navigation. In the proposed algorithm the accelerometer is used to propagate the state when its value exceeds a threshold and it is used to estimate its errors otherwise. Numerical examples and comparison to other accelerometer usage schemes are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  4. Three-axis MEMS Accelerometer for Structural Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbin, E.; Koleda, A.; Nesterenko, T.; Vtorushin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system accelerometers are widely used for metrological measurements of acceleration, tilt, vibration, and shock in moving objects. The paper presents the analysis of MEMS accelerometer that can be used for the structural inspection. ANSYS Multiphysics platform is used to simulate the behavior of MEMS accelerometer by employing a finite element model and MATLAB/Simulink tools for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems.

  5. A novel piezoresistive polymer nanocomposite MEMS accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seena, V.; Hari, K.; Prajakta, S.; Pratap, Rudra; Ramgopal Rao, V.

    2017-01-01

    A novel polymer MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) accelerometer with photo-patternable polymer nanocomposite as a piezoresistor is presented in this work. Polymer MEMS Accelerometer with beam thicknesses of 3.3 µm and embedded nanocomposite piezoresistive layer having a gauge factor of 90 were fabricated. The photosensitive nanocomposite samples were prepared and characterized for analyzing the mechanical and electrical properties and thereby ensuring proper process parameters for incorporating the piezoresistive layer into the polymer MEMS accelerometer. The microfabrication process flow and unit processes followed are extremely low cost with process temperatures below 100 °C. This also opens up a new possibility for easy integration of such polymer MEMS with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) devices and circuits. The fabricated devices were characterized using laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) and the devices exhibited a resonant frequency of 10.8 kHz and a response sensitivity of 280 nm g-1 at resonance. The main focus of this paper is on the SU-8/CB nanocomposite piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer technology development which covers the material and the fabrication aspects of these devices. CoventorWare FEA analysis performed using the extracted material properties from the experimental characterization which are in close agreement to performance parameters of the fabricated devices is also discussed. The simulated piezoresistive polymer MEMS devices showed an acceleration sensitivity of 126 nm g-1 and 82 ppm of ΔR/R per 1 g of acceleration.

  6. Micro-Accelerometers Monitor Equipment Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Evigia Systems to develop a miniaturized accelerometer to account for gravitational effects in space experiments. The company has gone on to implement the technology in its suite of prognostic sensors, which are used to monitor the integrity of industrial machinery. As a result, five employees have been hired.

  7. Low-Cost Accelerometers for Physics Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Straulino, Samuele

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of a modern game-console controller as a data acquisition interface for physics experiments is discussed. The investigated controller is equipped with three perpendicular accelerometers and a built-in infrared camera to evaluate its own relative position. A pendulum experiment is realized as a demonstration of the proposed…

  8. Time Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time -Domain Switched Accelerometer Design and Fabrication Paul Swanson Andrew Wang...Approved for public release. SSC Pacific San Diego, CA 92152-5001 TECHNICAL REPORT 2052 September 2014 Time ...objective of this report is to record the decision-making process for developing the device design and fabrication workflow for the time -domain switched

  9. Accelerometer-controlled automatic braking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Sleeper, R. K.; Nayadley, J. R., Sr.

    1973-01-01

    Braking system, which employs angular accelerometer to control wheel braking and results in low level of tire slip, has been developed and tested. Tests indicate that system is feasible for operations on surfaces of different slipperinesses. System restricts tire slip and is capable of adapting to rapidly-changing surface conditions.

  10. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  11. What Counts as Student Voice in Active Citizenship Case Studies? Education for Citizenship in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Hamish; Munn, Pamela; Brown, Jane

    2007-01-01

    We analyse a teacher-to-teacher discourse (14 web-published case studies) concerning "participation as citizenship" in schools. Many different mechanisms through which pupils participate are reported (from school councils to paired-reading schemes and community links). The claimed outcomes of these activities are also varied: improving…

  12. Self diagnostic accelerometer ground testing on a C-17 aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDA's flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  13. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Ground Testing on a C-17 Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  14. A new cell counting method to evaluate anti-tumor compound activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Jian; Zhang, Xiu-Rong; Zhang, Lei; Li, Qing-Hua; Wang, Lin; Shi, Li-Hong; Fang, Chun-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Determining cell quantity is a common problem in cytology research and anti-tumor drug development. A simple and low-cost method was developed to determine monolayer and adherent-growth cell quantities. The cell nucleus is located in the cytoplasm, and is independent. Thus, the nucleus cannot make contact even if the cell density is heavy. This phenomenon is the foundation of accurate cell-nucleus recognition. The cell nucleus is easily recognizable in images after fluorescent staining because it is independent. A one-to-one relationship exists between the nucleus and the cell; therefore, this method can be used to determine the quantity of proliferating cells. Results indicated that the activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor Z1 was effective after this method was used. The nude-mouse xenograft model also revealed the potent anti-tumor activity of Z1. This research presents a new anti-tumor-drug evaluation method.

  15. Affective regulation of stereotype activation: It’s the (accessible) thought that counts

    PubMed Central

    Huntsinger, Jeffrey R.; Sinclair, Stacey; Dunn, Elizabeth; Clore, Gerald L.

    2010-01-01

    Extant research demonstrates that positive affect, compared to negative affect, increases stereotyping. In four experiments we explore whether the link between affect and stereotyping depends, critically, on the relative accessibility of stereotype-relevant thoughts and response tendencies. As well as manipulating mood, we measured or manipulated the accessibility of egalitarian response tendencies (Experiments 1-2) and counter-stereotypic thoughts (Experiments 3-4). In the absence of such response tendencies and thoughts, people in positive moods displayed greater stereotype activation —consistent with past research. By contrast, in the presence of accessible egalitarian response tendencies or counter-stereotypic thoughts, people in positive moods exhibited less stereotype activation than those in negative moods. PMID:20363909

  16. Both associative activation and thematic extraction count, but thematic false memories are more easily rejected.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Paula; Garcia-Marques, Leonel; Fernandez, Angel; Albuquerque, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyse the roles played by associative activation and thematic extraction in the explanation of false memories using the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Associative lists with two different types of critical items (CIs) were used: one, the associative CI, corresponded to the word most strongly primed by the associates in the list and another, the thematic CI, was the word that best described the theme of the list. Following three different types of encoding instructions (standard, warning or strategic), false recognition for these two types of CIs was analysed in either self-paced or speeded response recognition tests. The results showed considerable levels of false memories for both types of CIs. Even without the quality of being "good themes", associative CIs produced high levels of false recognition, which suggests that associative activation plays a prominent role in false memory formation. More interestingly, thematic CIs were more prone to be edited out, reinforcing the argument that thematic identifiability has a major role in the rejection of false memories.

  17. Effect of intramammary injection of rboGM-CSF on milk levels of chemiluminescence activity, somatic cell count, and Staphylococcus aureus count in Holstein cows with S. aureus subclinical mastitis

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The effect of intramammary injection of recombinant bovine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rboGM-CSF, 400 μg/10 mL) on quarter milk levels of chemiluminescence (CL) activity, and somatic cell count (SCC) and shedding pattern of Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. Ten Holstein cows, naturally infected with S. aureus were used, with either early-stage or late-stage subclinical mastitis. Injection of rboGM-CSF caused a remarkable increase in milk CL activity with a peak at 6 h after the cytokine injection in the early- and late-stage groups. In the early-stage group, milk SCC stayed around preinjection level at 6 h, rose significantly on days 1 and 2, and was followed by a smooth and significant decline to an under preinjection level (below 200 000 cells/mL) on day 7 postinjection. Alternatively, in the late-stage group, milk SCC rose significantly at 6 h after the cytokine injection and maintained high levels thereafter. The milk S. aureus count decreased drastically by the cytokine injection in the early-stage group. The bacterial count was moderately decreased in the late-stage group, but increased back to preinoculation levels on day 7 after the cytokine injection. The results suggest that the rboGM-CSF has a potential as a therapeutic agent for S. aureus infection causing subclinical mastitis of dairy cows, if the cytokine is applied at the initial stage of infection. PMID:15352542

  18. Establishing school day pedometer step count cut-points using ROC curves in low-income children.

    PubMed

    Burns, Ryan D; Brusseau, Timothy A; Fu, You; Hannon, James C

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has not established pedometer step count cut-points that discriminate children that meet school day physical activity recommendations using a tri-axial ActiGraph accelerometer criterion. The purpose of this study was to determine step count cut-points that associate with 30min of school day moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in school-aged children. Participants included 1053 school-aged children (mean age=8.4±1.8years) recruited from three low-income schools from the state of Utah in the U.S. Physical activity was assessed using Yamax DigiWalker CW600 pedometers and ActiGraph wGT3X-BT triaxial accelerometers that were concurrently worn during school hours. Data were collected at each school during the 2014-2015 school year. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine pedometer step count cut-points that associated with at least 30min of MVPA during school hours. Cut-points were determined using the maximum Youden's J statistic (J max). For the total sample, the area-under-the-curve (AUC) was 0.77 (p<0.001) with a pedometer cut-point of 5505 steps (J max=0.46, Sensitivity=63%, Specificity=84%; Accuracy=76%). Step counts showed greater diagnostic ability in girls (AUC=0.81, p<0.001; Cut-point=5306 steps; Accuracy=78.8%) compared to boys (AUC=0.72, p<0.01; Cut-point=5786 steps; Accuracy=71.4%). Pedometer step counts showed good diagnostic ability in girls and fair diagnostic ability in boys for discriminating children that met at least 30min of MVPA during school hours.

  19. Comparing the 7-Day PAR with a Triaxial Accelerometer for Measuring Time in Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, Richard; Snyder, Denise Clutter; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Lobach, David; Kraus, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary study aim was to evaluate associations of estimated weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise from self-reports of the telephone-administered 7-Day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) with data captured by the RT3 triaxial accelerometer. Methods This investigation was undertaken as part of the FRESH START study, a randomized clinical trial that tested an iteratively-tailored diet and exercise mailed print intervention among newly diagnosed breast and prostate cancer survivors. A convenience sample of 139 medically-eligible subjects living within a 60-mile radius of the study center provided both 7-Day PAR and accelerometer data at enrollment. Ultimately n=115 substudy subjects were found eligible for the FRESH START study and randomized to one of two study treatment arms. Follow-up assessments at Year 1 (n=103) and Year 2 (n=99) provided both the 7-Day PAR and accelerometer data. Results There was moderate agreement between the 7-Day PAR and the accelerometer with longitudinal serial correlation coefficients of .54 (baseline), .24 (Year 1) and .53 (Year 2), all P-values < .01, though the accelerometer estimates for weekly time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were much higher than those of the 7-Day PAR at all time points. The two methods were poorly correlated in assessing sensitivity to change from baseline to Year 1 (rho=.11, P=.30). Using mixed models repeated measures analysis, both methods exhibited similar non-significant treatment arm X time interaction P-values (7-Day PAR=.22, accelerometer=.23). Conclusions The correlations for three serial time points were in agreement with findings of other studies that compared self-reported time in exercise with physical activity captured by accelerometry. However, these methods capture somewhat different dimensions of physical activity and provide differing estimates of change over time. PMID:19461530

  20. Robust Optimization of a MEMS Accelerometer Considering Temperature Variations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjun; Yang, Feng; Bao, Xiaofan; Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A robust optimization approach for a MEMS accelerometer to minimize the effects of temperature variations is presented. The mathematical model of the accelerometer is built. The effects of temperature variations on the output performance of the accelerometer are determined, and thermal deformation of the accelerometer is analyzed. The deviations of the output capacitance and resonance frequency due to temperature fluctuations are calculated and discussed. The sensitivity analysis method is employed to determine the design variables for robust optimization and find out the key structural parameters that have most significant influence on the output capacitance and resonance frequency of the accelerometer. The mathematical model and procedure for the robust optimization of the accelerometer are proposed. The robust optimization problem is solved and discussed. The robust optimization results show that an optimized accelerometer with high sensitivity, high temperature robustness and decoupling structure is finally obtained. PMID:25785308

  1. Feasibility study of ZnO nanowire made accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Chan; Ko, Hyun-U.; Song, Sangho; Yun, Youngmin; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    Vertically aligned arrays of ZnO nanowire can be used for many applications such as energy harvesters, UV sensors and mechanical sensors. Here we report the feasibility of a miniaturized accelerometer made with ZnO nanowire. For improving the sensitivity of miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer, size of piezoelectric ceramic should be large which results in heavy accelerometer and low resonance frequency. To resolve the problem for the miniaturized accelerometer fabrication, ZnO nanowire is chosen. ZnO nanowire, which has piezoelectric property with Wurtzite structure. Since it has high aspect ratio, the use of ZnO nanowire leads to increase deformation and piezoelectric response output. The vertically ZnO nanowire array is grown on a copper substrate by hydrothermal synthesis process. Detail Fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. To prove the feasibility of the fabricated accelerometer, dynamic response test is performed in comparison with a commercial accelerometer.

  2. [Accreditation of a hygiene hospital laboratory for sampling and analysis activities for the detection and counting of Legionella in water].

    PubMed

    Lecointe, Didier; Noël, Coralie; Beauvais, Raphaëlle; Descaves, Carole; Gouot, Armelle; Bourgeois, Sandrine; Koutcherenko, Stéphane; Kassidi, Noura

    2015-01-01

    Since January 1(st) 2012, detection and counting of Legionella bacteria have been obligatory in France and must be carried out by COFRAC-accredited laboratories. In our establishment, sampling and analysis were outsourced and our hospital was scheduled to move to a new site. We aimed to develop both these activities in-house and to obtain COFRAC accreditation, whilst organizing the move to the new site. We set up a quality assurance system bringing together staff from the hygiene laboratory and institutional resource managers. We set up sampling and analysis activities in-house 13 months before requesting accreditation. The initial evaluation took place before we moved and identified 17 areas of deficiency, six of which were considered critical. After we had moved, a subsequent evaluation considered 14 of these deficiencies to have been corrected, included the six initially identified as critical. We were therefore awarded accreditation. The quality assurance system established during the year before our request was submitted led to accreditation two and a half years after the transfer in-house of sampling and analysis activities, despite our hospital moving during this period.

  3. Counting the costs of accreditation in acute care: an activity-based costing approach

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Virginia; Greenfield, David; Hogden, Anne; Forde, Kevin; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the costs of hospital accreditation in Australia. Design Mixed methods design incorporating: stakeholder analysis; survey design and implementation; activity-based costs analysis; and expert panel review. Setting Acute care hospitals accredited by the Australian Council for Health Care Standards. Participants Six acute public hospitals across four States. Results Accreditation costs varied from 0.03% to 0.60% of total hospital operating costs per year, averaged across the 4-year accreditation cycle. Relatively higher costs were associated with the surveys years and with smaller facilities. At a national level these costs translate to $A36.83 million, equivalent to 0.1% of acute public hospital recurrent expenditure in the 2012 fiscal year. Conclusions This is the first time accreditation costs have been independently evaluated across a wide range of hospitals and highlights the additional cost burden for smaller facilities. A better understanding of the costs allows policymakers to assess alternative accreditation and other quality improvement strategies, and understand their impact across a range of facilities. This methodology can be adapted to assess international accreditation programmes. PMID:26351190

  4. Equating accelerometer estimates among youth: the Rosetta Stone 2

    PubMed Central

    Brazendale, Keith; Beets, Michael W.; Bornstein, Daniel B.; Moore, Justin B.; Pate, Russell R.; Weaver, Robert G.; Falck, Ryan S.; Chandler, Jessica L.; Andersen, Lars B.; Anderssen, Sigmund A.; Cardon, Greet; Cooper, Ashley; Davey, Rachel; Froberg, Karsten; Hallal, Pedro C.; Janz, Kathleen F.; Kordas, Katarzyna; Kriemler, Susi; Puder, Jardena J.; Reilly, John J.; Salmon, Jo; Sardinha, Luis B.; Timperio, Anna; van Sluijs, Esther MF

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Different accelerometer cutpoints used by different researchers often yields vastly different estimates of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA). This is recognized as cutpoint non-equivalence (CNE), which reduces the ability to accurately compare youth MVPA across studies. The objective of this research is to develop a cutpoint conversion system that standardizes minutes of MVPA for six different sets of published cutpoints. Design Secondary data analysis Methods Data from the International Children’s Accelerometer Database (ICAD; Spring 2014) consisting of 43,112 Actigraph accelerometer data files from 21 worldwide studies (children 3-18 years, 61.5% female) were used to develop prediction equations for six sets of published cutpoints. Linear and non-linear modeling, using a leave one out cross-validation technique, was employed to develop equations to convert MVPA from one set of cutpoints into another. Bland Altman plots illustrate the agreement between actual MVPA and predicted MVPA values. Results Across the total sample, mean MVPA ranged from 29.7 MVPA min.d-1 (Puyau) to 126.1 MVPA min.d-1 (Freedson 3 METs). Across conversion equations, median absolute percent error was 12.6% (range: 1.3 to 30.1) and the proportion of variance explained ranged from 66.7% to 99.8%. Mean difference for the best performing prediction equation (VC from EV) was -0.110 min.d-1 (limits of agreement (LOA), -2.623 to 2.402). The mean difference for the worst performing prediction equation (FR3 from PY) was 34.76 min.d-1 (LOA, -60.392 to 129.910). Conclusions For six different sets of published cutpoints, the use of this equating system can assist individuals attempting to synthesize the growing body of literature on Actigraph, accelerometry-derived MVPA. PMID:25747468

  5. Do not hesitate to use Tversky-and other hints for successful active analogue searches with feature count descriptors.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Varnek, Alexandre

    2013-07-22

    This study is an exhaustive analysis of the neighborhood behavior over a large coherent data set (ChEMBL target/ligand pairs of known Ki, for 165 targets with >50 associated ligands each). It focuses on similarity-based virtual screening (SVS) success defined by the ascertained optimality index. This is a weighted compromise between purity and retrieval rate of active hits in the neighborhood of an active query. One key issue addressed here is the impact of Tversky asymmetric weighing of query vs candidate features (represented as integer-value ISIDA colored fragment/pharmacophore triplet count descriptor vectors). The nearly a 3/4 million independent SVS runs showed that Tversky scores with a strong bias in favor of query-specific features are, by far, the most successful and the least failure-prone out of a set of nine other dissimilarity scores. These include classical Tanimoto, which failed to defend its privileged status in practical SVS applications. Tversky performance is not significantly conditioned by tuning of its bias parameter α. Both initial "guesses" of α = 0.9 and 0.7 were more successful than Tanimoto (at its turn, better than Euclid). Tversky was eventually tested in exhaustive similarity searching within the library of 1.6 M commercial + bioactive molecules at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html , comparing favorably to Tanimoto in terms of "scaffold hopping" propensity. Therefore, it should be used at least as often as, perhaps in parallel to Tanimoto in SVS. Analysis with respect to query subclasses highlighted relationships of query complexity (simply expressed in terms of pharmacophore pattern counts) and/or target nature vs SVS success likelihood. SVS using more complex queries are more robust with respect to the choice of their operational premises (descriptors, metric). Yet, they are best handled by "pro-query" Tversky scores at α > 0.5. Among simpler queries, one may distinguish between "growable" (allowing for active

  6. The development of the disease activity score (DAS) and the disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28).

    PubMed

    van Riel, P L C M

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity cannot be measured using a single variable. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) has been developed as a quantitative index to be able to measure, study and manage disease activity in RA in daily clinical practice, clinical trials, and long term observational studies. The DAS is a continuous measure of RA disease activity that combines information from swollen joints, tender joints, acute phase response and patient self-report of general health. Cut points were developed to classify patients in remission, as well as low, moderate, and severe disease activity in the 1990s. DAS-based EULAR response criteria were primarily developed to be used in clinical trials to classify individual patients as non-, moderate, or good responders, depending on the magnitude of change and absolute level of disease activity at the conclusion of the test.

  7. Reticulocyte Count Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reticulocyte Count Related tests: Red Blood Cell Count ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Blood Smear ; Erythropoietin ; Vitamin ... on a complete blood count (CBC) , RBC count , hemoglobin or hematocrit , to help determine the cause To ...

  8. A mechanical filter for FBG accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocciolone, Marco; Bucca, Giuseppe; Collina, Andrea; Comolli, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Many applications are characterized by very severe environment from the sensors point of view. An example is the railway field, where often the measurement setup is subjected to high voltage and electromagnetic emission. In these work conditions, optical sensors are more suitable than electrical ones due to their characteristics. In this paper, the acceleration measurements are taken into account. Nowadays many optical accelerometers are present on the market. In particular, in this work FBG accelerometers are considered. This kind of sensors is characterized by an undamped resonance that can produce the break of the sensor. One possibility to avoid this problem is to add a damping effect in order to reduce the resonance amplification. In the following section, the method to reproduce a mechanical filter able to increase the damping coefficient of the sensor is presented. Experimental results in laboratory will be discussed, showing the effectiveness of the solution.

  9. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-04-13

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods.

  10. Multi-Axis Accelerometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom; Parker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A low-cost, portable, and simplified system has been developed that is suitable for in-situ calibration and/or evaluation of multi-axis inertial measurement instruments. This system overcomes facility restrictions and maintains or improves the calibration quality for users of accelerometer-based instruments with applications in avionics, experimental wind tunnel research, and force balance calibration applications. The apparatus quickly and easily positions a multi-axis accelerometer system into a precisely known orientation suitable for in-situ quality checks and calibration. In addition, the system incorporates powerful and sophisticated statistical methods, known as response surface methodology and statistical quality control. These methods improve calibration quality, reduce calibration time, and allow for increased calibration frequency, which enables the monitoring of instrument stability over time.

  11. Dark matter direct detection with accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.

    2016-04-01

    The mass of the dark matter particle is unknown, and may be as low as ˜1 0-22 eV . The lighter part of this range, below ˜eV , is relatively unexplored both theoretically and experimentally but contains an array of natural dark matter candidates. An example is the relaxion, a light boson predicted by cosmological solutions to the hierarchy problem. One of the few generic signals such light dark matter can produce is a time-oscillating, equivalence-principle-violating force. We propose searches for this using accelerometers, and consider in detail the examples of torsion balances, atom interferometry, and pulsar timing. These approaches have the potential to probe large parts of unexplored parameter space in the next several years. Thus such accelerometers provide radically new avenues for the direct detection of dark matter.

  12. MGRA: Motion Gesture Recognition via Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Feng; You, Shujuan; Wei, Meiyu; Zhang, Yongtuo; Guo, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers have been widely embedded in most current mobile devices, enabling easy and intuitive operations. This paper proposes a Motion Gesture Recognition system (MGRA) based on accelerometer data only, which is entirely implemented on mobile devices and can provide users with real-time interactions. A robust and unique feature set is enumerated through the time domain, the frequency domain and singular value decomposition analysis using our motion gesture set containing 11,110 traces. The best feature vector for classification is selected, taking both static and mobile scenarios into consideration. MGRA exploits support vector machine as the classifier with the best feature vector. Evaluations confirm that MGRA can accommodate a broad set of gesture variations within each class, including execution time, amplitude and non-gestural movement. Extensive evaluations confirm that MGRA achieves higher accuracy under both static and mobile scenarios and costs less computation time and energy on an LG Nexus 5 than previous methods. PMID:27089336

  13. Physical activity in physical education: teacher or technology effects.

    PubMed

    Grissom, Traci; Ward, Phillip; Martin, Beth; Leenders, Nicole Y J M

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed if wearing a heart rate monitor influenced student activity levels in elementary physical education. Data were analyzed for 4 students using an alternating treatment design to assess differential effects between accelerometer activity counts obtained from students when wearing the heart rate monitor and when they were not wearing the monitor. Results show that (a) there was no difference in activity counts between the 2 conditions, (b) boys had higher means than girls, and (c) the variance between more and less active boys was greater than the variance among the girls.

  14. The GRADIO accelerometer - Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.; Touboul, P.

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry based on differential microaccelerometry has been proposed by ONERA in the early eighties. Since 1986, an important effort is devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers. Their configuration has been optimized for the ARISTOTELES mission with the objective of 0.01 Eotvos resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. The achieved resolution, better than 10 exp -9 G, is limited by the actual stability of alignments on the testing equipment.

  15. A novel differential optical fiber accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shaohua; Zhao, Jiang; Hong, Guangwei; Jia, Bo

    2013-08-01

    The development of sensitive fiber-optic accelerometers is a subject of continuing interest. To acquire high resolution, Michelson phase interferometric techniques are widely adopted. Among the variety structures, the compliant cylinder approach is particularly attractive due to its high sensitivity that is defined as the induced phase shift per applied acceleration. While the two arms of Michelson interferometer should be at the same optical path, it is inconvenient to adjust the two arms' length to equal, also the polarization instability and phase random drift will cause a signal decline. To overcome these limitations, a novel optical fiber accelerometer based on differential interferometric techniques is proposed and investigated. The interferometer is a Sagnac-like white light interferometer, which means the bandwidth of laser spectrum can be as wide as tens nanometers. This interferometer was firstly reported by Levin in 1990s. Lights are divided to two paths before entering the coupler. To induce time difference, one passes through a delay arm and another goes a direct arm. After modulated by the sensing component, they reflect to opposite arm. The sensing part is formed by a seismic mass that is held to only one compliant cylinder, where the single-mode optical fiber is wrapped tightly. When sticking to vibrations, the cylinder compresses or stretches as a spring. The corresponding changes in cylinder circumference lead to strain in the sensing fibers, which is detected as an optical phase shift by the interferometer. The lights from two arms reach the vibration source at different time, sensing a different accelerate speed; produce a different optic path difference. Integrating the dissimilarity of the accelerated speed by time can obtain the total acceleration graph. A shaker's vibration has been tested by the proposed accelerometer referring to a standard piezoelectric accelerometer. A 99.8% linearity of the optical phase shift to the ground acceleration

  16. High performance MEMS accelerometers for concrete SHM applications and comparison with COTS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, S.; Joseph Daniel, R.; Sumangala, K.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometers used for civil and huge mechanical structural health monitoring intend to measure the shift in the natural frequency of the monitored structures (<100 Hz) and such sensors should have large sensitivity and extremely low noise floor. Sensitivity of accelerometers is inversely proportional to the frequency squared. Commercial MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System) accelerometers that are generally designed for large bandwidth (e.g 25 kHz in ADXL150) have poor sensor level sensitivity and therefore uses complex signal conditioning electronics to achieve large sensitivity and low noise floor which in turn results in higher cost. In this work, an attempt has been made to design MEMS capacitive and piezoresistive accelerometers for smaller bandwidth using IntelliSuite and CoventorWare MEMS tools respectively. The various performance metrics have been obtained using simulation experiments and the results show that these sensors have excellent voltage sensitivity, noise performance and high resolution at sensor level and are even superior to commercial MEMS accelerometers.

  17. Accelerometer Data Analysis and Presentation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project analyzes Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data for principal investigators of microgravity experiments. Principal investigators need a thorough understanding of data analysis techniques so that they can request appropriate analyses to best interpret accelerometer data. Accelerometer data sampling and filtering is introduced along with the related topics of resolution and aliasing. Specific information about the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement System data sampling and filtering is given. Time domain data analysis techniques are discussed and example environment interpretations are made using plots of acceleration versus time, interval average acceleration versus time, interval root-mean-square acceleration versus time, trimmean acceleration versus time, quasi-steady three dimensional histograms, and prediction of quasi-steady levels at different locations. An introduction to Fourier transform theory and windowing is provided along with specific analysis techniques and data interpretations. The frequency domain analyses discussed are power spectral density versus frequency, cumulative root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, one-third octave band root-mean-square acceleration versus frequency, and power spectral density versus frequency versus time (spectrogram). Instructions for accessing NASA Lewis Research Center accelerometer data and related information using the internet are provided.

  18. Effects of image noise, respiratory motion, and motion compensation on 3D activity quantification in count-limited PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman, W.; Mawlawi, O. R.; Mikell, J. K.; Mourtada, F.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of noise, motion blur, and motion compensation using quiescent-period gating (QPG) on the activity concentration (AC) distribution—quantified using the cumulative AC volume histogram (ACVH)—in count-limited studies such as 90Y-PET/CT. An International Electrotechnical Commission phantom filled with low 18F activity was used to simulate clinical 90Y-PET images. PET data were acquired using a GE-D690 when the phantom was static and subject to 1-4 cm periodic 1D motion. The static data were down-sampled into shorter durations to determine the effect of noise on ACVH. Motion-degraded PET data were sorted into multiple gates to assess the effect of motion and QPG on ACVH. Errors in ACVH at AC90 (minimum AC that covers 90% of the volume of interest (VOI)), AC80, and ACmean (average AC in the VOI) were characterized as a function of noise and amplitude before and after QPG. Scan-time reduction increased the apparent non-uniformity of sphere doses and the dispersion of ACVH. These effects were more pronounced in smaller spheres. Noise-related errors in ACVH at AC20 to AC70 were smaller (<15%) compared to the errors between AC80 to AC90 (>15%). The accuracy of ACmean was largely independent of the total count. Motion decreased the observed AC and skewed the ACVH toward lower values; the severity of this effect depended on motion amplitude and tumor diameter. The errors in AC20 to AC80 for the 17 mm sphere were  -25% and  -55% for motion amplitudes of 2 cm and 4 cm, respectively. With QPG, the errors in AC20 to AC80 of the 17 mm sphere were reduced to  -15% for motion amplitudes  <4 cm. For spheres with motion amplitude to diameter ratio  >0.5, QPG was effective at reducing errors in ACVH despite increases in image non-uniformity due to increased noise. ACVH is believed to be more relevant than mean or maximum AC to calculate tumor control and normal tissue complication probability

  19. A new type of tri-axial accelerometers with high dynamic range MEMS for earthquake early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chaoyong; Chen, Yang; Chen, Quansheng; Yang, Jiansi; Wang, Hongti; Zhu, Xiaoyi; Xu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Earthquake Early Warning System (EEWS) has shown its efficiency for earthquake damage mitigation. As the progress of low-cost Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS), many types of MEMS-based accelerometers have been developed and widely used in deploying large-scale, dense seismic networks for EEWS. However, the noise performance of these commercially available MEMS is still insufficient for weak seismic signals, leading to the large scatter of early-warning parameters estimation. In this study, we developed a new type of tri-axial accelerometer based on high dynamic range MEMS with low noise level using for EEWS. It is a MEMS-integrated data logger with built-in seismological processing. The device is built on a custom-tailored Linux 2.6.27 operating system and the method for automatic detecting seismic events is STA/LTA algorithms. When a seismic event is detected, peak ground parameters of all data components will be calculated at an interval of 1 s, and τc-Pd values will be evaluated using the initial 3 s of P wave. These values will then be organized as a trigger packet actively sent to the processing center for event combining detection. The output data of all three components are calibrated to sensitivity 500 counts/cm/s2. Several tests and a real field test deployment were performed to obtain the performances of this device. The results show that the dynamic range can reach 98 dB for the vertical component and 99 dB for the horizontal components, and majority of bias temperature coefficients are lower than 200 μg/°C. In addition, the results of event detection and real field deployment have shown its capabilities for EEWS and rapid intensity reporting.

  20. What Is the Effect on Obesity Indicators from Replacing Prolonged Sedentary Time with Brief Sedentary Bouts, Standing and Different Types of Physical Activity during Working Days? A Cross-Sectional Accelerometer-Based Study among Blue-Collar Workers

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Aadahl, Mette; Korshøj, Mette; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Holtermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to investigate if (a) substituting total sedentary time or long sedentary bouts with standing or various types of physical activity and (b) substituting long sedentary bouts with brief sedentary bouts; is associated with obesity indicators using a cross sectional isotemporal substitution approach among blue-collar workers. Methods A total of 692 workers from transportation, manufacturing and cleaning sectors wore an Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer on the thigh for 1–4 working days. The sedentary (sit and lie), standing, walking, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) time on working days was computed using validated Acti4 software. The total sedentary time and uninterrupted sedentary time spent in brief (≤5 mins), moderate (>5 and ≤30 mins), and long (>30mins) bouts, were determined for the whole day and during work and non-work time separately. The obesity indicators, BMI (kg/m2), waist circumference (cm) and fat percentage were objectively measured. Isotemporal substitution modelling was utilized to determine the linear association with obesity indicators of replacing 30 min of total sedentary time or long sedentary bouts with standing, walking or MVPA and separately replacing 30 min of long sedentary bouts with brief sedentary bouts. Results Workers [mean (standard deviation, SD); age = 45.1 (9.9) years, BMI = 27.5 (4.9) kg/m2, %BF = 29.6 (9.5), waist circumference = 94.4 (13.0) cm] sat for 2.4 hours (~32% of the measured time, SD = 1.8 hours) across the day during work period and 5.5 hours (~62% of the measured time, SD = 1.5 hours) during non-work period. Most of the sedentary time was accrued in moderate bouts [work = 1.40 (SD = 1.09) hours] during work and in long bouts during non-work [2.7 (SD = 1.4) hours], while least in long sedentary bouts during work [work = 0.5 (SD = 0.9)] and in brief sedentary bouts [0.5 hours (SD = 0.3)] during non-work. Significant associations with all obesity indicators were

  1. Measurement of whole body cellular and collagen nitrogen, potassium, and other elements by neutron activation and whole body counting

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.M.; Fabricius, P.J.; Dykes, P.W.

    1987-09-01

    Whole body nitrogen can be measured by neutron activation analysis with an acceptable radiation dose; it is an index of body protein which, in normal subjects, is 65% cellular protein and 35% extracellular connective collagen. Whole body potassium can be measured by whole body counting without irradiating the subject; it is an index of body cell mass. We measured whole body nitrogen, potassium, extracellular water, intracellular water, and fat-folds. The differences between 37 malnourished patients and five normal subjects suggested that the patients had 9 kg less cell mass than normal, but no difference in extracellular mass. Measurements were made on eight patients before and after 14 days of total parenteral nutrition; balance of nitrogen intake and excretion also was measured. The changes were consistent with mean increases of 3 kg of cellular mass and 3 kg of fat with no change of extracellular mass. The accuracy and sensitivity of the whole body measurements need further confirmation for use in patients with changing body composition. Where tissue wasting is largely from the cellular compartment, potassium could be a more sensitive index of wasting than nitrogen. Multielement analysis of nitrogen, potassium, chlorine, and carbon will probably be valuable in elucidating body composition in malnutrition.

  2. Spectroscopic performance of DEPFET active pixel sensor prototypes suitable for the high count rate Athena WFI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Andritschke, Robert; Bähr, Alexander; Meidinger, Norbert; Ott, Sabine; Richter, Rainer H.; Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Treis, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    The focal plane of the WFI of Athena consists of two sensors. One features a large field of view of 40' X 40' and one is forseen to be used for bright point like sources. Both parts base on DEPFET active pixel sensors. To fulfil the count rate requirement for the smaller sensor of less than 1% pile-up for a one Crab source it has to have a sufficient high frame rate. Since therefore the readout becomes a large fraction of the total photon integration time, the probability of measurements with incomplete signals increases. A shutter would solve the problem of these so called misfits but is not in agreement with the required high throughput of more than 80%. The Infinipix design has implemented a storage in addition to separate the collection and the readout of the charges without discarding them. Its working principle was successfully shown by Bähr et al.1 on single pixel level. For the further development three layout variants were tested on a 32 X 32 pixel array scale. The measurements of the spectroscopic performance show very promising results even for the intended readout speed for the Athena WFI of 2:5 μs per sensor row. Although, there are still layout and technology improvements necessary to ensure the reliability needed for space missions. In this paper we present the measurement results on the comparison of the three prototype layout variants.

  3. Accelerometer measurement of upper extremity movement after stroke: a systematic review of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Noorkõiv, Marika; Rodgers, Helen; Price, Christopher I

    2014-10-09

    The aim of this review was to identify and summarise publications, which have reported clinical applications of upper limb accelerometry for stroke within free-living environments and make recommendations for future studies. Data was searched from MEDLINE, Scopus, IEEExplore and Compendex databases. The final search was 31st October 2013. Any study was included which reported clinical assessments in parallel with accelerometry in a free-living hospital or home setting. Study quality is reflected by participant numbers, methodological approach, technical details of the equipment used, blinding of clinical measures, whether safety and compliance data was collected. First author screened articles for inclusion and inclusion of full text articles and data extraction was confirmed by the third author. Out of 1375 initial abstracts, 8 articles were included. All participants were stroke patients. Accelerometers were worn for either 24 hours or 3 days. Data were collected as summed acceleration counts over a specified time or as the duration of active/inactive periods. Activity in both arms was reported by all studies and the ratio of impaired to unimpaired arm activity was calculated in six studies. The correlation between clinical assessments and accelerometry was tested in five studies and significant correlations were found. The efficacy of a rehabilitation intervention was assessed using accelerometry by three studies: in two studies both accelerometry and clinical test scores detected a post-treatment difference but in one study accelerometry data did not change despite clinical test scores showing motor and functional improvements. Further research is needed to understand the additional value of accelerometry as a measure of upper limb use and function in a clinical context. A simple and easily interpretable accelerometry approach is required.

  4. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair.

    PubMed

    Droogendijk, H; de Boer, M J; Sanders, R G P; Krijnen, G J M

    2014-08-06

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model is presented for the design of the accelerometer, and guidelines are derived to reduce responsivity due to flow-induced contributions to the accelerometer's output. Measurements show that this microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) hair-based accelerometer has a resonance frequency of 320 Hz, a detection threshold of 0.10 ms(-2) and a dynamic range of more than 35 dB. The accelerometer exhibits a clear directional response to external accelerations and a low responsivity to airflow. Further, the accelerometer's physical limits with respect to noise levels are addressed and the possibility for short-term adaptation of the sensor to the environment is discussed.

  5. Comparison and validation of capacitive accelerometers for health care applications.

    PubMed

    Büsching, Felix; Kulau, Ulf; Gietzelt, Matthias; Wolf, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Fall detection, gait analysis and context recognition are examples of applications where capacitive accelerometers are widely used in health care. In most of the existing work, algorithms were developed for a specific platform and accelerometers were used without explicitly choosing a specific type. With this work we present an inexpensive and practical test setup for replicable and repeatable testing of accelerometers. In addition we use this setup to evaluate six of the most commonly available accelerometers today and list their outcomes for linearity, power consumption and correlation of the tested sensors. We also attempt to an answer to the question of whether applications and algorithms developed for one platform and one type of accelerometer can be easily transferred to another accelerometer.

  6. Accelerometers Identify New Behaviors and Show Little Difference in the Activity Budgets of Lactating Northern Fur Seals (Callorhinus ursinus) between Breeding Islands and Foraging Habitats in the Eastern Bering Sea

    PubMed Central

    Battaile, Brian C.; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q.; Nordstrom, Chad A.; Rosen, David A. S.; Trites, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    We tagged 82 lactating northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) with tri-axial accelerometers and magnetometers on two eastern Bering Sea islands (Bogoslof and St. Paul) with contrasting population trajectories. Using depth data, accelerometer data and spectral analysis we classified time spent diving (30%), resting (~7%), shaking and grooming their pelage (9%), swimming in the prone position (~10%) and two types of previously undocumented rolling behavior (29%), with the remaining time (~15%) unspecified. The reason for the extensive rolling behavior is not known. We ground-truthed the accelerometry signals for shaking and grooming and rolling behaviors—and identified the acceleration signal for porpoising—by filming tagged northern fur seals in captivity. Speeds from GPS interpolated data indicated that animals traveled fastest while in the prone position, suggesting that this behavior is indicative of destination-based swimming. Very little difference was found in the percentages of time spent in the categorical behaviors with respect to breeding islands (Bogoslof or St. Paul Island), forager type (cathemeral or nocturnal), and the region where the animals foraged (primarily on-shelf <200m, or off-shelf > 200m). The lack of significant differences between islands, regions and forager type may indicate that behaviors summarized over a trip are somewhat hardwired even though foraging trip length and when and where animals dive are known to vary with island, forager type and region. PMID:25807552

  7. Accelerometers identify new behaviors and show little difference in the activity budgets of lactating northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) between breeding islands and foraging habitats in the eastern Bering Sea.

    PubMed

    Battaile, Brian C; Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Nordstrom, Chad A; Rosen, David A S; Trites, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We tagged 82 lactating northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) with tri-axial accelerometers and magnetometers on two eastern Bering Sea islands (Bogoslof and St. Paul) with contrasting population trajectories. Using depth data, accelerometer data and spectral analysis we classified time spent diving (30%), resting (~7%), shaking and grooming their pelage (9%), swimming in the prone position (~10%) and two types of previously undocumented rolling behavior (29%), with the remaining time (~15%) unspecified. The reason for the extensive rolling behavior is not known. We ground-truthed the accelerometry signals for shaking and grooming and rolling behaviors--and identified the acceleration signal for porpoising--by filming tagged northern fur seals in captivity. Speeds from GPS interpolated data indicated that animals traveled fastest while in the prone position, suggesting that this behavior is indicative of destination-based swimming. Very little difference was found in the percentages of time spent in the categorical behaviors with respect to breeding islands (Bogoslof or St. Paul Island), forager type (cathemeral or nocturnal), and the region where the animals foraged (primarily on-shelf <200 m, or off-shelf > 200 m). The lack of significant differences between islands, regions and forager type may indicate that behaviors summarized over a trip are somewhat hardwired even though foraging trip length and when and where animals dive are known to vary with island, forager type and region.

  8. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  9. Phase space representation of neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field in relation to solar activity in cycles 21 and 22.

    PubMed

    Silva, H G; Lopes, I

    Heliospheric modulation of galactic cosmic rays links solar cycle activity with neutron monitor count rate on earth. A less direct relation holds between neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field because different atmospheric processes, including fluctuations in the ionosphere, are involved. Although a full quantitative model is still lacking, this link is supported by solid statistical evidence. Thus, a connection between the solar cycle activity and atmospheric electric field is expected. To gain a deeper insight into these relations, sunspot area (NOAA, USA), neutron monitor count rate (Climax, Colorado, USA), and atmospheric electric field (Lisbon, Portugal) are presented here in a phase space representation. The period considered covers two solar cycles (21, 22) and extends from 1978 to 1990. Two solar maxima were observed in this dataset, one in 1979 and another in 1989, as well as one solar minimum in 1986. Two main observations of the present study were: (1) similar short-term topological features of the phase space representations of the three variables, (2) a long-term phase space radius synchronization between the solar cycle activity, neutron monitor count rate, and potential gradient (confirmed by absolute correlation values above ~0.8). Finally, the methodology proposed here can be used for obtaining the relations between other atmospheric parameters (e.g., solar radiation) and solar cycle activity.

  10. Phase space representation of neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field in relation to solar activity in cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Lopes, I.

    2016-07-01

    Heliospheric modulation of galactic cosmic rays links solar cycle activity with neutron monitor count rate on earth. A less direct relation holds between neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field because different atmospheric processes, including fluctuations in the ionosphere, are involved. Although a full quantitative model is still lacking, this link is supported by solid statistical evidence. Thus, a connection between the solar cycle activity and atmospheric electric field is expected. To gain a deeper insight into these relations, sunspot area (NOAA, USA), neutron monitor count rate (Climax, Colorado, USA), and atmospheric electric field (Lisbon, Portugal) are presented here in a phase space representation. The period considered covers two solar cycles (21, 22) and extends from 1978 to 1990. Two solar maxima were observed in this dataset, one in 1979 and another in 1989, as well as one solar minimum in 1986. Two main observations of the present study were: (1) similar short-term topological features of the phase space representations of the three variables, (2) a long-term phase space radius synchronization between the solar cycle activity, neutron monitor count rate, and potential gradient (confirmed by absolute correlation values above ~0.8). Finally, the methodology proposed here can be used for obtaining the relations between other atmospheric parameters (e.g., solar radiation) and solar cycle activity.

  11. A new accelerometer recording system for shuttle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Byron

    1990-01-01

    Microgravity investigators are interested in enhancing the capabilities and improving the information return from accelerometers used in microgravity research. In addition to improving the accelerometer sensor, efforts should be directed towards using recent advances in microprocessor technology and system design techniques to improve sensor calibration and temperature compensation, online data display and analysis, and data reduction and information storage. Results from the above areas of investigation should be combined in an integrated design for a spaceflight microgravity accelerometer package.

  12. Design and Implementation of a Micromechanical Silicon Resonant Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Libin; Yang, Hui; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Liye; Liang, Jinxing

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer has attracted considerable attention in the research and development of high-precision MEMS accelerometers because of its output of quasi-digital signals, high sensitivity, high resolution, wide dynamic range, anti-interference capacity and good stability. Because of the mismatching thermal expansion coefficients of silicon and glass, the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer based on the Silicon on Glass (SOG) technique is deeply affected by the temperature during the fabrication, packaging and use processes. The thermal stress caused by temperature changes directly affects the frequency output of the accelerometer. Based on the working principle of the micromechanical resonant accelerometer, a special accelerometer structure that reduces the temperature influence on the accelerometer is designed. The accelerometer can greatly reduce the thermal stress caused by high temperatures in the process of fabrication and packaging. Currently, the closed-loop drive circuit is devised based on a phase-locked loop. The unloaded resonant frequencies of the prototype of the micromechanical silicon resonant accelerometer are approximately 31.4 kHz and 31.5 kHz. The scale factor is 66.24003 Hz/g. The scale factor stability is 14.886 ppm, the scale factor repeatability is 23 ppm, the bias stability is 23 μg, the bias repeatability is 170 μg, and the bias temperature coefficient is 0.0734 Hz/°C. PMID:24256978

  13. Suitability of MEMS Accelerometers for Condition Monitoring: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Albarbar, Alhussein; Mekid, Samir; Starr, Andrew; Pietruszkiewicz, Robert

    2008-01-01

    With increasing demands for wireless sensing nodes for assets control and condition monitoring; needs for alternatives to expensive conventional accelerometers in vibration measurements have been arisen. Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one of the available options. The performances of three of the MEMS accelerometers from different manufacturers are investigated in this paper and compared to a well calibrated commercial accelerometer used as a reference for MEMS sensors performance evaluation. Tests were performed on a real CNC machine in a typical industrial environmental workshop and the achieved results are presented. PMID:27879734

  14. Suitability of MEMS Accelerometers for Condition Monitoring: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Albarbar, Alhussein; Mekid, Samir; Starr, Andrew; Pietruszkiewicz, Robert

    2008-02-06

    With increasing demands for wireless sensing nodes for assets control and condition monitoring; needs for alternatives to expensive conventional accelerometers in vibration measurements have been arisen. Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one of the available options. The performances of three of the MEMS accelerometers from different manufacturers are investigated in this paper and compared to a well calibrated commercial accelerometer used as a reference for MEMS sensors performance evaluation. Tests were performed on a real CNC machine in a typical industrial environmental workshop and the achieved results are presented.

  15. A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, A.

    A three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometer ASTRE (Accelerometre Spatial Triaxial Electrostatique) is a simplified version of the GRADIO accelerometer designed for the ARISTOTELES mission, which operates by measuring the force provided by a three-axis electrostatic suspension of the proof-mass. It covers the g-spectrum from 10 exp -8 to 10 exp -4 in the frequency range dc to 5 Hz. A dedicated test bench was developed in order to preserve the accelerometer from the seismic noise. The paper presents the performance parameters of the ASTRE accelerometer and some of the design schemes.

  16. The GRADIO accelerometer: Design and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Alain; Touboul, M. P.

    1991-12-01

    The concept of Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG) based on differential microaccelerometry as proposed in the early eighties is summarized. Work devoted to the development of the GRADIO accelerometers is described. The configuration was optimized for the Aristoteles mission with the objective of increasing resolution for an integrating time of 4 s. Thanks to the selected three axis configuration, very sensitive differential tests were carried out between two very representative laboratory models, in directions perpendicular to gravity. The resolution of these tests, limited by the actual stability of alignments of the testing equipment is described.

  17. High-voltage integrated active quenching circuit for single photon count rate up to 80 Mcounts/s.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Giulia; Rech, Ivan; Gulinatti, Angelo; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-08-08

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been subject to a fast improvement in recent years. In particular, custom technologies specifically developed to fabricate SPAD devices give the designer the freedom to pursue the best detector performance required by applications. A significant breakthrough in this field is represented by the recent introduction of a red enhanced SPAD (RE-SPAD) technology, capable of attaining a good photon detection efficiency in the near infrared range (e.g. 40% at a wavelength of 800 nm) while maintaining a remarkable timing resolution of about 100ps full width at half maximum. Being planar, the RE-SPAD custom technology opened the way to the development of SPAD arrays particularly suited for demanding applications in the field of life sciences. However, to achieve such excellent performance custom SPAD detectors must be operated with an external active quenching circuit (AQC) designed on purpose. Next steps toward the development of compact and practical multichannel systems will require a new generation of monolithically integrated AQC arrays. In this paper we present a new, fully integrated AQC fabricated in a high-voltage 0.18 µm CMOS technology able to provide quenching pulses up to 50 Volts with fast leading and trailing edges. Although specifically designed for optimal operation of RE-SPAD devices, the new AQC is quite versatile: it can be used with any SPAD detector, regardless its fabrication technology, reaching remarkable count rates up to 80 Mcounts/s and generating a photon detection pulse with a timing jitter as low as 119 ps full width at half maximum. The compact design of our circuit has been specifically laid out to make this IC a suitable building block for monolithically integrated AQC arrays.

  18. The 4 Ms CHANDRA Deep Field-South Number Counts Apportioned by Source Class: Pervasive Active Galactic Nuclei and the Ascent of Normal Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmer, Bret D.; Xue, Y. Q.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Brusa, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Luo, B.; Paolillo, M.; Ptak, A.; Shemmer, O.; Schneider, D. P.; Tozzi, P.; Vignali, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present 0.5-2 keV, 2-8 keV, 4-8 keV, and 0.5-8 keV (hereafter soft, hard, ultra-hard, and full bands, respectively) cumulative and differential number-count (log N-log S ) measurements for the recently completed approx. equal to 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey, the deepest X-ray survey to date. We implement a new Bayesian approach, which allows reliable calculation of number counts down to flux limits that are factors of approx. equal to 1.9-4.3 times fainter than the previously deepest number-count investigations. In the soft band (SB), the most sensitive bandpass in our analysis, the approx. equal to 4 Ms CDF-S reaches a maximum source density of approx. equal to 27,800 deg(sup -2). By virtue of the exquisite X-ray and multiwavelength data available in the CDF-S, we are able to measure the number counts from a variety of source populations (active galactic nuclei (AGNs), normal galaxies, and Galactic stars) and subpopulations (as a function of redshift, AGN absorption, luminosity, and galaxy morphology) and test models that describe their evolution. We find that AGNs still dominate the X-ray number counts down to the faintest flux levels for all bands and reach a limiting SB source density of approx. equal to 14,900 deg(sup -2), the highest reliable AGN source density measured at any wavelength. We find that the normal-galaxy counts rise rapidly near the flux limits and, at the limiting SB flux, reach source densities of approx. equal to 12,700 deg(sup -2) and make up 46% plus or minus 5% of the total number counts. The rapid rise of the galaxy counts toward faint fluxes, as well as significant normal-galaxy contributions to the overall number counts, indicates that normal galaxies will overtake AGNs just below the approx. equal to 4 Ms SB flux limit and will provide a numerically significant new X-ray source population in future surveys that reach below the approx. equal to 4 Ms sensitivity limit. We show that a future approx. equal to 10 Ms CDF

  19. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  20. Validation of cardiac accelerometer sensor measurements.

    PubMed

    Remme, Espen W; Hoff, Lars; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Naerum, Edvard; Skulstad, Helge; Fleischer, Lars A; Elle, Ole Jakob; Fosse, Erik

    2009-12-01

    In this study we have investigated the accuracy of an accelerometer sensor designed for the measurement of cardiac motion and automatic detection of motion abnormalities caused by myocardial ischaemia. The accelerometer, attached to the left ventricular wall, changed its orientation relative to the direction of gravity during the cardiac cycle. This caused a varying gravity component in the measured acceleration signal that introduced an error in the calculation of myocardial motion. Circumferential displacement, velocity and rotation of the left ventricular apical region were calculated from the measured acceleration signal. We developed a mathematical method to separate translational and gravitational acceleration components based on a priori assumptions of myocardial motion. The accuracy of the measured motion was investigated by comparison with known motion of a robot arm programmed to move like the heart wall. The accuracy was also investigated in an animal study. The sensor measurements were compared with simultaneously recorded motion from a robot arm attached next to the sensor on the heart and with measured motion by echocardiography and a video camera. The developed compensation method for the varying gravity component improved the accuracy of the calculated velocity and displacement traces, giving very good agreement with the reference methods.

  1. Monolithic CMOS-MEMS integration for high-g accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Vinayak; Li, Holden; Tan, Chuan Seng

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights work-in-progress towards the conceptualization, simulation, fabrication and initial testing of a silicon-germanium (SiGe) integrated CMOS-MEMS high-g accelerometer for military, munition, fuze and shock measurement applications. Developed on IMEC's SiGe MEMS platform, the MEMS offers a dynamic range of 5,000 g and a bandwidth of 12 kHz. The low noise readout circuit adopts a chopper-stabilization technique implementing the CMOS through the TSMC 0.18 µm process. The device structure employs a fully differential split comb-drive set up with two sets of stators and a rotor all driven separately. Dummy structures acting as protective over-range stops were designed to protect the active components when under impacts well above the designed dynamic range.

  2. Young Children Counting at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Rose

    2007-01-01

    Learning to count is something that most children start to do by the time they are about two, and parents know from first-hand experience that family members play a big part in helping with this complex process. In this article, the author describes a project involving families sharing effective counting activities. The project called…

  3. Identification of Accelerometer Nonwear Time and Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Melody; Badland, Hannah M.; Schofield, Grant M.; Shepherd, Janine

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the accuracy of various automated rules for determining accelerometer nonwear time in a sample of predominantly desk-based office workers (using their self-reported nonwear times as a criterion). Second, the authors examined the effect of applying these rules to accelerometer data retention…

  4. Potassium Counts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, John

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity to determine whether the radioactivity of a pure potassium salt is directly proportional to the amount of potassium in it and whether this could be used as a method of analysis for potassium in a solid. (MKR)

  5. High sensitivity optical waveguide accelerometer based on Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fenghua; Qian, Guang; Li, Ruozhou; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-08-20

    An optical waveguide accelerometer based on tunable asymmetrical Fano resonance in a ring-resonator-coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed and analyzed. A Fano resonance accelerometer has a relatively large workspace of coupling coefficients with high sensitivity, which has potential application in inertial navigation, missile guidance, and attitude control of satellites. Due to the interference between a high-Q resonance pathway and a coherent background pathway, a steep asymmetric line shape is generated, which greatly improves the sensitivity of this accelerometer. The sensitivity of the accelerometer is about 111.75 mW/g. A 393-fold increase in sensitivity is achieved compared with a conventional MZI accelerometer and is approximately equal to the single ring structure.

  6. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Accelerometer Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G. M.; Bougher, S. W.; Theriot, M. E.; Zurek, R. W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Tolson, R. H.; Murphy, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, designed for aerobraking, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude is fine tuned to the density surface that safely used the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 400 orbits. MRO periapsis precessed from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis was brought dramatically from 40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) August 30, 2006. After ABX, a few small propulsive maneuvers established the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Each of the 400 plus aerobraking orbits provided a vertical structure and distribution of density, scale heights, and temperatures, along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (greater than 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: "Where did the water go?" Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extended vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both near the surface and in the upper atmosphere. Thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from subsurface to exosphere may both be critical. Comparisons of data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), MO and MRO help characterize key temporal and spatial cycles including: winter polar warming, planetary scale

  7. Relationship between Physical Activity and Plasma Fibrinogen Concentrations in Adults without Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodríguez, José I.; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Martinez-Vizcaino, Vicente; Martin-Borras, Carme; de-la-Cal-dela-Fuente, Aventina; Sauras-Llera, Ines; Sanchez-Perez, Alvaro; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between regular physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day physical activity recall (PAR), and plasma fibrinogen concentrations. Methods A cross-sectional study in a previously established cohort of healthy subjects was performed. This study analyzed 1284 subjects who were included in the EVIDENT study (mean age 55.0±13.6 years; 60.90% women). Fibrinogen concentrations were measured in blood plasma. Physical activity was assessed with a 7-day PAR (metabolic equivalents (METs)/hour/week) and GT3X ActiGraph accelerometer (counts/minute) for 7 days. Results Physical exercise, which was evaluated with both an accelerometer (Median: 237.28 counts/minute) and 7-day PAR (Median: 8 METs/hour/week). Physical activity was negatively correlated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations, which was evaluated by counts/min (r = −0.100; p<0.001) and METs/hour/week (r = −0.162; p<0.001). In a multiple linear regression analysis, fibrinogen concentrations of the subjects who performed more physical activity (third tertile of count/minute and METs/hour/week) respect to subjects who performed less (first tertile), maintained statistical significance after adjustments for age and others confounders (β = −0.03; p = 0.046 and β = −0.06; p<0.001, respectively). Conclusions Physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day PAR, was negatively associated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations. This relation is maintained in subjects who performed more exercise even after adjusting for age and other confounders. PMID:24498413

  8. Validating Accelerometry as a Measure of Physical Activity and Energy Expenditure in Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Monica C.; Balraj, Elizabeth; DiSanzo, Beth L.; Ivey, Frederick M.; Hafer-Macko, Charlene E.; Treuth, Margarita S.; Ryan, Alice S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accelerometers can objectively measure steps taken per day in individuals without gait deficits, but accelerometers also have the ability to estimate frequency, intensity, and duration of physical activity. However, thresholds to distinguish varying levels of activity intensity using the Actical brand accelerometer are standardized only for the general population and may underestimate intensity in stroke. Objective To derive Actical activity count thresholds specific to stroke disability for use in more accurately gauging time spent at differing activity levels. Methods Men (n=18) and women (n=10) with chronic hemiparetic gait (4±2 years latency, 43% Caucasian, 56% African American, ages of 47–83 yrs, BMI 19 – 48 kg/m2) participated in the study. Actical accelerometers were placed on the non-paretic hip to obtain accelerometry counts during eight activities of varying intensity: 1) watching TV; 2) seated stretching; 3) standing stretching; 4) floor sweeping; 5) stepping in place; 6) over-ground walking; 7) lower speed treadmill walking (1.0 mph at 4% incline); and 8) higher speed treadmill walking (2.0 mph at 4% incline). Simultaneous portable monitoring (Cosmed K4b2) enabled quantification of energy cost for each activity in metabolic equivalents (METs, or oxygen consumption in multiples of resting level). Measurements were obtained for 10 min of standard rest and 5 minutes during each of the eight activities. Results Regression analysis yielded the following new stroke-specific Actical minimum thresholds: 125 counts per minute (cpm) for sedentary/light activity, 667 cpm for light/moderate activity, and 1546 cpm for moderate/vigorous activity. Conclusion Our revised cut-points better reflect activity levels after stroke and suggest significantly lower thresholds relative to those observed for the general population of healthy individuals. We conclude that the standard, commonly applied Actical thresholds are inappropriate for this unique population

  9. Respiratory signal derived from the smartphone built-in accelerometer during a Respiratory Load Protocol.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Luis; Torres, Abel; Sarlabous, Leonardo; Jané, Raimon

    2015-01-01

    The scope of our work focuses on investigating the potential use of the built-in accelerometer of the smartphones for the recording of the respiratory activity and deriving the respiratory rate. Five healthy subjects performed an inspiratory load protocol. The excursion of the right chest was recorded using the built-in triaxial accelerometer of a smartphone along the x, y and z axes and with an external uniaxial accelerometer. Simultaneously, the respiratory airflow and the inspiratory mouth pressure were recorded, as reference respiratory signals. The chest acceleration signal recorded in the z axis with the smartphone was denoised using a scheme based on the ensemble empirical mode decomposition, a noise data assisted method which decomposes nonstationary and nonlinear signals into intrinsic mode functions. To distinguish noisy oscillatory modes from the relevant modes we use the detrended fluctuation analysis. We reported a very strong correlation between the acceleration of the z axis of the smartphone and the reference accelerometer across the inspiratory load protocol (from 0.80 to 0.97). Furthermore, the evaluation of the respiratory rate showed a very strong correlation (0.98). A good agreement was observed between the respiratory rate estimated with the chest acceleration signal from the z axis of the smartphone and with the respiratory airflow signal: Bland-Altman limits of agreement between -1.44 and 1.46 breaths per minute with a mean bias of -0.01 breaths per minute. This preliminary study provides a valuable insight into the use of the smartphone and its built-in accelerometer for respiratory monitoring.

  10. Modeling of the vibrating beam accelerometer nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowski, P. A.; Knop, R. C.

    Successful modeling and processing of the output of a quartz Vibrating Beam Accelerometer (VBA), whose errors are inherently nonlinear with respect to input acceleration, are reported. The VBA output, with two signals that are frequencies of vibrating quartz beams, has inherent higher-order terms. In order to avoid vibration rectification errors, the signal output must be sampled at a rapid rate and the output must be reduced using a nonlinear model. The present model, with acceleration as a function of frequency, is derived by a least-squares process where the covariance matrix is obtained from simulated data. The system performance is found to be acceptable to strategic levels, and it is shown that a vibration rectification error of 400 micrograms/sq g can be reduced to 4 micrograms/sq g by using the processor electronics and a nonlinear model.

  11. Does a waist-worn accelerometer capture intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior among persons with multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Goldman, Myla

    2011-01-01

    The valid application of accelerometry and interpretation of its output (i.e., counts per unit time) for the measurement of walking behavior in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) rests upon multiple untested assumptions. This study tested the assumption that a waist-worn accelerometer should capture the intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior. Twenty-four participants with a neurologist-confirmed diagnosis of MS and who were ambulatory with minimal assistance undertook three 6-min periods of over-ground walking that involved comfortable (CWS) and then slower (SWS) and faster (FWS) walking speeds while wearing ActiGraph, model 7164, accelerometers around the waist and ankle. The experimental manipulation of walking was successful such that the CWS was 76.7 ± 13.0 m/min (range = 55.6–105.14), whereas the SWS and FWS were 64.3 ± 12.3 m/min (range = 44.5–90.1) and 89.1 ± 13.8 m/min (range = 60.9–116.4), respectively. Movement counts from the waist and ankle-worn accelerometer were strongly associated with the manipulation of speed, but the association was stronger for the waist than ankle based on both eta-squared estimates (η2 values = .78 and .46) and the average squared multiple correlations from individual regression analyses (R2 values = .97 ± .04 and .88 ± .21). The bivariate correlation between movement counts from the waist-worn accelerometer and speed of walking (r = .823, p = .001) was large in magnitude and significantly different (z = 3.22, p = .001) from that between movement counts from the ankle-worn unit and walking speed (r = .549, p = .001). This study provides novel evidence that an accelerometer worn around the waist captures intra- and inter-person variation in over-ground walking behavior in those with MS. PMID:20875952

  12. Does a waist-worn accelerometer capture intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior among persons with multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Suh, Yoojin; Goldman, Myla

    2010-12-01

    The valid application of accelerometry and interpretation of its output (i.e., counts per unit time) for the measurement of walking behavior in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) rests upon multiple untested assumptions. This study tested the assumption that a waist-worn accelerometer should capture the intra- and inter-person variation in walking behavior. Twenty-four participants with a neurologist-confirmed diagnosis of MS and who were ambulatory with minimal assistance undertook three 6-min periods of over-ground walking that involved comfortable (CWS) and then slower (SWS) and faster (FWS) walking speeds while wearing ActiGraph, model 7164, accelerometers around the waist and ankle. The experimental manipulation of walking was successful such that the CWS was 76.7±13.0m/min (range=55.6-105.14), whereas the SWS and FWS were 64.3±12.3m/min (range=44.5-90.1) and 89.1±13.8m/min (range=60.9-116.4), respectively. Movement counts from the waist and ankle-worn accelerometer were strongly associated with the manipulation of speed, but the association was stronger for the waist than ankle based on both eta-squared estimates (η(2) values=.78 and .46) and the average squared multiple correlations from individual regression analyses (R(2) values=.97±.04 and .88±.21). The bivariate correlation between movement counts from the waist-worn accelerometer and speed of walking (r=.823, p=.001) was large in magnitude and significantly different (z=3.22, p=.001) from that between movement counts from the ankle-worn unit and walking speed (r=.549, p=.001). This study provides novel evidence that an accelerometer worn around the waist captures intra- and inter-person variation in over-ground walking behavior in those with MS.

  13. Evaluation of nitroxynil and closantel activity using ELISA and egg counts against Fasciola hepatica in experimentally and naturally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Boulard, C; Carreras, F; Van Gool, F

    1995-01-01

    The responses of cattle infected with Fasciola hepatica to treatment with nitroxynil or closantel were monitored by faecal egg counts and by ELISA assay of anti-fluke antibodies. A first trial with experimentally infected heifers showed an increase in anti-fluke antibody titre as early as 2 weeks post-infection. Eggs were first detected in the faeces 10 weeks after infection. Egg output increased steadily over the next 8 weeks and then rapidly decreased. Treatment of a 20-week infection with nitroxynil was followed by a slow decrease in antibody titre 4 weeks later. This decrease continued over the next 40 weeks, but returned to pre-infection levels in only 2 out of 4 animals. The faecal egg count fell to zero 2 weeks after treatment and remained so for the following 30 weeks, although 1 animal produced a few eggs 32 and 34 weeks post-treatment. Within this period, neither diagnostic technique discriminated between this persistently infected animal and the others. In a second trial, 45 cattle from a naturally infected herd were treated with nitroxynil or closantel. The faecal egg counts of the treated cattle were zero within the following 2 months, whereas there were eggs in the faeces of the control (untreated) group. Nevertheless, the treated cattle showed a small, non-significant drop in anti-fluke antibody titre. These results demonstrate the need for new tools to monitor and evaluate accurately the efficacy of anthelmintic treatment.

  14. A relationship between CD4 count and oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in urban population

    PubMed Central

    Satyakiran, Gadavalli Vera Venkata; Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Alexander, Glory; Rao, Saritha; Venugopal, Reshma; Hosthor, Sreelatha S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection gradually destroys the body's immune system, which makes it harder for the body to fight infections. HIV infection causes a quantitative and qualitative depletion of CD4 lymphocyte count, which increases the risk of opportunistic infections. Thus, CD4 count is one of the key factors in determining both the urgency of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation and the need of prophylaxis for opportunistic infections. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and variations in the oral manifestations of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients on HAART therapy in urban population and their association with CD4 count. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted by screening eighty patients who were HIV positive in an urban location. Both adult and pediatric patients were screened for oral manifestations and simultaneously CD4 count was also evaluated. Patients with HIV infection for variable time period who are under HAART were considered. Statistical Analysis: Measures of central tendency were used to analyse the data. Results: HIV infection destroys the immune system of an individual, making the patient susceptible to various infections and malignancies. With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, the scenario has changed drastically. We have observed that patients with CD4 counts between 164 and 1286 show relatively few oral manifestations. Long-term HAART therapy causes pigmentation, xerostomia and angular cheilitis but is taken up quite well by the patients. Conclusion: In this study, eighty patients with HAART from urban population showed very minimal oral findings because of good accessibility for treatment and awareness about HIV infections. The patients who were on long-standing HAART treatment also showed minimal oral manifestation such as pigmentation and xerostomia. Hence, we conclude that recognition, significance and treatment of these lesions in patients with HIV

  15. The NuSTAR Extragalactic Surveys: The Number Counts of Active Galactic Nuclei and the Resolved Fraction of the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, F. A.; Aird, J.; Civano, F.; Lansbury, G.; Mullaney, J. R.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; Ajello, M.; Barret, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Baloković, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Del Moro, A.; Forster, K.; Gandhi, P.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R. C.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K. K.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Treister, E.; Walton, D.; Westergaard, N. J.; Wik, D.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W. W.; Zoglauer, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present the 3-8 keV and 8-24 keV number counts of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) extragalactic surveys. NuSTAR has now resolved 33%-39% of the X-ray background in the 8-24 keV band, directly identifying AGNs with obscuring columns up to ˜ {10}25 {{cm}}-2. In the softer 3-8 keV band the number counts are in general agreement with those measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra over the flux range 5× {10}-15 ≲ S(3-8 keV)/{erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 ≲ {10}-12 probed by NuSTAR. In the hard 8-24 keV band NuSTAR probes fluxes over the range 2× {10}-14 ≲ S(8-24 keV)/{erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 ≲ {10}-12, a factor ˜100 fainter than previous measurements. The 8-24 keV number counts match predictions from AGN population synthesis models, directly confirming the existence of a population of obscured and/or hard X-ray sources inferred from the shape of the integrated cosmic X-ray background. The measured NuSTAR counts lie significantly above simple extrapolation with a Euclidian slope to low flux of the Swift/BAT 15-55 keV number counts measured at higher fluxes (S(15-55 keV) ≳ 10-11 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2), reflecting the evolution of the AGN population between the Swift/BAT local (z\\lt 0.1) sample and NuSTAR’s z˜ 1 sample. CXB synthesis models, which account for AGN evolution, lie above the Swift/BAT measurements, suggesting that they do not fully capture the evolution of obscured AGNs at low redshifts.

  16. Associations of Accelerometer-Measured and Self-Reported Sedentary Time With Leukocyte Telomere Length in Older Women.

    PubMed

    Shadyab, Aladdin H; Macera, Caroline A; Shaffer, Richard A; Jain, Sonia; Gallo, Linda C; LaMonte, Michael J; Reiner, Alexander P; Kooperberg, Charles; Carty, Cara L; Di, Chongzhi; Manini, Todd M; Hou, Lifang; LaCroix, Andrea Z

    2017-01-18

    Few studies have assessed the association of sedentary time with leukocyte telomere length (LTL). In a cross-sectional study conducted in 2012-2013, we examined associations of accelerometer-measured and self-reported sedentary time with LTL in a sample of 1,481 older white and African-American women from the Women's Health Initiative and determined whether associations varied by level of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA). The association between sedentary time and LTL was evaluated using multiple linear regression models. Women were aged 79.2 (standard deviation, 6.7) years, on average. Self-reported sedentary time was not associated with LTL. In a model adjusting for demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, and health-related factors, among women at or below the median level of accelerometer-measured MVPA, those in the highest quartile of accelerometer-measured sedentary time had significantly shorter LTL than those in the lowest quartile, with an average difference of 170 base pairs (95% confidence interval: 4, 340). Accelerometer-measured sedentary time was not associated with LTL in women above the median level of MVPA. Findings suggest that, on the basis of accelerometer measurements, higher sedentary time may be associated with shorter LTL among less physically active women.

  17. Placement of Accelerometers for High Sensing Resolution in Micromanipulation

    PubMed Central

    Latt, W. T.; Tan, U-X.; Riviere, C. N.; Ang, W. T.

    2012-01-01

    High sensing resolution is required in sensing of surgical instrument motion in micromanipulation tasks. Accelerometers can be employed to sense physiological motion of the instrument during micromanipulation. Various configurations of accelerometer placement had been introduced in the past to sense motion of a rigid-body such as a surgical instrument. Placement (location and orientation) of accelerometers fixed in the instrument plays a significant role in achieving high sensing resolution. However, there is no literature or work on the effect of placement of accelerometers on sensing resolution. In this paper, an approach of placement of accelerometers within an available space to obtain highest possible sensing resolution in sensing of rigid-body motion in micromanipulation tasks is proposed. Superiority of the proposed placement approach is shown in sensing of a microsurgical instrument angular motion by comparing sensing resolutions achieved as a result of employing the configuration following the proposed approach and the existing configurations. Apart from achieving high sensing resolution, and design simplicity, the proposed placement approach also provides flexibility in placing accelerometers; hence it is especially useful in applications with limited available space to mount accelerometers. PMID:22423176

  18. Vibration sensing in smart machine rotors using internal MEMS accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Samuel; Cole, Matthew O. T.; Keogh, Patrick S.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a novel topology for enhanced vibration sensing in which wireless MEMS accelerometers embedded within a hollow rotor measure vibration in a synchronously rotating frame of reference. Theoretical relations between rotor-embedded accelerometer signals and the vibration of the rotor in an inertial reference frame are derived. It is thereby shown that functionality as a virtual stator-mounted displacement transducer can be achieved through appropriate signal processing. Experimental tests on a prototype rotor confirm that both magnitude and phase information of synchronous vibration can be measured directly without additional stator-mounted key-phasor sensors. Displacement amplitudes calculated from accelerometer signals will become erroneous at low rotational speeds due to accelerometer zero-g offsets, hence a corrective procedure is introduced. Impact tests are also undertaken to examine the ability of the internal accelerometers to measure transient vibration. A further capability is demonstrated, whereby the accelerometer signals are used to measure rotational speed of the rotor by analysing the signal component due to gravity. The study highlights the extended functionality afforded by internal accelerometers and demonstrates the feasibility of internal sensor topologies, which can provide improved observability of rotor vibration at externally inaccessible rotor locations.

  19. Recent Results from CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Nerem, R. S.; Thompson, B.; Pavlis, E.; Williams, T. A.; Colombo, O. L.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE to be launched in the early part of 02') that combine a new generation of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a high precision three-axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the non-gravitational forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three-axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies.

  20. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  1. The validity of the ActiPed for physical activity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Brown, D K; Grimwade, D; Martinez-Bussion, D; Taylor, M J D; Gladwell, V F

    2013-05-01

    The ActiPed (FitLinxx) is a uniaxial accelerometer, which objectively measures physical activity, uploads the data wirelessly to a website, allowing participants and researchers to view activity levels remotely. The aim was to validate ActiPed's step count, distance travelled and activity time against direct observation. Further, to compare against pedometer (YAMAX), accelerometer (ActiGraph) and manufacturer's guidelines. 22 participants, aged 28±7 years, undertook 4 protocols, including walking on different surfaces and incremental running protocol (from 2 mph to 8 mph). Bland-Altman plots allowed comparison of direct observation against ActiPed estimates. For step count, the ActiPed showed a low % bias in all protocols: walking on a treadmill (-1.30%), incremental treadmill protocol (-1.98%), walking over grass (-1.67%), and walking over concrete (-0.93%). When differentiating between walking and running step count the ActiPed showed a % bias of 4.10% and -6.30%, respectively. The ActiPed showed >95% accuracy for distance and duration estimations overall, although underestimated distance (p<0.01) for walking over grass and concrete. Overall, the ActiPed showed acceptable levels of accuracy comparable to previous validated pedometers and accelerometers. The accuracy combined with the simple and informative remote gathering of data, suggests that the ActiPed could be a useful tool in objective physical activity monitoring.

  2. Donor lymphocyte count and thymic activity predict lymphocyte recovery and outcomes after matched-sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    McIver, Zachariah; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; Wu, Colin; Grim, Andrew; Ito, Sawa; Cho, Irene; Hensel, Nancy; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, Austin John

    2013-03-01

    Delayed immune recovery is a characteristic feature of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult recipients. Although recipient thymic T-cell neogenesis contributes to T-cell regeneration after transplantation, thymic recovery in the transplant recipient decreases with increasing age, and is diminished by intensive preconditioning regimens and graft-versus-host disease. In adult recipients, most events that determine transplant success or failure occur during the period when the majority of circulating T cells is derived from the donor's post thymic T-cell repertoire. As a result, the make-up of the donor lymphocyte compartment may strongly influence immune recovery and transplant outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine donor lymphocyte counts in a series of patients undergoing an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant to identify the potential contribution of donor regulatory and conventional T lymphocyte populations to immune recovery and transplant outcomes. We examined donor lymphocyte subset counts in relation to post-transplant lymphocyte recovery and transplant events in 220 consecutive myeloablative, T-cell-depleted, HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with hematologic malignancies. In a multivariate analysis, absolute numbers of donor CD4(+) recent thymic emigrants were associated with overall survival (P=0.032). The donors' absolute lymphocyte count and thymic production of regulatory T cells were both associated with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (P=0.002 and P=0.022, respectively). In conclusion, these results identify donor immune characteristics that are associated with lymphocyte recovery, extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease, and survival in the recipient following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study reported here was performed using peripheral blood samples drawn from donors and patients enrolled in the ClinicalTrials.gov-registered trials

  3. The vertical accelerometer, a new instrument for air navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laboccetta, Letterio

    1923-01-01

    This report endeavors to show the possibility of determining the rate of acceleration and the advantage of having such an accelerometer in addition to other aviation instruments. Most of the discussions concern balloons.

  4. Wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren

    2011-01-01

    The capability to quantify gait characteristics through a wireless accelerometer iPod application in an effectively autonomous environment may alleviate the progressive strain on highly specific medical resources. The iPod consists of the inherent attributes imperative for robust gait quantification, such as a three dimensional accelerometer, data storage, flexible software, and the capacity for wireless transmission of the gait data through email. Based on the synthesis of the integral components of the iPod, a wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics has been tested and evaluated in an essentially autonomous environment. The quantified gait acceleration waveforms were wirelessly transmitted using email for postprocessing. The site for the gait experiment occurred in a remote location relative to the location where the postprocessing was conducted. The wireless accelerometer iPod application for quantifying gait characteristics demonstrated sufficient accuracy and consistency.

  5. LANCE Q-flex accelerometer qualification test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, J. S.; Mitchell, J. N.; Hester, T.; Searcy, D.

    1982-03-01

    This report covers the performance obtained on six Sundstrand Q-Flex accelerometers during the qualification test program for the LANCE missile. The Qualification Test Program was divided into three parts: (1) Flight Assurance Tests (FAT), (2) Storage and Transportation Tests (SATT), and (3) Reliability Overstress Tests (ROT). All testing was performed in accordance with Vought accelerometer procurement specification 704-166C dated 8 June 1978.

  6. Optical fiber accelerometer based on a silicon micromachined cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Abdelrafik; Lecoy, Pierre; Marty, Jeanine; Renouf, Christine; Ferdinand, Pierre

    1995-12-01

    An intensity-modulated fiber-optic accelerometer based on backreflection effects has been manufactured and tested. It uses a multimode fiber placed at a spherical mirror center, and the beam intensity is modulated by a micromachined silicon cantilever. This device has applications as an accelerometer and vibrometer for rotating machines. It exhibits an amplitude linearity of +/-1.2% in the range of 0.1-22 m s-2, a frequency linearity of +/-1% in the

  7. A PFV2 accelerometer for high shock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tise, Bert; Smith, Talbot

    1989-08-01

    The development, fabrication, and testing of a high-g piezoelectric accelerometer that uses polyvinlylidene fluoride as the piezoelectric transducer is described. The accelerometer is designed to continuously measure accelerations up to 1000,000 g. The device is packages in a 3/8 inch hex head bolt and can include a built-in hybrid buffer to provide a low output impedance analog signal. Included are fabrication procedures, mechanical drawings, and software listings for test data analysis programs.

  8. Sources of variability of estimates of malaria case counts, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Each January, the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) estimates numbers of malaria infections among U.S. service members using a surveillance case definition to identify "malaria cases". These cases include individuals with a hospital discharge diagnosis of malaria and those who were reported with malaria through military notifiable event reporting systems. This report compares the MSMR surveillance case definition with other proposed case definitions to demonstrate the degree to which estimates of numbers of malaria cases are dependent upon clinical settings, data sources and case-defining rules used to produce such estimates. For example, including outpatient diagnoses as malaria cases would more than double the 2010 case count. As compared with cases defined using other proposed case definitions, many more MSMR-defined cases had records of a specific Plasmodium species, a laboratory test for malaria and recent travel to a malaria-endemic country. Interpretations of the results of MSMR reports should consider how "cases" are defined.

  9. All about Carbohydrate Counting

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 14 All About Carbohydrate Counting What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a way to plan your meals. It can help ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 2/14 Toolkit No. 14: All About Carbohydrate Counting continued The chart at the ...

  10. Performance of several low-cost accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Allen, R.M.; Chung, A. I.; Cochran, E.S.; Guy, R.; Hellweg, M.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Several groups are implementing low‐cost host‐operated systems of strong‐motion accelerographs to support the somewhat divergent needs of seismologists and earthquake engineers. The Advanced National Seismic System Technical Implementation Committee (ANSS TIC, 2002), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with other network operators, is exploring the efficacy of such systems if used in ANSS networks. To this end, ANSS convened a working group to explore available Class C strong‐motion accelerometers (defined later), and to consider operational and quality control issues, and the means of annotating, storing, and using such data in ANSS networks. The working group members are largely coincident with our author list, and this report informs instrument‐performance matters in the working group’s report to ANSS. Present examples of operational networks of such devices are the Community Seismic Network (CSN; csn.caltech.edu), operated by the California Institute of Technology, and Quake‐Catcher Network (QCN; Cochran et al., 2009; qcn.stanford.edu; November 2013), jointly operated by Stanford University and the USGS. Several similar efforts are in development at other institutions. The overarching goals of such efforts are to add spatial density to existing Class‐A and Class‐B (see next paragraph) networks at low cost, and to include many additional people so they become invested in the issues of earthquakes, their measurement, and the damage they cause.

  11. Factors associated with participant compliance in studies using accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Lam, T H

    2013-09-01

    Participant compliance is an important issue in studies using accelerometers. Some participants wear the accelerometer for the duration specified by the researchers but many do not. We investigated a range of demographic factors associated with participant compliance in obtaining analyzable accelerometer data. A total of 3601 participants (aged 47.6±13.1 years, 44.6% male) were included. They were asked to wear an accelerometer (ActiGraph) for four consecutive days after completing a household survey during March 2009-January 2011 in Hong Kong. Participants wore the accelerometer on average for 13.9h in a 24-h day. No significant difference was found between males and females (p=0.38). Using log-linear regression, it was found that older participants (0.5% more wearing hours for each year of age, p<0.001), those with full-time job (p<0.01), with tertiary education (p<0.01), non-smokers (p<0.01) and with high self-reported health (p<0.05) wore the accelerometer for more hours. These results provide details for estimating compliance rates for samples with different characteristics and thus sample size calculation to account for participant compliance.

  12. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, V. I.; Brown, F. A.; Davie, N. T.

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of -50 to +186 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of -50 to 70 F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer's operational limits of -30 and +150 F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of -50 and +160 F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is +\\-5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  13. Shuttle high resolution accelerometer package experiment results - Atmospheric density measurements between 60-160 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hinson, E. W.; Nicholson, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Indirect or inferred values of atmospheric density encountered by the Shuttle Orbiter during reentry have been calculated from acceleration measurements made by the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP) and the Orbiter Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) liner accelerometers. The atmospheric density data developed from this study represent a significant gain with respect to the body of data collected to date by various techniques in the altitude range of 60 to 160 km. The data are unique in that they cover a very wide horizontal range during each flight and provide insight into the actual density variations encountered along the reentry flight path. The data, which were collected over about 3 years, are also characterized by variations in solar activity, geomagnetic index, and local solar time. Comparison of the flight-derived densities with various atmospheric models have been made, and analyses have attempted to characterize the data and to show correlation with selected physical variables.

  14. Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA): A fundamental support to BepiColombo Radio Science Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.; Morbidini, A.; Nozzoli, S.; Peron, R.; Persichini, M.; Reale, A.; Santoli, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio Science Experiments of the BepiColombo mission will enable substantial improvement of the knowledge of Mercury's orbit and rotation, and the relativistic dynamics in the solar system. A fundamental support to the spacecraft tracking data will be given by the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA). This is a three-axis accelerometer devoted to the measurement of the non-gravitational perturbations acting on the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), whose knowledge is important in order to fully exploit the quality of the tracking data. The intrinsic noise level of the instrument that will be onboard MPO, 10-9m/s2/√{Hz} in the 3×10-5 to 10-1Hz frequency range, guarantees the fulfilment of the RSE requirements. The main scientific and technological features of the instrument are discussed, together with its current error budget, experimental activities and foreseen calibration strategies.

  15. Standardization of 241Am by digital coincidence counting, liquid scintillation counting and defined solid angle counting.

    PubMed

    Balpardo, C; Capoulat, M E; Rodrigues, D; Arenillas, P

    2010-01-01

    The nuclide (241)Am decays by alpha emission to (237)Np. Most of the decays (84.6%) populate the excited level of (237)Np with energy of 59.54 keV. Digital coincidence counting was applied to standardize a solution of (241)Am by alpha-gamma coincidence counting with efficiency extrapolation. Electronic discrimination was implemented with a pressurized proportional counter and the results were compared with two other independent techniques: Liquid scintillation counting using the logical sum of double coincidences in a TDCR array and defined solid angle counting taking into account activity inhomogeneity in the active deposit. The results show consistency between the three methods within a limit of a 0.3%. An ampoule of this solution will be sent to the International Reference System (SIR) during 2009. Uncertainties were analysed and compared in detail for the three applied methods.

  16. Obtaining Accelerometer Data in a National Cohort of Black and White Adults

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Virginia J.; Rhodes, J. David; Mosher, Aleena; Hutto, Brent; Stewart, Margaret S.; Colabianchi, Natalie; Vena, John E.; Blair, Steven N.; Hooker, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report methodological details and feasibility of conducting an accelerometer ancillary study in a large U.S. cohort being followed for stroke and cognitive decline. Methods REGARDS is a national, population-based study of 30,239 blacks and whites, aged ≥ 45 years, enrolled January 2003–October 2007. Baseline evaluations were conducted through computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) and an in-home visit. Participants are followed by CATI every 6 months. Starting with May 2009 follow-up, contingent on accelerometer availability, participants were invited to wear an accelerometer for 7 days. Device inventory was 1,150. Accelerometer, instructions, log sheet and stamped addressed return envelope were mailed to consenting participants. Postcard acknowledgement and reminders, and ≤ two calls were made to encourage compliance. Results Between May 2009 and January 2013, 20,076 were invited to participate; 12,146 (60.5%) consented. Participation rates by race-sex groups were similar: black women 58.6%, black men 59.6%, white women 62.3% and white men 60.5%. Mean age of the 12,146 participants to whom devices were shipped was 63.5 ± 8.7 years. Return rate was 92%. Of 11,174 returned, 1,187 were not worn, 14 had device malfunction, and of 9,973 with data, 8,096 (81.2%) provided usable data, defined as ≥ 4 days of 10+ hours of wear time, ranging from 74.4% among black women to 85.2% among white men. Conclusions Using mail and telephone methods, it is feasible to obtain objective measures of physical activity from a sizeable proportion of a national cohort of adults, with similar participation rates among blacks and whites. Linked with the clinical health information collected through follow-up, these data will allow future analyses on the association between objectively-measured sedentary time, physical activity and health outcomes. PMID:25333247

  17. Italian spring accelerometer (ISA) a high sensitive accelerometer for ``BepiColombo'' ESA CORNERSTONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, V.; Nozzoli, S.

    2001-12-01

    The targets of the ESA CORNERSTONE mission to Mercury "BepiColombo" are concerned with both planetary and magnetospheric physics and to test some aspects of the general relativity. A payload devoted to a set of experiments named radio science is located within one of the three proposed modules, the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). In particular, a high sensitivity accelerometer ( a min<10 -9√g/ Hz in the range 10 -4- 10 -1 Hz) will measure the inertial acceleration acting on the MPO. Such data, together with tracking data are used to evaluate the purely gravitational trajectory of the MPO, transforming it to a virtual drag-free satellite system. The ISA accelerometer, considered for this mission, is a well-studied instrument developed at the Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), with the financial support of the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). A prototype of such an instrument was constructed, matching the requirements of the radio science experiment. Results of the study concerning the use of ISA in the BepiColombo mission are reported here, particular care being devoted to the description of the instrument and to its sensitivity and thermal stabilisation.

  18. Sedentary Behavior in Preschoolers: How Many Days of Accelerometer Monitoring Is Needed?

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Wonwoo; Beets, Michael W.; Pate, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability of accelerometry for measuring sedentary behavior in preschoolers has not been determined, thus we determined how many days of accelerometry monitoring are necessary to reliably estimate daily time spent in sedentary behavior in preschoolers. In total, 191 and 150 preschoolers (three to five years) wore ActiGraph accelerometers (15-s epoch) during the in-school (≥4 days) and the total-day (≥6 days) period respectively. Accelerometry data were summarized as time spent in sedentary behavior (min/h) using three different cutpoints developed for preschool-age children (<37.5, <200, and <373 counts/15 s). The intraclass correlations (ICCs) and Spearman-Brown prophecy formula were used to estimate the reliability of accelerometer for measuring sedentary behavior. Across different cutpoints, the ICCs ranged from 0.81 to 0.92 for in-school sedentary behavior, and from 0.75 to 0.81 for total-day sedentary behavior, respectively. To achieve an ICC of ≥0.8, two to four days or six to nine days of monitoring were needed for in-school sedentary behavior and total-day sedentary behavior, respectively. These findings provide important guidance for future research on sedentary behavior in preschool children using accelerometry. Understanding the reliability of accelerometry will facilitate the conduct of research designed to inform policies and practices aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in preschool children. PMID:26492261

  19. Relative performance of several inexpensive accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, John R.; Rogers, John A.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the performance of several low-cost accelerometers for highly cost-driven applications in recording earthquake strong motion. We anticipate applications for such sensors in providing the lifeline and emergency-response communities with an immediate, comprehensive picture of the extent and characteristics of likely damage. We also foresee their use as 'filler' instruments sited between research-grade instruments to provide spatially detailed and near-field records of large earthquakes (on the order of 1000 stations at 600-m intervals in San Fernando Valley, population 1.2 million, for example). The latter applications would provide greatly improved attenuation relationships for building codes and design, the first examples of mainshock information (that is, potentially nonlinear regime) for microzonation, and a suite of records for structural engineers. We also foresee possible applications in monitoring structural inter-story drift during earthquakes, possibly leading to local and remote alarm functions as well as design criteria. This effort appears to be the first of its type at the USGS. It is spurred by rapid advances in sensor technology and the recognition of potential non-classical applications. In this report, we estimate sensor noise spectra, relative transfer functions and cross-axis sensitivity of six inexpensive sensors. We tested three micromachined ('silicon-chip') sensors in addition to classical force-balance and piezoelectric examples. This sample of devices is meant to be representative, not comprehensive. Sensor noise spectra were estimated by recording system output with the sensor mounted on a pneumatically supported 545-kg optical-bench isolation table. This isolation table appears to limit ground motion to below our system noise level. These noise estimates include noise introduced by signal-conditioning circuitry, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and noise induced in connecting wiring by ambient electromagnetic fields in

  20. Strong Motion Seismograph Based On MEMS Accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Y.; Hu, X.

    2013-12-01

    The MEMS strong motion seismograph we developed used the modularization method to design its software and hardware.It can fit various needs in different application situation.The hardware of the instrument is composed of a MEMS accelerometer,a control processor system,a data-storage system,a wired real-time data transmission system by IP network,a wireless data transmission module by 3G broadband,a GPS calibration module and power supply system with a large-volumn lithium battery in it. Among it,the seismograph's sensor adopted a three-axis with 14-bit high resolution and digital output MEMS accelerometer.Its noise level just reach about 99μg/√Hz and ×2g to ×8g dynamically selectable full-scale.Its output data rates from 1.56Hz to 800Hz. Its maximum current consumption is merely 165μA,and the device is so small that it is available in a 3mm×3mm×1mm QFN package. Furthermore,there is access to both low pass filtered data as well as high pass filtered data,which minimizes the data analysis required for earthquake signal detection. So,the data post-processing can be simplified. Controlling process system adopts a 32-bit low power consumption embedded ARM9 processor-S3C2440 and is based on the Linux operation system.The processor's operating clock at 400MHz.The controlling system's main memory is a 64MB SDRAM with a 256MB flash-memory.Besides,an external high-capacity SD card data memory can be easily added.So the system can meet the requirements for data acquisition,data processing,data transmission,data storage,and so on. Both wired and wireless network can satisfy remote real-time monitoring, data transmission,system maintenance,status monitoring or updating software.Linux was embedded and multi-layer designed conception was used.The code, including sensor hardware driver,the data acquisition,earthquake setting out and so on,was written on medium layer.The hardware driver consist of IIC-Bus interface driver, IO driver and asynchronous notification driver. The

  1. Design and development of PVDF-based MEMS hydrophone and accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bei

    It is always desirable to fabricate low-cost, highly sensitive and miniaturized sensors for various applications. In this thesis, the design and processing of PVDF-based MEMS hydrophones and accelerometers have been investigated. The basic structure of the hydrophone was fabricated on a silicon wafer using standard NMOS process technology. A MOSFET with extended gate electrode was designed as the interface circuit to a sensing material, which is a piezoelectric polymer, polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Acoustic impedance possessed by this piezoelectric material provides a reasonable match to that of water, which makes it very attractive for underwater applications. The electrical signal generated by the PVDF film was directly coupled to the gate of the MOSFET. In order to minimize the parasitic capacitance underneath the PVDF film and hence improve the device sensitivity, a thick photoresist, SU-8, was first employed as the dielectric layer under the extended gate electrode. For underwater operation, the hydrophone was encapsulated by a waterproof Rho-C rubber. However, it was found that the rubber induced the degradation of the MOSFET. To improve the reliability of the hydrophone, the active device was passivated by a silicon nitride layer, which is a good barrier material to most mobile ions and solvents. The device after passivation also shows a lower noise level. A theoretical model was developed to predict the sensitivity of the hydrophone. A reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental results was obtained. MEMS accelerometers based on the PVDF-MOSFET structure by attaching a seismic mass on top of the PVDF film were also fabricated. The accelerometer was calibrated using a comparison method and an average sensitivity of 0.28 mV/g was achieved. A dynamic model of the accelerometer was derived and the calculated results are in good agreement with the measured results.

  2. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Yue, Honghao; Liu, Rongqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Ding, Liang; Liang, Tian; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-01-01

    High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms. PMID:26287203

  3. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qianqian; Yue, Honghao; Liu, Rongqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Ding, Liang; Liang, Tian; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-08-14

    High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms.

  4. Analyzing Body Movements within the Laban Effort Framework Using a Single Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Kikhia, Basel; Gomez, Miguel; Jiménez, Lara Lorna; Hallberg, Josef; Karvonen, Niklas; Synnes, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a study on analyzing body movements by using a single accelerometer sensor. The investigated categories of body movements belong to the Laban Effort Framework: Strong—Light, Free—Bound and Sudden—Sustained. All body movements were represented by a set of activities used for data collection. The calculated accuracy of detecting the body movements was based on collecting data from a single wireless tri-axial accelerometer sensor. Ten healthy subjects collected data from three body locations (chest, wrist and thigh) simultaneously in order to analyze the locations comparatively. The data was then processed and analyzed using Machine Learning techniques. The wrist placement was found to be the best single location to record data for detecting Strong—Light body movements using the Random Forest classifier. The wrist placement was also the best location for classifying Bound—Free body movements using the SVM classifier. However, the data collected from the chest placement yielded the best results for detecting Sudden—Sustained body movements using the Random Forest classifier. The study shows that the choice of the accelerometer placement should depend on the targeted type of movement. In addition, the choice of the classifier when processing data should also depend on the chosen location and the target movement. PMID:24662408

  5. Ambulatory respiratory rate detection using ECG and a triaxial accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alexander M; Ferdosi, Nima; Narasimhan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of respiratory rate in ambulatory conditions has widespread applications for screening of respiratory diseases and remote patient monitoring. Unfortunately, minimally obtrusive techniques often suffer from low accuracy. In this paper, we describe an algorithm with low computational complexity for combining multiple respiratory measurements to estimate breathing rate from an unobtrusive chest patch sensor. Respiratory rates derived from the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and modulation of the QRS amplitude of electrocardiography (ECG) are combined with a respiratory rate derived from tri-axial accelerometer data. The three respiration rates are combined by a weighted average using weights based on quality metrics for each signal. The algorithm was evaluated on 15 elderly subjects who performed spontaneous and metronome breathing as well as a variety of activities of daily living (ADLs). When compared to a reference device, the mean absolute error was 1.02 breaths per minute (BrPM) during metronome breathing, 1.67 BrPM during spontaneous breathing, and 2.03 BrPM during ADLs.

  6. Modeling perceived stress via HRV and accelerometer sensor streams.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Cao, Hong; Nguyen, Hai-Long; Surmacz, Karl; Hargrove, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    Discovering and modeling of stress patterns of human beings is a key step towards achieving automatic stress monitoring, stress management and healthy lifestyle. As various wearable sensors become popular, it becomes possible for individuals to acquire their own relevant sensory data and to automatically assess their stress level on the go. Previous studies for stress analysis were conducted in the controlled laboratory and clinic settings. These studies are not suitable for stress monitoring in one's daily life as various physical activities may affect the physiological signals. In this paper, we address such issue by integrating two modalities of sensors, i.e., HRV sensors and accelerometers, to monitor the perceived stress levels in daily life. We gathered both the heart and the motion data from 8 participants continuously for about 2 weeks. We then extracted features from both sensory data and compared the existing machine learning methods for learning personalized models to interpret the perceived stress levels. Experimental results showed that Bagging classifier with feature selection is able to achieve a prediction accuracy 85.7%, indicating our stress monitoring on daily basis is fairly practical.

  7. 45 CFR 263.4 - When do educational expenditures count?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When do educational expenditures count? 263.4... do educational expenditures count? (a) Expenditures for educational activities or services count if... educational services or activities provided through the public education system do not count unless they...

  8. Counting to 20: Online Implementation of a Face-to-Face, Elementary Mathematics Methods Problem-Solving Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Catherine Stein

    2012-01-01

    This study describes implementation of the same problem-solving activity in both online and face-to-face environments. The activity, done in the first class period or first module of a K-2 mathematics methods course, was initially used in a face-to-face class and then adapted later for use in an online class. While the task was originally designed…

  9. Characterization of a MEMS Accelerometer for Inertial Navigating Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.D.

    1999-02-12

    Inertial MEMS sensors such as accelerometers and angular rotation sensing devices continue to improve in performance as advances in design and processing are made. Present state-of-the-art accelerometers have achieved performance levels in the laboratory that are consistent with requirements for successful application in tactical weapon navigation systems. However, sensor performance parameters that are of interest to the designer of inertial navigation systems are frequently not adequately addressed by the MEMS manufacturer. This paper addresses the testing and characterization of a MEMS accelerometer from an inertial navigation perspective. The paper discusses test objectives, data reduction techniques and presents results from the test of a three-axis MEMS accelerometer conducted at Sandia National Laboratories during 1997. The test was structured to achieve visibility and characterization of the accelerometer bias and scale factor stability overtime and temperature. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Neural networks counting chimes.

    PubMed Central

    Amit, D J

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the ideas that led to neural networks capable of recalling associatively and asynchronously temporal sequences of patterns can be extended to produce a neural network that automatically counts the cardinal number in a sequence of identical external stimuli. The network is explicitly constructed, analyzed, and simulated. Such a network may account for the cognitive effect of the automatic counting of chimes to tell the hour. A more general implication is that different electrophysiological responses to identical stimuli, at certain stages of cortical processing, do not necessarily imply synaptic modification, a la Hebb. Such differences may arise from the fact that consecutive identical inputs find the network in different stages of an active temporal sequence of cognitive states. These types of networks are then situated within a program for the study of cognition, which assigns the detection of meaning as the primary role of attractor neural networks rather than computation, in contrast to the parallel distributed processing attitude to the connectionist project. This interpretation is free of homunculus, as well as from the criticism raised against the cognitive model of symbol manipulation. Computation is then identified as the syntax of temporal sequences of quasi-attractors. PMID:3353371

  11. Terrestrial Applications of a Nano-g Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    1996-01-01

    The ultra-sensitive accelerometer, developed for NASA to monitor the microgravity environments of Space Shuttle, five orbiters and Space Station, needed to measure accelerations up to 10 mg with an absolute accuracy of 10 nano-g (10(exp -8)g) for at least two orbits (10(exp 4) seconds) to resolve accelerations associated with orbital drag. Also, the accelerometers needed to have less than 10(exp -9) F.S. off-axis sensitivity; to be thermally and magnetically inert; to be immune to quiescent shock, and to have an in-situ calibration capability. Multi-axis compact seismometers, designs that have twelve decades of dynamic range will be described. Density profilometers, precision gradiometers, gyros and vibration isolation designs and applications will be discussed. Finally, examples of transformations of the accelerometer into sensitive anemometers and imaging spectrometers will be presented.

  12. Accelerometer Method and Apparatus for Integral Display and Control Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting mechanical vibrations and outputting a signal in response thereto is discussed. An accelerometer package having integral display and control functions is suitable for mounting upon the machinery to be monitored. Display circuitry provides signals to a bar graph display which may be used to monitor machine conditions over a period of time. Control switches may be set which correspond to elements in the bar graph to provide an alert if vibration signals increase in amplitude over a selected trip point. The circuitry is shock mounted within the accelerometer housing. The method provides for outputting a broadband analog accelerometer signal, integrating this signal to produce a velocity signal, integrating and calibrating the velocity signal before application to a display driver, and selecting a trip point at which a digitally compatible output signal is generated.

  13. Micromachined force-balance feedback accelerometer with optical displacement detection

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Langlois, Eric; Baker, Michael; Okandan, Murat; Anderson, Robert

    2014-07-22

    An accelerometer includes a proof mass and a frame that are formed in a handle layer of a silicon-on-an-insulator (SOI). The proof mass is separated from the frame by a back-side trench that defines a boundary of the proof mass. The accelerometer also includes a reflector coupled to a top surface of the proof mass. An optical detector is located above the reflector at the device side. The accelerometer further includes at least one suspension spring. The suspension spring has a handle anchor that extends downwards from the device side to the handle layer to mechanically support upward and downward movement of the proof mass relative to a top surface of the proof mass.

  14. Isolation of a piezoresistive accelerometer used in high acceleration tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1992-12-31

    Both uniaxial and triaxial shock isolation techniques for a piezoresistive accelerometer have been developed for pyroshock and impact tests. The uniaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable characteristics for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to +186{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. The triaxial shock isolation technique has demonstrated acceptable results for a temperature range of {minus}50{degree}F to 70{degree}F and a frequency bandwidth of DC to 10 kHz. These temperature ranges, that are beyond the accelerometer manufacturer`s operational limits of {minus}30{degree}F and +150{degree}F, required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Since there is no NIST-traceable (National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable) calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000 g - 15,000 g for the temperature extremes of {minus}50{degree}F and +160{degree}F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson bar with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The NIST-traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is {plus_minus}5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified by the Sandia Secondary Standards Division with an uncertainty of 6%.

  15. Extracting Time-Accurate Acceleration Vectors From Nontrivial Accelerometer Arrangements.

    PubMed

    Franck, Jennifer A; Blume, Janet; Crisco, Joseph J; Franck, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sports-related concussions are of significant concern in many impact sports, and their detection relies on accurate measurements of the head kinematics during impact. Among the most prevalent recording technologies are videography, and more recently, the use of single-axis accelerometers mounted in a helmet, such as the HIT system. Successful extraction of the linear and angular impact accelerations depends on an accurate analysis methodology governed by the equations of motion. Current algorithms are able to estimate the magnitude of acceleration and hit location, but make assumptions about the hit orientation and are often limited in the position and/or orientation of the accelerometers. The newly formulated algorithm presented in this manuscript accurately extracts the full linear and rotational acceleration vectors from a broad arrangement of six single-axis accelerometers directly from the governing set of kinematic equations. The new formulation linearizes the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term with a finite-difference approximation and provides a fast and accurate solution for all six components of acceleration over long time periods (>250 ms). The approximation of the nonlinear centripetal acceleration term provides an accurate computation of the rotational velocity as a function of time and allows for reconstruction of a multiple-impact signal. Furthermore, the algorithm determines the impact location and orientation and can distinguish between glancing, high rotational velocity impacts, or direct impacts through the center of mass. Results are shown for ten simulated impact locations on a headform geometry computed with three different accelerometer configurations in varying degrees of signal noise. Since the algorithm does not require simplifications of the actual impacted geometry, the impact vector, or a specific arrangement of accelerometer orientations, it can be easily applied to many impact investigations in which accurate kinematics need to

  16. Metabolic responses of upper-body accelerometer-controlled video games in adults.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Leah C; Amonette, William E; Dupler, Terry L

    2010-10-01

    Historically, video games required little physical exertion, but new systems utilize handheld accelerometers that require upper-body movement. It is not fully understood if the metabolic workload while playing these games is sufficient to replace routine physical activity. The purpose of this study was to quantify metabolic workloads and estimate caloric expenditure while playing upper-body accelerometer-controlled and classic seated video games. Nineteen adults completed a peak oxygen consumption treadmill test followed by an experimental session where exercising metabolism and ventilation were measured while playing 3 video games: control (CON), low activity (LOW) and high activity (HI). Resting metabolic measures (REST) were also acquired. Caloric expenditure was estimated using the Weir equation. Mean oxygen consumption normalized to body weight for HI condition was greater than LOW, CON, and REST. Mean oxygen consumption normalized to body weight for LOW condition was also greater than CON and REST. Mean exercise intensities of oxygen consumption reserve for HI, LOW, and CON were 25.8% ± 5.1%, 6.4% ± 4.8%, and 0.8% ± 2.4%, respectively. Estimated caloric expenditure during the HI was significantly related to aerobic fitness, but not during other conditions. An active video game significantly elevated oxygen consumption and heart rate, but the increase was dependent on the type of game. The mean oxygen consumption reserve during the HI video game was below recommended international standards for moderate and vigorous activity. Although upper-body accelerometer-controlled video games provided a greater exercising stimulus than classic seated video games, these data suggest they should not replace routine moderate or vigorous exercise.

  17. Determination of sulfur in fly ash and fuel oil standard reference materials by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Filby, R.H.

    1983-12-01

    Sulfur was determined in NBS Coal Fly Ash (SRM 1633) and Residual Fuel Oils (SRM's 1619, 1620a, 1634a) by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (NAA) using the /sup 34/S(n,..gamma..)/sup 35/S reaction. The /sup 35/S was separated from solutions of the standards by either cation-anion exchange on Dowex 50W-X8/Dowex 1-X8 or by adsorption on Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Liquid scintillation counting of aqueous solutions was used for /sup 35/S measurement. The /sup 35/Cl(n,p)/sup 35/S interference was corrected for by measurement of chlorine by instrumental NAA. The method may be applied to very small samples of fly ash or air particulates (<10/sup -3/ g). 1 figure, 5 tables.

  18. Fabrication of a Miniaturized ZnO Nanowire Accelerometer and Its Performance Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Chan; Song, Sangho; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometer suitable for a small haptic actuator array. The accelerometer is made with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire (NW) grown on a copper wafer by a hydrothermal process. The size of the accelerometer is 1.5 × 1.5 mm2, thus fitting the 1.8 × 1.8 mm2 haptic actuator array cell. The detailed fabrication process of the miniaturized accelerometer is illustrated. Performance evaluation of the fabricated accelerometer is conducted by comparing it with a commercial piezoelectric accelerometer. The output current of the fabricated accelerometer increases linearly with the acceleration. The miniaturized ZnO NW accelerometer is feasible for acceleration measurement of small and lightweight devices. PMID:27649184

  19. A Basic Research for the Development and Evaluation of Novel MEMS Digital Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    A, to the characteristic physical scale of the flow . In the case of accelerometer beam motion, the characteristic scale for the gas damping problem...and dynamic conditions encountered in the MEMS accelerometer. Typical ESBGK simulation results for the gas flow around the moving accelerometer beam... gas damping response have been compared with measurements of MEMS accelerometer beam closing and opening response done at various acceleration pulse

  20. Counting a Culture of Mealworms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Math is not the only topic that will be discussed when young children are asked to care for and count "mealworms," a type of insect larvae (just as caterpillars are the babies of butterflies, these larvae are babies of beetles). The following activity can take place over two months as the beetles undergo metamorphosis from larvae to adults. As the…

  1. Self-noise models of five commercial strong-motion accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam; Evans, John R.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    To better characterize the noise of a number of commonly deployed accelerometers in a standardized way, we conducted noise measurements on five different models of strong‐motion accelerometers. Our study was limited to traditional accelerometers (Fig. 1) and is in no way exhaustive.

  2. Oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and their correlation to cluster of differentiation lymphocyte count in population of North-East India in highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Sarat Kumar; Das, Bijay Kumar; Das, Surya Narayan; Mohapatra, Namita; Nayak, Suryakanti; Bhuyan, Lipsa

    2016-01-01

    Background: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection which manifests as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease involving the defects of the T-lymphocyte arm of the immune system. Certain laboratory parameters such as the cluster of differentiation (CD4) count and clinical parameters have long been used as markers of disease progression. In industrialized countries, many studies show a highly correlation between the incidence of oral lesions and immunosuppression and hence, can be used as a marker of immunosuppression. This might not be applicable to a developing country like India. In this study, efforts have been made to supplement the present knowledge on various aspects of oral manifestations in HIV patients in the Indian subcontinent. Aims: To correlate the oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS patients to the level of circulating CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and their effect in anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Subjects and Methods: A total of 104 HIV positive patients were examined for oral lesions. The CD4 count estimated on the same day by fluorescent activated cell sort count machine was then correlated with various oral lesions. Results: Oral manifestations appeared when CD4 count decreased below 500 cells/mm3. Moreover, oral lesions found at different stages showed very strong correlation to their respective CD4 count. Furthermore, there was considerable decline in the incidence of oral manifestations in patients undergoing highly active ART. Conclusions: Oral manifestations are highly predictive markers of severe immune deterioration and disease progression in HIV patients. PMID:27994425

  3. High Sensitivity Optomechanical Reference Accelerometer over 10 kHz

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-05

    measurements and observations in seismology and gravimetry. 2 High sensitivity optomechanical reference accele Approved for public release; distribution is...and this category of accelerometers, outlining a path for high sensitivity reference acceleration measurements and observations in seismology and...Traditional applications require either high acceleration resolution, such as in gravimetry or seismology well below 100 Hz, or large bandwidths, as for

  4. An overview of the evolution of vibrating beam accelerometer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norling, B. L.

    The history of vibrating beam accelerometers (VBA) is briefly outlined, and the current status of VBA technology is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the VBA design fundamentals and the performance characteristics of several state-of-the-art VBA models. Finally, prospects for the future development of VBAs and the effect of VBA technology on the inertial navigation industry are discussed.

  5. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Simon, Jonathon N.; McConaghy, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  6. High-Moisture Diet for Laboratory Rats: Complete Blood Counts, Serum Biochemical Values, and Intestinal Enzyme Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battles, August H.; Knapka, Joseph T.; Stevens, Bruce R.; Lewis, Laura; Lang, Marie T.; Gruendel, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    Rats were fed an irradiated high-moisture diet (KSC-25) with or without access to a water bottle. Physiologic values were compared between these two groups and a group of rats fed a purified diet. Hematologic and serum biochemical values, urine specific gravity, and intestinal enzyme activities were determined from samples collected from the three groups of rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=32) fed the irradiated high-moisture diet with or without a water bottle were the test animals. Rats (n=16) fed an irradiated purified diet and water provided via a water bottle were the control group. The purified diet formulation, modified AIN-76A, is a commonly used purified diet for laboratory rodents. All rats remained alert and healthy throughout the study. A comparison of the physiologic values of rats in this study with reported normal values indicated that all of the rats in the study were in good health. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) of the physiologic values from each rat group are reported.

  7. Comparative analysis of dose rates in bricks determined by neutron activation analysis, alpha counting and X-ray fluorescence analysis for the thermoluminescence fine grain dating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bártová, H.; Kučera, J.; Musílek, L.; Trojek, T.

    2014-11-01

    In order to evaluate the age from the equivalent dose and to obtain an optimized and efficient procedure for thermoluminescence (TL) dating, it is necessary to obtain the values of both the internal and the external dose rates from dated samples and from their environment. The measurements described and compared in this paper refer to bricks from historic buildings and a fine-grain dating method. The external doses are therefore negligible, if the samples are taken from a sufficient depth in the wall. However, both the alpha dose rate and the beta and gamma dose rates must be taken into account in the internal dose. The internal dose rate to fine-grain samples is caused by the concentrations of natural radionuclides 238U, 235U, 232Th and members of their decay chains, and by 40K concentrations. Various methods can be used for determining trace concentrations of these natural radionuclides and their contributions to the dose rate. The dose rate fraction from 238U and 232Th can be calculated, e.g., from the alpha count rate, or from the concentrations of 238U and 232Th, measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The dose rate fraction from 40K can be calculated from the concentration of potassium measured, e.g., by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) or by NAA. Alpha counting and XRF are relatively simple and are accessible for an ordinary laboratory. NAA can be considered as a more accurate method, but it is more demanding regarding time and costs, since it needs a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. A comparison of these methods allows us to decide whether the time- and cost-saving simpler techniques introduce uncertainty that is still acceptable.

  8. The impact of accelerometer use in exercise-associated hypoglycemia prevention in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stenerson, Matthew; Cameron, Fraser; Payne, Shelby R; Payne, Sydney L; Ly, Trang T; Wilson, Darrell M; Buckingham, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-associated hypoglycemia is a common adverse event in people with type 1 diabetes. Previous in silico testing by our group demonstrated superior exercise-associated hypoglycemia mitigation when a predictive low glucose suspend (PLGS) algorithm was augmented to incorporate activity data. The current study investigates the effectiveness of an accelerometer-augmented PLGS algorithm in an outpatient exercise protocol. Subjects with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy participated in two structured soccer sessions, one utilizing the algorithm and the other using the subject's regular basal insulin rate. Each subject wore their own insulin pump and a Dexcom G4™ Platinum continuous glucose monitor (CGM); subjects on-algorithm also wore a Zephyr BioHarness™ 3 accelerometer. The algorithm utilized a Kalman filter with a 30-minute prediction horizon. Activity and CGM readings were manually entered into a spreadsheet and at five-minute intervals, the algorithm indicated whether the basal insulin infusion should be on or suspended; any changes were then implemented by study staff. The rate of hypoglycemia during and after exercise (until the following morning) was compared between groups. Eighteen subjects (mean age 13.4 ± 3.7 years) participated in two separate sessions 7-22 days apart. The difference in meter blood glucose levels between groups at each rest period did not achieve statistical significance at any time point. Hypoglycemia during the session was recorded in three on-algorithm subjects, compared to six off-algorithm subjects. In the postexercise monitoring period, hypoglycemia occurred in two subjects who were on-algorithm during the session and four subjects who were off-algorithm. The accelerometer-augmented algorithm failed to prevent exercise-associated hypoglycemia compared to subjects on their usual basal rates. A larger sample size may have achieved statistical significance. Further research involving an automated system, a larger sample

  9. Towards uniform accelerometry analysis: a standardization methodology to minimize measurement bias due to systematic accelerometer wear-time variation.

    PubMed

    Katapally, Tarun R; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2014-05-01

    Accelerometers are predominantly used to objectively measure the entire range of activity intensities - sedentary behaviour (SED), light physical activity (LPA) and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). However, studies consistently report results without accounting for systematic accelerometer wear-time variation (within and between participants), jeopardizing the validity of these results. This study describes the development of a standardization methodology to understand and minimize measurement bias due to wear-time variation. Accelerometry is generally conducted over seven consecutive days, with participants' data being commonly considered 'valid' only if wear-time is at least 10 hours/day. However, even within 'valid' data, there could be systematic wear-time variation. To explore this variation, accelerometer data of Smart Cities, Healthy Kids study (www.smartcitieshealthykids.com) were analyzed descriptively and with repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Subsequently, a standardization method was developed, where case-specific observed wear-time is controlled to an analyst specified time period. Next, case-specific accelerometer data are interpolated to this controlled wear-time to produce standardized variables. To understand discrepancies owing to wear-time variation, all analyses were conducted pre- and post-standardization. Descriptive analyses revealed systematic wear-time variation, both between and within participants. Pre- and post-standardized descriptive analyses of SED, LPA and MVPA revealed a persistent and often significant trend of wear-time's influence on activity. SED was consistently higher on weekdays before standardization; however, this trend was reversed post-standardization. Even though MVPA was significantly higher on weekdays both pre- and post-standardization, the magnitude of this difference decreased post-standardization. Multivariable analyses with standardized SED, LPA and MVPA as outcome

  10. The association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space mobility among older people.

    PubMed

    Tsai, L-T; Portegijs, E; Rantakokko, M; Viljanen, A; Saajanaho, M; Eronen, J; Rantanen, T

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space mobility in community-dwelling older people. Life-space refers to the spatial area a person purposefully moves through in daily life (bedroom, home, yard, neighborhood, town, and beyond) and life-space mobility to the frequency of travel and the help needed when moving through different life-space areas. The study population comprised community-living 75- to 90-year-old people {n = 174; median age 79.7 [interquartile range (IQR) 7.1]}, participating in the accelerometer substudy of Life-Space Mobility in Old Age (LISPE) project. Step counts and activity time were measured by an accelerometer (Hookie "AM20 Activity Meter") for 7 days. Life-space mobility was assessed with Life-Space Assessment (LSA) questionnaire. Altogether, 16% had a life-space area restricted to the neighborhood when moving independently. Participants with a restricted life space were less physically active and about 70% of them had exceptionally low values in daily step counts (≤ 615 steps) and moderate activity time (≤ 6.8 min). Higher step counts and activity time correlated positively with life-space mobility. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the temporal order of low physical activity level and restriction in life-space mobility.

  11. Averaging of TNTC counts.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, C N; Heller, B

    1988-01-01

    When plate count methods are used for microbial enumeration, if too-numerous-to-count results occur, they are commonly discarded. In this paper, a method for consideration of such results in computation of an average microbial density is developed, and its use is illustrated by example. PMID:3178211

  12. Anarthria impairs subvocal counting.

    PubMed

    Cubelli, R; Nichelli, P; Pentore, R

    1993-12-01

    We studied subvocal counting in two pure anarthric patients. Analysis showed that they performed definitively worse than normal subjects free to articulate subvocally and their scores were in the lower bounds of the performances of subjects suppressing articulation. These results suggest that subvocal counting is impaired after anarthria.

  13. Complexities of Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Bernadine Evans

    This document focuses on one child's skip counting methods. The pupil, a second grade student at Steuben School, in Kankakee, Illinois, was interviewed as she made several attempts at counting twenty-five poker chips on a circular piece of paper. The interview was part of a larger study of "Children's Conceptions of Number and Numeral,"…

  14. Counting Sheep in Basque

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Frank P.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates the interplay of a cognitive system, the Basque numerative system, and a behavioral one, counting sheep. The significant features of the Basque numerative system are analyzed; then it is shown how use of these features facilitates the counting of sheep on open ranges by Basque sheep farmers in California. (Author/RM)

  15. The use of infrared thermography and accelerometers for remote monitoring of dairy cow health and welfare.

    PubMed

    Stewart, M; Wilson, M T; Schaefer, A L; Huddart, F; Sutherland, M A

    2017-03-02

    Increasing reliance on automated systems on-farm has led to a need for remote monitoring of health and welfare. We aimed to validate 2 methods that could be integrated into automated systems currently in use: infrared thermography (IRT) to measure respiration rate (RR), and accelerometers to measure the flinch, step, kick (FSK) response and assessing stress and discomfort. We monitored 22 multiparous, nonlactating, Friesian and Friesian × Jersey cows (average 5.1 yr of age) during a baseline period (2 min), a restraint in a crush (2 min), and then a recovery period after exposure to a startle (2 min). We measured RR with continuous IRT imaging of airflow through the nostrils and by counting flank movements from video and live recordings. We recorded heart rate (HR) and HR variability using HR monitors, and we recorded FSK from continuous video analysis of leg movements and indirectly using accelerometers attached to both hind legs. The FSK response was scored between 1 and 4 based on the height and direction of each leg movement. We observed no change in RR, HR variability, or FSK in response to the startle; however, HR increased briefly by 10 bpm. Bland-Altman plots indicated good agreement between the different methods of measuring RR, with average differences of -0.01 ± 0.87, 0.83 ± 0.57, and 0.37 ± 1.02 breaths/min for video versus live, IRT versus live and IRT versus video, respectively. Acceleration was also highly correlated with FSK scores of ≤3 (R(2) = 0.96) and ≤2 (R(2) = 0.89) and moderately correlated with FSK scores of 1 (R(2) = 0.66) over the 4-min sampling period. The results show that accelerometers can provide an indirect measure of the FSK response, and IRT can be used reliably to measure RR. With further development, both technologies could be integrated into existing systems for remote monitoring of dairy cows' health and welfare on-farm.

  16. Validity of a Wearable Accelerometer Device to Measure Average Acceleration Values During High-Speed Running.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeremy P; Hopkinson, Trent L; Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Serpell, Benjamin G; Mara, Jocelyn K; Ball, Nick B

    2016-11-01

    Alexander, JP, Hopkinson, TL, Wundersitz, DWT, Serpell, BG, Mara, JK, and Ball, NB. Validity of a wearable accelerometer device to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3007-3013, 2016-The aim of this study was to determine the validity of an accelerometer to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. Thirteen subjects performed three sprint efforts over a 40-m distance (n = 39). Acceleration was measured using a 100-Hz triaxial accelerometer integrated within a wearable tracking device (SPI-HPU; GPSports). To provide a concurrent measure of acceleration, timing gates were positioned at 10-m intervals (0-40 m). Accelerometer data collected during 0-10 m and 10-20 m provided a measure of average acceleration values. Accelerometer data was recorded as the raw output and filtered by applying a 3-point moving average and a 10-point moving average. The accelerometer could not measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. The accelerometer significantly overestimated average acceleration values during both 0-10 m and 10-20 m, regardless of the data filtering technique (p < 0.001). Body mass significantly affected all accelerometer variables (p < 0.10, partial η = 0.091-0.219). Body mass and the absence of a gravity compensation formula affect the accuracy and practicality of accelerometers. Until GPSports-integrated accelerometers incorporate a gravity compensation formula, the usefulness of any accelerometer-derived algorithms is questionable.

  17. Does the Relationship Between Physical Activity and Quality of Life Differ Based on Generic Versus Disease-Targeted Instruments?

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Snook, Erin M.; Gliottoni, Rachael C.

    2009-01-01

    Background There has been an increased interest in the study of physical activity and its relationship with quality of life (QOL) and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic disease conditions. The investigations have used either generic or disease-targeted instruments for measuring QOL and HRQL, but have not examined differences in the associations as a function of the types of instruments. Purpose The present study examined the associations among physical activity, QOL, and HRQL using generic and disease-targeted instruments in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Participants were 292 individuals with MS who wore an accelerometer for 7 days and then completed the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ), Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale-29 (MSIS-29), Leeds Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Scale (LMSQOL), Short Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12), and Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS). Results Accelerometer counts and GLTEQ scores had similarly sized correlations with scores from generic (SF-12) and the disease-specific (MSIS-29)measures of HRQL and generic (SWLS) and the disease-specific (LMSQOL) measures of QOL. Path analysis indicated a similar pattern of directional relationships between accelerometer counts and GLTEQ scores with physical and mental HRQL and, in turn, physical and mental HRQL with QOL using generic and disease-targeted instruments. Conclusions Our results suggest that in cross-sectional analysis, physical activity is similarly related with QOL and HRQL using generic and disease-targeted instruments in persons with MS. PMID:18719976

  18. High performance, accelerometer-based control of the Mini-MAST structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; King, James A.; Phillips, Douglas J.; Hyland, David C.

    1992-08-01

    Many large space system concepts will require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements such as line of sight pointing accuracy and constraints on rms surface roughness. In order for these concepts to become operational, it is imperative that the benefits of active vibration control be shown to be practical in ground based experiments. The results of an experiment shows the successful application of the Maximum Entropy/Optical Projection control design methodology to active vibration control for a flexible structure. The testbed is the Mini-Mast structure at NASA-Langley and has features dynamically traceable to future space systems. To maximize traceability to real flight systems, the controllers were designed and implemented using sensors (four accelerometers and one rate gyro) that are actually mounted to the structure. Ground mounted displacement sensors that could greatly ease the control design task were available but were used only for performance evaluation. The use of the accelerometers increased the potential of destabilizing the system due to spillover effects and motivated the use of precompensation strategy to achieve sufficient compensator roll-off.

  19. Reliability and validity of daily physical activity measures during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Zbogar, Dominik; Eng, Janice J; Miller, William C; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Verrier, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the test–retest reliability and convergent validity of daily physical activity measures during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Design: Observational study. Setting: Two inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation centres. Subjects: Participants (n = 106) were recruited from consecutive admissions to rehabilitation. Methods: Physical activity during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation stay was recorded on two days via (1) wrist accelerometer, (2) hip accelerometer if ambulatory, and (3) self-report (Physical Activity Recall Assessment for People with Spinal Cord Injury questionnaire). Spearman’s correlations and Bland–Altman plots were utilized for test–retest reliability. Correlations between physical activity measures and clinical measures (functional independence, hand function, and ambulation) were performed. Results: Correlations for physical activity measures between Day 1 and Day 2 were moderate to high (ρ = 0.53–0.89). Bland–Altman plots showed minimal bias and more within-subject differences in more active individuals and wide limits of agreement. None of these three physical activity measures correlated with one another. A moderate correlation was found between wrist accelerometry counts and grip strength (ρ = 0.58) and between step counts and measures of ambulation (ρ = 0.62). Functional independence was related to wrist accelerometry (ρ = 0.70) and step counts (ρ = 0.56), but not with self-report. Conclusion: The test–retest reliability and convergent validity of the instrumented measures suggest that wrist and hip accelerometers are appropriate tools for use in research studies of daily physical activity in the spinal cord injury rehabilitation setting but are too variable for individual use. PMID:27635252

  20. Validation of triaxial accelerometers to measure the lying behaviour of adult domestic horses.

    PubMed

    DuBois, C; Zakrajsek, E; Haley, D B; Merkies, K

    2015-01-01

    Examining the characteristics of an animal's lying behaviour, such as frequency and duration of lying bouts, has become increasingly relevant for animal welfare research. Triaxial accelerometers have the advantage of being able to continuously monitor an animal's standing and lying behaviour without relying on live observations or video recordings. Multiple models of accelerometers have been validated for use in monitoring dairy cattle; however, no units have been validated for use in equines. This study tested Onset Pendant G data loggers attached to the hind limb of each of two mature Standardbred horses for a period of 5 days. Data loggers were set to record their position every 20 s. Horses were monitored via live observations during the day and by video recordings during the night to compare activity against accelerometer data. All lying events occurred overnight (three to five lying bouts per horse per night). Data collected from the loggers was converted and edited using a macro program to calculate the number of bouts and the length of time each animal spent lying down by hour and by day. A paired t-test showed no significant difference between the video observations and the output from the data loggers (P=0.301). The data loggers did not distinguish standing hipshot from standing square. Predictability, sensitivity, and specificity were all >99%. This study has validated the use of Onset Pendant G data loggers to determine the frequency and duration of standing and lying bouts in adult horses when set to sample and register readings at 20 s intervals.

  1. Predicting Chinese Children and Youth's Energy Expenditure Using ActiGraph Accelerometers: A Calibration and Cross-Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and cross-validate an equation based on ActiGraph accelerometer GT3X output to predict children and youth's energy expenditure (EE) of physical activity (PA). Method: Participants were 367 Chinese children and youth (179 boys and 188 girls, aged 9 to 17 years old) who wore 1 ActiGraph GT3X…

  2. AUTOMATIC COUNTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Howell, W.D.

    1957-08-20

    An apparatus for automatically recording the results of counting operations on trains of electrical pulses is described. The disadvantages of prior devices utilizing the two common methods of obtaining the count rate are overcome by this apparatus; in the case of time controlled operation, the disclosed system automatically records amy information stored by the scaler but not transferred to the printer at the end of the predetermined time controlled operations and, in the case of count controlled operation, provision is made to prevent a weak sample from occupying the apparatus for an excessively long period of time.

  3. Pioneer Anomaly and Space Accelerometer for Gravity Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Agnès; Christophe, Bruno; Reynaud, Serge

    2006-06-01

    The Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft are subject to an unexplained acceleration which has a constant value of (8.74 1.33) \\cdot 10-10 m\\cdot s-2 and seems to be directed toward the sun. The hypotheses to explain this anomaly are either technical artifacts or new physics. This presentation deals with the unfolding of two aspects of my thesis: Doppler and telemetry data analysis with the objective to investigate the nature of the anomaly, and adapation of an ONERA accelerometer for a future mission in which the anomaly will be confirmed and more precisely measured. The presence of an accelerometer is mandatory for the identification of the anomaly's origin.

  4. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-22

    To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7-20 Hz range.

  5. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-01

    To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7–20 Hz range. PMID:28117740

  6. Guidelines for Standardized Testing of Broadband Seismometers and Accelerometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutt, Charles R.; Evans, John R.; Followill, Fred; Nigbor, Robert L.; Wielandt, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    Testing and specification of seismic and earthquake-engineering sensors and recorders has been marked by significant variations in procedures and selected parameters. These variations cause difficulty in comparing such specifications and test results. In July 1989, and again in May 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey hosted international pub-lic/private workshops with the goal of defining widely accepted guidelines for the testing of seismological inertial sensors, seismometers, and accelerometers. The Proceedings of the 2005 workshop have been published and include as appendix 6 the report of the 1989 workshop. This document represents a collation and rationalization of a single set of formal guidelines for testing and specifying broadband seismometers and accelerometers.

  7. Transit Use, Physical Activity, and Body Mass Index Changes: Objective Measures Associated With Complete Street Light-Rail Construction

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Carol M.; Tribby, Calvin P.; Miller, Harvey J.; Smith, Ken R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed effects on physical activity (PA) and weight among participants in a complete street intervention that extended a light-rail line in Salt Lake City, Utah. Methods. Participants in the Moving Across Places Study resided within 2 kilometers of the new line. They wore accelerometers and global positioning system (GPS) loggers for 1 week before and after rail construction. Regression analyses compared change scores of participants who never rode transit with continuing, former, and new riders, after adjustment for control variables (total n = 537). Results. New riders had significantly more accelerometer-measured counts per minute than never-riders (P < .01), and former riders had significantly fewer (P < .01). New riders lost (P < .05) and former riders gained (P < .01) weight. Former riders lost 6.4 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) per 10 hours of accelerometer wear (P < .01) and gained 16.4 minutes of sedentary time (P < .01). New riders gained 4.2 MVPA minutes (P < .05) and lost 12.8 (P < .05) sedentary minutes per 10 hours accelerometer wear. Conclusions. In light of the health benefits of transit ridership in the complete street area, research should address how to encourage more sustained ridership. PMID:25973829

  8. [Platelet count in the cat].

    PubMed

    Moritz, A; Hoffmann, C

    1997-11-01

    The technique of collecting blood samples is primarily responsible for the appearance of platelet-agglomeration in cats. Blood obtained by the conventional way ("one syringe technology", drips of blood) caused in 52% of the cases an activation of the large and therefore active thrombocytes however. Rejection of the first 2-5 ml blood for the platelet count ("two syringe technology") reduced the rate of platelet-agglomeration significantly. No big differences in platelet-agglomeration were found with regard to the place used for collecting blood (V. cephalica antebrachii/V. jugularis). Platelet-agglutination was observed with Li-Heparin, K-EDTA, Na-Citrat or ACD anticoagulated blood samples. Citrat (Na-Citrat, ACD) seemed to have a stabilizing effect on feline thrombocytes as has been described for human thrombocytes. The platelet count in cats should be performed within 30 minutes.

  9. Champ Accelerometer: Evaluation and Contribution To The Gravity Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perosanz, F.; Loyer, S.; Bruinsma, S.; Tamagnan, D.; Lemoine, J. M.; Biancale, R.; Fayard, T.; Vales, N.; Touboul, P.

    The STAR accelerometer on-board the German CHAMP satellite delivers non- gravitational accelerations with an unprecedented resolution. This study presents the global evaluation of the instrument in terms of continuous measurement and "House Keeping" parameters surveying, a posteriori calibration strategy and results and mis- function analysis and correction. In addition the contribution of the STAR accelerom- eter to dynamic orbit computation and gravity modelling is evaluated. Different orbit fit solutions and geoid models resulting from gravity field test models are compared.

  10. Understanding Blood Counts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart, Kidneys, Liver and Lung Function Infections Iron Overload Low Blood Counts Pain Disease- and Treatment-Related ... cancer research around the world and provides free information and support services. Privacy Policy Security Copyright Link ...

  11. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in ... helps doctors check on your overall health. The tests can also help to diagnose diseases and conditions ...

  12. Calorie count - Fast food

    MedlinePlus

    ... count - fast food FOOD ITEM SERVING SIZE CALORIES Breakfast Foods Dunkin Donuts Egg White Veggie Wrap 1 ... Cheese Biscuit Sandwich 1 sandwich 510 BK Ultimate Breakfast Platter 1 platter 1190 McDonalds Fruit 'n Yogurt ...

  13. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control ... called starchy vegetables because they are high in starch. These vegetables have more carbohydrates per serving than ...

  14. Inventory count strategies.

    PubMed

    Springer, W H

    1996-02-01

    An important principle of accounting is that asset inventory needs to be correctly valued to ensure that the financial statements of the institution are accurate. Errors is recording the value of ending inventory in one fiscal year result in errors to published financial statements for that year as well as the subsequent fiscal year. Therefore, it is important that accurate physical counts be periodically taken. It is equally important that any system being used to generate inventory valuation, reordering or management reports be based on consistently accurate on-hand balances. At the foundation of conducting an accurate physical count of an inventory is a comprehensive understanding of the process coupled with a written plan. This article presents a guideline of the physical count processes involved in a traditional double-count approach.

  15. High resolution interface circuit for closed-loop accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yin; Xiaowei, Liu; Weiping, Chen; Zhiping, Zhou

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a low noise switched-capacitor CMOS interface circuit for the closed-loop operation of a capacitive accelerometer. The time division multiplexing of the same electrode is adopted to avoid the strong feedthrough between capacitance sensing and electrostatic force feedback. A PID controller is designed to ensure the stability and dynamic response of a high Q closed-loop accelerometer with a vacuum package. The architecture only requires single ended operational amplifiers, transmission gates and capacitors. Test results show that a full scale acceleration of ±3 g, non-linearity of 0.05% and signal bandwidth of 1000 Hz are achieved. The complete module operates from a ±5 V supply and has a measured sensitivity of 1.2 V/g with a noise of floor of in closed-loop. The chip is fabricated in the 2 μm two-metal and two-poly n-well CMOS process with an area of 15.2 mm2. These results prove that this circuit is suitable for high performance micro-accelerometer applications like seismic detection and oil exploration.

  16. Measuring gravitation near Mercury: the contribution of ISA accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Peron, Roberto; Lucchesi, David; Santoli, Francesco; Lefevre, Carlo; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Nozzoli, Sergio; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo

    2012-07-01

    The forthcoming BepiColombo mission for the exploration of the planet Mercury will include a comprehensive set of experiments --- the so--called Radio Science Experiments (RSE) --- in order to measure the gravitational field of the planet, its rotation, and to perform precise tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Fundamental piece of RSE is the high--sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) accelerometer. It will directly measure the strong non--gravitational perturbations acting on Mercury Planetary Orbiter spacecraft, which are an important source of error in the RSE meaurements. Being the first time for an high--sensitivity accelerometer onboard an interplanetary mission, a number of choices had to be made and several issues had to be faced in the design phases. Following a general description of the instrument scientific objectives, its working and operations will be described. Emphasis will be given on the complex calibration procedures required in the various mission phases and on the integration of the measurements with the overall RSE operations and data analysis.

  17. Citizen Sensors for SHM: Use of Accelerometer Data from Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Maria; Fukuda, Yoshio; Mizuta, Masato; Ozer, Ekin

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphones have created a significant opportunity to form a low-cost wireless Citizen Sensor network and produce big data for monitoring structural integrity and safety under operational and extreme loads. Such data are particularly useful for rapid assessment of structural damage in a large urban setting after a major event such as an earthquake. This study explores the utilization of smartphone accelerometers for measuring structural vibration, from which structural health and post-event damage can be diagnosed. Widely available smartphones are tested under sinusoidal wave excitations with frequencies in the range relevant to civil engineering structures. Large-scale seismic shaking table tests, observing input ground motion and response of a structural model, are carried out to evaluate the accuracy of smartphone accelerometers under operational, white-noise and earthquake excitations of different intensity. Finally, the smartphone accelerometers are tested on a dynamically loaded bridge. The extensive experiments show satisfactory agreements between the reference and smartphone sensor measurements in both time and frequency domains, demonstrating the capability of the smartphone sensors to measure structural responses ranging from low-amplitude ambient vibration to high-amplitude seismic response. Encouraged by the results of this study, the authors are developing a citizen-engaging and data-analytics crowdsourcing platform towards a smartphone-based Citizen Sensor network for structural health monitoring and post-event damage assessment applications. PMID:25643056

  18. Counting Attribute Blocks: Constructing Meaning for the Multiplication Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Elliott

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity in which attribute blocks help middle school students understand the fundamental counting principle and the multiplication rule. Demonstrates how these materials can aid students in building a conceptual understanding of multiplication and the counting principle. (ASK)

  19. Neutron counting with cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Van Esch, Patrick; Crisanti, Marta; Mutti, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn't allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)

  20. Association of Active and Sedentary Behaviors with Postmenopausal Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dallal, Cher M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Matthews, Charles E.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Hartman, Terryl J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Falk, Roni T.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Xu, Xia; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Gierach, Gretchen L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may reduce endogenous estrogens but few studies have assessed effects on estrogen metabolism and none have evaluated sedentary behavior in relation to estrogen metabolism. We assessed relationships between accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behavior and 15 urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites (EM) among postmenopausal controls from a population-based breast cancer case-control study conducted in Poland (2000-2003). Methods Postmenopausal women (N=542) were ages 40 to 72 years and not currently using hormone therapy. Accelerometers, worn for seven days, were used to derive measures of average activity (counts/day) and sedentary behavior (<100 counts/min/day). EM were measured in 12-hour urine samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. EM were analyzed individually, in metabolic pathways (C-2, -4, or -16), and as ratios relative to parent estrogens. Geometric means of EM by tertiles of accelerometer-measures, adjusted for age and body mass, were computed using linear models. Results High activity was associated with lower levels of estrone and estradiol (p-trend=0.01) while increased sedentary time was positively associated with these parent estrogens (p-trend=0.04). Inverse associations were observed between high activity and 2-methoxyestradiol, 4-methoxyestradiol, 17-epiestriol and 16-epiestriol (p-trend=0.03). Sedentary time was positively associated with methylated catechols in the 2- and 4-hydroxylation pathways (p-trend≤0.04). Women in the highest tertile of activity had increased hydroxylation at the C-2, -4, and -16 sites relative to parent estrogens (p-trend≤0.02) while increased sedentary time was associated with a lower 16-pathway:parent estrogen ratio (p-trend=0.01). Conclusions Higher activity was associated with lower urinary estrogens, possibly through increased estrogen hydroxylation and subsequent metabolism, while sedentary behavior may reduce metabolism. PMID:26460631

  1. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) and the Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts (DAS28) in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Piet L C M; Renskers, Lisanne

    2016-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), disease activity cannot be measured in all individual patients according to a single variable. The Disease Activity Score (DAS) and the DAS28 have been developed to measure disease activity in RA both in daily clinical practice as well as in clinical trials on a group as well as individual level. The DAS/DAS28 is a continuous measure of RA disease activity that combines information from swollen joints, tender joints, acute phase response and general health. The DAS-based EULAR response criteria were primarily developed to be used in clinical trials. The EULAR response criteria classify individual patients as non-, moderate, or good responders, dependent on the magnitude of change and level of disease activity reached. In addition, already in the early nineties, cut points were developed to categorise patients in remission. The DAS28 is incorporated in several electronic patient records and web-based systems for monitoring purposes in daily clinical practice. In addition to this, it is being used in combination with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to facilitate self-monitoring.

  2. Validity of using tri-axial accelerometers to measure human movement - Part I: Posture and movement detection.

    PubMed

    Lugade, Vipul; Fortune, Emma; Morrow, Melissa; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-02-01

    A robust method for identifying movement in the free-living environment is needed to objectively measure physical activity. The purpose of this study was to validate the identification of postural orientation and movement from acceleration data against visual inspection from video recordings. Using tri-axial accelerometers placed on the waist and thigh, static orientations of standing, sitting, and lying down, as well as dynamic movements of walking, jogging and transitions between postures were identified. Additionally, subjects walked and jogged at self-selected slow, comfortable, and fast speeds. Identification of tasks was performed using a combination of the signal magnitude area, continuous wavelet transforms and accelerometer orientations. Twelve healthy adults were studied in the laboratory, with two investigators identifying tasks during each second of video observation. The intraclass correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability were greater than 0.95 for all activities except for transitions. Results demonstrated high validity, with sensitivity and positive predictive values of greater than 85% for sitting and lying, with walking and jogging identified at greater than 90%. The greatest disagreement in identification accuracy between the algorithm and video occurred when subjects were asked to fidget while standing or sitting. During variable speed tasks, gait was correctly identified for speeds between 0.1m/s and 4.8m/s. This study included a range of walking speeds and natural movements such as fidgeting during static postures, demonstrating that accelerometer data can be used to identify orientation and movement among the general population.

  3. Fall-detection solution for mobile platforms using accelerometer and gyroscope data.

    PubMed

    De Cillisy, Francesca; De Simioy, Francesca; Guidoy, Floriana; Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Setolay, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Falls are a major health risk that diminish the quality of life among elderly people. Apart from falls themselves, most dramatic consequences are usually related with long lying periods that can cause serious side effects. These findings call for pervasive long-term fall detection systems able to automatically detect falls. In this paper, we propose an effective fall detection algorithm for mobile platforms. Using data retrieved from wearable sensors, such as Inertial Measurements Units (IMUs) and/or SmartPhones (SPs), our algorithm is able to detect falls using features extracted from accelerometer and gyroscope. While mostly of the mobile-based solutions for fall management deal only with accelerometer data, in the proposed approach we combine the instantaneous acceleration magnitude vector with changes of the user's heading in a Threshold Based Algorithm (TBA). In such a way, we were able to handle falls detection with minimal computational load, increasing the overall system accuracy with respect to traditional fall management methods. Experimental results show the strong detection performance of the proposed solution in discriminating between falls and typical Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) presenting fall-like acceleration patterns.

  4. Objective measurement of sedentary behaviour using accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, B; Stratton, G; Mc Carthy, M; Muehlhausen, W

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sedentary behaviour (SB) is an important risk factor for a number of chronic diseases. Although gaps remain in our knowledge of the elements of SB most associated with reduced health outcomes, measuring SB is important, especially in less active patient populations where treatment-related changes may be seen first in changes in SB. Methods: We review current published work in the measurement of SB to make recommendations for SB measurement in clinical studies. Results: To help move our understanding of the area forward, we propose a set of derived measures of SB that can be easily understood and interpreted. Conclusion: Although there is more work required to determine and validate the most clinically relevant and sensitive measures of SB, there is enough understanding of how to measure SB to enable its inclusion in study protocols. PMID:27478922

  5. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, James E.

    1987-01-01

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  6. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, J.E.

    1985-03-05

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  7. Accelerometry to Assess Preschooler's Free-Play: Issues with Count Thresholds and Epoch Durations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Melody; Schofield, Grant M.; Schluter, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the utility of current accelerometer threshold definitions and epoch durations for physical activity intensity classification in preschool-aged children. Using video footage of children engaged in active play, directly observed 1-sec epoch physical activity intensity scores were derived from a modified version of the Children's…

  8. Interpretation of galaxy counts

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsely, B.M.

    1980-10-01

    New models are presented for the interpretation of recent counts of galaxies to 24th magnitude, and predictions are shown to 28th magnitude for future comparison with data from the Space Telescope. The results supersede earlier, more schematic models by the author. Tyson and Jarvis found in their counts a ''local'' density enhancement at 17th magnitude, on comparison with the earlier models; the excess is no longer significant when a more realistic mixture of galaxy colors is used. Bruzual and Kron's conclusion that Kron's counts show evidence for evolution at faint magnitudes is confirmed, and it is predicted that some 23d magnitude galaxies have redshifts greater than unity. These may include spheroidal systems, elliptical galaxies, and the bulges of early-type spirals and S0's, seen during their primeval rapid star formation.

  9. Whose interests count?

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Lantos, John D

    2014-10-01

    Whose interests should count and how should various interests be balanced at the pediatric patient's bedside? The interests of the child patient clearly count. Recently, however, many authors have argued that the family's interests also count. But how should we think about the interests of others? What does it mean to talk about "the family" in this context? Does it really just mean the interests of each individual family member? Or is the family itself a moral entity that has interests of its own independent of the interests of each of its members? Are such interests important only as they affect the patient's interest or also for their own sake? In this special supplement to Pediatrics, a group of pediatricians, philosophers, and lawyers grapple with these questions. They examine these issues from different angles and reach different conclusions. Jointly, they demonstrate the ethical importance and, above all, the ethical complexity of the family's role at the bedside.

  10. Relationships between vocal function measures derived from an acoustic microphone and a subglottal neck-surface accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Daryush D.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring subglottal neck-surface acceleration has received renewed attention due to the ability of low-profile accelerometers to confidentially and noninvasively track properties related to normal and disordered voice characteristics and behavior. This study investigated the ability of subglottal neck-surface acceleration to yield vocal function measures traditionally derived from the acoustic voice signal and help guide the development of clinically functional accelerometer-based measures from a physiological perspective. Results are reported for 82 adult speakers with voice disorders and 52 adult speakers with normal voices who produced the sustained vowels /a/, /i/, and /u/ at a comfortable pitch and loudness during the simultaneous recording of radiated acoustic pressure and subglottal neck-surface acceleration. As expected, timing-related measures of jitter exhibited the strongest correlation between acoustic and neck-surface acceleration waveforms (r ≤ 0.99), whereas amplitude-based measures of shimmer correlated less strongly (r ≤ 0.74). Additionally, weaker correlations were exhibited by spectral measures of harmonics-to-noise ratio (r ≤ 0.69) and tilt (r ≤ 0.57), whereas the cepstral peak prominence correlated more strongly (r ≤ 0.90). These empirical relationships provide evidence to support the use of accelerometers as effective complements to acoustic recordings in the assessment and monitoring of vocal function in the laboratory, clinic, and during an individual’s daily activities. PMID:27066520

  11. System Wide Joint Position Sensor Fault Tolerance in Robot Systems Using Cartesian Accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, Hal A.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Joint position sensors are necessary for most robot control systems. A single position sensor failure in a normal robot system can greatly degrade performance. This paper presents a method to obtain position information from Cartesian accelerometers without integration. Depending on the number and location of the accelerometers. the proposed system can tolerate the loss of multiple position sensors. A solution technique suitable for real-time implementation is presented. Simulations were conducted using 5 triaxial accelerometers to recover from the loss of up to 4 joint position sensors on a 7 degree of freedom robot moving in general three dimensional space. The simulations show good estimation performance using non-ideal accelerometer measurements.

  12. The location of the tibial accelerometer does influence impact acceleration parameters during running.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Cuevas, Angel Gabriel; Encarnación-Martínez, Alberto; Camacho-García, Andrés; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro

    2016-10-03

    Tibial accelerations have been associated with a number of running injuries. However, studies attaching the tibial accelerometer on the proximal section are as numerous as those attaching the accelerometer on the distal section. This study aimed to investigate whether accelerometer location influences acceleration parameters commonly reported in running literature. To fulfil this purpose, 30 athletes ran at 2.22, 2.78 and 3.33 m · s(-1) with three accelerometers attached with double-sided tape and tightened to the participants' tolerance on the forehead, the proximal section of the tibia and the distal section of the tibia. Time-domain (peak acceleration, shock attenuation) and frequency-domain parameters (peak frequency, peak power, signal magnitude and shock attenuation in both the low and high frequency ranges) were calculated for each of the tibial locations. The distal accelerometer registered greater tibial acceleration peak and shock attenuation compared to the proximal accelerometer. With respect to the frequency-domain analysis, the distal accelerometer provided greater values of all the low-frequency parameters, whereas no difference was observed for the high-frequency parameters. These findings suggest that the location of the tibial accelerometer does influence the acceleration signal parameters, and thus, researchers should carefully consider the location they choose to place the accelerometer so that equivalent comparisons across studies can be made.

  13. Self-calibration method of the bias of a space electrostatic accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Xia, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Yan-Zheng; Wu, Shu-Chao; Zhou, Ze-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The high precision space electrostatic accelerometer is an instrument to measure the non-gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft. It is one of the key payloads for satellite gravity measurements and space fundamental physics experiments. The measurement error of the accelerometer directly affects the precision of gravity field recovery for the earth. This paper analyzes the sources of the bias according to the operating principle and structural constitution of the space electrostatic accelerometer. Models of bias due to the asymmetry of the displacement sensing system, including the mechanical sensor head and the capacitance sensing circuit, and the asymmetry of the feedback control actuator circuit are described separately. According to the two models, a method of bias self-calibration by using only the accelerometer data is proposed, based on the feedback voltage data of the accelerometer before and after modulating the DC biasing voltage (Vb) applied on its test mass. Two types of accelerometer biases are evaluated separately using in-orbit measurement data of a space electrostatic accelerometer. Based on the preliminary analysis, the bias of the accelerometer onboard of an experiment satellite is evaluated to be around 10(-4) m/s(2), about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the noise limit. Finally, considering the two asymmetries, a comprehensive bias model is analyzed. A modified method to directly calibrate the accelerometer comprehensive bias is proposed.

  14. Self-calibration method of the bias of a space electrostatic accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Xia, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Yan-Zheng; Wu, Shu-Chao; Zhou, Ze-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The high precision space electrostatic accelerometer is an instrument to measure the non-gravitational forces acting on a spacecraft. It is one of the key payloads for satellite gravity measurements and space fundamental physics experiments. The measurement error of the accelerometer directly affects the precision of gravity field recovery for the earth. This paper analyzes the sources of the bias according to the operating principle and structural constitution of the space electrostatic accelerometer. Models of bias due to the asymmetry of the displacement sensing system, including the mechanical sensor head and the capacitance sensing circuit, and the asymmetry of the feedback control actuator circuit are described separately. According to the two models, a method of bias self-calibration by using only the accelerometer data is proposed, based on the feedback voltage data of the accelerometer before and after modulating the DC biasing voltage (Vb) applied on its test mass. Two types of accelerometer biases are evaluated separately using in-orbit measurement data of a space electrostatic accelerometer. Based on the preliminary analysis, the bias of the accelerometer onboard of an experiment satellite is evaluated to be around 10-4 m/s2, about 4 orders of magnitude greater than the noise limit. Finally, considering the two asymmetries, a comprehensive bias model is analyzed. A modified method to directly calibrate the accelerometer comprehensive bias is proposed.

  15. Characterizing coarse bedload transport during floods with RFID and accelerometer tracers, in-stream RFID antennas and HEC-RAS modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    By monitoring the transport timing and distances of tracer grains in a steep mountains stream, we collected data that can constrain numerical bedload transport models considered for these systems. We captured bedload activity during a weeks-spanning snowmelt period in Reynolds Creek, Idaho by deploying Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and accelerometer embedded tracers with in-stream stationary RFID antennas. During transport events, RFID dataloggers recorded the times when tracers passed over stationary antennas. The accelerometer tracers also logged x, y, z-axis accelerations every 10 minutes to identify times of motion and rest. After snowmelt flows receded, we found tracers with mobile antennas and surveyed their positions. We know the timing and tracer locations when accelerometer tracers were initially entrained, passed stationary antennas, and were finally deposited at the surveyed locations. The fraction of moving accelerometers over time correlates well with discharge. Comparisons of the transported tracer fraction between rising and falling limbs over multiple flood peaks suggest that some degree of clockwise hysteresis persisted during the snowmelt period. Additionally, we apply accelerometer transport durations and displacement distances to calculate virtual velocities over full tracer path lengths and over lengths between initial locations to stationary antennas as well as between stationary antennas to final positions. The accelerometer-based virtual velocities are significantly faster than those estimated from traditional tracer methods that estimate bedload transport durations by assuming threshold flow conditions. We also subsample the motion data to calculate how virtual velocities change over the measurement intervals. Regressions of these relations are in turn used to extrapolate virtual velocities at smaller sampling timescales. Minimum hop lengths are also evaluated for each accelerometer tracer. Finally, flow conditions during the

  16. Validation of reported physical activity for cholesterol control using two different physical activity instruments.

    PubMed

    Fan, Amy Z; Ham, Sandra A; Muppidi, Shravani Reddy; Mokdad, Ali H

    2009-01-01

    The National Cholesterol Education Program recommends increasing physical activity to improve cholesterol levels and overall cardiovascular health. We examined whether US adults who reported increasing their physical activity to control or lower blood cholesterol following physician's advice or on their own efforts had higher levels of physical activity than those who reported that they did not. We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004, which implemented two physical activity assessment instruments. The physical activity questionnaire (PAQ) assessed self-reported frequency, intensity, and duration of leisure-time, household, and transportation-related physical activity in the past month. Physical movement was objectively monitored using a waist accelerometer that assessed minute-by-minute intensity (counts of movement/minute) during waking time over a 7-day period. We adjusted our analysis for age, gender, race/ethnicity, educational attainment, and body mass index. Participants who reported increasing physical activity to control blood cholesterol had more PAQ-assessed physical activity and more accelerometer-assessed active days per week compared to those who did not. However, there were no significant differences in cholesterol levels between comparison groups. These findings suggest that self-report of exercising more to control or lower cholesterol levels among US adults might be valid.

  17. Interest of the MICROSTAR Accelerometer to improve the GRASP Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, E.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Christophe, B.; Liorzou, F.; Huynh, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Geodetic Reference Antenna in Space (GRASP) is a micro satellite mission concept proposed by JPL to improve the definition of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF). GRASP collocates GPS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS sensors on a dedicated spacecraft in order to establish precise and stable ties between the key geodetic techniques used to define and disseminate the TRF. GRASP also offers a space-based reference antenna for the present and future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). By taking advantage of the new testing possibilities offer by the catapult facility at the ZARM drop tower, the ONERA's space accelerometer team proposes an up-dated version, called MICROSTAR, of its ultra sensitive electrostatic accelerometers which have contributed to the success of the last Earth's gravity missions GRACE and GOCE. Built around a cubic proof-mass, it provides the 3 linear accelerations with a resolution better than 10-11 ms-2/Hz1/2 into a measurement bandwidth between 10-3 Hz and 0.1 Hz and the 3 angular accelerations about its 3 orthogonal axes with 5´10-10 rad.s-2/Hz1/2 resolution. Integrated at the centre of mass of the satellite, MICROSTAR improves the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) by accurate measurement of the non-gravitational force acting on the satellite. It offers also the possibility to calibrate the change in the position of the satellite center of mass with an accuracy better than 100 μm as demonstrated in the GRACE mission. Assuming a sufficiently rigid structure between the antennas and the accelerometer, its data can participate to reach the mission objective of 1 mm precision for the TRF position.

  18. Piezoelectric Shaker Development for High Frequency Calibration of Accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Bev; Harper, Kari K.; Vogl, Gregory W.

    2010-05-28

    Calibration of vibration transducers requires sinusoidal motion over a wide frequency range with low distortion and low cross-axial motion. Piezoelectric shakers are well suited to generate such motion and are suitable for use with laser interferometric methods at frequencies of 3 kHz and above. An advantage of piezoelectric shakers is the higher achievable accelerations and displacement amplitudes as compared to electro-dynamic (ED) shakers. Typical commercial ED calibration shakers produce maximum accelerations from 100 m/s{sup 2} to 500 m/s{sup 2}. Very large ED shakers may produce somewhat higher accelerations but require large amplifiers and expensive cooling systems to dissipate heat. Due to the limitations in maximum accelerations by ED shakers at frequencies above 5 kHz, the amplitudes of the generated sinusoidal displacement are frequently below the resolution of laser interferometers used in primary calibration methods. This limits the usefulness of ED shakers in interferometric based calibrations at higher frequencies.Small piezoelectric shakers provide much higher acceleration and displacement amplitudes for frequencies above 5 kHz, making these shakers very useful for accelerometer calibrations employing laser interferometric measurements, as will be shown in this paper. These piezoelectric shakers have been developed and used at NIST for many years for high frequency calibration of accelerometers. This paper documents the construction and performance of a new version of these shakers developed at NIST for the calibration of accelerometers over the range of 3 kHz to 30 kHz and possibly higher. Examples of typical calibration results are also given.

  19. ISA accelerometer onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter: error budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Lucchesi, David M.; Nozzoli, Sergio; Santoli, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    We have estimated a preliminary error budget for the Italian Spring Accelerometer (ISA) that will be allocated onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) of the European Space Agency (ESA) space mission to Mercury named BepiColombo. The role of the accelerometer is to remove from the list of unknowns the non-gravitational accelerations that perturb the gravitational trajectory followed by the MPO in the strong radiation environment that characterises the orbit of Mercury around the Sun. Such a role is of fundamental importance in the context of the very ambitious goals of the Radio Science Experiments (RSE) of the BepiColombo mission. We have subdivided the errors on the accelerometer measurements into two main families: (i) the pseudo-sinusoidal errors and (ii) the random errors. The former are characterised by a periodic behaviour with the frequency of the satellite mean anomaly and its higher order harmonic components, i.e., they are deterministic errors. The latter are characterised by an unknown frequency distribution and we assumed for them a noise-like spectrum, i.e., they are stochastic errors. Among the pseudo-sinusoidal errors, the main contribution is due to the effects of the gravity gradients and the inertial forces, while among the random-like errors the main disturbing effect is due to the MPO centre-of-mass displacements produced by the onboard High Gain Antenna (HGA) movements and by the fuel consumption and sloshing. Very subtle to be considered are also the random errors produced by the MPO attitude corrections necessary to guarantee the nadir pointing of the spacecraft. We have therefore formulated the ISA error budget and the requirements for the satellite in order to guarantee an orbit reconstruction for the MPO spacecraft with an along-track accuracy of about 1 m over the orbital period of the satellite around Mercury in such a way to satisfy the RSE requirements.

  20. MEMS capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone.

    PubMed

    Young, Darrin J; Zurcher, Mark A; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff A; Ko, Wen H

    2012-12-01

    The design, implementation, and characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone are presented in this paper. The microphone is intended for middle ear hearing aids as well as future fully implantable cochlear prosthesis. Human temporal bones acoustic response characterization results are used to derive the accelerometer design requirements. The prototype accelerometer is fabricated in a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MEMS process. The sensor occupies a sensing area of 1 mm × 1 mm with a chip area of 2 mm × 2.4 mm and is interfaced with a custom-designed low-noise electronic IC chip over a flexible substrate. The packaged sensor unit occupies an area of 2.5 mm × 6.2 mm with a weight of 25 mg. The sensor unit attached to umbo can detect a sound pressure level (SPL) of 60 dB at 500 Hz, 35 dB at 2 kHz, and 57 dB at 8 kHz. An improved sound detection limit of 34-dB SPL at 150 Hz and 24-dB SPL at 500 Hz can be expected by employing start-of-the-art MEMS fabrication technology, which results in an articulation index of approximately 0.76. Further micro/nanofabrication technology advancement is needed to enhance the microphone sensitivity for improved understanding of normal conversational speech.

  1. 45 CFR 263.4 - When do educational expenditures count?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When do educational expenditures count? 263.4... EXPENDITURES OF STATE AND FEDERAL TANF FUNDS What Rules Apply to a State's Maintenance of Effort? § 263.4 When do educational expenditures count? (a) Expenditures for educational activities or services count...

  2. Accelerometer Placement for the International Space Station Node Modal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerometer location analysis for the modal survey test of the International Space Station Node is described. Three different approaches were utilized: (1) Guyan reduction; (2) Iterative Guyan reduction; and (3) The average driving point residue (ADPR) method. Both Guyan approaches worked well, but poor results were observed for the ADPR method. Although the iterative Guyan approach appears to provide the best set of sensor locations, it is intensive computationally, becoming impractical for large initial location sets. While this is computer dependent, it appears that initial sets larger than about 1500 degrees of freedom are impractical for the iterative technique.

  3. Self-powered In-plane Accelerometer Using Triboelectric Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Dhakar, Lokesh; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a self-powered triboelectric based accelerometer to detect wide range of in-plane acceleration utilizing the triboelectric mechanism. The freestanding sliding mode was utilized to realize the in-plane sensing. The fabricated device consists of soft polymer spring which displays wide detection range from ±1g to ±6g (g = 9.8m/s2) in x and y directions with sensitivity of 21mV/(g). The proposed device can be utilized for self-powered shock sensing in various future applications.

  4. LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, P.M.

    1960-02-16

    A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

  5. WY Kids Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Kids Count, Cheyenne.

    This WY Kids Count brochure uses the metaphor of children's building blocks to present information on the current well-being of Wyoming children and to advocate enhancing the lives of young children. Each block (i.e., each develop the brochure) presents concerns in a separate area: (1) poverty, highlighting the number of children living in…

  6. What Counts as Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  7. Birth size and physical activity in a cohort of Indian children aged 6–10 years

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, S. H.; Krishnaveni, G. V.; Veena, S. R.; Hill, J. C.; Osmond, C.; Kiran; Coakley, P.; Karat, S. C.; Fall, C. H. D.

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence of a reduction in children’s physical activity in India in the last decade. Our objective was to assess whether size and body composition at birth are associated with physical activity in school-aged children. Children from a prospective observational cohort study born in Mysore, South India between 1997 and 1998 (n = 663) had neonatal anthropometric measurements made within 72 h of delivery [weight, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), chest, abdomen and head circumference, crown–heel, crown–buttock and leg length, triceps and subscapular skinfolds]. At 6–10 years, children (n = 449) were asked to wear AM7164 or GT1M Actigraph accelerometers for 7 days. Body composition was measured within 6 months of activity monitoring. Arm muscle area at birth and time of activity monitoring was calculated from MUAC and skinfold measurements. Activity outcome measures were: mean accelerometer counts per minute (cpm); counts per day and proportion of time spent in moderate and vigorous activity. The mean (S.D.) number of days with ≥500 min of recorded accelerometer data was 7.0 (1.1). Linear regression models showed no significant associations between any of the neonatal anthropometric measures and the activity variables. Body fat percentage at 7.5 years was negatively associated with all activity variables (B = −4.69, CI: −7.31, −2.07 for mean cpm). In conclusion, this study showed no associations between body size and skinfold thickness at birth and objectively measured physical activity in childhood. PMID:24098836

  8. Point counts of birds: what are we estimating?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    Point counts of birds are made for many reasons, including estimating local densities, determining population trends, assessing habitat preferences, and exploiting the activities of recreational birdwatchers. Problems arise unless there is a clear understanding of what point counts mean in terms of actual populations of birds. Criteria for conducting point counts depend strongly on the purposes to which they will be put. This paper provides a simple mathematical conceptualization of point counts and illustrates graphically some of the influences on them.

  9. Atypical manifestation of progressive outer retinal necrosis in AIDS patient with CD4+ T-cell counts more than 100 cells/microL on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Vichitvejpaisal, Pornpattana; Reeponmahar, Somporn; Tantisiriwat, Woraphot

    2009-06-01

    Typical progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) is an acute ocular infectious disease in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients with extremely low CD4+ T-cell counts. It is a form of the Varicella- zoster virus (VZV) infection. This destructive infection has an extremely rapid course that may lead to blindness in affected eyes within days or weeks. Attempts at its treatment have had limited success. We describe the case of a bilateral PORN in an AIDS patient with an initial CD4+ T-cell count >100 cells/microL that developed after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A 29-year-old Thai female initially diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 1998, presented with bilaterally decreased visual acuity after initiating HAART two months earlier. Multiple yellowish spots appeared in the deep retina without evidence of intraocular inflammation or retinal vasculitis. Her CD4+ T-cell count was 127 cells/microL. She was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and positive VZV in the aqueous humor and vitreous by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Despite combined treatment with intravenous acyclovir and intravitreous ganciclovir, the patient's visual acuity worsened with no light-perception in either eye. This case suggests that PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of reduced visual acuity in AIDS patients initiating HAART with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. PORN may be a manifestation of the immune reconstitution syndrome.

  10. Dynamic Fluid in a Porous Transducer-Based Angular Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Siyuan; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Meiling; Ming, Li; Fu, Huijin; Wang, Tonglei

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of the dynamics of liquid flow in an angular accelerometer comprising a porous transducer in a circular tube of liquid. Wave speed and dynamic permeability of the transducer are considered to describe the relation between angular acceleration and the differential pressure on the transducer. The permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient of the transducer are determined in the experiments, and special prototypes are utilized to validate the theoretical model in both the frequency and time domains. The model is applied to analyze the influence of structural parameters on the frequency response and the transient response of the fluidic system. It is shown that the radius of the circular tube and the wave speed affect the low frequency gain, as well as the bandwidth of the sensor. The hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer and the cross-section radius of the circular tube can be used to control the transient performance. The proposed model provides the basic techniques to achieve the optimization of the angular accelerometer together with the methodology to control the wave speed and the hydrodynamic resistance of the transducer. PMID:28230793

  11. ISA accelerometer: fundamental support for the exploration of planet Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Nozzoli, Sergio; Peron, Roberto; Reale, Andrea; Santoli, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The development of BepiColombo mission is proceeding, in view of the launch, foreseen for 2014. This mission will perform a thorough study of the planet Mercury and its environment. An important set of scientific objectives is constituted by the so-called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), which will study the gravitational field and rotation of the planet, and will perform very precise tests of general relativity theory. In order to reach the required level of accuracy in recovering the relevant parameters, the data coming from the high-sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) instrument onboard the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will be used: this will be the first time for a deep-space probe. Following a brief description of the mission and RSE, the instrument and its wide capabilities will be reviewed. The focus will be in particular on the updated error budget, operational procedures and extended use of the instrument in the various parts of the RSE. It will be also described the procedure for on-ground calibration of the accelerometer.

  12. Free fall tests of the accelerometers of the MICROSCOPE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liorzou, F.; Boulanger, D.; Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.; Selig, H.

    2014-09-01

    The MICROSCOPE mission is fully dedicated to the in-orbit test of the Universality of free fall, the so-called Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP), with an expected accuracy better than 10-15. The test principle consists in comparing the accelerations of two proof masses of different composition in the Earth gravitational field. The payload embarks two pairs of test-masses made of Platinum Rhodium and Titanium alloys at the core of two dedicated coaxial electrostatic accelerometers. These instruments are under qualification for a launch in 2016. Their operations are only possible in microgravity environment which makes its validation on ground a real issue. In Europe, only the drop tower of the ZARM Institute provides a facility for experiments under conditions of weightlessness and offers the experimental conditions to verify the correct functioning of the MICROSCOPE payload. The height of the tower limits the “free fall” experiment period to 4.72 s. Under this strong constraint, the demonstration of the capability to control the test masses of the two coaxial electrostatic accelerometers is challenging. This paper describes the complete experimental set up and in which condition the test has been performed, then an analysis of a drop result is given with its interpretations.

  13. Technique for Determining Bridge Displacement Response Using MEMS Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hidehiko; Kimura, Kentaro; Miki, Chitoshi

    2016-01-01

    In bridge maintenance, particularly with regard to fatigue damage in steel bridges, it is important to determine the displacement response of the entire bridge under a live load as well as that of each member. Knowing the displacement response enables the identification of dynamic deformations that can cause stresses and ultimately lead to damage and thus also allows the undertaking of appropriate countermeasures. In theory, the displacement response can be calculated from the double integration of the measured acceleration. However, data measured by an accelerometer include measurement errors caused by the limitations of the analog-to-digital conversion process and sensor noise. These errors distort the double integration results. Furthermore, as bridges in service are constantly vibrating because of passing vehicles, estimating the boundary conditions for the numerical integration is difficult. To address these problems, this paper proposes a method for determining the displacement of a bridge in service from its acceleration based on its free vibration. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, field measurements were conducted using nine different accelerometers. Based on the results of these measurements, the proposed method was found to be highly accurate in comparison with the reference displacement obtained using a contact displacement gauge. PMID:26907287

  14. Surface Micromachined Silicon Carbide Accelerometers for Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAnna, Russell G.

    1998-01-01

    A finite-element analysis of possible silicon carbide (SIC) folded-beam, lateral-resonating accelerometers is presented. Results include stiffness coefficients, acceleration sensitivities, resonant frequency versus temperature, and proof-mass displacements due to centripetal acceleration of a blade-mounted sensor. The surface micromachined devices, which are similar to the Analog Devices Inc., (Norwood, MA) air-bag crash detector, are etched from 2-pm thick, 3C-SiC films grown at 1600 K using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). The substrate is a 500 gm-thick, (100) silicon wafer. Polysilicon or silicon dioxide is used as a sacrificial layer. The finite element analysis includes temperature-dependent properties, shape change due to volume expansion, and thermal stress caused by differential thermal expansion of the materials. The finite-element results are compared to experimental results for a SiC device of similar, but not identical, geometry. Along with changes in mechanical design, blade-mounted sensors would require on-chip circuitry to cancel displacements due to centripetal acceleration and improve sensitivity and bandwidth. These findings may result in better accelerometer designs for this application.

  15. Shock margin testing of a one-axis MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, Ted Blair; Tanner, Danelle Mary; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2008-07-01

    Shock testing was performed on a selected commercial-off-the-shelf - MicroElectroMechanical System (COTS-MEMS) accelerometer to determine the margin between the published absolute maximum rating for shock and the 'measured' level where failures are observed. The purpose of this testing is to provide baseline data for isolating failure mechanisms under shock and environmental loading in a representative device used or under consideration for use within systems and assemblies of the DOD/DOE weapons complex. The specific device chosen for this study was the AD22280 model of the ADXL78 MEMS Accelerometer manufactured by Analog Devices Inc. This study focuses only on the shock loading response of the device and provides the necessary data for adding influence of environmental exposure to the reliability of this class of devices. The published absolute maximum rating for acceleration in any axis was 4000 G for this device powered or unpowered. Results from this study showed first failures at 8000 G indicating a margin of error of two. Higher shock level testing indicated that an in-plane, but off-axis acceleration was more damaging than one in the sense direction.

  16. Airbag accelerometer with a simple switched-capacitor readout ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugai, Masahiro; Hirata, Yoshiaki; Tanimoto, Koji; Usami, Teruo; Araki, Toru; Otani, Hiroshi

    1997-09-01

    A bulk micromachined capacitive accelerometer for airbag applications based on (110) silicon anisotropic KOH etching is presented. The sensor is a two-chip accelerometer that consists of a glass-silicon-glass stacked sense element and an interface ASIC containing an impedance converter for capacitance detection, an EPROM and DACs for digital trimming, and a self-test feature for diagnosis. A simple switched-capacitor readout circuit with DC offset error cancellation scheme is proposed as the impedance converter. The dependence of narrow gap etching, surface roughness, and uniformity of the groove depth on the KOH concentration are also investigated for the fabrication of the device, and it is shown that the etch rate of the plane intrinsically controls the depth of the narrow gap with a KOH concentration of over 30 wt. percent, and smooth surface and uniformity of groove depth are obtained at 40 wt. percent KOH. The nonlinearity of the output is about 1.5 percent FS. The temperature coefficient of sensitivity and the off-axis sensitivity are 150 ppm/degree C and 2 percent respectively. The dimensions of the sensor are 10.3 X 10.3 X 3 mm.

  17. Engineering Implications of Rotational Sensitivity of Translational Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroschek, R. L.

    2006-12-01

    Several studies have indicated that nominal linear translational accelerometers are strongly sensitive to rotation motions, especially around their horizontal axis. It has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that this situation affects the acceleration record and severely limits appropriate velocity and displacement determination. More importantly the common believe that filtering long periods signals could "clean" the acceleration record from this unwanted effect has been shown inadequate by the author this abstract and collaborators using experimental testing. Rotational effects are still present on filtered records unless the complete frequency bandwidth that composes the rotation motion is filtered out. In civil engineering structures rotations are nearly always present. Typical examples are foundation rocking, beam bending, floor slab deformation and overall rotation of structures due to relative large loads or damage. Two real cases were rotation of a relative flexible structure strongly influence the linear accelerometer responses are presented and later experimentally reproduce in a shake table controlled situation. The first one corresponds to a bridge with a contiguous 383 meter simple supported beam rested on rubber bearing that suffered the rotational related distortions due to the passing of a heavy truck at the end of a seismic event. The second event corresponds to the vibration recording of vertical motions on an industrial bridge that is exposed to forced vibration of a large motor. Both examples indicate that in certain conditions motion records from structural instruments are subjected to distortions effects that could make acceleration, velocity and displacement (temporarily or permanent) measurements not reliable.

  18. Applying macro design tools to the design of MEMS accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Rodgers, M.S.; Montague, S.

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes the design of two different surface micromachined (MEMS) accelerometers and the use of design and analysis tools intended for macro sized devices. This work leverages a process for integrating both the micromechanical structures and microelectronics circuitry of a MEMS accelerometer on the same chip. In this process, the mechanical components of the sensor are first fabricated at the bottom of a trench etched into the wafer substrate. The trench is then filled with oxide and sealed to protect the mechanical components during subsequent microelectronics processing. The wafer surface is then planarized in preparation for CMOS processing. Next, the CMOS electronics are fabricated and the mechanical structures are released. The mechanical structure of each sensor consists of two polysilicon plate masses suspended by multiple springs (cantilevered beam structures) over corresponding polysilicon plates fixed to the substrate to form two parallel plate capacitors. One polysilicon plate mass is suspended using compliant springs forming a variable capacitor. The other polysilicon plate mass is suspended using very stiff springs acting as a fixed capacitor. Acceleration is measured by comparing the variable capacitance with the fixed capacitance during acceleration.

  19. Validity of the Fitbit activity tracker for measuring steps in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Serene S; Tiedemann, Anne; Hassett, Leanne M; Ramsay, Elisabeth; Kirkham, Catherine; Chagpar, Sakina; Sherrington, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Commercially available activity monitors, such as the Fitbit, may encourage physical activity. However, the accuracy of the Fitbit in older adults remains unknown. This study aimed to determine (1) the criterion validity of Fitbit step counts compared to visual count and ActiGraph accelerometer step counts and (2) the accuracy of ActiGraph step counts compared to visual count in community-dwelling older people. Methods Thirty-two community-dwelling adults aged over 60 wore Fitbit and ActiGraph devices simultaneously during a 2 min walk test (2MWT) and then during waking hours over a 7-day period. A physiotherapist counted the steps taken during the 2MWT. Results There was excellent agreement between Fitbit and visually counted steps (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,1)=0.88, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.94) from the 2MWT, and good agreement between Fitbit and ActiGraph (ICC2,1=0.66, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.82), and between ActiGraph and visually counted steps (ICC2,1=0.60, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.79). There was excellent agreement between the Fitbit and ActiGraph in average steps/day over 7 days (ICC2,1=0.94, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.97). Percentage agreement was closest for Fitbit steps compared to visual count (mean 0%, SD 4%) and least for Fitbit average steps/day compared to the ActiGraph (mean 13%, SD 25%). Conclusions The Fitbit accurately tracked steps during the 2MWT, but the ActiGraph appeared to underestimate steps. There was strong agreement between Fitbit and ActiGraph counted steps. The Fitbit tracker is sufficiently accurate to be used among community-dwelling older adults to monitor and give feedback on step counts. PMID:27900119

  20. Tyre contact length on dry and wet road surfaces measured by three-axial accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matilainen, Mika; Tuononen, Ari

    2015-02-01

    We determined the tyre contact length on dry and wet roads by measuring the accelerations of the inner liner with a three-axial accelerometer. The influence of the tyre pressure, driving velocity, and tread depth on the contact length was studied in both types of road surface conditions. On dry asphalt the contact length was almost constant, regardless of the driving velocity. On wet asphalt the presence of water could be detected even at low driving velocities (e.g. 20 km/h for a worn tyre) as the contact length began to decrease from that found in the dry asphalt situation. In addition to improving the performance of active safety systems and driver warning systems, the contact length information could be beneficial for classifying and studying the aquaplaning behaviour of tyres.

  1. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    O’Toole, A. E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com; Peña Arellano, F. E.; Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C.; Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M.; Sobacchi, E.; Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R. E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com; Bhawal, A.; Gong, P.; Lottarini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Murphy, C.

    2014-07-15

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  2. The Watt Count System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Watt Count System combines aerospace and computer technology, an engineering systems design approach and the environmental control expertise of a group of engineers who worked on Apollo. First step of the system is a computerized energy consumption analysis based on plans for a new home. Company calculates heating and cooling loads and customizes the most energy efficient system for the particular structure analyzed. A quality control engineer assures that insulation and ducting are installed to specifications. Analysis and design techniques are so accurate that company is able to give homeowner a two-year guarantee that the home's energy consumption will not exceed the kilowatt hour level determined by the computer in step one. In an annual energy performance comparison, a Watt Count home used 45 percent less energy than a conventionally equipped home.

  3. Calibration and validation of individual GOCE accelerometers by precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.; IJssel, J. A. A. van den

    2016-01-01

    The European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) carries a gradiometer consisting of three pairs of accelerometers in an orthogonal triad. Precise GOCE science orbit solutions (PSO), which are based on satellite-to-satellite tracking observations by the Global Positioning System and which are claimed to be at the few cm precision level, can be used to calibrate and validate the observations taken by the accelerometers. This has been done for each individual accelerometer by a dynamic orbit fit of the time series of position co-ordinates from the PSOs, where the accelerometer observations represent the non-gravitational accelerations. Since the accelerometers do not coincide with the center of mass of the GOCE satellite, the observations have to be corrected for rotational and gravity gradient terms. This is not required when using the so-called common-mode accelerometer observations, provided the center of the gradiometer coincides with the GOCE center of mass. Dynamic orbit fits based on these common-mode accelerations therefore served as reference. It is shown that for all individual accelerometers, similar dynamic orbit fits can be obtained provided the above-mentioned corrections are made. In addition, accelerometer bias estimates are obtained that are consistent with offsets in the gravity gradients that are derived from the GOCE gradiometer observations.

  4. A New Z-axis Resonant Micro-Accelerometer Based on Electrostatic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Dai, Bo; Liu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the paper is the design, the simulation, the fabrication and the experiment of a new z-axis resonant accelerometer based on the electrostatic stiffness. The new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer, which consists of a torsional accelerometer and two plane resonators, decouples the sensing movement of the accelerometer from the oscillation of the plane resonators by electrostatic stiffness, which will improve the performance. The new structure and the sensitive theory of the acceleration are illuminated, and the equation of the scale factor is deduced under ideal conditions firstly. The Ansys simulation is implemented to verify the basic principle of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator individually. The structure simulation results prove that the effective frequency of the torsional accelerometer and the plane resonator are 0.66 kHz and 13.3 kHz, respectively. Then, the new structure is fabricated by the standard three-mask deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process and encapsulated by parallel seam welding. Finally, the detecting and control circuits are designed to achieve the closed-loop self-oscillation, to trace the natural frequency of resonator and to measure the system frequency. Experimental results show that the new z-axis resonant accelerometer has a scale factor of 31.65 Hz/g, a bias stability of 727 μg and a dynamic range of over 10 g, which proves that the new z-axis resonant micro-accelerometer is practicable. PMID:25569748

  5. Operational Data Reduction Procedure for Determining Density and Vertical Structure of the Martian Upper Atmosphere from Mars Global Surveyor Accelerometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancro, George J.; Tolson, Robert H.; Keating, Gerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The success of aerobraking by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft was partly due to the analysis of MGS accelerometer data. Accelerometer data was used to determine the effect of the atmosphere on each orbit, to characterize the nature of the atmosphere, and to predict the atmosphere for future orbits. To interpret the accelerometer data, a data reduction procedure was developed to produce density estimations utilizing inputs from the spacecraft, the Navigation Team, and pre-mission aerothermodynamic studies. This data reduction procedure was based on the calculation of aerodynamic forces from the accelerometer data by considering acceleration due to gravity gradient, solar pressure, angular motion of the MGS, instrument bias, thruster activity, and a vibration component due to the motion of the damaged solar array. Methods were developed to calculate all of the acceleration components including a 4 degree of freedom dynamics model used to gain a greater understanding of the damaged solar array. The total error inherent to the data reduction procedure was calculated as a function of altitude and density considering contributions from ephemeris errors, errors in force coefficient, and instrument errors due to bias and digitization. Comparing the results from this procedure to the data of other MGS Teams has demonstrated that this procedure can quickly and accurately describe the density and vertical structure of the Martian upper atmosphere.

  6. Seasonal Variation in Objectively Assessed Physical Activity among Young Norwegian Talented Soccer Players: A Description of Daily Physical Activity Level

    PubMed Central

    Sæther, Stig A.; Aspvik, Nils P.

    2014-01-01

    ‘Practise makes perfect’ is a well-known expression in most sports, including top-level soccer. However, a high training and match load increases the risk for injury, overtraining and burnout. With the use of accelerometers and a self-report questionnaire, the aim of this study was to describe talented players’ physical activity (PA) level. Data were collected three times during the 2011 Norwegian Football season (March, June and October). The accelerometer output, counts·min–1 (counts per unit time registered), reports the daily PA-level for young talented soccer players. Results showed a stable PA-level across the season (March: 901.2 counts·min–1, June: 854.9 counts·min–1, October: 861.5 counts·min–1). Furthermore, comparison of five different training sessions across the season showed that the PA-level ranged from 2435.8 to 3745.4 counts·min–1. A one-way ANOVA showed no significant differences between the three measured weeks during the soccer season (p≤0.814). However, the training sessions in January had a significantly higher PA-level than those in June and October (p≤0.001). Based on these results, we discuss how potential implications of PA-level affect factors such as risk of injury, overtraining and burnout. We argue that player development must be seen as part of an overall picture in which club training and match load should be regarded as one of many variables influencing players’ PA-level. Key points It is well established that to achieve a high performance level in sport, one must implement a high training and match load in childhood and youth. With the use of accelerometers and a self-reported questionnaire, the aim of this study was to describe talented players’ total physical activity (PA) load. These results indicate that young talented soccer players must overcome large doses of PA on a weekly basis, exposing them to a high risk of injury, overtraining and burnout. PMID:25435792

  7. Assessment of the MyWellness Key accelerometer in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Samantha Kate; Armstrong, Marni J; Khandwala, Farah; Zanuso, Silvano; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-11-01

    Accelerometers are designed to measure physical activity (PA) objectively. The MyWellness Key (MWK) accelerometer has been validated primarily in younger, normal-weight populations. The aims of this study were to examine the accuracy of the MWK against directly measured lab-based exercise and free-living PA in people with type 2 diabetes, many of whom are older and overweight or obese. Thirty-five participants with type 2 diabetes completed the protocol, which included a laboratory-based session and a free-living phase. In the laboratory visit, participants completed a structured treadmill protocol wearing MWKs on each hip (all subjects) and bra cup (women only). The speed where each MWK switched from recording light- to moderate-intensity activity was determined for each MWK worn. In the free-living phase, participants wore the MWK for all waking hours for 2 weeks, and recorded exercise in PA diaries immediately after each exercise session. The mean cut-points between low ("Free") and moderate ("Play") intensity for the right and left waist-worn MWKs were 4.1 ± 0.5 km/h and 5.0 ± 0.9 km/h for the bra-mounted MWK; ideal cut-point would be 4.0 km/h. In the free-living phase, the Spearman correlation between PA according to PA diary and the waist-worn MWK was 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 0.85; P < 0.001), but only 0.66 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.77; P < 0.001) when on the bra. In conclusion, the waist-worn MWK measured PA volume accurately, and was acceptably accurate at discriminating between low- and moderate-intensity PA in people with type 2 diabetes. The MWK underestimated PA volume and intensity when worn on a bra.

  8. First Analysis of Densities Inferred from Accelerometer Data on ESA's Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, S.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Marty, J. C.; Svedhem, H.

    2015-12-01

    After completing its primary science mission, ESA decided to do a risky aerobraking campaign with Venus Express (VEx) in order to gain operational experience as well as to measure high-resolution density profiles at high northern latitude. VEx was in a polar and highly eccentric orbit (e=0.84). In the aerobraking period from 24 June to 11 July 2014, the pericenter was at 75°N at an altitude of 130-134 km, and the local solar time drifted from 6.2 to 4.5 hr. One density profile extending about 3° in latitude on both sides of the pericenter has been obtained for each of the 18 consecutive days at 1 Hz sampling, after ingestion of the 8 Hz accelerometer data in the GINS software. The uncertainty in the derived density is the sum of a systematic part due to the uncertainty in Cd, estimated to be 10%, and a noise and bias part due to the accelerometers. Using the accelerometer errors according to specifications, a signal-to-noise ratio of one is reached on average at 139 km altitude. The validity range of the VEx densities can also be evaluated by means of comparison with a model. The VEx-to-VTS3 density ratios were computed for each profile, and these results are consistent with the specified instrument resolution. VEx densities are on average nearly a factor of 2 smaller than VTS3, which is in agreement with Precise Orbit Determination results obtained for higher altitudes (160-170 km). However, variability of up to tens of percent is visible in the form of wavelike activity as well as an altitude-dependent variation that is revealed by ratios that become smaller towards the start and end of the profile. The latter model error hints at an inaccurate the temperature profile, errors in constituent concentrations, or both. The waves can be interpreted as a superposition of two wave trains with wavelengths of around 100 km and 250 km. Average scale heights over the range of observations (130-140 km) are found to be 2.9+/-0.6 km.

  9. High shock, high frequency characteristics of a mechanical isolator for a piezoresistive accelerometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1995-07-01

    A mechanical isolator has been developed for a piezoresistive accelerometer. The purpose of the isolator is to mitigate high frequency shocks before they reach the accelerometer because the high frequency shocks may cause the accelerometer to resonate. Since the accelerometer is undamped, it often breaks when it resonates. The mechanical isolator was developed in response to impact test requirements for a variety of structures at Sandia National Laboratories. An Extended Technical Assistance Program with the accelerometer manufacturer has resulted in a commercial isolator that will be available to the general public. This mechanical isolator has ten times the bandwidth of any other commercial isolator and has acceptable frequency domain performance from DC to 10 kHz ({plus_minus} 10%) over a temperature range of -65{degrees}F to +185{degrees}F as demonstrated in this paper.

  10. Digital coincidence counting - initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, K. S. A.; Watt, G. C.; Alexiev, D.; van der Gaast, H.; Davies, J.; Mo, Li; Wyllie, H. A.; Keightley, J. D.; Smith, D.; Woods, M. J.

    2000-08-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique in radiation metrology, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) of the United Kingdom, as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue-to-digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4π beta detector and an NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high-speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software-based algorithms. In this letter we describe some recent results obtained with the new acquistion hardware being tested at ANSTO. The system is fully operational and is now in routine use. Results for 60Co and 22Na radiation activity calibrations are presented, initial results with 153Sm are also briefly mentioned.

  11. Atmospheric structure from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter accelerometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, G.; Bougher, S.; Theriot, M.; Zurek, R.; Blanchard, R.; Tolson, R.; Murphy, J.

    Designed for aerobraking, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005, achieved Mars Orbital Insertion (MOI), March 10, 2006. Atmospheric density decreases exponentially with increasing height. By small propulsive adjustments of the apoapsis orbital velocity, periapsis altitude is fine tuned to the density surface that will safely use the atmosphere of Mars to aerobrake over 500 orbits. MRO periapsis precesses from the South Pole at 6pm LST to near the equator at 3am LST. Meanwhile, apoapsis is brought dramatically from ˜40,000km at MOI to 460 km at aerobraking completion (ABX) mid September 2006. After ABX, a few small propulsive maneuvers will establish the Primary Science Orbit (PSO), which without aerobraking would have required an additional 400 kg of fuel. Each of the 500 plus aerobraking orbits provides a vertical structure and distribution of density, scale heights, and temperatures, along the orbital path, providing key in situ insight into various upper atmosphere (> 100 km) processes. One of the major questions for scientists studying Mars is: "Where did the water go?" Honeywell's substantially improved electronics package for its IMU (QA-2000 accelerometer, gyro, electronics) maximized accelerometer sensitivities at the requests of The George Washington University, JPL, and Lockheed Martin. The improved accelerometer sensitivities allowed density measurements to exceed 200km, at least 40 km higher than with Mars Odyssey (MO). This extends vertical structures from MRO into the neutral lower exosphere, a region where various processes may allow atmospheric gasses to escape. Over the eons, water may have been lost in both the lower atmosphere and the upper atmosphere, thus the water balance throughout the entire atmosphere from subsurface to exosphere may be equally critical. Comparisons of data from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), MO and MRO will help characterize key temporal and spatial cycles including: polar vortices, winter polar

  12. Preliminary efficacy of prize-based contingency management to increase activity levels in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Washington, Wendy Donlin; Banna, Kelly M; Gibson, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 30% of Americans meet the criteria for obesity. Effective, low-cost interventions to increase physical activity are needed to prevent and treat obesity. In this study, 11 healthy adults wore Fitbit accelerometers for 3 weeks. During the initial baseline, subjects earned prize draws for wearing the Fitbit. During intervention, percentile schedules were used to calculate individual prize-draw criteria. The final week was a return to baseline. Four subjects increased step counts as a result of the intervention. A bout analysis of interresponse times revealed that subjects increased overall step counts by increasing daily minutes active and within-bout response rates and decreasing pauses between bouts of activity. Strategies to improve effectiveness are suggested, such as modification of reinforcement probability and amount and identification of the function of periods of inactivity.

  13. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  14. Quantifying slope and grain size dependent transport thresholds using RFID and accelerometer tracers with on-bed RFID antennas in an upland channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Integrating accelerometer and radio frequency identification (RFID) embedded tracers with in-stream RFID antennas can provide unique field-based relations for grain size and slope dependent thresholds of motion. We recorded bedload activity at a reach and across individual particles paths during a weeks-spanning snowmelt period in Reynolds Creek, Idaho. Deployed accelerometer tracers logged unique clast mobility, while stationary antennas captured the times when RFID and accelerometer tracers passed through a given reach. We analyze the temporal motion dataset from the stationary antennas along with the reach's shear stress conditions over the season. The antenna records quantify a grain-size dependent lower envelope for the threshold of motion that is fit with a hiding function. The accelerometer tracers were transported downstream as little as 10 m to more than 2 km, and were deposited in reaches with slopes ranging from 0.5 to 7 percent. The integration of the antenna-based hiding function along with flow modeling, grain size distributions and the accelerometer tracers' mobility data constrain the dependence of critical shear stress on reach slope. Both the grain-size and slope dependent threshold results gleaned from these novel field methods are then utilized to evaluate how transport capacities fluctuate along the channel during a snowmelt flood. The hiding function results from the stationary antennas also demonstrate promising potential for bedload monitoring programs to include continuous threshold data by deploying multiple antenna stations across watershed scales. This multi-antenna watershed application could provide spatiotemporal comparisons of transport thresholds between reaches of interest. Such an effort could also be used to quantify changes in transport thresholds due to natural perturbations or restoration/management modifications within a watershed.

  15. Accelerometer-Based Event Detector for Low-Power Applications

    PubMed Central

    Smidla, József; Simon, Gyula

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive, autocovariance-based event detection algorithm is proposed, which can be used with micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer sensors to build inexpensive and power efficient event detectors. The algorithm works well with low signal-to-noise ratio input signals, and its computational complexity is very low, allowing its utilization on inexpensive low-end embedded sensor devices. The proposed algorithm decreases its energy consumption by lowering its duty cycle, as much as the event to be detected allows it. The performance of the algorithm is tested and compared to the conventional filter-based approach. The comparison was performed in an application where illegal entering of vehicles into restricted areas was detected. PMID:24135991

  16. A silicon micromachined piezoresistive accelerometer for health and condition monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin M.; Henderson, H. Thurman

    1990-01-01

    Silicon micromachining etching techniques were utilized to batch-fabricate hundreds of general purpose microaccelerometers on a single silicon substrate. Piezoresistive sensing elements were aligned to the back-side patterns using an IR mask aligner and then diffused into the areas of maximum stress. Capping of the two-arm cantilever beam structure was achieved using a combination of electrostatic bonding and low temperature glass films. Overrange protection, critical damping, and overall protection from the outside environment are achieved by controlling the cavity depths of the top and bottom covers. Temperature compensation, amplification, and filtering are performed by a companion LSI chip that is interfaced to the accelerometer by conventional wire-bonding techniques.

  17. Vehicle Maneuver Detection with Accelerometer-Based Classification

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Villanueva, Javier; Carrillo-Zapata, Daniel; Terroso-Saenz, Fernando; Valdes-Vela, Mercedes; Skarmeta, Antonio F.

    2016-01-01

    In the mobile computing era, smartphones have become instrumental tools to develop innovative mobile context-aware systems. In that sense, their usage in the vehicular domain eases the development of novel and personal transportation solutions. In this frame, the present work introduces an innovative mechanism to perceive the current kinematic state of a vehicle on the basis of the accelerometer data from a smartphone mounted in the vehicle. Unlike previous proposals, the introduced architecture targets the computational limitations of such devices to carry out the detection process following an incremental approach. For its realization, we have evaluated different classification algorithms to act as agents within the architecture. Finally, our approach has been tested with a real-world dataset collected by means of the ad hoc mobile application developed. PMID:27690058

  18. GOCE Accelerometers Data Revisited: Stability And Detector Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, J.; Christophe, B.; Foulon, B.

    2013-12-01

    We report on our analyses of Gravity field and steady- state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) data aiming to characterize the stability and the noise of GOCE's ac- celerometers. We first measure science and detector co- herence signals, which allow us to infer the role of the accelerometers Digital Voltage Amplifiers and measure- ment chanel in the overall quadratic factor and scale fac- tor; we show that their temporal stability is as low as ex- pected. We then investigate the effect of the aliasing of high frequency detector's noise on the measured noise, in an attempt to explain why the measured noise is higher than originally expected. We find that although this alias- ing explains part of the higher noise, it does not account for the total of the difference seen between the expected and the measured noise.

  19. Concept of an Opto-electronic Accelerometer System (OAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunkel, B.; Keller, K.; Lutz, R.

    1987-01-01

    An accelerometer based on a spring-suspended reference mass and its precise relative motion measurement by means of 3 two-dimensional position sensitive detectors (PSD) is described. A breadboard model achieves a resolution (longterm linearity) of 25 nm in one direction. Due to the physical principle of the PSD, the second layer is slightly less sensitive than the top layer; accordingly for gravity gradient detection the more sensitive layer is selected for the Z/X component detection. At 10 Hz sampling rate an acceleration gradient of under 10 to the minus 12th power g (i.e., 0.01 E or 0.001 Gal/km) is considered to be detectable.

  20. Concept of an Opto-electronic Accelerometer System (OAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunkel, B.; Keller, K.; Lutz, R.

    1987-10-01

    An accelerometer based on a spring-suspended reference mass and its precise relative motion measurement by means of 3 two-dimensional position sensitive detectors (PSD) is described. A breadboard model achieves a resolution (longterm linearity) of 25 nm in one direction. Due to the physical principle of the PSD, the second layer is slightly less sensitive than the top layer; accordingly for gravity gradient detection the more sensitive layer is selected for the Z/X component detection. At 10 Hz sampling rate an acceleration gradient of under 10 to the minus 12th power g (i.e., 0.01 E or 0.001 Gal/km) is considered to be detectable.

  1. ISLES: Probing Extra Dimensions Using a Superconducting Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, Ho Jung; Moody, M. Vol; Prieto-Gortcheva, Violeta A.

    2003-01-01

    In string theories, extra dimensions must be compactified. The possibility that gravity can have large radii of compactification leads to a violation of the inverse square law at submillimeter distances. The objective of ISLES is to perform a null test of Newton s law in space with a resolution of one part in 10(exp 5) or better at 100 microns. The experiment will be cooled to less than or equal to 2 K, which permits superconducting magnetic levitation of the test masses. To minimize Newtonian errors, ISLES employs a near null source, a circular disk of large diameter-to-thickness ratio. Two test masses, also disk-shaped, are suspended on the two sides of the source mass at a nominal distance of 100 microns. The signal is detected by a superconducting differential accelerometer. A ground test apparatus is under construction.

  2. Modeling CD4+ cell count increase over a six-year period in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in Senegal.

    PubMed

    De Beaudrap, Pierre; Etard, Jean-François; Diouf, Assane; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Guèye, Ndèye Fatou; Guèye, Pape Mandoumbé; Sow, Papa Salif; Mboup, Souleymane; Ndoye, Ibra; Ecochard, René; Eric, Delaporte

    2009-06-01

    To assess the extents and determinants of long-term CD4 cell increases after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), changes in CD4 cell counts were analyzed in a cohort of HIV-1-infected Senegalese using a mixed-effects model. After a median follow-up of 54 months, an average of 483 CD4 cells/mm3 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 331; 680) was reached. The average asymptote level was approximately 421 cells/mm3 (95% CI = 390; 454) in patients with < 200 cells/mm3 at baseline and approximately 500 cells/mm3 in patients with > 200 cells/mm3. The independent predictors of long-term CD4 cell reconstitution were the baseline CD4 cell count and the monthly average viral load over the entire follow-up. This good long-term immune reconstitution, optimal in subjects with low average viral loads and > 200 CD4 cells/mm3 at baseline, argues in favor of the earliest possible access to ART and underlines the importance of strict compliance with the treatment.

  3. Counting RG flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-05

    Here, interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts -- from counting RG walls to AdS/CFT correspondence -- will not only provide favorable answers, but will also lead us to a unified general framework that is powerful enough to account for peculiar RG flows and predict new physical phenomena. Namely, using Bott's version of Morse theory we relate the topology of conformal manifolds to certain properties of RG flows that can be used as precise diagnostics and "topological obstructions" for the strong form of the C-theorem in any dimension. Moreover, this framework suggests a precise mechanism for how the violation of the strong C-theorem happens and predicts "phase transitions" along the RG flow when the topological obstruction is non-trivial. Along the way, we also find new conformal manifolds in well-known 4d CFT's and point out connections with the superconformal index and classifying spaces of global symmetry groups.

  4. Counting RG flows

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-05

    Here, interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts -- from counting RG walls to AdS/CFT correspondence -- will not only provide favorable answers, but will also lead us to a unified general framework that is powerfulmore » enough to account for peculiar RG flows and predict new physical phenomena. Namely, using Bott's version of Morse theory we relate the topology of conformal manifolds to certain properties of RG flows that can be used as precise diagnostics and "topological obstructions" for the strong form of the C-theorem in any dimension. Moreover, this framework suggests a precise mechanism for how the violation of the strong C-theorem happens and predicts "phase transitions" along the RG flow when the topological obstruction is non-trivial. Along the way, we also find new conformal manifolds in well-known 4d CFT's and point out connections with the superconformal index and classifying spaces of global symmetry groups.« less

  5. Use of three-dimensional accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Jenna E; Walz, Paul H; Passler, Thomas; White, Brad J; Theurer, Miles E; van Santen, Edzard

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the use of 3-D accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with a low-virulent strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). ANIMALS 20 beef steers (mean weight, 238 kg). PROCEDURES Calves were allocated to a BVDV (n = 10) or control (10) group. On day 0, calves in the BVDV group were inoculated with a low-virulent strain of BVDV (4 × 10(6) TCID50, intranasally), and calves in the control group were sham inoculated with BVDV-free medium (4 mL; intranasally). An accelerometer was affixed to the right hind limb of each calf on day -7 to record activity (lying, walking, and standing) continuously until 35 days after inoculation. Baseline was defined as days -7 to -1. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for CBC, serum biochemical analysis, virus isolation, and determination of anti-BVDV antibody titers. RESULTS All calves in the BVDV group developed viremia and anti-BVDV antibodies but developed only subclinical or mild disease. Calves in the control group did not develop viremia or anti-BVDV antibodies. Mean time allocated to each activity did not differ significantly between the BVDV and control groups on any day except day 8, when calves in the BVDV group spent less time standing than the calves in the control group. Following inoculation, calves in both groups tended to spend more time lying and less time walking and standing than they did during baseline. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that behavioral data obtained by accelerometers could not distinguish calves subclinically infected with BVDV from healthy control calves. However, subtle changes in the behavior of the BVDV-infected calves were detected and warrant further investigation.

  6. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-02-20

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%.

  7. A brief test of the Hewlett-Packard MEMS seismic accelerometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homeijer, Brian D.; Milligan, Donald J.; Hutt, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Testing was performed on a prototype of Hewlett-Packard (HP) Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) seismic accelerometer at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This prototype was built using discrete electronic components. The self-noise level was measured during low seismic background conditions and found to be 9.8 ng/√Hz at periods below 0.2 s (frequencies above 5 Hz). The six-second microseism noise was also discernible. The HP MEMS accelerometer was compared to a Geotech Model GS-13 reference seismometer during seismic noise and signal levels well above the self-noise of the accelerometer. Matching power spectral densities (corrected for accelerometer and seismometer responses to represent true ground motion) indicated that the HP MEMS accelerometer has a flat (constant) response to acceleration from 0.0125 Hz to at least 62.5 Hz. Tilt calibrations of the HP MEMS accelerometer verified that the flat response to acceleration extends to 0 Hz. Future development of the HP MEMS accelerometer includes replacing the discreet electronic boards with a low power application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and increasing the dynamic range of the sensor to detect strong motion signals above one gravitational acceleration, while maintaining the self-noise observed during these tests.

  8. A triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm for optimal sensor placement in structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jingqing; Feng, Shuo; Liu, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Optimal sensor placement (OSP) technique is a vital part of the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Triaxial accelerometers have been widely used in the SHM of large-scale structures in recent years. Triaxial accelerometers must be placed in such a way that all of the important dynamic information is obtained. At the same time, the sensor configuration must be optimal, so that the test resources are conserved. The recommended practice is to select proper degrees of freedom (DOF) based upon several criteria and the triaxial accelerometers are placed at the nodes corresponding to these DOFs. This results in non-optimal placement of many accelerometers. A ‘triaxial accelerometer monkey algorithm’ (TAMA) is presented in this paper to solve OSP problems of triaxial accelerometers. The EFI3 measurement theory is modified and involved in the objective function to make it more adaptable in the OSP technique of triaxial accelerometers. A method of calculating the threshold value based on probability theory is proposed to improve the healthy rate of monkeys in a troop generation process. Meanwhile, the processes of harmony ladder climb and scanning watch jump are proposed and given in detail. Finally, Xinghai NO.1 Bridge in Dalian is implemented to demonstrate the effectiveness of TAMA. The final results obtained by TAMA are compared with those of the original monkey algorithm and EFI3 measurement, which show that TAMA can improve computational efficiency and get a better sensor configuration.

  9. Quasi-Static Calibration Method of a High-g Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Fan, Jinbiao; Zu, Jing; Xu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    To solve the problem of resonance during quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers, we deduce the relationship between the minimum excitation pulse width and the resonant frequency of the calibrated accelerometer according to the second-order mathematical model of the accelerometer, and improve the quasi-static calibration theory. We establish a quasi-static calibration testing system, which uses a gas gun to generate high-g acceleration signals, and apply a laser interferometer to reproduce the impact acceleration. These signals are used to drive the calibrated accelerometer. By comparing the excitation acceleration signal and the output responses of the calibrated accelerometer to the excitation signals, the impact sensitivity of the calibrated accelerometer is obtained. As indicated by the calibration test results, this calibration system produces excitation acceleration signals with a pulse width of less than 1000 μs, and realize the quasi-static calibration of high-g accelerometers with a resonant frequency above 20 kHz when the calibration error was 3%. PMID:28230743

  10. Agreement rates for sleep/wake judgments obtained via accelerometer and sleep diary: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2008-11-01

    Agreement rates for waking and sleeping obtained via sleep diary and accelerometer were evaluated, to compare the two methods. Sleep/wake data for consecutive days and nights were surveyed in 119 healthy university students. Accelerometer sleep/wake judgments obeyed the standard algorithm. Agreement rates for waking and sleeping according to accelerometer versus sleep diary, respectively, were calculated. Sleep diary data were set as a baseline. Seventy-six subjects (63.9%), 22 to 32 years of age, presented perfect data for the analysis. The mean sleep times, in minutes, judged by sleep diary and by accelerometer, were 482.3 and 629.6, respectively. The mean percentages and standard deviations of agreement on wake and sleep were 77.5% (SD = 10.2) and 86.1% (SD = 6.2), respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between the agreement rates for wake and sleep (r = -.482, p < .01). The accelerometer showed some measurement failure during waking, presumably because of the decrease in body movement. Sleep diary data during daytime appear to be more valid for detecting a sleep/wake cycle than are accelerometer data. In contrast, nocturnal sleep diary data might be supplemented by the use of an accelerometer as long as participants do not have insomnia.

  11. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer for Mission Critical Health Monitoring of Aircraft and Spacecraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John; Tokars, Roger; Jaros, Dave; Riggs, M. Terrence; Evans, Kenneth P.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    A self diagnostic accelerometer system has been shown to be sensitive to multiple failure modes of charge mode accelerometers. These failures include sensor structural damage, an electrical open circuit and most importantly sensor detachment. In this paper, experimental work that was performed to determine the capabilities of a self diagnostic accelerometer system while operating in the presence of various levels of mechanical noise, emulating real world conditions, is presented. The results show that the system can successfully conduct a self diagnostic routine under these conditions.

  12. Use of a laser doppler vibrometer for high frequency accelerometer characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Hansche, B.D.; Solomon, O.M.

    1995-12-31

    A laser doppler vibrometer (LDV) is being used for high frequency characterizations of accelerometers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). A LDV with high frequency (up to 1.5 MHz) and high velocity (10 M/s) capability was purchased from a commercial source and has been certified by the Primary Electrical Standards Department at SNL. The method used for this certification and the certification results are presented. Use of the LDV for characterization of accelerometers at high frequencies and of accelerometer sensitivity to cross-axis shocks on a Hopkinson bar apparatus is discussed.

  13. Numbers, Counting, and Infinity in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meconi, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of middle-school students' natural understanding of large numbers to introduce the concept of infinity. Presents activities that investigate infinite sets by demonstrating a one-to-one correspondence between the counting numbers and the given set. Examples include prime numbers, Fibonacci numbers, fractions, even and odd numbers,…

  14. KidsCount in Colorado! 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Beverly R.

    This 1994 Kids Count report focuses on risk-taking behaviors among Colorado adolescents and discusses how prevention and early intervention strategies can impact the lives of the state's children. Statistics and descriptions are given for: (1) alcohol, tobacco, and drug use; (2) teen sexuality, including sexual activity and teen pregnancy and…

  15. Characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments up to 150,000 G

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Davie, N.T.; Brown, F.A.

    1995-03-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our undemanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. Two different Hopkinson bar materials are being used: Titanium and beryllium The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-10 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 150,000 g as determined from measurements with a titanium Hopkinson bar are presented. The beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is described. Preliminary in-axis characteristics of the piezoresistive accelerometer at a nominal shock level of 50,000 g for a frequency range of DC-30 kHz determined from the beryllium bar are presented.

  16. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, the beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration with a laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is described. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-50 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 70,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar are presented. Preliminary results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross-axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are presented.

  17. Bulk Micromachined 6H-SiC High-g Piezoresistive Accelerometer Fabricated and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2002-01-01

    High-g accelerometers are needed in certain applications, such as in the study and analysis of high-g impact landings and projectiles. Also, these accelerometers must survive the high electromagnetic fields associated with the all-electric vehicle technology needed for aerospace applications. The choice of SiC is largely due to its excellent thermomechanical properties over conventional silicon-based accelerometers, whose material properties inhibit applicability in high electromagnetic radiation and high temperatures (>150 C) unless more complex and sometimes costly packaging schemes are adopted. This work was the outcome of a NASA Glenn Research Center summer internship program, in collaboration with Cornell University and the Munitions Directorate of the U.S. Air Force in Eglin, Florida. It aimed to provide the enabling technology infrastructure (modeling, fabrication, and validation) for the implementation of SiC accelerometers designed specifically for harsh environments.

  18. Quantified reflex strategy using an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren

    2012-01-01

    A primary aspect of a neurological evaluation is the deep tendon reflex, frequently observed through the patellar tendon reflex. The reflex response provides preliminary insight as to the status of the nervous system. A quantified reflex strategy has been developed, tested, and evaluated though the use of an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application integrated with a potential energy device to evoke the patellar tendon reflex. The iPod functions as a wireless accelerometer equipped with robust software, data storage, and the capacity to transmit the recorded accelerometer waveform of the reflex response wirelessly through email for post-processing. The primary feature of the reflex response acceleration waveform is the maximum acceleration achieved subsequent to evoking the patellar tendon reflex. The quantified reflex strategy using an iPod as a wireless accelerometer application yields accurate and consistent quantification of the reflex response.

  19. POD improvements of GALILEO satellites through the measurement of their non-gravitational accelerations by means of an onboard accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron, Roberto; Lucchesi, David M.; Santoli, Francesco; Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo; Kalarus, Maciej; Zielinski, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Research Centre (SRC) of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS) of Warsaw. The GALAC main objective is to provide the characteristics and performance of an onboard accelerometer able to improve the POD with respect to the current best results obtained through the modeling of the NGPs. The starting point of our activities has been the ISA accelerometer developed for the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. We will present our results of a preparatory work for GALAC concerning a first characterization of the main NGPs acting on the GALILEO spacecraft of second generation, including their (main) spectral content. Such results are used to preliminary fix the accelerometer measurement band, its sensitivity and physical characteristics in order to fit with the GALILEO spacecraft environment.

  20. Long-term calorie restriction decreases metabolic cost of movement and prevents decrease of physical activity during aging in the rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yosuke; Colman, Ricki J; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Baum, Scott T.; Anderson, Rozalyn M.; Weindruch, Richard; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Short-term (<1 year) calorie restriction (CR) has been reported to decrease physical activity and metabolic rate in humans and non-human primate models; however, studies examining the very long-term (>10 year) effect of CR on these parameters are lacking. Objective The objective of this study was to examine metabolic and behavioral adaptations to long-term CR longitudinally in rhesus macaques. Design Eighteen (10 male, 8 female) control (C) and 24 (14 male, 10 female) age matched CR rhesus monkeys between 19.6 and 31.9 years old were examined after 13 and 18 years of moderate adult-onset CR. Energy expenditure (EE) was examined by doubly labeled water (DLW; TEE) and respiratory chamber (24hrEE). Physical activity was assessed both by metabolic equivalent (MET) in a respiratory chamber and by an accelerometer. Metabolic cost of movements during 24h were also calculated. Age and fat-free mass were included as covariates. Results Adjusted total and 24hr EE were not different between C and CR. Sleeping metabolic rate was significantly lower, and physical activity level was higher in CR than in C independent from the CR-induced changes in body composition. The duration of physical activity above 1.6 METs was significantly higher in CR than in C, and CR had significantly higher accelerometer activity counts than C. Metabolic cost of movements during 24h were significantly lower in CR than in C. The accelerometer activity counts were significantly decreased after seven years in C animals, but not in CR animals. Conclusions The results suggest that long-term CR decreases basal metabolic rate, but maintains higher physical activity with lower metabolic cost of movements compared with C. PMID:23954367

  1. Sensing and Control Electronics for Low-Mass Low-Capacitance MEMS Accelerometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    applications generally require sub µg/rtHz noise floor and less than 0.1% overall scale factor error in acceleration measurement. Micro accelerometers...Figure 1-2 shows a generic block diagram of the system under study. The first goal of this research is to design a low noise capacitive sensing...µg/ Transducer Sensing Circuit Control System Acceleration Digital Output Figure 1-2: Generic block diagram of accelerometer system studied in this

  2. Gyro and Accelerometer Based Navigation System for a Mobile Autonomous Robot.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-02

    8217[ C) ~OF ~ FEB 13 1986 J GYRO AND ACCELEROMETER BASED NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR A MOBILE AUTONOMOUS ROBOT Roland J. Bloom William J. Ramey, Jr. Captain...ACCELEROMETER BASED NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR A MOBILE AUTONOMOUS ROBOT THESIS Roland J. Bloom William J. Ramey, Jr. Captain, USAF Captain, USAF AF IT/GA/GE/ENG/85D...MOBILE AUTONOMOUS ROBOT THE SI S Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University In

  3. Application of the Satellite Triaxial Accelerometer Experiment to Atmospheric Density and Wind Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-04

    EVERETT R. SWIFT U DTIC " 4 MARCH 1982 -J_ OCT 2 9 1 3 Approed for publis rebo.; dlributon unlimited. AERONOMY DIVISION PROJECT 6690 , AIR FORCE...Accelerometers Thermospheric density; . * Aerodynic drag Atmospheric density -- A new satellite triaxial accelerometer system has been developed. This...understanding of dynamic processes in the atmosphere and for the improvement of atmospheric models. i’ :. 4 Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS

  4. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  5. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; ...

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  6. Modelling of the MEA float zone using accelerometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    During a floating zone experiment involving the growth of indium on a recent orbiter mission, (STS 32) oscillation of the zone shapes were observed to occur in response to the background acceleration. An understanding of the nature of the response of the zone shape to forced (g-jitter) oscillations and predictions of its impact on future experiments is of great interest not only to the PI's but to other commercial and academic investigators who plan to fly similar experiments in the orbiter and on space station. Motivated by this, a 15 month study was undertaken to analyze the nature of the g-sensitivity of the STS 32 floating zone crystal growth experiment. Numerical models were used to describe the time-dependent free surface motion of the zone as it responds to the spacecraft residual acceleration. Relevant experimental data concerning the acceleration environment was obtained from the Honeywell in Space Accelerometer (HISA) investigators through MSFC's ACAP program and processed and analyzed. For the indium floating zone experiment, a series of calculations were made using time-dependent axial accelerations g(t). The form of g(t) included simple sinusoidal disturbances as well as actual data (subject to appropriate filtering) measured on the STS 32 mission. Focus was on the calculation of the response of the free surface of the zone as well as the internal flows and internal heat transfer. The influence of solidification on the response of the zone shape was also examined but found to be negligible.

  7. Can accelerometers detect mass variations in Amazonian trees?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Gentine, Pierre; Guerin, Marceau; Hut, Rolf; Oliveira, Rafael; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The mass of trees is influenced by physiological processes within the tree (e.g. transpiration and root water uptake), as well as external loads (e.g. intercepted precipitation). Recent studies have found diurnal variations in radar backscatter over vegetated areas, which might be attributed to mass changes of the vegetation layer. Field measurements are required to study the driving processes. This study aims to use measured three-dimensional displacement and acceleration of trees, to detect and quantify their diurnal (bio)mass variations. Accelerometers and dendrometers were installed on seven different tree species in the Amazon rainforest. Trees were selected to cover a broad range of wood density. Using spectral analysis, the governing frequencies in the acceleration time series were found. The governing frequencies showed a diurnal pattern, as well as a change during precipitation events. Our results suggest that we can separate and potentially quantify tree mass changes due to (1) internal water redistribution and (2) intercepted precipitation. This will allow further investigation of the effect of precipitation and water stress on tree dynamics in forest canopies.

  8. Optical fiber accelerometer based on MEMS torsional micromirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fanlin; Zhong, Shaolong; Xu, Jing; Wu, Yaming

    2008-03-01

    A novel structure of optical fiber accelerometer based on MEMS torsional micro-mirror is introduced, including MEMS torsional micro-mirror and optical signal detection. The micro-mirror is a non-symmetric one, which means that the torsional bar supporting the micro-mirror is not located in the axis where the center of the micro-mirror locates. The optical signal detection is composed of PIN diode and dual fiber collimator, which is very sensitive to the coupling angle between the input fiber and output fiber. The detection principle is that acceleration is first transformed into torsional angle of the micro-mirror, then, optical insertion loss of the dual fiber collimator caused by the angle can be received by PIN. So under the flow of acceleration to torsional angle to optical signal attenuation to optical power detection, the acceleration is detected. The theory about sensing and optical signal detect of the device are discussed in this paper. The sensitive structure parameters and performance parameters are calculated by MATLAB. To simulate the static and modal analysis, the finite element analysis, ANSYS, is employed. Based on the above calculation, several optimization methods and the final structure parameters are given. The micro-mirror is completed by using silicon-glass bonding and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). In the experiment, the acceleration is simulated by electrostatic force and the test results show that the static acceleration detection agrees with the theory analysis very well.

  9. BepiColombo ISA accelerometer: ready for launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesco, Santoli; Valerio, Iafolla; Emiliano, Fiorenza; Carlo, Lefevre; Lucchesi David, M.; Marco, Lucente; Carmelo, Magnafico; Sergio, Nozzoli; Roberto, Peron

    2016-04-01

    To be launched in 2017, ESA mission BepiColombo will perform a thorough study of the planet Mercury and its environment. Among the wide range of its scientific objectives, an important set is constituted by the so-called Radio Science Experiments (RSE), which will study the gravitational field and rotation of the planet, and will perform very precise tests of general relativity theory. The fulfilment of these scientific objectives will be made possible by a precise orbit determination of the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), at the same time estimating a number of relevant parameters. In order to reach the required level of accuracy in recovering these parameters, the data coming from the high-sensitivity ISA (Italian Spring Accelerometer) instrument onboard the MPO probe will be used: the first time for a deep-space probe. After a long path of design and development, the instrument is now ready for integration into MPO. Following a brief description of the RSE in the context of the mission, the instrument and its capabilities will be reviewed. Emphasis will be given to the foreseen strategies for its operation in the various phases of the mission, along with the manifold calibration possibilities.

  10. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry. PMID:28265163

  11. Validity of gait asymmetry estimation by using an accelerometer in individuals with hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Oyake, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Tomofumi; Sugasawa, Masafumi; Oda, Chihiro; Tanabe, Shigeo; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Otaka, Yohei; Momose, Kimito

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of estimating step time and length asymmetries, using an accelerometer against force plate measurements in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four individuals who previously had experienced a stroke were asked to walk without using a cane or manual assistance on a 16-m walkway. Step time and length were measured using force plates, which is the gold standard for assessing gait asymmetry. In addition to ground reaction forces, trunk acceleration was simultaneously measured using an accelerometer. To estimate step time asymmetry using accelerometer data, the time intervals between forward acceleration peaks for each leg were calculated. To estimate step length asymmetry using accelerometer data, the integration of the positive vertical accelerations following initial contact of each leg was calculated. Asymmetry was considered the affected side value divided by the unaffected side value. [Results] Significant correlations were found between the accelerometer and the force plates for step time and length asymmetries (rho=0.83 and rho=0.64, respectively). [Conclusion] An accelerometer might be useful for assessing step time and length asymmetries in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, although improvements are needed for estimating the accuracy of step length asymmetry.

  12. Free Fall tests for the qualification of Ultra sensitive accelerometers for space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Françoise, Liorzou; Pierre, Marque Jean; Santos Rodrigues, Manuel

    ONERA is developing since a long time accelerometers for space applications in the field of Earth Observations and Fundamental Physics. The more recent examples are the accelerom-eters embarked on the ESA GOCE mission launched in March 2009, dedicated to the Earth precise gravity field mapping, and the accelerometers of the CNES MICROSCOPE mission dedicated to the in orbit test of the Equivalence Principle. Those Ultra sensitive accelerome-ters are optimised for the space environment and operate over an acceleration range less than 10-6 ms-2 with an outstanding accuracy around 10-12 ms-2Hz1/2. Their testability on ground requires creating a low gravity environment in order to verify their functionalities and partially their performances before their delivery before launch. Free fall tests are the only way to ob-tain such a microgravity environment in representating space conditions. The presentation will show in a first part the results of the free fall test campaigns performed in the 120-meter high ZARM drop tower that have led to the qualification of the GOCE accelerometers. In a second part, it will describe the test plan being conducted to assess the best free-fall environment for the MICROSCOPE accelerometers. In particular, some efforts have been paid by ZARM and ONERA to develop a dedicated "free-flyer"capsule, in order to reduce the residual drag acceleration along the fall. Some results from the preliminary tests performed in preparation to the MICROSCOPE qualification campaign will be also presented.

  13. Early recognition of regional cardiac ischemia using a 3-axis accelerometer sensor.

    PubMed

    Elle, Ole Jakob; Halvorsen, Steinar; Gulbrandsen, Martin Gunnar; Aurdal, Lars; Bakken, Andre; Samset, Eigil; Dugstad, Harald; Fosse, Erik

    2005-08-01

    Perioperative mortality in coronary artery bypass grafting is usually caused by reduced left ventricular function due to regional myocardial ischemia or infarction. Post-operative graft occlusion is a well-known problem in coronary surgery. A sensitive tool to detect graft occlusion and monitor myocardial function may give the opportunity to revise malfunctioning grafts before departure from the hospital. This paper describes how a new method can detect cardiac ischemia using a 3-axis piezoelectric accelerometer. In three anesthetized pigs, a 3-axis piezoelectric accelerometer was sutured on the lateral free wall of the left ventricle. The left anterior descending (LAD) was occluded for different time periods and the accelerometer data were sampled with a PC. Short-time Fourier transform was calculated based on the accelerometer time series. The results were visualized using a 2D color-coded time-frequency plot. In the area of occlusion, a change to stronger power of higher harmonics was observed. Consequently, a difference value between the instant frequency pattern and a reference frequency pattern showed a rise in absolute value during the occlusion period. The preliminary results indicate that early recognition of regional cardiac ischemia is possible by analyzing accelerometer data acquired from the three animal trials using the prototype 3-axis accelerometer sensor.

  14. Improved mapping of planetary gravitational field with an electrostatic accelerometer/gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, Bernard; Huynh, Phuong-Anh; Liorzou, Francoise; Christophe, Bruno; Hardy, Emilie; Boulanger, Damien; Lebat, Vincent; Perrot, Eddy

    2015-04-01

    ONERA has a proven record spanning several years in developing the most accurate accelerometers for geodesy missions. They are still operational in the GRACE mission and their successors for the GRACE-FO mission will fly in 2017. Finally, the GOCE mission has shown the benefit of using a gradiometer for the direct measurement of the gravity field. Now, ONERA proposes a new accelerometer design, MicroSTAR, for interplanetary missions. This design based on the same technology as for the GRACE and GOCE space missions, with the notable addition of a bias rejection system, has a reduced mass and consumption. The accelerometer is embarked on Uranus Pathfinder (mission proposal for Cosmic M4) as up-scope instrument to achieve two scientific objectives: 1) to determine the gravity fields of Uranus and the satellites, allowing for a better understanding of the planet interior composition, 2) to test gravity at the largest possible length scales to search for deviations from General Relativity. The success of using accelerometer for geodesy mission could be imported in the planetary science field. The poster details the accuracy which can be achieved on the gravity potential field according to different accelerometer configurations. It describes the instrument and its integration inside an interplanetary probe. Finally, it explains the benefit of using this electrostatic accelerometer complementary to radio science technology for improved planetary gravitational field measurements.

  15. Improvement of the Planetary Gravitational Potentiel Field Knwoledge with Accurate Electrostatic Accelerometer / Gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophe, B.; Lebat, V.; Foulon, B.; Liorzou, F.; Perrot, E.; Boulanger, D.; Hardy, E.

    2014-12-01

    ONERA has developed since several years the most accurate accelerometers for the geodesy mission. The accelerometers are still operational in the GRACE mission. Their successors for the GRACE-FO mission are under manufacturing and will fly in 2017. Finally, the GOCE mission has proved the interest of gradiometer for a direct measurement of the gravity field.Now, ONERA proposes a new design of accelerometer, MicroSTAR, for interplanetary mission. It inherits of the same technology but with reduced mass and consumption. It has been proposed in several missions towards outer planets in order to test the deviation to the relativity general over large distance to the sun (with the addition of a bias rejection system). But the same instrument could be interesting to improve our knowledge of the planetary gravitational potential field, allowing a better understanding of the planet interior composition. The success of using accelerometer for geodesy mission could be imported in the planetary science.The paper will present the accuracy achievable on the gravity potential field according to different accelerometer configurations (one accelerometer, one gradiometer arm or a complete 3-axis gradiometer). Then, the instrument will be described and the integration of the instrument inside an interplanetary probe will be evoked.

  16. Linearity enhancement of scale factor in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Lishuang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    A method to reduce the residual stress of support arms in an optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer is proposed in order to enhance the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer. First, the behavior of residual stress in support arms is analyzed in detail, and the simulation of shape curvature caused by residual stress in aluminum-made support arms is completed using finite element analysis. Then, by comparing two different materials of support arms (aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms), a modified fabrication is introduced in order to reduce the unexpected residual stress in support arms. Finally, based on contrast experiments, the linearity of the scale factor of accelerometers with aluminum-made and silicon-made support arms is measured using the force feedback test system, respectively. Results show that the linearity of the scale factor of the accelerometer with silicon-made support arms is 0.85%, which is reduced about an order of magnitude compared to that of the accelerometer with aluminum-made support arms with the linearity of scale factor of 7.48%; linearity enhancement of the scale factor is validated. This allows accuracy improvement of the optical interrogated micromechanical accelerometer in the application of inertial navigation and positioning.

  17. The improved physical activity index for measuring physical activity in EPIC Germany.

    PubMed

    Wientzek, Angelika; Vigl, Matthäus; Steindorf, Karen; Brühmann, Boris; Bergmann, Manuela M; Harttig, Ulrich; Katzke, Verena; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    In the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (EPIC), physical activity (PA) has been indexed as a cross-tabulation between PA at work and recreational activity. As the proportion of non-working participants increases, other categorization strategies are needed. Therefore, our aim was to develop a valid PA index for this population, which will also be able to express PA continuously. In the German EPIC centers Potsdam and Heidelberg, a clustered sample of 3,766 participants was re-invited to the study center. 1,615 participants agreed to participate and 1,344 participants were finally included in this study. PA was measured by questionnaires on defined activities and a 7-day combined heart rate and acceleration sensor. In a training sample of 433 participants, the Improved Physical Activity Index (IPAI) was developed. Its performance was evaluated in a validation sample of 911 participants and compared with the Cambridge Index and the Total PA Index. The IPAI consists of items covering five areas including PA at work, sport, cycling, television viewing, and computer use. The correlations of the IPAI with accelerometer counts in the training and validation sample ranged r = 0.40-0.43 and with physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) r = 0.33-0.40 and were higher than for the Cambridge Index and the Total PA Index previously applied in EPIC. In non-working participants the IPAI showed higher correlations than the Cambridge Index and the Total PA Index, with r = 0.34 for accelerometer counts and r = 0.29 for PAEE. In conclusion, we developed a valid physical activity index which is able to express PA continuously as well as to categorize participants according to their PA level. In populations with increasing rates of non-working people the performance of the IPAI is better than the established indices used in EPIC.

  18. Associations of Body Size and Composition with Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    LOHMAN, TIMOTHY G.; RING, KIMBERLY; SCHMITZ, KATHRYN H.; TREUTH, MARGARITA S.; LOFTIN, MARK; YANG, SONG; SOTHERN, MELINDA; GOING, SCOTT

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether components of body composition (size, fat mass, and fat-free mass) were related to physical activity. Methods A random sample of 60 eligible sixth grade girls at each of 36 schools (six schools per region and six regions in total sample); complete measurements on 1553 girls. Physical activity was assessed over 6 d in each girl using an accelerometer, and body composition was assessed using a multiple regression equation using body mass index and triceps skinfold. Minutes of moderate-to-vigorous and vigorous physical activity were estimated from accelerometer counts per 30 s above threshold values determined from a previous study. Results Significant inverse relationships were found for all measures of body size and composition and all physical activity indices. The combination of fat and fat-free mass expressed as a weight and as an index (divided by height squared) along with race, SES, site, and school were most highly associated with physical activity in multiple regression analysis, accounting for 14–15% of the variance in physical activity. Fat mass was more closely related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and vigorous physical activity (VPA) than fat-free mass with higher standardized regression coefficients. Conclusion We conclude that both fat mass or fat mass index as well as fat-free mass or fat-free mass index make independent contributions in association with physical activity levels. These indices are recommended for future studies. PMID:16775560

  19. Kids Count [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Carl, Ed.; Wilson, Nancy, Ed.

    This Kids Count report is combined with Families Count, and provides information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The first statistical profile is based on 10 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths; (5) teen deaths; (6) juvenile…

  20. "Just" Counting: Young Children's Oral Counting and Enumeration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John; Bruce, Bob

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the specific skills and abilities of young children in oral counting and enumeration. Responses to an oral counting task and an enumeration task by a sample (n=93) of 3- and 4-year old children attending a range of pre-five establishments in an urban district of northern England are described. The findings, whilst providing…